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Sample records for radiation induced crystallinity

  1. Regulatory effect of Bcl-2 in ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis of the mouse crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    DONG, YUCHEN; ZHENG, YAJUAN; XIAO, JUN; ZHU, CHAO; ZHAO, MEISHENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of Bcl-2 during the process of apoptosis in the mouse crystalline lens. In total, 12 normal mice served as the control group and 12 Bcl-2 knockout (K.O) mice served as the experimental group. The mouse crystalline lens was sampled for the detection of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression following exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to determine Bcl-2 expression in the groups of normal mice receiving UV radiation or not receiving UV radiation. Samples of the murine crystalline lens were microscopically harvested and analyzed using western blotting. Apoptosis was detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Furthermore, caspase 3 activity was examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits, and RT-qPCR was used to analyze caspase-3 expression levels. The results of the present study demonstrated that there was no statistically significant difference in the level of Bcl-2 gene transcription between the two groups. In addition, UV radiation did not change the macrostructure of the crystalline lens in the group of normal mice or the group of Bcl-2 K.O mice. The results of the TUNEL assay indicated that the normal-UV group exhibited a more significant apoptosis level compared with the Bcl-2 K.O-UV group. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of caspase-3 in the normal-UV group was significantly higher compared with the normal-nonUV group (P<0.05), while the levels in the Bcl-2 K.O-UV group were significantly higher compared with the Bcl-2 K.O and normal-nonUV groups (P<0.05). In addition, the mRNA expression level of caspase-3 was significantly higher in the normal-UV, as compared with the Bcl-2 K.O-UV group (P<0.05), and the variation trends in caspase-3 activity were consistent. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that Bcl-2 may have an important role in the

  2. Preparation of inorganic crystalline compounds induced by ionizing, UV and laser radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čuba, Václav; Pavelková, Tereza; Bárta, Jan; Gbur, Tomáš; Vlk, Martin; Zavadilová, Alena; Indrei, Jakub; Dočekalová, Zuzana; Pospíšil, Milan; Múčka, Viliam

    2012-09-01

    Results on preparation of nickel, zinc, yttrium, aluminum and cobalt oxides, zinc peroxide and hydroxide, yttrium and lutetium aluminum garnets and cobalt(II) aluminate via irradiation of aqueous solutions containing soluble metal salts and radical scavengers (formate anion or propan-2-ol) are summarized in this paper. Various physico-chemical and structural properties of prepared compounds (e.g. crystallinity, specific surface area, particle size) are also reported. All used variants of radiation method are rather convenient and simple, and yield nano-scale powder materials with interesting characteristics. Prepared materials generally have high chemical purity, high specific surface area and narrow distribution of particle size (ranging in tens of nm). Generally, accelerated electrons, gamma, and UV radiation yield materials with comparable properties and structural characteristics, but UV-radiation seems to be the most convenient for preparation of intricate compounds such as synthetic garnets and spinels, while ionizing radiation is better for preparation of compounds doped with foreign ions. Among discussed compounds, only zinc oxide, peroxide and hydroxide were prepared directly via irradiation. For preparation of other crystalline oxidic compounds, mild heat treatment of amorphous or weakly crystalline solid phase was necessary.

  3. Radiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transition in intermetallic compounds of the Cu-Ti alloy system

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Devanathan, R. ); Sabochick, M.J. . Computer Applications Div.)

    1992-02-01

    Recent progress in molecular-dynamics studies of radiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transition in the ordered intermetallic compounds of the Cu-Ti system is discussed. The effect of irradiation was simulated by the generation of Frenkel pairs,which resulted in both the formation of stable point defects and chemical disorder upon defect recombination. The thermodynamic, structural and mechanical responses of the compounds during irradiation were determined by monitoring changes in the system potential energy, volume expansion, pair correlation function, diffraction patterns, and elastic constants. It was found that the intermetallics Cu{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}, CuTi, and CuTi{sub 2} could be rendered amorphous by the creation of Frenkel pairs, but Cu{sub 4}Ti could not, consistent with experimental observations during electron irradiation. However, the simulations showed that Cu{sub 4}Ti did become amorphous when clusters of Frenkel pairs were introduced, indicating that this compound may be susceptible to amorphization by heavy-ion bombardment. A generalization of the Lindemann criterion was used to develop a thermodynamic description of solid-state amorphization as a disorder- induced melting process.

  4. The radiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transition in zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W.J. ); Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L. )

    1994-03-01

    A comprehensive understanding of radiation effects in zircon, ZrSiO[sub 4], over a broad range of time scales (0.5 h to 570 million years) has been obtained by a study of natural zircon, Pu-doped zircon, and ion-beam irradiated zircon. Radiation damage in zircon results in the simultaneous accumulation of both point defects and amorphous regions. The amorphization process is consistent with models based on the multiple overlap of particle tracks, suggesting that amorphization occurs as a result of a critical defect concentration. The amorphization dose increases with temperature in two stages (below 300 K and above 473 K) and is nearly independent of the damage source ([alpha]-decay events or heavy-ion beams) at 300 K. Recrystallization of completely amorphous zircon occurs above 1300 K and is a two-step process that involves the initial formation of pseudo-cubic ZrO[sub 2].

  5. Radiation-Induced Helium Nanobubbles Enhance Ductility in Submicron-Sized Single-Crystalline Copper.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming-Shuai; Du, Jun-Ping; Wan, Liang; Ogata, Shigenobu; Tian, Lin; Ma, Evan; Han, Wei-Zhong; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhi-Wei

    2016-07-13

    The workability and ductility of metals usually degrade with exposure to irradiation, hence the phrase "radiation damage". Here, we found that helium (He) radiation can actually enhance the room-temperature deformability of submicron-sized copper. In particular, Cu single crystals with diameter of 100-300 nm and containing numerous pressurized sub-10 nm He bubbles become stronger, more stable in plastic flow and ductile in tension, compared to fully dense samples of the same dimensions that tend to display plastic instability (strain bursts). The sub-10 nm He bubbles are seen to be dislocation sources as well as shearable obstacles, which promote dislocation storage and reduce dislocation mean free path, thus contributing to more homogeneous and stable plasticity. Failure happens abruptly only after significant bubble coalescence. The current findings can be explained in light of Weibull statistics of failure and the beneficial effects of bubbles on plasticity. These results shed light on plasticity and damage developments in metals and could open new avenues for making mechanically robust nano- and microstructures by ion beam processing and He bubble engineering. PMID:27249672

  6. Radiation effects and crystallinity in polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, A.; Ungar, G.

    A survey is presented of a series of works on the influence of crystallinity on the radiation induced effects, cross-linking in particular, in polyethylene and paraffins. The principal theme is that the usual conception of random introduction of cross-links into a random assembly of chains needs to be modified in the presence of crystallinity in general and chain folding in particular. A long series of varied investigations on polyethylene have indeed demonstrated through a series of conspicuous effects that not only the ordering intrinsic to crystals and the increased intrachain contacts due to chain folding, but the higher level morphology, the nature and mutual arrangement in particular, have a major influence on the effectivity of the radiation leading to networks. Extension of the works to paraffins identified unsuspected mobility of both the radiation precursor species and the paraffin molecule itself (cross-linked and uncross-linked) within the crystal lattice, leading to phase segregation of the cross-linked species into microscopically identifiable domains together with identifying a trend for the cross-links themselves to form non-randomly in groups. The latter phenomenon, observed also in the molten state, indicates that the departure from randomness in the cross-linking process is much more deep-rooted than originally anticipated, and calls for a general reassessment of our knowledge of cross-linking. Other topics included as part of the general enquiry are the destruction of crystallinity, the promotion of hexagonal phase through radiation, the effect of morphology on chain scission and the general, still unsolved issue of how to assess cross-links by a direct analytical method (involving NMR). The hope is expressed that the bringing together of these varied pieces of work will serve the unification of presently widely diverse areas of experience and might influence developments in the radiation studies of paraffinoid substances.

  7. UV-radiation induced disruption of dry-cavities in human γD-crystallin results in decreased stability and faster unfolding.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhen; Yang, Zaixing; Huynh, Tien; King, Jonathan A; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-01-01

    Age-onset cataracts are believed to be expedited by the accumulation of UV-damaged human γD-crystallins in the eye lens. Here we show with molecular dynamics simulations that the stability of γD-crystallin is greatly reduced by the conversion of tryptophan to kynurenine due to UV-radiation, consistent with previous experimental evidences. Furthermore, our atomic-detailed results reveal that kynurenine attracts more waters and other polar sidechains due to its additional amino and carbonyl groups on the damaged tryptophan sidechain, thus breaching the integrity of nearby dry center regions formed by the two Greek key motifs in each domain. The damaged tryptophan residues cause large fluctuations in the Tyr-Trp-Tyr sandwich-like hydrophobic clusters, which in turn break crucial hydrogen-bonds bridging two β-strands in the Greek key motifs at the "tyrosine corner". Our findings may provide new insights for understanding of the molecular mechanism of the initial stages of UV-induced cataractogenesis. PMID:23532089

  8. A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for the ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of crystalline lenses with laser-induced microbubbles interrogated by acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for an ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of an animal crystalline lens was developed and validated. We measured the bulk displacement of laser-induced microbubbles created at different positions within the lens using nanosecond laser pulses. An impulsive acoustic radiation force was applied to the microbubble, and spatio-temporal measurements of the microbubble displacement were assessed using a custom-made high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system consisting of two 25 MHz focused ultrasound transducers. One of these transducers was used to emit a train of ultrasound pulses and another transducer was used to receive the ultrasound echoes reflected from the microbubble. The developed system was operating at 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Based on the measured motion of the microbubble, Young’s moduli of surrounding tissue were reconstructed and the values were compared with those measured using the indentation test. Measured values of Young’s moduli of four bovine lenses ranged from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 26 ± 1.4 kPa, and there was good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, our studies, utilizing the high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system, suggest that the developed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of ex vivo crystalline lenses. Furthermore, the potential of the presented approach for in vivo measurements is discussed.

  9. Intense and energetic radiation from crystalline undulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggerhøj, U. I.; Wistisen, T. N.

    2015-07-01

    With the recent experimental confirmation of the existence of energetic radiation from a Small Amplitude, Small Period (SASP) crystalline undulator (Wistisen et al., 2014), the field of specially manufactured crystals, from which specific radiation characteristics can be obtained, has evolved substantially. In the present paper we show how the radiation spectra can be tuned, using electrons and positrons of energies from 100 MeV up to 20 GeV. The latter energy is relevant for possible experiments at the FACET facility at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), whereas 100 MeV has been chosen to show the potentialities connected to using crystalline undulators as radiation targets for Nuclear Waste Transmutation (NWT). Energies in the few hundred MeV range are relevant for the facilities at the MAinzer MIcrotron (MAMI). For the 20 GeV case we show explicitly that quantum corrections to the emission spectrum become very significant, an effect that may be observed in the near future using the FACET beam at SLAC.

  10. Light-induced liquid crystallinity.

    PubMed

    Kosa, Tamas; Sukhomlinova, Ludmila; Su, Linli; Taheri, Bahman; White, Timothy J; Bunning, Timothy J

    2012-05-17

    Liquid crystals are traditionally classified as thermotropic, lyotropic or polymeric, based on the stimulus that governs the organization and order of the molecular system. The most widely known and applied class of liquid crystals are a subset of thermotropic liquid crystals known as calamitic, in which adding heat can result in phase transitions from or into the nematic, cholesteric and smectic mesophases. Photoresponsive liquid-crystal materials and mixtures can undergo isothermal phase transitions if light affects the order parameter of the system within a mesophase sufficiently. In nearly all previous examinations, light exposure of photoresponsive liquid-crystal materials and mixtures resulted in order-decreasing photo-induced isothermal phase transitions. Under specialized conditions, an increase in order with light exposure has been reported, despite the tendency of the photoresponsive liquid-crystal system to reduce order in the exposed state. A direct, photo-induced transition from the isotropic to the nematic phase has been observed in a mixture of spiropyran molecules and a nematic liquid crystal. Here we report a class of naphthopyran-based materials that exhibit photo-induced conformational changes in molecular structure capable of yielding order-increasing phase transitions. Appropriate functionalization of the naphthopyran molecules leads to an exceedingly large order parameter in the open form, which results in a clear to strongly absorbing dichroic state. The increase in order with light exposure has profound implications in optics, photonics, lasing and displays and will merit further consideration for applications in solar energy harvesting. The large, photo-induced dichroism exhibited by the material system has been long sought in ophthalmic applications such as photochromic and polarized variable transmission sunglasses. PMID:22596158

  11. Radiation damage of heavy crystalline detector materials by 24 GeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barysevich, A.; Dormenev, V.; Fedorov, A.; Glaser, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Korjik, M.; Maas, F.; Mechinski, V.; Rusack, R.; Singovski, A.; Zoueyski, R.

    2013-02-01

    Samples of three heavy crystalline materials: PbWO4, Bi4Si3O12, and PbF2 were irradiated in a high-intensity 24 GeV proton beam at the CERN PS to fluencies of 3.8×1013 protons/cm2. The optical transmission radiation damage was measured and all crystals show a shift of the cutoff in the transmission spectrum that is not observed when the crystals are irradiated with γ radiation. This shift of the cutoff under proton irradiation seems to be a general property of the heavy crystalline materials. A mechanism for this proton-induced transmission damage is discussed.

  12. Radiation of the magneto-crystalline undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, V.; Kaplin, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The radiation at grazing incidence of relativistic positively charged particles on the crystal surface in the presence of magnetic field is studied theoretically. The magnetic field is supposed to be parallel to the surface. Dependent on the initial conditions the particle can be captured in the channeling mode and perform periodic oscillations along the surface of the crystal. The spectrum, angular distribution and polarization of radiation are calculated. The emission spectrum of a single particle is discrete and it extends up to very large numbers of harmonics. If the magnetic field is much weaker than the electric field of atoms, the frequency range of radiation of the particle beam does not depend on magnetic field and is defined solely by the energy of the particles and by the surface averaged potential, though the frequency of the first harmonic is defined only by the magnetic field. In case of channeled positrons the characteristic energy of the emitted photons is of order 10γ3/2 (eV), where γ is the particle relativistic factor. The main part of radiation is bound to a narrow cone and is polarized largely orthogonal to the surface of the crystal.

  13. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, G. D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin M.; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James C.

    2014-02-03

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (~1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  14. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon; Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1-5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  15. The radiation damage of crystalline silicon PN diode in tritium beta-voltaic battery.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yisong; Yang, Yuqing; Liu, Yebing; Li, Hao; Wang, Guanquan; Hu, Rui; Xiong, Xiaoling; Luo, Shunzhong

    2014-08-01

    A tritium beta-voltaic battery using a crystalline silicon convertor composed of (100)Si/SiO2/Si3N4 film degrades remarkably with radiation from a high intensity titanium tritide film. Simulation and experiments were carried out to investigate the main factor causing the degradation. The radiation damages mainly comes from the x-ray emitted from the titanium tritide film and beta particle can relieve the damages. The x-ray radiation induced positive charges in the SiO2 film destroying the output property of the PN diode with the induction of an electric field. PMID:24751350

  16. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  17. Radiation-induced osteochondromas

    SciTech Connect

    Libshitz, H.I.; Cohen, M.A.

    1982-03-01

    Radiation-induced osteochondromas, either single or multiple, occur more commonly than is generally recognized. The incidence following irradiation for childhood malignancy is approximately 12%. Any open epiphysis is vulnerable. Age at irradiation, time of appearance following therapy, dose and type of radiation, and clinical course in 14 cases are dicussed. Due to growth of the lesion and/or pain, 3 tumors were excised. None revealed malignant degeneration.

  18. Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, Frances

    1998-10-03

    OAK B204 Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films. The work in the past 6 months has involved three areas of magnetic thin films: (1) amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys, (2) epitaxial Co-Pt and hTi-Pt alloy thin films, and (3) collaborative work on heat capacity measurements of magnetic thin films, including nanoparticles and CMR materials.

  19. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  20. Surfactant-induced postsynthetic modulation of Pd nanoparticle crystallinity.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wei, Y.; Zhu, L.; Li, D.; Jiang, J. S.; Markovic, N. M.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Sun, S.

    2011-02-01

    Modulation of Pd nanoparticle (NP) crystallinity is achieved by switching the surfactants of different binding strengths. Pd NPs synthesized in the presence of weak binding surfactants such as oleylamine possess polyhedral shapes and a polycrystalline nature. When oleylamine is substituted by trioctylphosphine, a much stronger binding surfactant, the particles become spherical and their crystallinity decreases significantly. Moreover, the Pd NPs reconvert their polycrystalline structure when the surfactant is switched back to oleylamine. Through control experiments and molecular dynamics simulation, we propose that this unusual nanocrystallinity transition induced by surfactant exchange was resulted from a counterbalance between the surfactant binding energy and the nanocrystal adhesive energy. The findings represent a novel postsynthetic approach to tailoring the structure and corresponding functional performance of nanomaterials.

  1. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  2. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  3. [Radiation-induced neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Dobrzyńska-Rutkowska, Aneta; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-12-01

    Radiation-induced neuropathy is commonly observed among oncological patients. Radiation can affect the nervous tissue directly or indirectly by inducing vasculopathy or dysfunction of internal organs. Symptoms may be mild and reversible (e.g., pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, drowsiness, fatigue, paresthesia) or life-threatening (cerebral oedema, increased intracranial pressure, seizures). Such complications are clinically divided into peripheral (plexopathies, neuropathies of spinal and cranial nerves) and central neuropathy (myelopathy, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment). The degree of neuronal damages primarily depends on the total and fractional radiation dose and applied therapeutic methods. The conformal and megavoltage radiotherapy seems to be the safeties ones. Diagnostic protocol includes physical examination, imaging (in particular magnetic resonance), electromyography, nerve conduction study and sometimes histological examination. Prevention and early detection of neurological complications are necessary in order to prevent a permanent dysfunction of the nervous system. Presently their treatment is mostly symptomatic, but in same cases a surgical intervention is required. An experimental and clinical data indicates some effectiveness of different neuroprotective agents (e.g. anticoagulants, vitamin E, hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline, bevacizumab, methylphenidate, donepezil), which should be administered before and/or during radiotherapy. PMID:24490474

  4. [Radiation-induced cancers].

    PubMed

    Dutrillaux, B

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low dose range i.e., population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations of tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. PMID:9868399

  5. Extreme UV induced dissociation of amorphous solid water and crystalline water bilayers on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Sturm, J. M.; Lee, Chris J.; Bijkerk, Fred

    2016-04-01

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV, λ = 13.5 nm) induced dissociation of water layers on Ru(0001) was investigated. We irradiated amorphous and crystalline water layers on a Ru crystal with EUV light, and measured the surface coverage of remaining water and oxygen as a function of radiation dose by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The main reaction products are OH and H with a fraction of oxygen from fully dissociated water. TPD spectra from a series of exposures reveal that EUV promotes formation of the partially dissociated water overlayer on Ru. Furthermore, loss of water due to desorption and dissociation is also observed. The water loss cross sections for amorphous and crystalline water are measured at 9 ± 2 × 10- 19 cm2 and 5 ± 1 × 10- 19 cm2, respectively. Comparison between the two cross sections suggests that crystalline water is more stable against EUV induced desorption/dissociation. The dissociation products can oxidize the Ru surface. For this early stage of oxidation, we measured a smaller (compared to water loss) cross section at 2 × 10- 20 cm2, which is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the photon absorption cross section (at 92 eV) of gas phase water. The secondary electron (SE) contributions to the cross sections are also estimated. From our estimation, SE only forms a small part (20-25%) of the observed photon cross section.

  6. Fs-laser induced flexibility increase in the crystalline lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, S.; Fromm, M.; Lakharia, R.; Schaefer, M.; Oberheide, U.; Ripken, T.; Breitenfeld, P.; Gerten, G.; Ertmer, W.; Lubatschowksi, H.

    2007-02-01

    Presbyopia is one age related effect every human is suffering beginning at the age of about 45 years. Reading glasses are the conventional treatment so far. According to the Helmholtz theory the loss of accommodation in age is due to the hardening and the resulting loss of elasticity of the crystalline lens. However the ciliary muscle and the lens capsule stay active, respectively. Therefore a possible treatment concept is to regain the flexibility by inducing gliding planes in form of microcuts inside the lens. The increase of flexibility in young porcine lenses by different cutting patterns was shown by Ripken et al. 1, 2 who verified the increase in flexibility by the spinning test introduced by Fisher. 3 We will present our first measurements of flexibility increase of human donor lenses. Furthermore the influence of the laser cuts into the lens on the accommodation amplitude will be shown in a three dimensional finite-element simulation.

  7. Protection of human γB-crystallin from UV-induced damage by epigallocatechin gallate: spectroscopic and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Susmitnarayan; Bag, Sudipta; Bose, Madhuparna; Das, Amit Kumar; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2016-08-16

    The transparency of the human eye lens depends on the solubility and stability of the structural proteins of the eye lens, the crystallins. Although the mechanism of cataract formation is still unclear, it is believed to involve protein misfolding and/or aggregation of proteins due to the influence of several external factors such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation, low pH, temperature and exposure to chemical agents. In this article, we report the study of UV induced photo-damage (under oxidative stress) of recombinant human γB-crystallin in vitro in the presence of the major green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). We have shown that EGCG has the ability to protect human γB-crystallin from oxidative stress-induced photo-damage. PMID:27410057

  8. Induced seismicity in crystalline basement: Understanding the reasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, cases of induced seismicity have been reported for geothermal wells in aseismic regions. The use of geothermal energy naturally influences the reservoir as heat and water are withdrawn. However, most geothermal plants reinject the water so that pressure levels within the reservoir remain more or less stable. Despite this and despite low injection pressures, some of these reinjecting plants experience induced seismicity. One example is the well Unterhaching Gt2, close to Munich, Germany. Here, the reservoir is an approximately 500 m thick karstified limestone layer of the Upper Jurassic, in which extraction and reinjection take place. Flow rates of more than 100 l/s have been established with reinjection pressures below 10 bar. Nevertheless, induced seismicity occurs. Most of the events are below 1.0 but some reach up to 2.4 on the Richter scale. Due to their location, they can without any doubt be attributed to the reinjection process. However, the origin of the quakes is not within the reservoir but located in the crystalline basement. As the reinjection well cuts through a steeply inclined fault, a hydraulic connection between reservoir, borehole and basement is given if a hydraulically open fault is assumed. So far, it was impossible to find a correlation between the occurrence of induced seismicity and operating parameters of the geothermal plant like flow rate, injection pressure, or temperature. Therefore, thermo-hydraulic-mechanical numerical models of the subsurface have been developed to understand the interaction between different parameters and to possibly identify critical thresholds for the initiation of induced seismicity. Due to the large scale of the model, several kilometers in each direction, an equivalent porosity approach has been chosen for the hydraulic modeling of the karstic limestone layer. Flow within in the fault is also described by Darcy's law as the fault is not assumed to be a surface but a volume. This assumption is

  9. Errors inducing radiation overdoses.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    There is no doubt that equipments exposing radiation and used for therapeutic purposes should be often checked for possibly administering radiation overdoses to the patients. Technologists, radiation safety officers, radiologists, medical physicists, healthcare providers and administration should take proper care on this issue. "We must be beneficial and not harmful to the patients", according to the Hippocratic doctrine. Cases of radiation overdose are often reported. A series of cases of radiation overdoses have recently been reported. Doctors who were responsible, received heavy punishments. It is much better to prevent than to treat an error or a disease. A Personal Smart Card or Score Card has been suggested for every patient undergoing therapeutic and/or diagnostic procedures by the use of radiation. Taxonomy may also help. PMID:24251304

  10. Radiation-induced disease.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, M

    1993-01-01

    The term radiation covers a wide spectrum of forms of energy, most of which have at one stage or another been suspected of causing human ill health. In general, study of the effects of radiation on health involves a mix of scientific disciplines, from population epidemiology to physics, which are seldom if ever found in a single scientist. As a result, interdisciplinary communication is of the utmost importance, and is a potent source of misunderstanding and misinformation. The forms of radiation which have been most specifically associated with health effects include ionizing and ultraviolet radiation. Claimed effects of electromagnetic and microwave radiation (excluding thermal effects) are too indefinite for detailed consideration. Ionizing radiation is a well-documented mutagen, which clearly causes cancers in humans, and human exposure has been increased by atomic weapons testing and medical and industrial uses of radioactivity. There is also a growing awareness of the possible role of some types of natural radiation, such as radon, in causing disease. Ultraviolet radiation is also associated with cancers, and is suspected of involvement in the increasing incidence of skin cancers in European populations. Factors thought to underlie recent changes in exposure to these mutagens are discussed. PMID:8222990

  11. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  12. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  13. Low energy radiation stability of nano-crystalline cubic Zirconia films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Parswajit; Ghosh, Santanu; Avasthi, Devesh K.

    2016-07-01

    The radiation stability of nano-crystalline cubic Zirconia films was investigated under 41 keV He ion irradiation. These ions were chosen to simulate alpha particles (produced during fission events) because of the similar electronic energy loss in Zirconia. The ZrO2 films, with an average grain size of 8 nm, were grown on Si (1 0 0) substrates by electron beam assisted thermal evaporation. Although the cubic structure was retained upon irradiation, a slight reduction in crystallinity in the irradiated films was detected as compared to the as-deposited film. No bulk amorphization was however observed for any of the fluences and hence these films are radiation tolerant to alpha particles.

  14. Tensile and tribological properties of high-crystallinity radiation crosslinked UHMWPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bistolfi, Alessandro; Turell, Mary Beth; Lee, Ying-Lung; Bellare, Anuj

    2009-09-02

    Osteolysis due to particulate wear debris associated with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) components of total joint replacement prostheses has been a major factor determining their in vivo lifetime. In recent years, radiation crosslinking has been employed to decrease wear rates in PE components, especially in acetabular cups of total hip replacement prostheses. A drawback of radiation crosslinking is that it leads to a crosslinked PE (or XPE) with lower mechanical properties compared with uncrosslinked PE. In contrast, high-crystallinity PEs are known to have several mechanical properties higher than conventional PE. In this study, we hypothesized that increasing the crystallinity of radiation crosslinked and remelted XPE would result in an increase in tensile properties without compromising wear resistance. High-pressure crystallization was performed on PE and XPE and analyzed for the resulting morphological alterations using differential scanning calorimeter, low voltage scanning electron microscopy, and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering. Uniaxial tensile tests showed that high-pressure crystallization increased the tensile modulus and yield stress in both PE and XPE, decreased the ultimate strain and ultimate stress in PE but had no significant effect on ultimate strain or ultimate stress in XPE. Multidirectional wear tests demonstrated that high-pressure crystallization decreased the wear resistance of PE but had no effect on the wear resistance of XPE. In conclusion, this study shows that high-pressure crystallization can be effectively used to increase the crystallinity and modulus of XPE without compromising its superior wear resistance compared with PE.

  15. Heat-induced structural transitions of alpha-crystallin studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivandin, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Muranov, K. O.; Murugova, T. N.; Kozlov, S. S.; Genkina, N. K.

    2012-03-01

    Alpha-crystallin from the bovine eye lens was studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in 90% D2O buffer solution at 20, 50, 60, 65, 75, 85 and 95°C. The temperature points for this study were specified on the basis of differential scanning calorimetric analysis of alpha-crystallin solutions which has shown two endothermic transitions with midpoints at 64.5 and 86°C. The SANS study revealed no significant alpha-crystallin quaternary structure alterations at 50°C as compared with 20°C. At 60-65°C the SANS data confirmed substantial alpha-crystallin quaternary structure rearrangements which resulted in the formation of alpha-crystallin oligomers with a similar shape but approximately twofold increased molecular weight as compared to the native state at 20°C. At higher temperatures (75, 85 and 95°C) the SANS patterns were very similar and were consistent with the scattering by rod-like particles with a cross-section radius of gyration ~55 This transformation of alpha-crystallin to the rod-like particles was evidently irreversible as these particles remained in solution after cooling to 20°C. Ab initio shape models of the native and high-temperature alpha-crystallin were retrieved with DAMMIN and DAMAVER software. Schematic model of alpha-crystallin heat-induced quaternary structure transitions was considered.

  16. Crystallinity and vinyl groups formation in polyethylene films exposed to UV-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Romo, A.; González-Mota, R.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Rosales-Candelas, I.; Muñoz-Campos, E. I.

    2011-10-01

    Polyethylene (PE), is a polymer formed by carbon-carbon single bonds, is a very stable material with a very slow degradation rate. In this paper, polyethylene films bag type were exposed to UV-B radiation (320-280 nm) at different exposure times (2 to 12 days). The UV radiation effects on PE samples were characterized using infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). The vinyl group formation indicates the PE degradation. These chemical groups have IR absorption in 900-1300 cm-1; additionally the degree of crystallinity increase with the increasing of the exposure time. The experiment showed significant changes in PE molecular structure.

  17. Crystalline polymorphism induced by charge regulation in ionic membranes

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Cheuk-Yui; Palmer, Liam C.; Kewalramani, Sumit; Qiao, Baofu; Stupp, Samuel I.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Bedzyk, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The crystallization of molecules with polar and hydrophobic groups, such as ionic amphiphiles and proteins, is of paramount importance in biology and biotechnology. By coassembling dilysine (+2) and carboxylate (–1) amphiphiles of various tail lengths into bilayer membranes at different pH values, we show that the 2D crystallization process in amphiphile membranes can be controlled by modifying the competition of long-range and short-range interactions among the polar and the hydrophobic groups. The pH and the hydrophobic tail length modify the intermolecular packing and the symmetry of their crystalline phase. For hydrophobic tail lengths of 14 carbons (C14), we observe the coassembly into crystalline bilayers with hexagonal molecular ordering via in situ small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. As the tail length increases, the hexagonal lattice spacing decreases due to an increase in van der Waals interactions, as demonstrated by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. For C16 and C18 we observe a reentrant crystalline phase transition sequence, hexagonal–rectangular-C–rectangular-P–rectangular-C–hexagonal, as the solution pH is increased from 3 to 10.5. The stability of the rectangular phases, which maximize tail packing, increases with increasing tail length. As a result, for very long tails (C22), the possibility of observing packing symmetries other than rectangular-C phases diminishes. Our work demonstrates that it is possible to systematically exchange chemical and mechanical energy by changing the solution pH value within a range of physiological conditions at room temperature in bilayers of molecules with ionizable groups. PMID:24065818

  18. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Chen, Yu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    This report describes complete practical guidelines and insights for the crystalline sponge method, which have been derived through the first use of synchrotron radiation on these systems, and includes a procedure for faster synthesis of the sponges. These guidelines will be applicable to crystal sponge data collected at synchrotrons or in-house facilities, and will allow researchers to obtain reliable high-quality data and construct chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination. A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine

  19. Radiation induced estane polymer crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, M.; Foster, P.

    1997-12-01

    The exposure of polymeric materials to radiation has been known to induce the effects of crosslinking and degradation. The crosslinking phenomena comes about when two long chain polymers become linked together by a primary bond that extends the chain and increases the viscosity, molecular weight and the elastic modules of the polymer. This process has been observed in relatively short periods of time with fairly high doses of radiation, on the order of several megarads/hour. This paper address low dose exposure over long periods of time to determine what the radiation effects are on the polymeric binder material in PBX 9501. An experimental sample of binder material without explosives will be placed into a thermal and radiation field produced from a W-48 put mod 0. Another sample will be placed in a thermal environment without the radiation. The following is the test plan that was submitted to the Pantex process. The data presented here will be from the first few weeks of exposure and this test will be continued over the next few years. Subsequent data will hopefully be presented in the next compatibility and aging conference.

  20. Optical properties and crystallinity of silver mirrors under a 35 krad cobalt-60 radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Po-Kai Chiang, Donyau; Lee, Chao-Te; Lin, Yu-Wei; Hsiao, Chien-Nan

    2015-09-15

    This study addresses the effects of thin film optical design and environmental radiation on the optical properties of silver mirrors. Different experimental thin film optical designs are selected, and the film stack is built using Macleod's approach. Mirror elements are exposed to the same dose of radiation and their properties are characterized using a spectrophotometer equipped with an integration sphere and an x-ray diffractometer. Spectrophotometric analyses of mirrors exposed to about 35 krad of {sup 60}Co radiations overall show that the B270 glass substrates coated with titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), pure chrome, and pure silver effectively reduces radiation damage. The absorption spectrum of the TiO{sub 2} film in the visible region decreases after radiation and displays drifting. As thin metal films comparison, the silver thin film exhibits higher radiation resistance than the chrome thin film. The x-ray diffraction analysis on metal film layers reveals that crystallinity slightly increases when the silver thin film is irradiated.

  1. Laser ablation of single-crystalline silicon by radiation of pulsed frequency-selective fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the process of destruction of the surface of a single-crystalline silicon wafer scanned by the beam of a pulsed ytterbium-doped fiber laser radiation with a wavelength of λ = 1062 nm. It is established that the laser ablation can proceed without melting of silicon and the formation of a plasma plume. Under certain parameters of the process (radiation power, beam scan velocity, and beam overlap density), pronounced oxidation of silicon microparticles with the formation of a characteristic loose layer of fine powdered silicon dioxide has been observed for the first time. The range of lasing and beam scanning regimes in which the growth of SiO2 layer takes place is determined.

  2. Hydrogeologic controls on induced seismicity in crystalline basement rocks due to fluid injection into basal reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yipeng; Person, Mark; Rupp, John; Ellett, Kevin; Celia, Michael A; Gable, Carl W; Bowen, Brenda; Evans, James; Bandilla, Karl; Mozley, Peter; Dewers, Thomas; Elliot, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A series of Mb 3.8-5.5 induced seismic events in the midcontinent region, United States, resulted from injection of fluid either into a basal sedimentary reservoir with no underlying confining unit or directly into the underlying crystalline basement complex. The earthquakes probably occurred along faults that were likely critically stressed within the crystalline basement. These faults were located at a considerable distance (up to 10 km) from the injection wells and head increases at the hypocenters were likely relatively small (∼70-150 m). We present a suite of simulations that use a simple hydrogeologic-geomechanical model to assess what hydrogeologic conditions promote or deter induced seismic events within the crystalline basement across the midcontinent. The presence of a confining unit beneath the injection reservoir horizon had the single largest effect in preventing induced seismicity within the underlying crystalline basement. For a crystalline basement having a permeability of 2 × 10(-17)  m(2) and specific storage coefficient of 10(-7) /m, injection at a rate of 5455 m(3) /d into the basal aquifer with no underlying basal seal over 10 years resulted in probable brittle failure to depths of about 0.6 km below the injection reservoir. Including a permeable (kz  = 10(-13)  m(2) ) Precambrian normal fault, located 20 m from the injection well, increased the depth of the failure region below the reservoir to 3 km. For a large permeability contrast between a Precambrian thrust fault (10(-12)  m(2) ) and the surrounding crystalline basement (10(-18)  m(2) ), the failure region can extend laterally 10 km away from the injection well. PMID:23745958

  3. Electrically Induced Twist in Smectic Liquid-Crystalline Elastomers.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Naciri, Jawad; Ratna, B R; Selinger, Robin L B; Selinger, Jonathan V

    2016-07-01

    As an approach for electrically controllable actuators, we prepare elastomers of chiral smectic-A liquid crystals, which have an electroclinic effect, i.e., molecular tilt induced by an applied electric field. Surprisingly, our experiments find that an electric field causes a rapid and reversible twisting of the film out of the plane, with a helical sense that depends on the sign of the field. To explain this twist, we develop a continuum elastic theory based on an asymmetry between the front and back of the film. We further present finite-element simulations, which show the dynamic shape change. PMID:27096378

  4. Au induced low-temperature formation of preferentially (111)-oriented crystalline Ge on insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hayato; Kudo, Kohei; Nomitsu, Tatsushi; Mochii, Ryosuke; Moto, Kenta; Takakura, Kenichiro; Tsunoda, Isao

    2016-04-01

    The effects of Au insertion in solid-phase crystallization for amorphous Ge films on SiO2/Si substrates were investigated to achieve oriented crystalline Ge. After high-temperature annealing above 300 °C, Au atoms were highly diffused in the amorphous Ge layer. The resulting crystalline Ge consisted of random grains formed by crystal nucleation in the entire Ge region. However, when annealing temperature was decreased to below 250 °C, Au atoms were localized at their initial position even after a long annealing (20 h). Moreover, formation of preferentially (111)-oriented crystalline Ge was achieved without using the metal-induced layer-exchange crystallization method. These results suggest that crystal nucleation preferentially occurs at the amorphous Ge/Au interface, and subsequently the nucleus growth progresses into the Ge layer.

  5. Induced birefringence and dichroism in azo polymers. Comparison between amorphous and liquid crystalline polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Natansohn, A.; Brown, D.; Rochon, P.

    1993-12-31

    Macroscopic order can be induced in amorphous high-Tg azo polymers (usually containing electron-donor - electron-acceptor substituted azobenzene moieties) by exposure to polarized light. The phenomenon is based on a series of trans-cis-trans isomerization cycles and the induced birefringence is typically of 2x10{sup {minus}2}. The ordered domains can be returned to randomness ({open_quotes}erased{close_quotes}) using circularly polarized light. This paper will present a comparison between amorphous and liquid crystalline azo polymers. The most significant difference between these two types of polymers is that any other type of concert with the azo moiety. Consequently the dichroism and birefringence induced in the liquid crystalline polymers can be one order of magnitude higher than in the amorphous polymers. At the same time, however, the time required to achieve saturation also increases by at least one order of magnitude.

  6. Proximity-induced superconductivity in crystalline Cu and Co nanowires and nanogranular Co structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kompaniiets, M. Begun, E.; Porrati, F.; Huth, M.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Neetzel, C.; Ensinger, W.

    2014-08-21

    We report an experimental study of proximity effect-induced superconductivity in crystalline Cu and Co nanowires and a nanogranular Co nanowire structure in contact with a superconducting W-based floating electrode (inducer). For electrical resistance measurements up to three pairs of Pt-based voltage leads were attached at different distances beside the inner inducer electrode, thus allowing us to probe the proximity effect over a length of 2–12 μm. Up to 30% resistance drops with respect to the normal-state value have been observed for the crystalline Co and Cu nanowires when sweeping the temperature below T{sub c} of the inducer (5.2 K). By contrast, relative R(T) drops were found to be an order of magnitude smaller for the nanogranular Co nanowire structure. Our analysis of the resistance data shows that the superconducting proximity length in crystalline Cu and Co is about 1 μm at 2.4 K, attesting to a long-range proximity effect in the Co nanowire. Moreover, this long-range proximity effect is insusceptible to magnetic fields up to 11 T, which is indicative of spin-triplet pairing. At the same time, proximity-induced superconductivity in the nanogranular Co nanowire is strongly suppressed due to the dominating Cooper pair scattering caused by its intrinsic microstructure.

  7. Ultrasound visualization of internal crystalline lens deformation using laser-induced microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Glasser, Adrian; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2014-02-01

    The progressive loss of accommodation of the eye, called presbyopia, affects people with age and can result in a complete loss of accommodation by about age 55 years. It is generally accepted that presbyopia is due to an increase in stiffness of the lens. With increasing age, the stiffness of the crystalline lens nucleus increases faster than that of the cortex. During accommodation, the deformation of different parts of the crystalline lens is different and likely changes with age. However, a direct observation of crystalline lens deformation and strain distribution is difficult because although imaging methods such as OCT or Scheimpflug imaging can distinguish cortex and nucleus, they cannot determine their regional deformation. Here, patterns of laser-induced microbubbles were created in gelatin phantoms and different parts of excised animal crystalline lenses and their displacements in response to external deformation were tracked by ultrasound imaging. In the animal lenses, the deformation of the lens cortex was greater than that of nucleus and this regional difference is greater for a 27-month-old bovine lens than for a 6-month-old porcine lens. This approach enables visualization of localized, regional deformation of crystalline lenses and, if applied to lenses from animal species that undergo accommodation, may help to understand the mechanisms of accommodation and presbyopia, improve diagnostics, and, potentially, aid in the development of new methods of lens modifying presbyopia treatments.

  8. The ability of lens alpha crystallin to protect against heat-induced aggregation is age-dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Emmons, T.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Alpha crystallin was prepared from newborn and aged bovine lenses. SDS-PAGE and tryptic peptide mapping demonstrated that both preparations contained only the alpha-A and alpha-B chains, with no significant contamination of other crystallins. Compared with alpha crystallin from the aged lens, alpha crystallin from the newborn lens was much more effective in the inhibition of beta L crystallin denaturation and precipitation induced in vitro by heat. Together, these results demonstrate that during the aging process, the alpha crystallins lose their ability to protect against protein denaturation, consistent with the hypothesis that the alpha crystallins play an important role in the maintenance of protein native structure in the intact lens.

  9. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: Practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao -Liang; Chen, Yu -Sheng; Clardy, Jon

    2015-01-01

    A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collectionmore » times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine occupancies, discussion of the proper use of geometric and anisotropic displacement parameter restraints and constraints, and whether to perform solvent squeezing/masking. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process for the crystal sponges is also discussed. The presented general guidelines will be invaluable for researchers interested in using the crystalline sponge method at in-house diffraction or synchrotron facilities, will facilitate the collection and analysis of reliable high

  10. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: Practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao -Liang; Chen, Yu -Sheng; Clardy, Jon

    2015-01-01

    A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine occupancies, discussion of the proper use of geometric and anisotropic displacement parameter restraints and constraints, and whether to perform solvent squeezing/masking. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process for the crystal sponges is also discussed. The presented general guidelines will be invaluable for researchers interested in using the crystalline sponge method at in-house diffraction or synchrotron facilities, will facilitate the collection and analysis of

  11. Induced Smith-Purcell radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, D. N.; Artemyev, A. I.; Oganesyan, K. B.; Rostovtsev, Y. V.; Hu, C.-K.

    2010-11-01

    Excitation of induced coherent Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation by relativistic magnetized electron beam in the absence of the resonator is considered within the framework of the dispersion equation. We have found that the dispersion equation for the SP instability is a quadratic equation for frequency. The first-step approximation for solution of the dispersion equation, giving the SP-spectrum of frequency, corresponds to the mirror boundary case, when the electron beam propagates above a plane metal surface (mirror). It was found that the conditions for both the Thompson and the Raman regimes of excitation do not depend on beam current and depend on the height of the beam above the grating surface. The growth rate of the instability in both cases is proportional to the square root of the electron beam current. No feedback is needed to provide the coherent emission.

  12. Radiation-induced physical changes in UHMWPE implant components.

    PubMed

    Naidu, S H; Bixler, B L; Moulton, M J

    1997-02-01

    Post-irradiation aging of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is not well understood. Retrieval studies and in vitro aged specimens have shown oxidative changes along with increases in crystallinity. Critical analysis and review of the polymer science and polymer physics literature shows that while oxidation may be important during the first year post-irradiation, subsequent aging occurs because of initial gamma radiation-induced chain scission leading to eventual isothermal crystallization of polymer chains in the amorphous regions of the UHMWPE bulk. Mechanical properties of aged UHMWPE are not as yet clear and, until such data become available, gamma irradiation sterilization must be used with caution. PMID:9048391

  13. Temperature dependence of the radiative recombination coefficient in crystalline silicon from spectral photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Hieu T. Macdonald, Daniel; Baker-Finch, Simeon C.

    2014-03-17

    The radiative recombination coefficient B(T) in crystalline silicon is determined for the temperature range 90–363 K, and in particular from 270 to 350 K with an interval of 10 K, where only sparse data are available at present. The band-band absorption coefficient established recently by Nguyen et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 043710 (2014)] via photoluminescence spectrum measurements is employed to compute the values of B(T) at various temperatures. The results agree very well with literature data from Trupke et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 94, 4930 (2003).] We present a polynomial parameterization describing the temperature dependence of the product of B(T) and the square of the intrinsic carrier density. We also find that B(T) saturates at a near constant value at room temperature and above for silicon samples with relatively low free carrier densities.

  14. Milling induces disorder in crystalline griseofulvin and order in its amorphous counterpart

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, Andrew; Zhang, Yan; Carvajal, M. Teresa; Pinal, Rodolfo

    2012-04-02

    This study investigates two apparently similar thermal signatures, shaped as bimodal exotherms, observed when either the crystalline or the amorphous from of the drug are subjected to milling. Crystalline griseofulvin was cryomilled and the (quenched-melt) amorphous form was subjected to either cryomilling or grinding. The thermal and surface properties of the resulting samples were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and surface energy analysis. After milling, both the crystalline and the amorphous material revealed visually similar bimodal exothermic events when the heating rate was 20 C min{sup -1}. Under different heating rates, the pair of DSC peaks for the bimodal exotherm of each material behaved entirely different from each other. The two peaks of the bimodal event, as well as the glass transition, can be kinetically resolved for the ground amorphous form using standard mode DSC. In contrast, similar analysis was unable to resolve the bimodal exotherm or a glass transition in the case of the cryomilled crystals. Furthermore, cryomilled crystals do not exhibit a glass transition even when analyzed using modulated DSC. Synchrotron sourced X-ray analysis revealed that grinding the amorphous material results in the nucleation and growth of the crystalline form. Milling thus induces disorder in the crystals of griseofulvin but induces order in the amorphous form of the drug. The surface of the two milled systems consistently exhibited different energetics under a wide range of relative humidity conditions. These findings suggest that cryomilling induces both bulk and surface disorder, specifically, a certain level of dislocations on the crystal. In contrast, grinding the amorphous material lowers the activation energy for crystal formation, inducing nuclei formation and growth throughout the amorphous matrix.

  15. Development of Micro and Nano Crystalline CVD Diamond TL/OSL Radiation Detectors for Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza-Flores, Marcelino

    2015-03-01

    Modern radiotherapy methods requires the use of high photon radiation doses delivered in a fraction to small volumes of cancer tumors. An accurate dose assessment for highly energetic small x-ray beams in small areas, as in stereotactic radiotherapy, is necessary to avoid damage to healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. Recent advances on the controlled synthesis of CVD diamond have demonstrated the possibility of using high quality micro and nano crystalline CVD as an efficient detector and dosimeter suitable for high energy photons and energetic particle beams. CVD diamond is a very attractive material for applications in ionizing radiation dosimetry, particularly in the biomedical field since the radiation absorption by a CVD diamond is very close to that of soft tissue. Furthermore, diamond is stable, non-toxic and radiation hard. In the present work we discuss the CVD diamond properties and dosimeter performance and discuss its relevance and advantages of various dosimetry methods, including thermally stimulated luminescence (TL) as well as optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The recent CVD improved method of growth allows introducing precisely controlled impurities into diamond to provide it with high dosimetry sensitivity. For clinical dosimetry applications, high accuracy of dose measurements, low fading, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and linear dose response characteristics are very important parameters which all are found in CVD diamonds specimens. In some cases, dose linearity and reproducibility in CVD diamond have been found to be higher than standard commercial TLD materials like LiF. In the present work, we discuss the state-of-the art developments in dosimetry applications using CVD diamond. The financial support from Conacyt (Mexico) is greatly acknowledged

  16. Medium-induced multi-photon radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Salgado, Carlos A.; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    We study the spectrum of multi-photon radiation off a fast quark in medium in the BDMPS/ASW approach. We reproduce the medium-induced one-photon radiation spectrum in dipole approximation, and go on to calculate the two-photon radiation in the Molière limit. We find that in this limit the LPM effect holds for medium-induced two-photon ladder emission.

  17. Creep of a crystalline metallic layer induced by high energy heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyagoub, A.; Chamberod, A.; Dran, J. C.; Dunlop, A.; Garrido, F.; Klaumünzer, S.; Thomé, L.

    1996-02-01

    The atomic transport induced by ion electronic energy loss in amorphous systems is studied on metallic sandwiches irradiated at liquid nitrogen temperature with 500 MeV iodide ions delivered by the VICKSI accelerator of the Hahn-Meitner-Institut (Berlin). The sandwiches are composed of two amorphous Ni3B layers of 1 or 1.5 μm thickness embedding a crystalline Au or W layer of thickness varying from 20 to 900 nm. Rutherford backscattering experiments using a 3.6 MeV He2+ beam delivered by the ARAMIS accelerator of the CSNSM (Orsay) were performed in order to determine the modifications of the geometry of the sandwiches after swift heavy ion irradiation. The results show a huge creep of the crystalline part of the sandwiches. The magnitude of this creep depends on the nature of the crystalline layer (Au or W) and increases steadily with the irradiating ion fluence with a strain-rate decreasing with increasing layer thickness. This creep phenomenon is due to the plastic deformation process occurring in the surrounding amorphous layers and is induced by ion electronic energy loss. A simple rheological model is developed to reproduce the observed effects.

  18. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  19. Study of molecular mechanisms of UV-induced aggregation of crystallins and possibility of maintaining eye lens transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soustov, L. V.; Chelnokov, E. V.; Bityurin, N. M.; Kiselev, A. L.; Nemov, V. V.; Sergeev, Yu. V.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2006-03-01

    The effect of D-pantethine and L-carnosine on the rate of UV-induced (XeC1 laser λ = 308 nm) aggregation of a mixture of βL-crystallin and α-crystallin is studied. We also demonstrate that the suggested by us combination of short-chain peptides shows better protective properties with respect to UV-induced aggregation than known anti-cataract agents.

  20. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  1. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure.

  2. Molten sodium-induced graphitization towards highly crystalline and hierarchical porous graphene frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanwen; Zhang, Yu; Wu, Xing-Long; Fan, Haosen; Luo, Zhong-Zhen; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Yan, Qingyu

    2015-09-01

    Mass production of high quality graphene platelets has attracted considerable interest for potential applications in various fields. Nevertheless, in literature, the graphite oxide (GO)-derived graphene is always lacking high crystallinity and hierarchical porosity. Herein, we report a new molten sodium-induced graphitization for mass-fabricating highly crystalline and porous graphene sheets. The 3D graphene hydrogels (GHs) obtained from GO by the hydrothermal self-assembly are directly annealed in molten sodium at 800 °C. As a result, the D band intensity in Raman spectroscopy is reduced significantly, while 2D band intensity is increased prominently, which is a typical characteristic of highly crystalline graphene. More importantly, the resulting Na-GFs-800 sample exhibits increased surface area and narrow mesopore size distribution (∼3.6 nm). The excellent supercapacitive performance of Na-GFs-800 has been demonstrated in an organic symmetric system. Meanwhile, the possible interaction mechanism between molten sodium and GHs has been proposed in the text.

  3. The C-terminal region of alpha-crystallin: involvement in protection against heat-induced denaturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Emmons, T.; Horwitz, J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the alpha-crystallins can protect other proteins against heat-induced denaturation and aggregation. To determine the possible involvement of the C-terminal region in this activity, the alpha-crystallins were subjected to limited tryptic digestion, and the amount of cleavage from the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin chains was assessed using antisera specific for these regions. Limited tryptic digestion resulted in cleavage only from the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin. This trypsin-treated alpha-A crystallin preparation showed a decreased ability to protect proteins from heat-induced aggregation using an in vitro assay. Together, these results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin is important for its ability to protect against heat-induced aggregation, which is consistent with the hypothesis that post-translational changes that are known to occur at the C-terminal region may have significant effects on the ability of alpha-A crystallin to protect against protein denaturation in vivo.

  4. Direct Radiation Damage to Crystalline DNA: What is the Source of Unaltered Base Release?

    PubMed Central

    Razskazovskiy, Yuriy; Debije, Michael G.; Bernhard, William A.

    2008-01-01

    The radiation chemical yields of unaltered base release have been measured in three crystalline double-stranded DNA oligomers after X irradiation at 4 K. The yields of released bases are between 10 and 20% of the total free radical yields measured at 4 K. Using these numbers, we estimate that the yield of DNA strand breaks due to the direct effect is about 0.1 μmol J−1. The damage responsible for base release is independent of the base type (C, G, A or T) and is not scavenged by anthracycline drugs intercalated in the DNA. For these reasons, reactions initiated by the hydroxyl radical have been ruled out as the source of base release. Since the intercalated anthracycline scavenges electrons and holes completely but does not inhibit base release, the possibility for damage transfer from the bases to the sugars can also be ruled out. The results are consistent with a model in which primary radical cations formed directly on the sugar-phosphate backbone react by two competing pathways: deprotonation, which localizes the damage on the sugar, and hole tunneling, which transfers the damage to the base stack. Quantitative estimates indicate that these two processes are approximately equally efficient. PMID:10761004

  5. Radiation effects and annealing kinetics in crystalline silicates, phosphates and complex Nb-Ta-Ti oxides. FInal Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1987-08-10

    Interaction of heavy particles (alpha-recoil nuclei, fission fragments, implanted ions) with ceramics is complex because they have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions and chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage can produce diverse results, but most commonly, crystalline periodic materials become either polycrystalline or aperiodic (metamict state). We studied the transition from crystalline to aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by alpha recoil nuclei in the U and Th decay series and in synthetic, analogous structure types which have been amorphized by ion implantation. Transition from crystalline to aperiodic was followed by analysis of XRD, high resolution TEM, and EXAFS/XANE spectroscopy. Use of these techniques with increasing dose provided data on an increasing finer scale as the damage process progressed.

  6. Shear-induced conformation change in α-crystalline nylon6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabnejad, Saeid; Manzhos, Sergei; He, Chaobin; Shim, V. P. W.

    2014-12-01

    A study of shear deformation of α-crystalline nylon6 is undertaken, using dispersion-corrected density functional theory. The shear stress-strain relationship and shear strength for interlayer shear deformation are computed. A conformation change induced by shear is identified along twinning deformation, whereby the conformation of chains, specifically the location of non-H-bonded hydrogen atoms, changes continuously. This paves a way for the modulation of properties of this group of materials by small shear deformation, if the non-H-bonded hydrogens are chemically substituted to form non-equivalent conformations when deformed.

  7. Formation kinetics of copper-related light-induced degradation in crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos, J. Savin, H.

    2014-12-21

    Light-induced degradation (LID) is a deleterious effect in crystalline silicon, which is considered to originate from recombination-active boron-oxygen complexes and/or copper-related defects. Although LID in both cases appears as a fast initial decay followed by a second slower degradation, we show that the time constant of copper-related degradation increases with increasing boron concentration in contrast to boron-oxygen LID. Temperature-dependent analysis reveals that the defect formation is limited by copper diffusion. Finally, interface defect density measurements confirm that copper-related LID is dominated by recombination in the wafer bulk.

  8. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  9. Radiation-induced neoplasms of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Skultety, F.M.; Leibrock, L.G.; Severson, G.S.

    1987-04-01

    The histopathology of two patients with radiation-induced neoplasms of the brain following therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancies is described. The second neoplasms were an atypical meningioma and a polymorphous cell sarcoma, respectively. They occurred 12 and 23 years after irradiation (4000 rad), within the original field of irradiation. In both cases, the radiation-induced tumors were histologically distinct from the initial medulloblastomas. Both patients were retreated with local irradiation using permanent implantation of radioactive iodine-125 seeds.

  10. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  11. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Gilson, Verle A.; Schriever, Richard L.; Shearer, James W.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  12. Molecular insights into the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Umbright, Christina; Roberts, Jenny R.; Cumpston, Amy; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David; Li, Shengqiao; Kashon, Michael; Joseph, Pius

    2015-01-01

    Identification of molecular target(s) and mechanism(s) of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity is important for the intervention and/or prevention of diseases associated with exposure to silica. Rats were exposed to crystalline silica by inhalation (15 mg m−3, 6 h per day, 5 days) and global gene expression profile was determined in the lungs by microarray analysis at 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks following termination of silica exposure. The number of significantly differentially expressed genes (>1.5-fold change and <0.01 false discovery rate P-value) detected in the lungs during the post-exposure time intervals analyzed exhibited a steady increase in parallel with the progression of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity noticed in the rats. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of a representative set of 10 genes confirmed the microarray findings. The number of biological functions, canonical pathways and molecular networks significantly affected by silica exposure, as identified by the bioinformatics analysis of the significantly differentially expressed genes detected during the post-exposure time intervals, also exhibited a steady increase similar to the silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, respiratory diseases, cancer, and tissue remodeling and fibrosis were significantly differentially expressed in the rat lungs; however, unresolved inflammation was the single most significant biological response to pulmonary exposure to silica. Excessive mucus production, as implicated by significant overexpression of the pendrin coding gene, SLC26A4, was identified as a potential novel mechanism for silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Collectively, the findings of our study provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in the rat. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22431001

  13. Poly-crystalline thin-film by aluminum induced crystallization on aluminum nitride substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhopal, Muhammad Fahad; Lee, Doo Won; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-07-01

    Thin-film polycrystalline silicon (pc-Si) on foreign (non-silicon) substrates has been researched by various research groups for the production of photovoltaic cells. High quality pc-Si deposition on foreign substrates with superior optical properties is considered to be the main hurdle in cell fabrication. Metal induced crystallization (MIC) is one of the renowned techniques used to produce this quality of material. In the current study, an aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) method was adopted to produce pc-Si thin-film on aluminum nitride (AlN) substrate by a seed layer approach. Aluminum and a-Si layer were deposited using an e-beam evaporator. Various annealing conditions were used in order to investigate the AIC grown pc-Si seed layers for process optimization. The effect of thermal annealing on grain size, defects preferentially crystallographic orientation of the grains were analyzed. Surface morphology was studied using an optical microscope. Poly-silicon film with a crystallinity fraction between 95-100% and an FWHM between 5-6 cm-1 is achievable at low temperatures and for short time intervals. A grain size of about 10 micron can be obtained at a low deposition rate on an AIN substrate. Similarly, Focused ion beam (FIB) also showed that at 425 °C sample B and at 400 °C sample A were fully crystallized. The crystalline quality of pc-Si was evaluated using µ-Raman spectroscopy as a function of annealed conditions and Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was used to determine the phase direction of the pc-Si layer. The current study implicates that a poly-silicon layer with good crystallographic orientation and crystallinity fraction is achievable on AIN substrate at low temperatures and short time frames.

  14. Myeloperoxidase and Crystalline Bodies in the Granules of DMBA-Induced Rat Chloroma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ioachim, Harry L.; Keller, Steven; Sabbath, Marlene; Andersson, Barbro; Dorsett, Brent; Essner, Edward

    1972-01-01

    Chloroma (chloroleukemia) was induced in a splenectomized rat by repeatedly administering dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and was serially transplanted thereafter. Composed of immature myeloid cells, the tumor imparted a green discoloration to the tissues that it infiltrated extensively. Chloroma cells fluoresced red in ultraviolet light, produced a characteristic curve in spectrophotometry, and contained large amounts of myeloperoxidase. They included numerous intracytoplasmic granules of both types A and B, which contained occasional crystalline bars. Permanent lines of chloroma cells were established in tissue culture. These cells, while maintaining their initial morphology, ceased producing myeloperoxidase and subsequently induced white tumors when they were isotransplanted. ImagesFig 12Fig 13Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3 PMID:4333120

  15. Vibron Solitons and Soliton-Induced Infrared Spectra of Crystalline Acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeno, S.

    1986-01-01

    Red-shifted infrared spectra at low temperatures of amide I (C=O stretching) vibrations of crystalline acetanilide measured by Careri et al. are shown to be due to vibron solitons, which are nonlinearity-induced localized modes of vibrons arising from their nonlinear interactions with optic-type phonons. A nonlinear eigenvalue equation giving the eigenfrequency of stationary solitons is solved approximately by introducing lattice Green's functions, and the obtained result is in good agreement with the experimental result. Inclusion of interactions with acoustic phonons yields the Debye-Waller factor in the zero-phonon line spectrum of vibron solitons, in a manner analogous to the case of impurity-induced localized harmonic phonon modes in alkali halides.

  16. Radiation-induced intracranial malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.; Mealey, J. Jr.; Sartorius, C.

    1989-07-01

    The authors present seven cases of malignant gliomas that occurred after radiation therapy administered for diseases different from the subsequent glial tumor. Included among these seven are three patients who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy. Previously reported cases of radiation-induced glioma are reviewed and analyzed for common characteristics. Children receiving central nervous system irradiation appear particularly susceptible to induction of malignant gliomas by radiation. Interstitial brachytherapy may be used successfully instead of external beam radiotherapy in previously irradiated, tumor-free brain, and thus may reduce the risk of radiation necrosis. 31 references.

  17. [Quantification of radiation-induced genetic risk].

    PubMed

    Ehling, U H

    1987-05-01

    Associated with technical advances of our civilization is a radiation- and chemically-induced increase in the germ cell mutation rate in man. This would result in an increase in the frequency of genetic diseases and would be detrimental to future generations. It is the duty of our generation to keep this risk as low as possible. The estimation of the radiation-induced genetic risk of human populations is based on the extrapolation of results from animal experiments. Radiation-induced mutations are stochastic events. The probability of the event depends on the dose; the degree of the damage does not. The different methods to estimate the radiation-induced genetic risk will be discussed. The accuracy of the predicted results will be evaluated by a comparison with the observed incidence of dominant mutations in offspring born to radiation exposed survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. These methods will be used to predict the genetic damage from the fallout of the reactor accident at Chernobyl. For the exposure dose we used the upper limits of the mean effective life time equivalent dose from the fallout values in the Munich region. According to the direct method for the risk estimation we will expect for each 100 to 500 spontaneous dominant mutations one radiation-induced mutation in the first generation. With the indirect method we estimate a ratio of 100 dominant spontaneous mutations to one radiation-induced dominant mutation. The possibilities and the limitations of the different methods to estimate the genetic risk will be discussed. The discrepancy between the high safety standards for radiation protection and the low level of knowledge for the toxicological evaluation of chemical mutagens will be emphasized. PMID:3589954

  18. Amorphous and crystalline optical materials used as instruments for high gamma radiation doses estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioan, M.-R.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear radiation induce some changes to the structure of exposed materials. The main effect of ionizing radiation when interacting with optical materials is the occurrence of color centers, which are quantitatively proportional to the up-taken doses. In this paper, a relation between browning effect magnitude and dose values was found. Using this relation, the estimation of a gamma radiation dose can be done. By using two types of laser wavelengths (532 nm and 633 nm), the optical powers transmitted thru glass samples irradiated to different doses between 0 and 59.1 kGy, were measured and the associated optical browning densities were determined. The use of laser light gives the opportunity of using its particularities: monochromaticity, directionality and coherence. Polarized light was also used for enhancing measurements quality. These preliminary results bring the opportunity of using glasses as detectors for the estimation of the dose in a certain point in space and for certain energy, especially in particles accelerators experiments, where the occurred nuclear reactions are involving the presence of high gamma rays fields.

  19. Heat shock factor 1 induces crystallin-αB to protect against cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qiang; Hu, Yanzhong; Ma, Yuanfang; Dong, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Cisplatin, a wildly used chemotherapy drug, induces nephrotoxicity that is characterized by renal tubular cell apoptosis. In response to toxicity, tubular cells can activate cytoprotective mechanisms, such as the heat shock response. However, the role and regulation of the heat shock response in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain largely unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated the induction of heat shock factor (Hsf)1 and the small heat shock protein crystallin-αB (CryAB) during cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. Consistently, cisplatin induced Hsf1 and CryAB in a cultured renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs). RPTCs underwent apoptosis during cisplatin treatment, which was increased when Hsf1 was knocked down. Transfection or restoration of Hsf1 into Hsf1 knockdown cells suppressed cisplatin-induced apoptosis, further supporting a cytoprotective role of Hsf1 and its associated heat shock response. Moreover, Hsf1 knockdown increased Bax translocation to mitochondria and cytochrome c release into the cytosol. In RPTCs, Hsf1 knockdown led to a specific downregulation of CryAB. Transfection of CryAB into Hsf1 knockdown cells diminished their sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis, suggesting that CryAB may be a key mediator of the cytoprotective effect of Hsf1. Taken together, these results demonstrate a heat shock response in cisplatin nephrotoxicity that is mediated by Hsf1 and CryAB to protect tubular cells against apoptosis. PMID:27194715

  20. O-GlcNAcylation of αB-crystallin regulates its stress-induced translocation and cytoprotection.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Vigneshwaran; Donofrio, Anthony J; Martin, Jody L

    2013-07-01

    Under normal conditions, the ubiquitously expressed αB-crystallin functions as a chaperone. αB-crystallin has been implicated in a variety of pathologies, consistent with a build-up of protein aggregates, such as neuromuscular disorders, myofibrillar myopathies, and cardiomyopathies. αB-crystallins' cardioprotection is partially attributed to its translocation and binding to cytoskeletal elements in response to stress. The triggers for this translocation are not clearly understood. In the heart, αB-crystallin undergoes at least three significant post-translational modifications: phosphorylation at ser-45 and 59 and O-GlcNAcylation (O-linked attachment of the monosaccharide β-N-acetyl-glucosamine) at thr-170. Whether phosphorylation status drives translocation remains controversial. Therefore, we evaluated the role of αB-crystallins' O-GlcNAcylation in its stress-induced translocation and cytoprotection in cardiomyocytes under stress. Immunoblotting and precipitation experiments with anti-O-GlcNAc antibody (CTD110.6) and glycoprotein staining (Pro-Q Emerald) both demonstrate robust stress-induced O-GlcNAcylation of αB-crystallin. A non-O-GlcNAcylatable αB-crystallin mutant (αB-T170A) showed diminished translocation in response to heat shock and robust phosphorylation at both ser-45 and ser-59. Cell survival assays show a loss of overexpression-associated cytoprotection with the non-glycosylatable mutant to multiple stresses. While ectopic expression of wild-type αB-crystallin strongly stabilized ZsProSensor, a fusion protein rapidly degraded by the proteasome, the non-O-GlcNAcylatable version did not. Therefore, we believe the O-GlcNAcylation of αB-crystallin is a dynamic and important regulator of both its localization and function. PMID:23543138

  1. Radiation-induced squamous sialometaplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Leshin, B.; White, W.L.; Koufman, J.A. )

    1990-07-01

    We describe a patient with recurrent acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma following radiation therapy. Mohs micrographic sections revealed extensive squamous sialometaplasia showing striking histologic similarity to the patient's squamous cell carcinoma. Criteria necessary to differentiate squamous sialometaplasia from neoplasm are presented. This differentiation is important to ensure adequate tumor resection without unnecessary sacrifice of tumor-free tissue.

  2. Mesoscale modeling of strain induced solid state amorphization in crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei

    Solid state amorphization, and in particular crystalline to amorphous transformation, can be observed in metallic alloys, semiconductors, intermetallics, minerals, and also molecular crystals when they undergo irradiation, hydrogen gas dissolution, thermal interdiffusion, mechanical alloying, or mechanical milling. Although the amorphization mechanisms may be different, the transformation occurs due to the high level of disorder introduced into the material. Milling induced solid state amorphization is proposed to be the result of accumulation of crystal defects, specifically dislocations, as the material is subjected to large deformations during the high energy process. Thus, understanding the deformation mechanisms of crystalline materials will be the first step in studying solid state amorphization in crystalline materials, which not only has scientific contributions, but also technical consequences. A phase field dislocation dynamics (PFDD) approach is employed in this work to simulate plastic deformation of molecular crystals. This PFDD model has the advantage of tracking all of the dislocations in a material simultaneously. The model takes into account the elastic interaction between dislocations, the lattice resistance to dislocation motion, and the elastic interaction of dislocations with an external stress field. The PFDD model is employed to describe the deformation of molecular crystals with pharmaceutical applications, namely, single crystal sucrose, acetaminophen, gamma-indomethacin, and aspirin. Stress-strain curves are produced that result in expected anisotropic material response due to the activation of different slip systems and yield stresses that agree well with those from experiments. The PFDD model is coupled to a phase transformation model to study the relation between plastic deformation and the solid state amorphization of crystals that undergo milling. This model predicts the amorphous volume fraction in excellent agreement with

  3. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits glucose-induced membrane cholesterol crystalline domain formation through a potent antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    Lipid oxidation leads to endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and foam cell formation during atherogenesis. Glucose also contributes to lipid oxidation and promotes pathologic changes in membrane structural organization, including the development of cholesterol crystalline domains. In this study, we tested the comparative effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid indicated for the treatment of very high triglyceride (TG) levels, and other TG-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) on lipid oxidation in human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as membrane lipid vesicles prepared in the presence of glucose (200 mg/dL). We also examined the antioxidant effects of EPA in combination with atorvastatin o-hydroxy (active) metabolite (ATM). Glucose-induced changes in membrane structural organization were measured using small angle x-ray scattering approaches and correlated with changes in lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) levels. EPA was found to inhibit LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner (1.0-10.0 µM) and was distinguished from the other TG-lowering agents, which had no significant effect as compared to vehicle treatment alone. Similar effects were observed in membrane lipid vesicles exposed to hyperglycemic conditions. The antioxidant activity of EPA, as observed in glucose-treated vesicles, was significantly enhanced in combination with ATM. Glucose treatment produced highly-ordered, membrane-restricted, cholesterol crystalline domains, which correlated with increased LOOH levels. Of the agents tested in this study, only EPA inhibited glucose-induced cholesterol domain formation. These data demonstrate that EPA, at pharmacologic levels, inhibits hyperglycemia-induced changes in membrane lipid structural organization through a potent antioxidant mechanism associated with its distinct, physicochemical interactions with the membrane bilayer. PMID:25449996

  4. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  5. Depth-dependent crystallinity of nano-crystalline silicon induced by step-wise variation of hydrogen dilution during hot-wire CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendse, C. J.; van Heerden, B. A.; Muller, T. F. G.; Cummings, F. R.; Oliphant, C. J.; Malgas, G. F.; Motaung, D. E.

    2015-06-01

    To induce an amorphous surface in a nano-crystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin film, the hydrogen dilution was reduced step-wise at fixed time intervals from 90 - 50% during the hotwire chemical vapour deposition process. This contribution reports on the structural properties of the resultant nc-Si:H thin film as a function of the deposition time. Raman spectroscopy, confirmed by high resolution transmission spectroscopy, indicates crystalline uniformity in the growth direction, accompanied by the progression of an amorphous surface layer as the deposition time is increased. The silicon- and oxygen bonding configurations were probed using infrared spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The growth mechanism is ascribed to the improved etching rate by atomic hydrogen in nano-crystalline silicon towards the film/substrate interface region. The optical properties were calculated by applying the effective medium approximation theory, where the existence of bulk and interfacial layers, as inferred from cross-sectional microscopy, were taken into account.

  6. Influence of excipients in comilling on mitigating milling-induced amorphization or structural disorder of crystalline pharmaceutical actives.

    PubMed

    Balani, Prashant N; Ng, Wai Kiong; Tan, Reginald B H; Chan, Sui Yung

    2010-05-01

    The feasibility of using excipients to suppress the amorphization or structural disorder of crystalline salbutamol sulphate (SS) during milling was investigated. SS was subjected to ball-milling in the presence of alpha-lactose monohydrate (LAC), adipic acid (AA), magnesium stearate (MgSt), or polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP). X-ray powder diffraction, dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), high sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (HSDSC) were used to analyze the crystallinity of the milled mixtures. Comilling with crystalline excipients, LAC, AA, and MgSt proved effective in reducing the amorphization of SS. LAC, AA, or MgSt acting as seed crystals to induce recrystallization of amorphous SS formed by milling. During comilling, both SS and LAC turned predominantly amorphous after 45 min but transformed back to a highly crystalline state after 60 min. Amorphous content was below the detection limits of DVS (0.5%) and HSDSC (5%). Comilled and physical mixtures of SS and ALM were stored under normal and elevated humidity conditions. This was found to prevent subsequent changes in crystallinity and morphology of comilled SS:LAC as compared to significant changes in milled SS and physical mixture. These results demonstrate a promising application of comilling with crystalline excipients in mitigating milling induced amorphization of pharmaceutical actives. PMID:19902526

  7. Thermal Stress Induced Aggregation of Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) and Protection by α-Crystallin via Its Chaperone Function

    PubMed Central

    Swamy-Mruthinti, Satyanarayana; Srinivas, Volety; Hansen, John E.; Rao, Ch Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) formerly known as membrane intrinsic protein (MIP), is expressed exclusively in the lens during terminal differentiation of fiber cells. AQP0 plays an important role not only in the regulation of water content but also in cell-to-cell adhesion of the lens fiber cells. We have investigated the thermal stress-induced structural alterations of detergent (octyl glucoside)-solubilized calf lens AQP0. The results show an increase in the amount of AQP0 that aggregated as the temperature increased from 40°C to 65°C. α-Crystallin, molecular chaperone abundantly present in the eye lens, completely prevented the AQP0 aggregation at a 1∶1 (weight/weight) ratio. Since α-crystallin consists of two gene products namely αA- and αB-crystallins, we have tested the recombinant proteins on their ability to prevent thermal-stress induced AQP0 aggregation. In contrast to the general observation made with other target proteins, αA-crystallin exhibited better chaperone-like activity towards AQP0 compared to αB-crystallin. Neither post-translational modifications (glycation) nor C-terminus truncation of AQP0 have any appreciable effect on its thermal aggregation properties. α-Crystallin offers similar protection against thermal aggregation as in the case of the unmodified AQP0, suggesting that αcrystallin may bind to either intracellular loops or other residues of AQP0 that become exposed during thermal stress. Far-UV circular dichroism studies indicated a loss of αhelical structures when AQP0 was subjected to temperatures above 45°C, and the presence of α-crystallin stabilized these secondary structures. We report here, for the first time, that α-crystallin protects AQP0 from thermal aggregation. Since stress-induced structural perturbations of AQP0 may affect the integrity of the lens, presence of the molecular chaperone, α-crystallin (particularly αA-crystallin) in close proximity to the lens membrane is physiologically relevant. PMID:24312215

  8. Induced radioactivity from industrial radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lone, M. A.

    1990-12-01

    Analytic expressions are developed for quantitative analysis of radioactivity induced by radiation processing of products with electrons or photons. These expressions provide reasonable estimates of induced activity much faster than Monte Carlo simulations. Analysis of radioactivity from processing of meat with 10 MeV electrons shows an induced activity of less than 10 mBq/(kgkGy) just after irradiation. This is 4 orders of magnitude less than the natural background activity of about 100 Bq/kg found in meat. Five days after processing the induced activity will reduce by a factor of 300.

  9. Imaging Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Mike E.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Tsien, Christina I.; Bailey, Janet E.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2013-01-01

    Technological developments in radiation therapy and other cancer therapies have led to a progressive increase in five-year survival rates over the last few decades. Although acute effects have been largely minimized by both technical advances and medical interventions, late effects remain a concern. Indeed, the need to identify those individuals who will develop radiation-induced late effects, and to develop interventions to prevent or ameliorate these late effects is a critical area of radiobiology research. In the last two decades, preclinical studies have clearly established that late radiation injury can be prevented/ameliorated by pharmacological therapies aimed at modulating the cascade of events leading to the clinical expression of radiation-induced late effects. These insights have been accompanied by significant technological advances in imaging that are moving radiation oncology and normal tissue radiobiology from disciplines driven by anatomy and macrostructure to ones in which important quantitative functional, microstructural, and metabolic data can be noninvasively and serially determined. In the current article, we review use of positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy to generate pathophysiological and functional data in the central nervous system, lung, and heart that offer the promise of, (1) identifying individuals who are at risk of developing radiation-induced late effects, and (2) monitoring the efficacy of interventions to prevent/ameliorate them. PMID:22348250

  10. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T. Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Molinie, P.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  11. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T.; Molinie, P.; Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon® FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon® FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  12. Management of radiation-induced urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Matthias D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation as a treatment option for prostate cancer has been chosen by many patients. One of the side effects encountered are radiation-induced urethral strictures which occur in up to 11% of patients. Radiation damage has often left the irradiated field fibrotic and with poor vascularization which make these strictures a challenging entity to treat. The mainstay of urologic management remains an urethroplasty procedure for which several approaches exist with variable optimal indication. Excision and primary anastomoses are ideal for shorter bulbar strictures that comprise the majority of radiation-induced urethral strictures. One advantage of this technique is that it does not require tissue transfers and success rates of 70-95% have consistently been reported. Substitution urethroplasty using remote graft tissue such as buccal mucosa are indicated if the length of the stricture precludes a tension-free primary anastomosis. Despite the challenge of graft survival in radiation-damaged and poorly vascularized recipient tissue, up to 83% of patients have been treated successfully although the numbers described in the literature are small. The most extensive repairs involve the use of tissue flaps, for example gracilis muscle, which may be required if the involved periurethral tissue is unable to provide sufficient vascular support for a post-operative urethral healing process. In summary, radiation-induced urethral strictures are a challenging entity. Most strictures are amenable to excision and primary anastomosis (EPA) with encouraging success rates but substitution urethroplasty may be indicated when extensive repair is needed. PMID:26816812

  13. Metal Chloride Induced Formation of Porous Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Films: Morphology, Thermal Properties and Crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, W. L.; Yaakob, N. N.; Zainal Abidin, A.; Abu Bakar, M.; Abu Bakar, N. H. H.

    2016-06-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) films with highly porous structures were synthesized using a one phase system comprising of metal chloride/methanol/PHB/chloroform (MCl2/CH3OH/PHB/CHCl3). SEM analyses confirmed that the MCl2 (where M = Cu2+ or Ni2+) induced porous structures with pore sizes ranging from 0.3 - 2.0 μm. The average pore size increased with the increasing MCl2 content. There existed weak physical interactions between the PHB chains and MCl2 as revealed by FTIR and NMR spectroscopies. The residue of MCl2 in the porous PHB film does not exert significant influence on the thermal stability of PHB. Nevertheless, the crystallinity of the prepared film is enhanced, as MCl2 acts as the nucleation sites to promote the growth of spherullites.

  14. Towards photo-induced swimming: actuation of liquid crystalline elastomer in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerretti, Giacomo; Martella, Daniele; Zeng, Hao; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Palagi, Stefano; Mark, Andrew G.; Melde, Kai; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer; Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2016-04-01

    Liquid Crystalline Elastomers (LCEs) are very promising smart materials that can be made sensitive to different external stimuli, such as heat, pH, humidity and light, by changing their chemical composition. In this paper we report the implementation of a nematically aligned LCE actuator able to undergo large light-induced deformations. We prove that this property is still present even when the actuator is submerged in fresh water. Thanks to the presence of azo-dye moieties, capable of going through a reversible trans-cis photo-isomerization, and by applying light with two different wavelengths we managed to control the bending of such actuator in the liquid environment. The reported results represent the first step towards swimming microdevices powered by light.

  15. Light-induced point defect reactions of residual iron in crystalline silicon after aluminum gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelbarey, D.; Kveder, V.; Schroeter, W.; Seibt, M.

    2010-08-15

    Deep level transient spectroscopy is used to study light-induced reactions of residual iron impurities after aluminum gettering (AlG) in crystalline silicon. White-light illumination at room temperature leads to the formation of a defect which is associated with a donor level at 0.33 eV above the valence band. This defect is stable up to about 175 deg. C where it dissociates reversibly in case of small iron concentrations and irreversibly for high iron concentrations. Since marker experiments using gold and platinum diffusion show a high vacancy concentration after AlG a tentative identification of the new defect as the metastable iron-vacancy pair is proposed.

  16. Radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Perino, L.E.; Schuffler, M.D.; Mehta, S.J.; Everson, G.T.

    1986-10-01

    A case of intestinal pseudoobstruction occurring 30 yr after radiation therapy is described. Mechanical causes of obstruction were excluded by laparotomy. Histology of full-thickness sections of the small bowel revealed vascular ectasia and sclerosis, serosal fibrosis, neuronal proliferation within the submucosa, and degeneration of the muscle fibers of the circular layer of the muscularis propria. On the basis of the clinical and histologic findings we conclude that, in this patient, intestinal pseudoobstruction was due to muscular and neuronal injury from abdominal irradiation.

  17. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F. )

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  18. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  19. An Iodine-Vapor-Induced Cyclization in a Crystalline Molecular Flask.

    PubMed

    Knichal, Jane V; Shepherd, Helena J; Wilson, Chick C; Raithby, Paul R; Gee, William J; Burrows, Andrew D

    2016-05-10

    A vapor-induced cyclization has been observed in the host environment of a crystalline molecular flask (CMF), within which 1,8-bis(2-phenylethynyl)naphthalene (bpen), a diarenynyl system primed for cyclization, was exposed to iodine vapor to yield the corresponding indeno[2,1-α]phenalene species. The cyclization process, unique in its vapor-induced, solvent-free nature, was followed spectroscopically, and found to occur concurrently with the displacement of lattice solvent for molecular iodine in CMF⋅0.75 bpen⋅2.25 CHCl3 ⋅H2 O. The cyclization occurred under mild conditions and without the need to suspend the crystals in solvent. The ability of CMFs to host purely gas-induced reactions is further highlighted by the subsequent sequential oxidation reaction of cyclized 7-iodo-12-phenylindeno[2,1-α]phenalene (ipp) with molecular oxygen derived from air, yielding 12-hydroxy-7-iodo-2-phenylindeno[2,1-α]phenalen-1(12H)-one (hipp). PMID:27060377

  20. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  1. Polyaniline fibers, films, and powders: X-ray studies of crystallinity and stress-induced preferred orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.E.; Zhu, Q.; Tang, X.; Scherr, E.M.; MacDiarmid, A.G. . Lab. for Research on the Structure of Matter); Cajipe, V.B. . Inst. des Materiaux des Nantes)

    1994-08-29

    Powder (hk0) and four-circle X-ray diffractometry are used to study the effects of hot-stretching on films and fibers of the emeralidine base form of polyaniline (EB-II). It is shown definitively that hot-stretching induces nucleation of new crystalline material rather than growth and/or orientation of pre-existing crystallites. The diffuse scattering from amorphous EB-II is dominated by short-range interchain correlations and develops preferred orientation in response to stretching but with a broader mosaic than the crystalline phase. For the maximally-stretched samples, the crystal fractions was determined by accounting for the different mosaic distributions of crystalline and amorphous phases, correcting for the mass of N-methylphenazolinium plasticizer and ruling out any significant contribution from NMP diffuse scattering to the amorphous EB-II profiles. Films stretched to L/L[sub 0] = 4.25 contain no more than 4% crystalline material while fibers with L/L[sub 0] = 4.5 are 24--30% crystalline. These fractional crystallinity values are significantly small than found for EB-II powder (60%). More importantly, these results have implications for models of electric properties which invoke interchain interactions.

  2. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  3. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  4. Radiation-Induced Phase Transformations in Ilmenite-Group Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J. N.

    1997-12-31

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool for characterizing and understanding radiation-induced structural changes in materials. We have irradiated single crystals of ilmenite (FeTiO{sub 3}) and geikielite (MgTiO{sub 3}) using ions and electrons to better understand the response of complex oxides to radiation. Ion irradiation experiments of bulk single crystals at 100 K show that ilmenite amorphized at doses of less than 1x10(exp15) Ar(2+)/sq cm and at a damage level in the peak damage region of 1 displacement per atom (dpa). Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction of a cross-sectioned portion of this crystal confirmed the formation of a 150 am thick amorphous layer. Geikielite proved to be more radiation resistant, requiring a flux of 2x10(exp 15) Xe(2+)/sq cm to induce amorphization at 100 K. This material did not amorphize at 470 K, despite a dose of 2.5 x10(exp 16) Xe(2+)/sq cm and a damage level as high as 25 dpa. Low temperature irradiations of electron- transparent crystals with 1 MeV Kr(+) also show that ilmenite amorphized after a damage level of 2.25 dpa at 175 K.Similar experiments on geikielite show that the microstructure is partially amorphous and partially crystalline after 10 dpa at 150 K. Concurrent ion and electron irradiation of both materials with 1 MeV Kr(+) and 0.9 MeV electrons produced dislocation loops in both materials, but no amorphous regions were formed. Differences in the radiation response of these isostructural oxides suggests that in systems with Mg-Fe solid solution, the Mg-rich compositions may be more resistant to structural changes.

  5. Cataracts induced by microwave and ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, R.M.; Tripathi, B.J.; Tripathi, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Microwaves most commonly cause anterior and/or posterior subcapsular lenticular opacities in experimental animals and, as shown in epidemiologic studies and case reports, in human subjects. The formation of cataracts seems to be related directly to the power of the microwave and the duration of exposure. The mechanism of cataractogenesis includes deformation of heat-labile enzymes, such as glutathione peroxide, that ordinarily protect lens cell proteins and membrane lipids from oxidative damage. Oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups and the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates cause local variations in the orderly structure of the lens cells. An alternative mechanism is thermoelastic expansion through which pressure waves in the aqueous humor cause direct physical damage to the lens cells. Cataracts induced by ionizing radiation (e.g., X-rays and gamma rays) usually are observed in the posterior region of the lens, often in the form of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation causes increasing opacification of the lens, which appears after a decreasing latency period. Like cataract formation by microwaves, cataractogenesis induced by ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the lens cell membrane. Another possible mechanism is damage to lens cell DNA, with decreases in the production of protective enzymes and in sulfur-sulfur bond formation, and with altered protein concentrations. Until further definitive conclusions about the mechanisms of microwaves and ionizing radiation induced cataracts are reached, and alternative protective measures are found, one can only recommend mechanical shielding from these radiations to minimize the possibility of development of radiation-induced cataracts. 74 references.

  6. αB-crystallin and HspB2 deficiency is protective from diet-induced glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Toft, Daniel J; Fuller, Miles; Schipma, Matthew; Chen, Feng; Cryns, Vincent L; Layden, Brian T

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence suggests molecular chaperones have a role in the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes. As αB-crystallin and HspB2 are molecular chaperones and data suggests their expression is elevated in the skeletal muscle of diabetic and obese animals, we sought to determine if αB-crystallin and HspB2 collectively play a functional role in the metabolic phenotype of diet-induced obesity. Using αB-crystallin/HspB2 knockout and littermate wild-type controls, it was observed that mice on the high fat diet gained more weight as compared to the normal chow group and genotype did not impact this weight gain. To test if the genotype and/or diet influenced glucose homeostasis, intraperitoneal glucose challenge was performed. While similar on normal chow diet, wild-type mice on the high fat diet exhibited higher glucose levels during the glucose challenge compared to the αB-crystallin/HspB2 knockout mice. Although wild-type mice had higher glucose levels, insulin levels were similar for both genotypes. Insulin tolerance testing revealed that αB-crystallin/HspB2 knockout mice were more sensitive to insulin, leading to lower glucose levels over time, which is indicative of a difference in insulin sensitivity between the genotypes on a high fat diet. Transcriptome analyses of skeletal muscle in αB-crystallin/HspB2 knockout and wild-type mice on a normal or high fat diet revealed reductions in cytokine pathway genes in αB-crystallin/HspB2 knockout mice, which may contribute to their improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these data reveal that αB-crystallin/HspB2 plays a role in development of insulin resistance during a high fat diet challenge. PMID:27330996

  7. Effect of the substrate-induced crystalline interphase on the adhesion of polyurethane to metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jangsoon

    Bond strengths of three polyurethane to an aluminum were measured by indentation debonding, and interfacial features between two materials were microscopically investigated. All the polyurethanes crystallized at the Al substrate surface by heterogeneous nucleation, but the spherulitic features varied as a function of OH number. For non-aged samples, crosslinking level determined the adhesion of polyurethane film to aluminum substrate, while number density of spherulites was an important factor for aged samples. There was an optimum OH number to attain the highest bond strength. Hence, it was found that the decrease of OH number below this value, which is usually done by changing blowing gas from CFC-11 to pentane, caused poor adhesion of polyurethane foam to the aluminum. The crystalline interphase formed at the aluminum surface was examined by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. The crystallinity of non-aged samples varied from air polymer surface to interface. The coherence lengths and interplanar spacings of all the reflections also changes up to interface by the presence of substrate. In particular, the integrated intensity of (100) and (021) reflections is linearly dependent upon X-ray penetration depth. The bond strength was exponentially proportional to the interfacial crystallinity, since stronger interface makes the adhesive force be double or redouble across interface. The preferred polymer molecular ordering in the 100 direction also provided stronger bonding of the polyurethane to the aluminum. From strain induced line broadening estimated by change of interplanar spacing, the polymer films possessing the greater dislocation density at interfacial area showed lower adhesion. It is believed that dislocations as stress concentrator play a part in determining adhesion. The rough zinc phosphated steel was used as a substrate with respect to a HCFC 141b and water co-blown polyurethane foam. Long period dissolution maintained interfacial crystallites, which

  8. Wave induced barrier transparency and melting of quasi-crystalline structures in two dimensional plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amita

    2007-04-15

    The conservation of energy and enstrophy in two dimensional inviscid hydrodynamics leads to dual cascade behavior. The energy cascades towards long scales and the enstrophy is transferred to shorter scales. The interplay of these dynamical processes leads to self organization and formation of coherent patterns in the two dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence. It was shown by Kukharkin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 25, 2486 (1995)] that this process of self organization occurs in an even more interesting fashion in the Hasegawa Mima (HM) equation [Phys. Fluids 21, 21 (1978)] This equation is a generalization of the two dimensional Navier Stokes hydrodynamics model in which there is a characteristic natural scale in the system (e.g., Larmor radius in the drift wave context). Kukharkin et al. observed that this scale acts as a barrier in the energy cascade, such that the cascade rate at the longer wavelength side of the barrier is smaller. This work has also shown that the accumulation of energy around the intrinsic scale leads to the formation of quasi-crystalline patterns. In the present paper it has been demonstrated that the presence of wave excitations leads to an increased cascade towards longer scales past the natural length scale barrier. It has also been demonstrated that wave excitations lead to the melting of quasi-crystalline structures. Another intriguing but interesting observation is that even though the faster cascade is induced by waves arising through an anisotropic inhomogeneity in one of the plasma parameters, the spectrum of the fluctuations continues to remain predominantly isotropic. A physical understanding of the observations is provided by illustrating a close connection between the Kelvin-Helmholtz destabilization of shear flows and the phenomenon of inverse cascade in 2D fluid flows.

  9. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style.

  10. Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapatsis, Michael (Inventor); Lai, Zhiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    In certain aspects, the invention features methods for forming crystalline membranes (e.g., a membrane of a framework material, such as a zeolite) by inducing secondary growth in a layer of oriented seed crystals. The rate of growth of the seed crystals in the plane of the substrate is controlled to be comparable to the rate of growth out of the plane. As a result, a crystalline membrane can form a substantially continuous layer including grains of uniform crystallographic orientation that extend through the depth of the layer.

  11. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  12. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Philipp J.; Park, Henry S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  13. Ionizing Radiation-induced Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Meeseon; Moon, Kieun; Jo, Min-Heui; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Radiation risk has become well known through epidemiological studies of clinically or occupationally exposed populations, animal experiments, and in vitro studies; however, the study of radiation related or induced disease has been limited in Korea. This study is to find the level of occupational radiation exposure for various kinds of accidents, compensated occupational diseases, related studies, and estimations on future occupational disease risks. Research data of related institutions were additionally investigated. About 67% of 62,553 radiation workers had no exposure or less than 1.2 mSv per year. The 5 reported cases on radiation accident patients in Korea occurred during nondestructive testing. According to the recent rapid increase in the number of workers exposed to radiation, a higher social recognition of cancer, and an increasing cancer mortality rate, it is expected that occupational disease compensation will rapidly increase as well. Therefore, it is important to develop scientific and objective decision methods, such as probability of causation and screening dose in the establishment of an exposure and health surveillance system. PMID:21258594

  14. Radiation-induced autophagy: mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Madhuri; Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Das, Asmita; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S; Sharma, Kulbhushan

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionary conserved, indispensable, lysosome-mediated degradation process, which helps in maintaining homeostasis during various cellular traumas. During stress, a context-dependent role of autophagy has been observed which drives the cell towards survival or death depending upon the type, time, and extent of the damage. The process of autophagy is stimulated during various cellular insults, e.g. oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, imbalances in calcium homeostasis, and altered mitochondrial potential. Ionizing radiation causes ROS-dependent as well as ROS-independent damage in cells that involve macromolecular (mainly DNA) damage, as well as ER stress induction, both capable of inducing autophagy. This review summarizes the current understanding on the roles of oxidative stress, ER stress, DNA damage, altered mitochondrial potential, and calcium imbalance in radiation-induced autophagy as well as the merits and limitations of targeting autophagy as an approach for radioprotection and radiosensitization. PMID:26764568

  15. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  16. Acceleration of potential-induced degradation by salt-mist preconditioning in crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Soh; Nishiyama, Naoki; Yoshino, Seiji; Ujiro, Takumi; Watanabe, Shin; Doi, Takuya; Masuda, Atsushi; Tanahashi, Tadanori

    2015-08-01

    We examined the sequential effects of salt-mist stress followed by high-system-voltage stress on the power loss of crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules to determine whether a crucial failure as potential-induced degradation (PID) is accelerated by material-property changes caused by the long-term effects of a less harmful stress such as salt-mist spraying. Degradation profiles confirmed in this study show that PID is accelerated by certain types of salt-mist preconditioning. For the acceleration of PID, the contribution of sodium ions liberated from the front glass of the PV module seems to be excluded. Therefore, we consider that the sodium ions penetrating into the PV modules from the ambient environment may also cause degradation according to the proposed mechanisms of PID, as the sodium ions existing in the front glass cause PID. Furthermore, this type of degradation may indicate the wear-out phenomenon after a long-term exposure in the field (especially near the coast).

  17. Role of α-crystallin B in regulation of stress induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Subhalakshmi; Mitra, Arkadeep; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recently emerging evidence suggests that cardiomyocyte apoptosis is one of the major pathogenic factors in heart diseases leading to heart failure. Cardiomyocytes undergo apoptosis in response to a wide variety of cellular stresses including protein folding stress at Endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Stressed myocytes elicit an adaptive response referred as Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) by inducing accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) to mitigate the ER stress. HSPs act as molecular chaperons by assisting correct folding of the aggregated misfolded proteins in ER lumen. α-Crystallin B (CRYAB) is an abundant small HSP that confers protection to cardiomyocytes against various stress stimuli. Recent evidence indicates that CRYAB directly interacts with several components of ER stress and also mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Based on currently available literature this mini review will focus on how CRYAB confers protection to stressed myocardium thereby emphasizing its function as antiapoptotic molecule. Understanding the interplay between CRYAB and the key components in the apoptotic signaling cascade mediated by ER and mitochondria will help in development of novel therapies for cardiac diseases. PMID:25613032

  18. Flow-Induced Assembly of Colloidal Liquid Crystalline Nanosheets Toward Unidirectional Macroscopic Structures.

    PubMed

    Nono, Yoshihiro; Mouri, Emiko; Nakata, Munetaka; Nakato, Teruyuki

    2016-03-01

    Multiscale structures of anisotropic nanoparticles up to macroscopic scales are important in order to produce practical materials through nanotechnology. As an example of such structures, hierarchical organization of colloidal liquid crystals of niobium oxide nanosheets yields stripe textures observable by naked eyes. The stripes are generated by the growth of liquid crystalline domains (tactoids) and the alignment of the tactoids under an electric field and gravity applied in the directions orthogonal to each other. The nanosheets forming the tactoids are unidirectionally aligned along the flow induced by gravity, and the aligned tactoids are stretched to be connected each other to form the stripes. Time evolution of the stripes indicates that they are generated during the settlement of the nanosheets. The nanosheets are debundled with the settlement, and thus the stripes are gradually degenerated during the settlement. Larger tactoids cause faster nanosheet settlement and stripe degeneration. The electric field applied orthogonally to gravity has roles of pinning the nanosheets to slow down their settlement and retains the stripes for several hours. PMID:27455743

  19. Immunity induced by a broad class of inorganic crystalline materials is directly controlled by their chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gareth R.; Fierens, Kaat; Preston, Stephen G.; Lunn, Daniel; Rysnik, Oliwia; De Prijck, Sofie; Kool, Mirjam; Buckley, Hannah C.; O’Hare, Dermot; Austyn, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    There is currently no paradigm in immunology that enables an accurate prediction of how the immune system will respond to any given agent. Here we show that the immunological responses induced by members of a broad class of inorganic crystalline materials are controlled purely by their physicochemical properties in a highly predictable manner. We show that structurally and chemically homogeneous layered double hydroxides (LDHs) can elicit diverse human dendritic cell responses in vitro. Using a systems vaccinology approach, we find that every measured response can be modeled using a subset of just three physical and chemical properties for all compounds tested. This correlation can be reduced to a simple linear equation that enables the immunological responses stimulated by newly synthesized LDHs to be predicted in advance from these three parameters alone. We also show that mouse antigen–specific antibody responses in vivo and human macrophage responses in vitro are controlled by the same properties, suggesting they may control diverse responses at both individual component and global levels of immunity. This study demonstrates that immunity can be determined purely by chemistry and opens the possibility of rational manipulation of immunity for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24799501

  20. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  1. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  2. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  3. Tea Flavanols Block Advanced Glycation of Lens Crystallins Induced by Dehydroascorbic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingdong; Zhao, Yantao; Wang, Pei; Ahmedna, Mohamed; Ho, Chi-Tang; Sang, Shengmin

    2015-01-20

    Growing evidence has shown that ascorbic acid (ASA) can contribute to protein glycation and the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), especially in the lens. The mechanism by which ascorbic acid can cause protein glycation probably originates from its oxidized form, dehydroascorbic acid (DASA), which is a reactive dicarbonyl species. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that four tea flavanols, (-)-epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EGCG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin 3-O-gallate (ECG), and (-)-epicatechin (EC), could significantly trap DASA and consequently form 6C- or 8C-ascorbyl conjugates. Among these four flavanols, EGCG exerted the strongest trapping efficacy by capturing approximate 80% of DASA within 60 min. We successfully purified and identified seven 6C- or 8C-ascorbyl conjugates of flavanols from the chemical reaction between tea flavanols and DASA under slightly basic conditions. Of which, five ascorbyl conjugates, EGCGDASA-2, EGCDASA-2, ECGDASA-1, ECGDASA-2 and ECDASA-1, were recognized as novel compounds. The NMR data showed that positions 6 and 8 of the ring A of flavanols were the major active sites for trapping DASA. We further demonstrated that tea flavanols could effectively inhibit the formation of DASA-induced AGEs via trapping DASA in the bovine lens crystallin-DASA assay. In this assay, 8C-ascorbyl conjugates of flavanols were detected as the major adducts using LC-MS. This study suggests that daily consumption of beverages containing tea flavanols may prevent protein glycation in the lens induced by ascorbic acid and its oxidized products. PMID:25437149

  4. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  5. Genistein mitigates radiation-induced testicular injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Heo, Kyu; Yi, Joo-Mi; Gong, Eun Ji; Yang, Kwangmo; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2012-08-01

    The present study investigated the radioprotective effect of a multifunctional soy isoflavone, genistein, with the testicular system. Genistein was administered (200 mg/kg body weight) to male C3H/HeN mice by subcutaneous injection 24 h prior to pelvic irradiation (5 Gy). Histopathological parameters were evaluated 12 h and 21 days post-irradiation. Genistein protected the germ cells from radiation-induced apoptosis (p < 0.05 vs vehicle-treated irradiated mice at 12 h post-irradiation). Genistein significantly attenuated radiation-induced reduction in testis weight, seminiferous tubular diameter, seminiferous epithelial depth and sperm head count in the testes (p < 0.05 vs vehicle-treated irradiated mice at 21 days post-irradiation). Repopulation and stem cell survival indices of the seminiferous tubules were increased in the genistein-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated irradiation group at 21 days post-irradiation (p < 0.01). The irradiation-mediated decrease in the sperm count and sperm mobility in the epididymis was counteracted by genistein (p < 0.01), but no effect on the frequency of abnormal sperm was evident. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated using DCFDA method and exposure to irradiation elevated ROS levels in the testis and genistein treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of radiation-induced ROS production. The results indicate that genistein protects from testicular dysfunction induced by gamma-irradiation by an antiapoptotic effect and recovery of spermatogenesis. PMID:22162311

  6. Assessing the changes in the biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens induced by cold cataract with air-pulse OCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Singh, M.; Liu, C.-H.; Han, Z.; Li, J.; Raghunathan, R.; Larin, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    A cataract is the increase in opacity of the crystalline lens that can pathologically degrade visual acuity. In this study, we utilized a phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (OCE) system to study the effects of a cold cataract on the biomechanical properties of the porcine crystalline lens in vitro. The cold cataract was induced by placing the whole lens in a low temperature environment until the lens was obviously clouded. Air-pulse OCE measurements were conducted on 6 lenses before and after cold cataract induction. A low amplitude displacement (≤ 10 µm) was induced by a focused air-pulse and the temporal deformation profiles from the surface and within the lenses were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the stiffness of the porcine lens increased after induction of the cold cataract, and it demonstrated the feasibility of OCE to assess the biomechanical changes in the lens due to cataract.

  7. Cathodoluminescence of radiation-induced zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Nishido, H.; Kayama, M.; Noumi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Zircon occurs as a common accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, and maintains much information on thermal history, metamorphic process and natural radiation dose accumulated in the mineral. U-Pb zircon dating (e.g., SHRIMP) is an important tool to interpret a history of the minerals at a micrometer-scale, where cathodoluminescence (CL) image has been used for identification of internal zones and domains having different chemical compositions and/or structures with a high spatial resolution. The CL of zircon is derived from various types of emission centers, which are derived from impurities such as rare earth elements (REE) and structural defects. In fact, the CL features of zircon are closely related to metamorphic process and radiation from contained radionuclides as well as geochemical condition of its formation. Most zircon has yellow emission, which seems to be assigned to UO2 centers or radiation-induced defect during metamictization of the lattice by alpha particles from the decay of U and Th. In this study, the radiation effects on zircon CL have been studied for He+ ion-implanted samples annealed at various temperatures to clarify radiation-induced defect centers involved with the yellow CL emission in zircon. Single crystals of zircon from Malawi (MZ), Takidani granodiorite (TZ) and Kurobegawa granite (KZ) were selected for He+ ion implantation experiments. The polished plates of the samples were implanted by He+ ion 4.0 MeV corresponding to energy of alpha particle from 238 U and 232Th. CL spectra in the range from 300 to 800 nm with 1 nm step were measured by a scanning electron microscopy-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL). CL spectra of untreated and annealed zircon show emission bands at ~370 nm assigned to intrinsic defect centers and at ~480, ~580 and ~760 nm to trivalent Dy impurity centers (Cesbron et al., 1995; Gaft et al, 2005). CL emissions in the yellow-region were observed in untreated zircon. The TZ and KZ indicate

  8. Crystalline silicon growth in the aluminium-induced glass texturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; Law, Felix; Widenborg, Per I.; Aberle, Armin G.

    2012-12-01

    Aluminium-induced texturing (AIT) is a method to texture glass surfaces by utilising the reaction between aluminium (Al) and glass at high temperature (above 500 °C) and a subsequent wet-chemical treatment that removes the reaction products. In this work, we studied the solid state reaction between a sputtered Al layer and a borosilicate glass sheet during AIT annealing. Raman spectroscopy showed that crystalline silicon (c-Si) is formed during the AIT process. An optical microscope was used to visualise the evolution of the c-Si growth. Plan-view scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations performed on samples after completed AIT reaction showed that separate c-Si clusters formed at the glass surface. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the c-Si clusters grew upwards and were on top of the glass surface. Cross-sectional SEM examination showed that the c-Si layer is not uniform and that crater-shaped nodules are embedded into the glass. The widths and depths of the nodules are in the micrometre range. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that the nodules consist mainly of aluminium oxide (Al2O3). X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the c-Si grains are preferentially (111) oriented. The activation energy of the reaction between Al and borosilicate glass is 3.0±0.2 eV based on in-situ XRD analysis of the c-Si growth. Finally, a phenomenological model of the AIT process is proposed and we suggest that the topology of the glass texture strongly depends on the size, depth and lateral separation of the Al2O3 nodules embedded in the glass.

  9. Estrogen Protects against Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Valluri, Shailaja; Lopez, Jennifer; Greer, Falon; DesRosiers, Colleen; Caperell-Grant, Andrea; Mendonca, Marc S.; Bigsby, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Cataractogenesis is a complication of radiotherapy when the eye is included in the treatment field. Low doses of densely ionizing space radiation may also result in an increased risk of cataracts in astronauts. We previously reported that estrogen (17-β-estradiol), when administered to ovariectomized rats commencing 1 week before γ irradiation of the eye and continuously thereafter, results in a significant increase in the rate and incidence of cataract formation and a decreased latent period compared to an ovariectomized control group. We therefore concluded that estrogen accelerates progression of radiation-induced opacification. We now show that estrogen, if administered continuously, but commencing after irradiation, protects against radiation cataractogenesis. Both the rate of progression and incidence of cataracts were greatly reduced in ovariectomized rats that received estrogen treatment after irradiation compared to ovariectomized rats. As in our previous study, estradiol administered 1 week prior to irradiation at the time of ovariectomy and throughout the period of observation produced an enhanced rate of cataract progression. Estrogen administered for only 1 week prior to irradiation had no effect on the rate of progression but resulted in a slight reduction in the incidence. We conclude that estrogen may enhance or protect against radiation cataractogenesis, depending on when it is administered relative to the time of irradiation, and may differentially modulate the initiation and progression phases of cataractogenesis. These data have important implications for astronauts and radiotherapy patients. PMID:19138041

  10. Amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions for nuclear radiation detector applications

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Hong, W.S.; Luke, P.N.; Wang, N.W.; Ziemba, F.P.

    1996-10-01

    Results on characterization of electrical properties of amorphous Si films for the 3 different growth methods (RF sputtering, PECVD [plasma enhanced], LPCVD [low pressure]) are reported. Performance of these a-Si films as heterojunctions on high resistivity p-type and n- type crystalline Si is examined by measuring the noise, leakage current, and the alpha particle response of 5mm dia detector structures. It is demonstrated that heterojunction detectors formed by RF sputtered films and PECVD films are comparable in performance with conventional surface barrier detectors. Results indicate that the a-Si/c-Si heterojunctions have the potential to greatly simplify detector fabrication. Directions for future avenues of nuclear particle detector development are indicated.

  11. Photoluminescence and radiation response properties of Ce3+-doped CsCaCl3 crystalline scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yutaka; Saeki, Keiichiro; Tanaka, Hironori; Yahaba, Takuma; Yanagida, Takayuki; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report on the photoluminescence and scintillation properties of a newly developed CsCaCl3:Ce (0.5 mol%) crystalline scintillator grown by the vertical Bridgman method. The fluorescence quantum efficiency for the Ce3+ characteristic emission bands centered at around 350–400 nm was 76% under excitation at 330 nm light. The photoluminescence decay time of the Ce3+ was approximately 32 ns. When x-ray excited the crystal, intense emission bands were observed at 350–400 nm, and could be attributed to the Ce3+ emission. The scintillation light yield of the developed crystal was ∼7600 ph MeV‑1 compared to a NaI:Tl commercial scintillator, and the principal scintillation decay time was approximately 340 ns plus two fast components of around 1.6 ns and 45 ns.

  12. Radiation induced carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Amendola, M.A.; McClatchey, K.D.

    1985-07-01

    A squamous cell carcinoma presented in a 20 year old female nonsmoker three years after receiving a high dosage of radiation therapy to the base of the skull, face and entire neuroaxis and intense combination chemotherapy for a parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is reported. The larynx received a dose of about 3,500 rads over an eight week period. This dosage in conjunction with the associated intense chemotherapy regimen given to the patient may explain the appearance of a radiation induced tumor in an unusually short latent period. This certainly represents a risk in young patients in whom an aggressive combined approach is taken and the physician should be aware of.

  13. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Nishio, S.; Morioka, T.; Fukui, M.; Kitamura, K.; Hikita, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The case of a patient who developed osteosarcoma in the sphenoid bone 15 years after radiation therapy for a craniopharyngioma is reported. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone has not been reported previously. Reported cases of radiation-induced osteosarcomas are reviewed.

  14. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  15. Residual stress induced crystalline to amorphous phase transformation in Nb2O5 quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Sahil; Dhawan, Tanuj; Vedeshwar, Agnikumar G.

    2014-07-01

    Nb2O5 quantum dots (QDs) were grown using a simple technique of vacuum thermal evaporation. QDs were found to be crystalline in nature by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) in TEM. Samples with thickness up to 20 nm did not show any significant residual strain. Residual stress effect on band gap of crystalline Nb2O5 was studied for films thicker than 20 nm. Residual strain was determined using SAED of the films with reference to powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). Films thicker than 45 nm become amorphous as analyzed by both SAED and XRD. The optical absorption of films in the range 25-60 nm indicates significantly varying optical band gap of films. The varying band gap with film thickness scales linearly very well with the variation of residual stress with film thickness. The residual stress dependence of band gap of crystalline films yields stress free band gap as 3.37 eV with pressure coefficient of band gap (∂Eg/∂P)T = -29.3 meV/GPa. From this study, the crystalline to amorphous transformation in tetragonal form of M-Nb2O5 has been determined to be at about 14 GPa. Both pressure coefficient of band gap and crystalline to amorphous transition for tetragonal M-Nb2O5 have been determined for the first time in the literature.

  16. Radiation induced micrencephaly in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, L.K.; Johnston, D.A.; Felleman, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A brain weight deficit of about 70 mg was induced at doses of approximately 75-mGy and a deficit of 60 mg was induced at 100 mGy. This confirms the effects projected and observed by Wanner and Edwards. Although the data do not demonstrate a clear dose-response relationship between the 75-mGy and 100-mGy groups, the data are statistically consistent with a dose-response effect because of the overlapping confidence intervals. The lack of a statistically significant observation is most likely related to the small difference in doses and the limited numbers of animals examined. There are several factors that can influence the brain weight of guinea pig pups, such as caging and housing conditions, the sex of the animal, and litter size. These should be taken into account for accurate analysis. Dam weight did not appear to have a significant effect. The confirmation of a micrencephalic effect induced x rays at doses of 75-mGy during this late embryonic stage of development is consistent with the findings of small head size induced in those exposed prior to the eight week of conception at Hiroshima. This implies a mechanism for micrencephaly different from those previously suggested and lends credence to a causal relation between radiation and small head size in humans at low doses as reported by Miller and Mulvihill. 16 refs., 13 tabs.

  17. Radiation-induced uterine changes: MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Arrive, L.; Chang, Y.C.; Hricak, H.; Brescia, R.J.; Auffermann, W.; Quivey, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    To assess the capability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to demonstrate postirradiation changes in the uterus, MR studies of 23 patients who had undergone radiation therapy were retrospectively examined and compared with those of 30 patients who had not undergone radiation therapy. MR findings were correlated with posthysterectomy histologic findings. In premenopausal women, radiation therapy induced (a) a decrease in uterine size demonstrable as early as 3 months after therapy ended; (b) a decrease in signal intensity of the myometrium on T2-predominant MR images, reflecting a significant decrease in T2 relaxation time, demonstrable as early as 1 month after therapy; (c) a decrease in thickness and signal intensity of the endometrium demonstrable on T2-predominant images 6 months after therapy; and (d) loss of uterine zonal anatomy as early as 3 months after therapy. In postmenopausal women, irradiation did not significantly alter the MR imaging appearance of the uterus. These postirradiation MR changes in both the premenopausal and postmenopausal uteri appeared similar to the changes ordinarily seen on MR images of the nonirradiated postmenopausal uterus.

  18. Theory Of Radiation-Induced Attenuation In Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tsuen-Hsi; Johnston, Alan R.

    1996-01-01

    Improved theory of radiation-induced attenuation of light in optical fibers accounts for effects of dose rates. Based on kinetic aspects of fundamental physics of color centers induced in optical fibers by radiation. Induced attenuation is proportional to density of color centers, and part of this density decays by thermal-annealing/recombination process after irradiation.

  19. Crystallinity-induced shape evolution of Pt-Ag nanosheets from branched nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Azhar; Saleem, Faisal; Lin, Haifeng; Ni, Bing; Wang, Xun

    2016-08-18

    Crystallinity offers countless opportunities for the controlled synthesis of multimetallic 2D and 3D nanomaterials. Herein we have successfully synthesized 2D Pt-Ag ultrathin nanosheets through the oxidative etching of twin seeds and 3D Pt-Ag-Cu tetrapods via altering the crystallinity through the incorporation of copper into the Pt-Ag alloy. A better electrocatalytic activity is obtained for the oxidation of formic acid which is 3.8 times higher than that of a commercial platinum catalyst as the stepped surface atom densities are higher on the nanosheets. PMID:27494004

  20. Pressure-Induced Concurrent Transformation to an Amorphous and Crystalline Phase in Berlinite-Type FePO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, M.P.; Rozenberg, G.K.; Milner, A.P.; Amanowicz, M.; Zhou, T.; Schwarz, U.; Syassen, K.; Dean Taylor, R.; Hanfland, M.; Brister, K.

    1997-12-01

    X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, and M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopy provide a diverse description of the high pressure behavior of berlinite-type FePO{sub 4} . At a pressure of 2.5(5) GPa, a transformation to a coexisting new crystalline (chp) and amorphous (ahp) phase is observed with about equal abundance. The chp phase is identified as a VCrO{sub 4} type, where Fe{sup III } and P{sup V} ions, respectively, are sixfold and fourfold coordinated. In the 6{endash}25GPa range and after decompression, the relative abundance of the chp and ahp phases remains unchanged. These phenomena of concurrent amorphous and crystalline transformations at low hydrostatic pressure and stable abundance ratio over a large pressure range are unique in pressure-induced structural transformations of SiO{sub 2} analogs. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Shear Flow Induced Transition from Liquid-Crystalline to Polymer Behavior in Side-Chain Liquid Crystal Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noirez, L.; Lapp, A.

    1997-01-01

    We determine the structure and conformation of side-chain liquid-crystalline polymers subjected to shear flow in the vicinity of the smectic phase by neutron scattering on the velocity gradient plane. Below the nematic-smectic transition we observe a typical liquid-crystal behavior; the smectic layers slide, leading to a main-chain elongation parallel to the velocity direction. In contrast, a shear applied above the transition induces a tilted main-chain conformation which is typical for polymer behavior.

  2. Alpha-decay-induced fracturing in zircon - The transition from the crystalline to the metamict state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Murakami, Takashi; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    1987-01-01

    Zonation due to alpha-decay damage in a natural single crystal of zircon from Sri Lanka is discussed. The zones vary in thickness on a scale from one to hundreds of microns. The uranium and thorium concentrations vary from zone to zone such that the alpha decay dose is between 0.2 x 10 to the 16th and 0.8 x 10 to the 16th alpha-events per milligram. The transition from the crystalline to the aperiodic metamict state occurs over this dose range. At doses greater than 0.8 x 10 to the 16th alpha events/mg there is no evidence for long-range order. This type of damage will accumulate in actinide-bearing, ceramic nuclear waste forms. The systematic pattern of fractures would occur in crystalline phases that are zoned with respect to actinide radionuclides.

  3. Electron beam-induced formation of crystalline nanoparticle chains from amorphous cadmium hydroxide nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Stoychev, Georgi V; Okhrimenko, Denis V; Appelhans, Dietmar; Voit, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and especially quantum dot arrays have been attracting tremendous attention due to their potential applications in various high-tech devices, including QD lasers, solar cells, single photon emitters, QD memories, etc. Here, a dendrimer-based approach for the controlled synthesis of ultra-thin amorphous cadmium hydroxide nanofibers was developed. The fragmentation of the obtained nanofibers in crystalline nanoparticle chains under the irradiation with electron beam was observed in both ambient and cryo-conditions. Based on the experimental results, a model for the formation of amorphous nanofibers, as well as their transformation in crystalline nanoparticle chains is proposed. We foresee that these properties of the nanofibers, combined with the possibility to convert cadmium hydroxide into CdX (X=O, S, Se, Te), could result in a new method for the preparation of 2D and 3D QDs-arrays with numerous potential applications in high performance devices. PMID:26397918

  4. Investigations on the liquid crystalline phases of cation-induced condensed DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, C. K. S.; Sundaresan, Neethu; Radhakrishnan Pillai, M.; Thomas, T.; Thomas, T. J.

    2005-10-01

    Viral and nonviral condensing agents are used in gene therapy to compact oligonucleotides and plasmid DNA into nanostructures for their efficient transport through the cell membranes. Whereas viral vectors are best by the toxic effects on the immune system, most of the nonviral delivery vehicles are not effective for use in clinical system. Recent investigations indicate that the supramolecular organization of DNA in the condensed state is liquid crystalline. The present level of understanding of the liquid crystalline phase of DNA is inadequate and a thorough investigation is required to understand the nature, stability, texture and the influence of various environmental conditions on the structure of the phase. The present study is mainly concerned with the physico-chemical investigations on the liquid crystalline transitions during compaction of DNA by cationic species such as polyamines and metallic cations. As a preliminary to the above investigation, studies were conducted on the evolution of mesophase transitions of DNA with various cationic counterion species using polarized light microscopy. These studies indicated significant variations in the phase behaviour of DNA in the presence of Li and other ions. Apart from the neutralization of the charges on the DNA molecule, these ions are found to influence selectively the hydration sphere of DNA that in turn influences the induction and stabilization of the LC phases. The higher stability observed with the liquid crystalline phases of Li--DNA system could be useful in the production of nanostructured DNA. In the case of the polyamine, a structural specificity effect depending on the nature, charge and structure of the polyamine used has been found to be favoured in the crystallization of DNA.

  5. Analog of microwave-induced resistance oscillations induced in GaAs heterostructures by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, T.; Dmitriev, I. A.; Kozlov, D. A.; Schneider, M.; Jentzsch, B.; Kvon, Z. D.; Olbrich, P.; Bel'kov, V. V.; Bayer, A.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Kuczmik, T.; Oltscher, M.; Weiss, D.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the study of terahertz radiation-induced MIRO-like oscillations of magnetoresistivity in GaAs heterostructures. Our experiments provide an answer on two most intriguing questions—effect of radiation helicity and the role of the edges—yielding crucial information for an understanding of the MIRO (microwave-induced resistance oscillations) origin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the range of materials exhibiting radiation-induced magneto-oscillations can be largely extended by using high-frequency radiation.

  6. Towards high efficiency thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells: The roles of light trapping and non-radiative recombinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzola, A.; Kowalczewski, P.; Andreani, L. C.

    2014-03-01

    Thin-film solar cells based on silicon have emerged as an alternative to standard thick wafers technology, but they are less efficient, because of incomplete absorption of sunlight, and non-radiative recombinations. In this paper, we focus on the case of crystalline silicon (c-Si) devices, and we present a full analytic electro-optical model for p-n junction solar cells with Lambertian light trapping. This model is validated against numerical solutions of the drift-diffusion equations. We use this model to investigate the interplay between light trapping, and bulk and surface recombination. Special attention is paid to surface recombination processes, which become more important in thinner devices. These effects are further amplified due to the textures required for light trapping, which lead to increased surface area. We show that c-Si solar cells with thickness of a few microns can overcome 20% efficiency and outperform bulk ones when light trapping is implemented. The optimal device thickness in presence of light trapping, bulk and surface recombination, is quantified to be in the range of 10-80 μm, depending on the bulk quality. These results hold, provided the effective surface recombination is kept below a critical level of the order of 100 cm/s. We discuss the possibility of meeting this requirement, in the context of state-of-the-art techniques for light trapping and surface passivation. We show that our predictions are within the capability of present day silicon technologies.

  7. Towards high efficiency thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells: The roles of light trapping and non-radiative recombinations

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzola, A. Kowalczewski, P.; Andreani, L. C.

    2014-03-07

    Thin-film solar cells based on silicon have emerged as an alternative to standard thick wafers technology, but they are less efficient, because of incomplete absorption of sunlight, and non-radiative recombinations. In this paper, we focus on the case of crystalline silicon (c-Si) devices, and we present a full analytic electro-optical model for p-n junction solar cells with Lambertian light trapping. This model is validated against numerical solutions of the drift-diffusion equations. We use this model to investigate the interplay between light trapping, and bulk and surface recombination. Special attention is paid to surface recombination processes, which become more important in thinner devices. These effects are further amplified due to the textures required for light trapping, which lead to increased surface area. We show that c-Si solar cells with thickness of a few microns can overcome 20% efficiency and outperform bulk ones when light trapping is implemented. The optimal device thickness in presence of light trapping, bulk and surface recombination, is quantified to be in the range of 10–80 μm, depending on the bulk quality. These results hold, provided the effective surface recombination is kept below a critical level of the order of 100 cm/s. We discuss the possibility of meeting this requirement, in the context of state-of-the-art techniques for light trapping and surface passivation. We show that our predictions are within the capability of present day silicon technologies.

  8. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  9. Delocalization of femtosecond laser radiation in crystalline Si in the mid-IR range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavedeev, E. V.; Kononenko, V. V.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The strong delocalization of the energy of femtosecond pulses in silicon appears to be an essential factor for preventing laser damage inside a crystal and seemingly excludes the possibility of direct laser writing in the bulk, at least in the one- and two-photon absorption (1 PA and 2 PA) wavelength regions. Previously, the prefocal depletion of the pulse energy and laser-induced free-carrier plasma defocusing of the light were considered to be the main causes of the unlocalized dissipation of light energy. Here, we consider whether the delocalization could be significantly reduced by using longer wavelengths, at which the role of 1 PA and 2 PA decreases and higher orders of nonlinearity come into play. We numerically simulate propagation of focused femtosecond pulses at a wavelength of 1.2-5.25 μm. Plasma defocusing was found to be the crucial delocalization mechanism that prevents the enhancement of material excitation, even in the five-photon absorption region.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of crystallin, redox, and apoptotic genes by C-Phycocyanin in the selenite-induced cataractogenic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Rasiah Pratheepa; Ramkumar, Srinivasagan; Thankappan, Bency; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy; Balaji, Sadhasivam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to examine the constrictive potential of C-Phycocyanin (C-PC) in regulating changes imposed on gene expression in the selenite-induced cataract model. Methods Wistar rat pups were divided into three groups of eight each. On P10, Group I received an intraperitoneal injection of normal saline. Groups II and III received a subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (19 μmol/kg bodyweight); Group III also received an intraperitoneal injection of C-PC (200 mg/kg bodyweight) on P9–14. Total RNA was isolated on P16, and the relative abundance of mRNA of the crystallin structural genes, redox components, and apoptotic cascade were ascertained with real-time PCR with reference to the internal control β-actin. Results Real-time PCR analysis showed the crystallin genes (αA-, βB1-, γD-) and redox cycle components (Cat, SOD-1, Gpx) were downregulated, the apoptotic components were upregulated, and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 was downregulated in Group II. Treatment with 200 mg/kg bodyweight C-PC (Group III) transcriptionally regulated the instability of the expression of these genes, thus ensuring C-PC is a prospective anticataractogenic agent that probably delays the onset and progression of cataractogenesis induced by sodium selenite. Conclusions C-PC treatment possibly prevented cataractogenesis triggered by sodium selenite, by regulating the lens crystallin, redox genes, and apoptotic cascade mRNA expression and thus maintains lens transparency. C-PC may be developed as a potential antioxidant compound applied in the future to prevent and treat age-related cataract. PMID:25593511

  11. Treatment of radiation-induced cystitis with hyperbaric oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Boland, F.P.; Mori, H.; Gallagher, M.; Brereton, H.; Preate, D.L.; Neville, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of hyperbaric oxygen on radiation cystitis have been documented in 3 patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. Cessation of gross hematuria and reversal of cystoscopic bladder changes were seen in response to a series of hyperbaric oxygen treatments of 2 atmosphere absolute pressure for 2 hours. To our knowledge this is the first report of cystoscopically documented healing of radiation-induced bladder injury.

  12. Acceptor-donor-acceptor-based small molecules with varied crystallinity: processing additive-induced nanofibril in blend film for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Chen, Yujin; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Huifang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yaowen; Yang, Xiaoming; Ma, Changqi; Chen, Liwei; Zhu, Xiulin; Tu, Yingfeng

    2013-09-01

    A series of acceptor-donor-acceptor-based small molecules (SMs) with varied crystallinity were successfully synthesized. The processing additive can induce the SMs to self-organize as nanofibrils with higher crystallinity and controlled scales of nanofibrils, which have significant influence on the photovoltaic performance.A series of acceptor-donor-acceptor-based small molecules (SMs) with varied crystallinity were successfully synthesized. The processing additive can induce the SMs to self-organize as nanofibrils with higher crystallinity and controlled scales of nanofibrils, which have significant influence on the photovoltaic performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic process and characterizations of SMs; TGA, electrochemical properties, molecular orbital surfaces of SMs; AFM images of SM:PC71BM blend films; EQE curves; optical, electrochemical properties and photovoltaic parameters. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03048b

  13. Direct observation of binding stress-induced crystalline orientation change in piezoelectric plate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined the mechanism of the detection resonance frequency shift, Δf/f, of a 1370 μm long and 537 μm wide [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.65[PbTiO3]0.35 (PMN-PT) piezoelectric plate sensor (PEPS) made of a 8-μm thick PMN-PT freestanding film. The Δf/f of the PEPS was monitored in a three-step binding model detections of (1) binding of maleimide-activated biotin to the sulfhydryl on the PEPS surface followed by (2) binding of streptavidin to the bound biotin and (3) subsequent binding of biotinylated probe deoxyribonucleic acid to the bound streptavidin. We used a PMN-PT surrogate made of the same 8-μm thick PMN-PT freestanding film that the PEPS was made of but was about 1 cm in length and width to carry out crystalline orientation study using X-ray diffraction (XRD) scan around the (002)/(200) peaks after each of the binding steps. The result of the XRD studies indicated that each binding step caused the crystalline orientation of the PMN-PT thin layer to switch from the vertical (002) orientation to the horizontal (200) orientation, and most of the PEPS detection Δf/f was due to the change in the lateral Young's modulus of the PMN-PT thin layer as a result of the crystalline orientation change.

  14. Nanoparticle-induced widening of the temperature range of liquid-crystalline blue phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatairi, Eva; Rožič, Brigita; Kutnjak, Zdravko; Tzitzios, Vassilios; Nounesis, George; Cordoyiannis, George; Thoen, Jan; Glorieux, Christ; Kralj, Samo

    2010-04-01

    Liquid-crystalline blue phases exhibit exceptional properties for applications in the display and sensor industry. However, in single component systems, they are stable only for very narrow temperature range between the isotropic and the chiral nematic phase, a feature that severely hinders their applicability. Systematic high-resolution calorimetric studies reveal that blue phase III is effectively stabilized in a wide temperature range by mixing surface-functionalized nanoparticles with chiral liquid crystals. This effect is present for two liquid crystals, yielding a robust method to stabilize blue phases, especially blue phase III. Theoretical arguments show that the aggregation of nanoparticles at disclination lines is responsible for the observed effects.

  15. Radiation-induced nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mohsen; Namimoghadam, Amir; Korouni, Roghaye; Fashiri, Paria; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Elahimanesh, Farideh; Amiri, Fatemeh; Moradi, Ghobad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the improvements in cancer screening and treatment, it still remains as one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Nausea and vomiting as the side effects of different cancer treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, are multifactorial and could affect the treatment continuation and patient quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the possible linkage between ABO blood groups and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV), also its incidence and affecting factors. One hundred twenty-eight patients referring to Tohid hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, were selected and the patients and treatment-related factors were determined in a cross-sectional study. Patients’ nausea and vomiting were recorded from the onset of treatment until 1 week after treatment accomplishment. Also, previous possible nausea and vomiting were recorded. The frequencies of nausea and vomiting and their peak time were examined during the treatment period. The association between ABO blood group and the incidence of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) were significant and it seems that A blood group patients are the most vulnerable individuals to these symptoms. The association between Rhesus antigen and the time of maximum severity of RINV may indicate that Rhesus antigen affects the time of maximum severity of RINV. The incidence of RINV was not affected by karnofsky performance status, but it was related to the severity of RINV. Furthermore, among the factors affecting the incidence of nausea and vomiting, nausea and vomiting during patient's previous chemotherapy, radiotherapy region, and background gastrointestinal disease were shown to be three important factors. In addition to familiar RINV-affecting factors, ABO blood group may play an important role and these results address the needs for further studies with larger sample size. PMID:27495037

  16. Radiation-induced degradation of DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douki, T.; Delatour, T.; Martini, R.; Cadet, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radio-induced degradation of DNA involves radical processes. A series of lesions among the major bases degradation products has been measured in isolated DNA exposed to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. Degradation can be accounted for by the formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water (indirect effect). The four bases are degraded in high yield. Direct effect has been mimicked by photo-induced electron abstraction from the bases producing their radical cation. Quantification of the modified bases showed that guanine is the preferential target. This can be explained by its lower oxidation potential and charge transfer phenomena. La décomposition radio-induite de l'ADN fait intervenir des processus radicalaires. Une série de lésions choisies parmi les produits majeurs de dégradation des bases a été mesurée dans de l'ADN isolé exposé au rayonnement en solution aqueuse aérée. Les modifications sont alors dues aux radicaux hydroxyles produits par la radiolyse de l'eau (effet indirect) et les quatre bases sont efficacement dégradées. L'arrachement d'électrons aux bases par photosensibilisation pour produire leur radical cation, a été utilisé comme modèle de l'effet direct. La quantification des bases modifiées montre que la guanine est préférentiellement dégradée. Cette observation peut s'expliquer par le plus faible potentiel d'oxydation de cette base ainsi que par les phénomènes de transfert de charge vers les guanines.

  17. Pravastatin limits radiation-induced vascular dysfunction in the skin.

    PubMed

    Holler, Valerie; Buard, Valerie; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Guipaud, Olivier; Baudelin, Cedric; Sache, Amandine; Perez, Maria del R; Squiban, Claire; Tamarat, Radia; Milliat, Fabien; Benderitter, Marc

    2009-05-01

    About half of people with cancer are treated with radiation therapy; however, normal tissue toxicity still remains a dose-limiting factor for this treatment. The skin response to ionizing radiation may involve multiple inflammatory outbreaks. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced vascular injury. Furthermore, endothelial dysfunction reflects a decreased availability of nitric oxide. Statins have been reported to preserve endothelial function through their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, wild type and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)(-/-) mice were subjected to dorsal skin irradiation and treated with pravastatin for 28 days. We demonstrated that pravastatin has a therapeutic effect on skin lesions and abolishes radiation-induced vascular functional activation by decreasing interactions between leukocytes and endothelium. Pravastatin limits the radiation-induced increase of blood CCL2 and CXCL1 production expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules such as E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and inflammatory cell migration in tissues. Pravastatin limits the in vivo and in vitro radiation-induced downregulation of eNOS. Moreover, pravastatin has no effect in eNOS(-/-) mice, demonstrating that eNOS plays a key role in the beneficial effect of pravastatin in radiation-induced skin lesions. In conclusion, pravastatin may be a good therapeutic approach to prevent or reduce radiation-induced skin damage. PMID:19212344

  18. Radiation-induced undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma after radiation therapy for a desmoid tumour.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, J; Kaci, R; Orcel, P; Nizard, R; Laredo, J-D

    2016-02-01

    Radiation-induced sarcoma is a long-term complication of radiation therapy. The most common secondary neoplasia is the undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, which is usually described in the deep soft tissue of the trunk or extremities. Radiation-induced sarcomas have a poor prognosis. An early diagnosis and management are needed to improve the survival rate of such patients. We presently report a case of a radiation-induced undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma of the left gluteus maximus muscle, which developed 25 years after an initial diagnosis of aggressive fibromatosis and 21 years after a tumour recurrence. This case study illustrates the risk of developing a sarcoma in a radiation field and the need for long-term follow-up after radiation therapy. Unnecessary radiation therapy, in particular in the case of benign conditions in young patients, should be avoided. PMID:26725422

  19. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  20. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  1. Radiation exposure induces inflammasome pathway activation in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Stoecklein, Veit M; Osuka, Akinori; Ishikawa, Shizu; Lederer, Madeline R; Wanke-Jellinek, Lorenz; Lederer, James A

    2015-02-01

    Radiation exposure induces cell and tissue damage, causing local and systemic inflammatory responses. Because the inflammasome pathway is triggered by cell death and danger-associated molecular patterns, we hypothesized that the inflammasome may signal acute and chronic immune responses to radiation. Using a mouse radiation model, we show that radiation induces a dose-dependent increase in inflammasome activation in macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells, and B cells as judged by cleaved caspase-1 detection in cells. Time course analysis showed the appearance of cleaved caspase-1 in cells by day 1 and sustained expression until day 7 after radiation. Also, cells showing inflammasome activation coexpressed the cell surface apoptosis marker annexin V. The role of caspase-1 as a trigger for hematopoietic cell losses after radiation was studied in caspase-1(-/-) mice. We found less radiation-induced cell apoptosis and immune cell loss in caspase-1(-/-) mice than in control mice. Next, we tested whether uric acid might mediate inflammasome activation in cells by treating mice with allopurinol and discovered that allopurinol treatment completely blocked caspase-1 activation in cells. Finally, we demonstrate that radiation-induced caspase-1 activation occurs by a Nod-like receptor family protein 3-independent mechanism because radiation-exposed Nlrp3(-/-) mice showed caspase-1 activation profiles that were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that inflammasome activation occurs in many immune cell types following radiation exposure and that allopurinol prevented radiation-induced inflammasome activation. These results suggest that targeting the inflammasome may help control radiation-induced inflammation. PMID:25539818

  2. Flow Induced Structures in Liquid Crystalline Polymers as Studied by Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadmun, Mark

    2000-03-01

    Small angle neutron scattering has been utilized to examine the orientation of liquid crystalline polymer systems during and after the application of a flow field. Thermotropic systems show unique behavior including perpendicular orientation to the flow direction at low temperature and a temperature dependence of the molecular orientation within in the nematic regime. It is also found that the orientation is long-lived after the removal of the shear field in the thermotropic system. In lyotropic systems, however, an interesting dependence on solvent is found. The alignment behavior of poly(benzyl L-glutamate) (PBLG) in deuterated benzyl alcohol (DBA) differs significantly from the alignment of PBLG in deuterated m-cresol (DMC) during shear and upon shear cessation. This is unexpected, as DMC is an isomer of DBA. Possible explanations for this behavior will be discussed.

  3. Radiation induced damage and recovery in poly(3-hexyl thiophene) based polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Yang, Yang; Devine, R A B; Mayberry, Clay

    2008-10-22

    Polymer solar cells have been characterized during and after x-ray irradiation. The open circuit voltage, dark current and power conversion efficiency show degradation consistent with the generation of defect states in the polymer semiconductor. The polymer solar cell device remained functional with exposure to a considerable dose (500 krad (SiO(2))) and showed clear signs of recovery upon removal of the irradiation source (degraded from 4.1% to 2.2% and recovered to 2.9%). Mobility-relaxation time variation, derived from J-V measurement, clearly demonstrates that radiation induced defect generation mechanisms in the organic semiconductor are active and need to be further studied. Optical transmission results ruled out the possibility of reduced light absorption and/or polymer crystallinity. The results suggest that organic solar cells are sufficiently radiation tolerant to be useful for space applications. PMID:21832674

  4. Temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide and the structural transition from organogel to crystalline nanowires.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renliang; Wang, Yuefei; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide (FF) into various nanoarchitectures has received great amounts of attention in recent years. Here, we report the temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide to microtubes, nanowires, or organogel in different solvents. We also find that the organogel in isopropanol transforms into crystalline flakes or nanowires when the temperature increases. The reversible self-assembly in polar solvents may be mainly controlled by electronic and aromatic interactions between the FF molecules themselves, which is associated with the dissociation equilibrium and significantly influenced by temperature. We found that the organogel in the isopropanol solvent made a unique transition to crystalline structures, a process that is driven by temperature and may be kinetically controlled. During the heating-cooling process, FF preferentially self-assembles to metastable nanofibers and organogel. They further transform to thermodynamically stable crystal structures via molecular rearrangement after introducing an external energy, such as the increasing temperature used in this study. The strategy demonstrated in this study provides an efficient way to controllably fabricate smart, temperature-responsive peptide nanomaterials and enriches the understanding of the growth mechanism of diphenylalanine peptide nanostructures. PMID:25520600

  5. Temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide and the structural transition from organogel to crystalline nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide (FF) into various nanoarchitectures has received great amounts of attention in recent years. Here, we report the temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide to microtubes, nanowires, or organogel in different solvents. We also find that the organogel in isopropanol transforms into crystalline flakes or nanowires when the temperature increases. The reversible self-assembly in polar solvents may be mainly controlled by electronic and aromatic interactions between the FF molecules themselves, which is associated with the dissociation equilibrium and significantly influenced by temperature. We found that the organogel in the isopropanol solvent made a unique transition to crystalline structures, a process that is driven by temperature and may be kinetically controlled. During the heating-cooling process, FF preferentially self-assembles to metastable nanofibers and organogel. They further transform to thermodynamically stable crystal structures via molecular rearrangement after introducing an external energy, such as the increasing temperature used in this study. The strategy demonstrated in this study provides an efficient way to controllably fabricate smart, temperature-responsive peptide nanomaterials and enriches the understanding of the growth mechanism of diphenylalanine peptide nanostructures. PMID:25520600

  6. Induced liquid-crystalline ordering in solutions of stiff and flexible amphiphilic macromolecules: Effect of mixture composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagolev, Mikhail K.; Vasilevskaya, Valentina V.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2016-07-01

    Impact of mixture composition on self-organization in concentrated solutions of stiff helical and flexible macromolecules was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulation. The macromolecules were composed of identical amphiphilic monomer units but a fraction f of macromolecules had stiff helical backbones and the remaining chains were flexible. In poor solvents the compacted flexible macromolecules coexist with bundles or filament clusters from few intertwined stiff helical macromolecules. The increase of relative content f of helical macromolecules leads to increase of the length of helical clusters, to alignment of clusters with each other, and then to liquid-crystalline-like ordering along a single direction. The formation of filament clusters causes segregation of helical and flexible macromolecules and the alignment of the filaments induces effective liquid-like ordering of flexible macromolecules. A visual analysis and calculation of order parameter relaying the anisotropy of diffraction allow concluding that transition from disordered to liquid-crystalline state proceeds sharply at relatively low content of stiff components.

  7. Formation of titanium monoxide (001) single-crystalline thin film induced by ion bombardment of titanium dioxide (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabón, B. M.; Beltrán, J. I.; Sánchez-Santolino, G.; Palacio, I.; López-Sánchez, J.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Rojo, J. M.; Ferrer, P.; Mascaraque, A.; Muñoz, M. C.; Varela, M.; Castro, G. R.; de La Fuente, O. Rodríguez

    2015-02-01

    A plethora of technological applications justify why titanium dioxide is probably the most studied oxide, and an optimal exploitation of its properties quite frequently requires a controlled modification of the surface. Low-energy ion bombardment is one of the most extended techniques for this purpose and has been recently used in titanium oxides, among other applications, to favour resistive switching mechanisms or to form transparent conductive layers. Surfaces modified in this way are frequently described as reduced and defective, with a high density of oxygen vacancies. Here we show, at variance with this view, that high ion doses on rutile titanium dioxide (110) induce its transformation into a nanometric and single-crystalline titanium monoxide (001) thin film with rocksalt structure. The discovery of this ability may pave the way to new technical applications of ion bombardment not previously reported, which can be used to fabricate heterostructures and interfaces.

  8. Identifying radiation induced point defect in SiC nanowires: computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uu, Ming

    SiC nanowires (NWs) are expected to possess higher radiation tolerance compared to their crystalline counterpart due to their efficiency in eliminating point defects generated by the radiations. In this study, we will develop a computational modeling scheme to identify the radiation induced point defects in SiC NWs. A preliminary study on the hexagonal 2H-SiC NWs has demonstrated that the point defects on the surface of the SiC NWs only create local distortions and will not cause the destruction of the entire structure of the SiC NWs. It is also found that the local strain created by the antisite, the C-vacancy, and the Si-interstitial defects induces a few impurity states inside the energy gap, while defects such as the Si-vacancy and C-interstitial defects tend to produce a small tail at the top of the valence band. These observations suggest that the electronic properties of the SiC NWs will not be affected to any great extent by these types of points defects on the surface of the SiC NWs, and therefore the SiC NWs are expected to be tolerant or resistant responding to these types of radiation effect.

  9. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

  10. Mechanisms involved in the protection of UV-induced protein inactivation by the corneal crystallin ALDH3A1.

    PubMed

    Estey, Tia; Cantore, Miriam; Weston, Philip A; Carpenter, John F; Petrash, J Mark; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2007-02-16

    Various lines of evidence have shown that ALDH3A1 (aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1) plays a critical and multifaceted role in protecting the cornea from UV-induced oxidative stress. ALDH3A1 is a corneal crystallin, which is defined as a protein recruited into the cornea for structural purposes without losing its primary function (i.e. metabolism). Although the primary role of ALDH3A1 in the metabolism of toxic aldehydes has been clearly demonstrated, including the detoxification of aldehydes produced during UV-induced lipid peroxidation, the structural role of ALDH3A1 in the cornea remains elusive. We therefore examined the potential contribution of ALDH3A1 in maintaining the optical integrity of the cornea by suppressing the aggregation and/or inactivation of other proteins through chaperone-like activity and other protective mechanisms. We found that ALDH3A1 underwent a structural transition near physiological temperatures to form a partially unfolded conformation that is suggestive of chaperone activity. Although this structural transition alone did not correlate with any protection, ALDH3A1 substantially reduced the inactivation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and malondialdehyde when co-incubated with NADP(+), reinforcing the importance of the metabolic function of this corneal enzyme in the detoxification of toxic aldehydes. A large excess of ALDH3A1 also protected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from inactivation because of direct exposure to UVB light, which suggests that ALDH3A1 may shield other proteins from damaging UV rays. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ALDH3A1 can reduce protein inactivation and/or aggregation not only by detoxification of reactive aldehydes but also by directly absorbing UV energy. This study provides for the first time mechanistic evidence supporting the structural role of the corneal crystallin ALDH3A1 as a UV-absorbing constituent of the cornea. PMID:17158879

  11. Radiation-induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Riewe, L.C.; Witczak, Schrimpf, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    Capacitance-voltage and thermally stimulated current methods are used to investigate radiation induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides. Results are compared with models of oxide and interface trap charge buildup at low electric fields.

  12. Radiation-induced impairment of neuronal excitability

    SciTech Connect

    Pellmar, T.C.; Tolliver, J.M.; Neel, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation causes a decrease in the synaptically evoked activity of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells. This effect is dose and dose-rate dependent. Hydrogen peroxide, which produces hydroxyl free radicals when combined with FE + 2, produces similar damage. In contrast, the radioprotectant, dithiothreitol, increases the excitability of hippocampal neurons. These studies indicate that radiation can directly affect the function of central neurons.

  13. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  14. Impurity induced crystallinity and optical emissions in ZnO nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, N. R.; Acharya, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the growth of ZnO nanocrystallites doped with impurities such as B, N and S by green chemistry route using ultrasound. The effect of intrinsic defects and impurity doping on the structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures has been studied and discussed. Characterization studies carried out using x-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the change in lattice parameters and crystallinity of ZnO in the presence of dopant. This has been explained on the basis of the dopant substitution at regular anion and interstitial sites. Study on surface morphology by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) shows a change from particle-like structure to aligned nanorods nucleated at definite sites. Elemental analysis such as x-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) has been carried out to ascertain the dopant configuration in ZnO. This has been corroborated by the results obtained from FTIR and Raman studies. UV-vis light absorption and PL studies show an expansion of the band gap which has been explained on the basis of Moss-Burstein shift in the electronic band gap of ZnO by impurity incorporation. The optical emissions corresponding to excitonic transition and defect centres present in the band gap of ZnO is found to shift towards lower/higher wavelength sides. New PL bands observed have been assigned to the transitions related to the impurity states present in the band gap of ZnO along with intrinsic defects.

  15. Coherent microwave radiation from a laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.

    2012-12-24

    We propose a method for generation of coherent monochromatic microwave/terahertz radiation from a laser-induced plasma. It is shown that small-scale plasma, located in the interaction region of two co-propagating plane-polarized laser beams, can be a source of the dipole radiation at a frequency equal to the difference between the frequencies of the lasers. This radiation is coherent and appears as a result of the so-called optical mixing in plasma.

  16. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:25062865

  17. Parathyroid hormone attenuates radiation-induced increases in collagen crosslink ratio at periosteal surfaces of mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Oest, Megan E; Gong, Bo; Esmonde-White, Karen; Mann, Kenneth A; Zimmerman, Nicholas D; Damron, Timothy A; Morris, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    As part of our ongoing efforts to understand underlying mechanisms contributing to radiation-associated bone fragility and to identify possible treatments, we evaluated the longitudinal effects of parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment on bone quality in a murine model of limited field irradiation. We hypothesized PTH would mitigate radiation-induced changes in the chemical composition and structure of bone, as measured by microscope-based Raman spectroscopy. We further hypothesized that collagen crosslinking would be especially responsive to PTH treatment. Raman spectroscopy was performed on retrieved tibiae (6-7/group/time point) to quantify metrics associated with bone quality, including: mineral-to-matrix ratio, carbonate-to-phosphate ratio, mineral crystallinity, collagen crosslink (trivalent:divalent) ratio, and the mineral and matrix depolarization ratios. Irradiation disrupted the molecular structure and orientation of bone collagen, as evidenced by a higher collagen crosslink ratio and lower matrix depolarization ratio (vs. non-irradiated control bones), persisting until 12weeks post-irradiation. Radiation transiently affected the mineral phase, as evidenced by increased mineral crystallinity and mineral-to-matrix ratio at 4weeks compared to controls. Radiation decreased bone mineral depolarization ratios through 12weeks, indicating increased mineral alignment. PTH treatment partially attenuated radiation-induced increases in collagen crosslink ratio, but did not restore collagen or mineral alignment. These post-radiation matrix changes are consistent with our previous studies of radiation damage to bone, and suggest that the initial radiation damage to bone matrix has extensive effects on the quality of tissue deposited thereafter. In addition to maintaining bone quality, preventing initial radiation damage to the bone matrix (i.e. crosslink ratio, matrix orientation) may be critical to preventing late-onset fragility fractures. PMID:26960578

  18. The influence of crystallinity degree on the glycine decomposition induced by 1 MeV proton bombardment in space analog conditions.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Sergio; Mendes, Luiz A V; Bordalo, Vinicius; Guaman, Christian F M; Ponciano, Cássia R; da Silveira, Enio F

    2013-01-01

    Glycine is the simplest proteinaceous amino acid and is present in all life-forms on Earth. In aqueous solutions, it appears mainly as zwitterion glycine (+NH3CH2COO-); however, in solid phase, it may be found in amorphous or crystalline (α, β, and γ) forms. The crystalline forms differ from each other by the packing of zwitterions in the unitary cells and by the number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. This molecular species has been extensively detected in carbonaceous meteorites and was recently observed in the cometary samples returned to Earth by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. In space, glycine is exposed to several radiation fields at different temperatures. We present an experimental study on the destruction of zwitterionic glycine crystals at room temperature by 1 MeV protons, in which the dependence of the destruction rates of the α-glycine and β-glycine crystals on bombardment fluence is investigated. The samples were analyzed in situ by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry at different proton fluences. The experiments occurred under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at the Van de Graaff accelerator lab at the Pontifical Catholic University at Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Brazil. For low fluences, the dissociation cross section of α-glycine was observed to be 2.5×10(-14) cm2, a value roughly 5 times higher than the dissociation cross section found for β-glycine. The estimated half-lives of α-glycine and β-glycine zwitterionic forms extrapolated to the Earth orbit environment are 9×10(5) and 4×10(6) years, respectively. In the diffuse interstellar medium the estimated values are 1 order of magnitude lower. These results suggest that pristine interstellar β-glycine is the one most likely to survive the hostile environments of space radiation. A small feature around 1650-1700 cm(-1), tentatively attributed to an amide functional group, was observed in the IR spectra of irradiated samples, suggesting that cosmic rays may induce peptide bond synthesis in

  19. Acid-induced dissociation of alpha A- and alpha B-crystallin homopolymers.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A; Augusteyn, R C

    1993-01-01

    Homopolymers were constructed from the alpha A and alpha B polypeptides isolated from the lens protein alpha-crystallin. As the pH is lowered from 7.0 to 3.4, these homopolymers dissociate to smaller species with molecular masses ranging from 80 to 250 kDa for the alpha A and around 140 kDa for the alpha B dissociation products. The pKa for this dissociation was 3.8 +/- 0.2 for alpha A and 4.1 +/- 0.1 for alpha B homopolymers. Further decreases in pH, to 2.5, resulted in the presence of only denatured alpha B polypeptides, whereas the alpha A dissociation products remained intact. Fractionation of the acid dissociation products from the alpha A homopolymer at pH 2.5 yielded stable species with molecular masses of 220 +/- 30, 160 +/- 20, and 90 +/- 10 kDa. The majority of the population at acid pH consisted of the 160 kDa species. Conformational analysis of these species revealed that most of the secondary structure of the original alpha A homopolymer was retained but that the tertiary structure was perturbed. Fluorescence quenching and energy transfer measurements suggested that the molecule had undergone acid expansion, with the greatest perturbation observed in the smallest particles. The results from this work suggest that alpha A homopolymers are heterogeneous populations of aggregates of a "monomeric" molecule with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. This "monomeric" molecule may be formed from the association of two tetrameric units. PMID:8274652

  20. Formation and annihilation of intrinsic defects induced by electronic excitation in high-purity crystalline SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-04-14

    Formation and thermal annihilation of intrinsic defects in {alpha}-quartz were examined using high-purity samples, while minimizing the contributions of reactions involving metallic impurities. Electronic excitation with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays was employed to avoid radiation-induced amorphization. The results clearly show that formation of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) as a result of decomposition of regular Si-O-Si bonds (Frenkel process) is the dominant intrinsic defect process. Compared with amorphous SiO{sub 2}, in {alpha}-quartz, the formation yield of Si-Si bonds is an order of magnitude smaller, the 7.6 eV optical absorption band is less broadened, and their thermal annihilation is complete at a lower temperature, around the {alpha}-{beta} quartz transition. In contrast, radiation-induced interstitial oxygen atoms practically do not form interstitial oxygen molecules.

  1. Characterization of radiation-induced Apoptosis in rodent cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Min; Chen, Changhu; Ling, C.C.

    1997-03-01

    For REC:myc(ch1), Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we determined the events in the development of radiation-induced apoptosis to be in the following order: cell division followed by chromatin condensation, membrane blebbing, loss of adhesion and the uptake of vital dye. Experimental data which were obtained using {sup 4}He ions of well defined energies and which compared the dependence of apoptosis and clonogenic survival on {sup 4}He range strongly suggested that in our cells both apoptosis and loss of clonogenic survival resulted from radiation damage to the cell nucleus. Corroboratory evidence was that BrdU incorporation sensitized these cells to radiation-induced apoptosis. Comparing the dose response for apoptosis and the clonogenic survival curves for Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we concluded that radiation-induced cell inactivation as assayed by clonogenic survival, and that a modified linear-quadratic model, proposed previously, modeled such a contribution effectively. In the same context, the selective increase in radiation-induced apoptosis. Comparing the dose response for apoptosis and the clonogenic survival curves for Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we concluded that radiation-induced apoptosis contributed to the overall radiation-induced cell inactivation as assayed by clonogenic survival, and that a modified linear-quadratic model, proposed previously, modeled such a contribution effectively. In the same context, the selective increase in radiation-induced apoptosis during late S and G{sub 2} phases reduced the relative radioresistance observed for clonogenic survival during late S and G{sub 2} phases. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance

    PubMed Central

    Kabarriti, Rafi

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  3. Hyperbaric oxygen: Primary treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Neville, E.C.

    1989-07-01

    Of 8 patients with symptoms of advanced cystitis due to pelvic radiation treated with hyperbaric oxygen 7 are persistently improved during followup. All 6 patients treated for gross hematuria requiring hospitalization have been free of symptoms for an average of 24 months (range 6 to 43 months). One patient treated for stress incontinence currently is dry despite little change in bladder capacity, implying salutary effect from hyperbaric oxygen on the sphincter mechanism. One patient with radiation-induced prostatitis failed to respond. This experience suggests that hyperbaric oxygen should be considered the primary treatment for patients with symptomatic radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  4. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance.

    PubMed

    Kabarriti, Rafi; Guha, Chandan

    2014-07-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  5. Microscopic Effects of Shock Metamorphism in Crystalline Rocks Correlated With Shock Induced Changes in Density, Haughton Impact Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, A. C.; Osinski, G.; Moser, D.

    2009-05-01

    Asteroid and comet impacts are an important geological process on all solid planetary bodies, including Earth, and involve pressures and temperatures that may reach several hundred GPa and several thousand K [1] over very limited spatial and temporal scales. This results in shock metamorphism and alters the target material on both megascopic and microscopic scales [2]. Many shock metamorphic features are unique to hypervelocity impact environments and are, therefore, diagnostic of such an event [1,2]. Of particular interest for this study is the effect of hypervelocity impact on the density of the target material. In the case of crystalline target rocks, shock metamorphism results in an increase of pore space and impact induced fractures which act to decrease the density. The Haughton impact structure is a well-preserved late Eocene (39 ± 2 Ma) complex impact structure, situated near the western end of Devon Island (75°22'N, 89°41'W) [3]. The geology of the area consists of a sedimentary sequence unconformably overlying crystalline Precambrian gneisses of the Canadian Shield. Since the impact, Devon Island has remained tectonically stable and Haughton remains well-preserved despite being subjected to several glaciations. The excellent preservation of the structure is largely due to the primarily cold and relatively dry environment that has existed in the Arctic since the Eocene [3]. Samples of crystalline material were collected from 36 sites within the impact breccia unit of the Haughton impact structure. These samples display a wide range of density and physical appearance. The type of shock effect(s) created depends upon the pressures and temperatures involved as well as the composition, density and material's location in the target. The samples found in the Haughton impact structure show a wide range of shock effects and thus were exposed to a variety of different conditions likely due to their in-situ positions relative to the impact. Polished thin sections

  6. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  7. Disruption of crystalline structure of Sn3.5Ag induced by electric current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Han-Chie; Lin, Kwang-Lung; Wu, Albert T.

    2016-03-01

    This study presented the disruption of the Sn and Ag3Sn lattice structures of Sn3.5Ag solder induced by electric current at 5-7 × 103 A/cm2 with a high resolution transmission electron microscope investigation and electron diffraction analysis. The electric current stressing induced a high degree of strain on the alloy, as estimated from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak shift of the current stressed specimen. The XRD peak intensity of the Sn matrix and the Ag3Sn intermetallic compound diminished to nearly undetectable after 2 h of current stressing. The electric current stressing gave rise to a high dislocation density of up to 1017/m2. The grain morphology of the Sn matrix became invisible after prolonged current stressing as a result of the coalescence of dislocations.

  8. Correlation between stimulated scattering processes and laser-induced damage in crystalline quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.; Haw, M. F.; Hsu, H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a systematic series of experiments to uncover possible correlation between laser-induced stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phonons and damage in quartz are presented. Such correlation is confirmed and the various thresholds are established. The anomalous transmission factor under phonon generation is found to decay exponentially as predicted with increasing incident laser power. The LF SBS phonon is also demonstrated to be a sensitive probe for precatastrophic damage.

  9. Plasma-assisted synthesis and pressure-induced structural transition of single-crystalline SnSe nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Hongyang; Wu, Xiaoxin; Cui, Hang; Li, Dongmei; Jiang, Junru; Gao, Chunxiao; Wang, Qiushi; Cui, Qiliang

    2015-06-28

    Two-dimensional tin selenide (SnSe) nanosheets were synthesized using a plasma-assisted direct current arc discharge method. The structural characterization indicates that the nanosheets are single-crystalline with an average thickness of ~25 nm and a lateral dimension of 500 nm. The high pressure behaviors of the as-synthesized SnSe nanosheets were investigated by in situ high-pressure synchrotron angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering up to ~30 GPa in diamond anvil cells at room temperature. A second-order isostructural continuous phase transition (Pnma → Cmcm) was observed at ~7 GPa, which is considerably lower than the transition pressure of bulk SnSe. The reduction of transition pressure is induced by the volumetric expansion with softening of the Poisson ratio and shear modulus. Moreover, the measured zero-pressure bulk modulus of the SnSe nanosheets coincides with bulk SnSe. This abnormal phenomenon is attributed to the unique intrinsic geometry in the nanosheets. The high-pressure bulk modulus is considerably higher than the theoretical value. The pressure-induced morphology change should be responsible for the improved bulk modulus. PMID:26269801

  10. Consideration on Na diffusion and recovery phenomena in potential-induced degradation for crystalline Si photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Atsushi; Hara, Yukiko; Jonai, Sachiko

    2016-02-01

    Potential-induced degradation (PID), which brings about a large rapid decrease in output power has been observed in megawatt-scale photovoltaic power plants. Na diffusion from a cover glass to a cell through an encapsulant is possibly the direct origin of PID for p-type crystalline Si photovoltaic modules. On the other hand, PID is suppressed when using an ionomer encapsulant instead of a conventional ethylene vinyl acetate encapsulant. Some researchers consider that the reason is the suppression of Na diffusion when using an ionomer encapsulant. However, there has been no direct observation of Na diffusion behavior to the best of our knowledge for the modules prepared using an ionomer encapsulant. In this study it was found for the first time that Na diffuses in p-type multicrystalline Si photovoltaic modules prepared using an ionomer encapsulant without PID, suggesting that Na diffusion is not a sufficient condition for PID to occur. Another feature of PID is the recovery phenomenon induced by applying reverse voltage after PID occurs. In this study it was also found that reverse voltage application in the initial stage is effective for suppressing PID.

  11. Temporal and spatial changes in VEGF, αA- and αB-crystallin expression in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Su, Chang; Wang, Jian-Tao; Du, Bei; Dong, Li-Jie; Liu, Ai-Hua; Li, Xiao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Retinal neovascularization is an iconic change in retinopathies. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and α-crystallins have been identified to mediate the pathogenesis of retinopathy. However, the special and temporal changes in their expression associated with retinal neovascularization have not yet been determined. Therefore, we examined the expression and distribution of VEGF, αA- and αB-crystallins in the retina using a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Methods: 90 C57/BL mice were randomly divided into the OIR and control groups. The OIR group at postnatal day 7 (P7) were kept at high oxidation state (75 ± 5%) for 5 days before returned to normal environment. Retinal tissue was cut into sections. Oxygen induced retinal neovascularization and vascular structural changes were evaluated using retinal fluorescein angiography. The number of endothelial cell nuclei breaking through the retinal internal limiting membrane was counted after H&E staining. The mRNA expression levels of VEGF, αA- and αB-crystallins in the mouse retina were determined using real-time RT-PCR. The distribution of αA- and αB-crystallins in the retina was detected by fluorescent immunohistochemistry staining. Results: Oxygen induction triggered new blood vessel formation in the retina and impaired the structure of the retinal vascular network. The number of endothelial cell nuclei breaking through the retinal internal limiting membrane was significantly increased in the OIR group compared to the control group at P13, P17 and P21 (P < 0.01), reaching the peak on P17. The expression levels of VEGF, αA- and αB-crystalllins were also significantly different between the OIR and control groups. VEGF expression was highest on P15, αA-crystallin expression was highest on P17, whereas αB-crystallin expression kept increasing during the time frame of our study. Both αA- and αB-crystallins were expressed in the ganglion cell layer and the inner nuclear cell

  12. Radiation-Induced Problems in Colorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ashburn, Jean H; Kalady, Matthew F

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy not only plays a pivotal role in the cancer care pathways of many patients with pelvic malignancies, but can also lead to significant injury of normal tissue in the radiation field (pelvic radiation disease) that is sometimes as challenging to treat as the neoplasms themselves. Acute symptoms are usually self-limited and respond to medical therapy. Chronic symptoms often require operative intervention that is made hazardous by hostile surgical planes and unforgiving tissues. Management of these challenging patients is best guided by the utmost caution and humility. PMID:27247532

  13. Electromechanical actuation and current-induced metastable states in suspended single-crystalline VO2 nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tselev, Alexander; Budai, John D; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2011-01-01

    Current-induced electromechanical actuation enabled by the metal-insulator transition in VO{sub 2} nanoplatelets is demonstrated. The Joule heating by a sufficient current flowing through suspended nanoplatelets results in formation of heterophase domain patterns and is accompanied by nanoplatelet deformation. The actuation action can be achieved in a wide temperature range below the bulk phase transition temperature (68 C). The observed current-sustained heterophase domain structures should be interpreted as distinct metastable states in free-standing and end-clamped VO{sub 2} samples. We analyze the main prerequisites for the realization of a current-controlled actuator based on the proposed concept.

  14. Thermal cycling induced load on copper-ribbons in crystalline photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Kraemer, F.; Wiese, S.; Wolter, K.-J.; Bagdahn, J.

    2010-08-01

    Solar module lifetime is limited by the fatigue behavior of its cell interconnectors: the copper-ribbons. Every change in temperature induces thermo-mechanical stresses in the module components due to their thermo-mechanical mismatch. The purpose of this work is to quantify this load on the copper-ribbons between the individual cells of a cell string during a thermal cycling test by measuring cell displacement using digital image correlation and to compare the results to finite element analysis (FEM). Furthermore with help of FEM the influences of different materials were investigated, allowing material and layout optimizations with respect to copper-ribbon loading.

  15. Radioprotectors and Mitigators of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Hyodo, Fuminori; Baum, Bruce J.; Krishna, Murali C.; Mitchell, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation is used in the treatment of a broad range of malignancies. Exposure of normal tissue to radiation may result in both acute and chronic toxicities that can result in an inability to deliver the intended therapy, a range of symptoms, and a decrease in quality of life. Radioprotectors are compounds that are designed to reduce the damage in normal tissues caused by radiation. These compounds are often antioxidants and must be present before or at the time of radiation for effectiveness. Other agents, termed mitigators, may be used to minimize toxicity even after radiation has been delivered. Herein, we review agents in clinical use or in development as radioprotectors and mitigators of radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Few agents are approved for clinical use, but many new compounds show promising results in preclinical testing. PMID:20413641

  16. Hyperprolactinemia from radiation-induced hypothalamic hypopituitarism

    SciTech Connect

    Corkill, G.; Hanson, F.W.; Gold, E.M.; White, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Samaan et al., described the effects of radiation damage of the hypothalamus in 15 patients with head and neck cancer. Shalet et al., in 1977 described endocrine morbidity in adults who as children had been irradiated for brain tumors. This report describes instances of hyperprolactinemia and associated hypothalamic, pituitary, and thyroid dysfunction following irradiation of a young adult female for brain neoplasia.

  17. RADIATION INDUCED VULCANIZATION OF RUBBER LATEX

    DOEpatents

    Mesrobian, R.B.; Ballantine, D.S.; Metz, D.J.

    1964-04-28

    A method of vulcanizing rubber latex by exposing a mixture containing rubber latex and from about 15 to about 21.3 wt% of 2,5-dichlorostyrene to about 1.1 megarads of gamma radiation while maintaining the temperature of the mixture at a temperature ranging between from about 56 to about 59 deg C is described. (AEC)

  18. Radiation-induced cerebellar chondrosarcoma. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Perrin, R.G.; Platts, M.E.; Simpson, W.J.

    1984-07-01

    The authors report a case of chondrosarcoma arising in the cerebellum 16 years after treatment of a cerebellar malignant astrocytoma by subtotal resection and irradiation. It is thought that the chondrosarcoma arising within the intracranial cavity was a probable consequence of previous ionizing radiation.

  19. Radiatively induced Fermi scale and unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanne, Tommi; Meroni, Aurora; Sannino, Francesco; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2016-05-01

    We consider extensions of the Standard Model in which the hierarchy between the unification and the Fermi scale emerges radiatively. Within the Pati-Salam framework, we show that it is possible to construct a viable model where the Higgs is an elementary pseudo-Goldstone boson, and the correct hierarchy is generated.

  20. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

  1. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamarov, Konstantin P.; Osminkina, Liubov A.; Zinovyev, Sergey V.; Maximova, Ksenia A.; Kargina, Julia V.; Gongalsky, Maxim B.; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P.; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V.; Nikiforov, Vladimir N.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-11-01

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50°C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1-5 W/cm2). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy.

  2. Pressure-induced depolarization and resonance in Raman scattering of single-crystalline boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Junjie; Zhang Ling; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen Mingwei; Goto, Takashi

    2010-02-01

    We report polarized and resonant Raman scattering of single-crystal boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) at high pressures. Significant intensity enhancements of 270 and 1086 cm{sup -1} Raman bands of B{sub 4}C have been observed at quasihydrostatic pressures higher than approx20 GPa. The pressure-induced intensity change of the 1086 cm{sup -1} band is mainly due to the resonance between excitation energy and electronic transition, whereas the intensity change of 270 cm{sup -1} band is caused by the depolarization effect. Importantly, the first-order phase transition has not been found at high quasihydrostatic pressures and all the Raman intensity changes along with the corresponding high-pressure lattice distortion can be recovered during unloading.

  3. Inducing Planar Orientation in Side‐Chain Liquid‐Crystalline Polymer Systems via Interfacial Control

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract For efficient photoresponses of liquid‐crystal (LC) azobenzene (Az) polymer systems, planar LC orientation of the Az mesogenic group is required because the light irradiation process usually occurs with normal incidence to the film surface. However, LC molecules with a rodlike shape tend to orient perpendicularly to the film surface according to the excluded volume effect theory. This review introduces new approaches for inducing planar orientation in side‐chain LC Az polymer films via interface and surface molecular designs. The planar orientation offers efficient in‐plane photoalignment and photoswitching to hierarchical LC architectures from molecular LC mesogens and LC phases to mesoscopic microphase‐separated structures. These approaches are expected to provide new concepts and possibilities in new LC polymer devices. PMID:26775770

  4. Inducing Planar Orientation in Side-Chain Liquid-Crystalline Polymer Systems via Interfacial Control.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Shusaku

    2016-02-01

    For efficient photoresponses of liquid-crystal (LC) azobenzene (Az) polymer systems, planar LC orientation of the Az mesogenic group is required because the light irradiation process usually occurs with normal incidence to the film surface. However, LC molecules with a rodlike shape tend to orient perpendicularly to the film surface according to the excluded volume effect theory. This review introduces new approaches for inducing planar orientation in side-chain LC Az polymer films via interface and surface molecular designs. The planar orientation offers efficient in-plane photoalignment and photoswitching to hierarchical LC architectures from molecular LC mesogens and LC phases to mesoscopic microphase-separated structures. These approaches are expected to provide new concepts and possibilities in new LC polymer devices. PMID:26775770

  5. Radiation induced growth of micro crystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Meisel, D.

    1991-01-01

    Generation of colloidal particles during the radiolysis of aqueous solutions was already observed in the early days of radiation chemistry. Systematic studies using radiation chemistry techniques as synthetic tools in the preparation of colloidal particles, primarily metallic particles, were begun approximately a decade ago in conjunction since they were found to catalyze multi-electron redox processes. A large number of metallic colloidal particles were then synthesized, including silver, gold, platinum, iridium, nickel, cadmium, and others. More recently, attention has turned to semiconductor colloidal particles. The stimulus to these studies is the observation of quantum size effects in small semiconductor particles that exhibit hybrid properties between those of the molecular species and the solid state bulk material. In the following we discuss our own observations on the evolution of semiconductor particles whose growth has been initiated by pulse radiolysis. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Radiation recall dermatitis induced by trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dochang; Koo, Ja Seung; Suh, Chang-Ok; Yoon, Chang Yun; Bae, Jaehyun; Lee, Soohyeon

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of radiation recall dermatitis caused by trastuzumab. A 55-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer received palliative first-line trastuzumab/paclitaxel and a salvage partial mastectomy with lymph node dissection was subsequently performed. In spite of the palliative setting, the pathology report indicated that no residual carcinoma was present, and then she underwent locoregional radiotherapy to ensure a definitive response. After radiotherapy, she has maintained trastuzumab monotherapy. Nine days after the fifth cycle of trastuzumab monotherapy, dermatitis in previously irradiated skin developed, with fever. Radiation recall dermatitis triggered by trastuzumab is extremely rare. A high fever developed abruptly with a skin rash. This may be the first case of this sort to be reported. PMID:23543400

  7. Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

  8. DECOHERENCE EFFECTS OF MOTION-INDUCED RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    P. NETO; D. DALVIT

    2000-12-01

    The radiation pressure coupling with vacuum fluctuations gives rise to energy damping and decoherence of an oscillating particle. Both effects result from the emission of pairs of photons, a quantum effect related to the fluctuations of the Casimir force. We discuss different alternative methods for the computation of the decoherence time scale. We take the example of a spherical perfectly-reflecting particle, and consider the zero and high temperature limits. We also present short general reviews on decoherence and dynamical Casimir effect.

  9. Simple method to demonstrate radiation-inducible radiation resistance in microbial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, S.T.; Maxcy, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    A simple method for detection of radiation-inducible radiation resistance was developed by irradiating aliquots (0.01 ml) of cell suspension on agar plates. Part of each experimental plate was subjected to an induction treatment, and subsequent radiation resistance was compared with that of untreated cells on the same plate. The UV radiation resistance of a Micrococcus sp. was increased approximately 1.6 times by an induction treatment. This simple procedure of irradiating cells in a fixed position on agar avoided washing, centrifugation, and cell enumeration required in traditional methods.

  10. Radiation-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds: A molecular-dynamics study of CuTi and Cu sub 4 Ti sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R. ); Sabochick, M.J. . Dept. of Engineering Physics)

    1991-06-01

    In the present paper, important results of our recent computer simulation of radiation-induced amorphization in the ordered compounds CuTi and Cu{sub 4}Ti{sub 3} are summarized. The energetic, structural, thermodynamic and mechanical responses of these intermetallics during chemical disordering, point-defect production and heating were simulated, using molecular dynamics and embedded-atom potentials. From the atomistic details obtained, the critical role of radiation-induced structural disorder in driving the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation is discussed. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Semi-interpenetrating polymer networks of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) prepared by radiation-induced polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martellini, Flavia; Innocentini Mei, Lúcia H.; Lora, Silvano; Carenza, Mario

    2004-09-01

    Semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) based on bacterial poly(3-hydroxy butyrate) with a hydrophilic monomer at different compositions were prepared by radiation-induced polymerization using γ-rays from a 60Co source with a total dose of 10-100 kGy. The swelling behaviour was determined by water content at equilibrium, while thermal properties and crystallinity were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Extraction of the soluble part of PHB from the films at low and high temperature with water or chloroform as well as FTIR data indicate the occurrence of the crosslinking reaction in the hydrogels. The results show a water uptake increasing with the hydrophilic component until 25%.

  12. Pressure- and temperature-induced transformations in crystalline polymers of C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Meletov, K. P.; Kourouklis, G. A.

    2012-10-15

    The great advantage of the C{sub 60} molecule is its potential for polymerization, due to which the molecule can be the building block of new all carbon materials. In addition, it contains, both sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} hybridized carbon atoms, which allows synthesizing new carbon materials with desired physicochemical properties using both types of carbon bonding. The one- and two-dimensional polymeric phases of C{sub 60} are prototype materials of this sort. Their properties, especially polymerization under pressure and room temperature via covalent bonding between molecules belonging to adjacent polymeric chains or polymeric layers, can be used for further development of new materials. The present review focuses on the study of the pressure-induced polymerization and thermodynamic stability of these materials and their recovered new phases by in-situ high-pressure Raman and X-ray diffraction studies. The phonon spectra show that the fullerene molecular cage in the high-pressure phases is preserved, while these polymers decompose under heat treatment into the initial fullerene C{sub 60} monomer.

  13. Effect of crystalline grain structures on the mechanical properties of twinning-induced plasticity steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Dan; Han, Fusheng

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the mechanical properties of twinning-induced plasticity steel, the grain morphology was tailored by different solidification technologies combined with deformation and heat treatment processing routes. Three typical grain morphologies, i.e., equiaxed, columnar as well as equiaxed/columnar grains were formed, and their mechanical behaviors were comparatively studied. Among the three materials, the equiaxed grain material exhibited the highest strength but the lowest plasticity. Depending on the grain size, the smaller the grain size, the higher the strength, but the lower the elongation. The columnar grain material possessed the most excellent plasticity but the weakest strength. These properties presented a non-monotonic dependence on the dendrite spacing, and the moderate spacing resulted in the optimum combination of strength and plasticity. The equiaxed/columnar grain coexisted material showed interesting properties, i.e., the strength and plasticity were just between those of single grain-shaped materials. The three materials also presented different strain hardening behaviors particularly in the uniform deformation stage. The equiaxed grain material showed a constant strain hardening rate, while the columnar grain and equiaxed/columnar grain materials showed a progressively increasing rate with increasing the true strain.

  14. Site specific oxidation of amino acid residues in rat lens γ-crystallin induced by low-dose γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ingu; Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Norihiko; Kanamoto, Takashi; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Noriko

    2015-10-30

    Although cataracts are a well-known age-related disease, the mechanism of their formation is not well understood. It is currently thought that eye lens proteins become abnormally aggregated, initially causing clumping that scatters the light and interferes with focusing on the retina, and ultimately resulting in a cataract. The abnormal aggregation of lens proteins is considered to be triggered by various post-translational modifications, such as oxidation, deamidation, truncation and isomerization, that occur during the aging process. Such modifications, which are also generated by free radical and reactive oxygen species derived from γ-irradiation, decrease crystallin solubility and lens transparency, and ultimately lead to the development of a cataract. In this study, we irradiated young rat lenses with low-dose γ-rays and extracted the water-soluble and insoluble protein fractions. The water-soluble and water-insoluble lens proteins were digested with trypsin, and the resulting peptides were analyzed by LC-MS. Specific oxidation sites of methionine, cysteine and tryptophan in rat water-soluble and -insoluble γE and γF-crystallin were determined by one-shot analysis. The oxidation sites in rat γE and γF-crystallin resemble those previously identified in γC and γD-crystallin from human age-related cataracts. Our study on modifications of crystallins induced by ionizing irradiation may provide useful information relevant to human senile cataract formation. PMID:26385181

  15. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  16. Relationship between cross-linking conditions of ethylene vinyl acetate and potential induced degradation for crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonai, Sachiko; Hara, Kohjiro; Tsutsui, Yuji; Nakahama, Hidenari; Masuda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship in crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules between the cross-linking level of copolymer of ethylene and vinyl acetate (EVA) as the encapsulant and the degree of degradation due to potential induced degradation (PID) phenomenon. We used three methods for the determination of cross-linking level of EVA: xylene method, which is one of the solvent extraction methods (SEM), curing degree by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and viscoelastic properties by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results indicate that degradation of PV modules by PID test depends on the cross-linking level of EVA. The PV modules encapsulated by EVA with higher cross-linking level show lower degradation degree due to PID phenomenon. Also we showed that EVA with higher cross-linking level tended to be higher volume resistivity. This tendency is similar to that for electrical resistance value during the PID test. The PID test was also done by changing thickness of EVA between front cover glass and c-Si with the same cross-linking level. The PV modules encapsulated by thicker EVA between front cover glass and c-Si cell show lower degradation by PID. From these results, the PV modules encapsulated by EVA with higher cross-linking level, higher volume resistivity and increased thickness would be tolerant of PID phenomenon.

  17. Radiation-induced products of peptides and their enzymatic digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, E.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical characterization of radiation-induced products of peptides and proteins is essential for understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on peptides and proteins. Furthermore, peptides containing radiation-altered amino acid residues might not be completely digestible by proteolytic enzymes. In this work, small homopeptides of Ala, Phe and Met were chosen as model peptides. Lysozyme was used to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on a small protein. All peptides and lysozyme were irradiated in diluted, oxygen free, N/sub 2/O-saturated aqueous solutions, using a /sup 60/Co-..gamma..-source. HPLC, capillary GC and GC-MS were applied to isolate and characterize the radiation-induced products. The enzymatic digestibility of the products was investigated using aminopeptidase M, leucine aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase A and carboxypeptidase Y. It was found that irradiation of peptides examined in this work leads to racemization and alteration of amino acid residues and crosslinks between the peptide chains. In addition, it was established that exopeptidases act differently on radiation-induced dimers of peptides composed of aliphatic, aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids.

  18. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  19. X-ray Radiation Induces Deprotonation of the Bilin Chromophore in Crystalline D. Radiodurans Phytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Feifei; Burgie, E. Sethe; Yu, Tao; Heroux, Annie; Schatz, George C.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Orville, Allen M.

    2015-02-04

    We report that in the red light-absorbing (Pr) state, the bilin chromophore of the Deinococcus radiodurans proteobacterial phytochrome (DrBphP) is hypersensitive to X-ray photons used in typical synchrotron X-ray protein crystallography experiments. This causes the otherwise fully protonated chromophore to deprotonate without additional major structural changes. Furthermore, these results have major implications for our understanding of the structural and chemical characteristics of the resting and intermediate states of phytochromes and other photoreceptor proteins.

  20. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  1. Intraoperative radiation therapy-induced sarcomas in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, H J; Sindelar, W F; Kinsella, T J; Mehta, D M

    1989-12-01

    In a canine model the tolerance of normal and surgically manipulated tissue to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated to provide guidelines for the clinical use of IORT in human cancer patients. A dose of 20 Gy IORT, with or without external beam radiotherapy, was generally well tolerated without significant increased treatment morbidity. Higher doses of IORT (over 30 Gy) have produced radiation-induced sarcomas in some animals followed over a long period. Therefore IORT should be used only in human cancer patients in well controlled studies, in which complications are well documented, and the possibility of radiation-induced malignancies in long-term survival should be considered. PMID:2594971

  2. Panretinal photocoagulation for radiation-induced ocular ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Roth, S.E.; Magargal, L.E.; Shields, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    We present preliminary findings on the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in preventing neovascular glaucoma in eyes with radiation-induced ocular ischemia. Our study group consisted of 20 patients who developed radiation-induced ocular ischemia following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy for a choroidal or ciliary body melanoma. Eleven of the 20 patients were treated by panretinal photocoagulation shortly after the diagnosis of ocular ischemia, but nine patients were left untreated. In this non-randomized study, the rate of development of neovascular glaucoma was significantly lower (p = 0.024) for the 11 photocoagulated patients than for the nine who were left untreated.

  3. The Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, M; Fardid, R; Hadadi, Gh; Fardid, M

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect is the phenomenon which non-irradiated cells exhibit effects along with their different levels as a result of signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Responses of non-irradiated cells may include changes in process of translation, gene expression, cell proliferation, apoptosis and cells death. These changes are confirmed by results of some In-Vivo studies. Most well-known important factors affecting radiation-induced bystander effect include free radicals, immune system factors, expression changes of some genes involved in inflammation pathway and epigenetic factors. PMID:25599062

  4. Effective surface passivation of p-type crystalline silicon with silicon oxides formed by light-induced anodisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jie; Grant, Nicholas; Lennon, Alison

    2014-12-01

    Electronic surface passivation of p-type crystalline silicon by anodic silicon dioxide (SiO2) was investigated. The anodic SiO2 was grown by light-induced anodisation (LIA) in diluted sulphuric acid at room temperature, a process that is significantly less-expensive than thermal oxidation which is widely-used in silicon solar cell fabrication. After annealing in oxygen and then forming gas at 400 °C for 30 min, the effective minority carrier lifetime of 3-5 Ω cm, boron-doped Czochralski silicon wafers with a phosphorus-doped 80 Ω/□ emitter and a LIA anodic SiO2 formed on the p-type surface was increased by two orders of magnitude to 150 μs. Capacitance-voltage measurements demonstrated a very low positive charge density of 3.4 × 1011 cm-2 and a moderate density of interface states of 6 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2. This corresponded to a silicon surface recombination velocity of 62 cm s-1, which is comparable with values reported for other anodic SiO2 films, which required higher temperatures and longer growth times, and significantly lower than oxides grown by chemical vapour deposition techniques. Additionally, a very low leakage current density of 3.5 × 10-10 and 1.6 × 10-9 A cm-2 at 1 and -1 V, respectively, was measured for LIA SiO2 suggesting its potential application as insulation layer in IBC solar cells and a barrier for potential induced degradation.

  5. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  6. Radiation-induced endometriosis in Macaca mulatta

    SciTech Connect

    Fanton, J.W.; Golden, J.G. )

    1991-05-01

    Female rhesus monkeys received whole-body doses of ionizing radiation in the form of single-energy protons, mixed-energy protons, X rays, and electrons. Endometriosis developed in 53% of the monkeys during a 17-year period after exposure. Incidence rates for endometriosis related to radiation type were: single-energy protons, 54%; mixed-energy protons, 73%; X rays, 71%; and electrons, 57%. The incidence of endometriosis in nonirradiated control monkeys was 26%. Monkeys exposed to single-energy protons, mixed-energy protons, and X rays developed endometriosis at a significantly higher rate than control monkeys (chi 2, P less than 0.05). Severity of endometriosis was staged as massive, moderate, and minimal. The incidence of these stages were 65, 16, and 19%, respectively. Observations of clinical disease included weight loss in 43% of the monkeys, anorexia in 35%, space-occupying masses detected by abdominal palpation in 55%, abnormal ovarian/uterine anatomy on rectal examination in 89%, and radiographic evidence of abdominal masses in 38%. Pathological lesions were endometrial cyst formation in 69% of the monkeys, adhesions of the colon in 66%, urinary bladder in 50%, ovaries in 86%, and ureters in 44%, focal nodules of endometrial tissue throughout the omentum in 59%, and metastasis in 9%. Clinical management of endometriosis consisted of debulking surgery and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy combined in some cases with total abdominal hysterectomy. Postoperative survival rates at 1 and 5 years for monkeys recovering from surgery were 48 and 36%, respectively.

  7. Atorvastatin Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Cardiac Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, KunYi; He, XuYu; Zhou, Yingling; Gao, Lijuan; Qi, Zhengyu; Chen, Jiyan; Gao, Xiuren

    2015-12-01

    Radiation-induced heart injury is one of the major side effects of radiotherapy for thoracic malignancies. Previous studies have shown that radiotherapy induced myocardial fibrosis and intensified myocardial remodeling. In this study, we investigated whether atorvastatin could inhibit radiation-induced heart fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats, which were randomly divided into six groups: control; radiation only; and four treatment groups receiving atorvastatin plus radiation (E1, E2, E3 and E4). All rats, except the control group, received local heart irradiation in 7 daily fractions of 3 Gy for a total of 21 Gy. Rats in groups E1 (10 mg/kg/day) and E2 (20 mg/kg/day) received atorvastatin and radiation treatment until week 12 after exposure. Rats in groups E3 (10 mg/kg/day) and E4 (20 mg/kg/day) received atorvastatin treatment from 3 months before irradiation to week 12 after irradiation. The expressions of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3, fibronectin, ROCK I and p-Akt in heart tissues were evaluated using real-time PCR or Western blot analyses. Atorvastatin significantly reduced the expression of TGF-β1, Smad3/P-Smad3, ROCK I and p-Akt in rats of the E1-E4 groups and in a dose-dependent manner. Fibronectin exhibited a similar pattern of expression changes. In addition, echocardiography showed that atorvastatin treatment can inhibit the increase of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, left ventricular end-systolic diameter and left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and prevent the decrease of ejection fraction and fraction shortening in E1-E4 groups compared with the radiation only group. This study demonstrated that radiation exposure increased the expression of fibronectin in cardiac fibroblasts and induced cardiac fibrosis through activation of the TGF-β1/Smad3, RhoA/ROCK, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Statins ameliorated radiation-induced cardiac fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results suggest that atorvastatin is effective for the treatment of radiation-induced

  8. Radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zargari, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of tinea capitis using radiotherapy was introduced at the beginning of the twentieth century. A variety of cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are seen years after this treatment. Objective: We sought to determine the clinical characteristics of BCCs among irradiated patients. Methods: The clinical records of all patients with BCC in a clinic in north of Iran were reviewed. Results: Of the 58 cases of BCC, 29 had positive history for radiotherapy in their childhood. Multiple BCCs were seen in 79.3% and 10.3% of patients with history and without history of radiotherapy, respectively. Conclusions: X-ray radiation is still a major etiologic factor in developing BCC in northern Iran. Patients with positive history for radiotherapy have higher rate of recurrence. PMID:26114066

  9. The axiverse induced dark radiation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Bobby; Pongkitivanichkul, Chakrit

    2016-04-01

    The string/ M theory Axiverse — a plethora of very light Axion Like Particles (ALPs) with a vast range of masses — is arguably a generic prediction of string/ M theory. String/ M theory also tends to predict that the early Universe is dominated by moduli fields. When the heavy moduli decay, before nucleosynthesis, they produce dark radiation in the form of relativistic ALPs. Generically one estimates that the number of relativistic species grows with the number of axions in the Axiverse, in contradiction to the observations that N eff ≤ 4. We explain this problem in detail and suggest some possible solutions to it. The simplest solution requires that the lightest modulus decays only into its own axion superpartner plus Standard Model particles and this severely constrains the moduli Kahler potential and mass matrix.

  10. Radiation induced inter-device leakage degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Zhang-Li; Shao, Hua; Zhang, Zheng-Xuan; Ning, Bing-Xu; Chen, Ming; Bi, Da-Wei; Zou, Shi-Chang

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of inter-device leakage current with total ionizing dose in transistors in 180 nm generation technologies is studied with an N-type poly-gate field device (PFD) that uses the shallow trench isolation as an effective gate oxide. The overall radiation response of these structures is determined by the trapped charge in the oxide. The impacts of different bias conditions during irradiation on the inter-device leakage current are studied for the first time in this work, which demonstrates that the worst condition is the same as traditional NMOS transistors. Moreover, the two-dimensional technology computer-aided design simulation is used to understand the bias dependence.

  11. Interleukin-32 Positively Regulates Radiation-Induced Vascular Inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hanako; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M.; Lin, P. Charles

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To study the role of interleukin-32 (IL-32), a novel protein only detected in human tissues, in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced vascular inflammation. Methods and Materials: Irradiated (0-6 Gy) human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with or without various agents-a cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) inhibitor, a cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) inhibitor, or lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs)-were used to assess IL-32 expression by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Expression of cell adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells using human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) cells was also analyzed. Results: Ionizing radiation dramatically increased IL-32 expression in vascular endothelial cells through multiple pathways. Ionizing radiation induced IL-32 expression through nuclear factor {kappa}B activation, through induction of cPLA2 and LPC, as well as induction of Cox-2 and subsequent conversion of arachidonic acid to prostacyclin. Conversely, blocking nuclear factor {kappa}B, cPLA2, and Cox-2 activity impaired IR-induced IL-32 expression. Importantly, IL-32 significantly enhanced IR-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion on endothelial cells. Conclusion: This study identifies IL-32 as a positive regulator in IR-induced vascular inflammation, and neutralization of IL-32 may be beneficial in protecting from IR-induced inflammation.

  12. Gamma Radiation Induced Calibration Shift for Four Cryogenic Thermometer Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Yeager, C. J.

    2004-06-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors utilized in space environments are exposed to ionizing radiation with the total dose dependent upon the length of the mission. Based upon their minimal size and robust packaging, four models of cryogenic Resistance Thermometer Devices (RTDs) manufactured by Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. were tested to determine their reliability for space applications with regard to radiation. Samples of Cernox™ RTDs (CX-1050-SD), ruthenium oxide RTDs (models RX-102A-AA and RX-103A-AA), and silicon diode thermometers (model DT-670-SD) were irradiated at room temperature by a cesium-137 gamma source to total doses ranging from 5 Gy to 10 kGy. This paper presents the resulting temperature shifts induced by the gamma radiation as a function of total dose over the 1.4 K to 325 K temperature range. These data show that 1) Cernox™ RTDs exhibit high radiation hardness to 10 kGy from 1.4 K to 325 K, 2) ruthenium oxide RTDs show moderate radiation hardness to 10 kGy below 10 K, and 3) silicon diodes temperature sensors exhibit some radiation tolerance to low levels of radiation (especially below 70 K), but quickly shift calibration at radiation levels above 300 Gy, especially above 100 K.

  13. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  14. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  15. Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

  16. SENSITIVITY TO RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER IN HEMOCHROMATOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of dose-response relationships for radiation-induced cancer in segments of the population with high susceptibility is critical for understanding the risks of low dose and low dose rates to humans. Clean-up levels for radionuclides will depend upon the fraction of t...

  17. SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Beutler, D.E.; Burt, M.; Dudley, K.J.; Stringer, T.A.

    1998-12-14

    Experiments on the SPHINX accelerator studying radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in foam indicate that a field-exclusion boundary layer model better describes foam than a Maxwell-Garnett model that treats the conducting gas bubbles in the foam as modifying the dielectric constant. In both cases, wall attachment effects could be important but were neglected.

  18. Kinetics of radiation-induced segregation in ternary alloys. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Kumar, A.; Wiedersich, H.

    1982-01-01

    Model calculations of radiation-induced segregation in ternary alloys have been performed, using a simple theory. The theoretical model describes the coupling between the fluxes of radiation-induced defects and alloying elements in an alloy A-B-C by partitioning the defect fluxes into those occurring via A-, B-, and C-atoms, and the atom fluxes into those taking place via vacancies and interstitials. The defect and atom fluxes can be expressed in terms of concentrations and concentration gradients of all the species present. With reasonable simplifications, the radiation-induced segregation problem can be cast into a system of four coupled partial-differential equations, which can be solved numerically for appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Model calculations have been performed for ternary solid solutions intended to be representative of Fe-Cr-Ni and Ni-Al-Si alloys under various irradiation conditions. The dependence of segregation on both the alloy properties and the irradiation variables, e.g., temperature and displacement rate, was calculated. The sample calculations are in good qualitative agreement with the general trends of radiation-induced segregation observed experimentally.

  19. Data acquisition system used in radiation induced electrical degradation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.P.

    1995-04-01

    Radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED) of ceramic materials has recently been reported and is the topic of much research at the present time. The object of this report is to describe the data acquisition system for an experiment designed to study RIED at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  20. Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. )

    1993-01-15

    The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

  1. Laser therapy for severe radiation-induced rectal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlquist, D.A.; Gostout, C.J.; Viggiano, T.R.; Pemberton, J.H.

    1986-12-01

    Four patients with chronic hematochezia and transfusion-dependent anemia from postradiation rectal vascular lesions were successfully managed by endoscopic laser coagulation. In all four patients, symptomatic, hematologic, and endoscopic improvement was evident. Laser therapy for severe radiation-induced rectal bleeding seems to be safe and efficacious and should be considered before surgical intervention.

  2. Radiation-induced segregation in alloy X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.

    1996-12-31

    Microstructural and microchemical evolution of an Alloy X-750 heat under neutron irradiation was studied in order to understand the origin of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Both clustering of point defects and radiation-induced segregation at interfaces were observed. Although no significant changes in the precipitate structure were observed, boundaries exhibited additional depletion of Cr and Fe and enrichment of Ni.

  3. Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  4. Radiation-induced dural fibrosarcoma with unusually short latent period

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, N.R.; Aydin, F.; Leshner, R.T. Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA )

    1993-05-01

    Although rare, the occurrence of radiation-induced intracranial neoplasms of various types is well known. Among these tumors, fibrosarcomas, especially in the region of seila turcica, seem to be the most common type. These tumors characteristically occur after a long latent period, usually several years, following radiation therapy. The authors now report a case of apparently radiation-induced fibrosarcoma with some unusual features in a 10-year-old boy who was treated with radiation for medulloblastoma. He received a total dose of 53.2 Gy radiation delivered at 1.8 per fraction with 6 MV acceleration using the standard craniospinal technique. An MRI at 15 months after the completion of radiotherapy showed a mass over the cerebral convexity, which increased two-fold in size within a period of 4 months. A well circumscribed tumor was removed from the fronto-parietal convexity. The tumor measured 5x4.5x1.5 cm and was attached to the dura with invasion of the overlying bone. Histologically, it displayed the characteristic features of a low-grade fibrosarcoma. The patient remains free of tumor 18 months after the surgery. This case emphasizes the potential risk for the development of a second neoplasm following therapeutic radiation and also documents, to the authors' knowledge, the shortest latent period reported so far between administration of radiotherapy and development of an intracranial tumor.

  5. Countermeasures against space radiation induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A R; Guan, J; Ware, J H

    2007-06-01

    Of particular concern for the health of astronauts during space travel is radiation from protons and high atomic number (Z), high energy particles (HZE particles). Space radiation is known to induce oxidative stress in astronauts after extended space flight. In the present study, the total antioxidant status was used as a biomarker to evaluate oxidative stress induced by proton and HZE particle radiation in the plasma of CBA mice and the protective effect of dietary supplement agents. The results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation significantly decreased the plasma level of total antioxidants in the irradiated CBA mice. Dietary supplementation with L: -selenomethionine (SeM) or a combination of selected antioxidant agents (which included SeM) could partially or completely prevent the decrease in the total antioxidant status in the plasma of animals exposed to proton or HZE particle radiation. These findings suggest that exposure to space radiation may compromise the capacity of the host antioxidant defense system; this adverse biological effect can be prevented at least partially by dietary supplementation with agents expected to have effects on antioxidant activities. PMID:17387501

  6. Radiation-Induced Bystander Response: Mechanism and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation (IR) to the genetic material in the cell gives rise to damage to DNA in a dose-dependent manner. There are two types of DNA damage; by a high dose (causing acute or deterministic effects) and by a low dose (related to chronic or stochastic effects), both of which induce different health effects. Among radiation effects, acute cutaneous radiation syndrome results from cell killing as a consequence of high-dose exposure. Recent advances: Recent advances in radiation biology and oncology have demonstrated that bystander effects, which are emerged in cells that have never been exposed, but neighboring irradiated cells, are also involved in radiation effects. Bystander effects are now recognized as an indispensable component of tissue response related to deleterious effects of IR. Critical issues: Evidence has indicated that nonapoptotic premature senescence is commonly observed in various tissues and organs. Senesced cells were found to secrete various proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, most of which are equivalent to those identified as bystander factors. Secreted factors could trigger cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell migration, inflammatory response, etc., which provide a tissue microenvironment assisting tissue repair and remodeling. Future directions: Understandings of the mechanisms and physiological relevance of radiation-induced bystander effects are quite essential for the beneficial control of wound healing and care. Further studies should extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of bystander effects and mode of cell death in response to IR. PMID:24761341

  7. Radiation-induced decomposition of explosives under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Giefers, Hubertus; Pravica, Michael; Yang, Wenge; Liermann, Peter

    2008-11-03

    We present high-pressure and high temperature studies of the synchrotron radiation-induced decomposition of powder secondary high explosives pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) using white beam synchrotron radiation at the 16 BM-B and 16 BM-D sectors of the HP-CAT beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The radiation-induced decomposition rate TATB showed dramatic slowing with pressure up to 26.6 GPa (the highest pressure studied), implying a positive activation volume of the activated complex. The decomposition rate of PETN varied little with pressure up to 15.7 GPa (the highest pressure studied). Diffraction line intensities were measured as a function of time using energy-dispersive methods. By measuring the decomposition rate as a function of pressure and temperature, kinetic and other constants associated with the decomposition reactions were extracted.

  8. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Isildar, M.; Bakale, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of ionizing radiation on histidine-deficient auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium were studied to improve the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The auxotrophs were divided into two groups - one which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions and another sensitive to frameshifts. These groups were composed of parent-daughter pairs in which the chemical mutagenicity enhancing plasmid, pKM101, is absent in the parent strain and present in the daughter. Co-60 ..gamma..-radiation and 250 kV x-rays were used to irradiate the bacteria. Irradiation of the frameshift - sensitive strains which carry the pKm101 plasmid doubled the absolute number of induced revertants whereas irradiation of the base-pair substitution sensitive strain which also carries the pKm101 plasmid produced nearly no change in the number of induced revertants. A nearly negligible effect on the mutation rate was observed for all parent strains. (ACR)

  9. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

    1996-10-01

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

  10. Dynamics of plasma formation, relaxation, and topography modification induced by femtosecond laser pulses in crystalline and amorphous dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Puerto, D.; Siegel, J.; Gawelda, W.; Galvan-Sosa, M.; Solis, J.; Ehrentraut, L.; Bonse, J.

    2010-05-15

    We have studied plasma formation and relaxation dynamics along with the corresponding topography modifications in fused silica and sapphire induced by single femtosecond laser pulses (800 nm and 120 fs). These materials, representative of high bandgap amorphous and crystalline dielectrics, respectively, require nonlinear mechanisms to absorb the laser light. The study employed a femtosecond time-resolved microscopy technique that allows obtaining reflectivity and transmission images of the material surface at well-defined temporal delays after the arrival of the pump pulse which excites the dielectric material. The transient evolution of the free-electron plasma formed can be followed by combining the time-resolved optical data with a Drude model to estimate transient electron densities and skin depths. The temporal evolution of the optical properties is very similar in both materials within the first few hundred picoseconds, including the formation of a high reflectivity ring at about 7 ps. In contrast, at longer delays (100 ps-20 ns) the behavior of both materials differs significantly, revealing a longer lasting ablation process in sapphire. Moreover, transient images of sapphire show a concentric ring pattern surrounding the ablation crater, which is not observed in fused silica. We attribute this phenomenon to optical diffraction at a transient elevation of the ejected molten material at the crater border. On the other hand, the final topography of the ablation crater is radically different for each material. While in fused silica a relatively smooth crater with two distinct regimes is observed, sapphire shows much steeper crater walls, surrounded by a weak depression along with cracks in the material surface. These differences are explained in terms of the most relevant thermal and mechanical properties of the material. Despite these differences the maximum crater depth is comparable in both material at the highest fluences used (16 J/cm{sup 2}). The