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Sample records for radiation induced gene

  1. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  2. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

    1996-10-01

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

  3. Radiation-induced gene expression in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Jones, Tamako A.; Chesnut, Aaron; Smith, Anna L.

    2002-01-01

    We used the nematode C. elegans to characterize the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in a simple animal model emphasizing the unique effects of charged particle radiation. Here we demonstrate by RT-PCR differential display and whole genome microarray hybridization experiments that gamma rays, accelerated protons and iron ions at the same physical dose lead to unique transcription profiles. 599 of 17871 genes analyzed (3.4%) showed differential expression 3 hrs after exposure to 3 Gy of radiation. 193 were up-regulated, 406 were down-regulated and 90% were affected only by a single species of radiation. A novel statistical clustering technique identified the regulatory relationships between the radiation-modulated genes and showed that genes affected by each radiation species were associated with unique regulatory clusters. This suggests that independent homeostatic mechanisms are activated in response to radiation exposure as a function of track structure or ionization density.

  4. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  5. Exposure to ionizing radiation induced persistent gene expression changes in mouse mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast tissue is among the most sensitive tissues to the carcinogenic actions of ionizing radiation and epidemiological studies have linked radiation exposure to breast cancer. Currently, molecular understanding of radiation carcinogenesis in mammary gland is hindered due to the scarcity of in vivo long-term follow up data. We undertook this study to delineate radiation-induced persistent alterations in gene expression in mouse mammary glands 2-month after radiation exposure. Methods Six to eight week old female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy of whole body γ radiation and mammary glands were surgically removed 2-month after radiation. RNA was isolated and microarray hybridization performed for gene expression analysis. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used for biological interpretation of microarray data. Real time quantitative PCR was performed on selected genes to confirm the microarray data. Results Compared to untreated controls, the mRNA levels of a total of 737 genes were significantly (p<0.05) perturbed above 2-fold of control. More genes (493 genes; 67%) were upregulated than the number of downregulated genes (244 genes; 33%). Functional analysis of the upregulated genes mapped to cell proliferation and cancer related canonical pathways such as ‘ERK/MAPK signaling’, ‘CDK5 signaling’, and ‘14-3-3-mediated signaling’. We also observed upregulation of breast cancer related canonical pathways such as ‘breast cancer regulation by Stathmin1’, and ‘HER-2 signaling in breast cancer’ in IPA. Interestingly, the downregulated genes mapped to fewer canonical pathways involved in cell proliferation. We also observed that a number of genes with tumor suppressor function (GPRC5A, ELF1, NAB2, Sema4D, ACPP, MAP2, RUNX1) persistently remained downregulated in response to radiation exposure. Results from qRT-PCR on five selected differentially expressed genes confirmed microarray data. The PCR data on PPP4c, ELF1, MAPK12, PLCG1, and E2F

  6. Gene expression profiling in undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma induced by high-dose radiation.

    PubMed

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Choi, Moo Hyun; Kim, Cha Soon; Choi, Seung Jin

    2016-06-01

    Published gene expression studies for radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis have used various methodologies. In this study, we identified differential gene expression in a human thyroid epithelial cell line after exposure to high-dose γ-radiation. HTori-3 cells were exposed to 5 or 10 Gy of ionizing radiation using two dose rates (high-dose rate: 4.68 Gy/min, and low-dose rate: 40 mGy/h) and then implanted into the backs of BALB/c nude mice after 4 (10 Gy) or 5 weeks (5 Gy). Decreases in cell viability, increases in giant cell frequency, anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo were observed. Particularly, the cells irradiated with 5 Gy at the high-dose rate or 10 Gy at the low-dose rate demonstrated more prominent tumorigenicity. Gene expression profiling was analyzed via microarray. Numerous genes that were significantly altered by a fold-change of >50% following irradiation were identified in each group. Gene expression analysis identified six commonly misregulated genes, including CRYAB, IL-18, ZNF845, CYP24A1, OR4N4 and VN1R4, at all doses. These genes involve apoptosis, the immune response, regulation of transcription, and receptor signaling pathways. Overall, the altered genes in high-dose rate (HDR) 5 Gy and low-dose rate (LDR) 10 Gy were more than those of LDR 5 Gy and HDR 10 Gy. Thus, we investigated genes associated with aggressive tumor development using the two dosage treatments. In this study, the identified gene expression profiles reflect the molecular response following high doses of external radiation exposure and may provide helpful information about radiation-induced thyroid tumors in the high-dose range. PMID:27006382

  7. Gene expression profiling in undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma induced by high-dose radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Choi, Moo Hyun; Kim, Cha Soon; Choi, Seung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Published gene expression studies for radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis have used various methodologies. In this study, we identified differential gene expression in a human thyroid epithelial cell line after exposure to high-dose γ-radiation. HTori-3 cells were exposed to 5 or 10 Gy of ionizing radiation using two dose rates (high-dose rate: 4.68 Gy/min, and low-dose rate: 40 mGy/h) and then implanted into the backs of BALB/c nude mice after 4 (10 Gy) or 5 weeks (5 Gy). Decreases in cell viability, increases in giant cell frequency, anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo were observed. Particularly, the cells irradiated with 5 Gy at the high-dose rate or 10 Gy at the low-dose rate demonstrated more prominent tumorigenicity. Gene expression profiling was analyzed via microarray. Numerous genes that were significantly altered by a fold-change of >50% following irradiation were identified in each group. Gene expression analysis identified six commonly misregulated genes, including CRYAB, IL-18, ZNF845, CYP24A1, OR4N4 and VN1R4, at all doses. These genes involve apoptosis, the immune response, regulation of transcription, and receptor signaling pathways. Overall, the altered genes in high-dose rate (HDR) 5 Gy and low-dose rate (LDR) 10 Gy were more than those of LDR 5 Gy and HDR 10 Gy. Thus, we investigated genes associated with aggressive tumor development using the two dosage treatments. In this study, the identified gene expression profiles reflect the molecular response following high doses of external radiation exposure and may provide helpful information about radiation-induced thyroid tumors in the high-dose range. PMID:27006382

  8. Irradiated esophageal cells are protected from radiation-induced recombination by MnSOD gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yunyun; Wang, Hong; Wiktor-Brown, Dominika; Rugo, Rebecca; Shen, Hongmei; Huq, M Saiful; Engelward, Bevin; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel S

    2010-04-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage is a precursor to mutagenesis and cytotoxicity. During radiotherapy, exposure of healthy tissues can lead to severe side effects. We explored the potential of mitochondrial SOD (MnSOD) gene therapy to protect esophageal, pancreatic and bone marrow cells from radiation-induced genomic instability. Specifically, we measured the frequency of homologous recombination (HR) at an integrated transgene in the Fluorescent Yellow Direct Repeat (FYDR) mice, in which an HR event can give rise to a fluorescent signal. Mitochondrial SOD plasmid/liposome complex (MnSOD-PL) was administered to esophageal cells 24 h prior to 29 Gy upper-body irradiation. Single cell suspensions from FYDR, positive control FYDR-REC, and negative control C57BL/6NHsd (wild-type) mouse esophagus, pancreas and bone marrow were evaluated by flow cytometry. Radiation induced a statistically significant increase in HR 7 days after irradiation compared to unirradiated FYDR mice. MnSOD-PL significantly reduced the induction of HR by radiation at day 7 and also reduced the level of HR in the pancreas. Irradiation of the femur and tibial marrow with 8 Gy also induced a significant increase in HR at 7 days. Radioprotection by intraesophageal administration of MnSOD-PL was correlated with a reduced level of radiation-induced HR in esophageal cells. These results demonstrate the efficacy of MnSOD-PL for suppressing radiation-induced HR in vivo. PMID:20334517

  9. Radiation-Inducible Caspase-8 Gene Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurushima, Hideo Yuan Xuan; Dillehay, Larry E.; Leong, Kam W.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Patients with malignant gliomas have a poor prognosis. To explore a novel and more effective approach for the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, we designed a strategy that combines caspase-8 (CSP8) gene therapy and radiation treatment (RT). In addition, the specificity of the combined therapy was investigated to decrease the unpleasant effects experienced by the surrounding normal tissue. Methods and Materials: We constructed the plasmid pEGR-green fluorescence protein that included the radiation-inducible early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) promoter and evaluated its characteristics. The pEGR-CSP8 was constructed and included the Egr-1 promoter and CSP8 complementary DNA. Assays that evaluated the apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity caused by CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were performed using U251 and U87 glioma cells. The pEGR-CSP8 was transfected into the subcutaneous U251 glioma cells of nude mice by means of in vivo electroporation. The in vivo effects of CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were evaluated. Results: The Egr-1 promoter yielded a better response with fractionated RT than with single-dose RT. In the assay of apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity, pEGR-CSP8 showed response for RT. The pEGR-CSP8 combined with RT is capable of inducing cell death effectively. In mice treated with pEGR-CSP8 and RT, apoptotic cells were detected in pathologic sections, and a significant difference was observed in tumor volumes. Conclusions: Our results indicate that radiation-inducible gene therapy may have great potential because this can be spatially or temporally controlled by exogenous RT and is safe and specific.

  10. [Role of DNA repair genes in radiation-induced changes of lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Shilova, L A; Pliusnina, E N; Zemskaia, N V; Moskalev, A A

    2014-01-01

    One of the main effects of various stress factors, including ionizing radiation, is DNA damage. Accumulation of DNA damage and somatic mutations in the somatic tissues is regarded as one of the basic mechanisms of aging. We have developed an approach to the study of molecular and genetic mechanisms of radioadaptation, which is based on the analysis of changes in the lifespan of Drosophila with a transformed genotype. In this study we investigated the radioadaptive response and hormesis by radiation-induced changed of the lifespan of different strains of Drosophila melanogaster, such as a wild type strain Canton-Sand strains with mutations in DNA damage response gene (homologue of GADD45), excision repair genes (homologues of XPF, XPC, PCNA) and double-strand breaks repair genes (homologues of RAD54, XRCC3, BLM). The exposure to irradiation at the dose rate of 40 cGy was performed chronically through the stages of fly development; an acute exposure at the dose rate of 30 Gy was applied to the adult stages of flies. Also, we investigated the resistance to acute gamma-radiation of Drosophila with conditional ubiquitous overexpression of genes that are involved in DNA damage recognition (homologues of GADD45, HUS1, CHK2), excision repair (homologues of XPF, XPC, AP-endonuclease-1) and double-strand break repair (homologues of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80, WRNexo). In the wild type strain Canton-S, manifestation of the radioadaptive response and radiation hormesis were observed. In individuals with DNA repair gene mutations, no radioadaptive response was observed, or observed to a lesser extent than in wild type flies. Mifepristone--inducible transgene activation does not lead to an increase in resistance to acute irradiation by the parameters of lifespan of Drosophila. Overexpression of DNA repair genes led to a sharp decline in lifespan also in the absence of irradiation. PMID:25775840

  11. Gene expression and hormone autonomy in radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Persinger, S.M.; Town, C.D. )

    1989-04-01

    In order to study the molecular genetics of factor controlling plant cell growth, we have isolated a group of radiation-induced tumors from Arabidopsis thaliana. Tumors appeared on plants derived from {sup 60}Co gamma-irradiated seed or seedlings, and are capable of hormone-autonomous growth in culture. We have used vertebrate oncogene probes to explore the hypothesis that the tumors arose by the radiation-induced activation of growth-regulating plant oncogenes. One probe, int-2, was used to isolate cDNA clones representing an mRNA differentially expressed between tumors and hormone-dependent callus tissue. The genomic organization and function of this and other differentially expressed Arabidopsis sequences are being further characterized. A second area of study concerns the hormonal status of individual tumors. Tumor tissue varies in color, texture, and degree of differentiation: while some tumors appear undifferentiated, one consistently produces roots, and others occasionally develop shoots or leaflets. The tumors have characteristic growth rates on hormone-free medium, and growth in response to exogenous hormones differs among the tumors themselves and from wild-type. Characterization of the relationships between hormonal status, morphogenesis, and gene expression should yield valuable insights into the mechanisms regulating plant growth and development.

  12. Association of radiation-induced genes with noncancer chronic diseases in Mayak workers occupationally exposed to prolonged radiation.

    PubMed

    Abend, Michael; Azizova, Tamara; Müller, Kerstin; Dörr, Harald; Doucha-Senf, Sven; Kreppel, Helmut; Rusinova, Galina; Glazkova, Irina; Vyazovskaya, Natalia; Unger, Kristian; Braselmann, Herbert; Meineke, Viktor

    2015-03-01

    We examined the association of gene expression with noncancer chronic disease outcomes in Mayak nuclear weapons plant workers who were exposed to radiation due to their occupation. We conducted a cross-sectional study with selection based on radiation exposure status of Mayak plant workers living in Ozyorsk who were alive in 2011 and either exposed to: combined incorporated Plutonium-239 ((239)Pu) and external gamma-ray exposure (n = 82); external gamma-ray exposure alone (n = 18); or were unexposed (n = 50) of Ozyorsk residents who provided community-based professional support for plant personnel and who were alive in 2011. Peripheral blood was taken and RNA was isolated and then converted into cDNA and stored at -20°C. In a previous analysis we screened the whole genome for radiation-associated candidate genes, and validated 15 mRNAs and 15 microRNAs using qRT-PCR. In the current analysis we examined the association of these genes with 15 different chronic diseases on 92 samples (47 males, 45 females). We examined the radiation-to-gene and gene-to-disease associations in statistical models stratified by gender and separately for each disease and exposure. We modeled radiation exposure as gamma or (239)Pu on both the continuous and categorical scales. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR), 95% confidence intervals (CI), and the concordance for genes that were significantly associated with radiation exposure and a specific disease outcome were identified. Altogether 12 mRNAs and 9 microRNAs appeared to be significantly associated with 6 diseases, including thyroid diseases (3 genes, OR: 1.2-5.1, concordance: 71-78%), atherosclerotic diseases (4 genes, OR: 2.5-10, concordance: 70-75%), kidney diseases (6 genes, OR: 1.3-8.6, concordance: 69-85%), cholelithiasis (3 genes, OR: 0.2-0.3, concordance: 74-75%), benign tumors [1 gene (AGAP4), OR: 3.7, concordance: 81%] and chronic radiation syndrome (4 genes, OR: 2.5-4.3, concordance: 70

  13. Role of Vitamin D receptor gene in radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of human breast epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debasish; Calaf, Gloria; Hei, Tom K

    2003-09-01

    1 Alpha,25-(OH)(2)-Vitamin D(3), the physiologically active metabolite of Vitamin D is known for its pro-differentiating and antiproliferative activity on various cancer cell lines. It exerts its growth-regulatory effects through binding to the Vitamin D recepter (VDR), a member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoic acid receptor family, which functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. There is accumulating evidence that Vitamin D may be an important determinant of both the occurrence and progression of breast cancer. Since radiation is an important etiological factor for breast cancer progression, it is important to study the role of VDR gene in radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis. This study is focused on a human breast tumor model developed by irradiating the spontaneously immortalized MCF-10F cell line with graded doses of high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation followed by treatment with estrogen. Study of VDR gene by restriction digestion with ApaI, BsmI and TaqI detected no polymorphism but direct sequencing analyses identified few single-base mutations within intron 8 and exon 9 of the gene. Over-expression of the VDR gene was noticed in irradiated and tumorigenic cell lines compared with control. Likewise, immunohistochemical data indicated a significant increase in VDR intensity in irradiated and tumorigenic cell lines. Considering all these evidence, it is likely that VDR can be used as a prognostic marker of tumor progression in radiation- and estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. PMID:12957667

  14. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  15. Entropic effects in formation of chromosome territories: towards understanding of radiation-induced gene translocation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Ciesla, Michal

    2012-07-01

    A detailed understanding of structural organization of biological target, such as geometry of an inter-phase chromosome, is an essential prerequisite for gaining deeper insight into relationship between radiation track structure and radiation-induced biological damage [1]. In particular, coupling of biophysical models aimed to describe architecture of chromosomes and their positioning in a cell nucleus [2-4] with models of local distribution of ionizations caused by passing projectiles, are expected to result in more accurate estimates of aberration induction caused by radiation. There is abundant experimental evidence indicating that arrangements of chromosomes in eukaryotic cell nucleus is non-random and has been evolutionary conserved in specific cell types. Moreover, the radial position of a given chromosome territory (CT) within the cell nucleus has been shown to correlate with its size and gene density. Usually it is assumed that chromosomal geometry and positioning result from the action of specific forces acting locally, such as hydrogen bonds, electrostatic, Van der Waals or hydrophobic interactions operating between nucleosomes and within their interiors. However, it is both desirable and instructive to learn to what extend organization of inter-phase chromosomes is affected by nonspecific entropic forces. In this study we report results of a coarse-grained analysis of a chromatin structure modeled by two distinct approaches. In the first method, we adhere to purely statistical analysis of chromatin packing within a chromosome territory. On the basis of the polymer theory, the chromatin fiber of diameter 30nm is approximated by a chain of spheres, each corresponding to about 30 kbp. Random positioning of the center of the domain is repeated for 1000 spherical nuclei. Configuration of the domain is determined by a random packing of a polymer (a string of identical beads) in estimated fraction of space occupied by a chromosome of a given length and mass

  16. Genetic dissection of susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis of thymocytes and mapping of Rapop1, a novel susceptibility gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Nobuko; Okumoto, Masaaki; Esaki, Kozaburo

    1995-02-10

    Genetic dissection of susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis of thymocytes was performed by counting dead cells in histologically processed thymuses after 0.5 Gy of whole-body X-irradiation, using recombinant congenic (CcS/Dem) strains derived from inbred mouse strains BALB/cHeA (susceptible) and STS/A (resistant). A high (8/20) number of strains with lower dead cell scores than BALB/cHeA among CcS/Dem recombinant congenic strains (RCS), which contain 12.5% of STS/A genome in the genetic background of BALB/cHeA strain, indicates that the difference between BALB/cHeA and STS/A is caused by several genes and that susceptibility probably requires BALB/ cHeA alleles at more than one locus. Similar results were obtained with CXS/Hg recombinant inbred (CXS/ Hg) strains. Analysis of F{sub 2} hybrids between BALB/ cHeA and CcS-7, one of the CcS/Dem strains that showed lower dead cell scores than BALB/cHeA, demonstrated that a novel gene (Rapop1, radiation-induced apoptosis 1) controlling susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis in the thymus is located in the proximal region of mouse chromosome 16. 40 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, Jr, A J

    2007-03-03

    Abstract for final report for project entitled A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo which has been supported by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program for approximately 7 years. This project has encompassed two sequential awards, ER62683 and then ER63308, in the Gene Response Section in the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute. The project was temporarily suspended during the relocation of the Principal Investigators laboratory to the Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health at the end of 2004. Remaining support for the final year was transferred to this new site later in 2005 and was assigned the DOE Award Number ER64065. The major aims of this project have been 1) to characterize changes in gene expression in response to low-dose radiation responses; this includes responses in human cells lines, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and in vivo after human or murine exposures, as well as the effect of dose-rate on gene responses; 2) to characterize changes in gene expression that may be involved in bystander effects, such as may be mediated by cytokines and other intercellular signaling proteins; and 3) to characterize responses in transgenic mouse models with relevance to genomic stability. A variety of approaches have been used to study transcriptional events including microarray hybridization, quantitative single-probe hybridization which was developed in this laboratory, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter microarray analysis using genomic regulatory motifs. Considering the frequent responsiveness of genes encoding cytokines and related signaling proteins that can affect cellular metabolism, initial efforts were initiated to study radiation responses at the metabolomic level and to correlate with radiation-responsive gene expression. Productivity includes twenty-four published and in press manuscripts

  18. Analysis of gene regulation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells induced by ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jacqueline J; Rogers, Christian; Howard, Carolyn B; Moore, Caronda; Chan, Lai-Man

    2005-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-induced cataracts are becoming a major environmental health concern because of the possible decrease in the stratospheric ozone layer. Experiments were designed to isolate gene(s) affected by UV irradiation in rabbit cornea tissues using fluorescent differential display-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (FDDRT-PCR). The epithelial cells were grown in standard medium for 2 or 4 hours post treatment. Cornea epithelial cells were irradiated with UVB for 20 minutes. RNA was extracted and amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using poly A+ specific anchoring primers and random arbitrary primers. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed several differentially expressed genes in untreated versus UV irradiated cells. Complimentary DNA (cDNA) fragments resulting from fluorescent differentially expressed mRNAs were eluted from the gel and re-amplified. The re-amplified PCR products were cloned directly into the PCR-TRAP cloning system. These data showed that FDDRT-PCR is a useful technique to elucidate UV-regulated gene expressions. Future experiments will involve sequence analysis of cloned inserts. The identification of these genes through sequence analysis could lead to a better understanding of cataract formation via DNA damage and mechanisms of prevention. PMID:16705801

  19. UV Radiation and Visible Light Induce hsp70 Gene Expression in the Antarctic Psychrophilic Ciliate Euplotes focardii.

    PubMed

    Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Passini, Valerio; Colombetti, Giuliano; Miceli, Cristina; La Terza, Antonietta; Marangoni, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    The psychrophilic ciliate Euplotes focardii inhabits the shallow marine coastal sediments of Antarctica, where, over millions of years of evolution, it has reached a strict molecular adaptation to such a constant-temperature environment (about -2 °C). This long evolution at sub-zero temperatures has made E. focardii unable to respond to heat stress with the activation of its heat shock protein (hsp) 70 genes. These genes can, however, be expressed in response to other stresses, like the oxidative one, thus indicating that the molecular adaptation has exclusively altered the heat stress signaling pathways, while it has preserved hsp70 gene activation in response to other environmental stressors. Since radiative stress has proved to be affine to oxidative stress in several organisms, we investigated the capability of UV radiation to induce hsp70 transcription. E. focardii cell cultures were exposed to several different irradiation regimes, ranging from visible only to a mixture of visible, UV-A and UV-B. The irradiation values of each spectral band have been set to be comparable with those recorded in a typical Antarctic spring. Using Northern blot analysis, we measured the expression level of hsp70 immediately after irradiation (0-h-labeled samples), 1 h, and 2 h from the end of the irradiation. Surprisingly, our results showed that besides UV radiation, the visible light was also able to induce hsp70 expression in E. focardii. Moreover, spectrophotometric measurements have revealed no detectable endogenous pigments in E. focardii, making it difficult to propose a possible explanation for the visible light induction of its hsp70 genes. Further research is needed to conclusively clarify this point. PMID:25666535

  20. Activation of transcription factor AP-2 mediates UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-induced expression of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Grether-Beck, S.; Olaizola-Horn, S.; Schmitt, H.; Grewe, M.

    1996-12-10

    UVA radiation is the major component of the UV solar spectrum that reaches the earth, and the therapeutic application of UVA radiation is increasing in medicine. Analysis of the cellular effects of UVA radiation has revealed that exposure of human cells to UVA radiation at physiological doses leads to increased gene expression and that this UVA response is primarily mediated through the generation of singlet oxygen. In this study, the mechanisms by which UVA radiation induces transcriptional activation of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were examined. UVA radiation was capable of inducing activation of the human ICAM-1 promoter and increasing OCAM-1 mRNA and protein expression. These UVA radiation effects were inhibited by singlet oxygen quenchers, augmented by enhancement of singlet oxygen life-time, and mimicked in unirradiated cells by a singlet oxygen-generating system. UVA radiation as well as singlet oxygen-induced ICAM-1 promoter activation required activation of the transcription factor AP-2. Accordingly, both stimuli activated AP-2, and deletion of the putative AP-2-binding site abrogated ICAM-1 promoter activation in this system. This study identified the AP-2 site as the UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-responsive element of the human ICAM-1 gene. The capacity of UVA radiation and/or singlet oxygen to induce human gene expression through activation of AP-2 indicates a previously unrecognized role of this transcription factor in the mammalian stress response. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    themselves to prolonged study, many tend to eliminate or rearrange the target chromosome until it is too small for further rearrangement. The observed frequency of induced instability by low and high linear-energy-transfer radiations greatly exceeds that observed for nuclear gene mutations at similar doses; hence, mutation of a gene or gene family is unlikely to be the initiating mechanism. Once initiated however, there is evidence in the GM10115 model system that it can be perpetuated over time by dicentric chromosome formation followed by bridge breakage fusion cycles (Marder and Morgan 1993), as well as recombinational events involving interstitial telomere like repeat sequences (Day et al. 1998). There is also increasing evidence that inflammatory type reactions (Lorimore et al. 2001, Lorimore and Wright 2003), presumably involving reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as cytokines and chemokines might be involved in driving the ustable phenotype (Liaikis et al. 2007, Hei et al. 2008). To this end there is very convincing evidence for such reactions being involved in another non-targeted effect associated with ionizing radiation, the bystander effect (Hei et al. 2008). Clearly the link between induced instability and bystander effects suggests common processes and inflammatory type reactions will likely be the subject of future investigation.

  2. A comparison of mutations induced by accelerated iron particles versus those induced by low earth orbit space radiation in the FEM-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, P. S.; Hlavacek, A.; Wilde, H.; Lewicki, D.; Schubert, W.; Kern, R. G.; Kazarians, G. A.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans was employed to determine the mutation frequency as well as the nature of mutations induced by low earth orbit space radiation ambient to Space Shuttle flight STS-76. Recovered mutations were compared to those induced by accelerated iron ions generated by the AGS synchrotron accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. For logistical reasons, dauer larvae were prepared at TCU, transported to either Kennedy Space Center or Brookhaven National Laboratory, flown in space or irradiated, returned to TCU and screened for mutants. A total of 25 fem-3 mutants were recovered after the shuttle flight and yielded a mutation frequency of 2.1x10(-5), roughly 3.3-fold higher than the spontaneous rate of 6.3x10(-6). Four of the mutations were homozygous inviable, suggesting that they were large deletions encompassing fem-3 as well as neighboring, essential genes. Southern blot analyses revealed that one of the 25 contained a polymorphism in fem-3, further evidence that space radiation can induce deletions. While no polymorphisms were detected among the iron ion-induced mutations, three of the 15 mutants were homozygous inviable, which is in keeping with previous observations that high LET iron particles generate deficiencies. These data provide evidence, albeit indirect, that an important mutagenic component of ambient space radiation is high LET charged particles such as iron ions.

  3. [Radiation-induced cancers].

    PubMed

    Dutrillaux, B

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low dose range i.e., population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations of tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. PMID:9868399

  4. YThe BigH3 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Radiation-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shao, G.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequences of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a 7 fold down- regulation of the novel tumor suppressor Big-h3 among radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells Furthermore ectopic re-expression of this gene suppresses tumorigenic phenotype and promotes the sensitivity of these tumor cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line we ectopically expresses the catalytic subunit of telomerase hTERT in primary human small airway epithelial SAE cells and generated several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV nucleon of 56 Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium These findings indicate

  5. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  6. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  7. Aquaporin-1 gene transfer to correct radiation-induced salivary hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Baum, Bruce J; Zheng, Changyu; Cotrim, Ana P; McCullagh, Linda; Goldsmith, Corinne M; Brahim, Jaime S; Atkinson, Jane C; Turner, R James; Liu, Shuying; Nikolov, Nikolay; Illei, Gabor G

    2009-01-01

    Irradiation damage to salivary glands is a common iatrogenic consequence of treatment for head and neck cancers. The subsequent lack of saliva production leads to many functional and quality-of-life problems for affected patients and there is no effective conventional therapy. To address this problem, we developed an in vivo gene therapy strategy involving viral vector-mediated transfer of the aquaporin-1 cDNA to irradiation-damaged glands and successfully tested it in two pre-clinical models (irradiated rats and miniature pigs), as well as demonstrated its safety in a large toxicology and biodistribution study. Thereafter, a clinical research protocol was developed that has received approval from all required authorities in the United States. Patients are currently being enrolled in this study. PMID:19096789

  8. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  9. Radiation-induced total-deletion mutations in the human hprt gene: a biophysical model based on random walk interphase chromatin geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Sachs, R. K.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a biophysical model that explains the sizes of radiation-induced hprt deletions. METHODS: Key assumptions: (1) Deletions are produced by two DSB that are closer than an interaction distance at the time of DSB induction; (2) Interphase chromatin is modelled by a biphasic random walk distribution; and (3) Misrejoining of DSB from two separate tracks dominates at low-LET and misrejoining of DSB from a single track dominates at high-LET. RESULTS: The size spectra for radiation-induced total deletions of the hprt gene are calculated. Comparing with the results of Yamada and coworkers for gamma-irradiated human fibroblasts the study finds that an interaction distance of 0.75 microm will fit both the absolute frequency and the size spectrum of the total deletions. It is also shown that high-LET radiations produce, relatively, more total deletions of sizes below 0.5 Mb. The model predicts an essential gene to be located between 2 and 3 Mb from the hprt locus towards the centromere. Using the same assumptions and parameters as for evaluating mutation frequencies, a frequency of intra-arm chromosome deletions is calculated that is in agreement with experimental data. CONCLUSIONS: Radiation-induced total-deletion mutations of the human hprt gene and intrachange chromosome aberrations share a common mechanism for their induction.

  10. Radiation-induced osteochondromas

    SciTech Connect

    Libshitz, H.I.; Cohen, M.A.

    1982-03-01

    Radiation-induced osteochondromas, either single or multiple, occur more commonly than is generally recognized. The incidence following irradiation for childhood malignancy is approximately 12%. Any open epiphysis is vulnerable. Age at irradiation, time of appearance following therapy, dose and type of radiation, and clinical course in 14 cases are dicussed. Due to growth of the lesion and/or pain, 3 tumors were excised. None revealed malignant degeneration.

  11. Examining Radiation-Induced In Vivo and In Vitro Gene Expression Changes of the Peripheral Blood in Different Laboratories for Biodosimetry Purposes: First RENEB Gene Expression Study.

    PubMed

    Abend, M; Badie, C; Quintens, R; Kriehuber, R; Manning, G; Macaeva, E; Njima, M; Oskamp, D; Strunz, S; Moertl, S; Doucha-Senf, S; Dahlke, S; Menzel, J; Port, M

    2016-02-01

    The risk of a large-scale event leading to acute radiation exposure necessitates the development of high-throughput methods for providing rapid individual dose estimates. Our work addresses three goals, which align with the directive of the European Union's Realizing the European Network of Biodosimetry project (EU-RENB): 1. To examine the suitability of different gene expression platforms for biodosimetry purposes; 2. To perform this examination using blood samples collected from prostate cancer patients (in vivo) and from healthy donors (in vitro); and 3. To compare radiation-induced gene expression changes of the in vivo with in vitro blood samples. For the in vitro part of this study, EDTA-treated whole blood was irradiated immediately after venipuncture using single X-ray doses (1 Gy/min(-1) dose rate, 100 keV). Blood samples used to generate calibration curves as well as 10 coded (blinded) samples (0-4 Gy dose range) were incubated for 24 h in vitro, lysed and shipped on wet ice. For the in vivo part of the study PAXgene tubes were used and peripheral blood (2.5 ml) was collected from prostate cancer patients before and 24 h after the first fractionated 2 Gy dose of localized radiotherapy to the pelvis [linear accelerator (LINAC), 580 MU/min, exposure 1-1.5 min]. Assays were run in each laboratory according to locally established protocols using either microarray platforms (2 laboratories) or qRT-PCR (2 laboratories). Report times on dose estimates were documented. The mean absolute difference of estimated doses relative to the true doses (Gy) were calculated. Doses were also merged into binary categories reflecting aspects of clinical/diagnostic relevance. For the in vitro part of the study, the earliest report time on dose estimates was 7 h for qRT-PCR and 35 h for microarrays. Methodological variance of gene expression measurements (CV ≤10% for technical replicates) and interindividual variance (≤twofold for all genes) were low. Dose estimates based on

  12. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  13. Changes in gene expression associated with radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Current research from our group has demonstrated differences in gene induction patterns for high- and low-linear energy transfer radiations; some genes are induced selectively following neutron exposure, others selectively following {gamma}-ray exposure, and others induced following exposure to either. These genes are associated with a broad array of different functions including apoptosis, cytoskeletal function, and gene regulation (dd-RT-PCR) technology to identify genes induced following exposure to different qualities of radiation and following exposure to radiation in the presence of radioprotectors.

  14. Acute Radiation-Induced Nocturia in Prostate Cancer Patients Is Associated With Pretreatment Symptoms, Radical Prostatectomy, and Genetic Markers in the TGF{beta}1 Gene

    SciTech Connect

    De Langhe, Sofie; De Ruyck, Kim; Ost, Piet; Fonteyne, Valerie; Werbrouck, Joke; De Meerleer, Gert; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: After radiation therapy for prostate cancer, approximately 50% of the patients experience acute genitourinary symptoms, mostly nocturia. This may be highly bothersome with a major impact on the patient's quality of life. In the past, nocturia is seldom reported as a single, physiologically distinct endpoint, and little is known about its etiology. It is assumed that in addition to dose-volume parameters and patient- and therapy-related factors, a genetic component contributes to the development of radiation-induced damage. In this study, we investigated the association among dosimetric, clinical, and TGF{beta}1 polymorphisms and the development of acute radiation-induced nocturia in prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Data were available for 322 prostate cancer patients treated with primary or postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Five genetic markers in the TGF{beta}1 gene (-800 G>A, -509 C>T, codon 10 T>C, codon 25 G>C, g.10780 T>G), and a high number of clinical and dosimetric parameters were considered. Toxicity was scored using an symptom scale developed in-house. Results: Radical prostatectomy (P<.001) and the presence of pretreatment nocturia (P<.001) are significantly associated with the occurrence of radiation-induced acute toxicity. The -509 CT/TT (P=.010) and codon 10 TC/CC (P=.005) genotypes are significantly associated with an increased risk for radiation-induced acute nocturia. Conclusions: Radical prostatectomy, the presence of pretreatment nocturia symptoms, and the variant alleles of TGF{beta}1 -509 C>T and codon 10 T>C are identified as factors involved in the development of acute radiation-induced nocturia. These findings may contribute to the research on prediction of late nocturia after IMRT for prostate cancer.

  15. Mitigating effects of L-selenomethionine on low-dose iron ion radiation-induced changes in gene expression associated with cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Nuth, Manunya; Kennedy, Ann R

    2013-07-01

    Ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy (HZE) particles poses a danger to astronauts during space travel. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the patterns of gene expression associated with cellular exposure to low-dose iron ion irradiation, in the presence and absence of L-selenomethionine (SeM). Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were exposed to low-dose iron ion (1 GeV/n) irradiation at 10 or 20 cGy with or without SeM pretreatment. The cells were harvested 6 and 16 h post-irradiation and analyzed by the Affymetrix U133Av2 gene chip arrays. Genes exhibiting a 1.5-fold expression cut-off and 5% false discovery rate (FDR) were considered statistically significant and subsequently analyzed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) for pathway analysis. Representative genes were further validated by real-time RT-PCR. Even at low doses of radiation from iron ions, global genome profiling of the irradiated cells revealed the upregulation of genes associated with the activation of stress-related signaling pathways (ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, p53 signaling, cell cycle and apoptosis), which occurred in a dose-dependent manner. A 24-h pretreatment with SeM was shown to reduce the radiation effects by mitigating stress-related signaling pathways and downregulating certain genes associated with cell adhesion. The mechanism by which SeM prevents radiation-induced transformation in vitro may involve the suppression of the expression of genes associated with stress-related signaling and certain cell adhesion events. PMID:23946774

  16. Effects of expression level of DNA repair-related genes involved in the NHEJ pathway on radiation-induced cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Yuan; Chen, Lie-Song; Sun, Rui; JI, Sheng-Jun; Ding, Yan-Yan; Wu, Jia; Tian, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy can induce cognitive decline. Impairments of hippocampal neurogenesis are thought to be a paramountly important mechanism underlying radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. In the mature nervous system, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are mainly repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways. It has been demonstrated that NHEJ deficiencies are associated with impaired neurogenesis. In our study, rats were randomly divided into five groups to be irradiated by single doses of 0 (control), 0 (anesthesia control), 2, 10, and 20 Gy, respectively. The cognitive function of the irradiated rats was measured by open field, Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. Real-time PCR was also used to detect the expression level of DNA DSB repair-related genes involved in the NHEJ pathway, such as XRCC4, XRCC5and XRCC6, in the hippocampus. The influence of different radiation doses on cognitive function in rats was investigated. From the results of the behavior tests, we found that rats receiving 20 Gy irradiation revealed poorer learning and memory, while no significant loss of learning and memory existed in rats receiving irradiation from 0–10 Gy. The real-time PCR and Western blot results showed no significant difference in the expression level of DNA repair-related genes between the 10 and 20 Gy groups, which may help to explain the behavioral results, i.e. DNA damage caused by 0–10 Gy exposure was appropriately repaired, however, damage induced by 20 Gy exceeded the body's maximum DSB repair ability. Ionizing radiation-induced cognitive impairments depend on the radiation dose, and more directly on the body's own ability to repair DNA DSBs via the NHEJ pathway. PMID:23135157

  17. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  18. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) gene therapy mediated by an attenuated form of Salmonella typhimurium ameliorates radiation induced pulmonary injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Jie; Ha, Xiao-Qin; Jiang, Jun-Jun; Lv, Tong-De; Wu, Chutse

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of KGF (Keratinocyte growth factor) gene therapy mediated by the attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Ty21a on radiation-induced pulmonary injury in rats model. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: TPK group (treated with TPK strain, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Ty21a-recombined human KGF gene); TP group (treated with TP strain, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Ty21a-recombined blank plasmid); and Saline group (treated with saline). After intraperitoneal administration for 48 h, the thoraxes of the rats were exposed to X-ray (20 Gy), and the rats were administered again two weeks after radiation. On the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 14th and 28th day after radiation, the rats were sacrificed and lung tissues were harvested. Histological analysis was performed, MDA contents and SOD activity were detected, mRNA levels of KGF, TGF-β, SP-A and SP-C were measured by Real-time RT-PCR, and their concentrations in the BALF were quantified with ELISA. Administration of TPK strain improved the pathological changes of the lung on the 28th day. In the TPK group, KGF effectively expressed since the 3rd day, MDA contents decreased and SOD activity increased significantly, on the 7th day and 14th day respectively. SP-A and SP-C expression elevated, whereas TGF-β expression was inhibited in the TPK group. These results suggest that this novel gene therapy of KGF could ameliorate radiation-induced pulmonary injury in rats, and may be a promising therapy for the treatment of radiative pulmonary injury. PMID:21436609

  19. [Radiation-induced neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Dobrzyńska-Rutkowska, Aneta; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-12-01

    Radiation-induced neuropathy is commonly observed among oncological patients. Radiation can affect the nervous tissue directly or indirectly by inducing vasculopathy or dysfunction of internal organs. Symptoms may be mild and reversible (e.g., pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, drowsiness, fatigue, paresthesia) or life-threatening (cerebral oedema, increased intracranial pressure, seizures). Such complications are clinically divided into peripheral (plexopathies, neuropathies of spinal and cranial nerves) and central neuropathy (myelopathy, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment). The degree of neuronal damages primarily depends on the total and fractional radiation dose and applied therapeutic methods. The conformal and megavoltage radiotherapy seems to be the safeties ones. Diagnostic protocol includes physical examination, imaging (in particular magnetic resonance), electromyography, nerve conduction study and sometimes histological examination. Prevention and early detection of neurological complications are necessary in order to prevent a permanent dysfunction of the nervous system. Presently their treatment is mostly symptomatic, but in same cases a surgical intervention is required. An experimental and clinical data indicates some effectiveness of different neuroprotective agents (e.g. anticoagulants, vitamin E, hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline, bevacizumab, methylphenidate, donepezil), which should be administered before and/or during radiotherapy. PMID:24490474

  20. Constitutive or Inducible Protective Mechanisms against UV-B Radiation in the Brown Alga Fucus vesiculosus? A Study of Gene Expression and Phlorotannin Content Responses

    PubMed Central

    Creis, Emeline; Delage, Ludovic; Charton, Sophie; Goulitquer, Sophie; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe; Ar Gall, Erwan

    2015-01-01

    A role as UV sunscreens has been suggested for phlorotannins, the phenolic compounds that accumulate in brown algae in response to a number of external stimuli and take part in cell wall structure. After exposure of the intertidal brown alga Fucus vesiculosus to artificial UV-B radiation, we examined its physiological responses by following the transcript level of the pksIII gene encoding a phloroglucinol synthase, likely to be involved in the first step of phlorotannins biosynthesis. We also monitored the expression of three targeted genes, encoding a heat shock protein (hsp70), which is involved in global stress responses, an aryl sulfotransferase (ast), which could be involved in the sulfation of phlorotannins, and a vanadium bromoperoxidase (vbpo), which can potentially participate in the scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the cross-linking and condensation of phlorotannins. We investigated whether transcriptional regulation of these genes is correlated with an induction of phlorotannin accumulation by establishing metabolite profiling of purified fractions of low molecular weight phlorotannins. Our findings demonstrated that a high dose of UV-B radiation induced a significant overexpression of hsp70 after 12 and 24 hours following the exposure to the UV-B treatment, compared to control treatment. The physiological performance of algae quantified by the photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) was slightly reduced. However UV-B treatment did not induce the accumulation of soluble phlorotannins in F. vesiculosus during the kinetics of four weeks, a result that may be related to the lack of induction of the pksIII gene expression. Taken together these results suggest a constitutive accumulation of phlorotannins occurring during the development of F.vesiculosus, rather than inducible processes. Gene expression studies and phlorotannin profiling provide here complementary approaches to global quantifications currently used in studies of phenolic compounds

  1. Radiation-Induced Liver Fibrosis Is Mitigated by Gene Therapy Inhibiting Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} Signaling in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Ming; Zeng Zhaochong; Zhou Jian; Tan Yunshan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: We determined whether anti-transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) intervention could halt the progression of established radiation-induced liver fibrosis (RILF). Methods and Materials: A replication-defective adenoviral vector expressing the extracellular portion of human T{beta}RII and the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G fusion protein (AdT{beta}RIIFc) was produced. The entire rat liver was exposed to 30 Gy irradiation to generate a RILF model (RILFM). Then, RILFM animals were treated with AdT{beta}RIIFc (1 x 10{sup 11} plaque-forming units [PFU] of T{beta}RII), control virus (1 x 10{sup 11} PFU of AdGFP), or saline. Delayed radiation liver injury was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Chronic oxidative stress damage, hepatic stellate cell activation, and hepatocyte regeneration were also analyzed. Results: In rats infected with AdT{beta}RIIFc, fibrosis was significantly improved compared with rats treated with AdGFP or saline, as assessed by histology, hydroxyproline content, and serum level of hyaluronic acid. Compared with AdGFP rats, AdT{beta}RIIFc-treated rats exhibited decreased oxidative stress damage and hepatic stellate cell activation and preserved liver function. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that TGF-{beta} plays a critical role in the progression of liver fibrosis and suggest that anti-TGF-{beta} intervention is feasible and ameliorates established liver fibrosis. In addition, chronic oxidative stress may be involved in the progression of RILF.

  2. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  3. Influential Factors and Synergies for Radiation-Gene Therapy on Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Shi, Yujuan; Xiao, Yanhong; Guo, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-gene therapy, a dual anticancer strategy of radiation therapy and gene therapy through connecting radiation-inducible regulatory sequence to therapeutic gene, leading to the gene being induced to express by radiation while radiotherapy is performed and finally resulting in a double synergistic antitumor effect of radiation and gene, has become one of hotspots in the field of cancer treatment in recent years. But under routine dose of radiation, especially in the hypoxia environment of solid tumor, it is difficult for this therapy to achieve desired effect because of low activity of radiation-inducible regulatory elements, low level and transient expression of target gene induced by radiation, inferior target specificity and poor biosecurity, and so on. Based on the problems existing in radiation-gene therapy, many efforts have been devoted to the curative effect improvement of radiation-gene therapy by various means to increase radiation sensitivity or enhance target gene expression and the expression's controllability. Among these synergistic techniques, gene circuit, hypoxic sensitization, and optimization of radiation-induced sequence exhibit a good application potential. This review provides the main influential factors to radiation-gene therapy on cancer and the synergistic techniques to improve the anticancer effect of radiation-gene therapy. PMID:26783511

  4. Errors inducing radiation overdoses.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    There is no doubt that equipments exposing radiation and used for therapeutic purposes should be often checked for possibly administering radiation overdoses to the patients. Technologists, radiation safety officers, radiologists, medical physicists, healthcare providers and administration should take proper care on this issue. "We must be beneficial and not harmful to the patients", according to the Hippocratic doctrine. Cases of radiation overdose are often reported. A series of cases of radiation overdoses have recently been reported. Doctors who were responsible, received heavy punishments. It is much better to prevent than to treat an error or a disease. A Personal Smart Card or Score Card has been suggested for every patient undergoing therapeutic and/or diagnostic procedures by the use of radiation. Taxonomy may also help. PMID:24251304

  5. Gene expression as a biomarker for human radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Omaruddin, Romaica A; Roland, Thomas A; Wallace, H James; Chaudhry, M Ahmad

    2013-03-01

    Accidental exposure to ionizing radiation can be unforeseen, rapid, and devastating. The detonation of a radiological device leading to such an exposure can be detrimental to the exposed population. The radiation-induced damage may manifest as acute effects that can be detected clinically or may be more subtle effects that can lead to long-term radiation-induced abnormalities. Accurate identification of the individuals exposed to radiation is challenging. The availability of a rapid and effective screening test that could be used as a biomarker of radiation exposure detection is mandatory. We tested the suitability of alterations in gene expression to serve as a biomarker of human radiation exposure. To develop a useful gene expression biomonitor, however, gene expression changes occurring in response to irradiation in vivo must be measured directly. Patients undergoing radiation therapy provide a suitable test population for this purpose. We examined the expression of CC3, MADH7, and SEC PRO in blood samples of these patients before and after radiotherapy to measure the in vivo response. The gene expression after ionizing radiation treatment varied among different patients, suggesting the complexity of the response. The expression of the SEC PRO gene was repressed in most of the patients. The MADH7 gene was found to be upregulated in most of the subjects and could serve as a molecular marker of radiation exposure. PMID:23446844

  6. Radiation-induced disease.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, M

    1993-01-01

    The term radiation covers a wide spectrum of forms of energy, most of which have at one stage or another been suspected of causing human ill health. In general, study of the effects of radiation on health involves a mix of scientific disciplines, from population epidemiology to physics, which are seldom if ever found in a single scientist. As a result, interdisciplinary communication is of the utmost importance, and is a potent source of misunderstanding and misinformation. The forms of radiation which have been most specifically associated with health effects include ionizing and ultraviolet radiation. Claimed effects of electromagnetic and microwave radiation (excluding thermal effects) are too indefinite for detailed consideration. Ionizing radiation is a well-documented mutagen, which clearly causes cancers in humans, and human exposure has been increased by atomic weapons testing and medical and industrial uses of radioactivity. There is also a growing awareness of the possible role of some types of natural radiation, such as radon, in causing disease. Ultraviolet radiation is also associated with cancers, and is suspected of involvement in the increasing incidence of skin cancers in European populations. Factors thought to underlie recent changes in exposure to these mutagens are discussed. PMID:8222990

  7. Protective Role of Hsp27 Protein Against Gamma Radiation-Induced Apoptosis and Radiosensitization Effects of Hsp27 Gene Silencing in Different Human Tumor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aloy, Marie-Therese Hadchity, Elie; Bionda, Clara; Diaz-Latoud, Chantal; Claude, Line; Rousson, Robert; Arrigo, Andre-Patrick; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: The ability of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) to protect cells from stressful stimuli and its increased levels in tumors resistant to anticancer therapeutics suggest that it may represent a target for sensitization to radiotherapy. In this study, we investigate the protective role of Hsp27 against radiation-induced apoptosis and the effect of its attenuation in highly expressing radioresistant cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: We examined clonogenic death and the kinetics of apoptotic events in different tumor cell lines overexpressing or underexpressing Hsp27 protein irradiated with photons. The radiosensitive Jurkat cell line, which does not express Hsp27 constitutively or in response to {gamma}-rays, was stably transfected with Hsp27 complementary DNA. Attenuation of Hsp27 expression was accomplished by antisense or RNAi (interfering RNA) strategies in SQ20B head-and-neck squamous carcinoma, PC3 prostate cancer, and U87 glioblastoma radioresistant cells. Results: We measured concentration-dependent protection against the cytotoxic effects of radiation in Jurkat-Hsp27 cells, which led to a 50% decrease in apoptotic cells at 48 hours in the highest expressing cells. Underlying mechanisms leading to radiation resistance involved a significant increase in glutathione levels associated with detoxification of reactive oxygen species, a delay in mitochondrial collapse, and caspase activation. Conversely, attenuation of Hsp27 in SQ20B cells, characterized by their resistance to apoptosis, sensitizes cells to irradiation. This was emphasized by increased apoptosis, decreased glutathione basal level, and clonogenic cell death. Sensitization to irradiation was confirmed in PC3 and U87 radioresistant cells. Conclusion: Hsp27 gene therapy offers a potential adjuvant to radiation-based therapy of resistant tumors.

  8. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  9. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  10. The Patched 1 tumor-suppressor gene protects the mouse lens from spontaneous and radiation-induced cataract.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Ilaria; Tanno, Barbara; Giardullo, Paola; Leonardi, Simona; Pasquali, Emanuela; Antonelli, Francesca; Tanori, Mirella; Casciati, Arianna; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna; Mancuso, Mariateresa

    2015-01-01

    Age-related cataract is the most common cause of visual impairment. Moreover, traumatic cataracts form after injury to the eye, including radiation damage. We report herein that sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling plays a key role in cataract development and in normal lens response to radiation injury. Mice heterozygous for Patched 1 (Ptch1), the Shh receptor and negative regulator of the pathway, develop spontaneous cataract and are highly susceptible to cataract induction by exposure to ionizing radiation in early postnatal age, when lens epithelial cells undergo rapid expansion in the lens epithelium. Neonatally irradiated and control Ptch1(+/-) mice were compared for markers of progenitors, Shh pathway activation, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Molecular analyses showed increased expression of the EMT-related transforming growth factor β/Smad signaling pathway in the neonatally irradiated lens, and up-regulation of mesenchymal markers Zeb1 and Vim. We further show a link between proliferation and the stemness property of lens epithelial cells, controlled by Shh. Our results suggest that Shh and transforming growth factor β signaling cooperate to promote Ptch1-associated cataract development by activating EMT, and that the Nanog marker of pluripotent cells may act as the primary transcription factor on which both signaling pathways converge after damage. These findings highlight a novel function of Shh signaling unrelated to cancer and provide a new animal model to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of cataract formation. PMID:25452120

  11. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  12. Early induced protein 1 (PrELIP1) and other photosynthetic, stress and epigenetic regulation genes are involved in Pinus radiata D. don UV-B radiation response.

    PubMed

    Valledor, Luis; Cañal, María Jesús; Pascual, Jesús; Rodríguez, Roberto; Meijón, Mónica

    2012-11-01

    The continuous atmospheric and environmental deterioration is likely to increase, among others, the influx of ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation. The plants have photoprotective responses, which are complex mechanisms involving different physiological responses, to avoid the damages caused by this radiation that may lead to plant death. We have studied the adaptive responses to UV-B in Pinus radiata, given the importance of this species in conifer forests and reforestation programs. We analyzed the photosynthetic activity, pigments content, and gene expression of candidate genes related to photosynthesis, stress and gene regulation in needles exposed to UV-B during a 96 h time course. The results reveal a clear increase of pigments under UV-B stress while photosynthetic activity decreased. The expression levels of the studied genes drastically changed after UV-B exposure, were stress related genes were upregulated while photosynthesis (RBCA and RBCS) and epigenetic regulation were downregulated (MSI1, CSDP2, SHM4). The novel gene PrELIP1, fully sequenced for this work, was upregulated and expressed mainly in the palisade parenchyma of needles. This gene has conserved domains related to the dissipation of the UV-B radiation that give to this protein a key role during photoprotection response of the needles in Pinus radiata. PMID:22471584

  13. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  14. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  15. Differential Gene Expression Profiles of Radioresistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Established by Fractionated Irradiation: Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Protein 3 Confers Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sook; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kwon, Myung-Sang

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread use of radiotherapy as a local and regional modality for the treatment of cancer, some non-small-cell lung cancers commonly develop resistance to radiation. We thus sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to radiation. Methods and Materials: We established the radioresistant cell line H460R from radiosensitive parental H460 cells. To identify the radioresistance-related genes, we performed microarray analysis and selected several candidate genes. Results: Clonogenic and MTT assays showed that H460R was 10-fold more resistant to radiation than H460. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression levels of 1,463 genes were altered more than 1.5-fold in H460R compared with parental H460. To evaluate the putative functional role, we selected one interesting gene tumor protein p53-inducible protein 3 (TP53I3), because that this gene was significantly downregulated in radioresistant H460R cells and that it was predicted to link p53-dependent cell death signaling. Interestingly, messenger ribonucleic acid expression of TP53I3 differed in X-ray-irradiated H460 and H460R cells, and overexpression of TP53I3 significantly affected the cellular radiosensitivity of H460R cells. Conclusions: These results show that H460R may be useful in searching for candidate genes that are responsible for radioresistance and elucidating the molecular mechanism of radioresistance.

  16. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  17. Radiation induced estane polymer crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, M.; Foster, P.

    1997-12-01

    The exposure of polymeric materials to radiation has been known to induce the effects of crosslinking and degradation. The crosslinking phenomena comes about when two long chain polymers become linked together by a primary bond that extends the chain and increases the viscosity, molecular weight and the elastic modules of the polymer. This process has been observed in relatively short periods of time with fairly high doses of radiation, on the order of several megarads/hour. This paper address low dose exposure over long periods of time to determine what the radiation effects are on the polymeric binder material in PBX 9501. An experimental sample of binder material without explosives will be placed into a thermal and radiation field produced from a W-48 put mod 0. Another sample will be placed in a thermal environment without the radiation. The following is the test plan that was submitted to the Pantex process. The data presented here will be from the first few weeks of exposure and this test will be continued over the next few years. Subsequent data will hopefully be presented in the next compatibility and aging conference.

  18. A Preliminary Study on Racial Differences in HMOX1, NFE2L2, and TGFβ1 Gene Polymorphisms and Radiation-Induced Late Normal Tissue Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Asim; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.; Ning, Yi; Reshko, Leonid B.; Cardnell, Robert J.G.; Alam, Omair; Rabender, Christopher S.; Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Walker, Linda; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Mikkelsen, Ross B.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: This study tested whether racial differences in genetic polymorphisms of 4 genes involved in wound repair and response to radiation can be used to predict the occurrence of normal tissue late effects of radiation therapy and indicate potential therapeutic targets. Methods and Materials: This prospective study examined genetic polymorphisms that modulate the expression of 4 genes involved in inflammation and fibrosis and response to radiation (HMOX1, NFE2L2, NOS3, and TGFβ1). DNA from blood samples of 179 patients (∼80% breast and head and neck) collected at the time of diagnosis by their radiation oncologist as exhibiting late normal tissue toxicity was used for the analysis. Patient demographics were as follows: 56% white, 43% African American, 1% other. Allelic frequencies of the different polymorphisms of the participants were compared with those of the general American population stratified by race. Twenty-six additional patients treated with radiation, but without toxicity at 3 months or later after therapy, were also analyzed. Results: Increased frequency of a long GT repeat in the HMOX1 promoter was associated with late effects in both African American and white populations. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) rs1800469 in the TGFβ1 promoter and the rs6721961 SNP in the NFE2L2 promoter were also found to significantly associate with late effects in African Americans but not whites. A combined analysis of these polymorphisms revealed that >90% of African American patients with late effects had at least 1 of these minor alleles, and 58% had 2 or more. No statistical significance was found relating the studied NOS3 polymorphisms and normal tissue toxicity. Conclusions: These results support a strong association between wound repair and late toxicities of radiation. The presence of these genetic risk factors can vary significantly among different ethnic groups, as demonstrated for some of the SNPs. Future studies should account for the

  19. Combined effects of ionizing radiation and cycloheximide on gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1993-11-01

    Experiments were done to determine the effects of ionizing radiation exposure on expression of genes following exposure of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells to the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (including such genes as {beta}-actin, c-fos, H4-histone, c-myc, c-jun, Rb, and p53). Results revealed that when ionizing radiations (either fission-spectrum neutrons or {gamma}-rays) were administered 15 min following the cycloheximide treatment of SHE cells, the radiation exposure reduced cycloheximide-mediated gene induction for most of the induced genes studied (c-fos, H4-histone, c-jun) In addition, dose-rate differences were found when radiation exposure most significantly inhibited the cycloheximide response. Our results suggest (1) that ionizing radiation does not act as a general protein synthesis inhibitor and (2) that the presence of a labile (metastable) protein is required for the maintenance of transcription and mRNA accumulation following radiation exposure, especially for radiation administered at high dose-rates.

  20. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  1. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuei-Fang; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Chi, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Ching-Kai; Liu, Ingrid Y.; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from five participants and each sample was subjected to 0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, 2.5 Gy, and 5 Gy of cobalt 60 radiation, followed by array-based expression profiling. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that the immune system and cancer development pathways appeared to be the major affected targets by radiation exposure. Therefore, 1 Gy radioactive exposure seemed to be a critical threshold dosage. In fact, after 1 Gy radiation exposure, expression levels of several genes including FADD, TNFRSF10B, TNFRSF8, TNFRSF10A, TNFSF10, TNFSF8, CASP1, and CASP4 that are associated with carcinogenesis and metabolic disorders showed significant alterations. Our results suggest that exposure to low-dose radiation may elicit changes in metabolic and immune pathways, potentially increasing the risk of immune dysfunctions and metabolic disorders. PMID:25276823

  2. Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Low-Dose Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegyesi, Hargita; Sándor, Nikolett; Schilling, Boglárka; Kis, Enikő; Lumniczky, Katalin; Sáfrány, Géza

    We have studied low dose radiation induced gene expression alterations in a primary human fibroblast cell line using Agilent's whole human genome microarray. Cells were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays (0; 0.1; 0.5 Gy) and 2 hours later total cellular RNA was isolated. We observed differential regulation of approximately 300-500 genes represented on the microarray. Of these, 126 were differentially expressed at both doses, among them significant elevation of GDF-15 and KITLG was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Based on the transcriptional studies we selected GDF-15 to assess its role in radiation response, since GDF-15 is one of the p53 gene targets and is believed to participate in mediating p53 activities. First we confirmed gamma-radiation induced dose-dependent changes in GDF-15 expression by qRT-PCR. Next we determined the effect of GDF-15 silencing on radiosensitivity. Four GDF-15 targeting shRNA expressing lentiviral vectors were transfected into immortalized human fibroblast cells. We obtained efficient GDF-15 silencing in one of the four constructs. RNA interference inhibited GDF-15 gene expression and enhanced the radiosensitivity of the cells. Our studies proved that GDF-15 plays an essential role in radiation response and may serve as a promising target in radiation therapy.

  3. The Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, M; Fardid, R; Hadadi, Gh; Fardid, M

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect is the phenomenon which non-irradiated cells exhibit effects along with their different levels as a result of signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Responses of non-irradiated cells may include changes in process of translation, gene expression, cell proliferation, apoptosis and cells death. These changes are confirmed by results of some In-Vivo studies. Most well-known important factors affecting radiation-induced bystander effect include free radicals, immune system factors, expression changes of some genes involved in inflammation pathway and epigenetic factors. PMID:25599062

  4. Induced Smith-Purcell radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, D. N.; Artemyev, A. I.; Oganesyan, K. B.; Rostovtsev, Y. V.; Hu, C.-K.

    2010-11-01

    Excitation of induced coherent Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation by relativistic magnetized electron beam in the absence of the resonator is considered within the framework of the dispersion equation. We have found that the dispersion equation for the SP instability is a quadratic equation for frequency. The first-step approximation for solution of the dispersion equation, giving the SP-spectrum of frequency, corresponds to the mirror boundary case, when the electron beam propagates above a plane metal surface (mirror). It was found that the conditions for both the Thompson and the Raman regimes of excitation do not depend on beam current and depend on the height of the beam above the grating surface. The growth rate of the instability in both cases is proportional to the square root of the electron beam current. No feedback is needed to provide the coherent emission.

  5. Suitability of Commonly Used Housekeeping Genes in Gene Expression Studies for Space Radiation Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, A.; Hellweg, C. E.; Bogner, S.; Lau, P.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    Research on the effects of ionizing radiation exposure involves the use of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction qRT-PCR for measuring changes in gene expression Several variables needs to be controlled for gene expression analysis -- different amounts of starting material between the samples variations in enzymatic efficiencies of the reverse transcription step and differences in RNA integrity Normalization of the obtained data to an invariant endogenous control gene reference gene is the elementary step in relative quantification strategy There is a strong correlation between the quality of the normalized data and the stability of the reference gene itself This is especially relevant when the samples have been obtained after exposure to radiation qualities inducing different amounts and kinds of damage leading to a cell cycle delay or even to a cell cycle block In order to determine suitable reference genes as internal controls in qRT-PCR assays after exposure to ionizing radiation we studied the gene expression levels of commonly used reference genes in A549 lung cancer cells Expression levels obtained for human beta actin ACTB human beta-2-microglobulin B2M human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase GAPDH human porphobilinogen deaminase PBGD human 18S ribosomal RNA 18S rRNA human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase G6PDH human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase HPRT human ubiquitin C UBC human transferrin TFRC

  6. Medium-induced multi-photon radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Salgado, Carlos A.; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    We study the spectrum of multi-photon radiation off a fast quark in medium in the BDMPS/ASW approach. We reproduce the medium-induced one-photon radiation spectrum in dipole approximation, and go on to calculate the two-photon radiation in the Molière limit. We find that in this limit the LPM effect holds for medium-induced two-photon ladder emission.

  7. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

  8. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure.

  9. Radiation response and regulation of apoptosis induced by a combination of TRAIL and CHX in cells lacking mitochondrial DNA: A role for NF-{kappa}B-STAT3-directed gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir N. Ghandhi, Shanaz A.; Zhou, Hongning; Huang, Sarah X.; Chai, Yunfei; Amundson, Sally A.; Hei, Tom K.

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depleted ({rho}{sup 0}) human skin fibroblasts (HSF) with suppressed oxidative phosphorylation were characterized by significant changes in the expression of 2100 nuclear genes, encoding numerous protein classes, in NF-{kappa}B and STAT3 signaling pathways, and by decreased activity of mitochondrial death pathway, compared to the parental {rho}{sup +} HSF. In contrast, the extrinsic TRAIL/TRAIL-Receptor mediated death pathway remained highly active, and exogenous TRAIL in a combination with cycloheximide (CHX) induced higher levels of apoptosis in {rho}{sup 0} cells compared to {rho}{sup +} HSF. Global gene expression analysis using microarray and qRT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA expression levels of many growth factors and their adaptor proteins (FGF13, HGF, IGFBP4, IGFBP6, and IGFL2), cytokines (IL6, {Oota}L17{Beta}, {Oota}L18, {Oota}L19, and {Oota}L28{Beta}) and cytokine receptors (IL1R1, IL21R, and IL31RA) were substantially decreased after mitochondrial DNA depletion. Some of these genes were targets of NF-{kappa}B and STAT3, and their protein products could regulate the STAT3 signaling pathway. Alpha-irradiation further induced expression of several NF-{kappa}B/STAT3 target genes, including IL1A, IL1B, IL6, PTGS2/COX2 and MMP12, in {rho}{sup +} HSF, but this response was substantially decreased in {rho}{sup 0} HSF. Suppression of the IKK-NF-{kappa}B pathway by the small molecular inhibitor BMS-345541 and of the JAK2-STAT3 pathway by AG490 dramatically increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the control and irradiated {rho}{sup +} HSF. Inhibitory antibodies against IL6, the main activator of JAK2-STAT3 pathway, added into the cell media, also increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HSF, especially after alpha-irradiation. Collectively, our results indicated that NF-{kappa}B activation was partially lost in {rho}{sup 0} HSF resulting in downregulation of the basal or radiation-induced expression of numerous NF-{kappa}B targets, further suppressing IL6

  10. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  11. Radiation-induced neoplasms of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Skultety, F.M.; Leibrock, L.G.; Severson, G.S.

    1987-04-01

    The histopathology of two patients with radiation-induced neoplasms of the brain following therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancies is described. The second neoplasms were an atypical meningioma and a polymorphous cell sarcoma, respectively. They occurred 12 and 23 years after irradiation (4000 rad), within the original field of irradiation. In both cases, the radiation-induced tumors were histologically distinct from the initial medulloblastomas. Both patients were retreated with local irradiation using permanent implantation of radioactive iodine-125 seeds.

  12. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  13. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Gilson, Verle A.; Schriever, Richard L.; Shearer, James W.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  14. Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

  15. Radiation-induced intracranial malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.; Mealey, J. Jr.; Sartorius, C.

    1989-07-01

    The authors present seven cases of malignant gliomas that occurred after radiation therapy administered for diseases different from the subsequent glial tumor. Included among these seven are three patients who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy. Previously reported cases of radiation-induced glioma are reviewed and analyzed for common characteristics. Children receiving central nervous system irradiation appear particularly susceptible to induction of malignant gliomas by radiation. Interstitial brachytherapy may be used successfully instead of external beam radiotherapy in previously irradiated, tumor-free brain, and thus may reduce the risk of radiation necrosis. 31 references.

  16. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Eun-Jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  17. [Quantification of radiation-induced genetic risk].

    PubMed

    Ehling, U H

    1987-05-01

    Associated with technical advances of our civilization is a radiation- and chemically-induced increase in the germ cell mutation rate in man. This would result in an increase in the frequency of genetic diseases and would be detrimental to future generations. It is the duty of our generation to keep this risk as low as possible. The estimation of the radiation-induced genetic risk of human populations is based on the extrapolation of results from animal experiments. Radiation-induced mutations are stochastic events. The probability of the event depends on the dose; the degree of the damage does not. The different methods to estimate the radiation-induced genetic risk will be discussed. The accuracy of the predicted results will be evaluated by a comparison with the observed incidence of dominant mutations in offspring born to radiation exposed survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. These methods will be used to predict the genetic damage from the fallout of the reactor accident at Chernobyl. For the exposure dose we used the upper limits of the mean effective life time equivalent dose from the fallout values in the Munich region. According to the direct method for the risk estimation we will expect for each 100 to 500 spontaneous dominant mutations one radiation-induced mutation in the first generation. With the indirect method we estimate a ratio of 100 dominant spontaneous mutations to one radiation-induced dominant mutation. The possibilities and the limitations of the different methods to estimate the genetic risk will be discussed. The discrepancy between the high safety standards for radiation protection and the low level of knowledge for the toxicological evaluation of chemical mutagens will be emphasized. PMID:3589954

  18. Radiation-induced squamous sialometaplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Leshin, B.; White, W.L.; Koufman, J.A. )

    1990-07-01

    We describe a patient with recurrent acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma following radiation therapy. Mohs micrographic sections revealed extensive squamous sialometaplasia showing striking histologic similarity to the patient's squamous cell carcinoma. Criteria necessary to differentiate squamous sialometaplasia from neoplasm are presented. This differentiation is important to ensure adequate tumor resection without unnecessary sacrifice of tumor-free tissue.

  19. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  20. Induced radioactivity from industrial radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lone, M. A.

    1990-12-01

    Analytic expressions are developed for quantitative analysis of radioactivity induced by radiation processing of products with electrons or photons. These expressions provide reasonable estimates of induced activity much faster than Monte Carlo simulations. Analysis of radioactivity from processing of meat with 10 MeV electrons shows an induced activity of less than 10 mBq/(kgkGy) just after irradiation. This is 4 orders of magnitude less than the natural background activity of about 100 Bq/kg found in meat. Five days after processing the induced activity will reduce by a factor of 300.

  1. Important step in radiation carcinogenesis may be inactivation of cellular genes

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.A.; Diamond, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The loss of genetic material may result in a predisposition to malignant disease. The best studied example is retinoblastoma where deletion or transcriptional inactivation of a specific gene is associated with the development of the tumor. When hereditary retinoblastoma patients are treated with radiation, the incidence of osteosarcoma within the treatment field is extremely high compared to other cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. These data, together with cytogenetic and molecular data on the development of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment suggest that radiation-induced deletions of critical DNA sequences may be an important event in radiation carcinogenesis. Therefore, we propose that radiation-induced tumors may result from deletion of tissue specific regulatory genes. Base alterations caused by radiation in dominantly transforming oncogenes may also contribute to radiation carcinogenesis.62 references.

  2. Imaging Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Mike E.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Tsien, Christina I.; Bailey, Janet E.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2013-01-01

    Technological developments in radiation therapy and other cancer therapies have led to a progressive increase in five-year survival rates over the last few decades. Although acute effects have been largely minimized by both technical advances and medical interventions, late effects remain a concern. Indeed, the need to identify those individuals who will develop radiation-induced late effects, and to develop interventions to prevent or ameliorate these late effects is a critical area of radiobiology research. In the last two decades, preclinical studies have clearly established that late radiation injury can be prevented/ameliorated by pharmacological therapies aimed at modulating the cascade of events leading to the clinical expression of radiation-induced late effects. These insights have been accompanied by significant technological advances in imaging that are moving radiation oncology and normal tissue radiobiology from disciplines driven by anatomy and macrostructure to ones in which important quantitative functional, microstructural, and metabolic data can be noninvasively and serially determined. In the current article, we review use of positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy to generate pathophysiological and functional data in the central nervous system, lung, and heart that offer the promise of, (1) identifying individuals who are at risk of developing radiation-induced late effects, and (2) monitoring the efficacy of interventions to prevent/ameliorate them. PMID:22348250

  3. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T. Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Molinie, P.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  4. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T.; Molinie, P.; Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon® FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon® FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  5. Management of radiation-induced urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Matthias D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation as a treatment option for prostate cancer has been chosen by many patients. One of the side effects encountered are radiation-induced urethral strictures which occur in up to 11% of patients. Radiation damage has often left the irradiated field fibrotic and with poor vascularization which make these strictures a challenging entity to treat. The mainstay of urologic management remains an urethroplasty procedure for which several approaches exist with variable optimal indication. Excision and primary anastomoses are ideal for shorter bulbar strictures that comprise the majority of radiation-induced urethral strictures. One advantage of this technique is that it does not require tissue transfers and success rates of 70-95% have consistently been reported. Substitution urethroplasty using remote graft tissue such as buccal mucosa are indicated if the length of the stricture precludes a tension-free primary anastomosis. Despite the challenge of graft survival in radiation-damaged and poorly vascularized recipient tissue, up to 83% of patients have been treated successfully although the numbers described in the literature are small. The most extensive repairs involve the use of tissue flaps, for example gracilis muscle, which may be required if the involved periurethral tissue is unable to provide sufficient vascular support for a post-operative urethral healing process. In summary, radiation-induced urethral strictures are a challenging entity. Most strictures are amenable to excision and primary anastomosis (EPA) with encouraging success rates but substitution urethroplasty may be indicated when extensive repair is needed. PMID:26816812

  6. Radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Perino, L.E.; Schuffler, M.D.; Mehta, S.J.; Everson, G.T.

    1986-10-01

    A case of intestinal pseudoobstruction occurring 30 yr after radiation therapy is described. Mechanical causes of obstruction were excluded by laparotomy. Histology of full-thickness sections of the small bowel revealed vascular ectasia and sclerosis, serosal fibrosis, neuronal proliferation within the submucosa, and degeneration of the muscle fibers of the circular layer of the muscularis propria. On the basis of the clinical and histologic findings we conclude that, in this patient, intestinal pseudoobstruction was due to muscular and neuronal injury from abdominal irradiation.

  7. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F. )

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  8. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  9. Ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis: radiation studies in Neurospora predictive for results in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; DeMarini, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation was the first mutagen discovered and was used to develop the first mutagenicity assay. In the ensuing 70+ years, ionizing radiation became a fundamental tool in understanding mutagenesis and is still a subject of intensive research. Frederick de Serres et al. developed and used the Neurospora crassa ad-3 system initially to explore the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. Using this system, de Serres et al. demonstrated the dependence of the frequency and spectra of mutations induced by ionizing radiation on the dose, dose rate, radiation quality, repair capabilities of the cells, and the target gene employed. This work in Neurospora predicted the subsequent observations of the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Modeled originally on the mouse specific-locus system developed by William L. Russell, the N. crassa ad-3 system developed by de Serres has itself served as a model for interpreting the results in subsequent systems in mammalian cells. This review describes the primary findings on the nature of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in the N. crassa ad-3 system and the parallel observations made years later in mammalian cells.

  10. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  11. Virus-induced gene complementation in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jinhua; Chen, Weiwei; Shen, Jiajia; Qin, Cheng; Lai, Tongfei; Zhang, Pengcheng; Wang, Ying; Wu, Chaoqun; Yang, Xin; Hong, Yiguo

    2013-01-01

    Virus-induced gene complementation (VIGC), a plant virus technology based on Potato virus X for transient overexpression of endogenous genes complemented tomato mutants, resulting in non-ripening fruits to ripen. This efficient “gain-of-function” approach involves no stable transformation, and reveals a fruit-specific transcriptional network that may exist among key transcription factors in modulating tomato ripening. Thus, VIGC represents a novel and feasible strategy for gene functional analysis in plants. PMID:24305652

  12. A specific library of randomly integrated reporter genes for the isolation of inducible functions by cell sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Lapeyre, J.N.; Marini, F.; Gratzner, H.G. AMC ImmunoDiagnostics, Houston, TX )

    1993-01-01

    A library of cells containing randomly integrated reporter genes has been constructed. The purpose of this library is to enable the isolation of genes of interest which are inducible by radiation, biological response modifiers, cytokines, or other agents. These genes are located near reporter genes which can be induced by the upstream promoter of the gene of interest. The reporter gene, Lac Z, was randomly inserted into the genome by retroviral transduction and subsequent selection of the neo[sup r] gene with gentamycin. Studies of radiation inducible genes were undertaken, whereby cells with the radiation sensitive function were isolated by sorting the cells fluorescent after staining with the beta gal substrate, fluorescein digalactoside (FDG). This gene-tagging approach is an improvement over the cDNA library subtraction protocol in that a single library of cells with random marker gene integration can be repeatedly and sequentially probed by sorting under different, selective conditions, dependent upon the genes to be characterized.

  13. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  14. Cataracts induced by microwave and ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, R.M.; Tripathi, B.J.; Tripathi, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Microwaves most commonly cause anterior and/or posterior subcapsular lenticular opacities in experimental animals and, as shown in epidemiologic studies and case reports, in human subjects. The formation of cataracts seems to be related directly to the power of the microwave and the duration of exposure. The mechanism of cataractogenesis includes deformation of heat-labile enzymes, such as glutathione peroxide, that ordinarily protect lens cell proteins and membrane lipids from oxidative damage. Oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups and the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates cause local variations in the orderly structure of the lens cells. An alternative mechanism is thermoelastic expansion through which pressure waves in the aqueous humor cause direct physical damage to the lens cells. Cataracts induced by ionizing radiation (e.g., X-rays and gamma rays) usually are observed in the posterior region of the lens, often in the form of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation causes increasing opacification of the lens, which appears after a decreasing latency period. Like cataract formation by microwaves, cataractogenesis induced by ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the lens cell membrane. Another possible mechanism is damage to lens cell DNA, with decreases in the production of protective enzymes and in sulfur-sulfur bond formation, and with altered protein concentrations. Until further definitive conclusions about the mechanisms of microwaves and ionizing radiation induced cataracts are reached, and alternative protective measures are found, one can only recommend mechanical shielding from these radiations to minimize the possibility of development of radiation-induced cataracts. 74 references.

  15. Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagadec, Chann; Vlashi, Erina; Alhiyari, Yazeed; Phillips, Tiffany M.; Bochkur Dratver, Milana; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for γ-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dose–dependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, γ-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells.

  16. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style.

  17. Virus induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis gene homologues in wheat identify genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat, functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for wheat breeding. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited tra...

  18. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  19. [Radiation-induced and therapy-related AML/MDS].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Toshiya

    2009-10-01

    Radiation induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was recognized a century ago, soon after mankind found radiation. Atomic bomb survivors developed de novo AML with relatively short latency with very high frequency. By contrast, excess occurrence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) as well as solid tumors was found decades late. This difference may be due to etiology that many de novo AML patients harbor chimeric leukemogenic genes caused by chromosomal translocations, while MDS patients rarely carry chimeras. In addition, epigenetic change would play important roles. Therapy related leukemia is mainly caused by topoisomerase II inhibitors that cause de novo AML with an 11q23 translocation or by alkyrating agents that induce MDS/AML with an AML1 point mutation and monosomy 7. PMID:19860183

  20. Low-dose radiation exposure induces a HIF-1-mediated adaptive and protective metabolic response

    PubMed Central

    Lall, R; Ganapathy, S; Yang, M; Xiao, S; Xu, T; Su, H; Shadfan, M; Asara, J M; Ha, C S; Ben-Sahra, I; Manning, B D; Little, J B; Yuan, Z-M

    2014-01-01

    Because of insufficient understanding of the molecular effects of low levels of radiation exposure, there is a great uncertainty regarding its health risks. We report here that treatment of normal human cells with low-dose radiation induces a metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis resulting in increased radiation resistance. This metabolic change is highlighted by upregulation of genes encoding glucose transporters and enzymes of glycolysis and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, concomitant with downregulation of mitochondrial genes, with corresponding changes in metabolic flux through these pathways. Mechanistically, the metabolic reprogramming depends on HIF1α, which is induced specifically by low-dose irradiation linking the metabolic pathway with cellular radiation dose response. Increased glucose flux and radiation resistance from low-dose irradiation are also observed systemically in mice. This highly sensitive metabolic response to low-dose radiation has important implications in understanding and assessing the health risks of radiation exposure. PMID:24583639

  1. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Philipp J.; Park, Henry S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  2. Ionizing Radiation-induced Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Meeseon; Moon, Kieun; Jo, Min-Heui; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Radiation risk has become well known through epidemiological studies of clinically or occupationally exposed populations, animal experiments, and in vitro studies; however, the study of radiation related or induced disease has been limited in Korea. This study is to find the level of occupational radiation exposure for various kinds of accidents, compensated occupational diseases, related studies, and estimations on future occupational disease risks. Research data of related institutions were additionally investigated. About 67% of 62,553 radiation workers had no exposure or less than 1.2 mSv per year. The 5 reported cases on radiation accident patients in Korea occurred during nondestructive testing. According to the recent rapid increase in the number of workers exposed to radiation, a higher social recognition of cancer, and an increasing cancer mortality rate, it is expected that occupational disease compensation will rapidly increase as well. Therefore, it is important to develop scientific and objective decision methods, such as probability of causation and screening dose in the establishment of an exposure and health surveillance system. PMID:21258594

  3. Radiation-induced autophagy: mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Madhuri; Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Das, Asmita; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S; Sharma, Kulbhushan

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionary conserved, indispensable, lysosome-mediated degradation process, which helps in maintaining homeostasis during various cellular traumas. During stress, a context-dependent role of autophagy has been observed which drives the cell towards survival or death depending upon the type, time, and extent of the damage. The process of autophagy is stimulated during various cellular insults, e.g. oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, imbalances in calcium homeostasis, and altered mitochondrial potential. Ionizing radiation causes ROS-dependent as well as ROS-independent damage in cells that involve macromolecular (mainly DNA) damage, as well as ER stress induction, both capable of inducing autophagy. This review summarizes the current understanding on the roles of oxidative stress, ER stress, DNA damage, altered mitochondrial potential, and calcium imbalance in radiation-induced autophagy as well as the merits and limitations of targeting autophagy as an approach for radioprotection and radiosensitization. PMID:26764568

  4. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  5. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  6. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  7. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  8. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development. PMID:25681390

  9. Genistein mitigates radiation-induced testicular injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Heo, Kyu; Yi, Joo-Mi; Gong, Eun Ji; Yang, Kwangmo; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2012-08-01

    The present study investigated the radioprotective effect of a multifunctional soy isoflavone, genistein, with the testicular system. Genistein was administered (200 mg/kg body weight) to male C3H/HeN mice by subcutaneous injection 24 h prior to pelvic irradiation (5 Gy). Histopathological parameters were evaluated 12 h and 21 days post-irradiation. Genistein protected the germ cells from radiation-induced apoptosis (p < 0.05 vs vehicle-treated irradiated mice at 12 h post-irradiation). Genistein significantly attenuated radiation-induced reduction in testis weight, seminiferous tubular diameter, seminiferous epithelial depth and sperm head count in the testes (p < 0.05 vs vehicle-treated irradiated mice at 21 days post-irradiation). Repopulation and stem cell survival indices of the seminiferous tubules were increased in the genistein-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated irradiation group at 21 days post-irradiation (p < 0.01). The irradiation-mediated decrease in the sperm count and sperm mobility in the epididymis was counteracted by genistein (p < 0.01), but no effect on the frequency of abnormal sperm was evident. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated using DCFDA method and exposure to irradiation elevated ROS levels in the testis and genistein treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of radiation-induced ROS production. The results indicate that genistein protects from testicular dysfunction induced by gamma-irradiation by an antiapoptotic effect and recovery of spermatogenesis. PMID:22162311

  10. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila genes. Report III. The black gene: general and molecular characteristics of its radiomutability].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, I D; Namolovan, L N; Aleksandrova, M V

    2012-01-01

    The results of the genetic, cytogenetic and molecular analysis of the nature of heritable recessive mutations at the small black (b) gene of Drosophila melanogaster induced by different doses (5-10 Gy) of 60Co gamma-rays and 0.85 MeV fission neutrons in the mature sperms of the wild-type males from the laboratory line D32 are presented. The whole spectrum of the b mutations induced by radiation of different quality is found to be the same and consists of the two main classes such as gene/point and gene/chromosome mutations, the latter of which include the whole-genomic, infra- or inter-chromosomal rearrangements involving the b gene. The induction rate of both mutation classes is found to be increased linearly with a dose of low- and high-LET radiation and the effectiveness of neutrons is 2.7 and 4.6 as large as that of gamma-rays under the gene/point and gene/chromosome mutation induction, respectively. Essentially, the molecular alterations underlying 65 gamma-ray- and neutron-induced gene/point b mutations are found not to be detected by the PCR technique. These and other established features of the b gene radiomutability are drastically different from those of another larger vestigial gene described earlier. The nature of these differences is discussed within the framework of the current notion of different biological organization of the two genes mentioned above and of the track structure theory as well. PMID:23227709

  11. Cathodoluminescence of radiation-induced zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Nishido, H.; Kayama, M.; Noumi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Zircon occurs as a common accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, and maintains much information on thermal history, metamorphic process and natural radiation dose accumulated in the mineral. U-Pb zircon dating (e.g., SHRIMP) is an important tool to interpret a history of the minerals at a micrometer-scale, where cathodoluminescence (CL) image has been used for identification of internal zones and domains having different chemical compositions and/or structures with a high spatial resolution. The CL of zircon is derived from various types of emission centers, which are derived from impurities such as rare earth elements (REE) and structural defects. In fact, the CL features of zircon are closely related to metamorphic process and radiation from contained radionuclides as well as geochemical condition of its formation. Most zircon has yellow emission, which seems to be assigned to UO2 centers or radiation-induced defect during metamictization of the lattice by alpha particles from the decay of U and Th. In this study, the radiation effects on zircon CL have been studied for He+ ion-implanted samples annealed at various temperatures to clarify radiation-induced defect centers involved with the yellow CL emission in zircon. Single crystals of zircon from Malawi (MZ), Takidani granodiorite (TZ) and Kurobegawa granite (KZ) were selected for He+ ion implantation experiments. The polished plates of the samples were implanted by He+ ion 4.0 MeV corresponding to energy of alpha particle from 238 U and 232Th. CL spectra in the range from 300 to 800 nm with 1 nm step were measured by a scanning electron microscopy-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL). CL spectra of untreated and annealed zircon show emission bands at ~370 nm assigned to intrinsic defect centers and at ~480, ~580 and ~760 nm to trivalent Dy impurity centers (Cesbron et al., 1995; Gaft et al, 2005). CL emissions in the yellow-region were observed in untreated zircon. The TZ and KZ indicate

  12. Estrogen Protects against Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Valluri, Shailaja; Lopez, Jennifer; Greer, Falon; DesRosiers, Colleen; Caperell-Grant, Andrea; Mendonca, Marc S.; Bigsby, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Cataractogenesis is a complication of radiotherapy when the eye is included in the treatment field. Low doses of densely ionizing space radiation may also result in an increased risk of cataracts in astronauts. We previously reported that estrogen (17-β-estradiol), when administered to ovariectomized rats commencing 1 week before γ irradiation of the eye and continuously thereafter, results in a significant increase in the rate and incidence of cataract formation and a decreased latent period compared to an ovariectomized control group. We therefore concluded that estrogen accelerates progression of radiation-induced opacification. We now show that estrogen, if administered continuously, but commencing after irradiation, protects against radiation cataractogenesis. Both the rate of progression and incidence of cataracts were greatly reduced in ovariectomized rats that received estrogen treatment after irradiation compared to ovariectomized rats. As in our previous study, estradiol administered 1 week prior to irradiation at the time of ovariectomy and throughout the period of observation produced an enhanced rate of cataract progression. Estrogen administered for only 1 week prior to irradiation had no effect on the rate of progression but resulted in a slight reduction in the incidence. We conclude that estrogen may enhance or protect against radiation cataractogenesis, depending on when it is administered relative to the time of irradiation, and may differentially modulate the initiation and progression phases of cataractogenesis. These data have important implications for astronauts and radiotherapy patients. PMID:19138041

  13. Radiation induced carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Amendola, M.A.; McClatchey, K.D.

    1985-07-01

    A squamous cell carcinoma presented in a 20 year old female nonsmoker three years after receiving a high dosage of radiation therapy to the base of the skull, face and entire neuroaxis and intense combination chemotherapy for a parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is reported. The larynx received a dose of about 3,500 rads over an eight week period. This dosage in conjunction with the associated intense chemotherapy regimen given to the patient may explain the appearance of a radiation induced tumor in an unusually short latent period. This certainly represents a risk in young patients in whom an aggressive combined approach is taken and the physician should be aware of.

  14. Molecular targets in radiation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Nordal, Robert A.; Wong, C. Shun . E-mail: shun.wang@sw.ca

    2005-05-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key feature of radiation injury to the central nervous system. Studies suggest that endothelial cell apoptosis, gene expression changes, and alteration of the microenvironment are important in initiation and progression of injury. Although substantial effort has been directed at understanding the impact of radiation on endothelial cells and oligodendrocytes, growing evidence suggests that other cell types, including astrocytes, are important in responses that include induced gene expression and microenvironmental changes. Endothelial apoptosis is important in early BBB disruption. Hypoxia and oxidative stress in the later period that precedes tissue damage might lead to astrocytic responses that impact cell survival and cell interactions. Cell death, gene expression changes, and a toxic microenvironment can be viewed as interacting elements in a model of radiation-induced disruption of the BBB. These processes implicate particular genes and proteins as targets in potential strategies for neuroprotection.

  15. Tumor suppressor function of Betaig-H3 gene in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Interaction between cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Using an immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cell model, we showed previously that expression of a list of genes including Betaig-h3 (induced by transforming growth factor-β) DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), p21 cip1, c-fos , Heat shock protein (HSP27) and cytokeratin 14 were differentially expressed in several independently generated, radiation-induced tumor cell lines (TL1-TL5) relative to parental BEP2D cells. Our previous data further demonstrated that loss of tumor suppressor gene(s) as a likely mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis. In the present study, we chose Betaig-h3 and DCC that were downregulated in tumorigenic cells for further study. Restored expression of Betaig-h3 gene, not DCC gene, by transfecting cDNA into tumor cells resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth. While integrin receptor α5β1 was overexpressed in tumor cells, its expression was corrected to the level found in control BEP2D cells after Betaig-h3 transfection. These data suggest that Betaig-h3 gene is involved in tumor progression by regulating integrin α5β1 receptor. Furthermore, exogenous TGF-β1 induced expression of Betaig-h3 gene and inhibited the growth of both control and tumorigenic BEP2D cells. Therefore, downregulation of Betaig-h3 gene may results from the decreased expression of upstream mediators such as TGF-β. The findings provide strong evidence that the Betaig-h3 gene has tumor suppressor function in radiation-induced tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a potential target for interventional therapy.

  16. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Nishio, S.; Morioka, T.; Fukui, M.; Kitamura, K.; Hikita, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The case of a patient who developed osteosarcoma in the sphenoid bone 15 years after radiation therapy for a craniopharyngioma is reported. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone has not been reported previously. Reported cases of radiation-induced osteosarcomas are reviewed.

  17. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila genes. Report V. The cinnabar gene: general and molecular characteristics of its radiomutability].

    PubMed

    Davkova, L N; Aleksandrov, I D; Aleksandrova, M V

    2014-01-01

    The results of the genetic, cytogenetic and molecular analysis of the recessive mutations at the small, lying close to the centromere, cinnabar (cn) gene of Drosophila melanogaster induced by γ-rays of 60Co (doses 5-60 Gy) or 0.85 MeV fission neutrons (doses 2.5-20 Gy) in the mature sperm of the wild-type males from the laboratory line D32 are presented. The whole spectrum of the cn mutations induced by different quality radiation is found to be the same and consists of the two main-distinct classes such as gene/point and gene/chromosome mutations either of which includes the array of the subclasses (gene/point simple or complex mutations and chromosome rearrangements detected as F1 cn mutants with dominant sterility of multilocus deletions involving the cn gene wholly). The induction rate of both mutation classes is found to be increased linearly with dose of low- and high-LET radiation and the RGE values of neutrons are 1.0 and 4.0 for the gene/point and gene/chromosome mutations respectively. According to the data of the molecular analysis, 28 out of 59 (47.5%) γ-ray- and neutron-induced gene/point cn mutations studied are found to have the intragenic DNA alterations detected by PCR technique as a loss of the single or two adjacent fragments-amplicons non-randomly located at the 5'- or 3'- end of the gene map. Essentially, 10 out of 48 (20.8%) γ-ray-and 3 out of 11 (27.3%) neutron-induced gene/point mutations are found to show the same molecular "phenotype" (the loss of the two adjacent fragments at the 3'- end of the gene map) as that in the cn1 allele-marker from the maternal tester-line KL with the females of which the irradiated males were crossed. Among the putative recombination-based genetic processes underlying the exchange between the cn1 and damaged cn(+32) alleles, the gene conversion in the "gonomeric" nucleus of the zygote seems to be the most likely such processing. The established features of the cn gene radiomutability are compared with those

  18. Radiation induced micrencephaly in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, L.K.; Johnston, D.A.; Felleman, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A brain weight deficit of about 70 mg was induced at doses of approximately 75-mGy and a deficit of 60 mg was induced at 100 mGy. This confirms the effects projected and observed by Wanner and Edwards. Although the data do not demonstrate a clear dose-response relationship between the 75-mGy and 100-mGy groups, the data are statistically consistent with a dose-response effect because of the overlapping confidence intervals. The lack of a statistically significant observation is most likely related to the small difference in doses and the limited numbers of animals examined. There are several factors that can influence the brain weight of guinea pig pups, such as caging and housing conditions, the sex of the animal, and litter size. These should be taken into account for accurate analysis. Dam weight did not appear to have a significant effect. The confirmation of a micrencephalic effect induced x rays at doses of 75-mGy during this late embryonic stage of development is consistent with the findings of small head size induced in those exposed prior to the eight week of conception at Hiroshima. This implies a mechanism for micrencephaly different from those previously suggested and lends credence to a causal relation between radiation and small head size in humans at low doses as reported by Miller and Mulvihill. 16 refs., 13 tabs.

  19. Gene expression in Catla catla (Hamilton) subjected to acute and protracted doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Anbumani, S; Mohankumar, Mary N

    2016-09-01

    Studies on transcriptional modulation after gamma radiation exposure in fish are limited. Cell cycle perturbations and expression of apoptotic genes were investigated in the fish, Catla catla after acute and protracted exposures to gamma radiation over a 90day period. Significant changes in gene expression were observed between day 1 and 90 post-exposure. Gamma radiation induced a significant down-regulation of target genes gadd45α, cdk1 and bcl-2 from day 1 to day 3 after protracted exposure, whereas it persists till day 6 upon acute exposure. From day 12 onwards, Gadd45α, cdk1 and bcl-2 genes were up-regulated following protracted exposure, indicating DNA repair, cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. There exists a linear correlation between these genes (gadd45α - r=0.85, p=0.0073; cdk1 - r=0.86, p=0.0053; bcl-2 - r=0.89, p=0.0026) at protracted exposures. This is the first report on the dual role of bcl-2 gene in fish exposed to acute and protracted radiation and correlation among the aforementioned genes that work in concert to promote 'repair' and 'death' circuitries in fish blood cells. PMID:27497304

  20. Radiation-induced uterine changes: MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Arrive, L.; Chang, Y.C.; Hricak, H.; Brescia, R.J.; Auffermann, W.; Quivey, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    To assess the capability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to demonstrate postirradiation changes in the uterus, MR studies of 23 patients who had undergone radiation therapy were retrospectively examined and compared with those of 30 patients who had not undergone radiation therapy. MR findings were correlated with posthysterectomy histologic findings. In premenopausal women, radiation therapy induced (a) a decrease in uterine size demonstrable as early as 3 months after therapy ended; (b) a decrease in signal intensity of the myometrium on T2-predominant MR images, reflecting a significant decrease in T2 relaxation time, demonstrable as early as 1 month after therapy; (c) a decrease in thickness and signal intensity of the endometrium demonstrable on T2-predominant images 6 months after therapy; and (d) loss of uterine zonal anatomy as early as 3 months after therapy. In postmenopausal women, irradiation did not significantly alter the MR imaging appearance of the uterus. These postirradiation MR changes in both the premenopausal and postmenopausal uteri appeared similar to the changes ordinarily seen on MR images of the nonirradiated postmenopausal uterus.

  1. Theory Of Radiation-Induced Attenuation In Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tsuen-Hsi; Johnston, Alan R.

    1996-01-01

    Improved theory of radiation-induced attenuation of light in optical fibers accounts for effects of dose rates. Based on kinetic aspects of fundamental physics of color centers induced in optical fibers by radiation. Induced attenuation is proportional to density of color centers, and part of this density decays by thermal-annealing/recombination process after irradiation.

  2. Radiation Induced Non-targeted Response: Mechanism and Potential Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Tom K.; Zhou, Hongning; Chai, Yunfei; Ponnaiya, Brian; Ivanov, Vladimir N.

    2012-01-01

    Generations of students in radiation biology have been taught that heritable biological effects require direct damage to DNA. Radiation-induced non-targeted/bystander effects represent a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation in that extranuclear and extracellular effects may also contribute to the biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Although radiation induced bystander effects have been well documented in a variety of biological systems, including 3D human tissue samples and whole organisms, the mechanism is not known. There is recent evidence that the NF-κB-dependent gene expression of interleukin 8, interleukin 6, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 33 in directly irradiated cells produced the cytokines and prostaglandin E2 with autocrine/paracrine functions, which further activated signaling pathways and induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression in bystander cells. The observations that heritable DNA alterations can be propagated to cells many generations after radiation exposure and that bystander cells exhibit genomic instability in ways similar to directly hit cells indicate that the low dose radiation response is a complex interplay of various modulating factors. The potential implication of the non-targeted response in radiation induced secondary cancer is discussed. A better understanding of the mechanism of the non-targeted effects will be invaluable to assess its clinical relevance and ways in which the bystander phenomenon can be manipulated to increase therapeutic gain in radiotherapy. PMID:21143185

  3. Tetracycline inducible gene manipulation in serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tillmann; Renzland, Insa; Baur, Max; Mönks, Simon; Herrmann, Elke; Huppert, Verena; Nürnberg, Frank; Schönig, Kai; Bartsch, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) neuronal system has important and diverse physiological functions throughout development and adulthood. Its dysregulation during development or later in adulthood has been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Transgenic animal models designed to study the contribution of serotonergic susceptibility genes to a pathological phenotype should ideally allow to study candidate gene overexpression or gene knockout selectively in serotonergic neurons at any desired time during life. For this purpose, conditional expression systems such as the tet-system are preferable. Here, we generated a transactivator (tTA) mouse line (TPH2-tTA) that allows temporal and spatial control of tetracycline (Ptet) controlled transgene expression as well as gene deletion in 5-HT neurons. The tTA cDNA was inserted into a 196 kb PAC containing a genomic mouse Tph2 fragment (177 kb) by homologous recombination in E. coli. For functional analysis of Ptet-controlled transgene expression, TPH2-tTA mice were crossed to a Ptet-regulated lacZ reporter line (Ptet-nLacZ). In adult double-transgenic TPH2-tTA/Ptet-nLacZ mice, TPH2-tTA founder line L62-20 showed strong serotonergic β-galactosidase expression which could be completely suppressed with doxycycline (Dox). Furthermore, Ptet-regulated gene expression could be reversibly activated or inactivated when Dox was either withdrawn or added to the system. For functional analysis of Ptet-controlled, Cre-mediated gene deletion, TPH2-tTA mice (L62-20) were crossed to double transgenic Ptet-Cre/R26R reporter mice to generate TPH2-tTA/Ptet-Cre/R26R mice. Without Dox, 5-HT specific recombination started at E12.5. With permanent Dox administration, Ptet-controlled Cre-mediated recombination was absent. Dox withdrawal either postnatally or during adulthood induced efficient recombination in serotonergic neurons of all raphe nuclei, respectively. In the enteric nervous system, recombination could not be detected. We generated a

  4. The effect of acute dose charge particle radiation on expression of DNA repair genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad Akram; Soedipe, Ayodotun; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Shishodia, Shishir; Gridley, Daila S; Pourmand, Nader; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2011-03-01

    The space radiation environment consists of trapped particle radiation, solar particle radiation, and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), in which protons are the most abundant particle type. During missions to the moon or to Mars, the constant exposure to GCR and occasional exposure to particles emitted from solar particle events (SPE) are major health concerns for astronauts. Therefore, in order to determine health risks during space missions, an understanding of cellular responses to proton exposure is of primary importance. The expression of DNA repair genes in response to ionizing radiation (X-rays and gamma rays) has been studied, but data on DNA repair in response to protons is lacking. Using qPCR analysis, we investigated changes in gene expression induced by positively charged particles (protons) in four categories (0, 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy) in nine different DNA repair genes isolated from the testes of irradiated mice. DNA repair genes were selected on the basis of their known functions. These genes include ERCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), ERCC2/NER (opening DNA around the damage, Nucleotide Excision Repair), XRCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), XRCC3 (DNA break and cross-link repair), XPA (binds damaged DNA in preincision complex), XPC (damage recognition), ATA or ATM (activates checkpoint signaling upon double strand breaks), MLH1 (post-replicative DNA mismatch repair), and PARP1 (base excision repair). Our results demonstrate that ERCC1, PARP1, and XPA genes showed no change at 0.1 Gy radiation, up-regulation at 1.0 Gy radiation (1.09 fold, 7.32 fold, 0.75 fold, respectively), and a remarkable increase in gene expression at 2.0 Gy radiation (4.83 fold, 57.58 fold and 87.58 fold, respectively). Expression of other genes, including ATM and XRCC3, was unchanged at 0.1 and 1.0 Gy radiation but showed up-regulation at 2.0 Gy radiation (2.64 fold and 2.86 fold, respectively). We were unable to detect gene expression for the

  5. HIFU-induced gene activation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Zhong, Pei; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan

    2001-05-01

    This work investigated the inducible gene activation in cancer cells that were sublethally injured during HIFU treatment. HeLa cells were transfected by an adenovirus vector that encodes GFP under the control of hsp70B promoter, leading to about 65% transfection efficiency. A volume of 10 μL transfected HeLa cells in suspension (5×107 cells/ml) were placed at the bottom of a PCR tube so that the cell suspension could be heated to a peak temperature of 50°C, 60°C, and 70°C for 120, 10, and 1 s, respectively, by a focused 1.1-MHz HIFU transducer operated at a peak negative pressure of -2.7 MPa at different duty cycles. One day after HIFU treatment, cell viability was determined to be 63%, 35%, and 18%, respectively, based on Trypan Blue exclusion test. Importantly, in all test groups, inducible GFP expression was detected in about 40%-50% of the surviving cells with GFP intensity increased by 25-fold based on flow cytometry analysis. These results demonstrate that even under the short exposure duration of HIFU treatment, inducible gene expression could be produced in sublethally injured cell population in vitro. Further studies are underway to explore the optimal HIFU condition for gene activation in vivo.

  6. Salt induced gene expression in Prosopis farcta

    SciTech Connect

    Heimer, I.M.; Golan, A.; Lips, H.

    1987-04-01

    The authors hypothesize that in facultative halophytes, the genes which impart salt tolerance are expressed when the plants are exposed to salt. As a first step towards possible identification of these genes, they examined salt induced changes of gene expression in the facultative halophyte Prosopis farcta at the protein level, by SDS-PAGE. Exposure to salt of aseptically grown, two-week old seedlings, was carried out in one of two ways: (1) a one step transfer of seedlings from medium without salt to that with the indicated concentrations followed by 5 hr or 24 hr incubation periods. During the last 2 hrs of each incubation period the seedlings were pulse-labelled with /sup 35/S Sulfate or L-Methionine; (2) a gradual increase of the salt concentration at 50 mM increments at 2-4 day intervals. Two days after reaching the desired salt concentration, the seedlings were pulse-labelled for 2 hrs with /sup 35/S sulfate or L-methionine. Protein from roots were extracted and analyzed. Polypeptides were visualized by staining with coomassie blue or by fluorography. Qualitative as well as quantitative changes of gene expression as induced by salt could be observed. Their significance regarding salt tolerance will be discussed.

  7. Differential Effects of Alpha-Particle Radiation and X-Irradiation on Genes Associated with Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Chen, Jeremy; Kutzner, Barbara; Wilkins, Ruth C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differential effects of alpha-(α-) particle radiation and X-rays on apoptosis and associated changes in gene expression. Human monocytic cells were exposed to α-particle radiation and X-rays from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Four days postexposure, cell death was measured by flow cytometry and 84 genes related to apoptosis were analyzed using real-time PCR. On average, 33% of the cells were apoptotic at 1.5 Gy of α-particle radiation. Transcript profiling showed statistical expression of 15 genes at all three doses tested. Cells exposed to X-rays were <5% apoptotic at ~1.5 Gy and induced less than a 2-fold expression in 6 apoptotic genes at the higher doses of radiation. Among these 6 genes, Fas and TNF-α were common to the α-irradiated cells. This data suggests that α-particle radiation initiates cell death by TNF-α and Fas activation and through intermediate signalling mediators that are distinct from X-irradiated cells. PMID:22091383

  8. The potential influence of radiation-induced microenvironments in neoplastic progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a complete carcinogen, able both to initiate and promote neoplastic progression and is a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland. Tissue response to radiation is a composite of genetic damage, cell death and induction of new gene expression patterns. Although DNA damage is believed to initiate carcinogenesis, the contribution of these other aspects of radiation response are beginning to be explored. Our studies demonstrate that radiation elicits rapid and persistent global alterations in the mammary gland microenvironment. We postulate that radiation-induced microenvironments may affect epithelial cells neoplastic transformation by altering their number or susceptibility. Alternatively, radiation induced microenvironments may exert a selective force on initiated cells and/or be conducive to progression. A key impetus for these studies is the possibility that blocking these events could be a strategy to interrupt neoplastic progression.

  9. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    Plants sense changes in their orientation towards the vector of gravity and respond with directional growth. Several metabolites in the signal transduction cascade have been identified. However, very little is known about the interaction between these sensing and signal transduction events and even less is known about their role in the differential growth response. Gravity induced changes in transcript abundance have been identified in Arabidopsis whole seedlings and root apices (Moseyko et al. 2002; Kimbrough et al. 2004). Gravity induced transcript abundance changes can be observed within less than 1 min after stimulation (Salinas-Mondragon et al. 2005). Gene expression however requires not only transcription but also translation of the mRNA. Translation can only occur when mRNA is associated with ribosomes, even though not all mRNA associated with ribosomes is actively translated. To approximate translational capacity we quantified whole genome transcript abundances in corn stem pulvini during the first hour after gravity stimulation in total and poly-ribosomal fractions. As in Arabidopsis root apices, transcript abundances of several clusters of genes responded to gravity stimulation. The vast majority of these transcripts were also found to associate with polyribosomes in the same temporal and quantitative pattern. These genes are transcriptionally regulated by gravity stimulation, but do not exhibit translational regulation. However, a small group of genes showed increased transcriptional regulation after gravity stimulation, but no association with polysomes. These transcripts likely are translationally repressed. The mechanism of translational repression for these transcripts is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the genes essential for gravitropic responses should be expressed in most or all species, we compared the temporal gravity induced expression pattern of all orthologs identified between maize and Arabidopsis. A small group of genes showed high

  10. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila genes. Report 2. The vestigial gene: molecular characteristics of chromosome mutations].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, K P; Aleksandrova, M V; Aleksandrov, I D; Korablinova, S V

    2012-01-01

    The results of the PCR-assay of mutation lesions at each of 16 fragments overlapping the entire vestigial (vg) gene of Drosophila melanogaster in 52 gamma-ray-, neutron- and neutron + gamma-ray-induced vg mutants having the inversion or translocation breakpoint within the vg microregion are presented. 4 from 52 mutants studied were found to have large deletions of about 200 kb covering the entire vg gene and adjacent to sca and l(2)C gene-markers as well. 23 mutants from 48 (47.9%) were found to have a wild-type gene structure showing that the exchange breakpoints are located outside of the vg gene. 25 others display the intragenic lesions of different complexity detected by PCR as the absence of(i) either one fragment or (ii) two or more (6-7) adjacent fragments and (iii) simultaneously several (i) or (i) and (ii) types separated by normal gene regions. It is important that 6 from 25 mutants have the breakpoint inside the vg gene and display the (i) or (ii) type of lesions at the gene regions containing the putative break whereas 5 others from 25 with the above lesions have the exchange breakpoint outside the vg gene. Therefore, the breakpoints underlying either inversions or translocations induced by low- and high-LET radiation are likely to be located within and outside the gene under study. Thereby, the formation of exchanges is accompanied by DNA deletions of various sizes at the exchange breakpoints. The molecular model of formation of such exchange-deletion rearrangements is elaborated and presented. Also, conception of the predominately clustered action of both low- and high-LET radiation on the germ cell genome is suggested as the summing-up of the presented results. The ability of ionizing radiation to induce the clusters of genetic alterations in the form of hidden DNA damages as well as gene/chromosome mutations is determined by the track structure and hierarchical organization of the genome. To detect the quality and frequency patterns of all

  11. Changes in Liver Metabolic Gene Expression from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. P.; Wotring, Virginia E.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation exposure is one of the unique physiological challenges of human spaceflight that is not encountered on earth. While radiation exposure is known to impart physiological stresses and alter normal function, it is unclear how it specifically affects drug metabolism. A major concern is that the actions of medications used in spaceflight may deviate from the expectations formed from terrestrial use. This concern was investigated at the molecular level by analyzing how gamma radiation exposure affected gene expression in the livers of mice. Three different doses of radiation were administered and after various intervals of recovery time, gene expression was measured with RT-qPCR screening arrays for drug metabolism and DNA repair. After examining the results of 192 genes total from each of 72 mice, 65 genes were found to be significantly affected by at least one of the doses of radiation. In general, the genes affected are involved in the metabolism of drugs with lipid or steroid hormone-like structures, as well as the maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage.

  12. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to both microgravity and space radiation, and are at risk for increased skeletal fragility due to bone loss. Evidence from rodent experiments demonstrates that both microgravity and ionizing radiation can cause bone loss due to increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts and decreased bone-forming osteoblasts, although the underlying molecular mechanisms for these changes are not fully understood. We hypothesized that excess reactive oxidative species (ROS), produced by conditions that simulate spaceflight, alter the tight balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities, leading to accelerated skeletal remodeling and culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used the MCAT mouse model; these transgenic mice over-express the human catalase gene targeted to mitochondria, the major organelle contributing free radicals. Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts reactive species, hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. This animal model was selected as it displays extended lifespan, reduced cardiovascular disease and reduced central nervous system radio-sensitivity, consistent with elevated anti-oxidant activity conferred by the transgene. We reasoned that mice overexpressing catalase in mitochondria of osteoblast and osteoclast lineage cells would be protected from the bone loss caused by simulated spaceflight. Over-expression of human catalase localized to mitochondria caused various skeletal phenotypic changes compared to WT mice; this includes greater bone length, decreased cortical bone area and moment of inertia, and indications of altered microarchitecture. These findings indicate mitochondrial ROS are important for normal bone-remodeling and skeletal integrity. Catalase over-expression did not fully protect skeletal tissue from structural decrements caused by simulated spaceflight; however there was significant protection in terms of cellular oxidative damage (MDA levels) to the skeletal tissue. Furthermore, we

  13. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  14. In vivo evidence for an endothelium-dependent mechanism in radiation-induced normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Emilie; François, Agnès; Toullec, Aurore; Guipaud, Olivier; Buard, Valérie; Tarlet, Georges; Mintet, Elodie; Jaillet, Cyprien; Iruela-Arispe, Maria Luisa; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism involved in side effects of radiation therapy, and especially the role of the endothelium remains unclear. Previous results showed that plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) contributes to radiation-induced intestinal injury and suggested that this role could be driven by an endothelium-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether endothelial-specific PAI-1 deletion could affect radiation-induced intestinal injury. We created a mouse model with a specific deletion of PAI-1 in the endothelium (PAI-1KOendo) by a Cre-LoxP system. In a model of radiation enteropathy, survival and intestinal radiation injury were followed as well as intestinal gene transcriptional profile and inflammatory cells intestinal infiltration. Irradiated PAI-1KOendo mice exhibited increased survival, reduced acute enteritis severity and attenuated late fibrosis compared with irradiated PAI-1flx/flx mice. Double E-cadherin/TUNEL labeling confirmed a reduced epithelial cell apoptosis in irradiated PAI-1KOendo. High-throughput gene expression combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed a putative involvement of macrophages. We observed a decrease in CD68+cells in irradiated intestinal tissues from PAI-1KOendo mice as well as modifications associated with M1/M2 polarization. This work shows that PAI-1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury by an endothelium-dependent mechanism and demonstrates in vivo that the endothelium is directly involved in the progression of radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:26510580

  15. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  16. Targeted gene silencing to induce permanent sterility.

    PubMed

    Dissen, G A; Lomniczi, A; Boudreau, R L; Chen, Y H; Davidson, B L; Ojeda, S R

    2012-08-01

    A non-surgical method to induce sterility would be a useful tool to control feral populations of animals. Our laboratories have experience with approaches aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A combination/modification of these methods may provide a useful framework for the design of approaches that can be used to sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: it needs to target a gene essential for fertility. It must involve a method that can selectively silence the gene of interest. It also needs to deliver the silencing agent via a minimally invasive method. Finally, the silencing effect needs to be sustained for many years, so that expansion of the targeted population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss this subject and provide a succinct account of our previous experience with: (i) molecular reagents able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) molecular reagents able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:22827375

  17. Analog of microwave-induced resistance oscillations induced in GaAs heterostructures by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, T.; Dmitriev, I. A.; Kozlov, D. A.; Schneider, M.; Jentzsch, B.; Kvon, Z. D.; Olbrich, P.; Bel'kov, V. V.; Bayer, A.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Kuczmik, T.; Oltscher, M.; Weiss, D.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the study of terahertz radiation-induced MIRO-like oscillations of magnetoresistivity in GaAs heterostructures. Our experiments provide an answer on two most intriguing questions—effect of radiation helicity and the role of the edges—yielding crucial information for an understanding of the MIRO (microwave-induced resistance oscillations) origin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the range of materials exhibiting radiation-induced magneto-oscillations can be largely extended by using high-frequency radiation.

  18. Inhibition of G{sub 1}-phase arrest induced by ionizing radiation in hematopoietic cells by overexpression of genes involved in the G{sub 1}/S-phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, M.; Berry, L.; Halloran, A.; Greenberger, J.S. |

    1995-09-01

    D-type cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk-4) are likely involved in regulating passage of cells through the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. A decrease in the proportion of cells in G{sub 1}, a relatively radiation-sensitive phase of the cell cycle, should result in increased resistance to ionizing radiation; however, the effect of such overexpression on X-ray-induced G{sub 1}-phase arrest is not known. Radiation survival curves were obtained at a dose rate of either 8 cGy/min or 1 Gy/min for subclones of the IL-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line 32D cl 3 expressing transgenes for either cyclin-D1, D2 or D3 or cdk-4. We compared the results to those with overexpression of the transgene for Bcl-2, whose expression enhances radiation survival and delays apoptosis. Cells overexpressing transgenes for each D-type cyclin or Bcl-2 had an increased number of cells in S phase compared to parent line 32D cl 3; however, overexpression of cdk-4 had no effect on cell cycle distribution. Cell death resulting from withdrawal of IL-3 was not affected by overexpression of D2, cdk-4 or Bcl-2. Flow cytometry 24 h after 5 Gy irradiation demonstrated that overexpression of each G{sub 1}-phase regulatory transgene decreased the proportion of cells at the G{sub 1}/S-phase border. Western analysis revealed induction of cyclin-D protein levels by irradiation, but no change in the D{sub O}, but a significant increase in the {rvec n} for cyclin-D or cdk-4 transgene-overexpressing clones at 1 Gy/min (P<0.017). At a lower dose rate of 8 cGy/min, the {rvec n} for cyclin or cdk-4-overexpressing clones was also increased (P<0.7). Thus overexpression of cyclin-D or cdk-4 in hematopoietic cells induces detectable effects on hematopoietic cell radiation biology including a broadening of the shoulder on the radiation survival curve and a decrease in radiation-induced G{sub 1}/S-phase arrest. 31 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Characterization of gamma radiation inducible thioredoxin h from Spirogyra varians.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Minchul; Yang, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Seung-Sik; Kim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Choi, Jong-il

    2013-08-15

    In this study, thioredoxin h (Trxh) was isolated and characterized from the fresh water green alga Spirogyra varians, which was one amongst the pool of proteins induced upon gamma radiation treatment. cDNA clones encoding S. varians thioredoxin h were isolated from a pre-constructed S. varians cDNA library. Trxh had a molecular mass of 13.5kDa and contained the canonical WCGPC active site. Recombinant Trxh showed the disulfide reduction activity, and exhibited insulin reduction activity. Also, Trxh had higher 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) reduction activity with Arabidopsis thioredoxin reductase (TR) than with Escherichia coli TR. Specific expression of the Trxh gene was further analyzed at mRNA and protein levels and was found to increase by gamma irradiation upto the absorbed dose of 3kGy, suggesting that Trxh may have potential functions in protection of biomolecules from gamma irradiation. PMID:23830452

  20. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  1. Particle Radiation signals the Expression of Genes in stress-associated Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, E.; Chang, P.; Bjornstad, K.; Dosanjh, M.; Cherbonnel, C.; Rosen, C.

    The explosive development of microarray screening methods has propelled genome research in a variety of biological systems allowing investigators to examine large-scale alterations in gene expression for research in toxicology pathology and therapy The radiation environment in space is complex and encompasses a variety of highly energetic and charged particles Estimation of biological responses after exposure to these types of radiation is important for NASA in their plans for long-term manned space missions Instead of using the 10 000 gene arrays that are in the marketplace we have chosen to examine particle radiation-induced changes in gene expression using a focused DNA microarray system to study the expression of about 100 genes specifically associated with both the upstream and downstream aspects of the TP53 stress-responsive pathway Genes that are regulated by TP53 include functional clusters that are implicated in cell cycle arrest apoptosis and DNA repair A cultured human lens epithelial cell model Blakely et al IOVS 41 3808 2000 was used for these studies Additional human normal and radiosensitive fibroblast cell lines have also been examined Lens cells were grown on matrix-coated substrate and exposed to 55 MeV u protons at the 88 cyclotron in LBNL or 1 GeV u Iron ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory The other cells lines were grown on conventional tissue culture plasticware RNA and proteins were harvested at different times after irradiation RNA was isolated from sham-treated or select irradiated populations

  2. Treatment of radiation-induced cystitis with hyperbaric oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Boland, F.P.; Mori, H.; Gallagher, M.; Brereton, H.; Preate, D.L.; Neville, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of hyperbaric oxygen on radiation cystitis have been documented in 3 patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. Cessation of gross hematuria and reversal of cystoscopic bladder changes were seen in response to a series of hyperbaric oxygen treatments of 2 atmosphere absolute pressure for 2 hours. To our knowledge this is the first report of cystoscopically documented healing of radiation-induced bladder injury.

  3. Gene expression profile of Jurkat cells exposed to high power terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundt, Jessica E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Rivest, Benjamin D.; Doroski, Michael L.; Payne, Jason; Ibey, Bennett L.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2011-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation sources are now being used in a host of military, defense, and medical applications. Widespread employment of these applications has prompted concerns regarding the health effects associated with THz radiation. In this study, we examined the gene expression profile of mammalian cells exposed to THz radiation. We hypothesized that if THz radiation couples directly to cellular constituents, then exposed cells may express a specific gene expression profile indicative of ensuing damage. To test this hypothesis, Jurkat cells were irradiated with a molecular gas THz laser (2.52 THz, 636 mWcm-2, durations: 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, or 50 minutes). Viability was assessed 24 h post-exposure using MTT assays, and gene expression profiles were evaluated 4 h post-exposure using mRNA microarrays. Comparable analyses were also performed for hyperthermic positive controls (44°C for 40 minutes). We found that cellular temperatures increased by ~6 °C during THz exposures. We also found that cell death increased with exposure duration, and the median lethal dose (LD50) was calculated to be ~44 minutes. The microarray data showed that THz radiation induced the transcriptional activation of genes associated with cellular proliferation, differentiation, transcriptional activation, chaperone protein stabilization, and apoptosis. For most genes, we found that the magnitude of differential expression was comparable for both the THz and thermal exposure groups; however, several genes were specifically activated by the THz exposure. These results suggest that THz radiation may elicit effects that are not exclusively due to the temperature rise created during THz exposures (i.e. thermal effects). In future work, we plan to verify the results of our microarray experiments using qPCR techniques.

  4. Chromatin Folding, Fragile Sites, and Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Low- and High- LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Cox, Bradley; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.; Wu, Honglu

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated non-random distributions of breaks involved in chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high-LET radiation. To investigate the factors contributing to the break point distribution in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations, human epithelial cells were fixed in G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome in separate colors. After the images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multimega base pair scale. Specific locations of the chromosome, in interphase, were also analyzed with bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes. Both mBAND and BAC studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested association of interphase chromatin folding to the radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. We further investigated the distribution of genes, as well as the distribution of breaks found in tumor cells. Comparisons of these distributions to the radiation hotspots showed that some of the radiation hotspots coincide with the frequent breaks found in solid tumors and with the fragile sites for other environmental toxins. Our results suggest that multiple factors, including the chromatin structure and the gene distribution, can contribute to radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

  5. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  6. Radiation-induced nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mohsen; Namimoghadam, Amir; Korouni, Roghaye; Fashiri, Paria; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Elahimanesh, Farideh; Amiri, Fatemeh; Moradi, Ghobad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the improvements in cancer screening and treatment, it still remains as one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Nausea and vomiting as the side effects of different cancer treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, are multifactorial and could affect the treatment continuation and patient quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the possible linkage between ABO blood groups and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV), also its incidence and affecting factors. One hundred twenty-eight patients referring to Tohid hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, were selected and the patients and treatment-related factors were determined in a cross-sectional study. Patients’ nausea and vomiting were recorded from the onset of treatment until 1 week after treatment accomplishment. Also, previous possible nausea and vomiting were recorded. The frequencies of nausea and vomiting and their peak time were examined during the treatment period. The association between ABO blood group and the incidence of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) were significant and it seems that A blood group patients are the most vulnerable individuals to these symptoms. The association between Rhesus antigen and the time of maximum severity of RINV may indicate that Rhesus antigen affects the time of maximum severity of RINV. The incidence of RINV was not affected by karnofsky performance status, but it was related to the severity of RINV. Furthermore, among the factors affecting the incidence of nausea and vomiting, nausea and vomiting during patient's previous chemotherapy, radiotherapy region, and background gastrointestinal disease were shown to be three important factors. In addition to familiar RINV-affecting factors, ABO blood group may play an important role and these results address the needs for further studies with larger sample size. PMID:27495037

  7. Radiation-induced degradation of DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douki, T.; Delatour, T.; Martini, R.; Cadet, J.

    1999-01-01

    Radio-induced degradation of DNA involves radical processes. A series of lesions among the major bases degradation products has been measured in isolated DNA exposed to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. Degradation can be accounted for by the formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water (indirect effect). The four bases are degraded in high yield. Direct effect has been mimicked by photo-induced electron abstraction from the bases producing their radical cation. Quantification of the modified bases showed that guanine is the preferential target. This can be explained by its lower oxidation potential and charge transfer phenomena. La décomposition radio-induite de l'ADN fait intervenir des processus radicalaires. Une série de lésions choisies parmi les produits majeurs de dégradation des bases a été mesurée dans de l'ADN isolé exposé au rayonnement en solution aqueuse aérée. Les modifications sont alors dues aux radicaux hydroxyles produits par la radiolyse de l'eau (effet indirect) et les quatre bases sont efficacement dégradées. L'arrachement d'électrons aux bases par photosensibilisation pour produire leur radical cation, a été utilisé comme modèle de l'effet direct. La quantification des bases modifiées montre que la guanine est préférentiellement dégradée. Cette observation peut s'expliquer par le plus faible potentiel d'oxydation de cette base ainsi que par les phénomènes de transfert de charge vers les guanines.

  8. Changes in Liver Metabolic Gene Expression from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. P.; Wotring, V. E.

    2012-01-01

    Increased exposure to radiation is one physiological stressor associated with spaceflight. While known to alter normal physiological function, how radiation affects metabolism of administered medications is unclear. Crew health could be affected if the actions of medications used in spaceflight deviated from expectations formed during terrestrial medication use. Three different doses of gamma radiation (50 mGy - 6.05 Gy) and a sham were administered to groups of 6 mice each, and after various intervals of recovery time, liver gene expression was measured with RT-qPCR arrays for drug metabolism and DNA repair enzymes. Results indicated approx.65 genes of the 190 tested were significantly affected by at least one of the radiation doses. Many of the affected genes are involved in the metabolism of drugs with hydrophobic or steroid-like structures, maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage. Most affected genes returned to near control expression levels by 7 days post-treatment. With 6 Gy exposure, metallothionein expression was 132-fold more than control at the 4 hr time point, and fell at each later time point (11-fold at 24 hrs, and 8-fold at 7 days). In contrast, Cyp17a1 showed a 4-fold elevation at 4 hrs after exposure and remained constant for 7 days.

  9. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Ornametal Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  10. Virus-Induced gene silencing in ornamental plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) provides an attractive tool for high throughput analysis of the functional effects of gene knock-down. Virus genomes are engineered to include fragments of target host genes, and the infected plant recognizes and silences the target genes as part of its viral defe...

  11. Pravastatin limits radiation-induced vascular dysfunction in the skin.

    PubMed

    Holler, Valerie; Buard, Valerie; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Guipaud, Olivier; Baudelin, Cedric; Sache, Amandine; Perez, Maria del R; Squiban, Claire; Tamarat, Radia; Milliat, Fabien; Benderitter, Marc

    2009-05-01

    About half of people with cancer are treated with radiation therapy; however, normal tissue toxicity still remains a dose-limiting factor for this treatment. The skin response to ionizing radiation may involve multiple inflammatory outbreaks. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced vascular injury. Furthermore, endothelial dysfunction reflects a decreased availability of nitric oxide. Statins have been reported to preserve endothelial function through their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, wild type and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)(-/-) mice were subjected to dorsal skin irradiation and treated with pravastatin for 28 days. We demonstrated that pravastatin has a therapeutic effect on skin lesions and abolishes radiation-induced vascular functional activation by decreasing interactions between leukocytes and endothelium. Pravastatin limits the radiation-induced increase of blood CCL2 and CXCL1 production expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules such as E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and inflammatory cell migration in tissues. Pravastatin limits the in vivo and in vitro radiation-induced downregulation of eNOS. Moreover, pravastatin has no effect in eNOS(-/-) mice, demonstrating that eNOS plays a key role in the beneficial effect of pravastatin in radiation-induced skin lesions. In conclusion, pravastatin may be a good therapeutic approach to prevent or reduce radiation-induced skin damage. PMID:19212344

  12. ATCG nucleotide fluctuation of Deinococcus radiodurans radiation genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Subramaniam, R.; Sullivan, R.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, C.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Flamholz, A.; Lieberman, D. H.; Cheung, T. D.

    2007-09-01

    The radiation resistance-repair genes in Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) and E-coli were analyzed in terms of the A, T, C, G nucleotide fluctuations. The studied genes were Rec-A, Rec-Q, and the unique DR PprA gene. In an ATCG sequence, each base was assigned a number equal to its atomic number. The resulting numerical sequence was the basis of the statistical analysis. Fractal analysis using the Higuchi method gave a fractal dimension increase of the Deinococcus radiodurans genes as compared to E-coli, which is comparable to the enhancement observed in the human HAR1 region (HAR1F gene) over that of the chimpanzee. Near neighbor fluctuation was also studied via the Black-Scholes model where the increment sequence was treated as a random walk series. The Deinococcus radiodurans radiation gene standard deviations were consistently higher than that of the E-coli deviations, and agree with the fractal analysis results. The sequence stacking interaction was studied using the published nucleotide-pair melting free energy values and Deinococcus radiodurans radiation genes were shown to possess larger negative free energies. The high sensitivity of the fractal dimension as a biomarker was tested with correlation analysis of the gamma ray dose versus fractal dimension, and the R square values were found to be above 0.9 (N=5). When compared with other nucleotide sequences such as the rRNA sequences, HAR1 and its chimpanzee counterpart, the higher fluctuation (correlated randomness) and larger negative free energy of a DR radiation gene suggested that a radiation resistance-repair sequence exhibited higher complexity. As the HAR1 nucleotide sequence complexity and its transcription activity of co-expressing cortex protein reelin supported a positive selection event in humans, a similar inference of positive selection of coding genes could be drawn for Deinococcus radiodurans when compared to E-coli. The origin of such a positive selection would be consistent with that of a

  13. Neutron radiation can activate K-ras via a point mutation in codon 146 and induces a different spectrum of ras mutations than does gamma radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, S R; Newcomb, E W; Pellicer, A

    1990-01-01

    Neutron radiation is known to produce tumors in animals and cause cell transformation. We have developed a protocol to efficiently induce thymic lymphomas in RF/J mice by a single acute dose of neutron irradiation. Activated ras genes were detected in 17% (4 of 24) of the tumors analyzed. One of the tumors contained a K-ras gene activated by a point mutation in codon 146. Activating ras mutations at position 146 have not been previously detected in any known human or animal tumors. The spectrum of ras mutations detected in neutron radiation-induced thymic lymphomas was different from that seen in thymic lymphomas induced by gamma radiation in the same strain of mice. These results may have important implications for the mechanisms by which different types of radiation damage DNA. Images PMID:2403644

  14. Radiation-induced undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma after radiation therapy for a desmoid tumour.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, J; Kaci, R; Orcel, P; Nizard, R; Laredo, J-D

    2016-02-01

    Radiation-induced sarcoma is a long-term complication of radiation therapy. The most common secondary neoplasia is the undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, which is usually described in the deep soft tissue of the trunk or extremities. Radiation-induced sarcomas have a poor prognosis. An early diagnosis and management are needed to improve the survival rate of such patients. We presently report a case of a radiation-induced undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma of the left gluteus maximus muscle, which developed 25 years after an initial diagnosis of aggressive fibromatosis and 21 years after a tumour recurrence. This case study illustrates the risk of developing a sarcoma in a radiation field and the need for long-term follow-up after radiation therapy. Unnecessary radiation therapy, in particular in the case of benign conditions in young patients, should be avoided. PMID:26725422

  15. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  16. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  17. Radiation exposure induces inflammasome pathway activation in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Stoecklein, Veit M; Osuka, Akinori; Ishikawa, Shizu; Lederer, Madeline R; Wanke-Jellinek, Lorenz; Lederer, James A

    2015-02-01

    Radiation exposure induces cell and tissue damage, causing local and systemic inflammatory responses. Because the inflammasome pathway is triggered by cell death and danger-associated molecular patterns, we hypothesized that the inflammasome may signal acute and chronic immune responses to radiation. Using a mouse radiation model, we show that radiation induces a dose-dependent increase in inflammasome activation in macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells, and B cells as judged by cleaved caspase-1 detection in cells. Time course analysis showed the appearance of cleaved caspase-1 in cells by day 1 and sustained expression until day 7 after radiation. Also, cells showing inflammasome activation coexpressed the cell surface apoptosis marker annexin V. The role of caspase-1 as a trigger for hematopoietic cell losses after radiation was studied in caspase-1(-/-) mice. We found less radiation-induced cell apoptosis and immune cell loss in caspase-1(-/-) mice than in control mice. Next, we tested whether uric acid might mediate inflammasome activation in cells by treating mice with allopurinol and discovered that allopurinol treatment completely blocked caspase-1 activation in cells. Finally, we demonstrate that radiation-induced caspase-1 activation occurs by a Nod-like receptor family protein 3-independent mechanism because radiation-exposed Nlrp3(-/-) mice showed caspase-1 activation profiles that were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that inflammasome activation occurs in many immune cell types following radiation exposure and that allopurinol prevented radiation-induced inflammasome activation. These results suggest that targeting the inflammasome may help control radiation-induced inflammation. PMID:25539818

  18. Ionizing radiation downregulates ASPM, a gene responsible for microcephaly in humans.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Akira; Yaoi, Takeshi; Ogi, Hiroshi; Wang, Bing; Suetomi, Katsutoshi; Sekine, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kato, Takamitsu; Takahashi, Sentaro; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Itoh, Kyoko; Fushiki, Shinji

    2008-05-01

    Microcephaly is a malformation associated with in utero exposed atomic bomb survivors and can be induced in mice by fetal exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The pathogenesis of IR-induced microcephaly, however, has not been fully understood. Our analyses of high-coverage expression profiling (HiCEP) demonstrated that the abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated gene (ASPM) was down-regulated in irradiated human diploid fibroblasts. ASPM was recently reported as the causative gene for MCPH-5, the most common type of congenital microcephaly in humans. Here, we show that the expression of the Aspm gene was significantly reduced by IR in various human and murine cells. Additionally, Aspm was found downregulated in the irradiated fetal mouse brain, particularly in the ventricular zones. A similar suppression was observed in the irradiated neurosphere cultures. This is the first report suggesting that the suppression of Aspm by IR could be the initial molecular target leading to the future microcephaly formation. PMID:18331833

  19. Tumor suppression function of the Big-h3 gene in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Interaction between cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Using an immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cell model, we show here that expression of Big-h3 gene, a secreted adhesion molecule induced by transforming growth factor- beta (TGF-beta ), is markedly decreased in independently generated, high LET radiation-induced tumor cell lines (TL1-TL5) relative to parental BEP2D cells. Expression of this gene was restored to control level in fusion cell lines between the tumorigenic and parental BEP2D cells that were no longer tumorigenic in nude mice. Transfection of Big-h3 gene into tumor cells resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth. While integrin receptor alpha 5/beta 1 was overexpressed in tumor cells, its expression was corrected to the level of control BEP2D cells after Big-h3 transfection. These data suggest that Big-h3 is involved in tumor progression by regulating integrin receptor alpha 5/beta 1. . WWee We further show that down regulation of Big-h3 results from loss of expression of TGFbeta1 in tumor cells. The findings provide strong evidence that the Big-h3 gene has tumor suppressor function in radiation induced tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a potential target for interventional therapy.

  20. Bystander effect induced by UV radiation; why should we be interested?

    PubMed

    Widel, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The bystander effect, whose essence is an interaction of cells directly subjected to radiation with adjacent non-subjected cells, via molecular signals, is an important component of ionizing radiation action. However, knowledge of the bystander effect in the case of ultraviolet (UV) radiation is quite limited. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by UV in exposed cells induce bystander effects in non-exposed cells, such as reduction in clonogenic cell survival and delayed cell death, oxidative DNA damage and gene mutations, induction of micronuclei, lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Although the bystander effect after UV radiation has been recognized in cell culture systems, its occurrence in vivo has not been studied. However, solar UV radiation, which is the main source of UV in the environment, may induce in human dermal tissue an inflammatory response and immune suppression, events which can be considered as bystander effects of UV radiation. The oxidative damage to DNA, genomic instability and the inflammatory response may lead to carcinogenesis. UV radiation is considered one of the important etiologic factors for skin cancers, basal- and squamous-cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. Based on the mechanisms of actions it seems that the UV-induced bystander effect can have some impact on skin damage (carcinogenesis?), and probably on cells of other tissues. The paper reviews the existing data about the UV-induced bystander effect and discusses a possible implication of this phenomenon for health risk.  PMID:23175338

  1. Radiation Exposure, the ATM Gene, and Contralateral Breast Cancer in the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Haile, Robert W.; Stovall, Marilyn; Boice, John D.; Shore, Roy E.; Langholz, Bryan; Thomas, Duncan C.; Lynch, Charles F.; Olsen, Jorgen H.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Teraoka, Sharon N.; Diep, Anh T.; Smith, Susan A.; Capanu, Marinela; Reiner, Anne S.; Liang, Xiaolin; Gatti, Richard A.; Concannon, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation is a known mutagen and an established breast carcinogen. The ATM gene is a key regulator of cellular responses to the DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. We investigated whether genetic variants in ATM play a clinically significant role in radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in women. Methods The Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology Study is an international population-based case–control study nested within a cohort of 52 536 survivors of unilateral breast cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 2000. The 708 case subjects were women with contralateral breast cancer, and the 1397 control subjects were women with unilateral breast cancer matched to the case subjects on age, follow-up time, registry reporting region, and race and/or ethnicity. All women were interviewed and underwent full mutation screening of the entire ATM gene. Complete medical treatment history information was collected, and for all women who received radiotherapy, the radiation dose to the contralateral breast was reconstructed using radiotherapy records and radiation measurements. Rate ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by using multivariable conditional logistic regression. All P values are two-sided. Results Among women who carried a rare ATM missense variant (ie, one carried by <1% of the study participants) that was predicted to be deleterious, those who were exposed to radiation (mean radiation exposure = 1.2 Gy, SD = 0.7) had a statistically significantly higher risk of contralateral breast cancer compared with unexposed women who carried the wild-type genotype (0.01–0.99 Gy: RR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2 to 6.5; ≥1.0 Gy: RR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.4 to 8.0) or compared with unexposed women who carried the same predicted deleterious missense variant (0.01–0.99 Gy: RR = 5.3, 95% CI = 1.6 to 17.3; ≥1.0 Gy: RR = 5.8, 95% CI = 1.8 to 19.0; Ptrend = .044). Conclusions Women who carry rare

  2. Identification of Gene Expression Biomarkers for Predicting Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tzu-Pin; Hsu, Yi-Yao; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Chuang, Eric Y.

    2014-01-01

    A need for more accurate and reliable radiation dosimetry has become increasingly important due to the possibility of a large-scale radiation emergency resulting from terrorism or nuclear accidents. Although traditional approaches provide accurate measurements, such methods usually require tedious effort and at least two days to complete. Therefore, we provide a new method for rapid prediction of radiation exposure. Eleven microarray datasets were classified into two groups based on their radiation doses and utilized as the training samples. For the two groups, Student's t-tests and resampling tests were used to identify biomarkers, and their gene expression ratios were used to develop a prediction model. The performance of the model was evaluated in four independent datasets, and Ingenuity pathway analysis was performed to characterize the associated biological functions. Our meta-analysis identified 29 biomarkers, showing approximately 90% and 80% accuracy in the training and validation samples. Furthermore, the 29 genes significantly participated in the regulation of cell cycle, and 19 of them are regulated by three well-known radiation-modulated transcription factors: TP53, FOXM1 and ERBB2. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a reliable method for identifying biomarkers across independent studies and high and reproducible prediction accuracy was demonstrated in both internal and external datasets. PMID:25189756

  3. Gene expression profiling of breast cells induced by X-rays and heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Roy, D; Guida, P; Zhou, G; Echiburu-Chau, C; Calaf, G M

    2008-05-01

    Several genetic aberrations and gene expression changes have been shown to occur when cells are exposed to various types of radiation. The integrity of DNA depends upon several processes that include DNA damage recognition and repair, replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Ionizing radiation has many sources, including radon decay from the soil and X-rays from medical practice. Epidemiological evidence indicates a risk for cancer by inducing genetic alterations through DNA damage, and molecular alterations have been reported in epidemiological studies of the A-bomb survivors. A spontaneously immortalized human breast epithelial cell model, MCF-10F, was used to examine the gene expression profiling of breast cells induced by X-ray and heavy ion exposure, by a cDNA expression array of DNA damage and repair genes. This cell line was exposed to 10, 50, 100 and 200 cGy of either X-rays or heavy ions and gene expression profiles were studied. Results indicated that out of a total of 161 genes, 38 were differentially expressed by X-ray treatment and 24 by heavy ion (Fe(+2)) treatment. Eight genes were common to both treatments and were confirmed by Northern blot analysis: BRCA1, BIRC2/CIAP1, CENP-E, DDB1, MRE11A, RAD54/ATRX, Wip1 and XPF/ERCC4. A number of candidate genes reported here may be useful molecular biomarkers of radiation exposure in breast cells. PMID:18425356

  4. Characterization of a Novel Radiation-Induced Sarcoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lang, J.E.; Zhu, W.; Nokes, B.T.; Sheth, G.R.; Novak, P.; Fuchs, L.; Watts, G.S.; Futscher, B.W.; Mineyev, N.; Ring, A.; LeBeau, L.; Nagle, R.; Cranmer, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is a potential complication of cancer treatment. No widely available cell line models exist to facilitate studies of RIS. Methods We derived a spontaneously immortalized primary human cell line, UACC-SARC1, from a RIS. Results Short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of UACC-SARC1 was virtually identical to its parental tumor. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of the tumor and immunocytochemistry (ICC) analysis of UACC-SARC1 revealed shared expression of vimentin, osteonectin, CD68, Ki67 and PTEN but tumor-restricted expression of the histiocyte markers α1-antitrypsin and α1-antichymotrypsin. Karyotyping of the tumor demonstrated aneuploidy. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) provided direct genetic comparison between the tumor and UACC-SARC1. Sequencing of 740 mutation hotspots revealed no mutations in UACC-SARC1 nor in the tumor. NOD/SCID gamma mouse xenografts demonstrated tumor formation and metastasis. Clonogenicity assays demonstrated that 90% of single cells produced viable colonies. NOD/SCID gamma mice produced useful patient-derived xenografts for orthotopic or metastatic models. Conclusion Our novel RIS strain constitutes a useful tool for pre-clinical studies of this rare, aggressive disease. UACC-SARC1 is an aneuploid cell line with complex genomics lacking common oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes as drivers of its biology. The UACC-SARC1 cell line will enable further studies of the drivers of RIS. Synopsis We derived a spontaneously immortalized primary human cell line, UACC-SARC1, from a radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS). Our novel RIS cell line constitutes a useful tool for pre-clinical studies of this rare, aggressive disease. PMID:25644184

  5. Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.

    1991-01-01

    We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

  6. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina; Gaidamakova, Elena; Matrosova, Vera; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam L; Mavromatis, K; Pitluck, Samual; Richardson, P M; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Tom; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M; Wolf, Yuri; Sorokin, Alexei; Gerasimova, Anna; Gelfand, Mikhail; Fredrickson, James K; Koonin, Eugene; Daly, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  7. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  8. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  9. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

  10. Radiation-induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Riewe, L.C.; Witczak, Schrimpf, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    Capacitance-voltage and thermally stimulated current methods are used to investigate radiation induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides. Results are compared with models of oxide and interface trap charge buildup at low electric fields.

  11. Radiation-induced impairment of neuronal excitability

    SciTech Connect

    Pellmar, T.C.; Tolliver, J.M.; Neel, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation causes a decrease in the synaptically evoked activity of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells. This effect is dose and dose-rate dependent. Hydrogen peroxide, which produces hydroxyl free radicals when combined with FE + 2, produces similar damage. In contrast, the radioprotectant, dithiothreitol, increases the excitability of hippocampal neurons. These studies indicate that radiation can directly affect the function of central neurons.

  12. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  13. GENE METHYLATION CHANGES IN TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES INDUCED BY ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The choice of a dose-response model used for extrapolation can be influenced by knowledge of mechanism of action. We have already showed that arsenic affects methylation of the human p53 gene promoter. Evidence that genes other than the p53 tumor suppressor gene are affected woul...

  14. Coherent microwave radiation from a laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.

    2012-12-24

    We propose a method for generation of coherent monochromatic microwave/terahertz radiation from a laser-induced plasma. It is shown that small-scale plasma, located in the interaction region of two co-propagating plane-polarized laser beams, can be a source of the dipole radiation at a frequency equal to the difference between the frequencies of the lasers. This radiation is coherent and appears as a result of the so-called optical mixing in plasma.

  15. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:25062865

  16. Radiation-induced alternative transcription and splicing events and their applicability to practical biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Macaeva, Ellina; Saeys, Yvan; Tabury, Kevin; Janssen, Ann; Michaux, Arlette; Benotmane, Mohammed A.; De Vos, Winnok H.; Baatout, Sarah; Quintens, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the individual exposure dose based on easily accessible samples (e.g. blood) immediately following a radiological accident is crucial. We aimed at developing a robust transcription-based signature for biodosimetry from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells irradiated with different doses of X-rays (0.1 and 1.0 Gy) at a dose rate of 0.26 Gy/min. Genome-wide radiation-induced changes in mRNA expression were evaluated at both gene and exon level. Using exon-specific qRT-PCR, we confirmed that several biomarker genes are alternatively spliced or transcribed after irradiation and that different exons of these genes exhibit significantly different levels of induction. Moreover, a significant number of radiation-responsive genes were found to be genomic neighbors. Using three different classification models we found that gene and exon signatures performed equally well on dose prediction, as long as more than 10 features are included. Together, our results highlight the necessity of evaluating gene expression at the level of single exons for radiation biodosimetry in particular and transcriptional biomarker research in general. This approach is especially advisable for practical gene expression-based biodosimetry, for which primer- or probe-based techniques would be the method of choice. PMID:26763932

  17. Radiation-induced alternative transcription and splicing events and their applicability to practical biodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Macaeva, Ellina; Saeys, Yvan; Tabury, Kevin; Janssen, Ann; Michaux, Arlette; Benotmane, Mohammed A; De Vos, Winnok H; Baatout, Sarah; Quintens, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the individual exposure dose based on easily accessible samples (e.g. blood) immediately following a radiological accident is crucial. We aimed at developing a robust transcription-based signature for biodosimetry from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells irradiated with different doses of X-rays (0.1 and 1.0 Gy) at a dose rate of 0.26 Gy/min. Genome-wide radiation-induced changes in mRNA expression were evaluated at both gene and exon level. Using exon-specific qRT-PCR, we confirmed that several biomarker genes are alternatively spliced or transcribed after irradiation and that different exons of these genes exhibit significantly different levels of induction. Moreover, a significant number of radiation-responsive genes were found to be genomic neighbors. Using three different classification models we found that gene and exon signatures performed equally well on dose prediction, as long as more than 10 features are included. Together, our results highlight the necessity of evaluating gene expression at the level of single exons for radiation biodosimetry in particular and transcriptional biomarker research in general. This approach is especially advisable for practical gene expression-based biodosimetry, for which primer- or probe-based techniques would be the method of choice. PMID:26763932

  18. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  19. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  20. A biophysical model for estimating the frequency of radiation-induced mutations resulting from chromosomal translocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco

    Gene mutations can be induced by radiation as a result of chromosomal translocations. A biophysical model is developed to estimate the frequency of this type of mutation induced by low-LET radiation. Mutations resulting from translocations are assumed to be formed by misrejoining of two DNA double strand breaks (DSB), one within the gene and one on a different chromosome. The chromosome containing the gene is assumed to occupy a spherical territory and does not overlap spatially with other chromosomes. Misrejoining between two DSB can occur only if the two DSB are closer than an interaction distance at the time of their induction. Applying the model to mutations of the hprt gene induced in G0 human lymphocyte cells by low-LET radiation, it is calculated that mutations resulting from translocations account for about 14% of the total mutations. The value of the interaction distance is determined to be 0.6 μm by comparing with the observed frequency of translocations in the X-chromosome.

  1. Characterization of radiation-induced Apoptosis in rodent cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Min; Chen, Changhu; Ling, C.C.

    1997-03-01

    For REC:myc(ch1), Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we determined the events in the development of radiation-induced apoptosis to be in the following order: cell division followed by chromatin condensation, membrane blebbing, loss of adhesion and the uptake of vital dye. Experimental data which were obtained using {sup 4}He ions of well defined energies and which compared the dependence of apoptosis and clonogenic survival on {sup 4}He range strongly suggested that in our cells both apoptosis and loss of clonogenic survival resulted from radiation damage to the cell nucleus. Corroboratory evidence was that BrdU incorporation sensitized these cells to radiation-induced apoptosis. Comparing the dose response for apoptosis and the clonogenic survival curves for Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we concluded that radiation-induced cell inactivation as assayed by clonogenic survival, and that a modified linear-quadratic model, proposed previously, modeled such a contribution effectively. In the same context, the selective increase in radiation-induced apoptosis. Comparing the dose response for apoptosis and the clonogenic survival curves for Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we concluded that radiation-induced apoptosis contributed to the overall radiation-induced cell inactivation as assayed by clonogenic survival, and that a modified linear-quadratic model, proposed previously, modeled such a contribution effectively. In the same context, the selective increase in radiation-induced apoptosis during late S and G{sub 2} phases reduced the relative radioresistance observed for clonogenic survival during late S and G{sub 2} phases. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance

    PubMed Central

    Kabarriti, Rafi

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  3. Hyperbaric oxygen: Primary treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Neville, E.C.

    1989-07-01

    Of 8 patients with symptoms of advanced cystitis due to pelvic radiation treated with hyperbaric oxygen 7 are persistently improved during followup. All 6 patients treated for gross hematuria requiring hospitalization have been free of symptoms for an average of 24 months (range 6 to 43 months). One patient treated for stress incontinence currently is dry despite little change in bladder capacity, implying salutary effect from hyperbaric oxygen on the sphincter mechanism. One patient with radiation-induced prostatitis failed to respond. This experience suggests that hyperbaric oxygen should be considered the primary treatment for patients with symptomatic radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  4. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance.

    PubMed

    Kabarriti, Rafi; Guha, Chandan

    2014-07-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  5. Non-thermal effects of terahertz radiation on gene expression in mouse stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Bishop, Alan R.; Usheva, Anny; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Chong, Shou; Dagon, Yossi; Booshehri, Layla G.; Mielke, Charles H.; Phipps, M. Lisa; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Rodriguez, George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, terahertz radiation sources are increasingly being exploited in military and civil applications. However, only a few studies have so far been conducted to examine the biological effects associated with terahertz radiation. In this study, we evaluated the cellular response of mesenchymal mouse stem cells exposed to THz radiation. We apply low-power radiation from both a pulsed broad-band (centered at 10 THz) source and from a CW laser (2.52 THz) source. Modeling, empirical characterization, and monitoring techniques were applied to minimize the impact of radiation-induced increases in temperature. qRT-PCR was used to evaluate changes in the transcriptional activity of selected hyperthermic genes. We found that temperature increases were minimal, and that the differential expression of the investigated heat shock proteins (HSP105, HSP90, and CPR) was unaffected, while the expression of certain other genes (Adiponectin, GLUT4, and PPARG) showed clear effects of the THz irradiation after prolonged, broad-band exposure. PMID:21991556

  6. Identification and transcriptional profiling of differentially expressed genes associated with response to UVA radiation in Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Jun; Zhu, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Ma, Wei-Hua; Desneux, Nicolas; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2013-10-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation, the major component of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the earth's surface, leads to negative effects in insects, such as oxidative stress, photoreceptor damage, and cell death. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of insect response to UVA radiation, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction approaches were combined to reveal differential transcript expression in Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 (Diptera: Drosophilidae). In this study, two subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed and sequenced, obtaining 131 high-quality unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that were up- or downregulated in D. melanogaster exposed to UVA radiation for 0.5 h. Of the 131 ESTs, 102 unique ESTs were differentially expressed and classified into 10 functional categories. The results showed that UVA radiation induces expression of genes related to stress and defense response and metabolism. Potential transcription factor binding motifs upstream of these genes are associated with multiple signaling pathways that may help the insect cope with the stress of UVA radiation. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis of insect response to UVA radiation at the transcriptional level. Our results reveal that UVA radiation influences the expression profiles of stress-responsive genes and provide further insights into the mechanisms of adaptive response to UVA radiation stress. PMID:24331622

  7. Effects of Pharmacological Inhibition and Genetic Deficiency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrahmani, Rym; Francois, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Crandall, David L.; Milliat, Fabien

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) genetic deficiency and pharmacological PAI-1 inhibition with PAI-039 in a mouse model of radiation-induced enteropathy. Methods and Materials: Wild-type (Wt) and PAI-1{sup -/-} knockout mice received a single dose of 19 Gy to an exteriorized localized intestinal segment. Sham and irradiated Wt mice were treated orally with 1 mg/g of PAI-039. Histological modifications were quantified using a radiation injury score. Moreover, intestinal gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Results: At 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 abolished the radiation-induced increase in the plasma active form of PAI-1 and limited the radiation-induced gene expression of transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1), CTGF, PAI-1, and COL1A2. Moreover, PAI-039 conferred temporary protection against early lethality. PAI-039 treatment limited the radiation-induced increase of CTGF and PAI-1 at 2 weeks after irradiation but had no effect at 6 weeks. Radiation injuries were less severe in PAI-1{sup -/-} mice than in Wt mice, and despite the beneficial effect, 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 had no effects on microscopic radiation injuries compared to untreated Wt mice. Conclusions: A genetic deficiency of PAI-1 is associated with amelioration of late radiation enteropathy. Pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 by PAI-039 positively impacts the early, acute phase increase in plasma PAI-1 and the associated radiation-induced gene expression of inflammatory/extracellular matrix proteins. Since PAI-039 has been shown to inhibit the active form of PAI-1, as opposed to the complete loss of PAI-1 in the knockout animals, these data suggest that a PAI-1 inhibitor could be beneficial in treating radiation-induced tissue injury in acute settings where PAI-1 is elevated.

  8. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  9. Impact of p53 status on heavy-ion radiation-induced micronuclei in circulating erythrocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Torous, D.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice that differed in their p53 genetic status were exposed to an acute dose of highly charged and energetic (HZE) iron particle radiation. Micronuclei (MN) in two distinct populations of circulating peripheral blood erythrocytes, the immature reticulocytes (RETs) and the mature normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs), were measured using a simple and efficient flow cytometric procedure. Our results show significant elevation in the frequency of micronucleated RETs (%MN-RETs) at 2 and 3 days post-radiation. At 3 days post-irradiation, the magnitude of the radiation-induced MN-RET was 2.3-fold higher in the irradiated p53 wild-type animals compared to the unirradiated controls, 2.5-fold higher in the p53 hemizygotes and 4.3-fold higher in the p53 nullizygotes. The persistence of this radiation-induced elevation of MN-RETs is dependent on the p53 genetic background of the animal. In the p53 wild-type and p53 hemizygotes, %MN-RETs returned to control levels by 9 days post-radiation. However, elevated levels of %MN-RETs in p53 nullizygous mice persisted beyond 56 days post-radiation. We also observed elevated MN-NCEs in the peripheral circulation after radiation, but the changes in radiation-induced levels of MN-NCEs appear dampened compared to those of the MN-RETs for all three strains of animals. These results suggest that the lack of p53 gene function may play a role in the iron particle radiation-induced genomic instability in stem cell populations in the hematopoietic system.

  10. Blocking the formation of radiation-induced breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangyang; Li, Wende; Patel, Shalin S; Cong, Juan; Zhang, Nan; Sabbatino, Francesco; Liu, Xiaoyan; Qi, Yuan; Huang, Peigen; Lee, Hang; Taghian, Alphonse; Li, Jian-Jian; DeLeo, Albert B; Ferrone, Soldano; Epperly, Michael W; Ferrone, Cristina R; Ly, Amy; Brachtel, Elena F; Wang, Xinhui

    2014-06-15

    The goal of adjuvant (post-surgery) radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer (BC) is to eliminate residual cancer cells, leading to better local tumor control and thus improving patient survival. However, radioresistance increases the risk of tumor recurrence and negatively affects survival. Recent evidence shows that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are radiation-resistant and that relatively differentiated BC cells can be reprogrammed into induced BCSCs (iBCSCs) via radiation-induced re-expression of the stemness genes. Here we show that in irradiation (IR)-treated mice bearing syngeneic mammary tumors, IR-induced stemness correlated with increased spontaneous lung metastasis (51.7%). However, IR-induced stemness was blocked by targeting the NF-κB- stemness gene pathway with disulfiram (DSF)and Copper (Cu2+). DSF is an inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and an FDA-approved drug for treating alcoholism. DSF binds to Cu2+ to form DSF-Cu complexes (DSF/Cu), which act as a potent apoptosis inducer and an effective proteasome inhibitor, which, in turn, inhibits NF-κB activation. Treatment of mice with RT and DSF significantly inhibited mammary primary tumor growth (79.4%) and spontaneous lung metastasis (89.6%) compared to vehicle treated mice. This anti-tumor efficacy was associated with decreased stem cell properties (or stemness) in tumors. We expect that these results will spark clinical investigation of RT and DSF as a novel combinatorial treatment for breast cancer. PMID:25003837

  11. Radiation-Induced Problems in Colorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ashburn, Jean H; Kalady, Matthew F

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy not only plays a pivotal role in the cancer care pathways of many patients with pelvic malignancies, but can also lead to significant injury of normal tissue in the radiation field (pelvic radiation disease) that is sometimes as challenging to treat as the neoplasms themselves. Acute symptoms are usually self-limited and respond to medical therapy. Chronic symptoms often require operative intervention that is made hazardous by hostile surgical planes and unforgiving tissues. Management of these challenging patients is best guided by the utmost caution and humility. PMID:27247532

  12. Radiation Increases Invasion of Gene-modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zielske, Steven P.; Livant, Donna L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells in the bone marrow which have been found to migrate to tumors, suggesting a potential use for cancer gene therapy. MSCs migrate to sites of tissue damage, including normal tissues damaged by radiation. In this study, we investigate the effect of tumor radiation therapy on localization of lentivirus-transduced MSCs to tumors. Methods and Materials MSCs were labeled with a lipophilic dye to investigate migration to colon cancer xenografts. Subsequently, MSCs were transduced with a lentiviral vector to model gene therapy and mark infused MSCs. LoVo tumor xenografts were treated with increasing doses of radiation therapy to assess the effect on MSC localization, which was measured by quantitative PCR. MSC invasion efficiency was determined in an invasion assay. Results MSCs migrated to tumor xenografts of various origins, with few cells found in normal tissues. A lentiviral vector efficiently transduced MSCs in the presence, but not absence, of Polybrene. When LoVo tumors were treated with increasing doses of radiation, more MSCs were found to migrate to them than to untreated tumors. Irradiation increased MSC localization in HT-29 and MDA-MB-231, but not UMSCC1, xenografts. MCP-1 expression in tumors did not correlate with basal levels of MSC infiltration, however, MCP-1 was modestly elevated in irradiated tumors. Media from irradiated LoVo cells stimulated MSC invasion into basement membranes. Conclusion These findings suggest that radiation induced injury can be used to target MSCs to tumors, which may increase the effectiveness of MSC cancer gene therapy. Production of tumor-derived factors in response to radiation stimulates MSC invasion. PMID:18849123

  13. Reduced Activity of Double-Strand Break Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Late Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Oorschot, Bregje van; Hovingh, Suzanne E.; Moerland, Perry D.; Medema, Jan Paul; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Vrieling, Harry; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical parameters and DNA damage response as possible risk factors for radiation toxicity in the setting of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Clinical parameters of 61 prostate cancer patients, 34 with (overresponding, OR) and 27 without (non-responding, NR) severe late radiation toxicity were assembled. In addition, for a matched subset the DNA damage repair kinetics (γ-H2AX assay) and expression profiles of DNA repair genes were determined in ex vivo irradiated lymphocytes. Results: Examination of clinical data indicated none of the considered clinical parameters to be correlated with the susceptibility of patients to develop late radiation toxicity. Although frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induced immediately after irradiation were similar (P=.32), significantly higher numbers of γ-H2AX foci were found 24 hours after irradiation in OR compared with NR patients (P=.03). Patient-specific γ-H2AX foci decay ratios were significantly higher in NR patients than in OR patients (P<.0001). Consequently, NR patients seem to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) more efficiently than OR patients. Moreover, gene expression analysis indicated several genes of the homologous recombination pathway to be stronger induced in NR compared with OR patients (P<.05). A similar trend was observed in genes of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway (P=.09). This is congruent with more proficient repair of DNA DSBs in patients without late radiation toxicity. Conclusions: Both gene expression profiling and DNA DSB repair kinetics data imply that less-efficient repair of radiation-induced DSBs may contribute to the development of late normal tissue damage. Induction levels of DSB repair genes (eg, RAD51) may potentially be used to assess the risk for late radiation toxicity.

  14. Expression of immediate early genes after treatment of human astrocytoma cells with radiation and taxol

    SciTech Connect

    Gubits, R.M.; Geard, C.R.; Schiff, P.B.

    1993-10-20

    The promising chemotherapeutic agent, taxol, has been shown to sensitize the G18 line of human astrocytoma cells to ionizing radiation. The present studies were performed to identify specific changes in gene expression associated with this altered sensitivity. The products of immediate early genes, which are induced transiently in cells in response to a variety of treatments, including growth factors, neurotransmitters, and irradiation with UV light or X rays, are thought to initiate a cascade of genetic responses to alterations in cellular environment. The present results demonstrate a dramatic attenuation in one immediate early gene response in association with a treatment that enhances radiosensitivity in a refractory human brain tumor line. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Assessment of Radiation Induced Therapeutic Effect and Cytotoxicity in Cancer Patients Based on Transcriptomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Karim, Sajjad; Mirza, Zeenat; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Gari, Mamdooh; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity induced by radiation therapy is a curse for cancer patients undergoing treatment. It is imperative to understand and define an ideal condition where the positive effects notably outweigh the negative. We used a microarray meta-analysis approach to measure global gene-expression before and after radiation exposure. Bioinformatic tools were used for pathways, network, gene ontology and toxicity related studies. We found 429 differentially expressed genes at fold change >2 and p-value <0.05. The most significantly upregulated genes were synuclein alpha (SNCA), carbonic anhydrase I (CA1), X-linked Kx blood group (XK), glycophorin A and B (GYPA and GYPB), and hemogen (HEMGN), while downregulated ones were membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A member 1 (MS4A1), immunoglobulin heavy constant mu (IGHM), chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7), BTB and CNC homology 1 transcription factor 2 (BACH2), and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 11B (BCL11B). Pathway analysis revealed calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis and the role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) in regulation of the immune response as the most inhibited pathways, while apoptosis signaling was significantly activated. Most of the normal biofunctions were significantly decreased while cell death and survival process were activated. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed the immune system process as the most overrepresented group under the biological process category. Toxicity function analysis identified liver, kidney and heart to be the most affected organs during and after radiation therapy. The identified biomarkers and alterations in molecular pathways induced by radiation therapy should be further investigated to reduce the cytotoxicity and development of fatigue. PMID:26907258

  16. Assessment of Radiation Induced Therapeutic Effect and Cytotoxicity in Cancer Patients Based on Transcriptomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Sajjad; Mirza, Zeenat; Chaudhary, Adeel G.; Abuzenadah, Adel M.; Gari, Mamdooh; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity induced by radiation therapy is a curse for cancer patients undergoing treatment. It is imperative to understand and define an ideal condition where the positive effects notably outweigh the negative. We used a microarray meta-analysis approach to measure global gene-expression before and after radiation exposure. Bioinformatic tools were used for pathways, network, gene ontology and toxicity related studies. We found 429 differentially expressed genes at fold change >2 and p-value <0.05. The most significantly upregulated genes were synuclein alpha (SNCA), carbonic anhydrase I (CA1), X-linked Kx blood group (XK), glycophorin A and B (GYPA and GYPB), and hemogen (HEMGN), while downregulated ones were membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A member 1 (MS4A1), immunoglobulin heavy constant mu (IGHM), chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7), BTB and CNC homology 1 transcription factor 2 (BACH2), and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 11B (BCL11B). Pathway analysis revealed calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis and the role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) in regulation of the immune response as the most inhibited pathways, while apoptosis signaling was significantly activated. Most of the normal biofunctions were significantly decreased while cell death and survival process were activated. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed the immune system process as the most overrepresented group under the biological process category. Toxicity function analysis identified liver, kidney and heart to be the most affected organs during and after radiation therapy. The identified biomarkers and alterations in molecular pathways induced by radiation therapy should be further investigated to reduce the cytotoxicity and development of fatigue. PMID:26907258

  17. Radioprotectors and Mitigators of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Hyodo, Fuminori; Baum, Bruce J.; Krishna, Murali C.; Mitchell, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation is used in the treatment of a broad range of malignancies. Exposure of normal tissue to radiation may result in both acute and chronic toxicities that can result in an inability to deliver the intended therapy, a range of symptoms, and a decrease in quality of life. Radioprotectors are compounds that are designed to reduce the damage in normal tissues caused by radiation. These compounds are often antioxidants and must be present before or at the time of radiation for effectiveness. Other agents, termed mitigators, may be used to minimize toxicity even after radiation has been delivered. Herein, we review agents in clinical use or in development as radioprotectors and mitigators of radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Few agents are approved for clinical use, but many new compounds show promising results in preclinical testing. PMID:20413641

  18. Radiation induces genomic instability and mammary ductal dysplasia in Atm heterozygous mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, M. M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Yu, Y.; McCarthy, M.; Zabriskie, R. C.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic syndrome resulting from the inheritance of two defective copies of the ATM gene that includes among its stigmata radiosensitivity and cancer susceptibility. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that although women with a single defective copy of ATM (AT heterozygotes) appear clinically normal, they may never the less have an increased relative risk of developing breast cancer. Whether they are at increased risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from medical exposures to ionizing radiation is unknown. We have used a murine model of AT to investigate the effect of a single defective Atm allele, the murine homologue of ATM, on the susceptibility of mammary epithelial cells to radiation-induced transformation. Here we report that mammary epithelial cells from irradiated mice with one copy of Atm truncated in the PI-3 kinase domain were susceptible to radiation-induced genomic instability and generated a 10% incidence of dysplastic mammary ducts when transplanted into syngenic recipients, whereas cells from Atm(+/+) mice were stable and formed only normal ducts. Since radiation-induced ductal dysplasia is a precursor to mammary cancer, the results indicate that AT heterozygosity increases susceptibility to radiogenic breast cancer in this murine model system.

  19. Hyperprolactinemia from radiation-induced hypothalamic hypopituitarism

    SciTech Connect

    Corkill, G.; Hanson, F.W.; Gold, E.M.; White, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Samaan et al., described the effects of radiation damage of the hypothalamus in 15 patients with head and neck cancer. Shalet et al., in 1977 described endocrine morbidity in adults who as children had been irradiated for brain tumors. This report describes instances of hyperprolactinemia and associated hypothalamic, pituitary, and thyroid dysfunction following irradiation of a young adult female for brain neoplasia.

  20. RADIATION INDUCED VULCANIZATION OF RUBBER LATEX

    DOEpatents

    Mesrobian, R.B.; Ballantine, D.S.; Metz, D.J.

    1964-04-28

    A method of vulcanizing rubber latex by exposing a mixture containing rubber latex and from about 15 to about 21.3 wt% of 2,5-dichlorostyrene to about 1.1 megarads of gamma radiation while maintaining the temperature of the mixture at a temperature ranging between from about 56 to about 59 deg C is described. (AEC)

  1. Radiation-induced cerebellar chondrosarcoma. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Perrin, R.G.; Platts, M.E.; Simpson, W.J.

    1984-07-01

    The authors report a case of chondrosarcoma arising in the cerebellum 16 years after treatment of a cerebellar malignant astrocytoma by subtotal resection and irradiation. It is thought that the chondrosarcoma arising within the intracranial cavity was a probable consequence of previous ionizing radiation.

  2. Radiatively induced Fermi scale and unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanne, Tommi; Meroni, Aurora; Sannino, Francesco; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2016-05-01

    We consider extensions of the Standard Model in which the hierarchy between the unification and the Fermi scale emerges radiatively. Within the Pati-Salam framework, we show that it is possible to construct a viable model where the Higgs is an elementary pseudo-Goldstone boson, and the correct hierarchy is generated.

  3. Variation in Telangiectasia Predisposing Genes Is Associated With Overall Radiation Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tanteles, George A.; Murray, Robert J.S.; Mills, Jamie; Barwell, Julian; Chakraborti, Prabir; Chan, Steve; Cheung, Kwok-Leung; Ennis, Dawn; Khurshid, Nazish; Lambert, Kelly; Machhar, Rohan; Meisuria, Mitul; Osman, Ahmed; Peat, Irene; Sahota, Harjinder; Woodings, Pamela; Talbot, Christopher J.; and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In patients receiving radiotherapy for breast cancer where the heart is within the radiation field, cutaneous telangiectasiae could be a marker of potential radiation-induced heart disease. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes known to cause heritable telangiectasia-associated disorders could predispose to such late, normal tissue vascular damage. Methods and Materials: The relationship between cutaneous telangiectasia as a late normal tissue radiation injury phenotype in 633 breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy was examined. Patients were clinically assessed for the presence of cutaneous telangiectasia and genotyped at nine SNPs in three candidate genes. Candidate SNPs were within the endoglin (ENG) and activin A receptor, type II-like 1 (ACVRL1) genes, mutations in which cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene associated with ataxia-telangiectasia. Results: A total of 121 (19.1%) patients exhibited a degree of cutaneous telangiectasiae on clinical examination. Regression was used to examine the associations between the presence of telangiectasiae in patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery, controlling for the effects of boost and known brassiere size (n=388), and individual geno- or haplotypes. Inheritance of ACVRL1 SNPs marginally contributed to the risk of cutaneous telangiectasiae. Haplotypic analysis revealed a stronger association between inheritance of a ATM haplotype and the presence of cutaneous telangiectasiae, fibrosis and overall toxicity. No significant association was observed between telangiectasiae and the coinheritance of the candidate ENG SNPs. Conclusions: Genetic variation in the ATM gene influences reaction to radiotherapy through both vascular damage and increased fibrosis. The predisposing variation in the ATM gene will need to be better defined to optimize it as a predictive marker for assessing radiotherapy late effects.

  4. [Role of constitutive and inducible repair in radiation resistance of Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Gulevich, E P; Kuznetsova, V N; Verbenko, V N

    2011-07-01

    Radiation resistance of Escherichia coil cells depends on how efficiently DNA is recovered after damage, which is determined by the function of constitutive and inducible repair branches. The effects of additional mutations of the key genes of constitutive and inducible repair (recA, lexA, recB, polA, lig, gyr, recE, recO, recR, recJ, recQ, uvrD, helD, recN, and ruv) on radiation resistance were studied in E. coli K-12 strain AB 1157 and highly radiation-resistant isogenic strain Gam(r)444. An optimal balance ensuring a high gamma resistance of the Gam(r)444 radiation-resistant E. coli mutant was due to expression of the key SOS repair genes (recA, lexA, recN, and ruv) and activation of the presynaptic functions of the RecF homologous recombination pathway as a result of a possible mutation of the uvrD gene, which codes for repair helicase II. PMID:21938951

  5. Protective effect of α-lipoic acid against radiation-induced fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seung-Hee; Park, Eun-Young; Kwak, Sungmin; Heo, Seung-Ho; Ryu, Je-Won; Park, Jin-Hong; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lee, Sang-Wook

    2016-03-29

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is one of the most common late complications of radiation therapy. We found that α-lipoic acid (α-LA) effectively prevents RIF. In RIF a mouse model, leg contracture assay was used to test the in vivo efficacy of α-LA. α-LA suppressed the expression of pro-fibrotic genes after irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, and inhibited the up-regulation of TGF-β1-mediated p300/CBP activity. Thus, α-LA prevents radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of NF-κB through inhibition of histone acetyltransferase activity. α-LA is a new therapeutic methods that can be used in the prevention-treatment of RIF. PMID:26799284

  6. Protective effect of α-lipoic acid against radiation-induced fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seung-Hee; Park, Eun-Young; Kwak, Sungmin; Heo, Seung-Ho; Ryu, Je-Won; Park, Jin-hong

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is one of the most common late complications of radiation therapy. We found that α-lipoic acid (α-LA) effectively prevents RIF. In RIF a mouse model, leg contracture assay was used to test the in vivo efficacy of α-LA. α-LA suppressed the expression of pro-fibrotic genes after irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, and inhibited the up-regulation of TGF-β1-mediated p300/CBP activity. Thus, α-LA prevents radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of NF-κB through inhibition of histone acetyltransferase activity. α-LA is a new therapeutic methods that can be used in the prevention-treatment of RIF. PMID:26799284

  7. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  8. Neutron Radiation Affects the Expression of Genes Involved in the Response to Auxin, Senescence and Oxidative Stress in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunati, A.; Tassone, P.; Migliaccio, F.

    2008-06-01

    Researches were conducted on the effect of neutron radiation on the expression of genes auxin activated or connected with the process of senescence in Arabidopsis plants. The research was done by applying the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The results indicated that the auxin response factors (ARFs) genes are clearly downregulated, whereas the indolacetic acid-induced (Aux/IAAs) genes in some cases were upregulated. By contrast in the mutants for auxin transport aux1 and eir1 the ARFs genes were upregulated. In addition, both in the wildtype and mutants, some already known genes activated by stress and senescence were significantly upregulated. On the basis of these researches we conclude that the process of senescence induced by irradiation is, at least in part, controlled by the physiology of the hormone auxin.

  9. Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage as a Predictor of Cancer Risk for Protons and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jerry R.

    1999-01-01

    We have successfully completed the series of experiments planned for year 1 and the first part of year 2 measuring the induction of chromosome aberrations induced in multiple cell types by three model space radiations: Fe-ions, protons and photons. Most of these data have now been compiled and a significant part subjected to detailed data analyses, although continuing data analysis is an important part of our current and future efforts. These analyses are directed toward defining the patterns of chromosomal damage induction by the three radiations and the extent to which such patterns are dependent on the type of cell irradiated. Our studies show significant differences, both quantitatively and qualitatively, between response of different cell types to these radiations however there is an overall pattern that characterizes each type of radiation in most cell lines. Thus our data identifies general dose-response patterns for each radiation for induction of multiple types of chromosomal aberrations but also identifies significant differences in response between some cell types. Specifically, we observe significant resistance for induction of aberrations in rat mammary epithelial cells when they are irradiated in vivo and assayed in vitro. Further, we have observed some remarkable differences in susceptibility to certain radiation-induced aberrations in cells whose genome has been modulated for two cancer- relevant genes, TP53 and CDKNIA. This data, if confirmed, may represent the first evidence of gene-specific differences in cellular metabolism of damage induced by densely-ionizing radiation that confers substantial sensitivity to protons compared to photons.

  10. Effect of ionizing radiation on the transcription levels of cell stress marker genes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Farcy, Emilie; Voiseux, Claire; Robbes, Ismaël; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Fievet, Bruno

    2011-07-01

    In the North-Cotentin (Normandy, France), the marine environment is chronically exposed to liquid releases from the La Hague nuclear fuel recycling plant (Areva NC), resulting in a small increase in radioactivity compared to natural background. The transcriptional expression levels of stress genes were investigated in oysters exposed to ionizing radiation. Adult oysters were kept for 6 weeks in (60)Co-labeled seawater (400 Bq liter(-1)), resulting in a total dose of 6.2 mGy. Transcriptional expression of target genes was monitored by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Nine genes were selected for their sensitivity to ionizing radiation based on the literature and available DNA sequences. They included genes encoding chaperone proteins and genes involved in oxidative stress regulation, cell detoxification and cell cycle regulation. Of the nine genes of interest, metallothionein (MT) and multi-drug resistance (MDR) displayed significant overexpression in response to chronic exposure to an internal low dose. For comparison, oysters were acutely exposed to an external high dose for 100 min, resulting in 20 Gy, and the same target gene expression analysis was carried out. As in the case of chronic exposure to the low dose, MT and MDR displayed significant increases. The results suggest that the transcriptional expression levels of cell stress genes may be used as a biosensor of exposure of oysters to ionizing radiation, with a particular focus on the MT and MDR genes. However, the upregulation of these potential players in the cellular response to radiation-induced stress was not correlated with mortality or apparent morbidity. The possible role of these stress genes in the resistance of oysters to ionizing radiation is discussed. PMID:21574864

  11. Radiation induced growth of micro crystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Meisel, D.

    1991-01-01

    Generation of colloidal particles during the radiolysis of aqueous solutions was already observed in the early days of radiation chemistry. Systematic studies using radiation chemistry techniques as synthetic tools in the preparation of colloidal particles, primarily metallic particles, were begun approximately a decade ago in conjunction since they were found to catalyze multi-electron redox processes. A large number of metallic colloidal particles were then synthesized, including silver, gold, platinum, iridium, nickel, cadmium, and others. More recently, attention has turned to semiconductor colloidal particles. The stimulus to these studies is the observation of quantum size effects in small semiconductor particles that exhibit hybrid properties between those of the molecular species and the solid state bulk material. In the following we discuss our own observations on the evolution of semiconductor particles whose growth has been initiated by pulse radiolysis. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Radiation recall dermatitis induced by trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dochang; Koo, Ja Seung; Suh, Chang-Ok; Yoon, Chang Yun; Bae, Jaehyun; Lee, Soohyeon

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of radiation recall dermatitis caused by trastuzumab. A 55-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer received palliative first-line trastuzumab/paclitaxel and a salvage partial mastectomy with lymph node dissection was subsequently performed. In spite of the palliative setting, the pathology report indicated that no residual carcinoma was present, and then she underwent locoregional radiotherapy to ensure a definitive response. After radiotherapy, she has maintained trastuzumab monotherapy. Nine days after the fifth cycle of trastuzumab monotherapy, dermatitis in previously irradiated skin developed, with fever. Radiation recall dermatitis triggered by trastuzumab is extremely rare. A high fever developed abruptly with a skin rash. This may be the first case of this sort to be reported. PMID:23543400

  13. Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

  14. DECOHERENCE EFFECTS OF MOTION-INDUCED RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    P. NETO; D. DALVIT

    2000-12-01

    The radiation pressure coupling with vacuum fluctuations gives rise to energy damping and decoherence of an oscillating particle. Both effects result from the emission of pairs of photons, a quantum effect related to the fluctuations of the Casimir force. We discuss different alternative methods for the computation of the decoherence time scale. We take the example of a spherical perfectly-reflecting particle, and consider the zero and high temperature limits. We also present short general reviews on decoherence and dynamical Casimir effect.

  15. Simple method to demonstrate radiation-inducible radiation resistance in microbial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, S.T.; Maxcy, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    A simple method for detection of radiation-inducible radiation resistance was developed by irradiating aliquots (0.01 ml) of cell suspension on agar plates. Part of each experimental plate was subjected to an induction treatment, and subsequent radiation resistance was compared with that of untreated cells on the same plate. The UV radiation resistance of a Micrococcus sp. was increased approximately 1.6 times by an induction treatment. This simple procedure of irradiating cells in a fixed position on agar avoided washing, centrifugation, and cell enumeration required in traditional methods.

  16. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  17. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  18. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  19. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila melanogaster genes. Report I. The vestigial gene: molecular characteristic of "point" mutations].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, I D; Afanas'eva, K P; Aleksandrova, M V; Lapidus, I L

    2012-01-01

    The screening of PCR-detected DNA alterations in 9 spontaneous and 59 gamma-ray-, neutron - or neutron + gamma-ray-induced Drosophila vestigial (vg) gene/"point" mutations was carried out. The detected patterns of existence or absence of either of 16 overlapping fragments into which vg gene (15.1 kb, 8 exons, 7 introns) was divided enable us to subdivide all mutants into 4 classes: (i) PCR+ (40.7%) without the detected changes; (ii) "single-site" (33.9%) with the loss of a single fragment; (iii) partial detections (15.2%) as a loss of 2-9 adjacent fragments and (iv) "cluster" mutants (10.2%) having 2-3 independent changes of(ii) and/or (iii) classes. All spontaneous mutants except one were found to be classified as (ii) whereas radiation-induced mutants are represented by all 4 classes whose interrelation is determined by the dose and radiation quality. In particular, the efficacy of neutrons was found to be nine times as large as that of gamma-rays under the "cluster" mutant induction. Essentially, the distribution of DNA changes along the gene is uneven. CSGE-assay of PCR+-exon 3 revealed DNA heteroduplexes in 5 out of 17 PCR+-mutants studied, 2 of which had small deletions (5 and 11 b) and 3 others made transitions (A --> G) as shown by the sequencing. Therefore, gamma-rays and neutrons seem to be significant environmental agents increasing the SNP risk for the population through their action on the germ cells. The results obtained are also discussed within the framework of the track structure theory and the notion of quite different chromatin organization in somatic and germ cells. PMID:22891545

  20. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  1. Radiation Increases Invasion of Gene-Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Zielske, Steven P.; Livant, Donna L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells in the bone marrow that have been found to migrate to tumors, suggesting a potential use for cancer gene therapy. MSCs migrate to sites of tissue damage, including normal tissues damaged by radiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of tumor radiotherapy on the localization of lentivirus-transduced MSCs to tumors. Methods and Materials: MSCs were labeled with a lipophilic dye to investigate their migration to colon cancer xenografts. Subsequently, the MSCs were transduced with a lentiviral vector to model gene therapy and mark the infused MSCs. LoVo tumor xenografts were treated with increasing radiation doses to assess the effect on MSC localization, which was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MSC invasion efficiency was determined in an invasion assay. Results: MSCs migrated to tumor xenografts of various origins, with few cells found in normal tissues. A lentiviral vector efficiently transduced MSCs in the presence, but not the absence, of hexadimethrine bromide (Polybrene). When LoVo tumors were treated with increasing radiation doses, more MSCs were found to migrate to them than to untreated tumors. Irradiation increased MSC localization in HT-29 and MDA-MB-231, but not UMSCC1, xenografts. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in tumors did not correlate with the basal levels of MSC infiltration; however, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was modestly elevated in irradiated tumors. Media from irradiated LoVo cells stimulated MSC invasion into basement membranes. Conclusion: These findings suggest that radiation-induced injury can be used to target MSCs to tumors, which might increase the effectiveness of MSC cancer gene therapy. The production of tumor-derived factors in response to radiation stimulates MSC invasion.

  2. Radiation-induced products of peptides and their enzymatic digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, E.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical characterization of radiation-induced products of peptides and proteins is essential for understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on peptides and proteins. Furthermore, peptides containing radiation-altered amino acid residues might not be completely digestible by proteolytic enzymes. In this work, small homopeptides of Ala, Phe and Met were chosen as model peptides. Lysozyme was used to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on a small protein. All peptides and lysozyme were irradiated in diluted, oxygen free, N/sub 2/O-saturated aqueous solutions, using a /sup 60/Co-..gamma..-source. HPLC, capillary GC and GC-MS were applied to isolate and characterize the radiation-induced products. The enzymatic digestibility of the products was investigated using aminopeptidase M, leucine aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase A and carboxypeptidase Y. It was found that irradiation of peptides examined in this work leads to racemization and alteration of amino acid residues and crosslinks between the peptide chains. In addition, it was established that exopeptidases act differently on radiation-induced dimers of peptides composed of aliphatic, aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids.

  3. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  4. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  5. Intraoperative radiation therapy-induced sarcomas in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, H J; Sindelar, W F; Kinsella, T J; Mehta, D M

    1989-12-01

    In a canine model the tolerance of normal and surgically manipulated tissue to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated to provide guidelines for the clinical use of IORT in human cancer patients. A dose of 20 Gy IORT, with or without external beam radiotherapy, was generally well tolerated without significant increased treatment morbidity. Higher doses of IORT (over 30 Gy) have produced radiation-induced sarcomas in some animals followed over a long period. Therefore IORT should be used only in human cancer patients in well controlled studies, in which complications are well documented, and the possibility of radiation-induced malignancies in long-term survival should be considered. PMID:2594971

  6. Panretinal photocoagulation for radiation-induced ocular ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Roth, S.E.; Magargal, L.E.; Shields, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    We present preliminary findings on the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in preventing neovascular glaucoma in eyes with radiation-induced ocular ischemia. Our study group consisted of 20 patients who developed radiation-induced ocular ischemia following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy for a choroidal or ciliary body melanoma. Eleven of the 20 patients were treated by panretinal photocoagulation shortly after the diagnosis of ocular ischemia, but nine patients were left untreated. In this non-randomized study, the rate of development of neovascular glaucoma was significantly lower (p = 0.024) for the 11 photocoagulated patients than for the nine who were left untreated.

  7. Heavy-ion radiation induced Photosynthesis changes in Oryza sativa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Meng, Qingmei

    The abnormal development of rice was observed frequently after the seed was exposed to heavy-ion radiation. The heavy-ion radiation could change the chloroplast structure in mesophyll cell by decreasing chloroplast grana and loosing the thylakoid lamellas. To study the mechanism of heavy-ion radiation induced photosynthesis changes, rice seed was exposed to 0-20 Gy dose of (12) C radiation. By measuring the changes of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, the content of chlorophyll as well as the expression of CP24 in the leaves of rice at the three-leaf stage, we analyzed the influence mechanism of heavy-ion radiation on photosynthesis in rice. The results indicated that chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm and content of chlorophyll (including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll) changed significantly in different doses. Both the relative expression of CP24 and its encoding gene lhcb6 altered after exposed to different dose of radiation. By using Pearson correlation analysis, we found that the 1 Gy was the bound of low-dose radiation. The possible molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the observed changes are discussed. Key Words: Heavy-ion Radiation; Rice; Photosynthesis; Fv/Fm; CP24.

  8. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  9. Radiation-induced endometriosis in Macaca mulatta

    SciTech Connect

    Fanton, J.W.; Golden, J.G. )

    1991-05-01

    Female rhesus monkeys received whole-body doses of ionizing radiation in the form of single-energy protons, mixed-energy protons, X rays, and electrons. Endometriosis developed in 53% of the monkeys during a 17-year period after exposure. Incidence rates for endometriosis related to radiation type were: single-energy protons, 54%; mixed-energy protons, 73%; X rays, 71%; and electrons, 57%. The incidence of endometriosis in nonirradiated control monkeys was 26%. Monkeys exposed to single-energy protons, mixed-energy protons, and X rays developed endometriosis at a significantly higher rate than control monkeys (chi 2, P less than 0.05). Severity of endometriosis was staged as massive, moderate, and minimal. The incidence of these stages were 65, 16, and 19%, respectively. Observations of clinical disease included weight loss in 43% of the monkeys, anorexia in 35%, space-occupying masses detected by abdominal palpation in 55%, abnormal ovarian/uterine anatomy on rectal examination in 89%, and radiographic evidence of abdominal masses in 38%. Pathological lesions were endometrial cyst formation in 69% of the monkeys, adhesions of the colon in 66%, urinary bladder in 50%, ovaries in 86%, and ureters in 44%, focal nodules of endometrial tissue throughout the omentum in 59%, and metastasis in 9%. Clinical management of endometriosis consisted of debulking surgery and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy combined in some cases with total abdominal hysterectomy. Postoperative survival rates at 1 and 5 years for monkeys recovering from surgery were 48 and 36%, respectively.

  10. IL-10 induces gene expression in macrophages: partial overlap with IL-5 but not with IL-4 induced genes.

    PubMed

    Stumpo, Rita; Kauer, Manfred; Martin, Stephan; Kolb, Hubert

    2003-10-01

    The hypothesis that IL-10, in addition to down-regulating pro-inflammatory activities of macrophages, induces an alternative state of macrophage reactivity was tested. We therefore conducted a systematic search for genes induced by IL-10 using the method of suppression subtractive hybridisation. Of an initial 1,300 candidate clones obtained, several screening rounds led to the identification of 51 clones which were reproducibly at least twofold up-regulated in mouse J774 macrophages in response to treatment with IL-10. Of these, 41 genes were homologous to known genes involved in cell metabolism or immunoregulation, five contained novel sequences and another five were homologous to ESTs without known function. One major finding was that about 25% of the IL-10 genes were also found expressed in response to IFNgamma, and several of these also reappeared in IL-4 or IL-5 induced mRNA species. Hence, Th1 and Th2 type cytokines may elicit a common basal activation response in macrophages. The second major finding was that 57% of IL-10 induced genes reappeared in IL-5 induced mRNA but no more than 18% were also found in IL-4 induced mRNA of J774 cells. We conclude that the gene expression response to IL-10 in macrophages is partially different from the response to IL-5 and is substantially different from the response to IL-4, which suggests an unexpected diversity of biological phenotypes induced by different Th2 type cytokines. PMID:14561490

  11. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in barley seedling leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is one of the most potent reverse genetics technologies for gene functional characterization. This method exploits a dsRNA-mediated antiviral defense mechanism in plants. Using this method allows researchers to generate rapid phenotypic data in a relatively rapid ...

  12. Divergence with gene flow within the recent chipmunk radiation (Tamias)

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, J; Demboski, J R; Bell, K C; Hird, S; Sarver, B; Reid, N; Good, J M

    2014-01-01

    Increasing data have supported the importance of divergence with gene flow (DGF) in the generation of biological diversity. In such cases, lineage divergence occurs on a shorter timescale than does the completion of reproductive isolation. Although it is critical to explore the mechanisms driving divergence and preventing homogenization by hybridization, it is equally important to document cases of DGF in nature. Here we synthesize data that have accumulated over the last dozen or so years on DGF in the chipmunk (Tamias) radiation with new data that quantify very high rates of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) introgression among para- and sympatric species in the T. quadrivittatus group in the central and southern Rocky Mountains. These new data (188 cytochrome b sequences) bring the total number of sequences up to 1871; roughly 16% (298) of the chipmunks we have sequenced exhibit introgressed mtDNA. This includes ongoing introgression between subspecies and between both closely related and distantly related taxa. In addition, we have identified several taxa that are apparently fixed for ancient introgressions and in which there is no evidence of ongoing introgression. A recurrent observation is that these introgressions occur between ecologically and morphologically diverged, sometimes non-sister taxa that engage in well-documented niche partitioning. Thus, the chipmunk radiation in western North America represents an excellent mammalian example of speciation in the face of recurrent gene flow among lineages and where biogeography, habitat differentiation and mating systems suggest important roles for both ecological and sexual selection. PMID:24781803

  13. Divergence with gene flow within the recent chipmunk radiation (Tamias).

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J; Demboski, J R; Bell, K C; Hird, S; Sarver, B; Reid, N; Good, J M

    2014-09-01

    Increasing data have supported the importance of divergence with gene flow (DGF) in the generation of biological diversity. In such cases, lineage divergence occurs on a shorter timescale than does the completion of reproductive isolation. Although it is critical to explore the mechanisms driving divergence and preventing homogenization by hybridization, it is equally important to document cases of DGF in nature. Here we synthesize data that have accumulated over the last dozen or so years on DGF in the chipmunk (Tamias) radiation with new data that quantify very high rates of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) introgression among para- and sympatric species in the T. quadrivittatus group in the central and southern Rocky Mountains. These new data (188 cytochrome b sequences) bring the total number of sequences up to 1871; roughly 16% (298) of the chipmunks we have sequenced exhibit introgressed mtDNA. This includes ongoing introgression between subspecies and between both closely related and distantly related taxa. In addition, we have identified several taxa that are apparently fixed for ancient introgressions and in which there is no evidence of ongoing introgression. A recurrent observation is that these introgressions occur between ecologically and morphologically diverged, sometimes non-sister taxa that engage in well-documented niche partitioning. Thus, the chipmunk radiation in western North America represents an excellent mammalian example of speciation in the face of recurrent gene flow among lineages and where biogeography, habitat differentiation and mating systems suggest important roles for both ecological and sexual selection. PMID:24781803

  14. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  15. Blockade of Kv1.3 channels ameliorates radiation-induced brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Lu, Kui; Li, Zichen; Zhao, Yaodong; Wang, Yiping; Hu, Bin; Xu, Pengfei; Shi, Xiaolei; Zhou, Bin; Pennington, Michael; Chandy, K. George; Tang, Yamei

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumors affecting the head, neck, and brain account for significant morbidity and mortality. The curative efficacy of radiotherapy for these tumors is well established, but radiation carries a significant risk of neurologic injury. So far, neuroprotective therapies for radiation-induced brain injury are still limited. In this study we demonstrate that Stichodactyla helianthus (ShK)–170, a specific inhibitor of the voltage-gated potassium (Kv)1.3 channel, protected mice from radiation-induced brain injury. Methods Mice were treated with ShK-170 for 3 days immediately after brain irradiation. Radiation-induced brain injury was assessed by MRI scans and a Morris water maze. Pathophysiological change of the brain was measured by immunofluorescence. Gene and protein expressions of Kv1.3 and inflammatory factors were measured by quantitative real-time PCR, reverse transcription PCR, ELISA assay, and western blot analyses. Kv currents were recorded in the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Results Radiation increased Kv1.3 mRNA and protein expression in microglia. Genetic silencing of Kv1.3 by specific short interference RNAs or pharmacological blockade with ShK-170 suppressed radiation-induced production of the proinflammatory factors interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor–α by microglia. ShK-170 also inhibited neurotoxicity mediated by radiation-activated microglia and promoted neurogenesis by increasing the proliferation of neural progenitor cells. Conclusions The therapeutic effect of ShK-170 is mediated by suppression of microglial activation and microglia-mediated neurotoxicity and enhanced neurorestoration by promoting proliferation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:24305723

  16. Sialylation of Integrin beta1 is Involved in Radiation-Induced Adhesion and Migration in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Hae-June; Seo, Woo Duck; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Previously, we reported that radiation-induced ST6 Gal I gene expression was responsible for an increase of integrin beta1 sialylation. In this study, we have further investigated the function of radiation-mediated integrin beta1 sialylation in colon cancer cells. Methods and Materials: We performed Western blotting and lectin affinity assay to analyze the expression and level of sialylated integrin beta1. After exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), adhesion and migration of cells were measured by in vitro adhesion and migration assay. Results: IR increased sialylation of integrin beta1 responsible for its increased protein stability and adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. However, for cells with an N-glycosylation site mutant of integrin beta1 located on the I-like domain (Mu3), these effects were dramatically inhibited. In addition, integrin beta1-mediated radioresistance was not observed in cells containing this mutant. When sialylation of integrin beta1 was targeted with a sulfonamide chalcone compound, inhibition of radiation-induced sialylation of integrin beta1 and inhibition of radiation-induced adhesion and migration occurred. Conclusion: The increase of integrin beta1 sialylation by ST6 Gal I is critically involved in radiation-mediated adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. From these findings, integrin beta1 sialylation may be a novel target for overcoming radiation-induced survival, especially radiation-induced adhesion and migration.

  17. Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Dysfunction Results From p53-Dependent Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Jennifer L.; Grundmann, Oliver; Burd, Randy; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer causes adverse secondary side effects in the salivary glands and results in diminished quality of life for the patient. A previous in vivo study in parotid salivary glands demonstrated that targeted head-and-neck irradiation resulted in marked increases in phosphorylated p53 (serine{sup 18}) and apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active mutant of Akt1 (myr-Akt1). Methods and Materials: Transgenic and knockout mouse models were exposed to irradiation, and p53-mediated transcription, apoptosis, and salivary gland dysfunction were analyzed. Results: The proapoptotic p53 target genes PUMA and Bax were induced in parotid salivary glands of mice at early time points after therapeutic radiation. This dose-dependent induction requires expression of p53 because no radiation-induced expression of PUMA and Bax was observed in p53-/- mice. Radiation also induced apoptosis in the parotid gland in a dose-dependent manner, which was p53 dependent. Furthermore, expression of p53 was required for the acute and chronic loss of salivary function after irradiation. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced in p53-/- mice, and their salivary function was preserved after radiation exposure. Conclusions: Apoptosis in the salivary glands after therapeutic head-and-neck irradiation is mediated by p53 and corresponds to salivary gland dysfunction in vivo.

  18. A two-mutation model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia using historical mouse data.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Bouffler, Simon; Ellender, Michele; Huiskamp, René; Kowalczuk, Christine; Meijne, Emmy; Sutmuller, Marjolein

    2011-03-01

    From studies of the atomic bomb survivors, it is well known that ionizing radiation causes several forms of leukemia. However, since the specific mechanism behind this process remains largely unknown, it is difficult to extrapolate carcinogenic effects at acute high-dose exposures to risk estimates for the chronic low-dose exposures that are important for radiation protection purposes. Recently, it has become clear that the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in CBA/H mice takes place through two key steps, both involving the Sfpi1 gene. A similar mechanism may play a role in human radiation-induced AML. In the present paper, a two-mutation carcinogenesis model is applied to model AML in several data sets of X-ray- and neutron-exposed CBA/H mice. The models obtained provide good fits to the data. A comparison between the predictions for neutron-induced and X-ray-induced AML yields an RBE for neutrons of approximately 3. The model used is considered to be a first step toward a model for human radiation-induced AML, which could be used to estimate risks of exposure to low doses. PMID:20842369

  19. MiR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuai; Ding, Nan; Pei, Hailong; Hu, Wentao; Wei, Wenjun; Zhang, Xurui; Zhou, Guangming; Wang, Jufang

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are well-established phenomena, in which DNA damage responses are induced not only in the directly irradiated cells but also in the non-irradiated bystander cells through intercellular signal transmission. Recent studies hint that bystander effects are possibly mediated via small non-coding RNAs, especially microRNAs. Thus, more details about the roles of microRNA in bystander effects are urgently needed to be elucidated. Here we demonstrated that bystander effects were induced in human fetal lung MRC-5 fibroblasts through medium-mediated way by different types of radiation. We identified a set of differentially expressed microRNAs in the cell culture medium after irradiation, among which the up-regulation of miR-21 was further verified with qRT-PCR. In addition, we found significant upregulation of miR-21 in both directly irradiated cells and bystander cells, which was confirmed by the expression of miR-21 precursor and its target genes. Transfection of miR-21 mimics into non-irradiated MRC-5 cells caused bystander-like effects. Taken together, our data reveals that miR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects. Elucidation of such a miRNA-mediated bystander effect is of utmost importance in understanding the biological processes related to ionizing radiation and cell-to-cell communication. PMID:25483031

  20. Atorvastatin Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Cardiac Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, KunYi; He, XuYu; Zhou, Yingling; Gao, Lijuan; Qi, Zhengyu; Chen, Jiyan; Gao, Xiuren

    2015-12-01

    Radiation-induced heart injury is one of the major side effects of radiotherapy for thoracic malignancies. Previous studies have shown that radiotherapy induced myocardial fibrosis and intensified myocardial remodeling. In this study, we investigated whether atorvastatin could inhibit radiation-induced heart fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats, which were randomly divided into six groups: control; radiation only; and four treatment groups receiving atorvastatin plus radiation (E1, E2, E3 and E4). All rats, except the control group, received local heart irradiation in 7 daily fractions of 3 Gy for a total of 21 Gy. Rats in groups E1 (10 mg/kg/day) and E2 (20 mg/kg/day) received atorvastatin and radiation treatment until week 12 after exposure. Rats in groups E3 (10 mg/kg/day) and E4 (20 mg/kg/day) received atorvastatin treatment from 3 months before irradiation to week 12 after irradiation. The expressions of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3, fibronectin, ROCK I and p-Akt in heart tissues were evaluated using real-time PCR or Western blot analyses. Atorvastatin significantly reduced the expression of TGF-β1, Smad3/P-Smad3, ROCK I and p-Akt in rats of the E1-E4 groups and in a dose-dependent manner. Fibronectin exhibited a similar pattern of expression changes. In addition, echocardiography showed that atorvastatin treatment can inhibit the increase of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, left ventricular end-systolic diameter and left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and prevent the decrease of ejection fraction and fraction shortening in E1-E4 groups compared with the radiation only group. This study demonstrated that radiation exposure increased the expression of fibronectin in cardiac fibroblasts and induced cardiac fibrosis through activation of the TGF-β1/Smad3, RhoA/ROCK, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Statins ameliorated radiation-induced cardiac fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results suggest that atorvastatin is effective for the treatment of radiation-induced

  1. Mutations in cancer genes of UV-induced skin tumors of hairless mice.

    PubMed

    van Kranen, H J; de Gruijl, F R

    1999-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a very common carcinogen in our environment. Epidemiological data on the relationship between skin cancers and ambient solar UV radiation are very limited. Hairless mice provide the possibility to study the process of UV carcinogenesis in more detail. Experiments with this animal model have yielded quantitative data on how tumor development depends on dose, time and wavelength of the UV radiation. In addition, at the molecular level the interactions between UV, specific cancer genes-like the Ras oncogene family and the p53 tumor suppressor gene, together with the role of DNA repair in this process have been addressed recently. In wildtype hairless mice mutations in the p53 gene are clearly linked to UVB but not to UVA radiation. Furthermore, the p53 alterations seem to be essential early in tumor development. However, in Xpa-deficient mice this dependency on p53 alterations appeared to be different as is the tumor type induced by UVB. Research using genetically modified hairless mice should enable us to further unravel the mechanisms of UV-induced skin cancer. PMID:10709351

  2. Radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zargari, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of tinea capitis using radiotherapy was introduced at the beginning of the twentieth century. A variety of cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are seen years after this treatment. Objective: We sought to determine the clinical characteristics of BCCs among irradiated patients. Methods: The clinical records of all patients with BCC in a clinic in north of Iran were reviewed. Results: Of the 58 cases of BCC, 29 had positive history for radiotherapy in their childhood. Multiple BCCs were seen in 79.3% and 10.3% of patients with history and without history of radiotherapy, respectively. Conclusions: X-ray radiation is still a major etiologic factor in developing BCC in northern Iran. Patients with positive history for radiotherapy have higher rate of recurrence. PMID:26114066

  3. The axiverse induced dark radiation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Bobby; Pongkitivanichkul, Chakrit

    2016-04-01

    The string/ M theory Axiverse — a plethora of very light Axion Like Particles (ALPs) with a vast range of masses — is arguably a generic prediction of string/ M theory. String/ M theory also tends to predict that the early Universe is dominated by moduli fields. When the heavy moduli decay, before nucleosynthesis, they produce dark radiation in the form of relativistic ALPs. Generically one estimates that the number of relativistic species grows with the number of axions in the Axiverse, in contradiction to the observations that N eff ≤ 4. We explain this problem in detail and suggest some possible solutions to it. The simplest solution requires that the lightest modulus decays only into its own axion superpartner plus Standard Model particles and this severely constrains the moduli Kahler potential and mass matrix.

  4. Radiation induced inter-device leakage degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Zhang-Li; Shao, Hua; Zhang, Zheng-Xuan; Ning, Bing-Xu; Chen, Ming; Bi, Da-Wei; Zou, Shi-Chang

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of inter-device leakage current with total ionizing dose in transistors in 180 nm generation technologies is studied with an N-type poly-gate field device (PFD) that uses the shallow trench isolation as an effective gate oxide. The overall radiation response of these structures is determined by the trapped charge in the oxide. The impacts of different bias conditions during irradiation on the inter-device leakage current are studied for the first time in this work, which demonstrates that the worst condition is the same as traditional NMOS transistors. Moreover, the two-dimensional technology computer-aided design simulation is used to understand the bias dependence.

  5. Interleukin-32 Positively Regulates Radiation-Induced Vascular Inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hanako; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M.; Lin, P. Charles

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To study the role of interleukin-32 (IL-32), a novel protein only detected in human tissues, in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced vascular inflammation. Methods and Materials: Irradiated (0-6 Gy) human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with or without various agents-a cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) inhibitor, a cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) inhibitor, or lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs)-were used to assess IL-32 expression by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Expression of cell adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells using human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) cells was also analyzed. Results: Ionizing radiation dramatically increased IL-32 expression in vascular endothelial cells through multiple pathways. Ionizing radiation induced IL-32 expression through nuclear factor {kappa}B activation, through induction of cPLA2 and LPC, as well as induction of Cox-2 and subsequent conversion of arachidonic acid to prostacyclin. Conversely, blocking nuclear factor {kappa}B, cPLA2, and Cox-2 activity impaired IR-induced IL-32 expression. Importantly, IL-32 significantly enhanced IR-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion on endothelial cells. Conclusion: This study identifies IL-32 as a positive regulator in IR-induced vascular inflammation, and neutralization of IL-32 may be beneficial in protecting from IR-induced inflammation.

  6. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

    SciTech Connect

    Balmain, Allan; Song, Ihn Young

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  7. Gamma Radiation Induced Calibration Shift for Four Cryogenic Thermometer Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Yeager, C. J.

    2004-06-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors utilized in space environments are exposed to ionizing radiation with the total dose dependent upon the length of the mission. Based upon their minimal size and robust packaging, four models of cryogenic Resistance Thermometer Devices (RTDs) manufactured by Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. were tested to determine their reliability for space applications with regard to radiation. Samples of Cernox™ RTDs (CX-1050-SD), ruthenium oxide RTDs (models RX-102A-AA and RX-103A-AA), and silicon diode thermometers (model DT-670-SD) were irradiated at room temperature by a cesium-137 gamma source to total doses ranging from 5 Gy to 10 kGy. This paper presents the resulting temperature shifts induced by the gamma radiation as a function of total dose over the 1.4 K to 325 K temperature range. These data show that 1) Cernox™ RTDs exhibit high radiation hardness to 10 kGy from 1.4 K to 325 K, 2) ruthenium oxide RTDs show moderate radiation hardness to 10 kGy below 10 K, and 3) silicon diodes temperature sensors exhibit some radiation tolerance to low levels of radiation (especially below 70 K), but quickly shift calibration at radiation levels above 300 Gy, especially above 100 K.

  8. Synthetic riboswitches that induce gene expression in diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Topp, Shana; Reynoso, Colleen M K; Seeliger, Jessica C; Goldlust, Ian S; Desai, Shawn K; Murat, Dorothée; Shen, Aimee; Puri, Aaron W; Komeili, Arash; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Scott, June R; Gallivan, Justin P

    2010-12-01

    We developed a series of ligand-inducible riboswitches that control gene expression in diverse species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including human pathogens that have few or no previously reported inducible expression systems. We anticipate that these riboswitches will be useful tools for genetic studies in a wide range of bacteria. PMID:20935124

  9. High and Low LET Radiation Differentially Induce Normal Tissue Damage Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Goethem, Marc-Jan van; Bron, Reinier; Hogewerf, Wytse; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Luijk, Peter van; Coppes, Robert P.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy using high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is aimed at efficiently killing tumor cells while minimizing dose (biological effective) to normal tissues to prevent toxicity. It is well established that high LET radiation results in lower cell survival per absorbed dose than low LET radiation. However, whether various mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be regulated differentially is not known. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate whether two actions related to normal tissue toxicity, p53-induced apoptosis and expression of the profibrotic gene PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1), are differentially induced by high and low LET radiation. Methods and Materials: Cells were irradiated with high LET carbon ions or low LET photons. Cell survival assays were performed, profibrotic PAI-1 expression was monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and apoptosis was assayed by annexin V staining. Activation of p53 by phosphorylation at serine 315 and serine 37 was monitored by Western blotting. Transfections of plasmids expressing p53 mutated at serines 315 and 37 were used to test the requirement of these residues for apoptosis and expression of PAI-1. Results: As expected, cell survival was lower and induction of apoptosis was higher in high -LET irradiated cells. Interestingly, induction of the profibrotic PAI-1 gene was similar with high and low LET radiation. In agreement with this finding, phosphorylation of p53 at serine 315 involved in PAI-1 expression was similar with high and low LET radiation, whereas phosphorylation of p53 at serine 37, involved in apoptosis induction, was much higher after high LET irradiation. Conclusions: Our results indicate that diverse mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be differentially affected by high and low LET radiation. This may have consequences for the development and manifestation of normal tissue damage.

  10. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in radiation-sensitive ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-1/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot} mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot} mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 MRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.