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1

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program  

SciTech Connect

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

2007-08-09

2

10 CFR 20.1101 - Radiation protection programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radiation protection programs. 20.1101 Section 20...REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Radiation Protection Programs § 20.1101 Radiation...

2013-01-01

3

10 CFR 35.26 - Radiation protection program changes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radiation protection program changes. 35...Administrative Requirements § 35.26 Radiation protection program changes. (a) A licensee may revise its radiation protection program without...

2013-01-01

4

Radiation Protection Technologist Training and Certification Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this program is to establish training requirements and methods for certifying the technical competence of Radiation Protection Technologists. This manual delineates general requirements as well as academic training, on-the-job training, are...

1982-01-01

5

10 CFR 835.101 - Radiation protection programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radiation protection programs. 835.101...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Management and Administrative Requirements § 835.101 Radiation protection programs....

2013-01-01

6

10 CFR 20.2102 - Records of radiation protection programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of radiation protection programs. 20.2102 Section...COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Records § 20.2102 Records of radiation protection programs. (a) Each...

2013-01-01

7

10 CFR 35.2026 - Records of radiation protection program changes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Records of radiation protection program changes. 35...Records § 35.2026 Records of radiation protection program changes. A licensee shall retain a record of each radiation protection program change made...

2013-01-01

8

Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry. Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect

This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

Not Available

1991-12-31

9

(Radiation protection)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The traveler attended the Seventh Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) in Sydney, Australia, April 11--15, 1988. This conference consisted of a comprehensive technical program with oral and poster presentations in all areas of radiation protection including several topics which were of special interest to the traveler; e.g., neutron dosimetry, personnel dosimetry and instrumentation, radiobiology, and radiation accidents.

Swaja

1988-01-01

10

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

Radiological Control Managers' Council

2008-06-01

11

Radiation safety and protection in US dental hygiene programs  

SciTech Connect

A survey of radiation safety and protection measures used by programs teaching dental hygiene indicated some areas for concern. No barriers or radiation shieldings were used between operator and patient in four programs. Radiation monitoring devices were not worn by faculty operators in 16% of the programs. Fewer than half of the programs used thyroid shields for patients on a routine basis. Insufficient filtration for the kilovolt peak employed was used by 14% of the programs, and for 19% more the filtration was unknown or unspecified. Three programs used closed cones. Rectangular collimation was not used at all by 63% of the programs, and only 20% used E speed film routinely. Quality assurance for equipment maintenance and for film processing were in place at only 54% and 49% of the programs, respectively.

Farman, A.G.; Hunter, N.; Grammer, S.

1986-07-01

12

10 CFR 35.2024 - Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs. 35.2024 Section...of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs. (a) A...duties, and responsibilities of the Radiation Safety Officer as required by §...

2013-01-01

13

Dental-service Dental Radiation Safety and Protection: Program guide  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the program guide for Dental Radiation Safety and Protection is to assist VA dental personnel in developing radiologic procedures that ensure maximum safety for their patients and themselves. In order to do this, the authors have included a summary of the biological hazards associated with exposure to x-radiation, provided information on patient exposure levels associated with dental X-ray units, and explained the methods for reducing patient and staff exposure to X-rays.

Not Available

1991-08-27

14

EPA`s occupational radiation safety and health protection program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe EPA`s Occupational Radiation, Safety, and Health Protection Program ({open_quotes}Program{close_quotes}), from its inception to the present day, emphasizing problems encountered and solutions derived in developing and implementing a centrally administered national health physics program. The Program uses written policies, guidance, practices, and methods, as well as a Radiation Safety Information Management System (RADSIMS) to manage and oversee individual Program components and trends. These components include (1) training and education, (2) monitoring and dosimetry, (3) medical/health physics guidance, and (4) quality assurance/control/improvement. The Program, which is currently operational in all ten EPA Regions, is unique in that it incorporates a national database (consistent among all Regions), tied by telecommunications into a VAX computer at Headquarters, into a health physics monitoring system for the purpose of ensuring that EPA workers occupational exposure to ionizing radiation is maintained at levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Development and implementation of the Program has evolved into four distinct phases starting in FY92: (1) EPA Region IV developed a pilot-program with Headquarters, and quality action teams were formed to develop Program components and policies; phases (2) and (3) the Program was expanded into EPA Regions V, VII, and VIII (FY93) and then the remaining six regions (FY94). Phase (4) continued the implementation of the Program as needed agency-wide so as to include EPA applicable program offices and possibly some laboratories during FY96.

Colwell, S.C.; Matusewicz, N.M. [SC& A, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Boyd, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-06-01

15

The IHS diagnostic X-ray equipment radiation protection program  

SciTech Connect

The Indian Health Service (IHS) operates or contracts with Tribal groups to operate 50 hospitals and approximately 165 primary ambulatory care centers. These facilities contain approximately 275 medical and 800 dental diagnostic x-ray machines. IHS environmental health personnel in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) developed a diagnostic x-ray protection program including standard survey procedures and menu-driven calculations software. Important features of the program include the evaluation of equipment performance collection of average patient entrance skin exposure (ESE) measurements for selected procedures, and quality assurance. The ESE data, collected using the National Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) protocol, will be presented. The IHS Diagnostic X-ray Radiation Protection Program is dynamic and is adapting to changes in technology and workload.

Knapp, A.; Byrns, G.; Suleiman, O.

1994-05-01

16

Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Radiation Protection Program: Report of the Special Panel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A Special Panel was appointed by the Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation to review the Radiation Protection Program at Three Mile Island Unit 2. The Panel confirmed several management and technical deficiencies in the radiation protection...

C. B. Meinhold T. D. Murphy D. R. Neely R. L. Kathren B. L. Rich

1979-01-01

17

(Radiation protection)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the Seventh Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) in Sydney, Australia, April 11--15, 1988. This conference consisted of a comprehensive technical program with oral and poster presentations in all areas of radiation protection including several topics which were of special interest to the traveler; e.g., neutron dosimetry, personnel dosimetry and instrumentation, radiobiology, and radiation accidents. Besides attending technical sessions, the traveler presented a paper on results and implications of neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies conducted since 1974 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). During the meeting, the traveler discussed possible future collaborative research efforts with scientists from several countries and obtained commitments for an ORNL-coordinated radiation protection conference planned for November of 1988. Through the conference attendance and discussions with dosimetry researchers, the traveler gained information concerning directions and philosophies in radiation protection and dosimetry and made preliminary plans for future cooperative efforts which will be directly related to Department of Energy (DOE) programs.

Swaja, R.E.

1988-05-06

18

CRC handbook of management of radiation protection programs  

SciTech Connect

This guidebook organizes the profusion of rules and regulations surrounding radiation protection into a single-volume reference. Employee and public protection, accident prevention, and emergency preparedness are included in this comprehensive coverage. Whenever possible, information is presented in convenient checklists, tables, or outlines that enable you to locate information quickly.

Miller, K.L.; Weidner, A.

1986-01-01

19

Radiation Protection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation protection is a very important aspect for the application of particle detectors in many different fields, like high energy physics, medicine, materials science, oil and mineral exploration, and arts, to name a few. The knowledge of radiation units, the experience with shielding, and information on biological effects of radiation are vital for scientists handling radioactive sources or operating accelerators or X-ray equipment. This article describes the modern radiation units and their conversions to older units which are still in use in many countries. Typical radiation sources and detectors used in the field of radiation protection are presented. The legal regulations in nearly all countries follow closely the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Tables and diagrams with relevant information on the handling of radiation sources provide useful data for the researcher working in this field.

Grupen, Claus

20

Radiation protection.  

PubMed

One of radiologic technologists' most important professional obligations is protecting patients, other members of the health care team, the public and themselves from as much radiation-related harm as possible while also maximizing the screening, diagnostic and therapeutic potential of ionizing radiation. This article reviews the different types of radiation dose and how radiation affects the body. Patient shielding, personnel dosimeters and area monitors are discussed, along with beam collimation and filtration. The author also describes protocols to protect pregnant patients and pregnant technologists. PMID:17519374

Brusin, Joyce Helena

21

Base-level management of radio-frequency radiation-protection program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

AFOEHL developed this report to assist the base-level aerospace medical team manage their radio-frequency radiation-protection program. This report supersedes USAFOEHL Report 80-42, 'A Practical R-F Guide for BEES.'

Rademacher, S.E.; Montgomery, N.D.

1989-04-01

22

Base-level management of radio-frequency radiation-protection program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

AFOEHL developed this report to assist the base-level aerospace medical team manage their radio-frequency radiation protection program. This report supersedes USAFOEHL Report 80-42, 'A practical R-F Guide for BEES.'

Rademacher, S.E.; Montgomery, N.D.

1989-04-01

23

Nuclear Technology Series. Radiation Protection Technician. A Suggested Program Planning Guide. Revised June 80.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program planning guide for a two-year postsecondary radiation protection technician program is designed for use with courses 17-22 of thirty-five included in the Nuclear Technology Series. The purpose of the guide is to describe the nuclear power field and its job categories for specialists, technicians, and operators; and to assist planners,

Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

24

Radiation Protection in Canada  

PubMed Central

The current status of radiation protection in Canada is discussed in the last of a three-part series. Particular emphasis has been placed on the role of the Radiation Protection Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare. A radioactive fallout study program has been established involving the systematic collection of air and precipitation samples from 24 locations, soil samples from 23 locations, fresh-milk samples from 16 locations, wheat samples from nine areas and human-bone specimens from various hospitals throughout Canada. A whole-body-counting facility and a special study of fallout in Northern areas have also been initiated. For any age group, the highest average strontium-90 concentration in human bone so far reported has been less than four picocuries per gram of calcium compared with the maximum permissible level of 67 derived from the International Committee on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendations. By the end of 1963 a general downward trend of levels of radioactivity detected in other parts of the program has been observed. Programs to assess the contribution to the radiation exposure of members of the population from medical x-rays, nuclear reactor operations and natural background-radiation sources have also been described. The annual genetically significant dose from diagnostic x-ray examinations in Canadian public hospitals has been estimated to be 25.8 mrem. Results from the reactor-environment monitoring programs have not suggested the presence of radioactivity beyond that contributed from fallout.

Bird, P. M.

1964-01-01

25

Collective dose as a performance measure for occupational radiation protection programs: Issues and recommendations  

SciTech Connect

Collective dose is one of the performance measures used at many US Department of Energy (DOE) contractor facilities to quantitatively assess the objectives of the radiation protection program. It can also be used as a management tool to improve the program for keeping worker doses as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Collective dose is used here to mean the sum of all total effective dose equivalent values for all workers in a specified group over a specified time. It is often used as a surrogate estimate of radiological risk. In principle, improvements in radiation protection programs and procedures will result in reduction of collective dose, all other things being equal. Within the DOE, most frequently, a single collective dose number, which may or may not be adjusted for workload and other factors, is used as a performance measure for a contractor. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the use of collective dose as a performance measure for ALARA programs at DOE sites.

Strom, D.J.; Harty, R.; Hickey, E.E.; Martin, J.B.; Peffers, M.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kathren, R.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

1998-07-01

26

Radiation Protection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Chemotherapy and radiation can be powerful weapons against cancer. But they harm healthy cells as well. Cells of the immune system and G.I. tract are especially vulnerable: instead of repairing the damage, they respond by committing cellular suicide. In contrast, tumor cells have mutations that make them resistant to cell death. Roswell Park Cancer Institute researcher Andrei Gudkov and his colleagues recently harnessed this property to create a new drug.

Science Update (AAAS;)

2008-05-01

27

Radiation Protection Considerations at USACE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Projects  

SciTech Connect

The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was initially authorized by Congress in 1974. FUSRAP was enacted to address residual radioactive contamination associated with numerous sites across the U.S. at which radioactive material (primarily Uranium ores and related milling products) had been processed in support of the nation's nuclear weapons program dating back to the Manhattan Project and the period immediately following World War II. In October 1997, Congress transferred the management of this program from the Department of Energy to the United States Corp of Engineers. Through this program, the Corps addresses the environmental remediation of certain sites once used by DOE's predecessor agencies, the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. The waste at FUSRAP sites consists mainly of low levels of uranium, thorium and radium, along with some mixed wastes. Upon completion of remedial activities, these sites are transferred to DOE for long-term stewardship activities. This paper presents and contrasts the radiological conditions and recent monitoring results associated with five large ongoing FUSRAP projects including Maywood, N.J.; the Linde site near Buffalo, N.Y.; Colonie in Albany N.Y. and the St Louis, Mo. airport and downtown sites. The radiological characteristics of soil and debris at each site and respective regulatory clean up criteria is presented and contrasted. Some differences are discussed in the radiological characteristics of material at some sites that result in variations in radiation protection monitoring programs. Additionally, summary data for typical personnel radiation exposure monitoring results are presented. In summary: 1. The FUSRAP projects for which data and observations are reported in this paper are considered typical of the radiological nature of FUSRAP sites in general. 2. These sites are characterized by naturally occurring uranium and thorium series radionuclides in soil and debris, at concentrations typically < E4 pCi/ gram total activity. 3. Although external exposure rates are generally low resulting in few exposures above background, occasional 'hot spots' are observed in the 1- 10 mR / hr range or higher. However personnel and general area external exposure monitoring programs consistently demonstrate very low potential for external exposure at theses sites. 4. Potential for airborne exposure is controlled by wetting and misting techniques during excavation and movement of materials. Air sampling and bioassay programs confirm low potential for airborne exposure of workers at these sites. 5. Radiation protection and health physics monitoring programs as implemented at these sites ensure that exposures to personal are maintained ALARA. (authors)

Brown, S.H. [CHP, SHB INC., Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2008-07-01

28

Radiation protection in space.  

PubMed

Radiation environment, basic concepts of radiation protection, and specific aspects of the space radiation field are reviewed. The discussion of physico-chemical and subcellular radiation effects includes mechanisms of radiation action and cellular consequences. The discussion of radiobiological effects includes unique aspects of HZE particle effects, space flight findings, terrestrial findings, analysis of somatic radiation effects and effects on critical organs, and early and delayed effects. Other topics include the impact of the space flight environment, measurement of radiation exposure, establishing radiation protection limits, limitations in establishing space-based radiation exposure limits, radiation protection measures, and recommendations. PMID:11541474

Reitz, G; Facius, R; Sandler, H

29

Radiation protection in pediatric interventional cardiology: An IAEA PILOT program in Latin America.  

PubMed

The aim of this work is to present a methodology and some initial results for a pilot program on radiation protection (RP) in pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The starting point of the program was a workshop involving several pediatric cardiologists leading this specialty in 11 Latin American countries. The workshop included a pilot RP training course and additional sessions during which the objectives of the program and the methodology to collect and process data on patient and staff radiation doses were discussed. Special attention was dedicated to agree on a common quality control (QC) protocol for the x-ray and imaging systems used in the different catheterization laboratories. The preliminary data showed that only 64% of the cardiologists used their personal dosimeters regularly and that only 36% were aware of their personal dose values. The data on pediatric interventional activity were collected from 10 centers from nine different countries. A total of 2,429 procedures (50% diagnostic and 50% therapeutic) were carried out during 2009 in these centers. Patient dose data were available in only a few centers and were not analyzed on a regular basis in any of the catheterization laboratories involved. Plans were developed for a basic QC protocol of the x-ray systems and construction of a Latin American database on pediatric cardiology with patient and staff dose values with the idea in mind of obtaining distributions of these dose values before promoting several optimization strategies. PMID:21799339

Vano, Eliseo; Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Leyton, Fernando; Durn, Ariel; Nader, Alejandro

2011-09-01

30

Atoms, radiation, and radiation protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book describes basic atomic and nuclear structure, the physical processes that result in the emission of ionizing radiations, and external and internal radiation protection criteria, standards, and practices from the standpoint of their underlying physical and biological basis. The sources and properties of ionizing radiation-charged particles, photons, and neutrons-and their interactions with matter are discussed in detail. The underlying

1986-01-01

31

Comparison of radiation protection programs at US power reactors, uranium mills, and low-level waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect

The accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power reactor in March 1979 and subsequent investigations identified serious concerns involving several aspects of radiation protection programs in general. Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories was contracted by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission to characterize and evaluate radiation protection programs at power reactors, uranium mills and commercial low-level waste disposal sites in the United States. These evaluations were termed appraisals because they were structured to facilitate an integrated look at the total radiation protection programs, delve into areas for which explicit regulatory requirements did not exist, and emphasize evaluation of capability and performance rather than compliance with regulations. This paper contains some of the results of 48 power reactor appraisals, 10 uranium mill appraisals and 3 commercial low-level waste disposal site appraisals. The appraisal scope and methodology as well as summary findings and conclusions will be discussed. It was observed from this effort that there is a difference in the adequacy of radiation protection programs as compared between the three types of nuclear facilities. It was observed, based on the risks involved, that the program elements at low-level waste disposal sites and power reactors were substantially better than at the uranium mills. 3 references.

Hadlock, D.E.; Hooker, C.D.; Munson, L.H.

1983-10-01

32

Protective prostheses during radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Current applications and complications in the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of oral malignancy are reviewed. Prostheses are used for decreasing radiation to vital structures not involved with the lesion but located in the field of radiation. With a program of oral hygiene and proper dental care, protective prostheses can help decrease greatly the morbidity seen with existing radiotherapy regimens.

Poole, T.S.; Flaxman, N.A.

1986-04-01

33

Exploratory study of the radiation-protection training programs in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the study was to examine current radiation training programs at a sample of utilities operating nuclear reactors and to evaluate employee information on radiation health. The study addressed three elements: (1) employee perceptions and understanding of ionizing radiation; (2) utility trainers-their background, training, and problems; (3) the content, materials, and conduct of training programs; (4) program uniformity and completeness. These areas were examined through visits to utilities, surveys, and employee interviews. The programs reviewed were developed by utility personnel who have backgrounds, for the most part, in health physics but who may have little formal training in adult education. This orientation, coupled with the inherent nature of the subject, has produced training programs that appear to be too technical to achieve the educational job intended. The average nuclear power plant worker does not have the level of sophistication needed to understand some of the information. It became apparent that nuclear power plant workers have concerns that do not necessarily reflect those of the scientific community. Many of these result from misunderstandings about radiation. Unfortunately, the training programs do not always address these unfounded but very real fears.

Fields, C.D.

1982-06-01

34

Radiation Protection in Canada  

PubMed Central

The current status of radiation protection in Canada has been summarized in the present paper, the first of a three-part series. Particular emphasis has been placed on the role of the Radiation Protection Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare. Somatic and hereditary effects of radiation exposure are briefly discussed as a basis for an understanding of the radiation protection standards which have been developed at national and international levels. The rapid increase in use of radioactive materials and x-ray apparatus in medicine, industry and research, and the extensive atmosphere testing of nuclear weapons have led to the development of comprehensive radiation protection activities in Canada, especially in the Department of National Health and Welfare. Well-established lines of communication and liaison exist among the various agencies responsible for these activities. ImagesFig. 1

Bird, P. M.

1964-01-01

35

Technical qualification requirements and training programs for radiation protection personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document deals with the policies and practices of the Environmental and Occupational Safety Division (EOSD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in regard to the selection, training, qualification, and requalification of radiation protection staff assigned to reactor and nonreactor nuclear facilities. Included are personnel at facilities that: (1) operate reactors or particle accelerators; (2) produce, process, or store radioactive liquid or solid waste; (3) conduct separations operations; (4) engage in research with radioactive materials and radiation sources; and (5) conduct irradiated materials inspection, fuel fabrication, deconamination, or recovery operations. The EOSD personnel also have environmental surveillance and operational and industrial safety responsibilities related to the total Laboratory.

Copenhaver, E.D.; Houser, B.S.; Butler, H.M. Jr.; Bogard, J.S.; Fair, M.F.; Haynes, C.E.; Parzyck, D.C.

1986-04-01

36

Radiation protection for radiologic technologists.  

PubMed

This article provides a review and update on radiation protection principles. Major topics include the effects of radiation on the body, natural and artificial sources of radiation, the basic principles of radiation protection and recommended dose limits. PMID:10665051

Newman, J

37

Physics for Radiation Protection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A practical guide to the basic physics that radiation protection professionals need A much-needed working resource for health physicists and other radiation protection professionals, this volume presents clear, thorough, up-to-date explanations of the basic physics necessary to address real-world problems in radiation protection. Designed for readers with limited as well as basic science backgrounds, Physics for Radiation Protection emphasizes applied concepts and carefully illustrates all topics through examples as well as practice problems. Physics for Radiation Protection draws substantially on current resource data available for health physics use, providing decay schemes and emission energies for approximately 100 of the most common radionuclides encountered by practitioners. Excerpts of the Chart of the Nuclides, activation cross sections, fission yields, fission-product chains, photon attenuation coefficients, and nuclear masses are also provided. Coverage includes: * The atom as an energy system * An overview of the major discoveries in radiation physics * Extensive discussion of radioactivity, including sources and materials * Nuclear interactions and processes of radiation dose * Calculational methods for radiation exposure, dose, and shielding * Nuclear fission and production of activation and fission products * Specialty topics ranging from nuclear criticality and applied statistics to X rays * Extensive and current resource data cross-referenced to standard compendiums * Extensive appendices and more than 400 figures

Martin, James E.

2000-06-01

38

1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

Not Available

1993-12-31

39

State oversight review of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant radiation protection and measurement programs  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG), an interdisciplinary organization attached to the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, has been providing an independent scientific oversight of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant WIPP project since 1978. Evaluations cover all aspects of the project that have potential radiological health and safety considerations. During the early years, most of the review emphasis was on site suitability and involved heavy emphasis on the disciplines of geology and hydrogeology. During the middle years, the amount of emphasis on facility design, waste characterization, waste transportation package development, and quality assurance increased. Now, as final preparations are being made for the receipt of radioactive wastes, EEG is heavily involved in evaluating on-site health physics programs and radiation-measurement systems. Also, EEG is conducting an independent environmental radiation-monitoring program.

Channell, J.K.

1989-01-01

40

Justification in Radiation Protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years the concept of Justification has increasingly come to the fore of the minds of legislators, users of radioactive materials and radiation protection specialists alike. Perhaps the most well known manifestation of this was the lengthy debate, ending in judicial review, about the Justification for the operation of the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (Thorp) at Sellafield and, more

David Owen

1999-01-01

41

Manifolds and Radiation Protection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the past 40 years humans have travelled beyond Earth's atmosphere, orbiting the planets for extended periods of time and landing on the Moon. Humans have survived this overwhelming challenge but to assure future exploration of space further expertise in the long term survival in space must be obtained. The International Space Station (ISS) provides this opportunity and allows space scientist to fine-tune their knowledge and prepare for even bolder human space missions. In this work we focus on the aspect of radiation, perhaps the most complex one from a physical and physiological perspective. Travel beyond the Earth's atmosphere and especially to Moon and Mars requires a precise consideration of the radiation environment as radiation exposure could be a show-stopper. At the moment scientists have not yet developed complete and reliable systems for radiation protection. Most likely an adequate level of protection will be reached through an integrated countermeasure system which could include: shields, monitoring of the environment, drugs to protect from damage, etc.

Rossitto, Franco; Petrov, Vladislav M.; Ongaro, Filippo

42

10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...of the Radiation Safety Officer in writing. (f...establish a Radiation Safety Committee to oversee...representative of the nursing service, and a representative...user nor a Radiation Safety Officer. The Committee...of this section in accordance...

2013-01-01

43

Radiation protection for nurses. Regulations and guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Rules and regulations of federal agencies and state radiation protection programs provide the bases for hospital policy regarding radiation safety for nurses. Nursing administrators should work with the radiation safety officer at their institutions to ensure that radiation exposures to staff nurses will be as low as reasonably achievable and that special consideration will be given to pregnant nurses. Nurses' fears about their exposure to radiation can be greatly reduced through education.

Jankowski, C.B. (Radiation Safety Office, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

1992-02-01

44

Space radiation protection issues.  

PubMed

The complex charged particle environments in space pose considerable challenges with regard to potential health consequences that can impact mission design and crew selection. The lack of knowledge of the biological effects of different ions in isolation and in combination is a particular concern because the risk uncertainties are very high for both cancer and non-cancer late effects. Reducing the uncertainties is of high priority. Two principal components of space radiation each raise different concerns. Solar particle events (SPE) occur sporadically and are comprised primarily of low- to moderate-energy protons. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is isotropic and relatively invariant in dose rate. GCR is also dominated by protons, but the energy range is wider than in SPE. In addition, the contribution of other light and heavy ions to the health risks from GCR must be addressed. This paper will introduce the principal issues under consideration for space radiation protection. PMID:23032885

Kronenberg, Amy; Cucinotta, Francis A

2012-11-01

45

Third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

This conference has been designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To partly fulfill these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection has been prepared. General topics include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, regulations and standards, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. This publication provides a summary of the technical program and a collection of abstracts of the oral presentations.

Not Available

1991-01-01

46

Radiation Protection in Canada  

PubMed Central

The current status of radiation protection in Canada is discussed in the second of a three-part series and particular emphasis is placed on the role of the Radiation Protection Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare. Administrative and operational control procedures have been developed, involving prior approval of health safeguards in the radioisotope user's facilities and techniques, and systematic monitoring and inspection. Where necessary, a medical follow-up of accidents and excessive radiation exposures is carried out. In 1963 more than 1600 radioisotope licences were issued. Filmmonitoring service was provided to about 15,500 isotope and x-ray workers. Semiautomatic handling procedures have been developed to meet the increasing demand for film-monitoring services. Monitoring and inspection services have been provided for x-ray workers, and a committee has been formed to develop administrative procedures for health and safety control in x-ray work. Committees have also been set up to review the health and safety aspects of the operation of nuclear reactors and particle accelerators.

Bird, P. M.

1964-01-01

47

Chemical Protection Against Radiation Damage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses potential war time and medical uses for chemical compounds giving protection against radiation damage. Describes compounds known to protect, research aimed at discovering such compounds, and problems of toxicity. (EB)

Campaigne, Ernest

1969-01-01

48

Radiation Protection Considerations at USACE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was initially authorized by Congress in 1974. FUSRAP was enacted to address residual radioactive contamination associated with numerous sites across the U.S. at which radioactive material (primarily Uranium ores and related milling products) had been processed in support of the nation's nuclear weapons program dating back to the Manhattan Project and the

2008-01-01

49

Chemical Protection Against Ionizing Radiation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the ty...

J. C. Livesey D. J. Reed L. F. Adamson

1984-01-01

50

Pregnancy and Radiation Protection  

SciTech Connect

Several modalities are currently utilized for diagnosis and therapy, by appropriate application of x-rays. In diagnostic radiology, interventional radiology, radiotherapy, interventional cardiology, nuclear medicine and other specialties radiation protection of a pregnant woman as a patient, as well as a member of the operating personnel, is of outmost importance. Based on radiation risk, the termination of pregnancy is not justified if foetal doses are below 100 mGy. For foetal doses between 100 and 500 mGy, a decision is reached on a case by case basis. In Diagnostic Radiology, when a pregnant patient takes an abdomen CT, then an estimation of the foetus' dose is necessary. However, it is extremely rare for the dose to be high enough to justify an abortion. Radiographs of the chest and extremities can be done at any period of pregnancy, provided that the equipment is functioning properly. Usually, the radiation risk is lower than the risk of not undergoing a radiological examination. Radiation exposure in uterus from diagnostic radiological examinations is unlikely to result in any deleterious effect on the child, but the possibility of a radiation-induced effect can not be entirely ruled out. The effects of exposure to radiation on the foetus depend on the time of exposure, the date of conception and the absorbed dose. Finally, a pregnant worker can continue working in an x-ray department, as long as there is reasonable assurance that the foetal dose can be kept below 1 mGy during the pregnancy. Nuclear Medicine diagnostic examinations using short-lived radionuclides can be used for pregnant patient. Irradiation of the foetus results from placental transfer and distribution of radiopharmaceuticals in the foetal tissues, as well as from external irradiation from radioactivity in the mother's organ and tissues. As a rule, a pregnant patient should not undergo therapy with radionuclide, unless it is crucial for her life. In Radiotherapy, the patient, treating oncologist, other team and family members should carefully discuss for the decision of abortion. Important factors must be considered such as the stage and aggressiveness of the tumour, the location of the tumour, the stage of pregnancy, various therapies etc.

Gerogiannis, J. [Nicosia General Hospital, Nicosia (Cyprus); Stefanoyiannis, A. P. [University General Hospital of Athens 'Attikon', Athens (Greece)

2010-01-21

51

THE PHYSICS OF RADIATION PROTECTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The utilization of atoraic energy is unavoidably accompanied by nuclear ; radiations such as gamma quanta, neutrons, electrons, alpha particles, ; protons, etc., which exert harmful biological effects; the workers at the ; installations and the population at large must be protected against them. The ; new science, the physics of radiation protection considers the following ; problems: 1. determination

Leipunskii

1962-01-01

52

Radiation protection guidelines for radiation emergencies  

SciTech Connect

The system of dose limitation and present guidance for emergency workers and guidance for intervention on behalf of the public are discussed. There are three elements for the system of dose limitation: justification, optimization and dose limits. The first element is basically a political process in this country. Justification is based on a risk-benefit analysis, and justification of the use of radioactive materials or radiation is generally not within the authority of radiation protection managers. Radiation protection managers typically assess detriments or harm caused by radiation exposure and have very little expertise in assessing the benefits of a particular practice involving nuclear material.

Lessard, E.T.; Meinhold, C.B.

1986-01-01

53

Impact of a proposed change in the maximum permissible dose limit for neutrons to radiation-protection programs at DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has issued a statement advising that it is considering lowering the maximum permissible dose for neutrons. This action would present substantive problems to radiation protection programs at DOE facilities where a potential for neutron exposure exists. In addition to altering administrative controls, a lowering of the maximum permissible dose for neutrons will require advances in personnel neutron dosimetry systems, and neutron detection and measurement instrumentation. Improvement in the characterization of neutron fields and spectra at work locations will also be needed. DOE has initiated research and development programs in these areas. However, problems related to the control of personnel neutron exposure have yet to be resolved and investigators are encouraged to continue collaboration with both United States and international authorities.

Murphy, B.L.

1981-09-01

54

Impact of a proposed change in the maximum permissible dose limit for neutrons to radiation-protection programs at DOE facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has issued a statement advising that it is considering lowering the maximum permissible dose for neutrons. This action would present substantive problems to radiation protection programs at DOE facilities where a potential for neutron exposure exists. In addition to altering administrative controls, a lowering of the maximum permissible dose for neutrons will require advances in personnel neutron dosimetry systems and neutron detection and measurement instrumentation. Improvement in the characterization of neutron fields and spectra at work locations will also be needed. DOE has initiated research and development programs in these areas. However, problems related to the control of personnel neutron exposure have yet to be resolved and investigators are encouraged to continue collaboration with both United States and international authorities.

Murphy, B. L.

1981-09-01

55

Chemical protection against ionizing radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some of the problems related to chemical protection against ionizing radiation are discussed with emphasis on : definition, classification, degree of protection, mechanisms of action and toxicity. Results on the biological response modifyers (BRMs) and on the combination of nontoxic (i.e. low) doses of sulphydryl radioprotectors and BRMs are presented.

Maisin, J. R.

56

Overview of radiation protection at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The radiation protection program at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory is described. After establishing a set of stringent design guidelines for radiation protection, both normal and accidental beam losses for each accelerator were estimated. From these parameters, shielding requirements were specified using Monte-Carlo radiation transport codes. A groundwater activation model was developed to demonstrate compliance with federal drinking water standards.

S. Baker; G. Britvich; J. Bull; L. Coulson; J. Coyne; N. Mokhov; V. Romero; G. Stapleton

1994-01-01

57

Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology (*)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interventional procedures are used by a significant number of medical specialities. Radiation protection (RP) for patients and staff is one of the main issues in Interventional Radiology (IR). UNSCEAR, ICRP and IAEA have devoted significant time over the last years to improve radiation safety in IR. Several combined factors: prolonged localized fluoroscopy, multiple radiographic exposures, and repeated procedures can cause

Eliseo Vano

58

CHEMICAL PROTECTION AGAINST IONIZING RADIATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent work on chemical protection against radiation effects in mammals ; is reviewed, especially with respect to whole-body exposure to external radiation. ; This survey shows that many explanations are being offered to account for the ; action of radioprotective agents. In general, the proposed mechanisms are ; concerned with inactivation of radicals and other chemical intermediates, ; depletion of

R. L. Straube; H. M. Patt

1963-01-01

59

The development of radiation protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The harm that might be caused by radiation exposure was recognised within months of Rontgen's discovery of X-rays, and recommendations for protection of patients and workers with radiation were formulated first in 1928. In the light of increasing radiobiological, genetic and human epidemiological evidence, it became clear that there might be no threshold, below which harmful effects did not occur.

E. E. Pochin

1981-01-01

60

Proceedings of the Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21-24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program

R. E. Swaja; C. S. Sims; W. H. Casson

1991-01-01

61

Radiation Exposure Compensation Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the Justice Department's Radiation Exposure Compensation Program homepage. This site features information about the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act, including claimant categories, claim forms, and the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act. This site also provides a table illustrating a summary of all claims received and compensation paid to date.

Program, U. S.

62

Historical review of personnel dosimetry development and its use in radiation protection programs at Hanford 1944 to the 1980s  

SciTech Connect

This document is an account of the personnel dosimetry programs as they were developed and practiced at Hanford from their inception in 1943 to 1944 to the 1980s. This history is divided into sections covering the general categories of external and internal measurement methods, in vivo counting, radiation exposure recordkeeping, and calibration of personnel dosimeters. The reasons and circumstances surrounding the inception of these programs at Hanford are discussed. Information about these programs was obtained from documents, letters, and memos that are available in our historical records; the personnel files of many people who participated in these programs; and from the recollections of many long-time, current, and past Hanford employees. For the most part, the history of these programs is presented chronologically to relate their development and use in routine Hanford operations. 131 refs., 38 figs., 23 tabs.

Wilson, R.H.

1987-02-01

63

Proceedings: 2003 Radiation Protection Technology Conference  

SciTech Connect

Health physics professionals within the nuclear industry are continually upgrading their programs with new methods and technologies. The Third Annual EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference facilitated this effort by communicating technical developments, program improvements, and experience throughout the nuclear power industry. When viewed from the perspective of shorter outages, diminishing numbers of contract RP technicians and demanding emergent work, this information flow is critical for the industry.

None

2004-04-01

64

Regulatory aspects of radiation protection.  

PubMed

The paper introduces the projects launched by the European Community to foster prospects in dosimetry, radiation protection and best use of equipment in the medical field. These projects are put in perspective with the European legal framework for radiation protection, in particular, the Basic Safety Standards Directive, the Medical Exposures Directive and the Directive on High-Activity Sealed Sources. A summary is given of the overall mission statements of the commission services in the field of radiation protection, including the field of research, and how they relate to other actions in the overall health policy of the EU. In conclusion, a number of priority areas for future work in the medical field are highlighted. PMID:16461539

Janssens, A; Sarro Vaquero, M

2006-02-03

65

Radiation protection in pediatric radiology  

SciTech Connect

The book covers all the basic concepts concerned with minimizing the radiation dose to patients, parents, and personnel, while producing radiographic studies of diagnostic quality. Practical information about tissues at risk, radiation risks specific to children, performance of radiographic and fluoroscopic examination, gonadal protection, pregnancy, immobilization of children, mobile radiography, and equipment considerations including those pertaining to computed tomography and dental radiography are given. (KRM)

Not Available

1981-01-01

66

Proceedings of the second conference on radiation protection and dosimetry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Second Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 31--November 3, 1988, at the Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To facilitate meeting these

R. E. Swaja; C. S. Sims

1988-01-01

67

ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION MEASUREMENT PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ARM scientists focus on obtaining field measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and...

68

Applied radiation biology and protection  

SciTech Connect

Written by two eminent expects in the field with many years of teaching experience between them, this book presents a concise coverage of the physical and biological basics of radiation biology and protection. The book begins with a description of the methods of particle detection and dosimetric evaluation. The effects of ionizing radiation on man are treated from the initial physico-chemical phase of interaction to their conceivable pathological consequences. Regulations, limits and safeguards on nuclear power plants, radioisotope installations and medical centers which make use of ionizing radiation are given and the risks of exposure to natural, industrial and scientific radiation sources evaluated. The final chapter takes a look at some of the more important nuclear accidents, including Windscale, Three Mile Island, and Chernobyl, and describes basic procedures to be carried out in the eventuality of a nuclear emergency. Twelve chapters have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Granier, R.; Gambini, D.J.

1990-01-01

69

CEBAF - environmental protection program plan  

SciTech Connect

An important objective in the successful operation of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is to ensure protection of the public and the environment. To meet this objective, the Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc., (SURA) is committed to working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop, implement, and manage a sound and workable environmental protection program at CEBAF. This environmental protection plan includes information on environmental monitoring, long-range monitoring, groundwater protection, waste minimization, and pollution prevention awareness program plan.

NONE

1995-10-01

70

78 FR 59982 - Revisions to Radiation Protection  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC-2012-0268] Revisions to Radiation Protection AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...Assuring that Occupational Radiation Exposures Are As Low As Is Reasonably...Achievable,'' Section 12.2, ``Radiation Sources,'' Section 12.3...

2013-09-30

71

Develop a Wellhead Protection Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students will develop a wellhead protection program for a hypothetical community. Students assume various roles in the community such as gas station owner, photo lab owner or employee, beauty salon owner, restaurant owner, resident, or environmentalist so that each student can bring the perspective of his or her role to the discussion. Students will discover that the relationships between businesses, environmentalists, and community leaders can be, but need not be, adversarial. As they progress through this activity students learn about the tools communities may use to develop a wellhead protection program. They will also recognize that developing a community wellhead protection program is not easy and that, while it is important to protect drinking water supplies, it can be very difficult to develop a program that will gain support from the overall community.

72

National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements semiannual technical progress report, March 1989August 1989  

Microsoft Academic Search

This semiannual technical progress report is for the period 1 March 1989 through 31 August 1989. This National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) program is designed to provide recommendations for radiation protection based on scientific principles. During this period several reports were published covering the topics of occupational radiation exposure, medical exposure, radon control, dosimetry, and radiation protection

Ney

1991-01-01

73

EPA Review of Radiation Protection Activities - 1974. A Prototype for Subsequent Annual Reports.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The primary focus of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) radiation strategy is to implement a program leading to the establishment of necessary radiation controls for the protection of public health and the environment. These controls would incl...

1975-01-01

74

Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection  

SciTech Connect

In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

Cossairt, J.D.

1996-10-01

75

Protective Coating Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This program consists of two primary segments: (1) installing an environmental monitoring station at the Toyota marshalling yard at Georgetown, Kentucky, and (2) conducting laboratory and field tests of paint and wax-coated painted specimens to assess the...

J. E. Funk T. Hopwood D. G. Hartman C. M. Oberst R. D. Saylor A. R. Sethuraman

1991-01-01

76

Research Priorities for Occupational Radiation Protection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report discusses the results of an extensive canvass of government, professional, societal, commercial, state, and local occupational radiation protection organizations. In the report, the subpanel addresses broad areas of radiation research it identi...

1994-01-01

77

Aiming Optimum Space Radiation Protection using Regolith  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiation protection of space radiation is very important factor in manned space activity on the moon. At the construction of lunar base, low cost radiation shielding would be achieved using regolith that exists on the surface of the moon. We studied radiation shielding ability of regolith as answer the question, how much of depth would be necessary to achieve minimum

Daisuke Masuda; Aiko Nagamatsu; Hiroko Indo; Yoichiro Iwashita; Hiromi Suzuki; Toru Shimazu; Sachiko Yano; Fumiaki Tanigaki; Noriaki Ishioka; Chiaki Mukai; Hideyuki J. Majima

2010-01-01

78

Proceedings: 2002 Radiation Protection Technology Conference: Baltimore, MD, October 2002  

SciTech Connect

In response to program pressures resulting from shorter outages, combined with a diminishing group of contract health physics (HP) technicians, HP professionals must continuously upgrade their programs. Demanding emergent work also requires HP technicians in the nuclear industry to use new methods and technologies. The EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference was directed at highlighting a number of key health physics issues and developments.

None

2003-04-01

79

Radiation protection guidelines for space missions  

SciTech Connect

The original recommendations for radiation protection guidelines were made by the National Academy of Sciences in 1970. Since that time the US crews have become more diverse in their makeup and much has been learned about both radiation-induced cancer and other late effects. While far from adequate there is now some understanding of the risks that high-Z and -energy (HZE) particles pose. For these reasons it was time to reconsider the radiation protection guidelines for space workers. This task was undertaken recently by National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP). 42 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

Fry, R.J.M.

1987-01-01

80

Impact of the Chernobyl accident on radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

The science of radiation protection is a fundamental outgrowth of peaceful and military applications of ionizing radiation and the use of nuclear energy. Scientific progress in radiation protection has not, however, been as dramatic as progress in other scientific endeavors, because many users of ionizing radiation have perceived that the major technical and institutional problems have already been solved. This misperception is not based on solid fact and is not shared by radiation protection professionals, who have a broader vision of both past achievements and problems remaining in this area. Experience gained as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident has highlighted new problems and demonstrated the urgency of finding better answers to some old questions. This paper addresses the future impact of the recent Chernobyl accident on the science of radiation protection. In summary, the accident demonstrated that particular emphasis should be directed toward: Improvement of dosimetric and health-effects models for predicting the consequences of exposure of the public to low doses of ionizing radiation. Development of optimized, realistic countermeasures and improvement in emergency preparedness. Education of the public, including students, scientists and politicians with regard to radiation protection issues. Development of advanced computer programs and radiation instruments for evaluating reactor accidents and their consequences. Transfer of learned concepts, methods and approaches to other scientific fields, such as environmental sciences, toxicology, pharmacology, etc.

Paretzke, H.G.

1988-08-01

81

Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H. [eds.

1991-10-01

82

Proceedings of the Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21-24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

Swaja, R. E.; Sims, C. S.; Casson, W. H.

1991-10-01

83

Anticarcinogenesis and radiation protection 2  

SciTech Connect

The dramatic decrease in the incidence of stomach cancer in industrialized countries during the past 50 years, which is yet to be fully explained, and the observation that carcinogenesis in laboratory animals can be inhibited by antioxidants, retinoids, and caloric restriction, among other influences, challenge us to press on in the search for practical means to prevent cancer. It is in relation to this goal that the studies summarized in this book have special significance. This book is based on the invited and contributed papers presented at the Third International Conference on Anticarcinogenesis and Radiation Protection, held on October 15--21, 1989, in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia. They cover a broad range of investigations into the mechanisms and inhibition of carcinogenesis. In keeping with recent advances in our understanding of the importance of oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in carcinogenesis, many of the reports focus on mutations and related changes at the level of DNA. At the same time, however, other reports deal with nutritional, immunological, endocrinological, and epidemiological aspects. In all, the various reports address carcinogenesis and its inhibition at virtually every level of biological organization. Included in this compendium are timely reviews of diverse and promising research strategies for cancer prevention, as pursued by investigators in different parts of the world.

Nygaard, O.F.; Upton, A.C. (eds.)

1991-01-01

84

Using computer-based training to facilitate radiation protection review  

SciTech Connect

In a national laboratory setting, it is necessary to provide radiation protection overview and training to diverse parts of the laboratory population. This includes employees at research reactors, accelerators, waste facilities, radiochemical isotope processing, and analytical laboratories, among others. In addition, our own radiation protection and monitoring staffs must be trained. To assist in the implementation of this full range of training, ORNL has purchased prepackaged computer-based training in health physics and technical mathematics with training modules that can be selected from many topics. By selection of specific modules, appropriate radiation protection review packages can be determined to meet many individual program needs. Because our radiation protection personnel must have some previous radiation protection experience or the equivalent of an associate's degree in radiation protection for entry level, the computer-based training will serve primarily as review of major principles. Others may need very specific prior training to make the computer-based training effective in their work situations. 4 refs.

Abercrombie, J.S.; Copenhaver, E.D.

1989-01-01

85

Radiation Worker Protection by Exposure Scheduling  

PubMed Central

The discovery of the protective adaptive response of cells to a low dose of radiation suggests applications to radiation worker/first responder protection. Its use in cancer radiotherapy has been discussed in a separate publication. This paper describes simple changes in scheduling that can make use of these beneficial adaptive effects for protection. No increase in total exposure is necessary, only a simple change in the timing of radiation exposure. A low dose of radiation at a sufficient dose rate will trigger the adaptive response. This in turn will offer a considerable protection against the damage from a subsequent high dose. A simple scenario is discussed as well as a brief review of the experimental basis of the adaptive response.

Blankenbecler, Richard

2011-01-01

86

RADIATION BIOLOGY: CONCEPTS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The opportunity to write a historical review of the field of radiation biology allows for the viewing of the devel- opment and maturity of a field of study, thereby being able to provide the appropriate context for the earlier years of re- search and its findings. The pioneering work of Muller, Sax, and McClintock, and many others, has stood the

R. Julian Preston

2004-01-01

87

Proceedings: Radiation Protection Technology Conference: Providence, RI, November 2001  

SciTech Connect

Health physics (HP) professionals within the nuclear industry are continually upgrading their respective programs with new methods and technologies. The move to shorter outages combined with a diminishing group of contract HP technicians and demanding emergent work makes such changes even more important. The EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference focused on a number of key health physics issues and developments.

None

2002-02-01

88

Radiation chemistry and environmental protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

A combination of different technological methods in one plant is usually economically advantageous in industry. Such a general approach is also useful in solving ecological problems by methods of radiation technology. This method of cleaning `harsh` sufactants and `mold` products and a stage of subsequent biological purification of these products from the water. Combining radiation and adsorption techniques is also

A. N. Ermakov; N. P. Tarasova; L. T. Bugaenko

1992-01-01

89

A curriculum model for Nevada Test Site radiation protection technician training  

Microsoft Academic Search

A research project was undertaken to develop a performance-based curriculum model for Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Technicians. The study began with an overview of Radiation Protection Technician training curricula within the Department of Energy (DOE) Government Contractor system and the Training Accreditation Manuals used for program evaluation of DOE system training programs. The research design included data from a

Petullo

1989-01-01

90

Development and implementation of a site radiation protection program for a radioactive waste vitrification and RCRA clean closure project at the Savannah River Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this project was to implement radiological protection program at the M-Area Vendo Treatment Facility (VTF) at the Savannah River Site. The project is unique in that it incorporates a turnkey approach to operation and control of a single waste treatment facility at a DOE site. The Vendor Treatment Facility is a temporary installation in the M-Area of

M. S. Davidson; I. S. Howard; W. A. Jr. Veronee

1996-01-01

91

The program RADLST (Radiation Listing)  

SciTech Connect

The program RADLST (Radiation Listing) is designed to calculate the nuclear and atomic radiations associated with the radioactive decay of nuclei. It uses as its primary input nuclear decay data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) format. The code is written in FORTRAN 77 and, with a few exceptions, is consistent with the ANSI standard. 65 refs.

Burrows, T.W.

1988-02-29

92

49 CFR 193.2057 - Thermal radiation protection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Thermal radiation protection. 193.2057 Section 193...Requirements § 193.2057 Thermal radiation protection. Each LNG container...following exceptions: (a) The thermal radiation distances must be calculated...

2012-10-01

93

49 CFR 193.2057 - Thermal radiation protection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Thermal radiation protection. 193.2057 Section 193...Requirements § 193.2057 Thermal radiation protection. Each LNG container...following exceptions: (a) The thermal radiation distances must be calculated...

2011-10-01

94

Research priorities for occupational radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines.

Not Available

1994-02-01

95

RADIATION PROTECTION CALCULATIONS FOR REACTORS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Practical shielding calculations for nuclear reactors are described. ; Nuclear radiation involved in reactor shielding and their sources, calculation ; methcds and their basic theories and the nuclear data of materials, which are ; necessary for the calculations, are listed or referred to in the special ; bibliography. The calculations can be made using normal desk calculators. The ; calculations

Lindackers

1960-01-01

96

Environmental protection by using radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The utilization of radiation for controlling environmental pollutants ; such as stack gas, sludge, and microorganisms in waste water is described. The ; sizes and costs of various irradiation sources such as ⁶°Co, ¹³⁷Cs, ; atomic reactors, accelerators, and spent fuel used for waste water treatment are ; compared, showing accelenators to have the lowest cost, except for atomic ;

Machi

1973-01-01

97

EPRI guide to managing nuclear utility protective clothing programs  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) commissioned a radioactive waste related project (RP2414-34) during the last quarter of 1989 to produce a guide for developing and managing nuclear protective clothing programs. Every nuclear facility must coordinate some type of protective clothing program for its radiation workers to insure proper and safe protection for the wearer and to maintain control over the spread of contamination. Yet, every nuclear facility has developed its own unique program for managing such clothing. Accordingly, a need existed for a reference guide to assist with the standardization of protective clothing programs and to assist in controlling the potentially runaway economics of such programs. This document is the first known effort to formalize the planning and economic factors surrounding a nuclear utility protective clothing program. It is intended to be informative by addressing the various pieces of information necessary to establish and maintain an effective, professionally managed protective clothing program. It also attempts to provide guidance toward tailoring the information and providing examples within the report to fit each utility's specific needs. This report is further intended to address new issues and trends occurring throughout the nuclear industry in late 1989 which can have either a significant positive or negative impact on the operations or economics of nuclear protective clothing programs. 1 ref., 11 tabs.

Kelly, J.J. (Right Angle Industries, Melbourne, FL (USA))

1991-05-01

98

Aiming Optimum Space Radiation Protection using Regolith.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation protection of space radiation is very important factor in manned space activity on the moon. At the construction of lunar base, low cost radiation shielding would be achieved using regolith that exists on the surface of the moon. We studied radiation shielding ability of regolith as answer the question, how much of depth would be necessary to achieve minimum radiation protection. We estimated the shielding ability of regolith against each atomic number of space radiation particles. Using stopping power data of ICRU REPORT49 and 73, we simulated the approximate expression (function of the energy of the atomic nucleus as x and the atomic number as Z) of the stopping power for the space proton particle (nucleus of H) against silicon dioxide (SiO2), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), and iron (Fe), which are the main components of regolith. Based on the expression, we applied the manipulation to the other particles of space radiation to up to argon particle (Ar). These simulated expressions complied well the data of ICRU REPORT49 and 73 except alpha particle (nucleus of He). The simulation values of stop-ping power of ten elements from potassium to nickel those we had no data in ICRU REPORT were further simulated. Using the obtained expressions, the relationship between the radiation absorbed dose and depth of a silicon dioxide was obtained. The space radiation relative dose with every depth in the moon could be estimated by this study.

Masuda, Daisuke; Nagamatsu, Aiko; Indo, Hiroko; Iwashita, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Hiromi; Shimazu, Toru; Yano, Sachiko; Tanigaki, Fumiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki; Mukai, Chiaki; Majima, Hideyuki J.

99

Office of Radiation Programs Training Manual. Management of Radiation Accidents.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Radiation fundamentals; Radiation detection; Radiation protection; Sources of radioactivity; (Sealed sources, Sealed sources in medicine, Sealed sources in industry, Basin principles of nuclear reactors, Nuclear detonations and fallout); Radiati...

1970-01-01

100

Proceedings of the second conference on radiation protection and dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

The Second Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 31--November 3, 1988, at the Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To facilitate meeting these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical sessions included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, calibration, standards and regulations, instrumentation, accreditation and test programs, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. This document provides a summary of the conference technical program and a partial collection of full papers for the oral presentations in order of delivery. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S. (eds.)

1988-11-01

101

Risk assessment for radiation protection purposes.  

PubMed

In defining criteria for good protection against ionizing radiation, it is important to assess quantitatively the likely risk of any radiation exposure. The 'somatic' risks to the individual result mainly from induction of cancer in the organs irradiated, and these risks can now be estimated on the basis of numerous detailed epidemiological surveys of exposed human populations. Estimates of the risk of hereditary effects, from genetic changes induced in germ cells, are based largely on the frequency with which such effects are induced in other species. In both cases the risk at very low dose can be inferred using knowledge of the way in which radiation damage is caused in tissues. Coherent systems of radiation protection are based on a restriction of doses to the whole body and to individual organs, such that the induction of cancer and genetic harm is infrequent, and the threshold dose for causing other, 'non-stochastic', effects is not exceeded. PMID:7020708

Pochin, E E

1980-09-01

102

Programs & Resources | Radiation Research Program (RRP)  

Cancer.gov

The RRP and its members have long-standing interest and experience in global cancer networking and research. The experience includes Dr. Vikram's 5 years at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) helping establish the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) for assisting underserved countries develop radiation oncology programs. Dr.

103

Contact RRP | Radiation Research Program (RRP)  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Content Search this site Radiation Research Program (RRP) Contact RRP Radiation Research Program (RRP) primary telephones & Fax: 240-276-5690 Main telephone number for Office of the Associate Director, Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch

104

Neutron Measuring Instruments for Radiation Protection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present report deals with selected topics from the field of neutron dosimetry for radiation protection connected with the work of the subcommittee 6802 in the Standards Committee on Radiology (NAR) of the German Standards Institute (DIN). It is a sort...

M. Heinzelmann W. Schneider M. Hoefert H. Kuehn R. Jahr

1979-01-01

105

Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

Harris, Eleanor [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)], E-mail: Eleanor.Harris@moffitt.org; Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Spangler, Ann E. [Moncrief Radiation Oncology Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States)

2009-06-01

106

Assessing the service provided by an institutional radiation safety survey program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Routine radiation safety surveys are a required part of every institutional radiation protection program. Although mandated by regulation, surveys are really performed to help clinicians and researchers establish and maintain radiologically-safe working and learning environments. In some cases, however, the priorities established by a radiation protection program may not coincide with the needs perceived by the institution`s workers, leading to

R. J. Emery; R. L. Sawyer; D. D. Sprau

1996-01-01

107

Radiation protection, radiation safety and radiation shielding assessment of HIE-ISOLDE.  

PubMed

The high intensity and energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project is an upgrade to the existing ISOLDE facility at CERN. The foreseen increase in the nominal intensity and the energy of the primary proton beam of the existing ISOLDE facility aims at increasing the intensity of the produced radioactive ion beams (RIBs). The currently existing ISOLDE facility uses the proton beam from the proton-synchrotron booster with an energy of 1.4 GeV and an intensity up to 2 ?A. After upgrade (final stage), the HIE-ISOLDE facility is supposed to run at an energy up to 2 GeV and an intensity up to 4 ?A. The foreseen upgrade imposes constrains, from the radiation protection and the radiation safety point of view, to the existing experimental and supply areas. Taking into account the upgraded energy and intensity of the primary proton beam, a new assessment of the radiation protection and radiation safety of the HIE-ISOLDE facility is necessary. Special attention must be devoted to the shielding assessment of the beam dumps and of the experimental areas. In this work the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo particle transport simulation program FLUKA was used to perform the computation of the ambient dose equivalent rate distribution and of the particle fluxes in the projected HIE-ISOLDE facility (taking into account the upgrade nominal primary proton beam energy and intensity) and the shielding assessment of the facility, with the aim of identifying in the existing facility (ISOLDE) the critical areas and locations where new or reinforced shielding may be necessary. The consequences of the upgraded proton beam parameters on the operational radiation protection of the facility were studied. PMID:23516267

Romanets, Y; Bernardes, A P; Dorsival, A; Gonalves, I F; Kadi, Y; di Maria, S; Vaz, P; Vlachoudis, V; Vollaire, J

2013-03-20

108

Shielded radiation protection quantities beyond LEO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has recommended that the quantities used to evaluate health risk to astronauts due to radiation exposure be effective dose and gray-equivalent. The NCRP recommends that effective dose be the limiting quantity for prevention of stochastic effects. Effective dose is a measure of whole body exposure, a weighted average of dose equivalent to a number body tissues for which the NCRP has adopted tissue weighting factors recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). For deterministic effects, the NCRP has recommended that gray-equivalent be used. Gray-equivalent is evaluated for specific critical organs and is the weighted sum of absorbed dose from field components to that organ using the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) number for that field component. RBE numbers recommended by the NCRP are used. The NCRP has provided effective dose limits as well as limits for gray-equivalent to eyes, skin, and blood forming organs (BFO) for astronauts in low earth orbit (LEO). As yet, no such limits have been defined for astronaut operations beyond LEO. In this study, the radiation protection quantities, effective dose and gray-equivalent to the eyes, skin, and BFO, are calculated for several environments beyond LEO. The lunar surface and Martian environments are included. For each environment, these radiation protection quantities are calculated behind varying amounts of various types of shielding materials. The results are compared to the exposure limits for LEO, since limits have not yet been defined for interplanetary missions. The benefits of using shielding material containing hydrogen and choosing optimal mission times are discussed.

Clowdsley, M. S.; Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M. Y.; Anderson, B. M.; Nealy, J. E.

109

Radiation effects program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

No existing LINAC Based Beam Heating facility comes within a factor of ten of the needs of a high heating rate thermodynamic properties research facility. The facility could be built at the Naval Research Lab. for a cost in the neighborhood of 2 million dollars. The 10 MeV electron beam would not produce any serious radioactivity but would provide unprecedented beam power for such other applications as food processing, sewer treatment, materials curing, radiation hardness assurance, etc. One can always achieve lower current densities by scattering the beam and moving the device under test further away from the scatterer. In this case one must rely on the TLD readings to indicate the dose rate at the point of interest. For general utility with the beam covering about four TLD's fairly evenly one can claim that the NRL LINAC can produce a maximum dose rate of about 6 x 10 to the 10th power rads (Si) per second for a pulse length of 1.5 microseconds, and about 1.4 x 10 to the 11th power rads (Si) per second in a 50 nanosecond pulse. In both cases the beam area is about 0.4 square centimeters.

1985-09-01

110

40 CFR 197.38 - Are the Individual Protection and Ground Water Protection Standards Severable?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the Individual Protection and Ground Water Protection Standards Severable...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS PUBLIC HEALTH...the Individual Protection and Ground Water Protection Standards...

2013-07-01

111

Case Studies in Wellhead Protection: Ten Examples of Innovative Wellhead Protection Programs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Carroll County, Maryland-Water Resource Management Program; Descanso, California-Community Water District Wellhead Protection Program; Eastern Shore of Virginia-Wellhead Protection Program; El Paso, Texas-Wellhead Protection Program; Enid, Oklah...

1992-01-01

112

Radiation safety program for the cardiac catheterization laboratory.  

PubMed

The Society of Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions present a practical approach to assist cardiac catheterization laboratories in establishing a radiation safety program. The importance of this program is emphasized by the appropriate concerns for the increasing use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging, and its potential adverse effects. An overview of the assessment of radiation dose is provided with a review of basic terminology for dose management. The components of a radiation safety program include essential personnel, radiation monitoring, protective shielding, imaging equipment, and training/education. A procedure based review of radiation dose management is described including pre-procedure, procedure and post-procedure best practice recommendations. Specific radiation safety considerations are discussed including women and fluoroscopic procedures as well as patients with congenital and structural heart disease. PMID:21254324

Chambers, Charles E; Fetterly, Kenneth A; Holzer, Ralf; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Blankenship, James C; Balter, Stephen; Laskey, Warren K

2011-01-19

113

Annual report for Insider Protection Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Insider Protection Program is to study and identify protection strategies and mechanisms to defend the Hanford Site against insider adversaries. Levels of protection required by US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders are to be met in a cost effective manner. The Insider Protection works in coordination with the Vulnerability Assessment (VA)/Master Safeguards and Security Agreement (MSSA) process to provide this protection. The VA studies are carried out in detail and provide useful information on the vulnerabilities and defense mechanisms identified at the time the study was made. The VA/MSSA results are an essential component of a general approach to defending against the insider.

Eggers, R.F.

1988-09-01

114

Occupational radiation protection dosimetry in Nigeria.  

PubMed

The general features of occupational radiation protection dosimetry in Nigeria within the period 1990-1999 have been summarised. About 640 personnel, representing about 25% of the estimated number of radiation workers in Nigeria, were monitored by the TL dosimetry technique during the period, with the majority being the personnel of the teaching hospitals across the country. Most private establishments, especially the X ray diagnostic centres, operate without dosimetry coverage or supervision by a regulatory authority. The weighted mean of the annual effective dose ranged between 0 and 28.97 mSv with the upper limit of collective effective dose being 18.47 man.Sv per year. The individual risk estimate due to this is about 1.5 x 10(-3) per year and this was among the medical personnel. The value could be more if all radiation workers in the country were monitored. PMID:11468807

Farai, I P; Obed, R I

2001-01-01

115

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect

In 1990, the treatment of clouds in climate models was identified as the highest-priority research topic in the newly formed United States Global Change Research Program. ARM was created to meet this challenge. The goal of the ARM program is to increase our understanding of the interaction between clouds and atmospheric radiative fluxes, and then to capture that knowledge in improved climate models. From an observational perspective, the focus is on measuring the solar and thermal infrared radiative fluxes at Earth's surface, and all of the atmospheric quantities that affect those fluxes. In this article, we describe the ARM central facility in the Southern Great Plains and the advanced instrumentation found there and also compare the site to an astronomical observatory. We provide examples of ARM science progress in radiative transfer studies, cloud property retrievals, and cloud modeling and parameterization. The ARM observatory has become an integral component of international collaborations and of US government research programs sponsored by agencies such as NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Although the Southern Great Plains site remains our premier facility, data from the remote ARM sites in Alaska and the Pacific are widely used to study polar and tropical climates. Along with continued observation at the existing ARM facilities, we also hope to build a mobile facility that would extend our measurement capability to any location on earth for a period of months to a year.

Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stokes, Gerald M.

2003-01-01

116

Ten principles and ten commandments of radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

For decades, the phrase {open_quotes}time, distance, and shielding{close_quotes} has been presented as summarizing the {open_quotes}basics{close_quotes} of radiation protection. Indeed, for protection from external radiation sources, these three principles are probably the most important ones on which a worker can make decisions and take actions. However, these principles do not address protection against intakes of radioactive materials or {open_quotes}ontakes{close_quotes} (skin contamination), other risk-limiting measures, or other important protective measures taken by governments, public health agencies, regulators, and institutional programs (measures such as performance standards, health education, facility engineering requirements, and administrative procedures). I have identified ten principles and ten accompanying commandments of radiation protection: time, distance, dispersal, source reduction, source barrier, personal barrier, decorporation, effect mitigation, optimal technology, and limitation of other exposures. Corresponding non-technical forms of the commandments are hurry (but don`t be hasty); stay away from it; disperse it and dilute it; use as little as possible; keep it in; keep it out; get it out or off of you (after intake or skin contamination); limit the damage; choose the best technology (perhaps a non-radiation technology); and don`t compound risks (don`t smoke). Technical versions of the commandments are also provided using the verbs {open_quotes}optimize,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}maximize,{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}minimize.{close_quotes} Not all commandments can be applied at the same time, and application may be different for workers and members of the public. Advantages, disadvantages, and implementation of these principles and commandments are discussed, and numerous examples provided. The application of the principles and commandments must be based on knowledge of the radiological conditions to be managed. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Strom, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-03-01

117

Semiannual report for Insider Protection program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Insider Protection program is to study and identify protection strategies and mechanisms to defend the Hanford Site against cleared persons (authorized insiders), who either were adversaries at the time of joining Westinghouse Hanford or who became adversaries after joining the company. The range of unauthorized, damaging actions that these adversaries could attempt include (1) theft of special nuclear material (SNM), (2) theft of classified materials, (3) theft of government property, (4) sabotage of equipment and facilities, and (5) radiological sabotage. This is the first semiannual report for this program. It covers work accomplished during the first of Fiscal Year 1988. Two insider protection program developments are described. They are the Insider Threat Assessment Computer Program (ITAC), which is now being used at Hanford, and the Nuclear Material Tracking System (NTRAK), a nondestructive assay (NDA) instrument concept for tracking the movement of SNM and determining when its movement becomes unauthorized. 2 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Eggers, R.F.

1988-03-01

118

Protection against solar ultraviolet radiation in childhood.  

PubMed

In the last decade, awareness of the harmful effects of solar ultraviolet radiation has increased. Modern lifestyles, outdoor occupations, sports and other activities make total sun avoidance impossible. Children spend more time outdoors than adults and there is compelling evidence that childhood is a particularly vulnerable time for the photocarcinogenic effects of the sun. Sun exposure among infants and pre-school age children is largely depend on the discretion of adult care providers. It is important to learn safe habits about sun-safety behaviours during the childhood. Children deserve to live and play in safe environments, and it is the responsibility of every adult to help children stay safe. Protecting children from excessive sun exposure is protection from sunburn today and other forms of sun damages, especially skin cancers, in the future. PMID:22220468

Pustisek, Nives; Situm, Mirna

2011-09-01

119

[Radiation protectants of the crystalline lens].  

PubMed

During more than a half of century, numerous compounds have been tested in different models against radiation-induced cataract. In this report, we will review the radioprotectors that have been already tested for non-human crystalline lens protection. We will focus on the most important published studies in this topic and the mechanisms of cytoprotection reported in vitro and in vivo from animals. The most frequent mechanisms incriminated in the cytoprotective effect are: free radical scavenging, limitation of lipid peroxidation, modulation of cycle progression increase of intracellular reduced glutathion pool, reduction of DNA strand breaks and limitation of apoptotic cell death. Amifostine (or Ethyol) and anethole dithiolethione (or Sulfarlem), already used clinically as chemo- and radioprotectants, could be further tested for ocular radioprotection particularly for radiation-induced cataract. PMID:15124544

Belkacmi, Y; Pasquier, D; Castelain, B; Warnet, J M; Lartigau, E

2003-11-01

120

The SunWise School Program Guide: A School Program that Radiates Good Ideas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To help educators raise sun safety awareness, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed the SunWise School Program, a national education program for children in grades K through 8. SunWise Partner Schools sponsor classroom and schoolwide activities that raise children's awareness of stratospheric ozone depletion, UV radiation,

US Environmental Protection Agency, 2003

2003-01-01

121

Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

Not Available

1988-01-01

122

The reference individual of radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

The 70-kg {open_quotes}standard man{close_quotes} representing a typical Western adult male has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s. In 1949 at the Chalk River conference, health physicists from the U.S., UK, and Canada agreed on the concept of a standard man to facilitate comparison of internal dose estimates. The 70-kg standard man included specifications of the masses of 25 organs and tissues, total body content of 15 elements, total water intake and output, water content of the body, and some anatomical and physiological data for the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. In 1959, in its Publication 2{sup 2} on permissible doses for internal radiation the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) modified standard man. In 1963 the ICRP established a task group to revise and extend the standard man concept. The name was changed later to Reference Man and the task group`s work was published in 1975 as ICRP Publication 23{sup 3}. Publication 23 similar to Publication 2, updates and documents the sources of the data. Data on women, children, and fetuses were also collected, where available, but these data were limited primarily to anatomical data and only a few reference values were established for these groups. Information assembled during the course of the effort on the Reference Man report was used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to construct a mathematical representation of the body (a phantom) that was suitable for use with Monte Carlo methods in the calculation of organ doses. That effort was undertaken to improve estimates of dose from photon-emitting radionuclides residing within organs, so-called internal emitters. The phantom, although updated throughout the years, remains today as the basis for organ dose estimates in nuclear medicine and radiation protection and underlies the radiation risk data derived from the epidemiologic studies of the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Eckerman, K.F.; Cristy, M.

1995-12-31

123

Gamma radiation and gamma protection factors onboard ships during radioactive fallout  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods of evaluating Gamma Ray Protection Factors (GRPF) for ships in various situations of radioactive fallout are discussed. These factors determine, in connection with a measured gamma radiation dose at a given detector point, the gamma radiation in different compartments of the ship. A computer program GASUFA was developed to calculate the GRPF. GASUFA performs calculations, considering energy, place, and

E. H. Brehm; T. Holst

1975-01-01

124

Radiated Emission Limits to Protect Digital Wireless Communication Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

International limits for maximum levels of unintentional radiated emission from electronic devices are developed to protect analog communication services. The international standardization work to develop such limits to protect digital communication servi...

P. Stenumgaard

2004-01-01

125

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, September 2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our Changing Climate--Is our climate really changing? How do we measure climate change? How can we predict what Earth's climate will be like for generations to come? One focus of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to improve scientific climate models enough to achieve reliable regional prediction of future climate. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the global

Holdridge

2001-01-01

126

Manual on radiation protection in hospital and general practice. Volume 1. Basic protection requirements  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general review of the radiation protection requirements common to all medical applications of ionizing radiation and radionuclides is presented in the first volume of a three-part series dealing with the radiation protection of patients, occupationally exposed persons, and the public. The series is directed to national authorities, hospital administrators, supervisors, hospital workers, teachers, and others who have responsibility in

C. B. Braestrup; K. J. Vikterlof

1974-01-01

127

Protection of Computer Programs--A Dilemma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer programs, as legitimate original inventions or creative written expressions, are entitled to patent or copyright protection. Understanding the legal implications of this concept is crucial to both computer programmers and their employers in our increasingly computer-oriented way of life. Basically the copyright or patent procedure

Carnahan, William H.

128

Radiation Protection Research Recommendations for Missions Beyond LEO  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the request of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements prepared NCRP Report 153, Information Needed to Make Radiation Protection Recommendations for Space Missions Beyond Low-Earth Orbit. This lengthy report, over 400 pages in length, published in November 2006, was drafted by NCRP Scientific Committee 1-7, and is a continuation of NCRP

Lawrence W. Townsend

2008-01-01

129

Dosimetry and Protection from Ionizing Radiation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Consideration is given to different methods of ionizing radiation dosimetry and simplified methods for design of shielding for gamma radiation, for neutron radiation and for design of shielding in a nuclear reactor.

B. P. Golubev

1967-01-01

130

Study of Biological Effects and Radiation Protection to Future European Manned Space Flights.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Earth's radiation environment; radiation dose calculation and measurement; foreseen exposure in European manned space missions; biological effects of radiation; and radiation monitoring and protection are discussed.

J. Bourrieau J. Berry J. P. Philippon M. Roux G. Reitz

1988-01-01

131

The importance and unique aspects of radiation protection in medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiation protection in medicine has unique aspects and is an essential element of medical practice. Medical uses of radiation occur throughout the world, from large cities to rural clinics. It has been estimated that the number of medical procedures using radiation grew from about 1.7 billion in 1980 to almost 4 billion in 2007. In spite of these large numbers,

Ola Holmberg; Renate Czarwinski; Fred Mettler

2010-01-01

132

UV radiation effects over microorganisms and study of protective agents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An important subject of astrobiological interest is the study of the effect of ultraviolet radiation on microorganisms and their protection mechanisms against this damaging agent. UV radiation is considered highly mutagenic and sterilizing, especially during the period of origin of life on Earth when the absence of the ozone layer meant there was no effective protection against ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Ferric iron, the product of iron metabolism, as a consequence of its spectral properties, has been suggested to provide protection against radiation making the study of its protective effect on acidophilic microorganisms from the Tinto ecosystem of interest in order to gain information about its possible implications in the development of life during the Archaean as well on planets lacking a protective atmosphere such as Mars. The studies described in this paper constitute preliminary experiments.

Gmez Gmez, Felipe; Grau Carles, Agustn; Vazquez, Luis; Amils, Ricardo

2004-03-01

133

48 CFR 952.223-72 - Radiation protection and nuclear criticality.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radiation protection and nuclear criticality...Provisions and Clauses 952.223-72 Radiation protection and nuclear criticality...section 274 of the Atomic Energy Act): Radiation Protection and Nuclear...

2012-10-01

134

48 CFR 952.223-72 - Radiation protection and nuclear criticality.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radiation protection and nuclear criticality...Provisions and Clauses 952.223-72 Radiation protection and nuclear criticality...section 274 of the Atomic Energy Act): Radiation Protection and Nuclear...

2011-10-01

135

78 FR 19148 - Shielding and Radiation Protection Review Effort and Licensing Conditions for Dry Storage...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...72 [NRC-2013-0051] Shielding and Radiation Protection Review Effort and Licensing...SFST-ISG-26A), Revision 0, ``Shielding and Radiation Protection Review Effort and Licensing...staff when reviewing the shielding and radiation protection portions of applications...

2013-03-29

136

42 CFR 37.43 - Protection against radiation emitted by roentgenographic equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Protection against radiation emitted by roentgenographic equipment...Examinations § 37.43 Protection against radiation emitted by roentgenographic equipment...recommendations of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements in NCRP...

2012-10-01

137

42 CFR 37.43 - Protection against radiation emitted by roentgenographic equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Protection against radiation emitted by roentgenographic equipment...Examinations § 37.43 Protection against radiation emitted by roentgenographic equipment...recommendations of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements in NCRP...

2011-10-01

138

Radiation safety as part of a comprehensive University Occupational Health and Safety Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rutgers University has developed an integrated occupational health and safety program incorporating the disciplines of radiation protection, chemical hygiene, industrial hygiene, occupational safety, hazardous substance disposal, and environmental control. The program was implemented by the Department of Radiation and Environmental Health and Safety which was organized in a nontraditional way to provide an interdisciplinary resource and service to a large

Edward A. Christman; Elan J. Gandsman

1994-01-01

139

River Protection Project (RPP) Environmental Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Program Plan was developed in support of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System Plan (ISMS) (RPP-MP-003), which establishes a single, defined environmental, safety, and health management system that integrates requirements into the work planning and execution processes to protect workers, the public, and the environment. The ISMS also provides mechanisms for increasing worker involvement in work planning, including hazard and environmental impact identification, analysis, and control; work execution; and feedback/improvement processes. The ISMS plan consists of six core functions. Each section of this plan describes the activities of the River Protection Project (RPP) (formerly known as the Tank Waste Remediation System) Environmental organization according to the following core functions: Establish Environmental Policy; Define the Scope of Work; Identify Hazards, Environmental Impacts, and Requirements; Analyze Hazards and Environmental Impacts and Implement Controls; Perform Work within Controls; and Provide Feedback and Continuous Improvement.

POWELL, P.A.

2000-03-29

140

Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

2012-04-03

141

Programs & Resources | Radiation Research Program (RRP)  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Content Search this site Programs & Resources Main Human Resources Needed for Cervical Cancer Screening Specialized Initiatives Information Systems Funded Research NIH Related Resources Last Updated: 08/09/10 Information Systems Image-guided

142

DCTD Radiation Research Program (RRP)  

Cancer.gov

Based in large measure on the CDRP grantees and their mentors, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) now has a robust Cancer Disparities Committee, and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) has incorporated a symposium on health disparities into its annual meeting so that addressing health disparities is a strong focus of radiation oncology.

143

The USDA UVB Radiation Monitoring Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Initiated in 1992 through a grant to Colorado State University, the UVB Radiation Monitoring Program is a project of the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service (CSREES). The program provides information on "the geographical distribution and temporal trends of UVB (ultraviolet-B) radiation in the United States." Given the increasing levels of ultraviolet radiation in the atmosphere, researchers are interested in assessing the potential impacts of UVB on agricultural crops and forests. This interesting Website offers an overview of the monitoring program, including a clickable map of data collection stations throughout the US, recent UV data (UV-B, UVA, etc.), a summary of research programs, instrumentation used in monitoring UV, a primer on UVB radiation (.pdf format), and much more. The bibliography and the Related Links section point users to additional resources.

144

Recommended Radiation Protection Practices for Low-Level Waste Disposal Sites  

SciTech Connect

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in estsblishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) dis- posal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW dis- posal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control , internal exposure control , respiratory protection, survei 1 - lance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of the occupa- tionally exposed individuals. As a result, radiation protection practices were recommended with related rationales in order to reduce occupational exposures as far below specified radiation limits as is reasonably achievable. In addition, recommendations were developed for achieving occupational exposure ALARA under the Regulatory Requirements issued in 10 CFR Part 61.

D. E. Hadlock, C. D. Hooker, W. N. Herrington, R. L. Gilchrist

1983-12-01

145

Engineering hot-cell windows for radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

Radiation protection considerations in the design and construction of hot-cell windows are discussed. The importance of evaluating the potential gamma spectra and neutron source terms is stressed. 11 references. (ACR)

Ferguson, K.R.; Courtney, J.C.

1983-01-01

146

Radiation Protection Criteria for Cases of Probabilistic Disruptive Events.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The individual risk limitation for the case of probabilistic disruptive events is studied, when the radiation effects cease to be only stochastic; the proposed criterion is applied for the case of high level waste repositories. The protection's optimizati...

D. J. Beninson

1985-01-01

147

Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory,...

R. E. Swaja C. S. Sims W. H. Casson

1991-01-01

148

Basis for radiation protection of the nuclear worker  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the standards for protection of persons who work in areas that have a potential for radiation exposure. A review is given of the units of radiation exposure and dose equivalent and of the value of the maximum permissible dose limits for occupational exposure. Federal Regulations and Regulatory Guides for radiation protection are discussed. Average occupational equivalent doses experienced in several operations typical of the United States Nuclear Industry are presented and shown to be significantly lower than the maximum permissible. The concept of maintaining radiation doses to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable is discussed and the practice of imposing engineering and administrative controls to provide effective radiation protection for the nuclear worker is described.

Guevara, F.A.

1982-01-01

149

Radiation protection guidance for activities in low-earth orbit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific Committee 75 (SC 75) of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) was assembled for the purpose of providing guidance to NASA concerning radiation protection in low-Earth orbit. The report of SC 75 was published in December 2000 as NCRP Report No. 132. In this presentation an overview of the findings and recommendations of the committee report will be presented.

Townsend, L. W.; Fry, R. J. M.

150

Radiation ProtectionSorting Out the Arguments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a response to an article by Wade Allison in which he argues that we should accept drastically higher doses of ionizing\\u000a radiation than what we currently do (Philosophy and Technology 24:193195, 2011). He employs four arguments in defence of his position: comparisons with background radiation, the positive experiences of\\u000a radiotherapy, the presence of biological defence mechanisms against radiation,

Sven Ove Hansson

151

Recommendations for occupational radiation protection in interventional cardiology.  

PubMed

The radiation dose received by cardiologists during percutaneous coronary interventions, electrophysiology procedures and other interventional cardiology procedures can vary by more than an order of magnitude for the same type of procedure and for similar patient doses. There is particular concern regarding occupational dose to the lens of the eye. This document provides recommendations for occupational radiation protection for physicians and other staff in the interventional suite. Simple methods for reducing or minimizing occupational radiation dose include: minimizing fluoroscopy time and the number of acquired images; using available patient dose reduction technologies; using good imaging-chain geometry; collimating; avoiding high-scatter areas; using protective shielding; using imaging equipment whose performance is controlled through a quality assurance programme; and wearing personal dosimeters so that you know your dose. Effective use of these methods requires both appropriate education and training in radiation protection for all interventional cardiology personnel, and the availability of appropriate protective tools and equipment. Regular review and investigation of personnel monitoring results, accompanied as appropriate by changes in how procedures are performed and equipment used, will ensure continual improvement in the practice of radiation protection in the interventional suite. These recommendations for occupational radiation protection in interventional cardiology and electrophysiology have been endorsed by the Asian Pacific Society of Interventional Cardiology, the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions, the Latin American Society of Interventional Cardiology, and the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. PMID:23475846

Durn, Ariel; Hian, Sim Kui; Miller, Donald L; Le Heron, John; Padovani, Renato; Vano, Eliseo

2013-03-08

152

DCTD Radiation Research Program (RRP)  

Cancer.gov

Under this initiative, RRP is collaborating with NIAID, the lead institute at NIH for the development of biodefense countermeasures. NIAIDs research portfolio includes many in-depth studies of the immune system, which is especially vulnerable to radiation.

153

Critical analysis of active shielding methods for space radiation protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

From time to time over the past several decades, designs utilizing active methods involving electromagnetic field configurations have been proposed for the purpose of protecting spacecraft crews from harmful space radiations. Designs affording protection from either solar energetic particle event protons or galactic cosmic rays or both have been proposed. Often these analyses are predicated upon simplified or even incorrect

Lawrence W. Townsend

2005-01-01

154

An ALARA radiation control program for a large brachytherapy service  

SciTech Connect

The Mallinckrody Institute of Radiology performs brachytherapy procedures with seven different radioisotopes: Cs-137, IR-192, I-125, Co-60, Sr-90, I-131, and P-32. The variety of procedures used and the number of patients treated (275 in 1983) present a challenge to health physics personnel to maintain occupational exposures as low as reasonably achievable. In this paper the key elements of the Institute's radiation control program are presented: baseline surveys with unshielded sources to develop standard protection measures, suggested working times for nursing personnel, source accountability, instructions to medical personnel, and answers to patient's questions abut radiation controls. Several example forms are included.

Glasgow, G.P. (Edward Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology, Washington Univ., School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (US))

1985-04-01

155

Has radiation protection become a health hazard?  

SciTech Connect

Scientists and engineers have a responsibility to speak out when their findings and recommendations lead to public harm. This can happen in several ways. One is when the media misinterpret or sensationalize a scientific fact misleading the public and creating unwarranted fear. Another is when regulations or public policy decision are purportedly based on scientific data but are, in fact, scientifically invalid. Fear of radiation has been far more detrimental to health than radiation itself. The author knows of no deaths to the public from accidental release of radiation, but the consequences of fear have been deadly.

Rockwell, T. [MPR Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-31

156

Viewpoint on proposed radiation-protection standards  

SciTech Connect

The proposed revision of 10CFR20 is discussed from a personal perspective. A brief historical review of the development of radiation standards is presented, and arguments against the proposed de minimis level elaborated upon. (ACR)

Auxier, J.A.

1982-01-01

157

Reduction of the radiation dose received by interventional cardiologists following training in radiation protection.  

PubMed

The University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis was established in 2003 to cover Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Districts of Northern Greece. The hospital has two interventional cardiology units and the occupational radiation exposure of the cardiologists was the highest of all specialties using ionising radiation. In order to aid in decreasing the radiation dose levels, a seminar was organised for all personnel working in interventional radiology field. After this, an important reduction of the radiation dose of the cardiologists was noted. Training in radiation protection is essential to reduce the radiation doses and consequently the deterministic and stochastic effects of ionising radiation of cardiologists working in interventional radiology. PMID:23185068

Abatzoglou, I; Koukourakis, M; Konstantinides, S

2012-11-25

158

Acceptable respiratory protection program and LASL respirator research  

Microsoft Academic Search

A short history is presented on the LASL Respiratory Protection Training Programs. Then a discussion is given on the major points of an acceptable respiratory protection program utilizing the points required by the Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulation 29 CFR 1910.134. Contributions to respirator research are reviewed. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: program administration; respirator

Skaggs

1979-01-01

159

DCTD Radiation Research Program (RRP)  

Cancer.gov

RRP promotes collaboration between imaging sciences and radiation oncology to develop objective determinations of tumor volumes. To facilitate this collaborative research, the American College of Radiology and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) have developed Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), a standard that allows communication between medical image devices. Published by NEMA, the standard is entirely based on freely available software. NEMA recently released a 16-part update of the DICOM standard.

160

40 CFR 191.15 - Individual protection requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...PROTECTION PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SPENT...RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for...

2011-07-01

161

47 CFR 80.83 - Protection from potentially hazardous RF radiation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Protection from potentially hazardous RF radiation. 80.83 Section 80.83 Telecommunication...Protection from potentially hazardous RF radiation. Any license or renewal application...cause exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation in excess of the RF exposure...

2011-10-01

162

47 CFR 80.83 - Protection from potentially hazardous RF radiation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Protection from potentially hazardous RF radiation. 80.83 Section 80.83 Telecommunication...Protection from potentially hazardous RF radiation. Any license or renewal application...cause exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation in excess of the RF exposure...

2012-10-01

163

Issues in deep space radiation protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exposures in deep space are largely from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) for which there is as yet little biological experience. Mounting evidence indicates that conventional linear energy transfer (LET) defined protection quantities (quality factors) may not be appropriate for GCR ions. The available biological data indicates that aluminum alloy structures may generate inherently unhealthy internal spacecraft environments in

J. Miller; C. Zeitlin; L. Heilbronn; F. A. Cucinotta; G. D. Badhwar; A. K. Noor; M. Y. Kim; F. F. Badavi; J. H. Heinbockel

2001-01-01

164

Dose quantities in radiation protection and their limitations.  

PubMed

For more than 50 years the quantity absorbed dose has been the basic physical quantity in the medical applications of ionising radiation as well as radiological protection against harm from ionising radiation. In radiotherapy relatively high doses are applied (to a part of the human body) within a short period and the absorbed dose is mainly correlated with deterministic effects such as cell killing and tissue damage. In contrast, in radiological protection one is dealing with low doses and low dose rates and long-term stochastic effects in tissue such as cancer induction. The dose quantity (absorbed dose) is considered to be correlated with the probability of cancer incidence and thus risk induced by exposure. ICRP has developed specific dosimetric quantities for radiological protection that allow the extent of exposure to ionising radiation from whole and partial body external radiation as well as from intakes of radionuclides to be taken into account by one quantity. Moreover, radiological protection quantities are designed to provide a correlation with risk of radiation induced cancer. In addition, operational dose quantities have been defined for use in measurements of external radiation exposure and practical applications. The paper describes the concept and considerations underlying the actual system of dose quantities, and discusses the advantage as well as the limitations of applicability of such a system. For example, absorbed dose is a non-stochastic quantity defined at any point in matter. All dose quantities in use are based on an averaging procedure. Stochastic effects and microscopic biological and energy deposition structures are not considered in the definition. Absorbed dose is correlated to the initial very short phase of the radiation interaction with tissue while the radiation induced biological reactions of the tissue may last for minutes or hours or even longer. There are many parameters other than absorbed dose that influence the process of cancer induction, which may influence the consideration of cells and/or tissues at risk which are most important for radiological protection. PMID:15623879

Dietze, G; Menzel, H-G

2004-01-01

165

Radiation protection considerations in space station missions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently studying the degree to which the baseline design of space station Freedom (SSF) would permit its evolution to a transportation node for lunar or Mars expeditions. To accomplish NASA's more ambitious exploration goals, nuclear-powered vehicles could be used in SSF's vicinity. This enhanced radiation environment around SSF could necessitate additional crew

K. L. Peddicord; W. E. Bolch

1991-01-01

166

Radiation Protection for Manned Interplanetary Missions - Radiation Sources, Risks, Remedies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Health risks in interplanetary explorative missions differ in two major features significantly from those during the manned missions experienced so far. For one, presently available technologies lead to durations of such missions significantly longer than so far encountered - with the added complication that emergency returns are ruled out. Thus radiation exposures and hence risks for late radiation sequelae like cancer increase proportional to mission duration - similar like most other health and many technical risks too. Secondly, loss of the geomagnetic shielding available in low earth orbits (LEO) does increase the radiation dose rates from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since significant fractions of the GCR flux below about 10 GeV/n now can reach the space vehicle. In addition, radiation from solar particle events (SPE) which at most in polar orbit segments can contribute to the radiation exposure during LEO missions now can reach the spaceship unattenuated. Radiation doses from extreme SPEs can reach levels where even early acute radiation sickness might ensue - with the added risks from potentially associated crew performance decrements. In contrast to the by and large predictable GCR contribution, the doses and hence risks from large SPEs can only stochastically be assessed. Mission designers face the task to contain the overall health risk within acceptable limits. Towards this end they have to transport the particle fluxes of the radiation fields in free space through the walls of the spaceship and through the tissue of the astronaut to the radiation sensitive organs. To obtain a quantity which is useful for risk assessment, the radiobiological effectiveness as well as the specific sensitivity of a given organ has to be accounted for in such transport calculations which of course require a detailed knowledge of the spatial distribution and the atomic composition of the surrounding shielding material. In doing so the mission designer encounters two major difficulties in addition to those connected with the knowledge of the external radiation fields and the cross sections necessary for the transport calculations. The radiobiological effectiveness of the GCR heavy ions is to a large extent only nominally known with large error margins. Furthermore, the reference risk, late cancer mortality, usually only materializes many years after the mission, in contrast to the risk from early radiation sickness or the other health risks, including those from prolonged exposure to weightlessness. 1 Given these large radiobiological uncertainties of space radiation risk assessment, a first and most effective countermeasure consists of research directed at their diminishment. Furthermore, a new risk criterion is needed which allows a unified quantitative treatment of all health and technical risks arising during the mission as well as the risk of late radiogenic cancer mortality many years after the mission. Countermeasures to reduce radiation exposure comprise judicious planning of the mission with respect to solar activity, skilful utilization and optimization of shielding materials, and research into advanced propulsion systems capable to cut down transit times in free space. Finally, research into means to reduce sensitivity to radiation health effects e.g. by chemical substances and nutritional additives constitutes the third class of possible countermeasures. Arguably, the single most effective among these measures would be reduction of transit time in free space. 2

Facius, R.; Reitz, G.

167

Calculation of Combat Vehicle Protection against a Residual Radiation Threat.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Gamma protection factors (GPF) for two medium tanks have been calculated using the Monte Carlo program, MORSE. Comparisons with appropriate experiments show good agreement. It is concluded that this calculational approach is a viable alternative to experi...

A. E. Rainis R. M. Schwenk R. E. Rexroad J. W. Kinch

1978-01-01

168

Prevent Eye Damage: Protect Yourself from UV Radiation  

MedlinePLUS

... that contains at least 50% post-consumer fiber. EPAs SunWise Program: Educating Youth About Sun Safety The ... and how you can participate, please visit www.epa.gov/sunwise . Protect Your Eyes The greatest amount ...

169

A curriculum model for Nevada Test Site radiation protection technician training  

SciTech Connect

A research project was undertaken to develop a performance-based curriculum model for Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Technicians. The study began with an overview of Radiation Protection Technician training curricula within the Department of Energy (DOE) Government Contractor system and the Training Accreditation Manuals used for program evaluation of DOE system training programs. The research design included data from a two page questionnaire. Further data were provided from other Radiation Protection Technician training programs within the DOE system. The developed model utilized a five-phase/step approach to curriculum design encompassing (1) needs analysis, (2) designing the training process, (3) development of curriculum and support materials, (4) training implementation, (5) training evaluation. The Needs Analysis determined the specific material to be covered in the training program. Designing the Training Process involved choosing, from the core/generic job tasks identified in the Needs analysis, the specific knowledge and skills learning objectives for the program. Development of Curriculum and Support Materials involved choosing the method of instruction, identifying which tasks would be taught on-the-job and designing the qualification standard and lesson plans for the tasks. 24 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Petullo, C.F.

1989-05-01

170

Radiation protection considerations in space station missions  

SciTech Connect

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently studying the degree to which the baseline design of space station Freedom (SSF) would permit its evolution to a transportation node for lunar or Mars expeditions. To accomplish NASA's more ambitious exploration goals, nuclear-powered vehicles could be used in SSF's vicinity. This enhanced radiation environment around SSF could necessitate additional crew shielding to maintain cumulative doses below recommended limits. This paper presents analysis of radiation doses received upon the return and subsequent unloading of Mars vehicles utilizing either nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) or nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion systems. No inherent shielding by the vehicle structure or space station is assumed; consequently, the only operational parameters available to control radiation doses are the source-to-target distance and the reactor shutdown time prior to the exposure period. For the operations planning, estimated doses are shown with respect to recommended dose limits and doses due solely to the natural space environment in low Earth orbit.

Peddicord, K.L.; Bolch, W.E. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

1991-01-01

171

Shielding and Radiation Protection in Ion Beam Therapy Facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation protection is a key aspect of any radiotherapy (RT) department and is made even more complex in ion beam therapy (IBT) by the large facility size, secondary particle spectra and intricate installation of these centers. In IBT, large and complex radiation producing devices are used and made available to the public for treatment. It is thus the responsibility of the facility to put in place measures to protect not only the patient but also the general public, occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed personnel working within the facility, and electronics installed within the department to ensure maximum safety while delivering maximum up-time.

Wroe, Andrew J.; Rightnar, Steven

172

Radiation protection and shielding standards for the 1980s  

SciTech Connect

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) is a standards-writing organization member of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The ANS Standards Committee has a subcommittee denoted ANS-6, Radiation Protection and Shielding, whose charge is to develop standards for radiation protection and shield design, to provide shielding information to other standards-writing groups, and to develop standard reference shielding data and test problems. This paper is a progress report of this subcommittee. Significant progress has been made since the last comprehensive report to the Society.

Trubey, D.K.

1982-01-01

173

Radioprotection from radiation-induced lymphedema without tumor protection.  

PubMed

Lymphedema or tissue swelling from impaired lymph drainage commonly occurs after regional nodal dissection and/or radiation therapy for cancer control. Treatment options for this disabling and life-altering complication involve long-term labor-intensive commitments. Sentinel node biopsy can forestall removal of negative regional nodes, offering some protection against lymphedema, however, most preventive measures are elusive, ineffective, or unproven. Our goal was to determine whether the radioprotectant amifostine could prevent or retard the development of lymphedema in a rodent radiation therapy-dependent model yet not offer tumor protection from the therapeutic effects of radiation therapy. We pre-treated rats after unilateral radical groin dissection with the organic thiophosphate radioprotectant amifostine or placebo prior to single dose post-operative groin radiation therapy and monitored hindlimb volumes, wound scores, and tissue lymphostasis. In addition, we determined whether amifostine protected human MCF7 breast cancer cells exposed to a range of radiation therapy doses in an in vitro clonogenic assay and an in vivo MCF7 tumor xenograft model. Our findings indicate that amifostine markedly reduced the volume of limb lymphedema and dramatically improved wound healing and tissue lymphostasis in the rodent lymphedema model. The in vivo and in vitro studies further demonstrated that amifostine offered no MCF7 tumor protection from radiation therapy. These pre-clinical findings provide proof-of-principle to further delineate specific mechanisms underlying amifostine's beneficial effects, determine optimal amifostine-radiation therapy dosing regimens, and thereby expedite translation into clinical trials to reduce lymphedema incidence and severity in cancer patients at high lymphedema risk in whom radiation therapy is the recommended therapy. PMID:20848992

Daley, S K; Bernas, M J; Stea, B D; Bracamonte, F; McKenna, M; Stejskal, A; Hirleman, E D; Witte, M H

2010-06-01

174

Setting standards for radiation protection: A time for change  

SciTech Connect

In 1950, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommended that ``certain radiation effects are irreversible and cumulative.`` Furthermore, the ICRP ``strongly recommended that every effort be made to reduce exposures to all types of ionizing radiations to the lowest possible level.`` Then in 1954, the ICRP published its assumption that human response to ionizing radiation was linear with dose, together with the recommendation that exposures be kept as low as practicable. These concepts are still the foundation of radiation protection policy today, even though, as Evans has stated, ``The linear non-threshold (LNT) model was adopted specifically on a basis of mathematical simplicity, not from radio-biological data.... Groups responsible for setting standards for radiation protection should be abreast of new developments and new data as they are published; however, this does not seem to be the case. For example, there have been many reports in scientific, peer-reviewed, and other publications during the last three decades that have shown the LNT model and the policy of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) to be invalid. However, none of these reports has been refuted or even discussed by standard-setting groups. We believe this mandates a change in the standard-setting process.

Patterson, H.W.; Hickman, D.P.

1996-01-01

175

Efforts to optimize radiation protection in interventional fluoroscopy.  

PubMed

While it has been known for more than a century that radiation presents risks to both the physician and the patient, skin injuries from fluoroscopy became increasingly rare after the 1930s, and radiation risk from fluoroscopy appeared to be adequately controlled. However, beginning in approximately 1975, new technologies and materials for interventional devices were developed. These enabled new procedures, and as these were instituted, skin injuries again occurred in patients. Four central issues were identified: equipment, quality management, operator training, and occupational radiation protection. Recognition that these were areas for improvement provoked changes in technology and practice that continue today. PMID:24077043

Miller, Donald L

2013-11-01

176

Mechanistic bases for modelling space radiation risk and planning radiation protection of astronauts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The approaches generally adopted for planning radiation protection in ground-based facilities cannot be applied straightforward for astronaut protection in space. Indeed in such extreme conditions, modelling methods and shielding design must be based on a detailed mechanistic knowledge of the peculiar astronauts irradiation conditions. Great help can derive from mechanistic modelling, generally aimed to better understand the intermediate steps

A. ottolenghi; F. Ballarini; M. Biaggi

177

Nuclear Technology Series. Course 2: Radiation Protection I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control

Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

178

Nuclear Technology Series. Course 17: Radiation Protection II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control

Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

179

Radiation exposure and radiation protection of the physician in iodine-131 Lipiodol therapy of liver tumours  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intra-arterial iodine-131 labelled Lipiodol therapy for liver cancer has been investigated for safety and efficacy over a number of years, but data on radiation exposure of personnel have remained unavailable to date. The aim of this study was to assess the radiation exposure of the physician during intra-arterial 131I-Lipiodol therapy for liver malignancies and to develop appropriate radiation protection measures

Jrn H. Risse; Carsten Ponath; Holger Palmedo; Christian Menzel; Frank Grnwald; Hans-J. Biersack

2001-01-01

180

EPA Radiation Protection for Students and Teachers (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) site explains the basic concepts of radiation and radiation protection. Background information includes the history of radiation protection and brief biographies of radiation researchers. There is also basic technical information, such as the types of radiation, radiation warning symbols, basic terms, and a dose calculator. Students can test what they have learned with puzzles and a quiz.

181

G4Beamline Program for Radiation Simulations  

SciTech Connect

G4beamline, a program that is an interface to the Geant4 toolkit that we have developed to simulate accelerator beamlines, is being extended with a graphical user interface to quickly and efficiently model experimental equipment and its shielding in experimental halls. The program is flexible, user friendly, and requires no programming by users, so that even complex systems can be simulated quickly. This improved user interface is of much wider application than just the shielding simulations that are the focus of this project. As an initial application, G4beamline is being extended to provide the simulations that are needed to determine the radiation sources for the proposed experiments at Jefferson Laboratory so that shielding issues can be evaluated. Since the program already has the capabilities needed to simulate the transport of all known particles, including scattering, attenuation, interactions, and decays, the extension involves implementing a user-friendly graphical user inter

Beard, Kevin; J. Roberts, Thomas; Degtiarenko, Pavel

2008-07-01

182

Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection.

Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

1987-01-01

183

Fact Sheet National Infrastructure Protection Program Sector ...  

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)

Text Version... Please contact the DHS NIPP program office via the web at www ... The program office will facilitate your involvement by contacting your respective ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/food/fooddefense

184

Hanford Site Groundwater Protection Management Program: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater protection is a national priority that is promulgated in a variety of environmental regulations at local, state, and federal levels. To effectively coordinate and ensure compliance with applicable regulations, the US Department of Energy has issued DOE Order 5400.1 (now under revision) that requires all US Department of Energy facilities to prepare separate groundwater protection program descriptions and plans. This document describes the Groundwater Protection Management Program for the Hanford Site located in the state of Washington. DOE Order 5400.1 specifies that the Groundwater Protection Management Program cover the following general topical areas: (1) documentation of the groundwater regime, (2) design and implementation of a groundwater monitoring program to support resource management and comply with applicable laws and regulations, (3) a management program for groundwater protection and remediation, (4) a summary and identification of areas that may be contaminated with hazardous waste, (5) strategies for controlling these sources, (6) a remedial action program, and (7) decontamination and decommissioning and related remedial action requirements. Many of the above elements are covered by existing programs at the Hanford Site; thus, one of the primary purposes of this document is to provide a framework for coordination of existing groundwater protection activities. Additionally, it describes how information needs are identified and can be incorporated into existing or proposed new programs. The Groundwater Protection Management Program provides the general scope, philosophy, and strategies for groundwater protection/management at the Hanford Site. Subtier documents provide the detailed plans for implementing groundwater-related activities and programs. Related schedule and budget information are provided in the 5-year plan for environmental restoration and waste management at the Hanford Site.

NONE

1993-11-01

185

14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317...CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection....

2010-01-01

186

14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317...CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection....

2010-01-01

187

14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Space 1 2009-01-01 2009-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317...CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection....

2009-01-01

188

14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Space 1 2009-01-01 2009-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317...CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection....

2009-01-01

189

Emergency Watershed Protection Program. Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP) Program helps remove threats to life and property that remain in the nation's watersheds in the aftermath of natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, and wildfires. This Programmatic Environmental I...

2004-01-01

190

Meeting the requirements of the wellhead protection program. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this technical guide (TG) is to provide U.S. Army installations with basic guidance on the steps required to address the Wellhead Protection (WHP) Program established in the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Amendments of 1986.

Spellman, S.

1996-02-14

191

EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) WASTE MINIMIZATION RESEARCH PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

Waste minimization is viewed by the Environmental Protection Agency as a desirable and viable alternative to hazardous waste disposal. The Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory, in conjunction with the Office of Solid Waste, is developing a Waste Minimization Program fo...

192

Medicinal protection with Chinese herb-compound against radiation damage  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were carried out on mice and the subjects irradiated for cancer therapy to evaluate the protective efficacy of a Chinese medicinal herb-compound (CMHC). The lethality and the degree of leucopenia caused by radiation in mice medicated with CMHC were significantly less in comparison with control mice (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). CMHC significantly improved the WBC and the thrombocytes in irradiated workers (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). The WBC count of 40 patients under radiotherapy while treated with CMHC recovered from 3450 +/- 77/c.mm to 5425 +/- 264/c.mm (p less than 0.001); whereas, in the control group, without any medication, the WBC count dropped significantly (p less than 0.001). Our results revealed the applicabilities of CMHC in protection against radiation damage in spaceflight and in other fields.

Zhang, R.J.; Qian, J.K.; Yang, G.H.; Wang, B.Z.; Wen, X.L. (Institute of Space Medico-Engineering, Beijing (China))

1990-08-01

193

78 FR 20103 - Radiation Protection Guidance for Diagnostic and Interventional X-Ray Procedures  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-1064; FRL-9797-6] Radiation Protection Guidance for Diagnostic and...soliciting public comments for 60 days, on Radiation Protection Guidance for Diagnostic and...Federal Guidance Report No. 9, ``Radiation Protection Guidance for Diagnostic...

2013-04-03

194

Resource Guide to Occupant Protection Programs and Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article lists public and private sector associations and organizations concerned with occupant protection. Many of these organizations will provide catalogues and other public information materials on occupant protection. Some have operational programs designed to influence their members in the health professions or the general public. All of the organizations have printed material available. Some provide additional resources on occupant

Kathryn Hollenbach; David A. Sleet

1984-01-01

195

Vitamin C acts as radiation-protecting agent  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well known that vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) is a very efficient, water soluble antioxidant. Its multifunctional biological and biochemical activities are rather well established in the last few decades (e.g. Sies and Stahl, 1995; Meydani et al., 1995; NRC, 1989. In the present letter we are reporting briefly the pronounced radiation-protecting properties of ascorbate (AH-) observed on bacteria (E. coli AB1157) as well as on cultured cells (SCC VII, eukaryotic cells).

Platzer, Isabel; Getoff, Nikola

1998-01-01

196

Mode of Action of Agents giving Protection from Radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A CONSIDERABLE number of compounds is now known to be capable of protecting animals against X-rays and other radiations. Among the most effective of these are sodium cyanide and sodium azide1, and thiourea2; alcohols3 and amines4 are active at higher concentrations. X-rays degrade polymethacrylic acid in aerated aqueous solutions, and the extent of the reaction could readily be followed by

P. Alexander; M. Fox

1952-01-01

197

A land exchange program to protect biodiversity  

SciTech Connect

Wilderness area boundries have often been set by absence of commercial reserves such as timber, ores, oil, and gas. However, to help further the goal of conserving biological diversity, wilderness areas should be explicity managed to maintain thier species richness over time. The author presents a land exchange approach in which each addition to the public domain for wilderness and biodiversity-conservation purposes could be matched by the simultaneous deletion of land of comparable market value with species already well protected. Discussed are how the four US federal land management agencies can implement the proposal, the benefits of protecting the ecological health of the National Wilderness Preservation System, the lack of guidance from leaders, the pressures facing the wilderness, and how partnerships can be built to protect biodiversity and primative recreational opportunities while reinvigorating the wilderness-conservation movement.

Cutler, M.R. (Explore Park, Roanoke, VA (United States))

1993-02-01

198

Y-12 Site environmental protection program implementation plan (EPPIP)  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 Plant Environmental Protection Program is conducted to: (1) protect public health and the environment from chemical and radiological releases occurring from current plant operations and past waste management and operational practices; (2) ensure compliance with federal, state, and local environmental regulations and DOE directives; (3) identify potential environmental problems; (4) evaluate existing environmental contamination and determine the need for remedial actions and mitigative measures; (5) monitor the progress of ongoing remedial actions and cleanup measures; and (6) inform the public of environmental issues relating to DOE operations. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, defines the general requirements for environmental protection programs at DOE facilities. This Environmental Protection Program Implementation Plan (EPPIP) defines the methods by which the Y-12 Plant staff will comply with the order by: (1) referencing environmental protection goals and objectives and identifying strategies and timetables for attaining them; (2) providing the overall framework for the design and implementation of the Y-12 Environmental Protection Program; and (3) assigning responsibilities for complying with the requirements of the order. The EPPIP is revised and updated annually.

NONE

1996-11-01

199

Medical radiation exposure and accidents. Dosimetry and radiation protection. Do we only benefit the patient?  

PubMed

This article presents and discusses new information on the old Hippocratic moto of "...not to harm but to benefit the patient". Some radiation accidents are due to medical errors. Millions of medical tests exposing radiation are performed every day worldwide increasing and sometimes exceeding the annual permissible dose administered to the general population. Public authorities are now seriously concerned about medical radiation overused. In U.S.A. both the House of Representatives and the Food and Drug Administration have recently delt with this problem. Others and we have suggested before and the International Atomic Energy Agency now proposes: a "Smart Card" for every individual who receives medical radiation. In this card the amount of medical radiation administered will be recorded. It is time to issue rules for protection of the public from medical radiation overdose. PMID:20808982

Grammaticos, Philip; Lyra, Maria

200

The IAEA's activities on radiation protection in interventional cardiology  

PubMed Central

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its mandate of developing and applying standards of radiation safety has initiated a number of activities in recent years on radiation protection in interventional cardiology. These activities are implemented through four mechanisms, namely training, providing information through the website, research projects and assistance to Member States through Technical Cooperation (TC) projects. Major international initiatives have been taken in the area of training where more than half a dozen regional training courses have been conducted for cardiologists from over 50 countries. Additionally four national training events for over 300 medical and paramedical staff members involved in interventional procedures were held. The training material is freely available on CD from the IAEA. The newly established website provides information on radiation protection issues [1]. Two coordinated research projects have just been completed where peak skin doses to patients undergoing high dose interventional procedures were studied and factors to manage patient doses were identified. The technical cooperation projects involving protection in cardiac interventional procedures have 30 countries as participants.

Rehani, MM

2007-01-01

201

EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) RESEARCH PROGRAM GUIDE  

EPA Science Inventory

Annual extramural research program guide for the Office of Research and Development. This report provides information on work being done in each part of ORD, research which EPA is planning for FY 1984, and how much the authors intend to spend on each program area. Some of the are...

202

Protective effect of corticosteroids on radiation pneumonitis in mice  

SciTech Connect

We explored the protective effect of corticosteroids on the mortality of mice that received thoracic irradiation. Methylprednisolone, 100 mg/kg/week, given from 11 weeks after gamma irradiation of the thorax resulted in an increase in the LD50 (11-26 weeks) from 14.3 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SE) Gy to 17.6 +/- 0.4 Gy, P less than 0.001, a protection factor of 1.2. Withdrawal of steroids at various times during the period of radiation pneumonitis resulted in accelerated mortality in the next 2-4 weeks, so that the cumulative mortality caught up with that of control animals by 4 weeks after steroid withdrawal. However, after the end of the usual period of pneumonitis withdrawal of steroids did not result in accelerated mortality, suggesting that the time when steroids are protective corresponds to the duration of pneumonitis. A smaller dose of steroids, 25 mg/kg/week, was found to be as protective as the larger dose used in the above experiments. The possibility that corticosteroids reduce mortality, even when given many weeks after radiation, may have important practical and theoretical implications.

Gross, N.J.; Narine, K.R.; Wade, R.

1988-01-01

203

US NRC discussion of options to revise radiation protection recommendations.  

PubMed

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is continuing the process of engaging stakeholders on issues associated with possible changes to the radiation protection regulations contained in 10 CFR Part 20, and other parts of the NRC regulations, to increase alignment with international recommendations. The Commission is particularly seeking to explore implications, as appropriate and where scientifically justified, of greater alignment with the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission for Radiological Protection. Other information from national and international sources is also being considered. Given that the NRC regulations provide adequate protection, the discussion has been focusing on discerning the benefits and burdens associated with revising the radiation protection regulatory framework. NRC, through three Federal Register Notices, has officially solicited comments on a series of key issues, and has conducted a series of facilitated workshops to encourage feedback from a wide range of stakeholders. The issues include the use of updated scientific methodologies and terminology, the occupational dose limits, and the use of the concepts of constraints in optimisation. NRC staff provided a policy paper with recommendations to the Commission on April 25, 2012 (NRC, 2012). PMID:23089031

Cool, D A

2012-08-22

204

Radiation protection training for diverse general employee populations  

SciTech Connect

Radiation protection training for the general employee at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has undergone a great deal of restructuring in the last two years. The number of personnel totally dedicated to nuclear facilities is less than a fifth of our employees and the percentage of contracted employees who are dedicated radiation workers is much smaller. However, the aging of our facilities and increasing emphasis on environmental control means that everyone needs to understand the basics of radiation protection. In accordance with changing DOE guidelines and internal ORNL policies, greater emphasis has been placed on keeping training focused on current issues, training the total workforce, and requiring some type of testing or feedback mechanism. This report describes efforts to instill respect, but not fear, of radiation in the work environment. Flexible tools are being developed to meet this objective for several diverse general employee populations. Continuing efforts include consideration of computer-based training for retraining, developing additional modules for specialized groups and jobs, and testing/documentation appropriate to each population segment. 6 refs.

Copenhaver, E.D.; Houser, B.S.

1986-01-01

205

A High-Throughput Screen for Alpha Particle Radiation Protectants  

PubMed Central

Abstract Alpha-particle-emitting elements are of increasing importance as environmental and occupational carcinogens, toxic components of radiation dispersal devices and accidents, and potent therapeutics in oncology. Alpha particle radiation differs from radiations of lower linear energy transfer in that it predominantly damages DNA via direct action. Because of this, radical scavengers effective for other radiations have had only limited effect in mitigating alpha particle toxicity. We describe here a simple assay and a pilot screen of 3,119 compounds in a high-throughput screen (HTS), using the alpha-particle-emitting isotope, 225Ac, for the discovery of compounds that might protect mammalian cells from alpha particles through novel mechanisms. The assay, which monitored the viability of a myeloid leukemic cell line upon alpha particle exposure, was robust and reproducible, yielding a Z' factor of 0.66 and a signal-to-noise ratio of nearly 10 to 1. Surprisingly, 1 compound emerged from this screen, epoxy-4,5-?-dihydroxysantonin (EDHS), that showed considerable protective activity. While the value of EDHS remains to be determined, its discovery is a proof of concept and validation of the utility of this HTS methodology. Further application of the described assay could yield compounds useful in minimizing the toxicity and carcinogenesis associated with alpha particle exposure.

Seideman, Jonathan H.; Shum, David; Djaballah, Hakim

2010-01-01

206

OSHA's Voluntary Protection Programs: Improved Oversight and Controls Would Better Ensure Program Quality.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is responsible for ensuring workplace safety. OSHA has established a number of programs, including the Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP), that take a cooperative approach to ...

2009-01-01

207

75 FR 41213 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Infrastructure Protection Data Call Survey; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...are no further updates. This correction notice is issued as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Thomas Chase Garwood, III, Chief Information Officer, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland Security. [FR...

2010-07-15

208

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

Ackerman, T

2004-10-31

209

Development of Environmental Education Programs for Protected Areas in Madagascar  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental education programs for schools in the peripheral zone of protected areas in Madagascar are still needed in numerous locations. My research investigated the status of environmental education and communication (EE&C) programs at Masoala National Park, Madagascar, as well as the attitudes of local residents toward the park and park staff. The multi-year qualitative research methods included individual and focus

Alison Ormsby

2008-01-01

210

Development of Environmental Education Programs for Protected Areas in Madagascar  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Environmental education programs for schools in the peripheral zone of protected areas in Madagascar are still needed in numerous locations. My research investigated the status of environmental education and communication (EE&C) programs at Masoala National Park, Madagascar, as well as the attitudes of local residents toward the park and park

Ormsby, Alison

2007-01-01

211

[Estimation of X-radiation protective coats in abdominal angiography].  

PubMed

Medical personnel involved in abdominal angiography are exposed not only to direct radiation but also scattered radiation from inspection tables, patients, image intensifiers, and the beam-limiting system (collimator), among others. Japanese standard JISZ4831 prescribes protective coats of at least 0.25 mm lead equivalent, which is the uniform thickness of lead equivalent. The most commonly used protective coats are 0.25 mm Pb, 0.35 mm Pb, or 0.5 mm Pb in thickness. The weight of a typical protective coat is about 3 kg. While some coats weigh up to 6 kg, wearing such heavy coats becomes physically burdensome as inspection time increases. The trade-off between physical burden and protection was considered by analyzing the X-ray intensity distribution and attenuation rate of scattered radiation in each position assumed by the medical staff. In the case of inspections performed at an x-ray tube voltage of 80 kV, it may be possible to reduce the weight of the lead rubber apron by about 33%. Namely, the lead thickness can be reduced uniformly by 0.20 mm Pb at 70 cm and 0.05 mm Pb at 100 cm, when the shielding capability of a 0.25 mm thick Pb layer is accepted as the standard at 40 cm above the gonad position. The same range of permeated X-ray dose for the gonad position may be reduced as well. In the case of 110 kV, when the lead thicknesses are 0.30 mm Pb at 40 cm and 70 cm, and 0.10 mm Pb at 100 cm, it is possible to reduce the weight of the lead rubber apron by about 28%. PMID:16049412

Koshida, Kichiro; Sota, Takumi; Noto, Kimiya; Fukuda, Atsushi; Matsubara, Kosuke; Nakagawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Chikako

2005-07-20

212

Envitonmental monitoring and radiation protection in kocjan Caves, Slovenia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

kocjan Caves were listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1986, due to their exceptional significance for cultural and natural heritage. Park kocjan Caves is located in South Eastern part of Slovenia. It was established with aim of conserving and protecting exceptional geomorphological, geological and hydrological outstanding features, rare and endangered plant and animal species, paleontological and archaeological sites, ethnological and architectural characteristics and cultural landscape and for the purpose of ensuring opportunities for suitable development, by the National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia in 1996. Park kocjan Caves established monitoring that includes caves microclimate parameters: humidity, CO2, wind flow and radon concentration and daughter products. The approach in managing the working place with natural background radiation is complex. Monitoring of Radon has been functioning for more than ten years now. Presentation will show the dynamic observed in the different parts of the caves, related to radon daughter products and other microclimatic data. Relation of background radiation to carrying capacity will be explained. Implementing the Slovene legislation in the field of radiation protection, we are obligated to perform special measurements in the caves and also having our guides and workers in the caves regularly examined according to established procedure. The medical exams are performed at Institution of Occupational Safety, Ljubljana in order to monitor the influence of Radon to the workers in the cave. The equivalent dose for each employed person is also established on regular basis and it is part of medical survey of workers in the caves. A system of education of the staff working in the caves in the field of radiation protection will be presented as well.

Debevec Gerjevi, V.; Jovanovi?, P.

2012-04-01

213

[Risk management from the perspective of the radiation protection officer. Consequences of new radiation protection laws in hospitals].  

PubMed

The implications of the new radiation protection law for hospitals. The novel German radiation control regulation ("Roentgenverordnung") came into effect on July 1, 2002. It contains a number of new rules the majority of which clearly take a more restrictive approach towards the application of ionising radiation. New dose thresholds have been set for control and monitoring areas and written working instructions are now required for all areas of radiology departments. The new regulations also require the indication for a radiological examination to be checked by a radiologist who has completed a formalised training in radiation protection. This particular aspect will have serious implications for every day practice. The necessity of having a trained radiologist on site for 24 hours a day will cause problems in many hospitals. The power of the responsible external independent control body ("rztliche Stelle") has been increased as have the duties of medical physicists. The performance of x-ray examinations that are not medically indicated is punishable by law as bodily harm. This as well as many other regulations are currently being checked for applicability in terms of guidelines, the majority of which are not yet available. PMID:14710658

Wolf, Karl-Jrgen; Gergeleit, Martin

2003-11-01

214

Former Radiation Worker Medial Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats for Department of Energy Programs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the forme...

2004-01-01

215

Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued radiation protection standards for the potential spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste disposal system in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These standards are found in Part 197 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR Part 197). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 directed, and gave the authority to, EPA to take this action based upon input from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The final standards were published in the Federal Register (66 FR 32073) on 13 June 2001. The 40 CFR Part 197 standards have four major parts: (1) individual-protection during storage activities; (2) individual-protection following closure of the repository; (3) human-intrusion; and (4) ground-water protection. The storage standard is 150 microsieverts (Sv) annual committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) to any member of the general public. The disposal standards are: (1) 150 Sv annual CEDE for the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) for 10,000 years after disposal; (2) 150 Sv received by the RMEI within 10,000 years after disposal as a result of human intrusion; and (3) the levels of radionuclides in the ground water cannot exceed 40 Sv from beta and gamma emitters, 5 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) of radium-226 and -228, and 15 pCi/L of gross alpha activity. There are also requirements related to the post-10,000-year period, the basis of compliance judgments, and performance assessments. The Agency has published its responses to the comments received, its technical background document, and its economic impact analysis. In addition to printed form, the documents are available on the World Wide Web at http://www.epa.gov/radiation/yucca/index.html.

Clark, R. L.

2002-02-27

216

Radiation Protection Studies for LCLS Tune Up Dump  

SciTech Connect

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is a pioneer fourth generation hard x-ray free electron laser that shall start to deliver laser pulses in 2009. Among other components of LCLS that present radiation protection concerns, the tune up dump (tdund) is of special interest because it also constitutes an issue for machine protection, as it is placed close to radiation sensitive components, like electronic devices and permanent magnets in the undulators. This paper first introduces the stopper of tdund looking at the heat load, and then it describes the shielding around the dump necessary to maintain the prompt and residual dose within design values. Next, preliminary comparisons of the magnetization loss in a dedicated on-site magnet irradiation experiment with FLUKA simulations serve to characterize the magnetic response to radiation of magnets like those of LCLS. The previous knowledge, together with the limit for the allowed demagnetization, are used to estimate the lifetime of the undulator. Further simulations provide guidelines on which lifetime can be expected for an electronic device placed at a given distance of tdund.

Santana-Leitner, M.; Fass, A.; Mao, S.; Nuhn, H.D.; /SLAC; Roesler, S.; /CERN; Rokni, S.; Vollaire, J.; /SLAC

2010-04-29

217

A biokinetic model for zinc for use in radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

The physiology of the essential trace element zinc has been studied extensively in human subjects using kinetic analysis of time-dependent measurements of administered zinc tracers. A number of biokinetic models describing zinc exchange between plasma and tissues and loss of systemic zinc in excreta have been developed from the derived data. More rudimentary biokinetic models for zinc have been developed to estimate radiation doses from internally deposited radioisotopes of zinc. The latter models are designed to provide broadly accurate estimates of cumulative decays of zinc radioisotopes in tissues and are not intended as realistic descriptions of the directions of movement of zinc in the body. This paper reviews biokinetic data for zinc and proposes a physiologically meaningful biokinetic model for systemic zinc for use in radiation protection. The proposed model bears some resemblance to zinc models developed in physiological studies but depicts a finer division of systemic zinc and is based on a broader spectrum of data than previous models. The proposed model and current radiation protection model for zinc yield broadly similar estimates of effective dose from internally deposited radioisotopes of zinc but substantially different dose estimates for several individual tissues, particularly the liver.

Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL

2012-01-01

218

BRIEF HISTORY OF THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE ON RADIATION PROTECTION AND MEASUREMENTS (NCRP) COVERING THE PERIOD 1929-1946  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Committee on Radiation Protection and Measurements was ; established in the United States in 1929, since which time it has provided the ; basic standards and guidance in the field. through the co-operation of many ; organizations this has proven to be an effective program. At the same time ; through interlocking membership between the HCRP and the

L. S. Taylor

1958-01-01

219

Improved Protection Against Solar-Simulated Radiation-Induced Immunosuppression by a Sunscreen with Enhanced Ultraviolet A Protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression is thought to play a part in skin cancer. Several studies have indicated that sunscreens that are designed to protect against erythema failed to give comparable protection against ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression. One possible reason for this discrepancy is inadequate ultraviolet A protection. This study evaluated the level of immunoprotection in mice afforded by two broad-spectrum sunscreens with

Amy Fourtanier; Audrey Gueniche; Delphine Compan; Susan L. Walker; Antony R. Young

2000-01-01

220

Potential of herbs in skin protection from ultraviolet radiation  

PubMed Central

Herbs have been used in medicines and cosmetics from centuries. Their potential to treat different skin diseases, to adorn and improve the skin appearance is well-known. As ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause sunburns, wrinkles, lower immunity against infections, premature aging, and cancer, there is permanent need for protection from UV radiation and prevention from their side effects. Herbs and herbal preparations have a high potential due to their antioxidant activity, primarily. Antioxidants such as vitamins (vitamin C, vitamin E), flavonoids, and phenolic acids play the main role in fighting against free radical species that are the main cause of numerous negative skin changes. Although isolated plant compounds have a high potential in protection of the skin, whole herbs extracts showed better potential due to their complex composition. Many studies showed that green and black tea (polyphenols) ameliorate adverse skin reactions following UV exposure. The gel from aloe is believed to stimulate skin and assist in new cell growth. Spectrophotometer testing indicates that as a concentrated extract of Krameria triandra it absorbs 25 to 30% of the amount of UV radiation typically absorbed by octyl methoxycinnamate. Sesame oil resists 30% of UV rays, while coconut, peanut, olive, and cottonseed oils block out about 20%. A sclerojuglonic compound which is forming from naphthoquinone and keratin is the reaction product that provides UV protection. Traditional use of plant in medication or beautification is the basis for researches and making new trends in cosmetics. This review covers all essential aspects of potential of herbs as radioprotective agents and its future prospects.

Korac, Radava R.; Khambholja, Kapil M.

2011-01-01

221

Potential of herbs in skin protection from ultraviolet radiation.  

PubMed

Herbs have been used in medicines and cosmetics from centuries. Their potential to treat different skin diseases, to adorn and improve the skin appearance is well-known. As ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause sunburns, wrinkles, lower immunity against infections, premature aging, and cancer, there is permanent need for protection from UV radiation and prevention from their side effects. Herbs and herbal preparations have a high potential due to their antioxidant activity, primarily. Antioxidants such as vitamins (vitamin C, vitamin E), flavonoids, and phenolic acids play the main role in fighting against free radical species that are the main cause of numerous negative skin changes. Although isolated plant compounds have a high potential in protection of the skin, whole herbs extracts showed better potential due to their complex composition. Many studies showed that green and black tea (polyphenols) ameliorate adverse skin reactions following UV exposure. The gel from aloe is believed to stimulate skin and assist in new cell growth. Spectrophotometer testing indicates that as a concentrated extract of Krameria triandra it absorbs 25 to 30% of the amount of UV radiation typically absorbed by octyl methoxycinnamate. Sesame oil resists 30% of UV rays, while coconut, peanut, olive, and cottonseed oils block out about 20%. A "sclerojuglonic" compound which is forming from naphthoquinone and keratin is the reaction product that provides UV protection. Traditional use of plant in medication or beautification is the basis for researches and making new trends in cosmetics. This review covers all essential aspects of potential of herbs as radioprotective agents and its future prospects. PMID:22279374

Kora?, Radava R; Khambholja, Kapil M

2011-07-01

222

Chromatin Compaction Protects Genomic DNA from Radiation Damage  

PubMed Central

Genomic DNA is organized three-dimensionally in the nucleus, and is thought to form compact chromatin domains. Although chromatin compaction is known to be essential for mitosis, whether it confers other advantages, particularly in interphase cells, remains unknown. Here, we report that chromatin compaction protects genomic DNA from radiation damage. Using a newly developed solid-phase system, we found that the frequency of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in compact chromatin after ionizing irradiation was 550-fold lower than in decondensed chromatin. Since radical scavengers inhibited DSB induction in decondensed chromatin, condensed chromatin had a lower level of reactive radical generation after ionizing irradiation. We also found that chromatin compaction protects DNA from attack by chemical agents. Our findings suggest that genomic DNA compaction plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity.

Takata, Hideaki; Hanafusa, Tomo; Mori, Toshiaki; Shimura, Mari; Iida, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

2013-01-01

223

Chromatin compaction protects genomic DNA from radiation damage.  

PubMed

Genomic DNA is organized three-dimensionally in the nucleus, and is thought to form compact chromatin domains. Although chromatin compaction is known to be essential for mitosis, whether it confers other advantages, particularly in interphase cells, remains unknown. Here, we report that chromatin compaction protects genomic DNA from radiation damage. Using a newly developed solid-phase system, we found that the frequency of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in compact chromatin after ionizing irradiation was 5-50-fold lower than in decondensed chromatin. Since radical scavengers inhibited DSB induction in decondensed chromatin, condensed chromatin had a lower level of reactive radical generation after ionizing irradiation. We also found that chromatin compaction protects DNA from attack by chemical agents. Our findings suggest that genomic DNA compaction plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. PMID:24130727

Takata, Hideaki; Hanafusa, Tomo; Mori, Toshiaki; Shimura, Mari; Iida, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

2013-10-09

224

FY-2007 PNNL Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the FY-2007 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

Wright, Patrick A.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Isern, Nancy G.; Madson, Vernon J.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Pugh, Ray; Schneirla, Keri A.; Shockey, Loretta L.; Tinker, Mike R.

2008-08-15

225

PNNL FY2005 DOE Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the FY 2005 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

Wright, Patrick A.; Madson, Vernon J.; Isern, Nancy G.; Haney, Janice M.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Gulley, Susan E.; Reck, John J.; Collins, Drue A.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, Landon A.; Wynn, Clifford L.

2005-01-31

226

New concept of IEC standards for radiation protection dosemeters.  

PubMed

The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) develops new standards for radiation protection dosemeters which follow a new concept. They are much more flexible in detail, but still ensure the same measurement quality. They are, for example, no longer specific for the detector type, but rather specific for the measurement task, e.g. for individual monitoring with active direct-reading instruments. Another example is that they are flexible with respect to the ranges of influence quantities. The conceptual changes are described in this paper, together with the advantages this new concept provides for manufacturers, users and legislators. PMID:18420572

Ambrosi, P; Behrens, R

2008-04-16

227

The relevance of occupational epidemiology to radiation protection standards.  

PubMed

Large-scale epidemiological studies of U.S. Department of Energy workers have been underway since the 1960s. Despite the increasing availability of information about long-term follow-up of badge-monitored nuclear workers, standard-setting bodies continue to rely on the Life Span Study (LSS) of A-bomb survivors as the primary epidemiological basis for making judgments about hazards of low-level radiation. Additionally, faith in the internal and external validity of studies of A-bomb survivors has influenced decisions about the design, analysis, and interpretation of many worker studies. A systematic comparison of the LSS and worker studies in terms of population characteristics, types of radiation exposures, selection factors, and dosimetry errors suggests that the priority given to dose response findings from the LSS is no longer warranted. Evidence from worker studies suggests that excess radiation-related cancer deaths occur at doses below the current occupational limits; low-dose effects have also been seen in studies of childhood cancers in relation to fetal irradiation. These findings should be considered in revising current radiation protection standards. PMID:17208790

Wing, S; Richardson, D; Stewart, A

1999-01-01

228

APPLICATIONS OF THE PHOTONUCLEAR FRAGMENTATION MODEL TO RADIATION PROTECTION PROBLEMS  

SciTech Connect

In order to provide radiation protection systems for high energy electron accelerators it is necessary to define the yields of hadrons produced when the electron beam interacts with a fixed target. In practical terms this will occur when any beam or fraction of the beam is lost from the accelerator orbit or when any fraction of the beam is intercepted by a target inserted in the path of the beam or when the beam is totally absorbed by a beam dump. The electron and gamma yields from these interactions are well characterized and amenable to calculation utilizing Monte Carlo shower codes. However, the yield of hadrons has been less well defined. Neutron production has received most attention because of its importance to radiation shielding. Production mechanisms such as the giant dipole and the quasi-deuteron resonances have provided valuable information for total neutron yields for electron beams at energies less than about 400 MeV. For electron beams at energies extending to 10 GeV it is necessary to include the higher energy resonance structures and the various intranuclear production channels that are available for the production of higher energy neutrons. The production model described in this paper permits the calculation of laboratory angle and energy of all hadrons produced when an electron beam of energy between 100 MeV and 10 GeV interacts with a fixed target. This model can be used as an event generator for Monte Carlo codes used for many radiation protection purposes including calculation of radiation shielding.

Pavel Degtiarenko

1996-01-01

229

Threat of ultraviolet radiation to the eye--how to protect against it  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effects of exposure of the eye to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and to provide information from which protective criteria and standards may be established. To accomplish this purpose, the article discusses ultraviolet radiation, absorption of UV radiation by the eye, the effects of ocular exposure to ultraviolet radiation, and how to protect the eye against exposure to UV radiation.

Pitts, D.G.

1981-12-01

230

78 FR 65045 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium Stabilization...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...al. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium...0938-AR74 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium...of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education...

2013-10-30

231

78 FR 54069 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP, and Eligibility...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...al. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP...0938-AR82 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP...of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education...

2013-08-30

232

78 FR 37031 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP, Premium...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...al. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP...0938-AR82 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, SHOP...of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as amended by the Health Care and...

2013-06-19

233

Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer and radiation protection standards  

SciTech Connect

At low doses, the primary biological effects of concern are stochastic in nature, i.e., they are more probable at higher doses, but their severity is independent of the dose. In the last decade, a new epidemiological information on radiation-induced cancer in humans has become available. In the Japanese survivors three new cycles of data (11 yr of experience) have accumulated, and a revised dosimetry system (DS86) has been introduced. UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) reevaluated the risk of cancer from all human sources, which include other human populations such as those treated for ankylosing spondylitis and for cancer of the cervix. UNSCEAR has also evaluated the cancer risk for each of nine organs. For radiation protection purposes (low doses and dose rates, adult populations mainly), nominal values of risk since the 1977-80 period have been {approximately}1%/Sv. This value will need to be increased in the light of the new estimates. Also, risk estimates for various tissues must be reconsidered, and weighting factors used by International Commission on Radiological Protection need to be reexamined. Recommendations on occupational and public dose limits must also be reconsidered. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements is in a comparatively good position with a recently produced set of recommendations that had higher cancer risk estimates in mind.

Sinclair, W.K. (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1989-11-01

234

Protection system representation in the electromagnetic transients program  

SciTech Connect

This paper concerns the addition of the few critical elements of a protection system to the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP), which is one of the most widely used programs for the simulation of transients in power systems. It contains models for almost every major power system component. A protection system consists of instrument transformers, relays, and circuit breakers. Models for current transformers (CTs) and capacitor voltage transformers (CVTs) are developed, validated, and incorporated in the EPRI/DCG EMTP Version 2.0. The user can define the values of the CT and CVT parameters. Total FORTRAN capability has been added to the EMTP; new subroutines and an inbuilt structure to allow the linking of user-defined FORTRAN subroutines with the main EMTP are explained. This capability is necessary to simulate computer relay algorithms. The outputs of the algorithms can be passed to the EMTP, which enables the study of the dynamic interaction between the power system and the protection system. The FORTRAN capability can also be used to develop models for relays. Models of specific relays, such as those for line protection (CEY51A and SLY12C) and transformer differential protection (D202 and BDD15B), are also available. The relay models can be used with different settings. These new features in the EMTP together constitute the critical elements of a protection system. Thus, it is now possible to simulate the dynamic interactions between a power system and a protection system.

Chaudhary, A.K.S. (Sargent Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States)); Tam, K.S.; Phadke, A.G. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Bradley Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1994-04-01

235

Radiation protection: the NCRP guidelines and some considerations for the future  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the USA and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), worldwide, were formed about 1928 and have since made recommendations on appropriate levels of protection from ionizing radiation for workers and for the public. These recommendations and much of the guidance provided by these organizations have usually been adopted by

Sinclair

2009-01-01

236

47 CFR 80.227 - Special requirements for protection from RF radiation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Special requirements for protection from RF radiation. 80.227 Section 80.227 Telecommunication...Special requirements for protection from RF radiation. As part of the information provided...human exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation in excess of the RF exposure...

2012-10-01

237

47 CFR 80.227 - Special requirements for protection from RF radiation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Special requirements for protection from RF radiation. 80.227 Section 80.227 Telecommunication...Special requirements for protection from RF radiation. As part of the information provided...human exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation in excess of the RF exposure...

2011-10-01

238

Laser protective eyewear program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of lasers at Los Alamos focused considerable attention on providing adequate eye protection for experimenters involved in the use of a wide variety of nonionizing radiation. Experiments with fast-pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, HF, and CO/sub 2/) were performed to gain biological threshold data on ocular damage. In parallel, eye protection devices were evaluated, which resulted in the development of lightweight, comfortable spectacles of colored glass filters that can be ground to prescription specifications. Goggle styles are employed in specific applications.

Winburn, D.C.

1980-01-01

239

Committee on DOE radiation epidemiological research programs  

SciTech Connect

In response to concerns with regard to their epidemiologic research program, the Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE) asked the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council to establish a committee to provide advice on this program. The purpose of this committee is twofold. The first purpose is to be a source of advice to the DOE on the current status and future direction of epidemiologic research funded by the Department. A second and more immediate purpose is to provide scientific advice on how the data base collected by DOE contractors for the Department's Worker Health and Mortality Study can be made readily available to the scientific community both within and outside the Department. The latter task is not without controversy since there are a number of conflicting interests concerning the widespread sharing of these data. The interests of the workers, the government, and the scientific community must be resolved in ways that ensure confidentiality of personnel records, protect priority of initial publication for the investigators who collected the data, and allow investigators not affiliated with the DOE or the Federal Government to analyze independently the worker health and mortality data base.

Ellett, W.H.; Cooper, R.D.

1990-04-10

240

On being understood: clarity and jargon in radiation protection.  

PubMed

While much of the language used to express the concepts of radiation protection works effectively, there are many ill-chosen names and phrases and much jargon that permeate our professional speech and writing. From the oxymoron "internal exposure" to the "snarl word" "decay," there is much room for improvement. This essay identifies many of the problems and suggests solutions. We examine the kinds of confusions that can result from using familiar words with unfamiliar meanings and the need for neology. We offer insights into specific and unambiguous naming of physical quantities and explore the seemingly unlimited kinds of "dose." We disaggregate exposure from irradiation following intakes, and unmask units like "gram rad per microcurie hour." We call for a definition of radiation weighting factor that doesn't result in a violation of the law of conservation of energy. We examine the subtleties of distinguishing between radiation and radioactive materials. Some words, such as "exposure," have multiple meanings, while at other times there are different words or phrases with the same meaning, such as "critical level" and "decision level" or "detection level" and "minimum detectable amount." Sometimes phrases are used whose meaning is unclear or not agreed upon, such as "lower limit of detection." Sometimes there are words that are simply not apt, such as "disintegration" applied to the emission of a subatomic particle from a nucleus. PMID:11845840

Strom, Daniel J; Watson, Charles R

2002-03-01

241

Radiation safety program outcomes as indicated by regulatory compliance activities from 1988 to 1997 in Texas.  

PubMed

Occupational radiation protection programs rarely encounter readily observable workplace injuries or illnesses, so upper management must rely on different indicators of relative performance. In many cases, the number of violations, complaints, and reported incidents is used. As with reported workplace injury and illness data, violation, complaint, and incident data provide only a crude indication of a radiation protection program's overall effectiveness. Even so, it is important to recognize that tangible program outcome measures such as these often dictate management decisions. Hence, safety professionals should have access to baseline violation, complaint, and incident trend data so that more informed preventive strategies can be put into place where possible. To assess the outcomes of radiation protection programs in Texas, data from regulatory compliance activities for a 10-y period, inclusive of calendar years 1988 to 1997, were assembled, summarized, and independently verified. For licensees of radioactive material, the ten most frequently cited violations represented 64% of the total issued during the study period. For registrants of radiation producing devices, the ten most frequently cited violations accounted for 73% of the total. A particular emphasis on proper recordkeeping is evident, and should be noted by any internal radiation protection quality assurance programs. Regardless of the permit type, the vast majority of violations issued were classified as low severity. Licensees were found to be involved in approximately 73% of the incidents recorded, with overexposures and badge overexposures representing the largest identifiable types. Registrants were found to be involved in approximately 57% of the complaints recorded, with the largest identifiable issue being concerns about health care provider qualifications or performance. Although this study was limited to a single state, the results can be of benefit to both quality assurance programs and professional health physics training courses by objectively identifying the areas commonly found to be deficient. PMID:10688459

Emery, R J; Charlton, M A; Goodman, G R

2000-03-01

242

Recent estimates of cancer risk from low-let ionizing radiation and radiation protection limits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estimates of the risk of cancer induction, formerly about 1%/Sv, formed the basis of ICRP radiation protection limits in 1977. They have now increased to about 4-5%/Sv for low doses. These increases are based mainly on new data for the Japanese survivors of the A-bombs of 1945. They result from the accumulation of 11 years more of data on solid tumors, the revisions in the dosimetry of those exposed and improvement in statistical methods and projections. The application of a dose rate effectiveness factor between effects at high dose rate and those at low dose and dose rate is also an important consideration. Not only has the total risk changed but also the distribution of risk among organs. Thus the effective dose equivalent may require modification. These changes are modifying ICRP and NCRP thinking about recommendations on protection limits, especially for radiation workers.

Sinclair, Warren K.

1992-07-01

243

USE OF MODELS IN MANAGING GROUND-WATER PROTECTION PROGRAMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Mathematical models can be helpful tools to managers of ground-water protection programs. They may be used for testing hypotheses about conceptualizations and to gather a fuller understanding of important physical, chemical and biological processes which affect ground-water resou...

244

77 FR 35700 - Protected Critical Infrastructure Information (PCII) Program Survey  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Infrastructure Protection (IP), Infrastructure Information...accordance with 5 CFR 1320.1. ADDRESSES: Written comments and questions...be forwarded to DHS/NPPD/IP/IICD, 245 Murray Lane, SW...PCII Program, IICD, and NPPD/IP use only.OMB is...

2012-06-14

245

Hanford Protective Barriers Program asphalt barrier studies -- FY 1988  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hanford Protective Barrier (HPB) Program is evaluating alternative barriers to provide a means of meeting stringent water infiltration requirements. One type of alternative barrier being considered is an asphalt-based layer, 1.3 to 15 cm thick, which has been shown to be very effective as a barrier for radon gas and, hence, should be equally effective as a barrier for

H. D. Freeman; G. W. Gee

1989-01-01

246

Evaluation of Food Protection and Defense Outreach Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This analysis documents the outcomes and impacts from a series of food protection and defense educational programs conducted over a 3-y period for private and public sector food system professionals. Several measures were used to determine the professions of participants; their improvements in skills and abilities that resulted from workshops; the

Shutske, John M.; Pierquet, Jennifer; Michel, Laura; Rasmussen, Ruth; Olson, Debra

2008-01-01

247

QUALITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION: THE EPA QA PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

Formalized quality assurance (QA) program requirements for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been established for more than ten years. uring this period, the environmental issues and concerns addressed by the EPA have changed. any issues, such as ozone depletion...

248

Evaluation of Food Protection and Defense Outreach Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This analysis documents the outcomes and impacts from a series of food protection and defense educational programs conducted over a 3-y period for private and public sector food system professionals. Several measures were used to determine the professions of participants; their improvements in skills and abilities that resulted from workshops;

Shutske, John M.; Pierquet, Jennifer; Michel, Laura; Rasmussen, Ruth; Olson, Debra

2008-01-01

249

NASA's planetary protection program as an astrobiology teaching module  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are currently developing a teaching module on the NASA's Planetary Protection Program for UW-Parkside SENCER courses. SENCER stands for Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibility. It is a national initiative of the National Science Foundation (NSF), now in its fifth year, to improve science education by teaching basic sciences through the complex public issues of the 21st century. The Planetary Protection Program is one such complex public issue. Teaching astrobiology and the NASA's goals via the Planetary Protection module within the SENCER courses seems to be a good formula to reach large number of students in an interesting and innovative way. We shall describe the module that we are developing. It will be launched on our web site titled "Astrobiology at Parkside" (http://oldweb.uwp.edu/academic/chemistry/kolb/organic_chemistry/, or go to Google and then to Vera Kolb Home Page), and thus will be available for teaching to all interested parties.

Kolb, Vera M.

2005-09-01

250

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to prepare a Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan. This document fulfills the requirement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This document was prepared by the Hydrology Section of the Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) Environmental Compliance Department, and it is the responsibility of this group to review the plan annually and update it every three years. This document is not, nor is it intended to be, an implementing document that sets forth specific details on carrying out field projects or operational policy. Rather, it is intended to give the reader insight to the groundwater protection philosophy at WIPP.

Washington TRU Solutions

2002-09-24

251

Radiation Rescue: Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Protect from Lethal Irradiation  

PubMed Central

Background Successful treatment of acute radiation syndromes relies on immediate supportive care. In patients with limited hematopoietic recovery potential, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is the only curative treatment option. Because of time consuming donor search and uncertain outcome we propose MSC treatment as an alternative treatment for severely radiation-affected individuals. Methods and Findings Mouse mesenchymal stromal cells (mMSCs) were expanded from bone marrow, retrovirally labeled with eGFP (bulk cultures) and cloned. Bulk and five selected clonal mMSCs populations were characterized in vitro for their multilineage differentiation potential and phenotype showing no contamination with hematopoietic cells. Lethally irradiated recipients were i.v. transplanted with bulk or clonal mMSCs. We found a long-term survival of recipients with fast hematopoietic recovery after the transplantation of MSCs exclusively without support by HSCs. Quantitative PCR based chimerism analysis detected eGFP-positive donor cells in peripheral blood immediately after injection and in lungs within 24 hours. However, no donor cells in any investigated tissue remained long-term. Despite the rapidly disappearing donor cells, microarray and quantitative RT-PCR gene expression analysis in the bone marrow of MSC-transplanted animals displayed enhanced regenerative features characterized by (i) decreased proinflammatory, ECM formation and adhesion properties and (ii) boosted anti-inflammation, detoxification, cell cycle and anti-oxidative stress control as compared to HSC-transplanted animals. Conclusions Our data revealed that systemically administered MSCs provoke a protective mechanism counteracting the inflammatory events and also supporting detoxification and stress management after radiation exposure. Further our results suggest that MSCs, their release of trophic factors and their HSC-niche modulating activity rescue endogenous hematopoiesis thereby serving as fast and effective first-line treatment to combat radiation-induced hematopoietic failure.

Lange, Claudia; Brunswig-Spickenheier, Barbel; Cappallo-Obermann, Heike; Eggert, Katharina; Gehling, Ursula M.; Rudolph, Cornelia; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Cornils, Kerstin; Zustin, Jozef; Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai; Zander, Axel R.

2011-01-01

252

An Epr Investigation of Radiation Protection by Aromatic Additives in Synthetic Polymers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research is a study of the protective effects against ionizing radiation that aromatic compounds provide when added to a synthetic polymer in various proportions. Since radiation damage in high polymer compounds is usually accompanied by the productio...

J. J. Banaszak

1964-01-01

253

[Current problems of chemical radiation protection of organisms].  

PubMed

The classification has been proposed for antiradiation protective agents which are divided into four groups: I. Radioprotectors; II. Adaptogens; III. Absorbents; IV. The means of Rehabilitations. Radioprotectors in turn are subdivided into myelo-, entero- and cerebroprotectors. Adaptogens act as stimulators of radioresistance. These are natural protectors which are perspective for chemical protection under low-level ionizing irradiation. Natural protectors influence regulatory systems of exposed organisms, mobilize endogenous background of radioresistance (EBR), immunity and intensivity the total non-specific resistance of organism (TNRO). Natural protectors (extracted from cells, plants, animals) are low- or nontoxic and can be used with food. Absorbents, the means of protection from internal irradiation, are subdivided into the drugs which prevents incorporation of radioiodine by thyroid gland and absorption of radionuclides (137Cs, 90Sr, 239Pu, 241Am) in the digestive tract. The main features which distinguish radioprotective drugs of different mechanisms on human organisms are presented. The main which different programs of reability on invalids-Chernobyl. PMID:10366942

Kudriashov, Iu B; Goncharenko, E N

254

Accreditation of human research protection program: An Indian perspective  

PubMed Central

With the increasing number of clinical trials being placed in India, it is the collective responsibility of the Investigator sites, Government, Ethics Committees, and Sponsors to ensure that the trial subjects are protected from risks these studies can have, that subjects are duly compensated, and credible data generated. Most importantly, each institution/hospital should have a strong Human Research Protection Program to safe guard the trial subjects. In order to look at research with a comprehensive objective approach, there is a need for a formal auditing and review system by a recognized body. As of now, only the sponsors are monitoring/auditing their respective trials; however, there is an increasing need to perform a more detailed review and assessment of processes of the institution and the Ethics Committee. This challenge can be addressed by going for accreditation by a reputed association that encompasses-the institutions, the ethics committees, and researcher/research staff. Starting their journey for the accreditation process in late 2010, Kasturba Medical College and Hospital [KMC], Manipal, and Manipal Hospital Bangalore [MHB] received full Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs (AAHRPP) accreditation in Dec 2011a first in India. This article delves into the steps involved in applying for AAHRPP accreditation from an Indian Perspective, the challenges, advantages, and testimonials from the two hospitals on the application experience and how the accreditation has improved the Human Research Protection Program at these hospitals.

Bairy, K. L.; Pereira, Pratibha

2012-01-01

255

Nonequilibrium Air Radiation (Nequair) Program: User's Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A supplement to the data relating to the calculation of nonequilibrium radiation in flight regimes of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles contains the listings of the computer code NEQAIR (Nonequilibrium Air Radiation), its primary input data, and expl...

C. Park

1985-01-01

256

About RRP | Radiation Research Program (RRP)  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Content Search this site About RRP Main Organizational Structure Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch Medical Physics Radiotherapy Development Branch Molecular Radiation Therapeutics Branch Oncology Outreach Last Updated: 08/09/10 Medical Physics Medical

257

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Multimedia Program  

SciTech Connect

The Native American multimedia program was developed to facilitate the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) partnership with tribes in the delivery of environmental programs on reservation lands and to enhance the EPA`s ability to carry out its trust responsibility to the tribes. By providing the means for each tribe to employ its own environmental specialist, the multimedia program helps provide the foundation necessary to build environmental infrastructure for the protection of Native American lands and people and for the development of more rigorous medium-specific programs. The multimedia program began in 1991 with two pilot projects on the Bad River Chippewa Reservation, Wisconsin, and the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming. Expanded in 1992, Region 5 awarded ten multimedia cooperative agreements. At the time, Region 5 made the commitment to fund all reservations within the region, and by end of fiscal year 1993, 24 agreements brought the program to all 29 tribes. This has been a monumental effort, possible only by coupling fiscal year 1993`s funding from the Office of Federal Activities ($599050) with the region`s own reprogramming efforts ($510000).

Ambutas, K. [Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL (United States)

1994-12-31

258

Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture: limitation and assessment in radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

Protection against ionizing radiation can follow two fundamentally different approaches. In limitation, the maximum permissible dose equivalent is selected on the basis of worst-case assumptions on the shape of dose-effect curves and the influence of other factors (dose distribution, relative biologic effectiveness, etc.). This system has the restricted aim of ensuring that radiation exposure results in risks below stipulated levels. In assessment, the functional relation and the numeric values required for risk estimation are postulated. This permits statements of the absolute values of risks, not only for the maximum permissible dose equivalent but also for any lesser dose equivalents. The principal concept underlying the assessment system is that of incoherence: lack of interdependence between the effects of dose increments and lack of interdependence between the effects on the constituent cells and organs of the body. The notion of incoherence and the choices of numeric values of risks are subject to substantial doubts. They must nevertheless be adopted when risk estimation cannot be avoided.

Rossi, H.H.

1985-01-01

259

Application of the HSEF to assessing radiation risks in the practice of radiation protection.  

PubMed

The primary risk coefficients upon which exposure limits for radiation protection purposes are currently based are derived almost exclusively from cancer-induction data obtained from human populations exposed to radiations of low linear energy transfer. The question of higher linear energy transfer radiations is handled by means of quality factors derived from values for relative biological effectiveness obtained from animal data. However, the advent of microdosimetry has made it possible to establish hit size effectiveness functions from single-cell systems, both in vitro and in vivo. This type of function can substitute completely for the concept of relative biological effectiveness, Q and equivalent dose. A common basis for risk coefficients and the hit size effectiveness function lies in the fact that human cancers are monoclonal and thus single cell in origin. The present communication utilizes this common base as a means of extending the present low-linear energy transfer based risk coefficients to include carcinogenic responses from exposure in radiation fields of any one or mixed qualities, extending from the smallest to the largest linear energy transfers of practical consequence. In doing so, risks from ionizing radiations of any linear energy transfer may be predicted more accurately than at present. PMID:7730058

Bond, V P; Varma, M; Feinendegen, L E; Wuu, C S; Zaider, M

1995-05-01

260

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitoring (ARM) Education Program: An Integrated Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Education and Outreach program supports ARM Operations at all three CART sites (North Slope of Alaska, Tropical West Pacific, and Southern Great Plains) in ways that are relevant to the needs of the communities and regions that host the ARM program sites. The goal of the education and outreach program is to develop basic science

F. Barnes; L. K. Marsh; M. Springer; C. E. Talus; A. Haruta; K. Kloesel; B. D. Zak; W. E. Clements

2001-01-01

261

Developing a model lifeline protection program for DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

A National Lifeline Standard Development Program is currently being conducted by FEMA and NIST. The Department of Energy is following these developments and supplementing them to meet Life-Safety and mission requirements for all DOE facilities as part of the Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Plan. The task will be overseen by a DOE management team with technical guidance provided by a Steering Group of management and operating contractor representatives. The DOE will participate in the federal program by conducting a workshop on lifeline protection issues, developing an overall plan, organizing a Steering Group, and conducting a pilot study at a DOE facility.

Lowing, A.N.

1996-11-01

262

Beam dumps design and local radiation protection at TERA synchrotron.  

PubMed

The realisation of the National Center of Hadrontherapy was funded by the Italian Government in 2002. The Centre will be built in the area of Pavia (Italy). The synchrotron designed in the framework of this programme will accelerate protons and carbon ions up to 250 MeV and 400 MeV u(-1), respectively. Some of the main aspects which were taken into account in the design of the acceleration system are the patient's safety and the beam control. From this point of view an important role is played by the beam dumps in the synchrotron ring and upstream of the extraction system. In particular, an horizontal and a vertical beam dump will be installed in the synchrotron ring: the former will be used for lowering the beam intensity and the latter for beam abortion. The dump at the extraction will absorb the particles during the mounting and the falling ramps of the synchrotron magnetic cycle, thus extracting only the flat top of the ion spill. Beam dumps can produce intense fields of secondary radiation (neutrons, charged light-hadrons and photons) and high rates of induced activity, since they can absorb the beam completely. Usually they have to be shielded to protect the electronics during machine operation and to attenuate the radiation dose below the limits imposed by the law when the personnel access to the synchrotron hall. The part of the shielding design of the beam dumps concerning with the acceleration of protons was made using Monte Carlo simulations with the FLUKA code. Both induced activity and secondary radiation were taken into account. The shields against secondary radiation produced by carbon ions were designed, referring only to secondary neutrons, taking double-differential distributions from the literature as sources for the FLUKA simulations. The induced activity from carbon ions interactions was estimated analytically, using the data generated by the EPAX 2 code. The dose-equivalent rates from the induced radionuclides were calculated at 1 m from the shielded dumps, taking into account the contribution of activated components of the synchrotron ring. PMID:16381716

Porta, A; Campi, F; Agosteo, S

2005-01-01

263

Groundwater Protection Program Science and Technology Summary Description  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Groundwater Protection Program, formerly the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project, was established in 1997 to develop the integrated approach, technical capability, and scientific information needed to perform site-wide assessments of the potential effects of Hanford Site soil and groundwater contaminants on people and the ecology. To complete this mission, gaps in scientific understanding and technologies were identified, and research to close those gaps was initiated.

Freshley, Mark D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Bunn, Amoret L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Gee, Glendon W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Gilmore, Tyler J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Kincaid, Charles T. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Peterson, Robert E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Ward, Anderson L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Yabusaki, Steven B. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Zachara, John M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-11-20

264

Developing a Respiratory Protection Program. Understanding the written elements.  

PubMed

1. Respirators can be the last defense for the estimated 5 million employees who use them for protection from dusts and fibers, fumes, mists, gases, vapors, and biological hazards. Because of these potentially lethal respiratory hazards, occupational and environmental health nurses need to be able to determine the need for, understand, develop, update, and implement an actionable respiratory protection program (RPP). 2. Regulated per 29 CFR 1910.134, a written RPP becomes the map or guideline process specific to the workplace that needs to be followed to ensure employee protection. 3. The nine required written elements of a RPP include respirator selection; fit testing; respirator use in routine and emergency situations; respirator maintenance and change schedules; ensuring adequate breathing air supply, quantity, and flow for atmosphere supplying respirators; regular evaluation of program effectiveness; medical evaluation; training employees in the respiratory hazards in routine and emergent situations; and training employees in proper use of the respirator. 4. Occupational and environmental health nurses are in a unique position to be a RPP program administrator, its designated licensed health care professional, or an active member of a team implementing the RPP process. PMID:11760528

Ryan, M G

2001-06-01

265

Neutron, Proton, and Photonuclear Cross Sections for Radiation Therapy and Radiation Protection  

SciTech Connect

The authors review recent work at Los Alamos to evaluate neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross section up to 150 MeV (to 250 MeV for protons), based on experimental data and nuclear model calculations. These data are represented in the ENDF format and can be used in computer codes to simulate radiation transport. They permit calculations of absorbed dose in the body from therapy beams, and through use of kerma coefficients allow absorbed dose to be estimated for a given neutron energy distribution. For radiation protection, these data can be used to determine shielding requirements in accelerator environments, and to calculate neutron, proton, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production. Illustrative comparisons of the evaluated cross section and kerma coefficient data with measurements are given.

Chadwick, M.B.

1998-09-10

266

Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Atoll (2002-2004)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Enewetak Island (Figure 1) (Bell et al., 2002). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental radiological surveillance programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in lifestyle, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining the cost and estimating the effectiveness of potential remedial measures, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation protection monitoring program established for the Enewetak Atoll population group along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2002-2004). Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated web site is a provision where users are able calculate and track doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating in the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Johannes, K; Henry, D

2006-01-17

267

Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Rongelap Atoll (2002-2004)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Rongelap Atoll (Figure 1). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental radiological surveillance programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in lifestyle, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining as well as the implementation, cost and effectiveness of potential intervention options, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation protection monitoring program established for resettlement workers living on Rongelap Island along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2002-2004). Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated web site is a provision where users are able calculate and track doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Arelong, E; Langinbelik, S

2006-01-17

268

Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death  

SciTech Connect

The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15 Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5 Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues.

McConnell, Kevin W. [Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Muenzer, Jared T. [Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Chang, Kathy C. [Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Davis, Chris G. [Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); McDunn, Jonathan E. [Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Coopersmith, Craig M. [Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Hilliard, Carolyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Hotchkiss, Richard S. [Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Hunt, Clayton R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)]. E-mail: chunt@radonc.wustl.edu

2007-04-06

269

Radiation terrorism: what society needs from the radiobiologyradiation protection and radiation oncology communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Societys and individuals concerns about the adverse effects from radiation are logically amplified many times when radiological terrorism is considered. The spectrum of events include industrial sabotage, the use of an explosive or non-explosive radiological dispersal device, the placement of a radiological exposure device in a public facility and the use of an improvised nuclear device. The consequences of an

C Norman Coleman; Gerald W Parker

2009-01-01

270

Non-ionizing radiation protection training manual for radiation control. Lectures, demonstrations, laboratories and tours on the course on non-ionizing radiations. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late 1974, consultation with the National Training Coordination Committee of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors determined that State personnel needed training in order to fulfill their responsibility with respect to the growing number of non-ionizing radiation sources. A contract was awarded to the Georgia Institute of Technology to develop materials for a training program on non-ionizing radiation

K. Z. Morgan; R. L. Burkhart

1976-01-01

271

Modulating Radiation Resistance: Novel Protection Paradigms Based on Defenses against Ionizing Radiation in the Extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For Deinococcus radiodurans and other bacteria which are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR) and desiccation, a mechanistic link exists between resistance, manganese accumulation, and protein protection. We have demonstrated that ultrafiltered,...

M. J. Daly

2010-01-01

272

Special Radiation Protection Precautions in Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine concerns the administration of appropriate amounts of radioactivity of certain isotopes, in order to achieve internal localized irradiation of neoplasmatic cells. Due to the increased level and the specific isotope characteristics of administered radioactivity, special Radiation Protection precautions must be taken. This study addresses such issues, based on national as well as international legislation and guidelines. Application of the principle of optimization is of outmost importance and is based on individual dose planning. The decision about the release of Nuclear Medicine patients after therapy is determined on an individual basis, taking into account patients' pattern of contact with other people, their age and that of persons in the home environment, in addition to other factors. Estimation of the absorbed dose given to the treated organ is based on uptake measurements and other biokinetic data, as well as on the mass of the treated tissue or organ. Concerning pregnant women, the rule of thumb is that they should not be treated, unless the radionuclide therapy is required to save their lives. In that case, the potential absorbed dose and risk to the foetus should be estimated and conveyed to the patient. After radionuclide therapy, a female should be advised to avoid pregnancy for the period of time depending on the specific radionuclide. This is to ensure that the dose to a conceptus/foetus would probably not exceed 1 mGy (the member of the public dose limit). The radiation risk for relatives and caregivers is small and unlikely to exceed the legal dose constraints during the period of the patient's treatment. Solid waste from the patient's stay in hospital is a different matter, and is normally incinerated or held for a period until radioactive decay brings the activity to an acceptable level.

Stefanoyiannis, A. P.; Gerogiannis, J.

2010-01-01

273

Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Utrok Atoll (2003-2004)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands (Figure 1). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental radiological surveillance programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in life-style, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining the cost and the effectiveness of potential remedial measures, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation surveillance monitoring program established for the Utrok Atoll population group along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2003-2004). The Utrok whole body counting facility has been temporarily stationed on Majuro Atoll and, in cooperation with the Utrok Atoll Local Government, serves as a national facility open to the general public. Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated website is a provision whereby users are able to calculate and track radiation doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating in the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Tibon, S; Chee, L

2006-01-17

274

United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000  

SciTech Connect

The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000.

Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

2000-07-01

275

Unlicensed residential programs: the next challenge in protecting youth.  

PubMed

Over the past decade in the United States, the number of private residential facilities for youth has grown exponentially, and many are neither licensed as mental health programs by states, nor accredited by respected national accrediting organizations. The Alliance for the Safe, Therapeutic and Appropriate use of Residential Treatment (A START) is a multi-disciplinary group of mental health professionals and advocates that formed in response to rising concerns about reports from youth, families and journalists describing mistreatment in a number of the unregulated programs. This article summarizes the information gathered by A START regarding unregulated facilities. It provides an overview of common program features, marketing strategies and transportation options. It describes the range of mistreatment and abuse experienced by youth and families, including harsh discipline, inappropriate seclusion and restraint, substandard psychotherapeutic interventions, medical and nutritional neglect, rights violations and death. It reviews the licensing, regulatory and accrediting mechanisms associated with the protection of youth in residential programs, or the lack thereof. Finally, it outlines policy implications and provides recommendations for the protection of youth and families who pursue residential treatment. PMID:16981808

Friedman, Robert M; Pinto, Allison; Behar, Lenore; Bush, Nicki; Chirolla, Amberly; Epstein, Monica; Green, Amy; Hawkins, Pamela; Huff, Barbara; Huffine, Charles; Mohr, Wanda; Seltzer, Tammy; Vaughn, Christine; Whitehead, Kathryn; Young, Christina Kloker

2006-07-01

276

The Seven (Or More) Deadly (Or Not So Deadly) Sins of Radiation Protection  

SciTech Connect

This editorial considers the errors that can occur in the routine practice of radiation protection in the workplace. This work provides a tool and an incentive for radiation protection professionals to mentally examine their radiation protection responsibilities to identify actions they may take to improve their part of the practice of radiation protection for the benefit of humankind. We introduce a rating tool that is patterned after the IAEA International Nuclear Event Scale.?Sins? discussed include ignorance of the radiological situation, failure to integrate safety management, disabling safety interlocks, warning devices, access controls, omission of''reasonable'' from the policy of''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA), extrapolation of risk beyond reason, using radiation exposure as an excuse for terminating an unwanted pregnancy, escalation of safety requirements beyond reason, failure to average a concentration standard, not responding to concerns (of workers, public, patient s, etc.), over-training, and substitution of prescriptive procedures for judgment. Readers are encouraged to look at their radiation protection activities and judge which ones do not make sense from the viewpoint of protecting people against radiation. It is likely that readers will find more than one radiation protection activity that bears scrutiny.

Strom, Daniel J.; Stansbury, Paul S.

2000-06-01

277

Ionizing and Nonionizing Radiation Protection. Module SH-35. Safety and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This student module on ionizing and nonionizing radiation protection is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module describes various types of ionizing and nonionizing radiation, and the situations in the workplace where potential hazards from radiation may exist. Following the introduction, 13 objectives (each keyed to a

Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

278

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, August 2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

ARM in Australia--The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has launched its newest Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) in Darwin, Australia. This is the fifth research site established since ARM Program inception in 1989. The new Darwin site and two other ARCS sites--on Manus Island and the island of Nauru--are in the Tropical

Holdridge

2002-01-01

279

Personnel Radiation Dosimetry Symposium: Program and Abstracts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose was to provide applied and research dosimetrists with sufficient information to evaluate the status and direction of their programs relative to the latest guidelines and techniques. A technical program was presented concerning experience, requ...

1984-01-01

280

Standards for protection against radiation, 10 CFR Part 20  

SciTech Connect

On may 21, 1991, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a revision to its standards for protection against ionizing radiation, 10 CFR Part 20. Although the revised part ({section}{section} 20.1001-20.2401) became effective on June 20, 1991, licensees may defer implementation of the revised rule until January 1, 1993. Licensees continue to be required to comply with the provisions of {section}{section} 20.1-20.601 until the time they adopt the provisions of {section}{section} 20.1001-20.2401. Therefore, between June 20, 1991 and January 1, 1993 both the provisions of {section}{section} 20.1-20.601 and {section}{section} 20.1001-20.2401 are in effect. This NUREG presents a comparative text of the provisions of the revised Part 20 ({section}{section} 20.1001-20. 2401) to the text of {section}{section} 20.1-20.601 for use by the NRC staff and NRC licensees. 2 refs.

Cool, D.A.; Peterson, H.T. Jr.

1991-10-01

281

Radiation protection concepts and quantities for the occupational exposure to cosmic radiation.  

PubMed

For the purposes of dose limitation and dose control, the harm, or detriment, of exposure to radiation is assessed by the quantity effective dose. Effective dose is evaluated by the application of factors to the averaged absorbed dose in the organs and tissues of the body. Radiation monitoring instruments are generally calibrated in terms of the quantity ambient dose equivalent which is defined in a simple spherical phantom. The relationship of these quantities is described. Requirements for the radiation protection of aircraft crew are given in the European Union Council Directive 96/29/EURATOM. There are requirements to assess the exposure of aircraft crew, to inform them of health risks, to reduce higher doses, and to control the dose to the fetus. There are no explicit dose limits, other than a dose objective to be applied to the exposure of the fetus, and no requirements for designation of areas or classification of workers. There are significant differences between the exposure condition of aircraft crew and workers in most other industries where there is occupational exposure to radiation. There are greater ranges of radiation types and energy, and there are different dose distributions and characteristics of the working populations. However, the field intensity is predictable and, with the exception of rare solar events, there is no risk of significant unexpected exposures. Dose assessment is anticipated to be by folding staff roster information with estimates of route doses, since there is little variability of dose rate within an aircraft. Route doses, which may be either an agreed average value for a given airport pairing and aircraft type, or be flight specific, will be closely linked to measured values. Requirements as to the accuracy of dose assessment should be applied which are broadly similar to those used in individual monitoring generally. PMID:11543395

Bartlett, D T

1999-01-01

282

G4Beamline Program for Radiation Simulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

G4beamline, a program that is an interface to the Geant4 toolkit that we have developed to simulate accelerator beamlines, is being extended with a graphical user interface to quickly and efficiently model experimental equipment and its shielding in experimental halls. The program is flexible, user friendly, and requires no programming by users, so that even complex systems can be simulated

Kevin Beard; Thomas J. Roberts; Pavel Degtiarenko

2008-01-01

283

About RRP | Radiation Research Program (RRP)  

Cancer.gov

The field of radiation oncology has a unique scientific breadth including radiation and stress biology, complex tumor and normal tissue systems, innovative technology, electronic data acquisition and analysis, image-guided therapy, multi-modality cancer treatment, outreach to the underserved, and medical and societal response to the threats from nuclear and radiological terrorism. With its research base in basic biology and physics and clinical care that encompasses the entire spectrum of oncology, radiation oncology has a unique role in multi-disciplinary translational science collaboration.

284

The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water classification system and wellhead protection program; Description, status and implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the need to protect ground water has become recognized, a wide array of programs and requirements have emerged at all levels of government to address a variety of different potential sources of contamination and to clean up already contaminated ground water. EPA, states and others have sought ways to accommodate this variability in designing and implementing programs to protect

M. Mlay; J. J. Valdes

1987-01-01

285

Nonequilibrium air radiation (Nequair) program: User's manual  

Microsoft Academic Search

A supplement to the data relating to the calculation of nonequilibrium radiation in flight regimes of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles contains the listings of the computer code NEQAIR (Nonequilibrium Air Radiation), its primary input data, and explanation of the user-supplied input variables. The user-supplied input variables are the thermodynamic variables of air at a given point, i.e., number densities of

1985-01-01

286

Constructing vulnerabilty and protective measures indices for the enhanced critical infrastructure protection program.  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has directed its Protective Security Advisors (PSAs) to form partnerships with the owners and operators of assets most essential to the Nation's well being - a subclass of critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) - and to conduct site visits for these and other high-risk assets as part of the Enhanced Critical Infrastructure Protection (ECIP) Program. During each such visit, the PSA documents information about the facility's current CIKR protection posture and overall security awareness. The primary goals for ECIP site visits (DHS 2009) are to: (1) inform facility owners and operators of the importance of their facilities as an identified high-priority CIKR and the need to be vigilant in light of the ever-present threat of terrorism; (2) identify protective measures currently in place at these facilities, provide comparisons of CIKR protection postures across like assets, and track the implementation of new protective measures; and (3) enhance existing relationships among facility owners and operators; DHS; and various Federal, State, local tribal, and territorial partners. PSAs conduct ECIP visits to assess overall site security; educate facility owners and operators about security; help owners and operators identify gaps and potential improvements; and promote communication and information sharing among facility owners and operators, DHS, State governments, and other security partners. Information collected during ECIP visits is used to develop metrics; conduct sector-by-sector and cross-sector vulnerability comparisons; identify security gaps and trends across CIKR sectors and subsectors; establish sector baseline security survey results; and track progress toward improving CIKR security through activities, programs, outreach, and training (Snyder 2009). The data being collected are used in a framework consistent with the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) risk criteria (DHS 2009). The NIPP framework incorporates consequence, threat, and vulnerability components and addresses all hazards. The analysis of the vulnerability data needs to be reproducible, support risk analysis, and go beyond protection. It also needs to address important security/vulnerability topics, such as physical security, cyber security, systems analysis, and dependencies and interdependencies. This report provides an overview of the approach being developed to estimate vulnerability and provide vulnerability comparisons for sectors and subsectors. the information will be used to assist DHS in analyzing existing protective measures and vulnerability at facilities, to identify potential ways to reduce vulnerabilities, and to assist in preparing sector risk estimates. The owner/operator receives an analysis of the data collected for a specific asset, showing a comparison between the facility's protection posture/vulnerability index and those of DHS sector/subsector sites visited. This comparison gives the owner/operator an indication of the asset's security strengths and weaknesses that may be contributing factors to its vulnerability and protection posture. The information provided to the owner/operator shows how the asset compares to other similar assets within the asset's sector or subsector. A 'dashboard' display is used to illustrate the results in a convenient format. The dashboard allows the owner/operator to analyze the implementation of additional protective measures and to illustrate how such actions would impact the asset's Protective Measures Index (PMI) or Vulnerability Index (VI).

Fisher, R. E.; Buehring, W. A.; Whitfield, R. G.; Bassett, G. W.; Dickinson, D. C.; Haffenden, R. A.; Klett, M. S.; Lawlor, M. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; LANL

2009-10-14

287

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, August 2000  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this USDA program is to provide information to the agricultural community about the geographic and temporal climatology of UV-B radiation. Scientists also use the data to determine changes in stratospheric ozone levels, cloud cover, and aerosols as they pertain to UV-B radiation and to improve the understanding of factors that control transmission of UV-B radiation. Advances have been made in areas of agriculture, human health effects, ecosystem studies, and atmospheric science. ARM Program personnel are excited about being a part of such a worthwhile effort.

Sisterson, D. L.

2000-08-30

288

Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators: Implementation of ALARA in Design and Operation of Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

It used to happen often, to us accelerator radiation protection staff, to be asked by a new radiation worker: ?How much dose am I still allowed?? And we smiled looking at the shocked reaction to our answer: ?You are not allowed any dose?. Nowadays, also thanks to improved training programs, this kind of question has become less frequent, but it is still not always easy to convince workers that staying below the exposure limits is not sufficient. After all, radiation is still the only harmful agent for which this is true: for all other risks in everyday life, from road speed limits to concentration of hazardous chemicals in air and water, compliance to regulations is ensured by keeping below a certain value. It appears that a tendency is starting to develop to extend the radiation approach to other pollutants (1), but it will take some time before the new attitude makes it way into national legislations.

Fasso, A.; Rokni, S.; /SLAC

2011-06-30

289

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR 264.90 through 264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-07-01

290

Alcator C-MOD environmental health and radiation program development  

Microsoft Academic Search

The challenge of providing an integrated health and safety program for an advanced fusion facility within the university atmosphere is addressed in the environment, health, and safety program design for the Alcator C-MOD project at MIT. The hazards common to all fusion experiments, such as radiation, cryogenics, high power and voltage, confined spaces, hazardous chemicals, and heavy mechanical and machine

T. P. Fuller; C. L. Fiore

1991-01-01

291

The Development of a Computer Program for Estimating Solar Radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is important to know solar energy potential before setting up any solar energy system. It is usually simulated, as the measurement is not easily attainable in every place. For this purpose, a computer program has been developed to determine solar radiation. The program, which is developed using Delphi language and can run under Windows operating systems, uses altitude, latitude,

N. C. Bezir; I. Akkurt; N. zek

2010-01-01

292

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, March 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM Program) is sending a copy of the ARM Video, an education overview of their program. In the video you will see and hear ARM scientists describe the importance of studying climate and climate change. It also contains a tour of some ARM sites and a look at state-of-the-art meteorological instrumentation, along with background information about the radiation budget and the complexity of climate modeling. The video was produced by the US Department of Energy.

Sisterson, D. L.

2000-04-03

293

Photoprotection beyond Ultraviolet Radiation Effective Sun Protection Has to Include Protection against Infrared A Radiation-Induced Skin Damage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solar radiation is well known to damage human skin, for example by causing premature skin ageing (i.e. photoageing). We have recently learned that this damage does not result from ultraviolet (UV) radiation alone, but also from longer wavelengths, in particular near-infrared radiation (IRA radiation, 7601,440 nm). IRA radiation accounts for more than one third of the solar energy that reaches

P. Schroeder; C. Calles; T. Benesova; F. Macaluso; J. Krutmann

2010-01-01

294

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Radiation Control Program - Partners in Site Restoration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Management and Integration (M&I) contract for all five of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) facilities to Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a world renowned national laboratory and research and development facility, the BJC mission involves executing the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program. In addition to BJC's M&I contract, UT-Battelle, LLC, a not-for-profit company, is the Management and Operating (M&O) contractor for DOE on the ORNL site. As part of ORNL's EM program, legacy inactive facilities (i.e., reactors, nuclear material research facilities, burial grounds, and underground storage tanks) are transferred to BJC and are designated as remediation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), or long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M) facilities. Facilities operated by both UT-Battelle and BJC are interspersed throughout the site and are usually in close proximity. Both UT-Battelle and BJC have DOE-approved Radiation Protection Programs established in accordance with 10 CFR 835. The BJC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program adapts to the M&I framework and is comprised of a combination of subcontracted program responsibilities with BJC oversight. This paper focuses on the successes and challenges of executing the BJC RADCON Program for BJC's ORNL Project through a joint M&I contractor relationship, while maintaining a positive working relationship and partnership with UT-Battelle's Radiation Protection organization.

Jones, S. L.; Stafford, M. W.

2002-02-26

295

Duke Power Company's independent radiation worker program  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, very large numbers of Duke Power Company's construction personnel have been transferred to the nuclear station Construction-Maintenance Department as the company's plant construction program has been completed. This paper reports that the large numbers of people involved and the transition from new plant construction to work in radiological environments has taxed the stations' exposure control programs and

L. Lewis; C. T. Yongue

1987-01-01

296

Personnel radiation dosimetry symposium: program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose was to provide applied and research dosimetrists with sufficient information to evaluate the status and direction of their programs relative to the latest guidelines and techniques. A technical program was presented concerning experience, requirements, and advances in gamma, beta, and neutron personnel dosimetry.

Not Available

1984-10-01

297

Nonequilibrium air radiation (Nequair) program: User's manual  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A supplement to the data relating to the calculation of nonequilibrium radiation in flight regimes of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles contains the listings of the computer code NEQAIR (Nonequilibrium Air Radiation), its primary input data, and explanation of the user-supplied input variables. The user-supplied input variables are the thermodynamic variables of air at a given point, i.e., number densities of various chemical species, translational temperatures of heavy particles and electrons, and vibrational temperature. These thermodynamic variables do not necessarily have to be in thermodynamic equilibrium. The code calculates emission and absorption characteristics of air under these given conditions.

Park, C.

1985-07-01

298

Ouabain protects against adverse developmental programming of the kidney  

PubMed Central

The kidney is extraordinarily sensitive to adverse fetal programming. Malnutrition, the most common form of developmental challenge, retards the formation of functional units, the nephrons. The resulting low nephron endowment increases susceptibility to renal injury and disease. Using explanted rat embryonic kidneys, we found that ouabain, the Na,K-ATPase ligand, triggers a calciumnuclear factor-?B signal, which protects kidney development from adverse effects of malnutrition. To mimic malnutrition, kidneys were serum deprived for 24 h. This resulted in severe retardation of nephron formation and a robust increase in apoptosis. In ouabain-exposed kidneys, no adverse effects of serum deprivation were observed. Proof of principle that ouabain rescues development of embryonic kidneys exposed to malnutrition was obtained from studies on pregnant rats given a low-protein diet and treated with ouabain or vehicle throughout pregnancy. Thus, we have identified a survival signal and a feasible therapeutic tool to prevent adverse programming of kidney development.

Li, Juan; Khodus, Georgiy R.; Kruusmagi, Markus; Kamali-Zare, Padideh; Liu, Xiao-Li; Eklof, Ann-Christine; Zelenin, Sergey; Brismar, Hjalmar; Aperia, Anita

2010-01-01

299

Radiation safety and protection of neonates in radiological examinations  

SciTech Connect

Radiation reduction methods in neonatal radiographic examinations are discussed. Studies performed on radiation exposures to the neonates, scattered radiation level, exposure to the nursery personnel, effectiveness of the various shielding methods, uniformity of the x-ray field, heel effect, and skin exposure estimation are described. In summary, recommendations for exposure reduction based on our experimental findings as well as on the ALARA concept of radiation safety are provided.

Yoshizumi, T.T.; Drummond, K.T.; Freeman, J.O.; Mullett, M.D.

1987-05-01

300

Fluorinated Single Wall Nanotube/Polyethylene Composites for Multifunctional Radiation Protection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Fluorinated Single Wall Nanotubes (f-SWNTs) have been processed in polyethylene by an incipient wetting technique to achieve a well dispersed nanocomposite for radiation protection. In some cases, samples were further processed using the rapid prototyping...

E. V. Barrera J. G. Vera M. L. Shofner M. X. Pulikkathara R. T. Wilkins

2003-01-01

301

The Distribution and Metabolism of the Radiation Protective Agent Aminopropylaminoethyl-Phosphorothioate (WR-2721) in Mice.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Aminopropylaminoethyl-phosphorothioate (WR-2721) is the least toxic and most effective of the phosphorothioate class of radiation protective agents. In order to investigate the mechanism of action of this agent, distribution and metabolism studies were ca...

G. Kollmann B. Shapiro S. Leon D. Martin

1978-01-01

302

Ochrana pri praci se zdroji ionizujiciho zareni. (Protection during work with ionizing radiation sources).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The publication has been set up as a textbook for training courses dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation, designed for supervisory staff and persons directly responsible for activities which involve the handling of ionizing ra...

1995-01-01

303

Proceedings of the American Nuclear Society executive conference on good radiation protection management  

SciTech Connect

Some of the topics covered in this book include: Records keeping and control of transient workers' access to vital areas; Designing plants for ALARA - revelation or evolution ; and There are good dollars and sense in good radiation protection management.

Not Available

1985-01-01

304

Description, Experimental Calibration, and Analysis of the Radiation Test Facility at the Protective Structures Development Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The initial calibration experiments performed at the Radiation Test Facility of the Protective Structures Development Center are described and their results analyzed. The dose rate above an open field and the attenuation afforded by the steel frame of the...

A. W. Starbird C. McDonnell J. Velletri J. F. Batter

1964-01-01

305

Proceedings of the Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (2nd).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Second Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 31--November 3, 1988, at the Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, r...

R. E. Swaja C. S. Sims

1988-01-01

306

The atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) program: Programmatic background and design of the cloud and radiation test bed  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, is a major new program of atmospheric measurement and modeling. The program is intended to improve the understanding of processes that affect atmospheric radiation and the description of these processes in climate models. An accurate description of atmospheric radiation and its interaction with clouds and cloud processes

Gerald M. Stokes; Stephen E. Schwartz

1994-01-01

307

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, April 2000  

SciTech Connect

This issue of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM Program) monthly newsletter is about the ARM Program goal to improve scientific understanding of the interactions of sunlight (solar radiation) with the atmosphere, then incorporate this understanding into computer models of climate change. To model climate accurately all around the globe, a variety of data must be collected from many locations on Earth. For its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites, ARM chose locations in the US Southern Great Plains, the North Slope of Alaska, and the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean to represent different climate types around the world. In this newsletter they consider the North Slope of Alaska site, with locations at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska.

Sisterson, D. L.

2000-05-05

308

THE EFFECT OF IONIZING RADIATIONS AND SUBSTRATE PROTECTION ON TYROSINASE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data are presented which indicate a specific protection of tyrosinase by ; its substrates. Explanations of this protective action are discussed. It ; appears that there are two sites of enzyme activity on the tyrosinase mole cule ; and that the cresolase site has a much higher affinity for its substrate than the ; catecholase site. It is suggested that

H. T. Jr. Yost; D. W. Jr. Fitterer; H. Goldin

1958-01-01

309

Protection from radiation-induced damage to spermatogenesis by hormone treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infertility caused by killing of the spermatogonial stem cells occurs frequently in men treated for cancer with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment of rats with testosterone plus estradiol, which reversibly inhibits the completion of spermatogenesis and protects spermatogonial stem cells from procarbazine-induced damage, would also protect these cells from radiation. Adult male LBNF rats were implanted for 6

B. Kurdoglu; G. Wilson; N. Parchuri; W. Ye; M. L. Meistrich

1994-01-01

310

Plant Phenolics as Radiation Protectants For The Beet Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Nucleopolyhedrovirus  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Thirteen phenolics were tested as ultraviolet (UV) protectants for the nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hbner). After 30 minute exposure to UVB/UVB radiation, eleven SeMNPV/phenolic combinations provided good to excellent UV protection when used at a concentra...

311

Synthesis of amino Derivatives of Dithio Acids as Potential Radiation Protective Agents.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Appreciable radiation-protective properties were found with the N-methyl-quinolinium- 2-dithioacetic acid derivatives. The bis(thiomethyl) and thio-methyl amino derivatives gave much greater protection (60-70% survival vs. 1000 rads) than the dithio acid ...

W. O. Foye

1984-01-01

312

New adventures in biomedical engineering: Radiation safety program management  

SciTech Connect

As biomedical/clinical engineers expand their managerial expertise into nontraditional areas, it makes sense that they pursue areas where their formal training in physics and mathematics can be applied. Radiation safety requires having the educational background to understand atomic structure, the nature of radioactivity, mathematics, biology, chemistry, and instrumentation. Program management requires having the administrative experience to manage people, data, files, documentation, and budgets. Radiation safety program management also requires an understanding of how best to prepare for a surprise inspection, similar to but technically more specific than other inspections and surveys previously experienced by the BME/CE professional.

Dickey, D.M. (Washington Hospital Center, DC (United States))

1991-09-01

313

PROTECTIVE MECHANISMS AND ACCLIMATION TO SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET-B RADIATION IN 'OENOTHERA STRICTA'  

EPA Science Inventory

Mechanisms of plant protection and acclimation to potentially damaging solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-320 nm) radiation incident on the Earth's surface were examined in Oenothera stricta. Attenuation of this radiation in the upper leaf epidermis reduces the penetration of UV-B ra...

314

Flavonoids can protect maize DNA from the induction of ultraviolet radiation damage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diverse flavonoid compounds are widely distributed in angio- sperm families. Flavonoids absorb radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum, and it has been proposed that these compounds function as UV filters. We demonstrate that the DNA in Zea mays plants that contain flavonoids (primarily anthocyanins) is protected from the induction of damage caused by UV radiation relative to

Ann E. Stapleton; Virginia Walbot

1994-01-01

315

Protective effects of melatonin and vitamin E in brain damage due to gamma radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gamma radiation is known to cause serious damage in the brain, and many agents have been used for neuroprotection. In this study, lipid peroxidation levels and histopathological changes in brain tissues of whole-body irradiated rats with likely radiation injury were compared to those with melatonin and vitamin E protection. Forty rats in four equal groups were used. The control group

Fatih S. Erol; Cahide Topsakal; M. Faik Ozveren; Metin Kaplan; Nevin Ilhan; I. Hanifi Ozercan; Oguz G. Yildiz

2004-01-01

316

Radiation exposure and protection for moon and Mars missions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A deep space radiation environment of galactic cosmic rays and energetic particles from solar flares imposes stringent requirements for radiation shielding for both personnel and electronic equipment at a moon base or on a Mars expedition. Current Los Alamos capabilities for calculating the effect of such shielding are described, and extensions and validation needed before actual manned deep space missions

R. E. MacFarlane; R. E. Prael; D. D. Strottman; G. F. Strniste; W. C. Feldman

1991-01-01

317

Nuclear Fragmentation Processes Relevant for Human Space Radiation Protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for human space explorations such as a moon base or a trip to Mars. Models have been developed in order to predict the radiation exposure to astronauts and to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials, and a key ingredient in these models is the physics of nuclear

Zi-Wei Lin

2007-01-01

318

Concepts of radiation safety and protection: Beyond BEIR V  

SciTech Connect

The publication of an updated report on the biological effects of ionizing radiation (BEIR V) has focused new attention on the potential hazards associated with the use of low doses of ionizing radiation for diagnostic purposes. This article reviews the BEIR V report findings and suggests methods for reducing the risks to dental patients and the operators of dental x-ray equipment.

Farman, A.G. (University of Louisville School of Dentistry, KY (USA))

1991-01-01

319

Guidance for Applicants for State Wellhead Protection Program Assistance Funds under the Safe Drinking Water Act.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1986 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) establish a new Wellhead Protection (WHP) Program to protect ground waters that supply wells and wellfields contributing drinking water to public water supply systems. The Guidance outlines procedu...

1987-01-01

320

Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant groundwater protection program management plan  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Y- 1 2 Plant (Y-12 Plant) is owned by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) under contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. The Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), which was initiated in 1975, provides for the protection of groundwater resources consistent with Federal, State, and local regulations, and in accordance with DOE orders and Energy Systems policies and procedures. The Y-12 Plant is located in Anderson County, Tennessee, and is within the corporate limits of the City of Oak Ridge. The Y-12 Plant is one of three major DOE complexes that comprise the 37,000-acre Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) located in Anderson and Roane counties. The Y-12 Plant is located in Bear Creek Valley at an elevation of about 950 feet (ft) above sea level. Bear Creek Valley is bounded on the northwest and southeast, and is isolated from populated areas of Oak Ridge, by parallel ridges that rise about 300 ft above the valley floor. The Y-12 Plant and its fenced buffer area are about 0.6 mile wide by 3.2 miles long and cover approximately 4,900 acres. The main industrialized section encompasses approximately 800 acres.

NONE

1996-06-01

321

Hanford Protective Barriers Program water-erosion studies, FY 1989  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting the water-erosion control task of the Hanford Protective Barriers Program to assess barrier stability against soil erosion and slumping. The purpose of the barriers is to protect shallow-burial waste sites at the Hanford Site from water infiltration, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years. These aboveground, mounded structures will consist of layered, fine-grained sediment and rock designed to direct surface- and ground-water pathways away from the buried waste. The fine-grained sediment for the barrier will be obtained from the McGee Ranch on the Hanford Site. The purpose of the FY 1989 field work was to test two hypotheses concerning the behavior of McGee Ranch soil: runoff may occur on very dry, fine-grained sediment prior to complete saturation and rainsplash is an important erosional process for this type of sediment. This report describes plot construction, sediment sampling, and calibration testing of the rainfall simulator. Baseline stratigraphic and sedimentologic data include bulk density and textural properties of sediment in the test plots. Baseline precipitation data consist of predetermined raindrop sizes, rainfall intensities, plot coverage, and operational data for the simulator. 10 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.; Walters, W.H.

1990-06-01

322

Protecting You/Protecting Me: Effects of an Alcohol Prevention and Vehicle Safety Program on Elementary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper describes an evaluation of Protecting You/Protecting Me (PY/PM), a classroom-based, alcohol-use prevention and vehicle safety program for elementary students in first through fifth grades developed by Mothers Against Drunk Driving. PY/PM lessons and activities focus on teaching children about (1) their brains (why their brain is

Bell, Mary Lou; Kelley-Baker, Tara; Rider, Raamses; Ringwalt, Christopher

2005-01-01

323

A review of voxel model development and radiation protection applications at ENEA.  

PubMed

The need of organ absorbed dose evaluation for radiation protection purposes stimulated, since the late 1960s, the development of anthropoid models to be used with radiation transport codes. Very significant improvements were introduced during the years, passing from stylised analytical human models to realistic voxel models based on computed tomography scans or MRI scans, and finally to advanced surface-geometry models. Besides illustrating the main contributions in this field from various international laboratories, this paper illustrates some applications of voxel models to internal (including in vivo monitoring) and external dosimetry for radiation protection. PMID:20385543

Gualdrini, Gianfranco; Ferrari, Paolo

2010-04-12

324

25 CFR 63.30 - What is the purpose of the Indian child protection and family violence prevention program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...purpose of the Indian child protection and family violence prevention program? 63.30...GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Program §...

2013-04-01

325

Low-Dose-Radiation Stimulated Natural Chemical and Biological Protection Against Lung Cancer  

PubMed Central

Research is being conducted world-wide related to chemoprevention of future lung cancer among smokers. The fact that low doses and dose rates of some sparsely ionizing forms of radiation (e.g., x rays, gamma rays, and beta radiation) stimulate transient natural chemical and biological protection against cancer in high-risk individuals is little known. The cancer preventative properties relate to radiation adaptive response (radiation hormesis) and involve stimulated protective biological signaling (a mild stress response). The biological processes associated with the protective signaling are now better understood and include: increased availability of efficient DNA double-strand break repair (p53-related and in competition with normal apoptosis), stimulated auxiliary apoptosis of aberrant cells (presumed p53-independent), and stimulated protective immune functions. This system of low-dose radiation activated natural protection (ANP) requires an individual-specific threshold level of mild stress and when invoked can efficiently prevent the occurrence of cancers as well as other genomic-instability-associated diseases. In this paper, low, essentially harmless doses of gamma rays spread over an extended period are shown via use of a biological-based, hormetic relative risk (HRR) model to be highly efficient in preventing lung cancer induction by alpha radiation from inhaled plutonium.

Scott, B. R.

2008-01-01

326

New nuclear build and evolving radiation protection challenges.  

PubMed

Radiological protection has continued to evolve in order to meet emerging challenges and will continue to do so. This paper will discuss the scientific and social challenges that will or may be faced by the radiological protection community in the coming 10 to 20 y and how these may affect what is expected to be a renewed interest in building and operating nuclear power plants for electricity generation. PMID:21399418

Lazo, Edward

2011-01-01

327

Radiation exposure and protection for moon and Mars missions  

SciTech Connect

A deep space radiation environment of galactic cosmic rays and energetic particles from solar flares imposes stringent requirements for radiation shielding for both personnel and electronic equipment at a moon base or on a Mars expedition. Current Los Alamos capabilities for calculating the effect of such shielding are described, and extensions and validation needed before actual manned deep space missions are launched are outlined. The biological effects of exposure to cosmic-ray ions and to low doses of radiation at low dose rates are poorly understood. Recent Los Alamos work on mutation effects in cells, DNA repair processes, and the analysis of chromosomal aberrations promises to increase our understanding of the basic processes, to provide methods to screen for radiation sensitivity, and to provide advanced dosimetry equipment for space missions.

MacFarlane, R.E.; Prael, R.E.; Strottman, D.D.; Strniste, G.F.; Feldman, W.C.

1991-04-01

328

A regulatory perspective on whether the system of radiation protection is fit for purpose.  

PubMed

The system of radiation protection has its origins in the early efforts to protect people from x rays and radium. It was at the Second International Congress of Radiology in Stockholm in 1928 where the first radiation protection recommendations were adopted. The system of protection steadily evolved as new sources of exposure arose and understanding of radiation-related health risks improved. Safeguarding against these risks has required regulators to set enforceable (i.e. measurable) standards. From erythema dose to tolerance dose, critical organ dose to effective dose equivalent, and now effective dose, the units used to set these limits have evolved along with the science underpinning them. Similarly, the definition of the person or group being protected has changed - from Standard Man to Reference Man to Reference Person, with age and gender differences now considered explicitly. As regulators look towards implementing the changes in the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), there remain questions about how to translate an optimisation-based system of constraints and reference levels into the more familiar regime of enforceable limits. Nevertheless, as the new ICRP Recommendations are refinements of a system that did the job it was designed to do more than adequately, so too will the new system of radiation protection be fit for purpose. PMID:23089004

Boyd, M A

2012-08-22

329

Medicaid program: computer matching and privacy protection for Medicaid eligibility--HCFA. Final rule.  

PubMed

This final rule revises regulations concerning the income and eligibility verification system (IEVS) under the Medicaid program. It implements provisions of the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988 and the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Amendments of 1990. These laws improve the oversight and procedures governing the disclosure of personal information used in computer matching programs and protect the privacy and due process rights of individuals whose records are exchanged by these programs. PMID:10133065

1994-01-31

330

Radiation Rescue: Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Protect from Lethal Irradiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundSuccessful treatment of acute radiation syndromes relies on immediate supportive care. In patients with limited hematopoietic recovery potential, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is the only curative treatment option. Because of time consuming donor search and uncertain outcome we propose MSC treatment as an alternative treatment for severely radiation-affected individuals.Methods and FindingsMouse mesenchymal stromal cells (mMSCs) were expanded from bone

Claudia Lange; Brbel Brunswig-Spickenheier; Heike Cappallo-Obermann; Katharina Eggert; Ursula M. Gehling; Cornelia Rudolph; Brigitte Schlegelberger; Kerstin Cornils; Jozef Zustin; Andrej-Nikolai Spiess; Axel R. Zander; Eric J. Bernhard

2011-01-01

331

Synthesis of nanosilver using a vitamin C derivative and studies on radiation protection.  

PubMed

Silver nanoparticles were prepared from silver nitrate using a vitamin C derivative, 6-palmitoyl ascorbic acid-2-glucoside (PAsAG), via a sonochemical experiment. The resultant golden yellow solution that contained silver nanoparticle-PAsAG complex (SN-PAsAG) of about 5?nm particle sizes was explored for its potential to offer protection to DNA from ?-radiation-induced damages. The presence of SN-PAsAG during irradiation inhibited the disappearance of covalently closed circular (ccc) form of plasmid pBR322 with a dose modifying factor of 1.78. SN-PAsAG protected cellular DNA from radiation-induced damage as evident from comet assay study on mouse spleen cells, irradiated ex vivo. When orally administered with SN-PAsAG at 1 hour prior to whole-body radiation exposure, cellular DNA was found protected from radiation-induced strand breaks in various tissues (spleen cells, bone marrow cells, and blood leucocytes) of animals. Also, SN-PAsAG could enhance the rate of repair of cellular DNA in blood leucocytes and bone marrow cells when administered immediately after radiation exposure. The studies, under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo radiation exposure conditions, showed effective radiation protection. PMID:21539456

Chandrasekharan, Dhanya K; Khanna, Pawan K; Kagiya, Tsutomu V; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan

2011-04-01

332

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, September 2002.  

SciTech Connect

This Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter covers the following topics: The Raman lidar at the SGP central facility is receiving upgrades to its environmental controls; The instrument tower at Okmulgee State Park is receiving upgrades to prevent Turkey Vultures from roosting on the booms.

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-10-02

333

Direct Beam Solar Radiation. A Digital Computer program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A digital computer program is described that provides bihourly direct beam solar radiation values (langleys/minute) and daily totals (langleys) for one or more sites anywhere on the Earth, for one or more days of the year, for eight different atmospheric ...

L. A. Rasmussen

1974-01-01

334

BOOK REVIEW: Fluence-Based and Microdosimetric Event-Based Methods for Radiation Protection in Space (NCRP Report No 137)  

Microsoft Academic Search

National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Bethesda, MD: NCRP This is the third report of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements which considers the potential radiation hazards associated with human activities in Space. The previous publications (1989 and 2000) considered these hazards largely in the conventional terms of absorbed dose and quality factors, and were guided by

J. Simmons

2002-01-01

335

Modern Methods of Real-Time Gamma Radiation Monitoring for General Personal Protection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Real-time radiation detectors become an essential part of emergency personnel who may have to respond to unknown accidents, incidents or terrorist attacks, which could involve radioactive material. More and more ordinary citizens are interested in personal radiation protection as well. Reasons include lost sources, nuclear industrial accidents, nuclear or radiological terrorism and the possibility of nuclear weapons being used in a war. People want to have the ability to measure it for themselves and they want to be notified when the radiation levels are increased. To meet this demand, considerable research into new sensors is underway, including efforts to enhance the sensor performance through both the material properties and manufacturing technologies. Deep understanding of physical properties of the materials under the influence of radiation exposure is vital for the effective design of dosimeter devices. Detection of radiation is based on the fact that both the electrical and the optical properties of the materials undergo changes upon the exposure to ionizing radiation. It is believed that radiation causes structural defects. The influence of radiation depends on both the dose and the parameters of the films including their thickness: the degradation is more severe for the higher dose and the thinner films. This paper presents overview of modern methods of real-time gamma radiation monitoring for personal protection of radiation workers and general public and suggests further developments in this area.

Korostynska, O.; Arshak, K.; Arshak, A.; Vaseashta, Ashok

336

Low-dose extrapolation of radiation health risks: some implications of uncertainty for radiation protection at low doses.  

PubMed

Ionizing radiation is a known and well-quantified human cancer risk factor, based on a remarkably consistent body of information from epidemiological studies of exposed populations. Typical examples of risk estimation include use of Japanese atomic bomb survivor data to estimate future risk from radiation-related cancer among American patients receiving multiple computed tomography scans, persons affected by radioactive fallout, or persons whose livelihoods involve some radiation exposure, such as x-ray technicians, interventional radiologists, or shipyard workers. Our estimates of radiation-related risk are uncertain, reflecting statistical variation and our imperfect understanding of crucial assumptions that must be made if we are to apply existing epidemiological data to particular situations. Fortunately, that uncertainty is also highly quantifiable, and can be presented concisely and transparently. Radiation protection is ultimately a political process that involves consent by stakeholders, a diverse group that includes people who might be expected to be risk-averse and concerned with plausible upper limits on risk (how bad could it be?), cost-averse and concerned with lower limits on risk (can you prove there is a nontrivial risk at current dose levels?), or combining both points of view. How radiation-related risk is viewed by individuals and population subgroups also depends very much on perception of related benefit, which might be (for example) medical, economic, altruistic, or nonexistent. The following presentation follows the lead of National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Commentary 14, NCRP Report 126, and later documents in treating radiation protection from the viewpoint of quantitative uncertainty analysis. PMID:19820450

Land, Charles E

2009-11-01

337

Perspective on the Use of LNT for Radiation Protection and Risk Assessment By The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

PubMed Central

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) bases its risk assessments, regulatory limits, and nonregulatory guidelines for population exposures to low level ionizing radiation on the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, which assumes that the risk of cancer due to a low dose exposure is proportional to dose, with no threshold. The use of LNT for radiation protection purposes has been repeatedly endorsed by authoritative scientific advisory bodies, including the National Academy of Sciences BEIR Committees, whose recommendations form a primary basis of EPAs risk assessment methodology. Although recent radiobiological findings indicate novel damage and repair processes at low doses, LNT is supported by data from both epidemiology and radiobiology. Given the current state of the science, the consensus positions of key scientific and governmental bodies, as well as the conservatism and calculational convenience of the LNT assumption, it is unlikely that EPA will modify this approach in the near future.

Puskin, Jerome S.

2009-01-01

338

Savings Estimates for the United States Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR Voluntary Product Labeling Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency-labeling program operated jointly by the United States Department of Energy and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading ...

C. Webber M. C. Sanchez O. Homan R. Brown

2008-01-01

339

34 CFR 381.1 - What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...of Individual Rights program? This program is designed to support a system in each State to protect the legal and human rights of eligible individuals with disabilities. (Authority: Sec. 509(a) of the Act; 29 U.S.C....

2009-07-01

340

24 CFR 5.363 - Housing programs: Protection of the pet.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Housing programs: Protection of the pet. 5.363 Section 5.363 Housing and...GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Pet Ownership for the Elderly or Persons With Disabilities Pet Ownership Requirements for Housing...

2010-04-01

341

Radiation protection: the NCRP guidelines and some considerations for the future.  

PubMed

The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the USA and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), worldwide, were formed about 1928 and have since made recommendations on appropriate levels of protection from ionizing radiation for workers and for the public. These recommendations and much of the guidance provided by these organizations have usually been adopted by regulatory bodies around the world. In the case of the NCRP, the levels have fallen from 0.1 roentgen per day in 1934 to the current 5 rem per year (a factor of about 5). The present levels recommended by both the ICRP and the NCRP correspond to reasonable levels of risk where the risks of harm from ionizing radiation are compared with the hazards of other, commonly regarded, as safe, industries. Some considerations for the future in radiation protection include trends in exposure levels (generally downward for the average exposure to workers) and improvements in risk estimation; questions of lifetime limits, de minimis levels, and partial body exposures; plus problems of high LET radiations, acceptability of risk, synergisms, and risk systems for protection. PMID:7342492

Sinclair, W K

342

Reduction in radiation-induced brain injury by use of pentobarbital or lidocaine protection  

SciTech Connect

To determine if barbiturates would protect brain at high doses of radiation, survival rates in rats that received whole-brain x-irradiation during pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia were compared with those of control animals that received no medication and of animals anesthetized with ketamine. The animals were shielded so that respiratory and digestive tissues would not be damaged by the radiation. Survival rates in rats that received whole-brain irradiation as a single 7500-rad dose under pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia was increased from between from 0% and 20% to between 45% and 69% over the 40 days of observation compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.007). Ketamine anesthesia provided no protection. There were no notable differential effects upon non-neural tissues, suggesting that pentobarbital afforded protection through modulation of ambient neural activity during radiation exposure. Neural suppression during high-dose cranial irradiation protects brain from acute and early delayed radiation injury. Further development and application of this knowledge may reduce the incidence of radiation toxicity of the central nervous system (CNS) and may permit the safe use of otherwise unsafe doses of radiation in patients with CNS neoplasms.

Oldfield, E.H.; Friedman, R.; Kinsella, T.; Moquin, R.; Olson, J.J.; Orr, K.; DeLuca, A.M. (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1990-05-01

343

Principles and Application of Collective Dose in Radiation Protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

`For moderate increments above background, a linear relationship between the incremental dose and the incremental probability of a deleterious effect will be an adequate approximation' (International Commission on Radiological Protection). This, and similar statements going back over a number of years, validates the collective dose concept. Put simply, collective dose is the sum of the doses to all people in

John Cooper

1996-01-01

344

Protection against radiation induced damage to spermatogenesis by Podophyllum hexandrum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aqueous extract of rhizome of Podophyllum hexandrum (RP-1) has been found to render protection against lethal whole body irradiation (10 Gy), damage to haemopoietic and gastrointestinal tissue etc. in mice. In order to assess its suitability from clinical point of view its effects were investigated on male germinal tissue in mice. Swiss albino strain A male mice (1012 weeks) were

Namita Samanta; H. C Goel

2002-01-01

345

FINAL REPORT FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs  

SciTech Connect

The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004.

Joe M. Aldrich

2004-11-01

346

Radiation Effects and Protection for Moon and Mars Missions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Manned and robotic missions to the Earth's moon and Mars are exposed to a continuous flux of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and occasional, but intense, fluxes of Solar Energetic Particles (SEP). These natural radiations impose hazards to manned exploration, but also present some constraints to the design of robotic missions. The hazards to interplanetary flight crews and their uncertainties have

Thomas A. Parnell; Tony W. Armstrong

347

Experimental Determination of Ultraviolet Radiation Protection of Common Materials  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Aiming at a better understanding of the problems associated with the depletion of the ozone layer, we propose several experiments to be performed by students of different levels: secondary and first-year undergraduate students. The oxidation of iodide induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, generated by a mercury lamp, is used as an indicator for

Tavares, Susana C. A.; da Silva, Joaquim C. G. Esteves; Paiva, Joao

2007-01-01

348

Radiation protection recommendations on dose limits: The role of the NCRP and the ICRP and future developments  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to review the role of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in making recommendations on dose limits for ionizing radiation exposure for workers and for the public. The text describes the new limits for workers and public recommended by ICRP in 1991 and NCRP in 1993 and the composition of the radiation health detriment on which they are based. The main component of this detriment is the risk of radiation induced cancer which is now estimated to be about three times greater than a decade or so earlier. Uncertainties in these risk estimates are discussed. Some special radiation protection problems, such as those for the embryo or fetus are described. The article also addresses future progress in radiation protection particularly with regard to future improvements in the scientific basis for radiation protection recommendations.

Sinclair, W.K. [National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Bethesda, MD (United States)

1995-02-01

349

Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1990 highlights  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to design and test an earthen cover system(s) that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. The joint PNL/WHC program was initiated in FY 1986. To date, research findings support the initial concepts of barrier designs for the Hanford Site. A fine-soil surface is planned to partition surface water into runoff and temporary storage. Transpiration by vegetation that grows in the fine-soil layer will return stored water to the atmosphere as will surface evaporation. A capillary break created by the interface of the fine-soil layer and coarser textured materials below will further limit the downward migration of surface water, making it available over a longer period of time for cycling to the atmosphere. Should water pass the interface, it will drain laterally through a coarse textured sand/gravel layer. Tested barrier designs appear to work adequately to prevent drainage under current and postulated wetter-climate (added precipitation) conditions. Wind and water erosion tasks are developing data to predict the extent of erosion on barrier surfaces. Data collected during the last year confirm the effectiveness of small burrowing animals in removing surface water. Water infiltrating through burrows of larger mammals was subsequently lost by natural processes. Natural analog and climate change studies are under way to provide credibility for modeling the performance of barrier designs over a long period of time and under shifts in climate. 10 refs., 30 figs.

Cadwell, L.L. (ed.)

1991-09-01

350

Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection Training Manual for Radiation Control. Lectures, Demonstrations, Laboratories and Tours on the Course on Non-Ionizing Radiations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In late 1974, consultation with the National Training Coordination Committee of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors determined that State personnel needed training in order to fulfill their responsibility with respect to the growing numb...

K. Z. Morgan R. L. Burkhart

1976-01-01

351

Hanford Protective Barriers Program asphalt barrier studies -- FY 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Protective Barrier (HPB) Program is evaluating alternative barriers to provide a means of meeting stringent water infiltration requirements. One type of alternative barrier being considered is an asphalt-based layer, 1.3 to 15 cm thick, which has been shown to be very effective as a barrier for radon gas and, hence, should be equally effective as a barrier for the larger molecules of water. Fiscal Year 1988 studies focused on the selection and formulation of the most promising asphalt materials for further testing in small-tube lysimeters. Results of laboratory-scale formulation and hydraulic conductivity tests led to the selection of a rubberized asphalt material and an admixture of 24 wt% asphalt emulsion and concrete sand as the two barriers for lysimeter testing. Eight lysimeters, four each containing the two asphalt treatments, were installed in the Small Tube Lysimeter Facility on the Hanford Site. The lysimeter tests allow the performance of these barrier formulations to be evaluated under more natural environmental conditions.

Freeman, H.D.; Gee, G.W.

1989-05-01

352

Protection from radiation injury by elemental diet: does added glutamine change the effect?  

PubMed Central

The feeding of a protein hydrolysate based 'elemental' diet supplemented with added glutamine did not provide superior protection to the small intestine of dogs subjected to therapeutic pelvic irradiation. Comparison of diets with and without the added glutamine showed significant protection of the intestine from radiation injury. Both histological examination and electron microscopy showed lack of tissue injury with both diets. The activity of the free radical generating enzymes, scavengers, and antioxidants were similar in the intestinal mucosa of dogs fed either diet. After radiation, however, the activity of xanthine oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase were significantly (p < 0.002) higher in the intestine of dogs fed elemental diet without the added glutamine. If the activities of these enzymes are important in the protection of the intestine from radiation injury, then the addition of extra glutamine may provide no benefit. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

McArdle, A H

1994-01-01

353

mTOR inhibition prevents epithelial stem cell senescence and protects from radiation-induced mucositis  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY The integrity of the epidermis and mucosal epithelia is highly dependent on resident self-renewing stem cells, which makes them vulnerable to physical and chemical insults compromising the repopulating capacity of the epithelial stem cell compartment. This is frequently the case in cancer patients receiving radiation or chemotherapy, many of whom develop mucositis, a debilitating condition involving painful and deep mucosal ulcerations. Here, we show that inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) with rapamycin increases the clonogenic capacity of primary human oral keratinocytes and their resident self-renewing cells by preventing stem cell senescence. This protective effect of rapamycin is mediated by the increase expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and the consequent inhibition of ROS formation and oxidative stress. mTOR inhibition also protects from the loss of proliferative basal epithelial stem cells upon ionizing radiation in vivo, thereby preserving the integrity of the oral mucosa and protecting from radiation-induced mucositis.

Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Patel, Vyomesh; Cotrim, Ana; Leelahavanichkul, Kantima; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Mitchell, James B.; Gutkind, J. Silvio

2012-01-01

354

Radiation protection for human exploration of the moon and mars: Application of the mash code system  

SciTech Connect

The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding code system -- MASH, developed for the Department of Defense for calculating radiation protection factors for armored vehicles against neutron and gamma radiation, has been used to assess the dose from reactor radiation to an occupant in a habitat on Mars. The capability of MASH to reproduce measured data is summarized to demonstrate the accuracy of the code. The estimation of the radiation environment in an idealized reactor-habitat model is reported to illustrate the merits of the adjoint Monte Carlo procedure for space related studies. The reactor radiation dose for different reactor-habitat surface configurations to a habitat occupant is compared with the natural radiation dose acquired during a 500-day Mars mission.

Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.; Drischler, J.D.; Barnes, J.M.

1992-06-01

355

Radiation protection for human exploration of the moon and mars: Application of the mash code system  

SciTech Connect

The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding code system -- MASH, developed for the Department of Defense for calculating radiation protection factors for armored vehicles against neutron and gamma radiation, has been used to assess the dose from reactor radiation to an occupant in a habitat on Mars. The capability of MASH to reproduce measured data is summarized to demonstrate the accuracy of the code. The estimation of the radiation environment in an idealized reactor-habitat model is reported to illustrate the merits of the adjoint Monte Carlo procedure for space related studies. The reactor radiation dose for different reactor-habitat surface configurations to a habitat occupant is compared with the natural radiation dose acquired during a 500-day Mars mission.

Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.; Drischler, J.D.; Barnes, J.M.

1992-01-01

356

The Relevance of Occupational Epidemiology to Radiation Protection Standards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large-scale epidemiological studies of U.S. Department of Energy workers have been underway since the 1960s. Despite the increasing availability of information about long- term follow-up of badge-monitored nuclear workers, standard-setting bodies continue to rely on the Life Span Study (LSS) of A-bomb survivors as the primary epidemiological basis for making judgments about hazards of low-level radiation. Additionally, faith in the

Wing S; Richardson D; Stewart A

1999-01-01

357

[Radiation protection issues in brachytherapic treatment of prostatic cancer].  

PubMed

Brachytherapy is an effective radiotherapeutic treatment for localized prostatic cancer. The permanent brachytherapy is a particular kind of radiotherapy which, US guided, uses permanently implanted seeds containing radioactive sources (Pd103 or I 125). The procedure is minimally invasive and allows to obtain high percentage of success which is comparable to surgery. The possibility to confine permanent radioactive implants in a well delimitated area doesn't exclude the exposition of both the medical staff and family's members of implanted patients. The radiation exposure involves the medical physicists, the radiotherapists, the Medical Radiology Technician, the anaesthetists, the surgeons, the professional nurses but also, after the brachytherapy treatment, public and family members, comforters and cares. It's necessary to consider radiation safety aspects of brachytherapy in order to reduce the risks of exposition. At the end, several studies showed that cremation of bodies could be a possible radiation source that remains in the patient's ashes, potentially inhaled by crematorium staff or members of the public. PMID:18409959

Bellia, M; Bellia, S; Ciantia, F; Luca, N; Serafino, L; Occhipinti, A; Bona, R; Mannino, G

358

HEU Transparency Implementation Program and its Radiation Safety Program  

SciTech Connect

In February 1993, the Governments of the United States (U.S.) and the Russian Federation (R.F.) signed a bilateral Agreement for the U.S. purchase of low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from 500 metric tons (MT) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) resulting from the dismantlement of Russian nuclear weapons. The HEU Purchase Agreement serves important national security and nonproliferation policy imperatives for both countries since its implementation reduces the quantity of surplus Russian HEU that could be stolen and diverted for weapons use. In return, Russia receives much needed U.S. dollars over a 20-year delivery period. In 2001, Russia received over half a billion US dollars from the purchase of the LEU blended from 30 MT HEU. As part of this Agreement, transparency rights were agreed upon that provide confidence to both governments that the nonproliferation objectives of the Agreement are being fulfilled. While the U.S. Department of State, in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is responsible negotiating transparency rights associated with this nuclear material, the NNSA is responsible for implementing those rights. These rights allow U.S. and R.F., personnel (called ''monitors'') to visit the processing facilities and observe the steps for processing the HEU into fuel for nuclear reactors. In this fashion, the processing of HEU to LEU is made ''transparent.'' For DOE, there are three transparency objectives: (1) that the HEU is extracted from nuclear weapons, (2) that this same HEU is oxidized, and (3) that the HEU is blended into LEU. For MINATOM, the transparency objective is: (1) that the LEU is fabricated into fuel for commercial nuclear power reactors: The transparency is based on visits by designated transparency monitors (100 preapproved U.S. and Russian monitors) with specific rights to monitor and to access storage and processing areas to provide confidence that the nonproliferation goals of the agreement are met. The Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program (TIP), within NNSA implements the transparency provisions of the bilateral agreement. It is constantly making progress towards meeting its objectives and gathering the information necessary to confirm that Russian weapons-usable HEU is being blended into LEU. Since the first shipment in 1995 through December 2001, a total of 141 MT of weapons-grade HEU, about 28% of the agreed total and equivalent to 5,650 nuclear weapons, was converted to LEU, further reducing the threat of this material returning back into nuclear weapons. In the year 2001, the LEU sold to electric utility customers for fuel was sufficient to supply the annual fuel needs for about 50 percent of the U.S. installed nuclear electrical power generation capacity. There are four primary uranium processing activities involved in converting HEU metal components extracted from dismantled nuclear weapons into fuel for power reactors: (1) Converting HEU metal to purified HEU oxide; (2) Converting purified HEU oxide to HEU hexafluoride; (3) Downblending HEU hexafluoride to LEU hexafluoride; and (4) Converting LEU hexafluoride into reactor fuel. The first three processes are currently being performed at four Russian nuclear processing facilities: Mayak Production Association (MPA), Electrochemical Plant (ECP), Siberian Chemical Enterprise (SChE), and Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP). Following the blending down of HEU, the LEU hexafluoride is loaded into industry, standard 30B cylinders at the downblending facilities and transported to St. Petersburg, Russia. From there the LEU is shipped by sea to the United States where it is converted into fuel to be used in nuclear power plants. There are six U.S. facilities processing LEU subject to the HEU purchase agreement: the Portsmouth uranium enrichment plant, Global Nuclear Fuel -America, Framatome-Lynchburg, Framatome-Richland, Westinghouse-Hematite, and Westinghouse Fuel Fabrication Facility.

Radev, R

2002-01-31

359

Effect of glutaurine and its derivatives and their combinations with radiation protective substances upon irradiated mice.  

PubMed

The radiation protective effects of glutaurine (gamma-L-glutamyl-taurine, Litoralon), and of some of its derivatives, as well as of their combinations with substances of the amino-alkyl-thiol group, have been investigated in mice. The results suggest that glutaurine possesses a radiation protective effect in animals irradiated with LD50/30 of roentgen rays and 60Co gamma rays. The compound has a favourable effect also when administered after irradiation. Its protective effect is especially marked in case of prolonged irradiation. Among the combinations best results were obtained by its simultaneous administration with subminimal doses of AET or cystamine. Some of its derivatives also exhibited considerable protection against irradiation with roentgen rays. PMID:6278851

Feuer, L; Benk, G

1981-01-01

360

Oral PEG 15-20 protects the intestine against radiation : role of lipid rafts.  

SciTech Connect

Intestinal injury following abdominal radiation therapy or accidental exposure remains a significant clinical problem that can result in varying degrees of mucosal destruction such as ulceration, vascular sclerosis, intestinal wall fibrosis, loss of barrier function, and even lethal gut-derived sepsis. We determined the ability of a high-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol-based copolymer, PEG 15-20, to protect the intestine against the early and late effects of radiation in mice and rats and to determine its mechanism of action by examining cultured rat intestinal epithelia. Rats were exposed to fractionated radiation in an established model of intestinal injury, whereby an intestinal segment is surgically placed into the scrotum and radiated daily. Radiation injury score was decreased in a dose-dependent manner in rats gavaged with 0.5 or 2.0 g/kg per day of PEG 15-20 (n = 9-13/group, P < 0.005). Complementary studies were performed in a novel mouse model of abdominal radiation followed by intestinal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), a common pathogen that causes lethal gut-derived sepsis following radiation. Mice mortality was decreased by 40% in mice drinking 1% PEG 15-20 (n = 10/group, P < 0.001). Parallel studies were performed in cultured rat intestinal epithelial cells treated with PEG 15-20 before radiation. Results demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented radiation-induced intestinal injury in rats, prevented apoptosis and lethal sepsis attributable to P. aeruginosa in mice, and protected cultured intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and microbial adherence and possible invasion. PEG 15-20 appeared to exert its protective effect via its binding to lipid rafts by preventing their coalescence, a hallmark feature in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to radiation.

Valuckaite, V.; Zaborina, O.; Long, J.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Wang, J.; Holbrook, C.; Zaborin, A.; Drabik, K.; Katdare, M.; Mauceri, H.; Weichselbaum, R.; Firestone, M. A.; Lee, K. Y.; Chang, E. B.; Matthews, J.; Alverdy, J. C.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Arkansas

2009-12-01

361

Thiols and selenium: protective effect on human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sensitivity of human dermal fibroblasts to UVA radiation has been linked to a decrease in intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels. GSH (?-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine) is a radical scavenger and a cofactor for protective enzymes such as selenium-dependent GSH peroxidases. In this study, we examine the possibility of a cooperative interaction between three cysteine delivery systems and selenium in protecting human cultured fibroblasts

N. Emonet; M. T. Leccia; A. Favier; J. C. Beani; M. J. Richard

1997-01-01

362

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, August 2002.  

SciTech Connect

ARM in Australia--The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has launched its newest Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) in Darwin, Australia. This is the fifth research site established since ARM Program inception in 1989. The new Darwin site and two other ARCS sites--on Manus Island and the island of Nauru--are in the Tropical Western Pacific region. The North American sites in the U.S. Southern Great Plains and on the North Slope of Alaska represent two different climate regions. A goal of the ARM Program is to improve understanding of (1) the ways clouds and atmospheric moisture interact with solar radiation and (2) the effects of these interactions on both a local and global climate. Years of collected data are being used to improve computer climate models so that their predictions are more accurate. The new Darwin site is at the Darwin International Airport, adjacent to the Darwin Airport Meteorological Office. The site features state-of-the-art instrumentation used to measure solar radiation and surface radiation balance; cloud parameters; and standard meteorological variables such as temperature, wind speed and direction, atmospheric moisture, precipitation rates, and barometric pressure. A data management system (DMS) consisting of two computer workstations collects, stores, processes, and backs up data from each of the ARCS instruments. Data are transmitted via the Internet to the United States for further processing and archiving with data from the other ARM sites. All ARM data are freely available via the Internet to the public and the worldwide scientific community (http://www.arm.gov/). Operational since April 2002, the Darwin site was officially dedicated on July 30, 2002, by dignitaries from both the United States and Australia. The site is a collaborative effort between DOE and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's Special Services Unit--the equivalent of the U.S. National Weather Service--which will handle daily operation. U.S. Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham remarked, ''Our collaboration with Australia in the establishment of this site represents an exciting expansion of the ARM Program and our ongoing quest to understand and predict the earth's climate.'' The five ARM Program research locations were chosen because of their varying and abundant cloud formations. More cloud types mean a more complete investigation. To the ARM collection, the Darwin site adds data sets detailing interactions between a unique type of cloud and solar radiation. This addition represents another step toward the ARM goal of more accurate predictions from computer climate models.

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-08-29

363

The present status and trend of ionizing-radiation application on environment protection in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies in a large scale on ionizing-radiation application on environment protection and pollution control have been carried out for nearly 20 years in China. Desulphurization and denitrification of flue gas by electron-beam processing in coal-fired power stations are a successful industrial example and therefore, a wider use of ionizing radiation in air pollution control can be expected in the near

Ding Yonghua; Zheng Degui; Yan Aoshuang; Niu Guanghua

2002-01-01

364

Cancer risk above 1 Gy and the impact for space radiation protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyses of the epidemiological data on the Japanese A-bomb survivors, who were exposed to ?-rays and neutrons, provide most current information on the doseresponse of radiation-induced cancer. Since the dose span of main interest is usually between 0 and 1Gy, for radiation protection purposes, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is often focused on this range. However, estimates of cancer

Uwe Schneider; Linda Walsh

2009-01-01

365

Lack of protection by carotenes against gamma-radiation damage in Phycomyces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carotenes could protect cells from radiation damage by chemically quenching the free radicals and the activated chemical species\\u000a originated by the exposure. We tested this hypothesis with strains of the zygomycete Phycomyces blakesleeanus that contained different carotenes (phytoene, lycopene, ?-carotene) or different concentrations of ?-carotene. Pairs of strains\\u000a were cultured together, exposed to a maximum of 73 Gy ?-radiation from

V. Martn-Rojas; A. Gmez-Puerto; E. Cerd-Olmedo

1996-01-01

366

A Monte Carlo model of an industrial gauge for radiation protection purposes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mahlo Gravimat densitometers\\/gauges located at the Feltex carpet factory in Christchurch, New Zealand, contain the radionuclide\\u000a strontium-90 (Sr-90). Accurate dose\\/dose rate estimation is always an important concern from a radiation protection point\\u000a of view. The EGSnrc\\/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code was used to create a model of one gauge to determination of the radiation dose\\u000a distributions and dose rates in

R. McGurk; J. Turner; H. M. Deloar; K. Packer

2008-01-01

367

Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act and Marine Mammal Protection Act. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

Two laws governing activities in the marine environment are considered in this Reference Book. The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA, P.L. 92-532) regulates ocean dumping of waste, provides for a research program on ocean dumping, and provides for the designation and regulation of marine sanctuaries. The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA, P.L. 92-522) establishes a federal program to protect and manage marine mammals. The Fishery Conservation and Management Act (FCMA, P.L. 94-265) establishes a program to regulate marine fisheries resources and commercial marine fishermen. Because the Department of Energy (DOE) is not engaged in any activities that could be classified as fishing under FCMA, this Act and its regulations have no implications for the DOE; therefore, no further consideration of this Act is given within this Reference Book. The requirements of the MPRSA and the MMPA are discussed in terms of their implications for the DOE.

Not Available

1988-01-31

368

The international atom: evolution of radiation control programs.  

PubMed

Under the Atoms for Peace program, Turkey received a one MWt swimming pool reactor in 1962 that initiated a health physics program for the reactor and a Radiation Control Program (RCP) for the country's use of ionizing radiation. Today, over 13,000 radiation workers, concentrated in the medical field, provide improved medical care with 6,200 x-ray units, including 494 CAT scanners, 222 radioimmunoassay (RIA) labs and 42 radiotherapy centers. Industry has a large stake in the safe use of ionizing radiation with over 1,200 x-ray and gamma radiography and fluoroscopic units, 2,500 gauges in automated process control and five irradiators. A 48-person RCP staff oversees this expanded radiation use. One incident involving a spent 3.3 TBq (88 Ci) 60Co source resulted in 10 overexposures but no fatalities. Taiwan received a 1.6 MWt swimming pool reactor in 1961 and rapidly applied nuclear technology to the medical and industrial fields. Today, there are approximately 24,000 licensed radiation workers in nuclear power field, industry, medicine and academia. Four BWRs and two PWRs supply about 25% of the island's electrical power needs. One traumatic event galvanized the RCP when an undetermined amount of 60Co was accidentally incorporated into reinforcing bars, which in turn were incorporated into residential and commercial buildings. Public exposures were estimated to range up to 15 mSv (1.3 rem) per annum. There were no reported ill effects, except possibly psychological, to date. The RCP now has instituted stringent control measures to ensure radiation-free dwellings and work places. Albania's RCP is described as it evolved since 1972. Regulations were promulgated which followed the IAEA Basic Safety Standards of that era. With 525 licenses and 600 radiation workers, the problem was not in the regulations per se but in their enforcement. The IAEA helped to upgrade the RCP as the economy evolved from one that was centrally planned economy to a free market economy. As this transition takes place, public radiation exposures in the medical field will continue to be high until the old x-ray equipment is phased out. A small conscientious health physics staff works with limited resources to keep radiation exposures at acceptable levels. These three country RCPs, as they have evolved, have some commonality. Today, all radiation installations are licensed, both for radioactive material and x-ray equipment. Radiation workers are individually licensed or registered. All RCPs have, or are striving to have, their radiation regulations conform to ICRP 60 recommendations as spelled out in the Basic Safety Standard (1996). Finally, all three countries have as yet to find a permanent solution for their radioactive waste. PMID:12075677

Bradley, F J

2002-07-01

369

A biokinetic model for manganese for use in radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

The ICRP is updating its recommendations regarding occupational exposure to radionuclides including the biokinetic models used to derive dose coefficients and assess bioassay data for internally deposited radionuclides. This report reviews biokinetic data for manganese and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic manganese consistent with the current database. The model provides a more detailed and biologically realistic description of the movement of absorbed manganese in the body than the model currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The proposed model and current ICRP model yield broadly similar estimates of dose per unit activity of inhaled or ingested radio-manganese but differ substantially with regard to interpretation of bioassay data.

Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL

2011-01-01

370

Sulfur compounds in therapy: Radiation-protective agents, amphetamines, and mucopolysaccharide sulfation  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur-containing compounds have been used in the search for whole-body radiation-protective compounds, in the design of amphetamine derivatives that retain appetite-suppressive effects but lack most behavioral effects characteristic of amphetamines, and in the search for the cause of kidney stone formation in recurrently stoneforming patients. Organic synthetic procedures were used to prepare radiation-protective compounds having a variety of sulfur-containing functional groups, and to prepare amphetamine derivatives having electron-attracting sulfur functions. In the case of the kidney stone causation research, isolation of urinary mucopolysaccharides (MPS) from recurrently stoneforming patients was carried out and the extent of sulfation of the MPS was determined by electrophoresis. Whole-body radiation-protective agents with a high degree of protection against lethal doses of gamma-radiation in mice were found in a series of quinolinium and pyridinium bis(methylthio) and methylthio amino derivatives. Mechanism studies showed that the copper complexes of these agents mimicked the beneficial action of superoxide dismutase. Electron-attracting sulfur-containing functions on amphetamine nitrogen, as well as 4'-amino nitrogen provided amphetamine derivatives with good appetite-suppressant effects and few or no adverse behavioral effects. Higher than normal levels of sulfation of the urinary MPS of stone formers suggested a cause for recurrent kidney stone formation. A sulfation inhibitor was found to prevent recurrence of stone formation and inhibit growth of existing stones. The inclusion of various sulfur-containing functions in organic molecules yielded compounds having whole-body radiation protection from lethal doses of gamma-radiation in animals. The presence of electron-attracting sulfur functions in amphetamine gave derivatives that retained appetite-suppressant effects and eliminated most adverse behavioral effects.

Foye, W.O. (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston (United States))

1992-09-01

371

Protection effects of condensed bromoacenaphthylene on radiation deterioration of ethylene-propylene-diene rubber. [Gamma radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a continuation of a series of the studies on the flame and ..gamma..-radiation resistant modification of ethylene-propylene-diene rubber (EPDM), condensed bromoacenaphthylene (con-BACN) as a newly developed flame retardant was synthesized and its effects on the radiation resistance of EPDM were investigated. The radiation resistance evaluated by measuring tensile properties of irradiated sheets of 2 mm thick was found improved

Y. Morita; M. Hagiwara; N. Kasai

1982-01-01

372

ARESE (ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment) Science Plan [Atmospheric Radiation Program  

SciTech Connect

Several recent studies have indicated that cloudy atmospheres may absorb significantly more solar radiation than currently predicted by models. The magnitude of this excess atmospheric absorption, is about 50% more than currently predicted and would have major impact on our understanding of atmospheric heating. Incorporation of this excess heating into existing general circulation models also appears to ameliorate some significant shortcomings of these models, most notably a tendency to overpredict the amount of radiant energy going into the oceans and to underpredict the tropopause temperature. However, some earlier studies do not show this excess absorption and an underlying physical mechanism that would give rise to such absorption has yet to be defined. Given the importance of this issue, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is sponsoring the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) to study the absorption of solar radiation by clear and cloudy atmospheres. The experimental results will be compared with model calculations. Measurements will be conducted using three aircraft platforms (ARM-UAV Egrett, NASA ER-2, and an instrumented Twin Otter), as well as satellites and the ARM central and extended facilities in North Central Oklahoma. The project will occur over a four week period beginning in late September, 1995. Spectral broadband, partial bandpass, and narrow bandpass (10nm) solar radiative fluxes will be measured at different altitudes and at the surface with the objective to determine directly the magnitude and spectral characteristics of the absorption of shortwave radiation by the atmosphere (clear and cloudy). Narrow spectral channels selected to coincide with absorption by liquid water and ice will help in identifying the process of absorption of radiation. Additionally, information such as water vapor profiles, aerosol optical depths, cloud structure and ozone profiles, needed to use as input in radiative transfer calculations, will be acquired using the aircraft and surface facilities available to ARESE. This document outlines the scientific approach and measurement requirements of the project.

Valero, F.P.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Cess, R.D.; Ramanathan, V.; Collins, W.D.; Minnis, P.; Ackerman, T.P.; Vitko, J.; Tooman, T.P.

1995-09-27

373

LAURISTON S. TAYLOR LECTURE ON RADIATION PROTECTION AND MEASURMENTS: WHAT MAKES PARTICLE RADIATION SO EFFECTIVE?  

PubMed Central

The scientific basis for the physical and biological effectiveness of particle radiations has emerged from many decades of meticulous basic research. A diverse array of biologically relevant consequences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organism level have been reported, but what are the key processes and mechanisms that make particle radiation so effective, and what competing processes define dose dependences? Recent studies have shown that individual genotypes control radiation-regulated genes and pathways in response to radiations of varying ionization density. The fact that densely ionizing radiations can affect different gene families than sparsely ionizing radiations, and that the effects are dose- and time-dependent has opened up new areas of future research. The complex microenvironment of the stroma, and the significant contributions of the immune response have added to our understanding of tissue-specific differences across the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum. The importance of targeted vs. nontargeted effects remain a thorny, but elusive and important contributor to chronic low dose radiation effects of variable LET that still needs further research. The induction of cancer is also LET-dependent, suggesting different mechanisms of action across the gradient of ionization density. The focus of this 35th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture is to chronicle the step-by-step acquisition of experimental clues that have refined our understanding of what makes particle radiation so effective, with emphasis on the example of radiation effects on the crystalline lens of the human eye.

Blakely, Eleanor A.

2012-01-01

374

21st L H Gray Conference: the radiobiology/radiation protection interface.  

PubMed

The 21st L H Gray Conference, organised by the L H Gray Trust with the Society for Radiological Protection, brought together international experts in radiobiology, epidemiology and risk assessment, and scientists involved in diagnostic and therapeutic radiation exposure. The meeting - held in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 4-6 June 2008 - aimed to raise awareness, educate and share knowledge of important issues in radiation protection. A distinguished group of speakers discussed topics that included (i) non-targeted effects of radiation, (ii) exposure to high natural background radiation, (iii) non-cancer effects in Japanese bomb survivors, (iv) lessons learnt from Chernobyl, (v) radiation in the workplace, (vi) biokinetic modelling, (vii) uncertainties in risk estimation, (viii) issues in diagnostic medical exposures, (ix) lessons leant from the polonium-210 incidence and (x) how the radiobiology/radiation oncology community is needed to help society prepare for potential future acts of radiation terrorism. The conference highlighted the importance, relevance and topicality of radiobiology today. PMID:19386958

West, C M L; Martin, C J; Sutton, D G; Wright, E G

2009-05-01

375

Community Radiation Monitoring Program annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The events of FY 1990 indicate that another successful year in the evolution of the Community Radiation Monitoring Program is in the books. The agencies and organizations involved in the program have developed a sound and viable working relationship, and it appears that the major objectives, primarily dispelling some of the concerns over weapons testing and radiation on the part of the public, are being effectively addressed. The program is certainly a dynamic operation, growing and changing to meet perceived needs and goals as more experience is gained through our work. The change in focus on our public outreach efforts will lead us to contacts with more students and schools, service clubs and special interest groups in the future, and will refine, and hopefully improve, our communication with the public. If that can be accomplished, plus perhaps influencing a few more students to stay in school and even grow up to be scientists, engineers and better citizens, we will be closer to having achieved our goals. It is important to note that the success of the program has occurred only because the people involved, from the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Desert Research Institute, the University of Utah and the Station Managers and Alternates work well and hard together. Our extended family'' is doing a good job. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Cooper, E.N.; McArthur, R.D.

1991-07-01

376

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ellingson, R.G. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States))

1991-01-01

377

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ellingson, R.G. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

1991-01-01

378

A program of computer-aided coordination analysis for an undergraduate course in protective relaying  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces a program used as a practicing tool for the protective relaying course of undergraduate level. This progress allows students to practice protective devices coordination in power systems on a personal computer by representing the time-current curve with dynamic computer graphics. The program is also provided with a debugging system that is designed to inform the user of any problem found in his protection scheme. In order to make students fully understand the dynamic performance of protective devices coordination, the program allows students to assign the location of a fault and it will display the operating time of the protective devices according to the tripping sequence. The program also has the function of automatic coordination analysis, the results of which can be compared with the user's scheme and can also help the user to have a better understanding of what are actually used in the industry today.

Chu, W.C.; Liu, M.C. (Tatung Inst. of Tech., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

1992-11-01

379

Technical Basis Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Radiation and Contamination Trending Program  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Program radiation and contamination trending program. The program consists of standardized radiation and contamination surveys of the KE Basin, radiation surveys of the KW basin, radiation surveys of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVD), and radiation surveys of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) with the associated tracking. This report also discusses the remainder of radiological areas within the SNFP that do not have standardized trending programs and the basis for not having this program in those areas.

ELGIN, J.C.

2000-10-02

380

THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATERSHED MANAGEMENT RESEARCH PROGRAM: AN OVERVIEW  

EPA Science Inventory

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has directed much attention to watersheds and water quality during its tenure as the United States Federal Agency charged with protection of human health and the environment. Watershed research as a vehicle to understand the interaction ...

381

Development of Curricula for Nuclear Radiation Protection, Nuclear Instrumentation, and Nuclear Materials Processing Technologies. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study was conducted to assist two-year postsecondary educational institutions in providing technical specialty courses for preparing nuclear technicians. As a result of project activities, curricula have been developed for five categories of nuclear technicians and operators: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and

Hull, Daniel M.

382

University of Pittsburgh researchers find experimental drug could protect some cancer patients from radiation side effects:  

Cancer.gov

A drug under development at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine could protect the cells of Fanconi anemia patients from damage caused by radiation treatment for head and neck cancers, a new study suggests.

383

Fourth International Conference on Anticarcinogenesis and Radiation Protection: Supplement. Volume 54, No. 7  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains full papers of presentations given at the 4th International Conference of Anticarcinogenesis and Radiation Protection held in Baltimore, Maryland April 18--23, 1993. Presentations were grouped into topic areas entitled Mechanisms of Cancer and Aging; Biomarkers and Susceptibility Factors; Molecular Diagnosis; Nutrition, exercise, and Cancer; Molecular Mechanisms of Chemoprotection; and Clinical Interventions.

NONE

1994-04-01

384

United States Environmental Protection Agency's Stratospheric Ozone Research Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A major consequence of decreasing the ozone layer is an increase in the transmission of UV-B radiation (290-320nm) to the surface of the earth. Researchers have identified many potentially serious effects of increased exposure to UV-B radiation on the env...

R. C. Worrest

1989-01-01

385

Environmental Radiation Measurements on the Mir Space Station, Program 1 Program 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As part of the NASA/Mir Phase 1B Science Program, the ionizing radiation environment inside and outside the Russian Mir's Space Station was monitored using a combination of Thermoluminescent Detectors (TLD) and CR-39 Plastic Nuclear Track Detectors (PNTD)...

E. V. Benton A. L. Frank E. R. Benton

1998-01-01

386

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitoring (ARM) Education Program: An Integrated Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Education and Outreach program supports ARM Operations at all three CART sites (North Slope of Alaska, Tropical West Pacific, and Southern Great Plains) in ways that are relevant to the needs of the communities and regions that host the ARM program sites. The goal of the education and outreach program is to develop basic science awareness, critical thinking skills, and improve environmental science capacity building for communities, teachers and students in ARM host communities and regions. This year, the primary goal is to extend the existing program to cover all three sites and to coordinate activities among the sites. In order to achieve this goal, we: o Bring awareness of the ARM program to host communities through public education relevant to the culture of the region; o Aid capacity building and community involvement in developing and implementing ARM education at each site; o Promote a broader knowledge of regional and international climate concerns for teachers and students through integration of ARM education across sites; o Assist access to ARM data for educational programs as technical resources permit, and to provide real time research experiences for students; and o Increase the knowledge base for teachers and students in basic science and critical thinking skills using curriculum-based enrichment activities in climate, climate change, and climate change effects relevant to each region.

Barnes, F.; Marsh, L. K.; Springer, M.; Talus, C. E.; Haruta, A.; Kloesel, K.; Zak, B. D.; Clements, W. E.

2001-12-01

387

Equipment performance and radiation protection status in X-ray fluoroscopy units in Sudan.  

PubMed

The number of fluoroscopy and fluoroscopically guided procedures has been substantially growing in developing countries at the same time advanced and sophisticated equipment are used in some hospitals. However, radiation protection requirements are not necessarily well adopted. In this study nine fluoroscopy X-ray units in Sudan were examined for compliance with international standards. The tests included: beam quality, entrance surface air kerma, image quality and radiation field measurements. Staff radiation protection tools such as lead aprons and eye glasses were also visually examined to find out whether international recommendations were fulfilled and to determine the level of staff awareness. The measured peak tube voltage deviation exceeded the recommended tolerance level in 30 % of the measurements. The results of patient doses measurements exceeded the recommended reference dose levels in 43 % of the measurements; however image quality and radiation field generally fulfilled the requirements for most units. The study revealed that a considerable number of fluoroscopy units were not performing according to the international standards and highlights the need of optimisation of radiation protection. PMID:21317144

Ahmed, Nada A; Nayl, A I; Suliman, I I

2011-02-10

388

History and Description of the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Motor Vehicle Fuel Economy Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the history of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) fuel economy program from the early 1970's up to and including the 1984 model year. (Beginning with the 1985 model year program significant changes were made to the program t...

C. D. Tyree

1982-01-01

389

Savings estimates for the United States Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR voluntary product labeling program  

Microsoft Academic Search

ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency-labeling program operated jointly by the United States Department of Energy and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Since the program's inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy-efficient products. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national, and international energy programs necessitates an open

Marla C. Sanchez; Richard E. Brown; Carrie Webber; Gregory K. Homan

2008-01-01

390

Protecting LHC components against radiation resulting from colliding beam interactions  

SciTech Connect

Beam-induced energy deposition in the LHC high luminosity interaction region (IR) components due to both pp collisions and beam loss in the IR vicinity is a significant challenge for the design of the high luminosity insertions. It was shown in our previous studies that a set of collimators in the machine and absorbers within the low-beta quadrupoles would reduce both the peak power density and total heat load to tolerable levels with a reasonable safety margin. In this paper the results of further optimization and comprehensive MARS calculations are briefly described for the updated IP1 and IP5 layouts and a baseline pp-collision source term. Power density, power dissipation, accumulated dose and residual dose rates are studied in the components of the inner triplets including their TAS absorbers, the TAN neutral beam absorbers, separation dipoles, and quadrupoles of the outer triplets and possible collimators there. It is shown that the optimized absorbers and collimators provide adequate protection of all the critical components.

Nikolai V. Mokhov and Igor L. Rakhno

2001-06-26

391

Evaluation of additional lead shielding in protecting the physician from radiation during cardiac interventional procedures.  

PubMed

Since cardiac interventional procedures deliver high doses of radiation to the physician, radiation protection for the physician in cardiac catheterization laboratories is very important. One of the most important means of protecting the physician from scatter radiation is to use additional lead shielding devices, such as tableside lead drapes and ceiling-mounted lead acrylic protection. During cardiac interventional procedures (cardiac IVR), however, it is not clear how much lead shielding reduces the physician dose. This study compared the physician dose [effective dose equivalent (EDE) and dose equivalent (DE)] with and without additional shielding during cardiac IVR. Fluoroscopy scatter radiation was measured using a human phantom, with an ionization chamber survey meter, with and without additional shielding. With the additional shielding, fluoroscopy scatter radiation measured with the human phantom was reduced by up to 98%, as compared with that without. The mean EDE (whole body, mean+/-SD) dose to the operator, determined using a Luxel badge, was 2.55+/-1.65 and 4.65+/-1.21 mSv/year with and without the additional shielding, respectively (p=0.086). Similarly, the mean DE (lens of the eye) to the operator was 15.0+/-9.3 and 25.73+/-5.28 mSv/year, respectively (p=0.092). In conclusion, although tableside drapes and lead acrylic shields suspended from the ceiling provided extra protection to the physician during cardiac IVR, the reduction in the estimated physician dose (EDE and DE) during cardiac catheterization with additional shielding was lower than we expected. Therefore, there is a need to develop more ergonomically useful protection devices for cardiac IVR. PMID:16395238

Chida, Koichi; Morishima, Yoshiaki; Katahira, Yoshiaki; Chiba, Hiroo; Zuguchi, Masayuki

2005-12-20

392

Protecting You/Protecting Me: Evaluation of a Student-Led Alcohol Prevention and Traffic Safety Program for Elementary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pre- and post-surveys of self-protective knowledge and skills in third, fourth, and fifth grade classrooms (n = 24) randomly assigned to a model program for alcohol prevention and traffic safety or to comparison group (n = 24 classrooms) were analyzed to evaluate replicability of immediate positive effects of first-year exposure and to test

Bell, Mary Lou; Baker, Tara Kelley; Falb, Timothy; Roberts-Gray, Cindy

2005-01-01

393

Protecting You/Protecting Me: Evaluation of a Student-Led Alcohol Prevention and Traffic Safety Program for Elementary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Pre- and post-surveys of self-protective knowledge and skills in third, fourth, and fifth grade classrooms (n = 24) randomly assigned to a model program for alcohol prevention and traffic safety or to comparison group (n = 24 classrooms) were analyzed to evaluate replicability of immediate positive effects of first-year exposure and to test

Bell, Mary Lou; Baker, Tara Kelley; Falb, Timothy; Roberts-Gray, Cindy

2005-01-01

394

REDUCTION OF CARBON EMISSIONS ASSOCIATED WITH DEFORESTATION IN BRAZIL: THE ROLE OF THE AMAZON REGION PROTECTED AREAS PROGRAM (ARPA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

,ABSTRACT The creation of protected,areas in the Brazilian Amazon has been playing an important role in biological diversity conservation in the region and in the protection of extensive tropical forest areas. Approximately 50% of the remaining Amazon forests are protected areas. In light of this scenario, the most ambitious biodiversity conservation program is currently the Amazon Region Protected Areas Program

Britaldo Silveira; Soares Filho; Paulo Moutinho; Hermann Rodrigues; Erika Pinto; Cludio C. Maretti; Carlos Alberto de Mattos; Fernando Vasconcelos de Arajo

395

THE US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

A scientifically rigorous determination of the condition of an aquatic resource is fundamental to all subsequent research, modeling, protection, and restoration issues. Environmental risk characterization is predicated on knowledge of condition and the rate at which that conditio...

396

Food Protection Plan and Third Party Certification Programs ...  

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)

... FDA encourages interested persons to submit written comments on the Food Protection Plan to the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305 ... More results from www.fda.gov/food/newsevents/constituentupdates

397

Protection by S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid against radiation-induced leg contractures in mice. [Gamma Radiation  

SciTech Connect

S-2-(3-Aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) was shown to provide marked protection against development of radiation-induced leg contractures in C3Hf/Kam mice whose legs were exposed to single doses of gamma-radiation. The radiation doses ranged from 3300 to 6200 rads delivered to the right hind thighs from two parallelly opposed 137Cs sources. WR-2721 was given i.p. 30 min before irradiation. The severity of radiation-induced leg contractures in untreated and WR-2721-treated mice was followed for 342 days after irradiation. The degree of leg contractures in both control and WR-2721-treated mice increased up to 100 days after radiation, when the change stabilized, remaining more or less at the same level to the end of the observation period. During this entire period, the severity of contractures was less in WR-2721-treated mice. The dose-modifying factor for the level of 5 mm reduction in leg extension was 1.5 at 182 days after irradiation. Since WR-2721 did not prevent the radiocurability of 8-mm fibrosarcomas growing in the same legs, these data imply that WR-2721 has a high potential for increasing therapeutic gain when combined with irradiation in the treatment of tumors of an appreciable size.

Hunter, N.; Milas, L.

1983-04-01

398

Shielding Calculation for High Energy Radiation X-Ray by Software program  

SciTech Connect

There are analytic methods for designing protective barriers however, they lack sufficient efficiency and considering the NCRP147(reports2007), designing mechanical protective barrier in order to protect the initial x-ray radiation and absorption of the ray quality of such radiation is different. In this study, computer software was designed to calculate the needed barrier with high accuracy. For proper determination of thickness of the protective barrier, relevant information about curves of radiation weakness, dose limit etc should be entered. The difference between the theoretical and calculated rates of this method is X{sup 2} = 10{sup -5} which indicates accuracy and high efficiency of this software.

Rahimi, Seyed Ali [Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Health, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Kilometer 18 KHAZARABAD Road, P.O.BOX: 48175-1553, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-04-21

399

Topical vitamin C protects porcine skin from ultraviolet radiation-induced damage.  

PubMed

Ultraviolet radiation damage to the skin is due, in part, to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) functions as a biological co-factor and antioxidant due to its reducing properties. Topical application of vitamin C has been shown to elevate significantly cutaneous levels of this vitamin in pigs, and this correlates with protection of the skin from UVB damage as measured by erythema and sunburn cell formation. This protection is biological and due to the reducing properties of the molecule. Further, we provide evidence that the vitamin C levels of the skin can be severely depleted after UV irradiation, which would lower this organ's innate protective mechanism as well as leaving it at risk of impaired healing after photoinduced damage. In addition, vitamin C protects porcine skin from UVA-mediated phototoxic reactions (PUVA) and therefore shows promise as a broad-spectrum photoprotectant. PMID:1390169

Darr, D; Combs, S; Dunston, S; Manning, T; Pinnell, S

1992-09-01

400

Current status of the application of ionizing radiation to environmental protection: I. Ionizing radiation sources, natural and drinking water purification (A Review)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Present-day applications of ionizing radiation to environmental protection are surveyed. This part of the review summarizes\\u000a new data on the ionizing radiation sources used in this area, on the radiation-chemical purification of polluted natural and\\u000a drinking water, and on the mechanisms of processes occurring in these systems under exposure to ionizing radiation. A particular\\u000a emphasis is placed on large-scale processes.

A. K. Pikaev

2000-01-01

401

Implications of scientific and technological developments for radiation protection in the next decade  

SciTech Connect

There are scientific and technological developments taking place that will affect the understanding of the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, the ability to measure the important parameters of ionizing radiation, and the ability to model radioactivity transport, both in the human body and in the environment. This paper focuses on emerging scientific and technological developments that will impact radiation protection in the next decade. Emerging scientific developments included in this paper are new methods and better analytic capabilities in epidemiology, a better understanding of the interactions between ionizing radiation and the various cellular components and more realistic models to describe the uptake, distribution, retention and excretion of radionuclides in humans. Technological developments include instruments to measure radioactivity in the humans and the environment, and better software to calculate doses from these previously measured quantities.

Johnson, J.R.; Stansbury, P.S.; Paretzke, H.

1993-01-01

402

On the use of age-specific effective dose coefficients in radiation protection of the public  

SciTech Connect

Current radiation protection standards for the public include a limit on effective dose in any year for individuals in critical groups. This paper considers the question of how the annual dose limit should be applied in controlling routine exposures of populations consisting of individuals of all ages. The authors assume that the fundamental objective of radiation protection is limitation of lifetime risk and, therefore, that standards for controlling routine exposures of the public should provide a reasonable correspondence with lifetime risk, taking into account the age dependence of intakes and doses and the variety of radionuclides and exposure pathways of concern. Using new calculations of the per capita (population-averaged) risk of cancer mortality per unit activity inhaled or ingested in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Federal Guidance Report No. 13, the authors show that applying a limit on annual effective dose only to adults, which was the usual practice in radiation protection of the public before the development of age-specific effective dose coefficients, provides a considerably better correspondence with lifetime risk than applying the annual dose limit to the critical group of any age.

Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

1998-11-01

403

75 FR 9607 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Guidance Document Request and Evaluation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...startup): $0. Total Burden Cost (operating/maintaining): $40,708.14. Signed: February 19, 2010. Thomas Chase Garwood, III, Chief Information Officer, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland Security. [FR...

2010-03-03

404

75 FR 9608 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Technical Assistance Request and Evaluation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...startup): $0. Total Burden Cost (operating/maintaining): $4,273.50. Signed: February 12, 2010. Thomas Chase Garwood, III, Chief Information Officer, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland Security. [FR...

2010-03-03

405

ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Protective Liner Systems, Inc., Epoxy Mastic, PLS-614  

EPA Science Inventory

The Protective Liner Systems International, Inc. Epoxy Mastic PLS-614 coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA?s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Material and T...

406

Way to Operationalize the DOD's Critical Infrastructure Protection Program Using Information Assurance Policies and Technologies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Critical Infrastructure Protection Program has recently reorganized under the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense under the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy. Requirements have been...

A. R. Friedman

2005-01-01

407

The Drilling Fluid Hazard Assessment Program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Drilling Fluids Hazard Assessment Program carried out by the Office of Research and Development of the Environmental Protection Agency is presented, from its initiation in 1976 to the planned tasks for Fiscal Year 1982. This synopsis includes discussi...

1982-01-01

408

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: ARSENIC MONITORING TECHNOLOGIES  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This technology ...

409

Evaluation of a Stress Management Program in a Child Protection Agency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

High stress levels experienced by child protection workers have been well documented. This study examined the effectiveness of a stress management program in a child protection agency. Subjects were case workers, immediate supervisors, and clerical staff; 320 subjects participated in pretesting and 279 subjects participated in posttesting.

Cahill, Janet; Feldman, Lenard H.

410

Development and Implementation of a Comprehensive Groundwater Protection Program at the Savannah River Plant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The major goals of the groundwater protection program are to evaluate the impact on groundwater quality as a result of Savannah River Plant operations, to take corrective measures as required to restore or protect groundwater quality, and to ensure that f...

D. E. Gordon

1984-01-01

411

Freeze protection problems and experiences in the HUD solar residential demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

The different kinds of freeze-up problems in solar energy systems are outlined, and methods of providing freeze protection are briefly discussed. These problems are illustrated by a few selected examples from the HUD Solar Residential Demonstration Program, which show the consequences and cost of freeze-up problems and the importance of protecting solar systems against them.

Sparkes, H.R.; Raman, K.; Trivedi, J.

1983-01-01

412

Risk and protective factors related to resilience in adolescents in an alternative education program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a multivariate correlational design, this study was designed to determine the degree to which selected risk and protective factors were related to resilience in an at-risk student population. A total of 12 individual, family and external risk and protective factors were identified and data were collected from 142 6th through 11th grade students in an alternative education program for

Kelly M Crawford

2006-01-01

413

Protection from radiation-induced damage to spermatogenesis by hormone treatment  

SciTech Connect

Infertility caused by killing of the spermatogonial stem cells occurs frequently in men treated for cancer with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment of rats with testosterone plus estradiol, which reversibly inhibits the completion of spermatogenesis and protects spermatogonial stem cells from procarbazine-induced damage, would also protect these cells from radiation. Adult male LBNF rats were implanted for 6 weeks with capsules containing testosterone and estradiol and then irradiated with doses from 2.5-7.0 Gy. Controls were irradiated with 1.8-3.5 Gy. Implants were removed 1 day after irradiation, and all animals were killed 10 weeks later for assessment of stem cell survival by counting repopulating tubules in histological sections and by sperm head counts. At doses of 2.5 and 3.5 Gy the repopulation indices and sperm head counts were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the rats treated with testosterone and estradiol than in the controls. Protection factors calculated from the dose-response curves were in the range of 1.5-2.2. Elucidation of the mechanism of protection is essential to apply it to clinical situations. The fact that the spermatogonia are protected against radiation as well as procarbazine indicates that the mechanism does not involve drug delivery or metabolism. 32 refs., 3 figs.

Kurdoglu, B.; Wilson, G.; Parchuri, N.; Ye, W.; Meistrich, M.L. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

1994-07-01

414

Constructing Vulnerabilty and Protective Measures Indices for the Enhanced Critical Infrastructure Protection Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has directed its Protective Security Advisors (PSAs) to form partnerships with the owners and operators of assets most essential to the Nation's well being - a subclass of critical infrastructure and key resour...

G. W. Bassett R. A. Haffenden R. E. Fisher R. G. Whitfield W. A. Buehring

2009-01-01

415

United States Environmental Protection Agency's stratospheric ozone research program  

SciTech Connect

A major consequence of decreasing the ozone layer is an increase in the transmission of UV-B radiation (290-320nm) to the surface of the earth. Researchers have identified many potentially serious effects of increased exposure to UV-B radiation on the environment and human health. They include: effects on agricultural crops, trees, and marine organisms, and damage to the human immune system, eyes (cataracts), and skin (cancer). Depletion of the ozone layer also contributes to materials damage and affects ground-level air quality. To assess the consequences of depletion of the ozone layer scientists and policy makers need information on the nature and magnitude of effects resulting from exposure to UV-B radiation. The information is critical to establishing responsible regulations and mitigation options.

Worrest, R.C.

1989-06-16

416

O-phospho-L-tyrosine protects TP53 wild-type cells against ionizing radiation.  

PubMed

O-phospho-L-tyrosine (P-Tyr) has been reported previously to inhibit growth of several cancer cell lines at mM concentrations. In the present study, we investigated the effect of this compound on tumor cells and normal cells in combination with radiation exposure. It could be demonstrated for the first time that P-Tyr at microM concentrations protects TP53 wild-type cells against ionizing radiation (SF4 minus BBI = 0.28, SF4 plus BBI = 0.45). On the contrary, human transformed or tumor cell lines characterized by mutated or functional inactivated TP53 were not altered or increased in their radiation sensitivity (SF4 minus BBI = 0.32, SF4 plus BBI = 0.22). Treatment of wild-type TP53 cells with P-Tyr induced stabilization of TP53 within 3 and 16 hours and a subsequent increase in CDKN1A expression after treatment. Consequently, a 16-hours pretreatment of cells with P-Tyr led to a significant radioprotective effect. This was not observed in cell lines with mutated TP53, which shows no radioprotection by P-Tyr. Thus, the present data suggest that P-Tyr-mediated radioprotection is dependent on preirradiation stabilization of TP53. The results indicate that P-Tyr is a radioprotective agent that can potentially be very useful and easy to deliver for radiation protection in general and especially in radiation therapy of TP53-mutated tumors. PMID:11992381

Dittmann, K H; Mayer, C; Rodemann, H P

2001-01-01

417

STATUS OF EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) RADON MITIGATION DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses the portion of EPA's radon reduction technology development/demonstration program dealing with the study of reduction methods for existing and new construction houses. The EPA program has as its objective the development and demonstration of cost-effective rad...

418

Protective effect of anthocyanins from lingonberry on radiation-induced damages.  

PubMed

There is a growing concern about the serious harm of radioactive materials, which are widely used in energy production, scientific research, medicine, industry and other areas. In recent years, owing to the great side effects of anti-radiation drugs, research on the radiation protectants has gradually expanded from the previous chemicals to the use of natural anti-radiation drugs and functional foods. Some reports have confirmed that anthocyanins are good antioxidants, which can effectively eliminate free radicals, but studies on the immunoregulatory and anti-radiation effects of anthocyanins from lingonberry (ALB) are less reported. In this experiment, mice were given orally once daily for 14 consecutive days before exposure to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation and were sacrificed on the 7th day post-irradiation. The results showed that the selected dose of extract did not lead to acute toxicity in mice; while groups given anthocyanins orally were significantly better than radiation control group according to blood analysis; pretreatment of anthocyanins significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced the thymus and spleen indices and spleen cell survival compared to the irradiation control group. Pretreatment with anthocyanins before irradiation significantly reduced the numbers of micronuclei (MN) in bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). These findings indicate that anthocyanins have immunostimulatory potential against immunosuppression induced by the radiation. PMID:23249859

Fan, Zi-Luan; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Zuo, Li-Li; Tian, Shuang-Qi

2012-12-18

419

Protective Effect of Anthocyanins from Lingonberry on Radiation-induced Damages  

PubMed Central

There is a growing concern about the serious harm of radioactive materials, which are widely used in energy production, scientific research, medicine, industry and other areas. In recent years, owing to the great side effects of anti-radiation drugs, research on the radiation protectants has gradually expanded from the previous chemicals to the use of natural anti-radiation drugs and functional foods. Some reports have confirmed that anthocyanins are good antioxidants, which can effectively eliminate free radicals, but studies on the immunoregulatory and anti-radiation effects of anthocyanins from lingonberry (ALB) are less reported. In this experiment, mice were given orally once daily for 14 consecutive days before exposure to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation and were sacrificed on the 7th day post-irradiation. The results showed that the selected dose of extract did not lead to acute toxicity in mice; while groups given anthocyanins orally were significantly better than radiation control group according to blood analysis; pretreatment of anthocyanins significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced the thymus and spleen indices and spleen cell survival compared to the irradiation control group. Pretreatment with anthocyanins before irradiation significantly reduced the numbers of micronuclei (MN) in bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). These findings indicate that anthocyanins have immunostimulatory potential against immunosuppression induced by the radiation.

Fan, Zi-Luan; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Zuo, Li-Li; Tian, Shuang-Qi

2012-01-01

420

Radiation, chemicals, and occupational health research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiation protection and its interplay with physical research programs are described. Differences and similarities between problems in health protection for chemicals and for radiation are discussed. The importance of dosimetry in radiation work and its relevance to chemicals are cited. A collaborative program between physical and biological scientists on the toxicity of metals is briefly described. It serves as an

1984-01-01

421

[Radiation protective quality of spacesuit "Orlan-M" during extravehicular activities on the International Space Station].  

PubMed

Sampling irradiation of spacesuit "Orlan-M" allowed construction of a simulation model of the spacesuit shielding function for critical body organs. The critical organs self-shielding model is a Russian standard anthropomorphic phantom. Radiation protective quality of the spacesuit was assessed by calculating the dose attenuation rates for several critical body organs of an ISS crewmember implementing EVA. These calculations are intended for more accurate assessment of radiation risk to the ISS crews donning "Orlan-M" in near-Earth orbits. PMID:17193981

Shurshakov, V A; Kartashov, D A; Kolomenski?, A V; Petrov, V M; Red'ko, V I; Abramov, I P; Letkova, L I; Tikhomirov, E P

422

Bibliography of marine radiation ecology prepared for the Seabed Program  

SciTech Connect

References on the effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms have been obtained from a number of sources. Many were obtained from reviews and other publications. Although the primary purpose of preparing this bibliography was to obtain information related to the nuclear wastes Seabed Disposal Biology Program of Sandia Laboratories, freshwater organisms are included as a matter of convenience and also with the belief that such a bibliography would be of interest to a wider audience than that restricted to the Seabed Program. While compilation of a list in an area broad in scope is often somewhat arbitrary, an attempt was made to reference publications that were related to field or laboratory studies of wild species of plants and animals with respect to radiation effects. Complete information concerning each reference are provided without excessive library search. Since one often finds references listed in the literature that are incompletely cited, it was not always possible to locate the reference for verification or completion of the citation. Such references are included where they appeared to be of possible value. When known, a reference is followed with its Nuclear Science Abstract designation, or rarely other abstract sources. Those desiring additional information should check Nuclear Science Abstracts utilizing the abstract number presented or other abstracting sources. In addition, the language of the article, other than English, is given when it is known to me.

Schultz, V.S.

1980-02-01

423

An Approach of Program Analysis Prevention for Information Protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evolution of mobile technologies will enable us to realize the ubiquitous computing environment. In such environment, a user's mobile terminal manages his sensitive information and assists in his activities. At the same time, information leakage will become more serious social problems. In this paper, we propose a framework which protects user's sensitive information according to a way the user

Kenichi Takahashi; Zhaoyu Liu; Kouichi Sakurai

2007-01-01

424

Establishing a human research protection program in a combatant command.  

PubMed

Extensive United States combat operations commenced for the first time in over decade in 2003. Early in 2004 there was no human research protection regulatory review and approval mechanism based in a deployed military combatant command. The absence of such a system presented a critical impediment to implementation of the time-honored tradition of a robust combat casualty care research effort. A coalition of concerned military medical personnel from the US Army proposed a novel mechanism to meet Department of Defense (DOD) requirements for the human research protection oversight of studies conducted in the combat theater of operations. In 2005, the Commander of Task Force 44 Medical Command (44th MEDCOM), who was serving as the Multi-National Corps Iraq (MNC-I) Surgeon, was charged with negotiating a DOD Assurance and implementing a new system of research review and protections. He deployed an Army Medical Department Medical Corps officer to assist in this endeavor and operationalize the plan. On March 19, 2005, the Multi-National Corps Iraq Commander signed a historic agreement with the US Army Surgeon General who developed a regulatory support and oversight mechanism to conduct research in theater. This innovative system not only honored the Army's commitment to human research protections, but also provided much needed support in the form of scientific and ethical review and compliance oversight to those deployed medical personnel with the vision to conduct healthcare studies in the combat environment. On July 20, 2005, the first DOD Assurance of Compliance for the Protection of Human Research Subjects was approved for MNC-I. This assurance allows the conduct of human subjects research in full compliance with all Federal, DOD, and Army regulatory requirements. This article describes that unique process. PMID:18376178

Brosch, Laura R; Holcomb, John B; Thompson, Jennifer C; Cordts, Paul R

2008-02-01

425

Data Management and Scientific Integration within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy with the goal to improve the predictive capabilities of General Circulation Models (GCM's) in their treatment of clouds and radiative transfer effects....

D. K. Gracio L. D. Hatfield K. R. Yates J. W. Voyles J. L. Tichler

1995-01-01

426

Summary of fire protection programs of the United States Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

This edition of the Annual Summary of DOE Fire Protection Programs continues the series started in 1972. Since May 1950, an annual report has been required from each field organization. The content has varied through the years and most of the accident data reporting requirements have been superseded by the Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System administered by EG G, Idaho. However, this report is the sole source of information relating to fire protection programs, and to the actions of the field offices and to headquarters that are of general fire protection interest.

Not Available

1991-10-01

427

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Survey of Radiation Biology Educators in U.S. and Canadian Radiation Oncology Residency Programs  

PubMed Central

Purpose The goal of this survey was to obtain detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the U.S. and Canada. Methods and Materials In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the U.S. and Canada. Results The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the ASTRO Radiation & Cancer Biology Practice Exam used by residents and educators. Consoination and Study Guides, were widely lidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course, were viewed as unlikely to be employed by most programs. Conclusions A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses, but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.

Rosenstein, Barry S.; Held, Kathryn D.; Rockwell, Sara; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Zeman, Elaine M.

2009-01-01

428

SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION - US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY SUPERFUND PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

This presentation outlines the Superfund program approach to site cleanup, then provides information from actual insitu and exsitu solidification/stabilization remediations to illustrate technology, equipment, field implementation, performance evaluation, cleanup specifications, ...

429

EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) INTEGRATED AIR CANCER PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The Integrated Air Cancer Project (IACP) is an interdisciplinary research program designed to develop the scientific methods and data sets needed to identify the major carcinogenic chemicals in the atmosphere; to characterize the emission sources and chemical precursors which giv...

430

EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE RADIATION PROTECTION AFFORDED BY TYPICAL OAK RIDGE HOMES AGAINST DISTRIBUTED SOURCES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The protection afforded against simulated fall-out radiation has been ;\\u000a evaluated for several typical homes in the Oak Ridge area. Nine houses were ;\\u000a chosen to represent a variety of construction materials, topographical ;\\u000a conditions and sizes; they included three types of Oak Ridge Cemesto houses, one ;\\u000a concrete-block house with a basement fall-out shelter, and two wood-frame houses. ;

T. D. Strickler; J. A. Auxier

1960-01-01

431

A secondary standard dosimetry system for calibration of radiation protection instruments  

Microsoft Academic Search

In view of the increasing need and accuracy requirements for the calibration of radiation protection dosimeters, a novel secondary\\u000a standard system consisting of a low level ionization chamber with 104 cm3 sensitive volume operating at ambient atmospheric pressure and an automated digital current integrator with dose\\/dose rate\\u000a calculation has been designed.\\u000a \\u000a The spherical ionization chamber of 27 cm diameter and

K. E. Duftschmid; J. Hiz

1982-01-01

432

Role of pigmentation in protecting Bacillus sp. endospores against environmental UV radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus endospores show different kinds of pigmentation. Red-pigmented spores of Bacillus atrophaeus DSM 675, dark-gray spores of B. atrophaeusT DSM 7264 and light-gray spores of B. subtilis DSM 5611 were used to study the protective role of the pigments in their resistance to defined ranges of environmental UV radiation. Spores of B. atrophaeus DSM 675 possessing a dark-red pigment were

Ralf Moeller; Gerda Horneck; Rainer Facius; Erko Stackebrandt

2005-01-01

433

Interleukin 1 beta initially sensitizes and subsequently protects murine intestinal stem cells exposed to photon radiation  

SciTech Connect

Interleukin 1 (IL-1) has been shown to prevent early bone marrow-related death following total-body irradiation, by protecting hematopoietic stem cells and speeding marrow repopulation. This study assesses the effect of IL-1 on the radiation response of the intestinal mucosal stem cell, a nonhematopoietic normal cell relevant to clinical radiation therapy. As observed with bone marrow, administration of human recombinant IL-1 beta (4 micrograms/kg) to C3H/Km mice 20 h prior to total-body irradiation modestly protected duodenal crypt cells. In contrast to bone marrow, IL-1 given 4 or 8 h before radiation sensitized intestinal crypt cells. IL-1 exposure did not substantially alter the slope of the crypt cell survival curve but did affect the shoulder: the X-ray survival curve was offset to the right by 1.01 +/- 0.06 Gy when IL-1 was given 20 h earlier and by 1.28 +/- 0.08 Gy to the left at the 4-h interval. Protection was greatest when IL-1 was administered 20 h before irradiation, but minimal effects persisted as long as 7 days after a single injection. The magnitude of radioprotection at 20 h or of radiosensitization at 4 h increased rapidly as IL-1 dose increased from 0 to 4 micrograms/kg. However, doses ranging from 10 to 100 micrograms/kg produced no further difference in radiation response. Animals treated with saline or IL-1 had similar core temperatures from 4 to 24 h after administration, suggesting that thermal changes were not responsible for either sensitization or protection. Mice irradiated 20 h after IL-1 had significantly greater crypt cell survival than saline-treated irradiated controls at all assay times, which ranged from 54 to 126 h following irradiation. The intervals to maximum crypt depopulation and initiation of repopulation were identical in both saline- and IL-1-treated groups.

Hancock, S.L.; Chung, R.T.; Cox, R.S.; Kallman, R.F. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA))

1991-05-01

434

Effects of a Sun Protection Program Targeting Elementary School Children and Their Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Excessive sun exposure in childhood is considered a risk factor for later development of skin cancer, so sun awareness\\u000a programs targeting children have been developed. Objective: To assess the benefits of involving parents at home in the sun\\u000a protection program received by their children at school. Method: The existing \\

Benjamin Barankin; Kimberly Liu; John Howard; Lyn Guenther

2001-01-01

435

Sun Protection is Fun! A Skin Cancer Prevention Program for Preschools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the Sun Protection is Fun! skin cancer prevention program for preschool children that features intervention methods grounded in social cognitive theory and emphasizes symbolic modeling, vicarious learning, enactive mastery experiences, and persuasion. Program components include a curriculum and teacher's guide, videos, newsletters,

Tripp, Mary K.; Herrmann, Nancy B.; Parcel, Guy S.; Chamberlin, Robert M.; Gritz, Ellen R.

2000-01-01

436

Protecting prosecution: Exploring the powers of law in an intervention program for domestic violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article critically analyzes how the criminal justice system centrally situates itself in an intervention program intended to protect victims of domestic abuse and stalking. Based on the first empirical, in-depth study in the Netherlands of an intervention program using electronic technology that is increasingly used in the United States, results indicate how the central role of the criminal justice

R. Rmkens

2006-01-01

437

Abatement and Pollution Control Training and Educational Programs Presented by the United States Environmental Protection Agency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This catalog is a compilation of training course and educational program descriptions in abatement and pollution control scheduled by the Environmental Protection Agency. Descriptions of programs include prerequisites, class size, and length of time with the content goals. Also given is general information concerning tuition fees, waiver requests,

Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

438

Protection effects of condensed bromoacenaphthylene on radiation deterioration of ethylene-propylene-diene rubber. [Gamma radiation  

SciTech Connect

As a continuation of a series of the studies on the flame and ..gamma..-radiation resistant modification of ethylene-propylene-diene rubber (EPDM), condensed bromoacenaphthylene (con-BACN) as a newly developed flame retardant was synthesized and its effects on the radiation resistance of EPDM were investigated. The radiation resistance evaluated by measuring tensile properties of irradiated sheets of 2 mm thick was found improved greatly by adding con-BACN together with ordinary rubber ingredients but decreased by decabromodiphenylether (DBDPE) that has bromins in aromatic rings as con-BACN. When EPDM sheets of 1 mm thick were irradiated in oxygen at a dose rate of 1 X 10/sup 5/ rad/h, the weight swelling ratio increased with increasing dose, indicating that oxidative main chain scission is predominant under the irradiation conditions. On the other hand, crosslinking was shown to be predominant in nitrogen. From the results of the swelling experiments with different additives, it was concluded that DBDPE accelerates both the main chain scission in oxygen and the crosslinking in nitrogen. In contrast to this, con-BACN reduced the chain scission in oxygen. This observation was accounted by the assumption that the influence of the oxidative chain scission is partly compensated by the concurrent crosslinking which takes place through additions of con-BACN to substrate polymers even in the presence of oxygen.

Morita, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Kasai, N.

1982-09-01

439

Planetary protection program for Mars 94/96 mission.  

PubMed

Mars surface in-situ exploration started in 1975 with the American VIKING mission. Two probes landed on the northern hemisphere and provided, for the first time, detailed information on the martian terrain, atmosphere and meteorology. The current goal is to undertake larger surface investigations and many projects are being planned by the major Space Agencies with this objective. Among these projects, the Mars 94/96 mission will make a major contributor toward generating significant information about the martian surface on a large scale. Since the beginning of the Solar System exploration, planets where life could exist have been subject to planetary protection requirements. Those requirements accord with the COSPAR Policy and have two main goals: the protection of the planetary environment from influence or contamination by terrestrial microorganisms, the protection of life science, and particularly of life detection experiments searching extra-terrestrial life, and not life carried by probes and spacecrafts. As the conditions for life and survival for terrestrial microorganisms in the Mars environment became known, COSPAR recommendations were updated. This paper will describe the decontamination requirements which will be applied for the MARS 94/96 mission, the techniques and the procedures which are and will be used to realize and control the decontamination of probes and spacecrafts. PMID:11538980

Rogovski, G; Bogomolov, V; Ivanov, M; Runavot, J; Debus, A; Victorov, A; Darbord, J C

1996-01-01

440

In vitro and in vivo protective effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor against radiation-induced intestinal injury.  

PubMed

Intestinal injury is a major cause of death after high-dose radiation exposure. The use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to treat radiation injury has focused on enhancing recovery from hematopoietic radiation syndrome. We evaluated G-CSF for its ability to protect against radiation-induced intestinal injury in rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) and BALB/c mouse models. For in vitro tests, pre-radiation addition of G-CSF to IEC-6 prevented cytotoxicity and the loss of cell viability. Pre-radiation G-CSF treatment also reduced radiation-induced cleavage of caspase-3 and p53 in IEC-6. For in vivo tests, examination 12h after abdominal irradiation showed that G-CSF-treated mice were protected against apoptosis of the jejunal crypts. G-CSF-treated mice also showed attenuated intestinal morphological changes 3.5days after abdominal radiation (10Gy). G-CSF also reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-? after radiation. This study showed that G-CSF may protect against radiation-induced intestinal damage through its anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects. These results suggest that G-CSF is promising candidate for protection against intestinal mucosal injury following irradiation. PMID:23728838

Kim, Joong-Sun; Yang, Miyoung; Lee, Chang-Geun; Kim, Sung-Dae; Kim, Jung-Ki; Yang, Kwangmo

2013-06-01

441

National committee on radiation protection, 1928-1960: from professional guidelines to government regulation  

SciTech Connect

The National Committee on Radiation Protection is a private, self-perpetuating body of radiation experts founded in 1928 which, except during World War II, has established the basic guidelines for radiation safety in the United States. This dissertation examines three themes in its history from 1928 to 1960. On an intellectual level, how do scientists make judgments when called upon to perform a legal function, instead of conduct research. On an institutional level, how does a scientific committee develop when it serves a medical, industrial, and legal constituency larger than the research community of the scientist themselves. On a political level, how has the development of atomic energy influenced both the intellectual content of the radiation safety standards and the institutional form of the NCRP. Institutional and political concerns were found to play a significant role in the NCRP's intellectual work from 1928 to 1960. The time span can be divided into three periods, revealing a growing politicization of radiation safety: professional self-regulation (1928-1941), government advisory committee (1946-1954), and public controversy and increasing legislation (1954-1960). In 1959, political controversy led to the establishment of the Federal Radiation Council, a government agency which was to replace the NCRP.

Whittemore, G.F.

1986-01-01

442

Caffeic acid protects human peripheral blood lymphocytes against gamma radiation-induced cellular damage.  

PubMed

In the present study, we investigated in vitro radioprotective potential of caffeic acid (CA), a naturally occurring catecholic acid against gamma radiation-induced cellular changes. Different concentrations of CA (5.5, 11, 22, 44, 66, and 88 microM) were incubated with lymphocytes for 30 min prior to gamma-irradiation, and micronuclei (MN) scoring and comet assay were performed to fix the effective concentration of CA against gamma-irradiation. Among all concentrations, 66 microM of CA showed the optimum protection by effectively decreasing the MN frequencies and comet attributes. From the above-mentioned results, 66 microM of CA was selected as the effective concentration and was further used to investigate its radioprotective efficacy. For that purpose, a separate experiment was carried out on the lymphocytes in which lymphocytes were preincubated with CA (66 microM) and were exposed to different doses of radiation (1, 2, 3, and 4 Gy). Genetic damage (MN, dicentric aberration, and comet attributes) and biochemical changes were measured. Gamma-irradiated lymphocytes showed a dose-dependent increase in the genetic damage and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, accompanied by the significant decrease in the antioxidant status, whereas CA pretreatment positively modulated all the radiation-induced changes through its antioxidant potential. The current study demonstrates that CA is effective in protecting lymphocytes against radiation-induced toxicity and encourages further in vivo study to evaluate radioprotective efficacy of CA. PMID:18561333

Devipriya, Nagarajan; Sudheer, Adluri Ram; Menon, Venugopal P

443

Low-Dose Radiation and Genotoxic Chemicals Can Protect Against Stochastic Biological Effects  

PubMed Central

A protective apoptosis-mediated (PAM) process that is turned on in mammalian cells by low-dose photon (X and ?) radiation and appears to also be turned on by the genotoxic chemical ethylene oxide is discussed. Because of the PAM process, exposure to low-dose photon radiation (and possibly also some genotoxic chemicals) can lead to a reduction in the risk of stochastic effects such as problematic mutations, neoplastic transformation (an early step in cancer occurrence), and cancer. These findings indicate a need to revise the current low-dose risk assessment paradigm for which risk of cancer is presumed to increase linearly with dose (without a threshold) after exposure to any amount of a genotoxic agent such as ionizing radiation. These findings support a view seldom mentioned in the past, that cancer risk can actually decrease, rather than increase, after exposure to low doses of photon radiation and possibly some other genotoxic agents. The PAM process (a form of natural protection) may contribute substantially to cancer prevention in humans and other mammals. However, new research is needed to improve our understanding of the process. The new research could unlock novel strategies for optimizing cancer prevention and novel protocols for low-dose therapy for cancer. With low-dose cancer therapy, normal tissue could be spared from severe damage while possibly eliminating the cancer.

Scott, Bobby R.; Walker, Dale M.; Walker, Vernon E.

2004-01-01

444

[Changes in the "medical research" licensing procedure under the German Radiation Protection Ordinance].  

PubMed

This publication outlines the "medical research" licensing procedure as specified in the amendment of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance of November 1, 2011. The general licensing requirements for the use of radiation have not been changed by the amendment. Three so-called use restrictions (i. e., dose limits of 10 mSv and 20 mSv, age limit of 50 years) have been modified. They will only apply to healthy volunteers in the future. In addition, there are considerable simplifications with respect to applications and licensing procedures of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fr Strahlenschutz, BfS) regarding the use of radiation in the newly introduced "accompanying diagnostics" ("Begleitdiagnostik") case group. The newly established, independent panel of experts at the German Radiological Society (Deutsche Rntgengesellschaft, DRG) may provide essential support to principal investigators, qualified physicians and sponsors for differentiating between "medical research" and "health care", the latter not being subject to licensing. An expert statement will be issued by the DRG within four weeks of an inquiry. This consulting service is subject to confidentiality, and is free of charge for inquirers and without any commitment. PMID:22331822

Habeck, M; Epsch, R; Minkov, V; Langer, M; Griebel, J; Brix, G

2012-02-13

445

Protective effect of nitric oxide against oxidative stress under ultraviolet-B radiation.  

PubMed

The response of bean leaves to UV-B radiation was extensively investigated. UV-B radiation caused increase of ion leakage, loss of chlorophyll, and decrease of the maximum efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm) and the quantum yield of PSII electron transport (PhiPSII) of bean leaves. H2O2 contents and the extent of thylakoid membrane protein oxidation increased, indicated by the decrease of thiol contents and the increase of carbonyl contents with the duration of UV-B radiation. Addition of sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide (NO) donor, can partially alleviate UV-B induced decrease of chlorophyll contents, Fv/Fm and PhiPSII. Moreover, the oxidative damage to the thylakoid membrane was alleviated by NO. The potassium salt of 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, a specific NO scavenger, arrested NO mediated protective effects against UV-B induced oxidative damage. Incubation of thylakoid membrane with increasing H2O2 concentrations showed a progressive enhancement in carbonyl contents. H2O2 contents were decreased in the presence of NO under UV-B radiation through increased activities of superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, and catalases. Taken together, the results suggest that NO can effectively protect plants from UV-B damage mostly probably mediated by enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:15908241

Shi, Suyun; Wang, Gang; Wang, Yading; Zhang, Lingang; Zhang, Lixin

2005-08-01

446

Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

Du Shisuo; Qiang Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zeng Zhaochong, E-mail: zeng.zhaochong@zs-hospital.sh.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan [Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang Zhengyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zeng Haiying [Department of Pathology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liu Zhongshan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

2010-03-15

447

Sunscreens: topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against harmful effects of solar radiation  

SciTech Connect

This review deals with topical and systemic approaches for protection of human skin against the harmful effects of solar radiation. Two concerns about the deleterious effects of sun exposure involve: (1) acute effects (e.g., sunburn and drug-induced phototoxicity) and (2) potential long-term risks of repeated sun exposures leading to development of solar elastosis, keratoses, induction of both nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancer, and alteration of immune responses and functions. Action spectra of normal and abnormal reactions of human skin to acute and chronic effects of solar radiation are presented with a view to helping the physician prescribe the appropriate sunscreens. Factors that influence acute effects of sunburn are reviewed. Various artificial methods effective in minimizing or preventing harmful effects of solar radiation, both in normal individuals and in patients with photosensitivity-related problems, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the commercially available chemical sunscreens and their properties. Sun protection factor (SPF) values of several brand-name formulations determined with a solar simulator under indoor conditions (laboratory) and with solar radiation under natural, field conditions are presented. Factors responsible for variations of SPF values observed under indoor and outdoor conditions are reviewed. Systemic photoprotective agents and their limitations are outlined. The photobiology of melanin pigmentation (the tanning reaction) is briefly discussed, with emphasis on the dangers of using quick-tanning lotions for stimulation of the tanning reaction.

Pathak, M.A.

1982-09-01

448

Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan. Volume 2, Protection programs  

SciTech Connect

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

Not Available

1989-08-01

449

Combined radiation-protective and radiation-sensitizing agents. IV. Measurement of intracellular protector concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Radiosensitization of hypoxic V79 Chinese hamster cells by 0.5 mM misonidazole at approximately 0-4 degrees C is substantially enhanced by pretreating the cells overnight with 0.1 mM buthionine sulfoximine, which lowers the cellular glutathione content to 5% of control values (from 4 mM to approximately 0.2 mM). The enhanced sensitization is reversed by concentrations of exogenous cysteine that are much lower (0.02 mM) than the original glutathione content. Reduced Co-enzyme A affords reversal of the enhancing effect at concentrations of about 1 mM. Sodium ascorbate gives no protection at all even at concentrations of 2 mM. The intracellular concentration of the reducing agents was measured using a spin-through oil technique. There was no diffusion of Co-A (MW greater than 750) or ascorbate (excluded by charge) into the cells. In contrast, cysteine was rapidly concentrated by factors of 4-10, even at the low temperatures used. Extracellular ascorbate's inability to radioprotect argues against electron transfer across the cell membrane as a mechanism for radioprotection. This mechanism could have explained the ability of exogenous thiols to radioprotect in former studies using glutathione, and in the present studies using Co-A. The potential of cysteine to be concentrated by cells poses a problem in the interpretation of exogenous protection by non-diffusing thiols, since trace contamination by cysteine could lead to the actual protection observed. Cysteine could also be formed by exchange reactions of exogenous thiols with the disulfide of cysteine, present in all media formulations.

Koch, C.J.; Stobbe, C.C.; Hettiaratchi, P.

1989-04-01

450

Implementation of the Environmental Protection Agency's radon action program  

SciTech Connect

In December 1984, very high radon levels were discovered in a house in the Reading Prong, a geologic region extending from eastern Pennsylvania into New Jersey and New York. The authors discuss how this discovery of extremely high residential radon levels was the catalyst for focusing the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) attention on the problem. Measurements taken in the house found radon concentrations as high as 130 times the federal occupational exposure standard for underground uranium mines. Subsequently, thousands of other houses in the area were also found to be contaminated by naturally occurring radon. High levels have now been found in nearly every state.

Chites, B.; Rinck, R.T.; Wagner, D. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (US))

1988-01-01

451

BLISS: A Computer Program for the Protection of Blood Donors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A BASIC program has been developed for the Hewlett-Packard Model 9845 desk-top computer which allows the creation of blood donor files for subsequent retrieval, update, and correction. A similar modified version was developed for hte HP 9835 Model. This s...

N. Catsimpoolas C. Cooke C. R. Valeri

1982-01-01

452