Science.gov

Sample records for radiation-burn injuries technical

  1. Car radiator burns: a prevention issue.

    PubMed

    Rabbitts, Angela; Alden, Nicole E; Conlin, Tara; Yurt, Roger W

    2004-01-01

    Scald burns continue to be the major cause of injury to patients admitted to the burn center. Scald burns occurring from car radiator fluid comprise a significant subgroup. Although manufacturer warning labels have been placed on car radiators, these burns continue to occur. This retrospective review looks at all patients admitted to our burn center who suffered scald burns from car radiator fluid to assess the extent of this problem. During the study period, 86 patients were identified as having suffered scald burns as a result of contact with car radiator fluid. Seventy-one percent of the burn injuries occurred in the summer months. The areas most commonly burned were the head and upper extremities. Burn prevention efforts have improved greatly over the years; however, this study demonstrates that scald burns from car radiator fluid continue to cause physical, emotional, and financial devastation. The current radiator warning labels alone are not effective. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has proposed a new federal motor vehicle safety standard to aid in decreasing the number of scald burns from car radiators. The results of this study were submitted to the United States Department of Transportation for inclusion in a docket for federal legislation supporting these safety measures. PMID:15353940

  2. Contemporary body armor: technical data, injuries, and limits.

    PubMed

    Prat, N; Rongieras, F; Sarron, J-C; Miras, A; Voiglio, E

    2012-04-01

    The introduction of firearms in the fifteenth century led to the continuous development of bulletproof personal protection. Due to recent industrial progress and the emergence of a new generation of ballistic fibers in the 1960s, the ability of individual ballistic protections to stop projectiles greatly increased. While protective equipment is able to stop increasingly powerful missiles, deformation during the impact can cause potentially lethal nonpenetrating injuries that are grouped under the generic term of behind armor blunt trauma, and the scope and consequences of these are still unclear. This review first summarizes current technical data for modern bulletproof vests, the materials used in them, and the stopping mechanisms they employ. Then it describes recent research into the specific ballistic injury patterns of soldiers wearing body armor, focusing on behind-armor blunt trauma. PMID:26815825

  3. 78 FR 32009 - Technical Report on the Injury Vulnerability of Older Occupants and Women

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477) or you may visit http... publication of a technical report comparing the injury and fatality risk in crashes of older and...

  4. Injury patterns of seniors in traffic accidents: A technical and medical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Stephan; Otte, Dietmar; Mueller, Christian Walter; Petri, Maximilian; Haas, Philipp; Stuebig, Timo; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the actual injury situation of seniors in traffic accidents and to evaluate the different injury patterns. METHODS: Injury data, environmental circumstances and crash circumstances of accidents were collected shortly after the accident event at the scene. With these data, a technical and medical analysis was performed, including Injury Severity Score, Abbreviated Injury Scale and Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale. The method of data collection is named the German In-Depth Accident Study and can be seen as representative. RESULTS: A total of 4430 injured seniors in traffic accidents were evaluated. The incidence of sustaining severe injuries to extremities, head and maxillofacial region was significantly higher in the group of elderly people compared to a younger age (P < 0.05). The number of accident-related injuries was higher in the group of seniors compared to other groups. CONCLUSION: Seniors are more likely to be involved in traffic injuries and to sustain serious to severe injuries compared to other groups. PMID:23173111

  5. New approach to radiation burn treatment by dosimetry-guided surgery combined with autologous mesenchymal stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Lataillade, J J; Doucet, C; Bey, E; Carsin, H; Huet, C; Clairand, I; Bottollier-Depois, J F; Chapel, A; Ernou, I; Gourven, M; Boutin, L; Hayden, A; Carcamo, C; Buglova, E; Joussemet, M; de Revel, T; Gourmelon, P

    2007-09-01

    The therapeutic management of severe radiation burns remains a challenging issue. Conventional surgical treatment (excision and skin autograft or rotation flap) often fails to prevent unpredictable and uncontrolled extension of the radiation necrotic process. We report here an innovative therapeutic strategy applied to the victim of a radiation accident (December 15, 2005) with an iridium gammagraphy radioactive source (192Ir, 3.3 TBq). The approach combined numerical dosimetry-guided surgery with cellular therapy using mesenchymal stem cells. A very severe buttock radiation burn (2000 Gy at the center of the skin surface lesion) of a 27-year-old Chilean victim was widely excised (10 cm in diameter) using a physical and anatomical dose reconstruction in order to better define the limit of the surgical excision in apparently healthy tissues. A secondary extension of the radiation necrosis led to a new excision of fibronecrotic tissues associated with a local cellular therapy using autologous expanded mesenchymal stem cells as a source of trophic factors to promote tissue regeneration. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were expanded according to a clinical-grade technique using closed culture devices and serum-free medium enriched in human platelet lysate. The clinical evolution (radiation pain and healing progression) was favorable and no recurrence of radiation inflammatory waves was observed during the 11 month patient's follow-up. This novel multidisciplinary therapeutic approach combining physical techniques, surgical procedures and cellular therapy with adult stem cells may be of clinical relevance for improving the medical management of severe localized irradiations. It may open new prospects in the field of radiotherapy complications. PMID:17907931

  6. Cut-laceration injuries and related career groups in New Jersey career, vocational, and technical education courses and programs.

    PubMed

    Shendell, Derek G; Mizan, Samina S; Marshall, Elizabeth G; Kelly, Sarah W; Therkorn, Jennifer H; Campbell, Jennifer K; Miller, Ashley E

    2012-09-01

    Investigations of young workers, including limited surveys in supervised school settings, suggested their elevated injury risk. This study identified factors contributing to cuts-lacerations among adolescents in New Jersey secondary school career, technical, and vocational education programs. Of 1,772 injuries reported between December 1, 1998, and September 1, 2010, 777 (44%) were cuts-lacerations; analyses focused on 224 reports (n = 182 post-exclusions) submitted after fall 2005 in three career groups-Food, Hospitality & Tourism (FH&T) (n = 71), Manufacturing & Construction (M&C) (n = 84), and Automotive & Transportation (A&T) (n = 27). Most students were "struck by" tools or hard surfaces (n = 93, 51%); 63 cuts were from knives in FH&T. In M&C, most cuts-lacerations were caused by hand-held tools (n = 18) and being "struck against/by" or "caught between hard surfaces" (n = 19). Males reported more cuts-lacerations (n = 145), most commonly among 11th graders (n = 54) and ages 16 to 17 years (n = 79). Fingers (n = 117) were most often injured, usually by cutting tools (n = 83). Training, supervision, and appropriate equipment, and further assessments of "struck by" and "pinch point" hazards, are needed. PMID:22938811

  7. Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Perfusion for Traumatic Brain Injury: Technical Challenges and Potentials.

    PubMed

    Andre, Jalal B

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), including concussion, is a public health concern, as it affects over 1.7 million persons in the United States per year. Yet, the diagnosis of TBI, particularly mild TBI (mTBI), can be controversial, as neuroimaging findings can be sparse on conventional magnetic resonance and computed tomography examinations, and when present, often poorly correlate with clinical signs and symptoms. Furthermore, the discussion of TBI, concussion, and head impact exposure is immediately complicated by the many differing opinions of what constitutes each, their respective severities, and how the underlying biomechanics of the inciting head impact might alter the distribution, severity, and prognosis of the underlying brain injury. Advanced imaging methodologies hold promise in improving the sensitivity and detectability of associated imaging biomarkers that might better correlate with patient outcome and prognostication, allowing for improved triage and therapeutic guidance in the setting of TBI, particularly in mTBI. This work will examine the defining symptom complex associated with mTBI and explore changes in cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labeling, as a potential imaging biomarker for TBI, and briefly correlate these observations with findings identified by single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography imaging. PMID:26502309

  8. Novel Method for Analyzing Locomotor Ability after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Munehisa; Yasuda, Akimasa; Nori, Satoshi; Saito, Nobuhito; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    In the research for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI), the evaluation of motor function in model rats must be as objective, noninvasive, and ethical as possible. The maximum speed and acceleration of a mouse measured using a SCANET system were previously reported to vary significantly according to severity of SCI. In the present study, the motor performance of SCI model rats was examined with SCANET and assessed for Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) score to determine the usefulness of the SCANET system in evaluating functional recovery after SCI. Maximum speed and acceleration within the measurement period correlated significantly with BBB scores. Furthermore, among several phased kinematic factors used in BBB scores, the capability of “plantar stepping” was associated with a drastic increase in maximum speed and acceleration after SCI. Therefore, evaluation of maximum speed and acceleration using a SCANET system is a useful method for rat models of SCI and can complement open field scoring scales. PMID:24097095

  9. Personal protective equipment use among students with special health care needs reporting injuries in school-sponsored vocational, career, and technical education programs in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Eric; Shendell, Derek; Eggert, Brain C; Marcella, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Students with special health care needs (SHCNs) and individualized education plans (IEPs) may be injured more often in vocational, career, and technical education (CTE) programs. No research to date considers personal protective equipment (PPE) use among students with SHCNs in school-based programs reporting injuries to agencies. Data from 1999 to 2011 on PPE use among injured students in CTE programs in public schools and private secondary schools for the disabled were analyzed; students with SHCNs were distinguished by IEP status within New Jersey Safe Schools surveilance data. Among students with IEPs using PPE, 36% of injuries occurred to body parts PPE was meant to protect. Likely injury types were cuts-lacerations and burns for students with IEPs using PPE and cuts-lacerations and sprains for students with IEPs not using PPE. Females with IEPs using PPE were injured less often than males across ages. Results suggested students with SHCNs with IEPs need further job-related training with increased emphasis on properly selecting and fitting PPE. PMID:24571050

  10. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Platz, Thomas; Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard. PMID:27610382

  11. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard. PMID:27610382

  12. Urethral Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Injuries Ureteral Injuries Urethral Injuries Injuries to the Penis and Scrotum Most urethral injuries occur in men. ... leakage of urine into the tissues of the penis, scrotum, abdominal wall, or perineum (the area between ...

  13. Midfoot and Forefoot Injuries.

    PubMed

    Gorbachova, Tetyana

    2015-08-01

    Sports injuries of the midfoot and forefoot encompass a spectrum of osseous and soft tissue trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging serves as a primary or important supplementary diagnostic modality in evaluation of various injuries, most important of which include Lisfranc complex injury, stress fractures, and injury to the first metatarsophalangeal joint, aka "turf toe." Current technical advances in magnetic resonance and improved knowledge of regional anatomy enable thorough evaluation of the complex anatomic structures of the foot and facilitate accurate diagnosis in the setting of trauma. PMID:26244619

  14. Injuries in Swedish skydiving

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Anton; Björnstig, Ulf

    2007-01-01

    Objective To create a basis for prevention of modern skydiving injuries. Design Descriptive epidemiological study. Setting National total material. Patients Data on all reported injury events (n = 257) in Swedish skydiving 1999–2003 (total 539 885 jumps) were retrieved from the Swedish Parachute Association. Non‐fatally injured skydivers were sent a questionnaire asking for event and injury details (response rate 89%), and supplementary hospital records were retrieved for the most serious injuries (n = 85). Human, equipment and environmental factors were assessed for risk. Main Outcome Measurements Frequency and severity of injuries. Results Incidence of non‐fatal injury events was 48 per 100 000 jumps. The lower extremities, spine and shoulders were important regions of injury. The most serious injuries were experienced by licensed skydivers, but students in training had a higher injury rate and more often left the sport because of the injury. Of two student‐training systems, one had an incidence less than half that of the other. Conclusions A basis for prevention was created, showing a potential for reduction of frequency and severity of injuries with training and technical interventions. PMID:17224436

  15. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of head injuries include bicycle or motorcycle wrecks, sports injuries, falls from windows (especially among children who live ... to watch for? When can I start playing sports again after a head injury? How can brain damage from a head injury ...

  16. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  17. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  18. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Usually, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  19. Approaches to the assessment of injuries to soil arising from discharges of hazardous substances and oil: Type B, Technical information document

    SciTech Connect

    Van Voris, P.; Dawson, G.W.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Cataldo, D.A.; Rogers, L.E.; Novich, C.M.; Meuser, J.

    1987-06-01

    Methods for determining the nature and magnitude of injury to the following natural resources are described for: soil chemical characteristics (acidity or pH, cation exchange capacity, percent base saturation, salinity); soil physical characteristics (porosity, water holding capacity, aggregate stability); biological characteristics (microbial activities, invertebrate activities, vegetation); and contaminant transport potential (leaching, food chain). In addition, this document explains how injuries to the soil resource can be translated into a reduction in service provided by that soil and how to determine soil recovery potential. That portion of 43 CFR Part 11 that pertains to the soils portion of the geologic resource is explained.

  20. Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino, Francisco José; de la Cuadra, Crótida; Guillén, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite overuse injuries being previously described as the most frequent in ballet, there are no studies on professional dancers providing the specific clinical diagnoses or type of injury based on the discipline. Hypothesis Overuse injuries are the most frequent injuries in ballet, with differences in the type and frequency of injuries based on discipline. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study performed between January 1, 2005, and October 10, 2010, on injuries occurring in professional dancers from leading Spanish dance companies who practiced disciplines such as classical, neoclassical, contemporary, and Spanish ballet. Data, including type of injury, were obtained from specialized medical services at the Trauma Service, Fremap, Madrid, Spain. Results A total of 486 injuries were evaluated, a significant number of which were overuse disorders (P < .0001), especially in the most technically demanding discipline of classical ballet (82.60%). Injuries were more frequent among female dancers (75.90%) and classical ballet (83.60%). A statistically significant prevalence of patellofemoral pain syndrome was found in the classical discipline (P = .007). Injuries of the adductor muscles of the thigh (P = .001) and of the low back facet (P = .02) in the Spanish ballet discipline and lateral snapping hip (P = .02) in classical and Spanish ballet disciplines were significant. Conclusion Overuse injuries were the most frequent injuries among the professional dancers included in this study. The prevalence of injuries was greater for the most technically demanding discipline (classical ballet) as well as for women. Patellofemoral pain syndrome was the most prevalent overuse injury, followed by Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy, and mechanical low back pain. Clinical Relevance Specific clinical diagnoses and injury-based differences between the disciplines are a key factor in ballet

  1. Ocular Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occur from blunt trauma, such as a sports injury or a fall with injury to the nose ... of protective goggles at all times. Even in sports like baseball, eye injuries can be prevented by using batting helmets that ...

  2. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  3. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  4. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  5. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work ...

  6. Blast Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical Providers Blast Injuries U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Gustavo Olgiati How ... tertiary injury Does a blast cause different brain injuries than blunt trauma? There currently is no evidence ...

  7. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains and strains Herniated disks Fractured vertebrae These injuries can cause pain and limit your movement. Treatments vary but might ...

  8. [Comparative Evaluation of Healing Wounds at a Local and Combined Radiation Injury in an Experiment].

    PubMed

    Legeza, V I; Grebenyuk, A N; Kondakov, A Y; Zargarova, N I

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing activity of 20 different means of conservative treatment of radiation burns was studies in the experiments on the rats subjected to local β-radiation (at a dose of 60 Gy) and combined radiation damage (β-radiation at a dose of 60 Gy and the whole-body γ-irradiation at a dose of 4 Gy). It was found that reparative processes in the irradiated,skin in the case of the local radiation injuries are most effectively accelerated by ointments Biopin, Panthenol-Ratiopharm, IL-1β and Iruksol; Dimexidum solution; aerosols Olazol, Gipozol and Polkortolon; wound coverings Procell-super and Selenopol. Ointments containing IL-1β, Dimexidum solution, aerosols and wound coverings have a healing effect in the case of combined radiation injury. PMID:26964343

  9. Lisfranc injuries.

    PubMed

    Welck, M J; Zinchenko, R; Rudge, B

    2015-04-01

    Lisfranc injuries are commonly asked about in FRCS Orthopaedic trauma vivas. The term "Lisfranc injury" strictly refers to an injury where one or more of the metatarsals are displaced from the tarsus. The term is more commonly used to describe an injury to the midfoot centred on the 2nd tarsometatarsal joint. The injury is named after Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin (1790-1847), a French surgeon and gynaecologist who first described the injury in 1815. 'Lisfranc injury' encompasses a broad spectrum of injuries, which can be purely ligamentous or involve the osseous and articular structures. They are often difficult to diagnose and treat, but if not detected and appropriately managed they can cause long-term disability. This review outlines the anatomy, epidemiology, classification, investigation and current evidence on management of this injury. PMID:25543185

  10. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality. PMID:20016434

  11. Contact radiator burn subsequent to spinal anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sever, C; Aysal, B K; Sahin, C; Kulahci, Y

    2012-06-30

    An unusual case is reported in which a patient sustained a third-degree burn of the plantar surface of the right foot as the result of contact with a heating radiator. This occurred when the patient fell asleep in his hospital bed after knee surgery. Spinal anaesthesia is easy to perform, and the risk factors, though present, are not serious. Such accidents are not infrequent and care should be taken to prevent them. PMID:23233830

  12. Basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joel S; Newberg, Arthur H

    2010-11-01

    Basketball injuries are most prevalent in the lower extremity, especially at the ankle and knee. Most basketball injuries are orthopedic in nature and commonly include ligament sprains, musculotendinous strains, and overuse injuries including stress fractures. By virtue of its excellent contrast resolution and depiction of the soft tissues and trabecular bone, magnetic resonance imaging has become the principal modality for evaluating many basketball injuries. In this article, commonly encountered basketball injuries and their imaging appearances are described. The epidemiology of basketball injuries across various age groups and levels of competition and between genders are reviewed. PMID:21094400

  13. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  14. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  15. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  16. Cycling injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bicycle-related injuries have increased as cycling has become more popular. Most injuries to recreational riders are associated with overuse or improper fit of the bicycle. Injuries to racers often result from high speeds, which predispose riders to muscle strains, collisions, and falls. Cyclists contact bicycles at the pedals, seat, and handlebars. Each is associated with particular cycling injuries. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8471908

  17. Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress.

  18. Orienteering injuries

    PubMed Central

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering. Imagesp236-ap237-ap237-bp238-ap239-ap240-a PMID:7159815

  19. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  20. Gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Hinkle, J; Betz, S

    1995-05-01

    If current trends for this nation continue, by the year 2003 the number of people killed by firearms will exceed the number of people killed in motor vehicle accidents. Critical care practitioners must understand the mechanism of injury associated with firearm injuries to provide optimal care. This article reviews internal, exterior, and terminal ballistics, bullet design, wound classification, and initial assessment and treatment of firearm injuries. PMID:7743422

  1. Skiing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    In the broad spectrum of orthopedic skiing injuries, ‘second aid’ on the mountain and at the base by the physician is very important. All skiing physicians should carry minimal medical supplies, including narcotic medication. Diagnosis and treatment of injuries at the hospital are outlined. Most ski fractures of the tibia can be treated by conservative methods. A more aggressive approach to diagnosis and treatment of ligamentous injuries of the knee is recommended. PMID:20469236

  2. Rowing injuries.

    PubMed

    Rumball, Jane S; Lebrun, Constance M; Di Ciacca, Stephen R; Orlando, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Participation in the sport of rowing has been steadily increasing in recent decades, yet few studies address the specific injuries incurred. This article reviews the most common injuries described in the literature, including musculoskeletal problems in the lower back, ribs, shoulder, wrist and knee. A review of basic rowing physiology and equipment is included, along with a description of the mechanics of the rowing stroke. This information is necessary in order to make an accurate diagnosis and treatment protocol for these injuries, which are mainly chronic in nature. The most frequently injured region is the low back, mainly due to excessive hyperflexion and twisting, and can include specific injuries such as spondylolysis, sacroiliac joint dysfunction and disc herniation. Rib stress fractures account for the most time lost from on-water training and competition. Although theories abound for the mechanism of injury, the exact aetiology of rib stress fractures remains unknown. Other injuries discussed within, which are specific to ribs, include costochondritis, costovertebral joint subluxation and intercostal muscle strains. Shoulder pain is quite common in rowers and can be the result of overuse, poor technique, or tension in the upper body. Injuries concerning the forearm and wrist are also common, and can include exertional compartment syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, deQuervain's and intersection syndrome, and tenosynovitis of the wrist extensors. In the lower body, the major injuries reported include generalised patellofemoral pain due to abnormal patellar tracking, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Lastly, dermatological issues, such as blisters and abrasions, and miscellaneous issues, such as environmental concerns and the female athlete triad, are also included in this article.Pathophysiology, mechanism of injury, assessment and management strategies are outlined in the text for each injury, with special attention given to ways to correct

  3. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper gear can cause them. Some people get hurt because they are not in shape. Not warming up or stretching enough can also ... injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  4. Rowing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hosea, Timothy M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Rowing is one of the original modern Olympic sports and was one of the most popular spectator sports in the United States. Its popularity has been increasing since the enactment of Title IX. The injury patterns in this sport are unique because of the stress applied during the rowing stroke. Evidence Acquisition: This review summarizes the existing literature describing the biomechanics of the rowing stroke and rowing-related injury patterns. Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December, 2011) as well as from textbook chapters and rowing coaching manuals. Results: Rowing injuries are primarily overuse related. The knee, lumbar spine, and ribs are most commonly affected. The injury incidence is directly related to the volume of training and technique. Conclusion: Familiarity of the injury patterns and the biomechanical forces affecting the rowing athlete will aid in prompt diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23016093

  5. Volleyball injuries.

    PubMed

    Eerkes, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the numbers of people playing indoor and beach volleyball since the early 1980s and, consequently, an increase in injuries. Most injuries are related to repetitive jumping and hitting the ball overhead. The ankle is the most commonly injured joint, but the knee, shoulder, low back, and fingers also are vulnerable. The shoulder in particular is subject to extreme torque when hitting and jump serving the ball. Some injuries have a predilection for those playing on sand versus those playing in an indoor court. The clinician caring for volleyball players should be aware of the types of injuries these players sustain and how to help them return to play promptly and appropriately. This article reviews the specific injuries that are most common as a result of participating in the sport of volleyball. PMID:22965348

  6. Technical writing versus technical writing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillingham, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Two terms, two job categories, 'technical writer' and 'technical author' are discussed in terms of industrial and business requirements and standards. A distinction between 'technical writing' and technical 'writing' is made. The term 'technical editor' is also considered. Problems inherent in the design of programs to prepare and train students for these jobs are discussed. A closer alliance between industry and academia is suggested as a means of preparing students with competent technical communication skills (especially writing and editing skills) and good technical skills.

  7. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is shaken, is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. Scalp wounds. Skull fractures. Head injuries may cause ... of people who suffer head injuries are children. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) accounts for over 1 in 6 injury- ...

  8. Technical Shibboleths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John S.

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technical sub-languages to reveal sociological functions of language that transcend mere transfer of substantive information. Finds one sociological feature, the shibboleth, acting widely throughout technical fields. (PA)

  9. Electrical injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage, especially to the heart, muscles, or brain. Electric current can cause injury in three ways: Cardiac arrest ... How long you were in contact with the electricity How the electricity moved through your body Your ...

  10. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, to help decrease swelling. The Body’s Healing Process From the moment a bone breaks or a ... what happens at each stage of the healing process: At the moment of injury: Chemicals are released ...

  11. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... at all times when using hand or power tools or chemicals, during high impact sports, or during other activities where you may get an eye injury. Wear sunglasses that screen ultraviolet light when you are ...

  12. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries. PMID:10645833

  13. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  14. Blast Injury

    PubMed Central

    de Candole, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    The shock wave generated by an explosion (“blast wave”) may cause injury in any or all of the following: (1) direct impact on the tissues of variations in environmental pressure; (2) flying glass and other debris set in motion by it; (3) propulsion of the body. Injuries in the first category affect gas-containing organs (ears, lungs and intestines), and acute death is attributed to air forced into the coronary vessels via damaged pulmonary alveoli. It is estimated that overpressure sufficient to cause lung injury may occur up to five miles from a 20-megaton nuclear explosion. The greatest single hazard from blast is, however, flying glass, and serious wounding from this cause is possible up to 12 miles from an explosion of this magnitude. PMID:6015742

  15. Blast injury.

    PubMed

    de Candole, C A

    1967-01-28

    The shock wave generated by an explosion ("blast wave") may cause injury in any or all of the following: (1) direct impact on the tissues of variations in environmental pressure; (2) flying glass and other debris set in motion by it; (3) propulsion of the body. Injuries in the first category affect gas-containing organs (ears, lungs and intestines), and acute death is attributed to air forced into the coronary vessels via damaged pulmonary alveoli. It is estimated that overpressure sufficient to cause lung injury may occur up to five miles from a 20-megaton nuclear explosion. The greatest single hazard from blast is, however, flying glass, and serious wounding from this cause is possible up to 12 miles from an explosion of this magnitude. PMID:6015742

  16. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  18. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase mortality 30% to 40% when patients with cutaneous burns and inhalation injury are compared with patients ... nasal hairs • Facial burns • Burns around the mouth • Mineral spirits – 104º F – paint thinner, brush cleaner. • Redness, ...

  19. Electrical Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your injuries are depends on how strong the electric current was, what type of current it was, how it moved through your body, and how long you were exposed. Other factors include how ... you should see a doctor. You may have internal damage and not realize it.

  20. Current review of injuries sustained in mixed martial arts competition.

    PubMed

    Walrod, Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Mixed martial arts (MMA) have enjoyed a tremendous growth in popularity over the past 10 years, yet there remains a paucity of information with respect to common injuries sustained in MMA competitions. In the available studies, certain trends pertaining to risk factors for injury, as well as the most common injuries sustained in MMA competition, were noted. Common risk factors include being the losing fighter, history of knockout or technical knockout, and longer fight duration. Common injuries that were noted include lacerations and abrasions, followed by injuries to the face and ocular region. Concussions with or without loss of consciousness also were noted in MMA competition. PMID:23531976

  1. Treatment of Colonic Injury During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Colonic injury during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) persists despite the advances in technical equipment and interventional radiology techniques. According to the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications, colonic injury is regarded as a stage IVa complication. Currently, the rate of colonic injury ranges between 0.3% and 0.5%, with an unremarkable difference in incidence between supine and prone PCNL procedures. Colon injury is the most significant complication of PCNL. Colonic injury can result in more complicated open exploration of the abdomen, involving colostomy construction. The necessity of a second operation for the closure of the colostomy causes financial and emotional burden on the patients, patients’ relatives, and surgeons. Currently, the majority of colonic injuries occurring during PCNL are retroperitoneal. The primary treatment option is a conservative approach. It must be kept in mind that the time of diagnosis is as important as the diagnosis itself in colonic injury. Surgeons performing PCNL are advised to be conservative when considering exploratory laparotomy and colostomy construction during treatment of colonic injury. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who underwent left prone PCNL that resulted in retroperitoneal colonic injury, along with a review of the current literature. PMID:26543436

  2. A national program for injury prevention in children and adolescents: the injury free coalition for kids.

    PubMed

    Pressley, Joyce C; Barlow, Barbara; Durkin, Maureen; Jacko, Sally A; Dominguez, DiLenny Roca; Johnson, Lenita

    2005-09-01

    Injury is the leading cause of death and a major source of preventable disability in children. Mechanisms of injury are rooted in a complex web of social, economic, environmental, criminal, and behavioral factors that necessitate a multifaceted, systematic injury prevention approach. This article describes the injury burden and the way physicians, community coalitions, and a private foundation teamed to impact the problem first in an urban minority community and then through a national program. Through our injury prevention work in a resource-limited neighborhood, a national model evolved that provides a systematic framework through which education and other interventions are implemented. Interventions are aimed at changing the community and home environments physically (safe play areas and elimination of community and home hazards) and socially (education and supervised extracurricular activities with mentors). This program, based on physician-community partnerships and private foundation financial support, expanded to 40 sites in 37 cities, representing all 10 US trauma regions. Each site is a local adaptation of the Injury Free Coalition model also referred to as the ABC's of injury prevention: A, "analyze injury data through local injury surveillance"; B, "build a local coalition"; C, "communicate the problem and raise awareness that injuries are a preventable public health problem"; D, "develop interventions and injury prevention activities to create safer environments and activities for children"; and E, "evaluate the interventions with ongoing surveillance." It is feasible to develop a comprehensive injury prevention program of national scope using a voluntary coalition of trauma centers, private foundation financial and technical support, and a local injury prevention model with a well-established record of reducing and sustaining lower injury rates for inner-city children and adolescents. PMID:15958785

  3. Technical Guid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasescu, F. T.; Stanciu, V.; Nitu, V.; Nitu, C.

    The book contains the most important informations from Physics,Mechanics,Heat,Electromagnetism, Nuclear Physics as well as tables with values for physical and technical Quantities. The book is designed especially for engineers, but could be useful for physicists

  4. Patient injuries in primary total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Hirvensalo, Eero; Huhtala, Heini; Remes, Ville

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Although the results of primary total hip replacements (THRs) are generally excellent, sometimes serious complications arise. Some of these severe complications are considered to be patient injuries. We analyzed primary THR-related patient injuries in a nationwide setting. Patients and methods - We evaluated all the primary THR-related patient injury claims in Finland between 2008 and 2010. We used the original medical records and 2 nationwide registries, the Care Register for Social Welfare and Health Care and the Patient Injury Claim Register. Results - We identified 563 claims, 44% of which were compensated (n = 250). Of these 250 compensated claims, 79% were considered to be avoidable (treatment injuries) and 21% were severe unexpected infections (with a preoperative infection risk of less than 2%). The most common type of technical error was cup malposition (31%). High-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume ≥ 400) had a lower patient injury rate. In lower-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume of < 400), the relative risks (RRs) of patient injury for any reason, due to technical errors, or because of cup malposition were 2-fold (95% CI: 1.6-3.1), 4-fold (95% CI: 2.3-6.2), and 9-fold (95% CI: 3-28), respectively, compared to high-volume hospitals. Interpretation - Our study provides the first comprehensive nationwide data on THR-related patient injury types. Hospital volume was associated with the quality and quantity of errors detected. An annual hospital volume of ≥ 400 primary THRs was established as a protective factor against patient injuries. PMID:26808350

  5. Patient injuries in primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Hirvensalo, Eero; Huhtala, Heini; Remes, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Although the results of primary total hip replacements (THRs) are generally excellent, sometimes serious complications arise. Some of these severe complications are considered to be patient injuries. We analyzed primary THR-related patient injuries in a nationwide setting. Patients and methods We evaluated all the primary THR-related patient injury claims in Finland between 2008 and 2010. We used the original medical records and 2 nationwide registries, the Care Register for Social Welfare and Health Care and the Patient Injury Claim Register. Results We identified 563 claims, 44% of which were compensated (n = 250). Of these 250 compensated claims, 79% were considered to be avoidable (treatment injuries) and 21% were severe unexpected infections (with a preoperative infection risk of less than 2%). The most common type of technical error was cup malposition (31%). High-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume ≥ 400) had a lower patient injury rate. In lower-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume of < 400), the relative risks (RRs) of patient injury for any reason, due to technical errors, or because of cup malposition were 2-fold (95% CI: 1.6–3.1), 4-fold (95% CI: 2.3–6.2), and 9-fold (95% CI: 3–28), respectively, compared to high-volume hospitals. Interpretation Our study provides the first comprehensive nationwide data on THR-related patient injury types. Hospital volume was associated with the quality and quantity of errors detected. An annual hospital volume of ≥ 400 primary THRs was established as a protective factor against patient injuries. PMID:26808350

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  7. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  8. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center PTACs Workspaces Log-in Search for: Traumatic Brain Injury A legacy resource from NICHCY Disability Fact ... in her. Back to top What is Traumatic Brain Injury? A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an ...

  10. Eye Injuries at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 20,000 workplace eye injuries happen each year. Injuries on the job often ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports that workplace eye injuries cost an estimated $300 million a year in ...

  11. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  12. Wounds and Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, ... millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can ...

  13. Impact Acceleration Model of Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Hellewell, Sarah C; Ziebell, Jenna M; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Morganti-Kossmann, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The impact acceleration (I/A) model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) was developed to reliably induce diffuse traumatic axonal injury in rats in the absence of skull fractures and parenchymal focal lesions. This model replicates a pathophysiology that is commonly observed in humans with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) caused by acceleration-deceleration forces. Such injuries are typical consequences of motor vehicle accidents and falls, which do not necessarily require a direct impact to the closed skull. There are several desirable characteristics of the I/A model, including the extensive axonal injury produced in the absence of a focal contusion, the suitability for secondary insult modeling, and the adaptability for mild/moderate injury through alteration of height and/or weight. Furthermore, the trauma device is inexpensive and readily manufactured in any laboratory, and the induction of injury is rapid (~45 min per animal from weighing to post-injury recovery) allowing multiple animal experiments per day. In this chapter, we describe in detail the methodology and materials required to produce the rat model of I/A in the laboratory. We also review current adaptations to the model to alter injury severity, discuss frequent complications and technical issues encountered using this model, and provide recommendations to ensure technically sound injury induction. PMID:27604723

  14. Meniscal injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Zedde, Pietro; Mela, Federico; Del Prete, Fabio; Masia, Francesco; Manunta, Andrea F

    2014-01-01

    Basketball is a highly competitive sport in which the knee joint is constantly subject to physical stresses. Basketball-related traumatic injuries are the result of specific technical movements. Even though basketball is not considered a contact sport, injuries in basketball players are due both to athletes' handling of the ball and to their intense physical interaction during games. Nowadays, traumatic meniscal injuries are constantly on the increase, especially in young athletes, and they are generally the result of compressive forces together with knee flexion rotation. Recognition of the great importance of meniscal biomechanics and of the functional role of the meniscus has resulted in the adoption of an increasingly preserving approach, also in the light of the effects, in terms of articular degeneration, of removing meniscal tissue. Even though recent decades have seen considerable developments in arthroscopic meniscectomy techniques, geared at preserving as much meniscal tissue as possible, basketball players undergoing this treatment often present, in the long run, clinical symptomatology severe enough to compromise their participation in competitive sport. Hence the treatment of meniscal injuries in athletes has become more and more preserving in recent years, through recourse to surgical techniques such as meniscal repair, biological replacement implantation and donor meniscus implantation, which allow pain relief, return to competitive activities and stable long-term results, slowing down arthritic progression. Therefore, considering the increasing number of meniscal injuries in basketball players, which can jeopardize their sporting careers, great importance is now attached to early diagnosis and to the correct choice of meniscal injury treatment in these athletes. PMID:25750909

  15. Basketball Injuries: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple Jr., David F.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses reasons for the increase in basketball-related injuries, describes common injuries, outlines steps for diagnosis and treatment, and offers recovery and prevention strategies. (IAH)

  16. Perioperative lung injury.

    PubMed

    Slinger, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Patients are at risk for several types of lung injury in the perioperative period. These injuries include atelectasis, pneumonia, pneumothorax, bronchopleural fistula, acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Anesthetic management can cause, exacerbate or ameliorate most of these injuries. Clinical research trends show that traditional protocols for perioperative mechanical ventilation, using large tidal volumes without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can cause a sub-clinical lung injury and this injury becomes clinically important when any additional lung injury is added. Lung-protective ventilation strategies using more physiologic tidal volumes and appropriate levels of PEEP can decrease the extent of this injury. PMID:18494396

  17. Technical Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Carol A.

    This manuscript provides information and problems for teaching mathematics to vocational education students. Problems reflect applications of mathematical concepts to specific technical areas. The materials are organized into six chapters. Chapter 1 covers basic arithmetic, including fractions, decimals, ratio and proportions, percentages, and…

  18. Chlordane (Technical)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlordane ( Technical ) ; CASRN 12789 - 03 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  19. Endovascular Repair of Blunt Popliteal Arterial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Dong, Peng; Sun, Yequan; Zhu, Wei; Pan, Xiaolin; Qi, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of endovascular repair for blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis of seven patients with clinical suspicion of popliteal arterial injuries that were confirmed by arteriography was performed from September 2009 to July 2014. Clinical data included demographics, mechanism of injury, type of injury, location of injury, concomitant injuries, time of endovascular procedures, time interval from trauma to blood flow restoration, instrument utilized, and follow-up. All patients were male (mean age of 35.9 ± 10.3 years). The type of lesion involved intimal injury (n = 1), partial transection (n = 2), complete transection (n = 2), arteriovenous fistula (n = 1), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). All patients underwent endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Results Technical success rate was 100%. Intimal injury was treated with a bare-metal stent. Pseudoaneurysm and popliteal artery transections were treated with bare-metal stents. Arteriovenous fistula was treated with bare-metal stent and coils. No perioperative death and procedure-related complication occurred. The average follow-up was 20.9 ± 2.3 months (range 18–24 months). One patient underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis due to stent thrombosis at 18 months after the procedure. All limbs were salvaged. Stent migration, deformation, or fracture was not found during the follow-up. Conclusion Endovascular repair seems to be a viable approach for patients with blunt popliteal arterial injuries, especially on an emergency basis. Endovascular repair may be effective in the short-term. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair. PMID:27587969

  20. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  1. Technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, P A

    1999-01-01

    Appropriately applied, guided tissue regeneration (GTR) therapy is an important addition to the clinician's treatment armamentarium. However, GTR therapy is highly technique-sensitive, and failure to understand and manage the subtleties of treatment will significantly diminish therapeutic results. This article discusses the technical prerequisites for successful application of GTR therapy to infrabony defects and periodontally involved furcations for maximization of treatment results. PMID:11360324

  2. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advances in detection and treatment of cancer, there is an increasing emphasis on the efficacy and safety aspects of cancer therapy. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for a wide variety of cancers, either alone or in combination with other treatments. Ionising radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent side effect of radiation therapy and a considerable proportion of patients suffer acute or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms as a result. These side effects often cause morbidity and may in some cases lower the efficacy of radiotherapy treatment. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract can be minimised by either of two strategies: technical strategies which aim to physically shift radiation dose away from the normal intestinal tissues, and biological strategies which aim to modulate the normal tissue response to ionising radiation or to increase its resistance to it. Although considerable improvement in the safety of radiotherapy treatment has been achieved through the use of modern optimised planning and delivery techniques, biological techniques may offer additional further promise. Different agents have been used to prevent or minimize the severity of gastrointestinal injury induced by ionising radiation exposure, including biological, chemical and pharmacological agents. In this review we aim to discuss various technical strategies to prevent gastrointestinal injury during cancer radiotherapy, examine the different therapeutic options for acute and chronic gastrointestinal radiation injury and outline some examples of research directions and considerations for prevention at a pre-clinical level. PMID:23345942

  3. Pediatric Hand Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew A; Cogan, Charles J; Adkinson, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric hand injuries are extremely common. Although many hand injuries are adequately managed in the emergency department, some may need evaluation and treatment by a pediatric hand surgeon to ensure a good functional outcome. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of the most common pediatric hand maladies: fingertip injuries/amputation, tendon injuries, and phalangeal and metacarpal fractures. The plastic surgery nurse should be familiar with hand injuries that require intervention to facilitate efficient management and optimal postoperative care. PMID:27606586

  4. Ophthalmic thermal injuries.

    PubMed

    Lipshy, K A; Wheeler, W E; Denning, D E

    1996-06-01

    Reflex lid closure often protects the eyes during facial burns. Although corneal burns are uncommon, other ophthalmic injuries occur more frequently. Ophthalmic burns are usually associated with marked facial damage and possible inhalation injury. Failure to recognize and appropriately treat ophthalmic burns can lead to catastrophic sequelae. We performed a 2-year survey of all facial burns in our burn unit. Forty-four patients with thermal facial burns were identified. Sixteen patients had ophthalmic injuries. Corneal injury was detected in 13 per cent (2/16). Intubation was required in 43.75 per cent (7/16) of patients with ophthalmic injuries. Mortality was 25 per cent (4/16). We conclude that patients with facial burns severe enough to cause ophthalmic injuries may be associated with other lethal injuries, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained until all lethal injuries are ruled out. All ophthalmic injuries should be evaluated by an ophthalmologist. PMID:8651533

  5. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  6. Incidence of syndesmotic injury.

    PubMed

    Vosseller, J Turner; Karl, John W; Greisberg, Justin K

    2014-03-01

    Injury to the tibiofibular syndesmosis can occur with ankle sprain or fracture. The incidence of syndesmotic injury has not been specifically studied at a population level. Data on syndesmotic injury were obtained from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), a federal-state-private partnership. It is administered by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, a division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. Two HCUP databases were queried for 8 states: the State Inpatient Database and the State Emergency Department Database. The first 6 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition (ICD-9) code diagnoses were searched for codes that are used for syndesmotic injury (ie, 845.03). These data, along with data from the 2010 US census, were used to yield incidence rates for syndesmosis injury, as well as for various demographic groups. National estimates of injury totals were also calculated. In the 8 states, there were a total of 1821 syndesmotic injuries. Given the population of these states, the incidence rate of syndesmotic injury was 2.09 syndesmotic injuries per 100,000 person-years. This incidence correlates to an estimated 6445 syndesmotic injuries per year in the United States. These data provide some baseline numbers as to the incidence of syndesmotic injury in the United States. Although the incidence was low relative to some other injuries, the fact that syndesmotic injuries tend to occur in younger patients may have a greater effect in terms of productive years of life lost. PMID:24762148

  7. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  8. Football injuries: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Olson, David E; Sikka, Robby Singh; Hamilton, Abigail; Krohn, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Football is one of the most popular sports in the United States and is the leading cause of sports-related injury. A large focus in recent years has been on concussions, sudden cardiac death, and heat illness, all thought to be largely preventable health issues in the young athlete. Injury prevention through better understanding of injury mechanisms, education, proper equipment, and practice techniques and preseason screening may aid in reducing the number of injuries. Proper management of on-field injuries and health emergencies can reduce the morbidity associated with these injuries and may lead to faster return to play and reduced risk of future injury. This article reviews current concepts surrounding frequently seen football-related injuries. PMID:23531977

  9. Bicycle-related injuries.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M J; Rivara, F P

    2001-05-15

    Bicycle riding is a popular form of recreation among persons of all ages, and related injuries cause significant morbidity and mortality. Most injuries occur in males and are associated with riding at high speed; most serious injuries and fatalities result from collisions with motor vehicles. Although superficial soft tissue injuries and musculoskeletal trauma are the most common injuries, head injuries are responsible for most fatalities and long-term disabilities. Overuse injuries may contribute to a variety of musculoskeletal complaints, compression neuropathies, perineal and genital complaints. Physicians treating such patients should consider medical factors, as well as suggest adjusting various components of the bicycle, such as the seat height and handlebars. Encouraging bicycle riders to wear helmets is key to preventing injuries; protective clothing and equipment, and general safety advice also may offer some protection. PMID:11388717

  10. What Are Sports Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 06:02 Size: 11.7 MB November 2014 What Are Sports Injuries? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Research Is Being Done on Treating Sports Injuries? What’s the Difference Between an Acute and a Chronic ...

  11. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  12. Head Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    Head Injury Prevention Tips American Association of Neurological Surgeons 5550 Meadowbrook Drive, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-3852 ... defined as a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the ...

  13. Injuries in classical ballet.

    PubMed

    Quirk, R

    1984-11-01

    The specialised medical knowledge about dancers' injuries is negligible compared with that which surrounds sports medicine. The author discusses his experience in the management of more than 2000 injuries sustained by dancers of classical ballet. PMID:6151832

  14. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually ...

  15. Hand Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrist, often making your fingers feel numb Injuries that result in fractures, ruptured ligaments and dislocations ... deformity Tendinitis - irritation of the tendons Disorders and injuries of your fingers and thumb

  16. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  17. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  18. Brain injury - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rehabilitation Nurses. Care of the patient with mild traumatic brain injury. Available at: www.aann.org/pubs/content/guidelines. ... Stroud, NL, Zafonte R. Rehabilitation of patients with traumatic brain injury. In: Winn HR, ed. Youman's Neurological Surgery . 6th ...

  19. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  20. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brachial Plexus Injuries Information Page Synonym(s): Erb's Palsy Table of Contents ( ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Brachial Plexus Injuries? The brachial plexus is a network of nerves ...

  1. Arm Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of muscles, joints, tendons and other connective tissue. Injuries to any of these parts of the arm ... a fall or an accident. Types of arm injuries include Tendinitis and bursitis Sprains Dislocations Broken bones ...

  2. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  3. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, ... your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For ...

  4. Teeth Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Teeth Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Teeth Injuries ... or young child injures the gums or baby teeth: Apply pressure to the area (if it's bleeding) ...

  5. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. These injuries can affect the entire leg, or just the foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Certain diseases also lead to leg problems. For ...

  6. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. These injuries can affect the entire leg, or just the foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Certain diseases also lead to leg ...

  7. Eye Injuries in Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... these injuries can be prevented. Overall, basketball and baseball cause the most eye injuries, followed by water ... involve body contact. Some high-risk sports are baseball, basketball, hockey, football, lacrosse, tennis and other racquet ...

  8. Softball Pitching and Injury.

    PubMed

    Lear, Aaron; Patel, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    The windmill softball pitch generates considerable forces about the athlete's shoulder and elbow. The injury pattern of softball pitchers seems to be primarily overuse injury, and they seem not to suffer the same volume of injury that baseball pitchers do. This article will explore softball pitching techniques, kinetics and kinematics of the windmill pitch, epidemiology of softball pitchers, and discuss possible etiologies of softball pitching injuries. PMID:27618243

  9. Editorial. Bicycle injuries and injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Pless, I B

    2014-07-01

    In 1989, long before this journal added injuries to its title, it published two papers on childhood injuries and I was asked to write an editorial for this occasion. I chose the title "Challenges for Injury Prevention: Two Neglected Aspects" because I thought the papers neglected to mention the inadequacy of injury statistics (at the time there were no emergency department data) and also failed to emphasize the public health importance of childhood injuries. It is instructive, therefore, to compare this issue's offerings with how matters stood nearly 25 years ago and see what progress we've made. Papers in this and the previous issue of this journal discuss bicycle safety in general and helmet use in particular. Although this is a somewhat narrow focus, it serves as one indicator of how the field has evolved and what remains to be done to improve both the science and policy in this domain. PMID:24991769

  10. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  11. "Floating shoulder" injuries.

    PubMed

    Heng, Kenneth

    2016-12-01

    "Floating shoulder" is a rare injury complex resulting from high-energy blunt force trauma to the shoulder, resulting in scapulothoracic dissociation. It is commonly associated with catastrophic neurovascular injury. Two cases of motorcyclists with floating shoulder injuries are described. PMID:26961729

  12. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that happen when too much stress is placed on a part of the body, resulting in inflammation (pain and swelling), muscle strain, or tissue damage. This stress generally occurs from ...

  13. Ankle syndesmosis injuries.

    PubMed

    Peña, Fernando A; Coetzee, J Chris

    2006-03-01

    Physician awareness of ankle syndesmosis injuries is improving. The anatomy involved and the mechanism of injury are extremely relevant for the understanding and treatment of this type of injury. Examination under anesthesia may confirm the syndesmosis instability. Based on those findings, stabilization is the recommended approach. PMID:16564452

  14. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  15. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  16. A twelve-year survey of cervicothoracic vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Bladergroen, M; Brockman, R; Luna, G; Kohler, T; Johansen, K

    1989-05-01

    This study of a large series of victims of trauma to the cervicothoracic great vessels confirms the lethal potential of these injuries: more than half of victims of such injuries died. The optimal management of patients potentially harboring such vascular damage appears to include skilled prehospital resuscitation and rapid transport to a trauma center, a high index of diagnostic suspicion, a low threshold for the performance of contrast arteriography, aggressive surveillance for associated neurologic and aerodigestive tract injuries, and timely technical repair, including liberal indications for sternotomy or thoracotomy to assure vascular control. PMID:2712204

  17. A Review of Posttraumatic Bowel Injuries in Ibadan

    PubMed Central

    Dongo, A. E.; Kesieme, E. B.; Irabor, D. O.; Ladipo, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Bowel injuries are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality following trauma. Evaluating patients who sustained abdominal trauma with bowel injury may pose a significant diagnostic challenge to the surgeon. Prompt recognition and timely intervention is necessary to improve outcome. Aim. This study was undertaken to evaluate treatment and outcome of patients with bowel trauma. Methods. A 5-year retrospective study of all patients presenting with abdominal trauma requiring surgical intervention seen in the UCH Ibadan, Nigeria was undertaken. Results. There were 71 patients (59 males and 12 females). The majority of cases (70%) occurred between the 3rd and 5th decades of life. Some 37 patients (52%) sustained blunt abdominal injury, while 34 patients (48%) sustained penetrating abdominal injury. There were 27 patients with bowel injuries (38%). Isolated bowel injuries occurred in 19 patients (27%). The most common surgical operation performed was simple closure. There were 3 deaths in patients with bowel injuries. Conclusion. Most cases of bowel injury can be managed by simple closure, a technique that is not so technically demanding for surgeons in less-developed countries. This study has also incidentally identified a “rule of six” for patients with bowel injuries and abdominal trauma. PMID:22084759

  18. Spinal injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Babcock, J L

    1975-05-01

    Spinal injuries with neurologic sequelae are a rare but catastrophic injury. Many of these injuries might be preventable through proper parent and child education, particularly in water sports and vehicles accidents. A significant number of neurologic injuries are incomplete at the time of injury and proper rescue and initial care may make the difference between life as a quadriplegic and life as a normal individual. Because of the complexity of the management of the child with spinal injuries and their relative rarity, the definitive care is best undertaken at hospitals which specialize in the care of spinal injuries. Progressive deformity of the spine, a problem unique to childhood and adolescent paralysis, is often preventable with prolonged immobilization and protection of the spine. Progressive deformities which interfere with function or result in neurologic deterioration require an aggressive surgical approach. PMID:1124228

  19. Lisfranc injuries: an update.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, Kyriacos I; Rosenfeld, Peter F; Calder, James D F

    2013-06-01

    Lisfranc injuries are a spectrum of injuries to the tarsometatarsal joint complex of the midfoot. These range from subtle ligamentous sprains, often seen in athletes, to fracture dislocations seen in high-energy injuries. Accurate and early diagnosis is important to optimise treatment and minimise long-term disability, but unfortunately, this is a frequently missed injury. Undisplaced injuries have excellent outcomes with non-operative treatment. Displaced injuries have worse outcomes and require anatomical reduction and internal fixation for the best outcome. Although evidence to date supports the use of screw fixation, plate fixation may avoid further articular joint damage and may have benefits. Recent evidence supports the use of limited arthrodesis in more complex injuries. PMID:23563815

  20. Sports injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Buckley, S L

    1994-02-01

    More children are participating in organized sports than ever before. Although improved coaching, equipment, officiating, and rules have been implemented to reduce injuries, a significant number of young athletes continue to be injured. Fortunately, most injuries sustained by young athletes are minor requiring only symptomatic treatment. However, because of the unique features of the immature skeleton, particularly the presence of open physes, these injuries can nonetheless result in permanent alteration of bone growth with long-term morbidity and disability. Furthermore, the prognosis and natural history of sports injuries in children may be different than that for similar injuries in adults. It is important that the practitioner dealing with young athletes be aware of the unique features of children's sports injuries so that proper treatment may be initiated and prognosis and expected outcome may be intelligently discussed with the patient and parents. This review provides current information regarding sports injuries in children by summarizing the most recent pertinent articles. PMID:8205179

  1. Injuries in Irish dance.

    PubMed

    Stein, Cynthia J; Tyson, Kesley D; Johnson, Victor M; Popoli, David M; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A; Micheli, Lyle J

    2013-12-01

    Irish dance is growing in popularity and competitiveness; however, very little research has focused specifically on this genre of dance. The purpose of this study was to analyze the types of dance injuries incurred by Irish dancers. A chart review was performed to identify all injuries associated with Irish dance seen in the sports medicine or orthopaedic clinics at the investigators' hospital over an 11-year period. "Injury" was defined as any dance-related pain or disorder that led to evaluation in the clinics. Survey data were also collected from study participants. Ultimately, 255 patients from over 30 different schools of dance were seen with injuries directly related (726 clinic visits) or partially related (199 visits) to Irish dance. Participants ranged in age from 4 to 47, with 95% (243/255) under the age of 19. These 255 patients received 437 diagnoses. Almost 80% of the injuries (348/437) were attributable to overuse, and 20.4% were acute and traumatic injuries (89/437). Ninety-five percent (95.9%) of injuries involved the hip or lower extremity. The most common sites were the foot (33.2%), ankle (22.7%), knee (19.7%), and hip (14.4%). Typical diagnoses were tendon injury (13.3%), apophysitis (11.4%), patellofemoral pain and instability (10.8%), stress injury (10.1%), and muscle injury (7.8%). The majority of traumatic injuries were seen in clinic within 3 weeks, but less than a quarter of overuse injuries were seen that quickly. The most common treatment, prescribed to 84.3% of patients, was physical therapy and home exercises, and the majority of dancers (64.3%) were able to return to full dance activity after injury. PMID:24565331

  2. Injury control in childhood.

    PubMed

    Grossman, D C; Rivara, F P

    1992-06-01

    The behavior and environment of individuals are key determinants of both unintentional and intentional injuries in childhood and adolescence. These two determinants often interact so that certain behaviors lead to different injury outcomes depending on the environmental context of the injury. For example, depression is more likely to lead to suicide in the presence of alcohol intoxication. Alcohol intoxication is much more likely to lead to the choice of a firearm in a suicide attempt. Children with poor pedestrian crossing skills are far more likely to be hit in a busy urban intersection than in a safer location. The science of injury control has attempted to learn more about both the behavioral, environmental, and agent characteristics that lead to injury. Each of these dimensions offers opportunities for injury prevention or amelioration of the outcome. Despite increasing knowledge about how certain behaviors are associated with specific types of injuries, there has been only limited success achieved by attempts to modify behavior, particularly by persuasion or education. More success has been derived by legislative mandates. The most success, particularly in the prevention of unintentional injury, has been achieved by modification of the environments and the agents that are most often associated with injury. Because intentional injuries involve extremely complex and aberrant behavior, there is a persistent concern that attempts to modify the environment (e.g., handgun control) will be overridden by those with a high level of intent, i.e., they will seek another method. Although this may be true for carefully premeditated acts, suicide attempts and assaults by youth are usually precipitated by an acute stressor that depends on the availability of a weapon at that immediate time. While we develop more sophisticated psychosocial epidemiologic models that accurately predict violent behavior, we must continue to analyze aspects of intentional injuries that offer an

  3. Injuries are not accidents

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Injuries are the result of an acute exposure to exhort of energy or a consequence of a deficiency in a vital element that exceeds physiological thresholds resulting threatens life. They are classified as intentional or unintentional. Injuries are considered a global health issue because they cause more than 5 million deaths per year worldwide and they are an important contributor to the burden of disease, especially affecting people of low socioeconomic status in low- and middle-income countries. A common misconception exists where injuries are thought to be the same as accidents; however, accidents are largely used as chance events, without taken in consideration that all these are preventable. This review discusses injuries and accidents in the context of road traffic and emphasizes injuries as preventable events. An understanding of the essence of injuries enables the standardization of terminology in public use and facilitates the development of a culture of prevention among all of us. PMID:25386040

  4. Lisfranc injuries in sport.

    PubMed

    DeOrio, Matthew; Erickson, Melissa; Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Easley, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex have traditionally been associated with high energy trauma such as motor vehicle collisions and industrial accidents. Recently, there has been a greater appreciation of mid-foot sprains that represent a spectrum of injury to the Lisfranc ligament complex. As a result, there has been an increased incidence of such injury resulting from low-energy trauma in activities ranging from recreational activity to elite athletic activity. This article discusses issues related to anatomy, clinical presentation, mechanism of injury, and diagnosis that are necessary to provide appropriate treatment for these injuries. There should be a high index of suspicion of this injury, and prompt diagnosis is important to allow athletes to return to sport with the best possible outcome. PMID:19501801

  5. Back injuries in college athletes.

    PubMed

    Keene, J S; Albert, M J; Springer, S L; Drummond, D S; Clancy, W G

    1989-09-01

    Frequency and types of back injuries sustained by intercollegiate athletes were determined by examining medical records of 4,790 athletes that competed in 17 varsity sports over a 10-year period. These athletes sustained 333 back injuries, an injury rate of 7 per 100 participants. Injury rates were significantly higher in football and gymnastics, and 80% of the injuries occurred in practice, 6% in competition, and 14% during preseason conditioning. Muscle strains occurred with much greater frequency than other types of injuries, and acute back injuries were much more prevalent (59%) than overuse injuries (12%) or injuries associated with pre-existing conditions (29%). PMID:2520075

  6. Road traffic injuries in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Deysi Yasmin; Fernández, Francisco José; Acero Velásquez, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    Road traffic injuries are a leading public health problem in Colombia. Pedestrians are the most vulnerable road users, especially in the main urban centers of Bogotá, Medellin and Cali. Data analyzed in this report include official statistics from the National Police and the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences for 1996-2000, and results of a study conducted at the National University of Colombia in 2000. Methods from the Highway Capacity Manual were used for determining physical and technical variables, and a Geographical Information System tool was used for the location and spatial analysis of the road traffic crashes. Pedestrians accounted for close to 32% of injuries and 40% of the deaths from road traffic crashes. The problem of road traffic crashes existed predominately in urban areas. In the main urban centers, pedestrians constituted nearly 68% of road traffic crash victims. The high level of risky road use behaviors demonstrated by pedestrians and drivers, and inadequate infrastructure for safe mobility of pedestrians in some sections of the road network were the main contributing factors. Major improvements were achieved in Bogotá following enhancements to the municipal transport system and other policies introduced since 1995. In conclusion, policies and programs for improving road safety, in particular pedestrian safety, and strengthening urban planning are top priority. PMID:12772483

  7. Injuries from hovercraft racing.

    PubMed

    Cattermole, H R

    1997-01-01

    A 31-year-old man presented with a potentially serious neck injury following a racing hovercraft accident. Previous reports of hovercrafting injuries could not be found, and a review of the sport's own records was undertaken. This shows there to be a wide range of injuries sustained from the sport, although most of them are minor. However, there are some worrying trends, and further studies are being undertaking in order to improve the sport's safety record. PMID:9196622

  8. Auger injuries in children.

    PubMed Central

    Letts, R. M.; Gammon, W.

    1978-01-01

    A 6-year review of auger injuries in Manitoba children revealed that 23 children sustained major injuries resulting in amputation of 17 limbs. Auger injuries are the main cause of traumatic amputation in children in Manitoba. Improved safety education for the entire farm family as well as better design of safety shields would decrease this carnage. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 9 PMID:630513

  9. Pedestrian injury risk functions based on contour lines of equal injury severity using real world pedestrian/passenger-car accident data

    PubMed Central

    Niebuhr, Tobias; Junge, Mirko; Achmus, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Injury risk assessment plays a pivotal role in the assessment of the effectiveness of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) as they specify the injury reduction potential of the system. The usual way to describe injury risks is by use of injury risk functions, i.e. specifying the probability of an injury of a given severity occurring at a specific technical accident severity (collision speed). A method for the generation of a family of risk functions for different levels of injury severity is developed. The injury severity levels are determined by use of a rescaled version of the Injury Severity Score (ISS) namely the ISSx. The injury risk curves for each collision speed is then obtained by fixing the boundary conditions and use of a case-by-case validated GIDAS subset of pedestrian-car accidents (N=852). The resultant functions are of exponential form as opposed to the frequently used logistic regression form. The exponential approach in combination with the critical speed value creates a new injury risk pattern better fitting for high speed/high energy crashes. Presented is a family of pedestrian injury risk functions for an arbitrary injury severity. Thus, the effectiveness of an ADAS can be assessed for mitigation of different injury severities using the same injury risk function and relying on the internal soundness of the risk function with regard to different injury severity levels. For the assessment of emergency braking ADAS, a Zone of Effective Endangerment Increase (ZEEI), the speed interval in which a one percent speed increase results at least in a one percent of injury risk increase, is defined. The methodology presented is kept in such general terms that a direct adaption to other accident configurations is easily done. PMID:24406954

  10. Pedestrian injury risk functions based on contour lines of equal injury severity using real world pedestrian/passenger-car accident data.

    PubMed

    Niebuhr, Tobias; Junge, Mirko; Achmus, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Injury risk assessment plays a pivotal role in the assessment of the effectiveness of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) as they specify the injury reduction potential of the system. The usual way to describe injury risks is by use of injury risk functions, i.e. specifying the probability of an injury of a given severity occurring at a specific technical accident severity (collision speed). A method for the generation of a family of risk functions for different levels of injury severity is developed. The injury severity levels are determined by use of a rescaled version of the Injury Severity Score (ISS) namely the ISSx. The injury risk curves for each collision speed is then obtained by fixing the boundary conditions and use of a case-by-case validated GIDAS subset of pedestrian-car accidents (N=852). The resultant functions are of exponential form as opposed to the frequently used logistic regression form. The exponential approach in combination with the critical speed value creates a new injury risk pattern better fitting for high speed/high energy crashes. Presented is a family of pedestrian injury risk functions for an arbitrary injury severity. Thus, the effectiveness of an ADAS can be assessed for mitigation of different injury severities using the same injury risk function and relying on the internal soundness of the risk function with regard to different injury severity levels. For the assessment of emergency braking ADAS, a Zone of Effective Endangerment Increase (ZEEI), the speed interval in which a one percent speed increase results at least in a one percent of injury risk increase, is defined. The methodology presented is kept in such general terms that a direct adaption to other accident configurations is easily done. PMID:24406954

  11. Acute injuries in Taekwondo.

    PubMed

    Schlüter-Brust, K; Leistenschneider, P; Dargel, J; Springorum, H P; Eysel, P; Michael, J W-P

    2011-08-01

    Although Taekwondo is becoming an increasingly popular sport, there is a lack of reliable epidemiologic data on Taekwondo injuries. To perform an epidemiologic study on the variety of types of injury in professional and amateur Taekwondo athletes and to find a relation between Taekwondo style, skill level, weight-class and warm-up routine and the occurrence of injuries, we analysed the injury data using a 7-page questionnaire from a total of 356 Taekwondo athletes who were randomly selected. Overall, we registered a total of 2,164 injuries in 356 athletes. Most traumas were contusions and sprains in the lower extremities. Professional Taekwondo athletes have an increased risk of injury in comparison to recreational athletes. Taekwondo style, weight class and tournament frequency have an influence on the athlete's injury profile. Warm-up routines were found to have a positive effect on injury rates. Overall, Taekwondo may be considered a rather benign activity, if injuries during Taekwondo tournaments can be avoided. If not, Taekwondo can result in serious musculoskeletal problems. PMID:21563037

  12. Imaging of Physeal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jawetz, Shari T.; Shah, Parina H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2015-01-01

    Context: As the intensity of youth participation in athletic activities continues to rise, the number of overuse injuries has also increased. A subset of overuse injuries involves the physis, which is extremely susceptible to injury. This paper aims to review the utility of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of physeal injuries in the skeletally immature population. Evidence Acquisition: A search for the keywords pediatric, physis, growth plate, x-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and overuse injury was performed using the PubMed database. No limits were set for the years of publication. Articles were reviewed for relevance with an emphasis on the imaging of growth plate injuries. Study Design: Retrospective literature review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Three major imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) complement each other in the evaluation of pediatric patients with overuse injuries. However, magnetic resonance imaging is the only modality that offers direct visualization of the physis, and it also offers the best soft tissue contrast for evaluating the other periarticular structures for concomitant injury. Conclusion: Imaging has an important role in the diagnosis of physeal injuries, and the information it provides has a tremendous impact on the subsequent management of these patients. PMID:25984260

  13. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2015-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best “treatment”. PMID:27027021

  14. Lightning and thermal injuries.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Arthur; Gamelli, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Electrical burns are classified as either high voltage (1000 volts and higher) or low voltage (<1000 volts). The typical injury with a high-voltage electrical contact is one where subcutaneous fat, muscles, and even bones are injured. Lower voltages may have lesser injuries. The electrical current has the potential to injure via three mechanisms: injury caused by current flow, an arc injury as the current passes from source to an object, and a flame injury caused by ignition of material in the local environment. Different tissues also have different resistance to the conduction of electricity. Voltage, current (amperage), type of current (alternating or direct), path of current flow across the body, duration of contact, and individual susceptibility all determine what final injury will occur. Devitalized tissue must be evaluated and debrided. Ocular cataracts may develop over time following electrical injury. Lightning strikes may conduct millions of volts of electricity, yet the effects can range from minimal cutaneous injuries to significant injury comparable to a high-voltage industrial accident. Lightning strikes commonly result in cardiorespiratory arrest, for which CPR is effective when begun promptly. Neurologic complications from electrical and lightning injuries are highly variable and may present early or late (up to 2 years) after the injury. The prognosis for electricity-related neurologic injuries is generally better than for other types of traumatic causes, suggesting a conservative approach with serial neurologic examinations after an initial CT scan to rule out correctable causes. One of the most common complications of electrical injury is a cardiac dysrhythmia. Because of the potential for large volumes of muscle loss and the release of myoglobin, the presence of heme pigments in the urine must be evaluated promptly. Presence of these products of breakdown of myoglobin and hemoglobin puts the injured at risk for acute renal failure and must be

  15. Esophageal exclusion and bypass for corrosive injury: The lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Richa; Behari, Anu; Reddy, Jayanth; Poddar, Banani

    2014-01-01

    While it is always preferable to excise and replace the diseased esophagus in corrosive injuries, the surgeon may be compelled to exclude and bypass it by a substernal conduit in select situations wherein excision is technically hazardous. This case illustrates the lessons learnt from a potentially life-threatening complication of bipolar esophageal exclusion. PMID:24604986

  16. Soccer injury in the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Wong, P; Hong, Y

    2005-08-01

    Information about soccer injuries is required to develop prevention and rehabilitation programmes. Most soccer injuries occur in the lower extremities. This type of injury is reviewed here. Definitions of injury, injury rate, injury percentage, mechanism of injury, anatomical region of injury, type of injury, and severity of injury are summarised. In each section, a description and summary of the data are provided. Finally, the limitations of the studies and suggestions to improve the investigation of soccer injuries are provided. PMID:16046325

  17. Burn injury in children.

    PubMed

    Zámecníková, I; Stĕtinský, J; Tymonová, J; Kadlcík, M

    2005-01-01

    The authors have analyzed the data files of 580 child patients up to 15 years of age who were hospitalized at the Burn Center of the FNsP Hospital in Ostrava in the years 1999 - 2003. The authors focused on mechanisms of burn injury in relation to the age of a child as well as extent, depth, localization, and local treatment of the injury. The data file was divided to four age groups: up to two years of age, 2 - 5 years of age, 5 - 10 years of age, and 10 - 15 years of age. As regards the mechanisms of injury, the authors have analyzed scalding by hot liquids, burns due to contact with a hot object, burns due to electric current, explosion, and injury caused by burning clothing. Injury by scalding prevails to a very significant degree in the youngest children. In the second age group the incidence of burn following contact with hot objects increases, as does the percentage of children injured by burning of clothing in children aged 5 - 10. The older children have increased prevalence of injuries caused by explosions. The greatest average extent of an injury is from burning of clothing. Most of the areas are burned deeply, localized in more areas of the body, and almost half of the cases required surgical intervention. Scalding comes second in terms of average extent of an injury. More than half of the injured areas are superficial, and areas of injury are different in the individual age groups. We addressed about a fifth of the cases surgically. The explosion of combustible materials caused a smaller extent of injury, on average, taking third place. The injuries were predominantly superficial, most commonly involving the head, trunk, and upper extremities. In none of the cases it was necessary for us to operate. Burn injuries caused by contact with hot objects are of a smaller extent. More than half of the burned areas are deep, localized most commonly in the upper extremities. Surgical intervention was necessary in more than half the cases. In terms of average

  18. Hand injuries as an indicator of other associated severe injuries.

    PubMed

    Vossoughi, Faranak; Krantz, Brent; Fann, Stephen

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of disabling or life-threatening injuries in patients with hand injuries. Retrospective data were collected from a level 1 trauma center registry. A total of 472 patients with hand injuries were admitted to the trauma unit between January 2000 and March 2004. Forty-four per cent of patients with hand injuries had life-threatening injuries. Fifty-one per cent of them had motor vehicle crash-related injuries. Motorcycle crashes were the next most common cause followed by explosions, falls, gunshots, machinery, stabs, bites, crushes, and so on. Frequency of associated injuries was as follows: head injuries, 31 per cent, including skull fractures, 22 per cent; spine injuries, 18 per cent, including spine fractures 18 per cent; chest injuries, 36 per cent, including rib fractures, 15 per cent; and abdominal injuries, 13 per cent. The authors focused on the incidence of disabling or life-threatening injuries in patients with hand injuries. Motor vehicle crashes were most common cause of hand injuries. The most common organs to be injured were chest and head. The most common head injury was skull fracture. Other injuries in decreasing order were spine and rib fractures. These data may be helpful in assessing ambulatory patients in the emergency room, in those hand injuries maybe indicative of other simultaneous life-threatening or disabling injuries. PMID:17674946

  19. Injury Free Coalition for Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sites Awards Safety Resources Staff Donate Online! Injury Free News The Great Trade-In Event Returns to ... Free Site -- Injury Free Call for Proposals Injury Free is supported by the generous contributions of organizations ...

  20. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are:  Child abuse  Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite)  Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  1. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are: Child abuse Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite) Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... a concussion may feel dazed and may lose vision or balance for a while after the injury A brain contusion is a bruise of the brain. This ... consciousness Headache Confusion Feeling dizzy or lightheaded Blurry vision ... or severe traumatic brain injury include all of the symptoms listed above ...

  3. Sports injuries and society.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Injuries are classified and examples of the ways in which they can arise are given. Treatment, rehabilitation and the value of exercise are considered. A review of the effects of increasing leisure time and sports have been given, the value of legislation, education, protective clothing and close supervision in preventing the occurrence of injuries in sport is discussed. Images p80-a PMID:7248691

  4. Management of Tracheobronchial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Altinok, Tamer; Can, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    Tracheobronchial injury is one of cases which are relatively uncommon, but must be suspected to make the diagnosis and managed immediately. In such a case, primary initial goals are to stabilize the airway and localize the injury and then determine its extend. These can be possible mostly with flexible bronchoscopy conducted by a surgeon who can repair the injury. Most of the penetrating injuries occur in the cervical region. On the other hand, most of the blunt injuries occur in the distal trachea and right main bronchus and they can be best approached by right posterolateral thoracotomy. The selection of the manner and time of approaching depends on the existence and severity of additional injuries. Most of the injuries can be restored by deploying simple techniques such as individual sutures, while some of them requires complex reconstruction techniques. Apart from paying attention to the pulmonary toilet, follow-up is crucial for determination of anastomotic technique or stenosis. Conservative treatment may be considered an option with a high probability of success in patients meeting the criteria, especially in patients with iatrogenic tracheobronchial injury. PMID:25610327

  5. Injuries in Preschool Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obeng, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the kinds of injuries that preschool teachers working in Indiana, USA, believed to be the most common in their preschool (3-6 year olds) classrooms, the causes of such injuries, and the most important precautions they take to prevent them. Also examined are the measures the teachers take…

  6. Conquering Athletic Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Paul M., Ed.; Taylor, Diane K., Ed.

    The purpose of this book is to be a source of complete, reliable, and practical sports medicine information. Experts from the American Running and Fitness Association describe in clear language how overuse injuries occur, how to recognize and self-treat them, when to seek professional help, and how to prevent future injuries. The book also…

  7. FIREARM INJURY SURVEILLANCE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, established an interagency agreement with CPSC to begin collecting data on nonfatal firearm-related injuries to monitor the incidence and characteristics of perso...

  8. Preventing Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Injuries Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. 01, 2016 Protecting your eyes from injury is one of the most basic things you can do to keep your vision healthy throughout your life. You may be somewhat aware of the possible ...

  9. Healing of Genital Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Carol D.

    2011-01-01

    Child sexual abuse as well as accidental trauma may cause acute injuries in the anogenital area. Most data on residual findings following genital trauma come from longitudinal studies of children who have been sexually assaulted, undergone surgical procedures, or experienced accidental trauma. Like injuries in other part parts of the body, such…

  10. Greater arch injuries.

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Deepak; Manjunath, Dayanand; Amaravathi, Rajkumar

    2014-12-01

    Dislocations and fracture dislocations of carpal bones are uncommon injuries which invariably poses challenges in the management. Perilunate fracture dislocations are the combination of ligamentous and osseous injury that involve the "greater arc" of the perilunate associated instability. Despite their severity, these injuries often go unrecognized in the emergency department leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment. A Prospective study was done from June 2008 to December 2013 in 15 cases of complex wrist injuries which included of greater arch injuries, perilunate fracture dislocation and one dorsal dislocation of Scaphoid. 10 cases of perilunate fracture dislocation underwent open reduction and internal fixation with Herbert screw and k-wire, 4 cases of greater arch injury underwent closed reduction and kwire fixation and one case of neglected dorsal dislocation underwent proximal row carpectomy. One patient had Sudecks osteodystrophy 1 had Scaphoid nonunion and 6 had median nerve compression. Overall outcome according to Mayo wrist score was 53 % excellent, 33 % good and 14 % fair. Greater arch injuries are difficult to treat because injuries to many ligaments are involved and failure to recognize early leads to persistent pain, disability and early onset of arthritis. Prompt recognition requires CT scan and MRI. Management requires reduction and multiple K-Wiring according to merits of the case. PMID:25414554

  11. Axillary nerve neurotization with the anterior deltopectoral approach in brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Jerome, J Terrence Jose; Rajmohan, Bennet

    2012-09-01

    Combined neurotization of both axillary and suprascapular nerves in shoulder reanimation has been widely accepted in brachial plexus injuries, and the functional outcome is much superior to single nerve transfer. This study describes the surgical anatomy for axillary nerve relative to the available donor nerves and emphasize the salient technical aspects of anterior deltopectoral approach in brachial plexus injuries. Fifteen patients with brachial plexus injury who had axillary nerve neurotizations were evaluated. Five patients had complete avulsion, 9 patients had C5, six patients had brachial plexus injury pattern, and one patient had combined axillary and suprascapular nerve injury. The long head of triceps branch was the donor in C5,6 injuries; nerve to brachialis in combined nerve injury and intercostals for C5-T1 avulsion injuries. All these donors were identified through the anterior approach, and the nerve transfer was done. The recovery of deltoid was found excellent (M5) in C5,6 brachial plexus injuries with an average of 134.4° abduction at follow up of average 34.6 months. The shoulder recovery was good with 130° abduction in a case of combined axillary and suprascapular nerve injury. The deltoid recovery was good (M3) in C5-T1 avulsion injuries patients with an average of 64° shoulder abduction at follow up of 35 months. We believe that anterior approach is simple and easy for all axillary nerve transfers in brachial plexus injuries. PMID:22434572

  12. Prevention of pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Demorest, Rebecca A; Landry, Gregory L

    2003-12-01

    With over 30 million children participating in sports each year across the United States, a number of significant injuries are to be expected. Although mild injuries such as strains, sprains, and contusions predominate, catastrophic injuries do occur. Young athletes are at an increased risk for growth plate and apophyseal injuries, overuse injuries, and heat illness. Many of these sports injuries can be prevented. Prevention strategies include protective equipment, rule changes, preseason and season prevention interventions, safety measures, better coaching, education, and a societal awareness of injury and prevention. This article discusses current injury prevention for children participating in baseball, football, soccer, and ice hockey. PMID:14583164

  13. Prevention of running injuries.

    PubMed

    Fields, Karl B; Sykes, Jeannie C; Walker, Katherine M; Jackson, Jonathan C

    2010-01-01

    Evidence for preventive strategies to lessen running injuries is needed as these occur in 40%-50% of runners on an annual basis. Many factors influence running injuries, but strong evidence for prevention only exists for training modification primarily by reducing weekly mileage. Two anatomical factors - cavus feet and leg length inequality - demonstrate a link to injury. Weak evidence suggests that orthotics may lessen risk of stress fracture, but no clear evidence proves they will reduce the risk of those athletes with leg length inequality or cavus feet. This article reviews other potential injury variables, including strength, biomechanics, stretching, warm-up, nutrition, psychological factors, and shoes. Additional research is needed to determine whether interventions to address any of these will help prevent running injury. PMID:20463502

  14. Longitudinal Lisfranc injury.

    PubMed

    Oak, Nikhil R; Manoli, Arthur; Holmes, James R

    2014-01-01

    Most Lisfranc or tarsometatarsal (TMT) joint injuries result from a horizontally directed force in which the metatarsals are displaced relative to the midfoot. The injury pattern that is described in this article is one of a longitudinal force through the first ray and cuneiform. A reliable measure to recognize the longitudinal Lisfranc variant injury has been the height difference between the distal articular surfaces of the first and second cuneiform bones in an anteroposterior (AP) weight-bearing radiograph. This measure helps identify subtle injuries in which there is a proximal and medial subluxation of the first cuneiform-metatarsal complex. Delayed diagnosis and treatment have been associated with poorer results and significant functional consequences. This article describes a simple radiographic measurement to recognize the longitudinal injury pattern and to aid in determining whether operative intervention is required. PMID:25785475

  15. Mole gun injury.

    PubMed

    Pistré, V; Rezzouk, J

    2013-09-01

    A mole gun is a weapon, which is used to trap and kill moles. This report provides an overview of the state of knowledge of mole gun injuries, comparable to blast injuries caused by fireworks, explosive or gunshot. Over a 2-year period, the authors reported their experience with ten hand injuries caused by mole gun. Radial side of the hand was often concerned, particularly the thumb. The authors explain their choices in the management of such lesions. Surgery was performed primarily and a large debridement currently seemed to offer the best outcome for the patient. Blast, crush, burns and lacerations may explain the higher rate of amputation to the digits. A long period of physiotherapy, specifically of the hand, was needed before the patient could return to work. This ballistic hand trauma encountered by surgeons requires knowledge and understanding of these injuries. It should be in accordance with firearms law because of severe injuries encountered and possible lethal wounds. PMID:23746826

  16. [Traumatic lung injury].

    PubMed

    Hara, Hidenori; Yoshimura, Hirokuni

    2004-07-01

    Pulmonary injuries include a wide variety of clinical conditions. Most patients with blunt chest trauma can be managed with conservative treatment. Only about 10 to 15% of patients with severe chest injuries require major thoracotomy. Management of pulmonary contusion, pulmonary laceration, pneumothorax or hemothorax by oxygen inhalation, respirator assist and chest drainage can usually result in complete recovery. However, pulmonary injuries sometimes lapse into fatal condition if they are improperly treated. Open thoracotomy is required in cases with persistent massive air leakage or massive bleeding with the use of chest drainage. It is crucial to evaluate the extent and severity of the injuries based on chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) findings for the proper initial treatment in patients with pulmonary injuries. PMID:15362557

  17. Prevention of youth injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Laraque, D.; Barlow, B.; Durkin, M.

    1999-01-01

    There are four categories of causes responsible for the majority of injuries in youth 10-19 years of age: 1) motor vehicle traffic; 2) violence (intra-familial, extra-familial, self, pregnancy-related); 3) recreational; and 4) occupational. This article presents data from the National Center for Health Statistics mortality data and the National Pediatric Trauma Registry morbidity data. Nationwide, the pediatric injury death rate is highest among adolescents 15-19 years of age. Motor vehicle-related deaths account for 41% and firearm-related deaths account for 36% of injury deaths in this age group. For youths aged 10-14 years, motor vehicle-related deaths account for 38% and; firearm-related deaths account for 26% of injury deaths. For both age groups, occupant motor vehicle-related deaths account for the majority of deaths and underscore the need for seat belt use. Using theoretical principles based on the Haddon matrix and a knowledge of adolescent development, proposed interventions to decrease injuries and deaths related to motor vehicles and firearms include graduated licensing, occupant restraint, speed limits, conflict resolution, and gun control. Occupational injuries, particularly injury associated with agricultural production, account for an estimated 100,000 injuries per year. Preventive strategies include OSHA regulations imposing standards for protective devices and further study for guidelines for adolescent work in agriculture. Injuries related to recreation include drowning and sports injuries. Preventive strategies may include proper supervision and risk reduction with respect to use of alcohol/drugs. The data presented support the use of primary prevention to achieve the most effective, safe community interventions targeting adolescents. PMID:10599188

  18. An Injury Prevention Strategy for Teen Restaurant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Julie A.; de Castro, A. B.; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun; Linker, Darren; Hildahl, Lyle; Miller, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of youth employment, workplace hazards, and characteristics unique to adolescents contribute to a relatively high incidence of injuries among teens in the restaurant industry. This article discusses the ProSafety model of injury prevention among teen restaurant workers. Through integration with an existing career and technical education program, the ProSafety project seeks to prevent occupational injuries among the teen worker population through classroom safety education and internship skills reinforcement. ProSafety is the product of an innovative collaboration with occupational health nurses, business professionals, educators, and government. Its approach is derived from Social Cognitive Theory, is consistent with key values and strategies of occupational health nurses, and provides lessons for practitioners seeking to reduce occupational injuries in food service or among other populations of adolescent workers. PMID:20180503

  19. Common injuries and medical problems in singles figure skaters.

    PubMed

    Porter, Emily B

    2013-01-01

    Figure skating continues to increase in popularity as both a recreational and competitive sport. Skaters continue to "push the envelope" in perfecting more technically difficult skills. With their strenuous training programs, skaters are at risk from chronic overuse injuries, which tend to plague singles skaters more often than acute injuries. The majority of injuries occur in the lower extremities or low back. Figure skaters also are at risk for particular medical problems, such as exercise-induced bronchospasm and disordered eating. Sports Medicine physicians are sure to encounter figure skaters and their "Sports-specific problems" in their practice and should be knowledgeable about the common maladies that can plague figure skaters. This article reviews the most common injuries and medical problems in singles figure skaters. PMID:24030306

  20. Incidence of Injury in Professional Mixed Martial Arts Competitions

    PubMed Central

    Bledsoe, Gregory H.; Hsu, Edbert B.; Grabowski, Jurek George; Brill, Justin D.; Li, Guohua

    2006-01-01

    Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) competitions were introduced in the United States with the first Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) in 1993. In 2001, Nevada and New Jersey sanctioned MMA events after requiring a series of rule changes. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of injury in professional MMA fighters. Data from all professional MMA events that took place between September 2001 and December 2004 in the state of Nevada were obtained from the Nevada Athletic Commission. Medical and outcome data from events were analyzed based on a pair-matched case-control design. Both conditional and unconditional logistic regression models were used to assess risk factors for injury. A total of 171 MMA matches involving 220 different fighters occurred during the study period. There were a total of 96 injuries to 78 fighters. Of the 171 matches fought, 69 (40.3%) ended with at least one injured fighter. The overall injury rate was 28.6 injuries per 100 fight participations or 12.5 injuries per 100 competitor rounds. Facial laceration was the most common injury accounting for 47.9% of all injuries, followed by hand injury (13.5%), nose injury (10.4%), and eye injury (8.3%). With adjustment for weight and match outcome, older age was associated with significantly increased risk of injury. The most common conclusion to a MMA fight was a technical knockout (TKO) followed by a tap out. The injury rate in MMA competitions is compatible with other combat sports involving striking. The lower knockout rates in MMA compared to boxing may help prevent brain injury in MMA events. Key Points Mixed martial arts (MMA) has changed since the first MMA matches in the United States and now has increased safety regulations and sanctioning. MMA competitions have an overall high rate of injury. There have been no MMA deaths in the United States. The knockout (KO) rate in MMA appears to be lower than the KO rate of boxing matches. MMA must continue to be supervised by properly

  1. Incidence of injury in professional mixed martial arts competitions.

    PubMed

    Bledsoe, Gregory H; Hsu, Edbert B; Grabowski, Jurek George; Brill, Justin D; Li, Guohua

    2006-01-01

    Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) competitions were introduced in the United States with the first Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) in 1993. In 2001, Nevada and New Jersey sanctioned MMA events after requiring a series of rule changes. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of injury in professional MMA fighters. Data from all professional MMA events that took place between September 2001 and December 2004 in the state of Nevada were obtained from the Nevada Athletic Commission. Medical and outcome data from events were analyzed based on a pair-matched case-control design. Both conditional and unconditional logistic regression models were used to assess risk factors for injury. A total of 171 MMA matches involving 220 different fighters occurred during the study period. There were a total of 96 injuries to 78 fighters. Of the 171 matches fought, 69 (40.3%) ended with at least one injured fighter. The overall injury rate was 28.6 injuries per 100 fight participations or 12.5 injuries per 100 competitor rounds. Facial laceration was the most common injury accounting for 47.9% of all injuries, followed by hand injury (13.5%), nose injury (10.4%), and eye injury (8.3%). With adjustment for weight and match outcome, older age was associated with significantly increased risk of injury. The most common conclusion to a MMA fight was a technical knockout (TKO) followed by a tap out. The injury rate in MMA competitions is compatible with other combat sports involving striking. The lower knockout rates in MMA compared to boxing may help prevent brain injury in MMA events. Key PointsMixed martial arts (MMA) has changed since the first MMA matches in the United States and now has increased safety regulations and sanctioning.MMA competitions have an overall high rate of injury.There have been no MMA deaths in the United States.The knockout (KO) rate in MMA appears to be lower than the KO rate of boxing matches.MMA must continue to be supervised by properly trained

  2. Low velocity penetrating head injury with impacted foreign bodies in situ

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Rashim; Singh, Deepak; Chopra, Sanjeev; Sinha, V. D.

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating head injury is a potentially life-threatening condition. Penetrating head injuries with impacted object (weapon) are rare. The mechanism of low velocity injury is different from high velocity missile injury. Impacted object (weapon) in situ poses some technical difficulties in the investigation and management of the victims, and if the anticipated problems are not managed properly, they may give rise to serious consequences. The management practice of eight patients with impacted object in situ in context of earlier reported similar cases in literature is presented. PMID:22059103

  3. Cerebral Vascular Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Kimbra; Amyot, Franck; Haber, Margalit; Pronger, Angela; Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic cerebral vascular injury (TCVI) is a very frequent, if not universal, feature after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is likely responsible, at least in part, for functional deficits and TBI-related chronic disability. Because there are multiple pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies that promote vascular health, TCVI is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention after TBI. The cerebral microvasculature is a component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) coupling neuronal metabolism with local cerebral blood flow. The NVU participates in the pathogenesis of TBI, either directly from physical trauma or as part of the cascade of secondary injury that occurs after TBI. Pathologically, there is extensive cerebral microvascular injury in humans and experimental animal, identified with either conventional light microscopy or ultrastructural examination. It is seen in acute and chronic TBI, and even described in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Non-invasive, physiologic measures of cerebral microvascular function show dysfunction after TBI in humans and experimental animal models of TBI. These include imaging sequences (MRI-ASL), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), and Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Understanding the pathophysiology of TCVI, a relatively under-studied component of TBI, has promise for the development of novel therapies for TBI. PMID:26048614

  4. Mechanical cornpicker hand injuries.

    PubMed

    Momcilović, Dragan; Prokes, Bela; Janjić, Zlata

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical cornpicker hand injuries are not frequent in comparison to general hand trauma, but they have a specific mechanism of occurrence and are very severe. This investigation included 221 hand injuries. The sex distribution shows a general male dominance (85.25%) in their active age (84.44%). These are, seasonal injuries mostly occurring in October (75.11%). By type of injuries, mutilating crush injuries are most frequent (64.25%). After completing the treatment, in most cases the functional result were estimated as bad (50.68%). Data concerning education and trainig for operating agricultural machines (96.38%--patients without training) and carrying out safety measures (63.35% of injured patients did not apply any protection measures) are devastating. The number of these injuries, as well as consequent permanent disabilities, may be considerably reduced by preventive measures, inclulding public health services and media. Use of contempoarary agricultural machinery, as well as obligatory training for operating these machines and application of protective measures, may also reduce the incidence of hand injuries during corn picking. PMID:16526250

  5. Power lawnmower injuries.

    PubMed

    Robertson, William W

    2003-04-01

    Power lawnmowers are among the most ubiquitous household tools, yet they pose significant danger to operator and bystanders. Despite of the United States Consumer Products Safety Commission's push to have safety standards established for walk-behind mowers in 1982 and for ride-on mowers in 1986, by 2000 approximately 80,000 injuries nationwide were estimated to be associated with power mowers. Large numbers of these injuries are thought to be preventable, especially those to individuals younger than 14 years. Orthopaedic surgeons treat a significant number of the injuries associated with mower use including lacerations, amputations, fractures, infections, and skin defects. Therefore, the orthopaedic community has a stake in the prevention and outcome of these injuries. To date, changes in mower design have seemed to be more successful than user education programs in decreasing the numbers of these injuries. Involving orthopaedists in safety education programs to help prevent injuries associated with power mower use may be one method of increasing user knowledge and preventing injury. PMID:12671483

  6. Penetrating cardiac injuries.

    PubMed

    Mittal, V; McAleese, P; Young, S; Cohen, M

    1999-05-01

    Our objective was to determine the influence of several clinical factors on the survival of patients with penetrating wounds to the heart. A retrospective review of 80 consecutive penetrating cardiac injuries treated in a Level II urban trauma center from 1980 through 1994 were examined. Thirty-six patients (45%) had gunshot wounds (including 1 shotgun wound), and 44 (55%) had stab wounds. Intervention consisted of emergency room (ER) or operating room thoracotomy. We measured the effect of several clinical factors on morbidity and patient survival. Survival rate was 17 of 36 (47%) in gunshot injuries and 35 of 44 (80%) in stab injuries, with an overall survival rate of 52 of 80 patients (65%). The average age was 24 years (range, 9-53), and there were 3 female patients. Twelve patients (15%) had multiple cardiac injuries, and 63 (79%) had other associated injuries. Fourteen patients (17%) presented with no blood pressure, and 55 (69%) were hypotensive on admission. ER thoracotomy was performed on 7 of 52 survivors (13%) and 24 of 28 nonsurvivors (86%). Survival after ER thoracotomy was 7 of 31 patients (22%). A selective approach is recommended, because ER thoracotomy has a limited role in penetrating cardiac injury. A high index of suspicion, prompt resuscitation, and immediate definitive surgical management resulted in a high survival rate for these frequently lethal injuries. PMID:10231214

  7. SUPERFUND TECHNICAL SUPPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under this task, technical support is provided to Regional Remedial Project Managers (RPMs)/On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs) at Superfund, RCRA, and Brownfields sites contaminated with hazardous materials by the Technical Support Center (TSC) for Monitoring and Site Characterization....

  8. Technical report writing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidoli, Carol A.

    1992-01-01

    This manual covers the fundamentals of organizing, writing, and reviewing NASA technical reports. It was written to improve the writing skills of LeRC technical authors and the overall quality of their reports.

  9. Biomechanical risk factors and mechanisms of knee injury in golfers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Robert N; McNair, Peter J

    2013-09-01

    Knee injuries in golf comprise approximately 8% of all injuries, and are considered to result from overuse, technical faults or a combination of those factors. This review examines factors involved in injury, including the structure of the knee joint, kinematics and kinetics of the golf swing, forces sustained by knee joint structures and the potential for joint injury as well as injury prevention strategies. The golf swing generates forces and torques which tend to cause internal or external rotation of the tibia on the femur, and these are resisted by the knee ligaments and menisci. Research has shown that both maximum muscle forces and the forces sustained during a golf swing are less than that required to cause damage to the ligaments. However, the complex motion of the golf swing, involving both substantial forces and ranges of rotational movement, demands good technique if the player is to avoid injuring their knee joint. Most knee injury in golf is likely related to joint laxity, previous injuries or arthritis, and such damage may be exacerbated by problems in technique or overuse. In addition to appropriate coaching, strategies to remedy discomfort include specific exercise programmes, external bracing, orthotics and equipment choices. PMID:24245048

  10. Management of Rotator Cuff and Impingement Injuries in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gerald R.; Kelley, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To review current concepts of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athlete. Data Sources: The information we present was compiled from a review of classic and recently published material regarding rotator cuff and impingement injuries. These materials were identified through a search of a personal literature database compiled by the authors, as well as by selective searching of the MEDLINE. In addition, much of the information presented represents observations and opinions of the authors developed over 8 to 10 years of treating shoulder injuries in athletes. Data Synthesis: Biomechanics of the normal shoulder and pathophysiology of rotator cuff injuries in the athletic population are discussed, followed by a summary of the important diagnostic features of rotator cuff and impingement injuries. The principles of rehabilitation are extensively presented, along with indications and important technical aspects of selected surgical procedures. General principles and specific protocols of postoperative rehabilitation are also summarized. Conclusions/Recommendations: Rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athletic population are multifactorial in etiology, exhibiting significant overlap with glenohumeral instability. Nonoperative treatment is successful in most athletic patients with rotator cuff and impingement injuries. When nonoperative treatment fails, arthroscopic surgical techniques such as rotator cuff repair and subacromial decompression may be successful in returning the athlete to competition. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13. PMID:16558644

  11. Gasoline immersion injury

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, L.A.; Cruse, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical burns and pulmonary complications are the most common problems encountered in the patient immersed in gasoline. Our patient demonstrated a 46-percent total-body-surface area, partial-thickness chemical burn. Although he did not develop bronchitis or pneumonitis, he did display persistent atelectasis, laryngeal edema, and subsequent upper airway obstruction. This had not previously been reported in gasoline inhalation injuries. Hydrocarbon hepatitis secondary to the vascular endothelial damage is apparently a reversible lesion with no reported long-term sequelae. Gasoline immersion injuries may be a series multisystem injury and require the burn surgeon to take a multisystem approach to its diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Editing Technical Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samson, Donald C., Jr.

    Intended for students in upper-division technical communication courses and professionals in business and government who want to learn how to edit technical writing, this book describes what technical editors do and how they do it. Throughout the book are exercises that students can use as self-tests; answer keys are provided for checking work.…

  13. Geomatics in injury prevention: the science, the potential and the limitations

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, M D; Chipman, M; Glazier, R H; Rinner, C; Marshall, S P

    2007-01-01

    Background Geomatics describes the activities involved in acquiring and managing geographical data and producing geographical information for scientific, administrative and technical endeavors. As an emerging science, geomatics has a great potential to support public health. Geomatics provides a conceptual foundation for the development of geographic information systems (GIS), computerized tools that manage and display geographical data for analytical applications. As descriptive epidemiology typically involves the examination of person, place and time in the occurrence of disease or injury, geomatics and GIS can play an important role in understanding and preventing injury. Aim This article provides a background to geomatics for those in the injury prevention field who are unfamiliar with spatial analysis. We hope to stimulate researchers and practitioners to begin to use geomatics to assist in the prevention of injury. Methods The authors illustrate the potential benefits and limitations of geomatics in injury prevention in a non-technical way through the use of maps and analysis. Results By analysing the location of patients treated for fall injuries in Central Toronto using GIS, some demographic and land use variables, such as household income, age, and the location of homeless shelters, were identified as explanatory factors for the spatial distribution. Conclusion By supporting novel approaches to injury prevention, geomatics has a great potential for efforts to combat the burden of injury. Despite some limitations, those with an interest in injury prevention could benefit from this science. PMID:17296690

  14. Prevention and Control of Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchfarber, Barbara S.; Zins, Joseph E.; Jason, Leonard A.

    Childhood injury continues to be a major public health crisis in the United States, with a large percentage of injuries being preventable and controllable. This chapter provides information related to understanding child and youth injury. Studies have shown that injuries affect identifiable high-risk groups. Such host factors that put children at…

  15. Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... of injury are alive and easily get educational information on the Internet. Web happy. sites such as the National Spinal Cord Injury Association (www.spinalcord.org) and SPINAL CORD Injury ♦ “Because of my injury, it is now impossible for me Information Network (www.spinalcord.uab.edu) have to ever ...

  16. Soda pop vending machine injuries.

    PubMed

    Cosio, M Q

    1988-11-11

    Fifteen male patients, 15 to 24 years of age, sustained injuries after rocking soda machines. The machines fell onto the victims, resulting in a variety of injuries. Three were killed. The remaining 12 required hospitalization for their injuries. Unless changes are made to safeguard these machines, people will continue to suffer severe and possibly fatal injuries from what are largely preventable accidents. PMID:3184337

  17. The Epidemiology of Injuries in Mixed Martial Arts

    PubMed Central

    Lystad, Reidar P.; Gregory, Kobi; Wilson, Juno

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mixed martial arts (MMA) has experienced a surge in popularity since emerging in the 1990s, but the sport has also faced concomitant criticism from public, political, and medical holds. Notwithstanding the polarized discourse concerning the sport, no systematic review of the injury problems in MMA has been published to date. Purpose: To systematically review the epidemiologic data on injuries in MMA and to quantitatively estimate injury incidence and risk factor effect sizes. Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Electronic searching of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED, and SPORTDiscus databases to identify studies reporting on the epidemiology of injuries in MMA. Random-effects models were used to obtain pooled summary estimates of the injury incidence rate per 1000 athlete-exposures (IIRAE) and rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was evaluated with the I 2 statistic. Results: A total of 6 studies were eligible for inclusion in this review. The IIRAE summary estimate was found to be 228.7 (95% CI, 110.4-473.5). No studies reported injury severity. The most commonly injured anatomic region was the head (range, 66.8%-78.0%) followed by the wrist/hand (range, 6.0%-12.0%), while the most frequent injury types were laceration (range, 36.7%-59.4%), fracture (range, 7.4%-43.3%), and concussion (range, 3.8%-20.4%). The most notable risk factors pertained to the outcome of bouts. Losers incurred 3 times as many injuries as winners, and fighters in bouts ending with knockout or technical knockout incurred more than 2 times as many injuries as fighters in bouts ending with submission. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the paucity of data, the injury incidence in MMA appears to be greater than in most, if not all, other popular and commonly practiced combat sports. In general, the injury pattern in MMA is very similar to that in professional boxing but unlike that found in other combat sports

  18. Iatrogenic Hepatopancreaticobiliary Injuries: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vachhani, Prasanti G.; Copelan, Alexander; Remer, Erick M.; Kapoor, Baljendra

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic hepatopancreaticobiliary injuries occur after various types of surgical and nonsurgical procedures. Symptomatically, these injuries may lead to a variety of clinical presentations, including tachycardia and hypotension from hemobilia or hemorrhage. Iatrogenic injuries may be identified during the intervention, immediately afterwards, or have a delayed presentation. These injuries are categorized into nonvascular and vascular injuries. Nonvascular injuries include biliary injuries such as biliary leak or stricture, pancreatic injury, and the development of fluid collections such as abscesses. Vascular injuries include pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous fistulas, dissection, and perforation. Imaging studies such as ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and digital subtraction angiography are critical for proper diagnosis of these conditions. In this article, we describe the clinical and imaging presentations of these iatrogenic injuries and the armamentarium of minimally invasive procedures (percutaneous drainage catheter placement, balloon dilatation, stenting, and coil embolization) that are useful in their management. PMID:26038625

  19. Injury reduction at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Griffing, Bill; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    In a recent DOE Program Review, Fermilab's director presented results of the laboratory's effort to reduce the injury rate over the last decade. The results, shown in the figure below, reveal a consistent and dramatic downward trend in OSHA recordable injuries at Fermilab. The High Energy Physics Program Office has asked Fermilab to report in detail on how the laboratory has achieved the reduction. In fact, the reduction in the injury rate reflects a change in safety culture at Fermilab, which has evolved slowly over this period, due to a series of events, both planned and unplanned. This paper attempts to describe those significant events and analyze how each of them has shaped the safety culture that, in turn, has reduced the rate of injury at Fermilab to its current value.

  20. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... another common cause of neck pain. Whiplash, a soft tissue injury to the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing ...

  1. Traumatic flexor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Lapegue, F; Andre, A; Brun, C; Bakouche, S; Chiavassa, H; Sans, N; Faruch, M

    2015-12-01

    The flexor system of the fingers consisting of flexor tendons and finger pulleys is a key anatomic structure for the grasping function. Athletes and manual workers are particularly at risk for closed injuries of the flexor system: ruptured pulleys, ruptures of the flexor digitorum profundus from its distal attachment ("jersey finger"), and less frequently, ruptures of the flexor digitorum superficialis and of the lumbrical muscles. Open injuries vary more and their imaging features are more complex since tendons may be torn in several locations, the locations may be unusual, the injuries may be associated with nerve and vascular injuries, fibrosis… Sonography is the best imaging modality to associate with the clinical exam for it allows an experienced physician to make an accurate and early diagnosis, crucial to appropriate early treatment planning. PMID:26564614

  2. Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... ups and training sessions before practices and before games. This will help ensure that they have fun ... be allowed periods of rest during practices and games. previous continue Common Types of Sports Injuries Three ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dramatically Improves Function After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats May 2004 press release on an experimental treatment ... NINDS). Signaling Molecule Improves Nerve Cell Regeneration in Rats August 2002 news summary on a signaling molecule ...

  4. Survey of laser injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Dunn, J. C., II; Roach, William P.

    2002-06-01

    Laser use is pervasive and steadily expanding both in the private sector and the Department of Defense (DoD). For more than 20 years, Rockwell Laser Industries, the U.S. Army, and the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health have separately collected data on injuries occurring during, or resultant from, the use of lasers. However, data from these sources is incomplete and has not recently undergone a thorough compiling, statistical analysis, review and summarization. It is our belief that in order to evaluate current related medical surveillance, safety and training procedures, this data needs such an examination. Persons maintaining these databases were contacted and any available data on laser injury was collected. The data was analyzed and examined for pertinent similarities and differences among a wide range of parameters. We summarize these findings in this paper and also comment on the injuries, current safety measures and injury reporting protocols associated with laser use.

  5. Investigation of laser injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Keeler, Natalie; Dennis, Jerome E.; Figueroa, Colin L.; Press, Howard A.; Rockwell, R. James, Jr.; Stuck, Bruce E.; Roach, William P.; Wartick, Ardith L.

    2003-06-01

    Recently a review of multiple laser injury and accident databases was initiated. Last year we reported on preliminary findings in this area. This past year the search for laser injury and accident reports was expanded, and a significant number of additional laser incidents were located. The database from the Food and Drug Administration"s Center for Devices and Radiological Health was supplemented with more up to date information and non-medical laser incidents were added. Rockwell Laser Industries database was verified to not contain duplicates from the new information, as was the Army"s Laser Accidents and Incidents Registry. Information from the Federal Aviation Administration regarding laser accidents and incidents were also included. Incidents not resulting in laser specific injuries has been tracked. This information was not included in our previous report. In this study, case reports are used to show gross trends in laser injury, accident and incident reporting. This study is still in progress, and evaluation is incomplete.

  6. Photobiomodulation on sports injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Timon C.; Jiao, Jian-Ling; Li, Cheng-Zhang; Xu, Xiao-Yang

    2003-12-01

    Sports injuries healing has long been an important field in sports medicine. The stimulatory effects of Low intensity laser (LIL) irradiation have been investigated in several medical fields, such as cultured cell response, wound healing, hormonal or neural stimulation, pain relief and others. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether LIL irradiation can accelerate sports injuries healing. Some experimental and clinical studies have shown the laser stimulation effects on soft tissues and cartilage, however, controversy still exists regarding the role of LIL when used as a therapeutic device. Summarizing the data of cell studies and animal experiments and clinic trials by using the biological information model of photobiomodulation, we conclude that LIL irradiation is a valuable treatment for superficial and localized sports injuries and that the injuries healing effects of the therapy depend on the dosage of LIL irradiation.

  7. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities include problems with cognition (thinking, memory, and reasoning), sensory processing (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell), ... barrier. NIH Patient Recruitment for Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. ...

  8. Eye Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... eye nausea or vomiting after an eye injury Think Prevention! Kids who play sports should wear protective goggles or unbreakable glasses as needed. Keep chemicals and other potentially dangerous objects out of the reach of children. Reviewed by: ...

  9. [Treating frostbite injuries].

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Remco R; Kolfschoten, Nikki E; de Jong, Vincent M; Frima, Herman; Daanen, Hein A M; Anema, Helen A

    2012-01-01

    Frostbite injuries rarely occur in healthy Dutch persons. However, as the number of people engaging in winter and outdoor activities and travelling to high altitudes increases, the risk of frostbite also increases. Frostbite is a cold-induced injury which results from two processes: freezing and microvascular occlusion. Adequate first aid, which focuses on the prevention of refreezing and mechanical injury, and rapid rewarming together with the administration of ibuprofen, are of the greatest importance for limiting eventual tissue damage. Iloprost infusion and possibly (r)tPA are indicated if a patient presents within 24 hours after the tissue has thawed and the injury is such that severe morbidity can be expected. If the patient presents after this time period, hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be considered; however, the evidence available on this type of treatment is limited. PMID:22748369

  10. Toe Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... include Corns and bunions Ingrown toenails Toe joint sprains and dislocations Fractured toe bones Treatments for toe injuries and disorders vary. They might include shoe inserts or special shoes, padding, taping, medicines, rest, and in severe cases, surgery.

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... a wide range of changes affecting thinking, sensation, language, or emotions. TBI can be associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. People with severe injuries usually need rehabilitation. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  12. Biomarkers of Lung Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unlike the hepatic, cardiovascular, nervous, or excretory organ systems, where there .ls a strong contribution of host factors or extracellular biochemical milieu in causing organ damage, the causes of lung injuries and subsequent diseases are primarily from direct environmental ...

  13. Genital injuries in adults.

    PubMed

    White, Catherine

    2013-02-01

    The examination of the rape victim should focus on the therapeutic, forensic and psychological needs of the individual patient. One aspect will be an examination for ano-genital injuries. From a medical perspective, they tend to be minor and require little in the way of treatment. They must be considered when assessing the risk of blood-borne viruses and the need for prophylaxis. From a forensic perspective, an understanding of genital injury rates, type of injury, site and healing may assist the clinician to interpret the findings in the context of the allegations that have been made. There are many myths and misunderstandings about ano-genital injuries and rape. The clinician has a duty to dispel these. PMID:23219384

  14. Sciatic nerve injection injury.

    PubMed

    Jung Kim, Hyun; Hyun Park, Sang

    2014-06-11

    Nerve injury is a common complication following intramuscular injection and the sciatic nerve is the most frequently affected nerve, especially in children, the elderly and underweight patients. The neurological presentation may range from minor transient pain to severe sensory disturbance and motor loss with poor recovery. Management of nerve injection injury includes drug treatment of pain, physiotherapy, use of assistive devices and surgical exploration. Early recognition of nerve injection injury and appropriate management are crucial in order to reduce neurological deficit and to maximize recovery. Sciatic nerve injection injury is a preventable event. Total avoidance of intramuscular injection is recommended if other administration routes can be used. If the injection has to be administered into the gluteal muscle, the ventrogluteal region (gluteal triangle) has a more favourable safety profile than the dorsogluteal region (the upper outer quadrant of the buttock). PMID:24920643

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we ...

  16. Traumatic injuries to athletes.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Bourguignon, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The timeliness of treatment after dental trauma is crucial to successful tooth preservation. This article focuses on the emergency treatment of common forms of dental trauma in athletes, both at the site of the injury and at the dental office. When dental injuries happen to young patients, saving the tooth is an absolute priority, because few long-term replacement solutions can be performed in a growing child. Preserving pulpal vitality of immature teeth is essential to allow continued root development. PMID:26545271

  17. Pars Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Oren, Jonathan H; Gallina, Jason M

    2016-03-01

    Pars injuries are common causes of low back pain in adolescent athletes. Workup traditionally has included lumbar radiographs with oblique views and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, recent literature has demonstrated the accuracy of MRI as a diagnostic modality. Acute injuries may be amenable to bracing with the goal of a healed lesion. Most cases of spondylolysis will result in asymptomatic non-union, though pars repair is an option for symptomatic pars defects without spondylolisthesis. PMID:26977552

  18. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Alexandra L; Lakhani, Saquib A; Hsu, Benson S

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding of pediatric traumatic brain injury and its management. Within the pediatric age group, ages 1 to 19, injuries are the number one cause of death with traumatic brain injury being involved in almost 50 percent of these cases. This, along with the fact that the medical system spends over $1 billion annually on pediatric traumatic brain injury, makes this issue both timely and relevant to health care providers. Over the course of this article the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of pediatric traumatic brain injury will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the early responder and the immediate interventions that should be considered and/or performed. The management discussed in this article follows the most recent recommendations from the 2012 edition of the Guidelines for the Acute Medical Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants, Children, and Adolescents. Despite the focus of this article, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound--or, to be more precise and use the average human's brain measurements, just above three pounds--of cure. PMID:26630835

  19. Abdominopelvic vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Sriussadaporn, S

    2000-01-01

    The clinical records of 25 patients with 32 abdominopelvic vascular injuries were reviewed. Sixty per cent of patients sustained blunt trauma and 40 per cent sustained penetrating trauma. Nineteen patients (76%) were in shock on arrival, 2 of them underwent ER thoracotomy when they first arrived in the emergency room. Nine patients (36%) had signs of lower extremity ischemia. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 16-50, mean 29 +/- 10.0. Nineteen patients (76%) had 35 associated injuries. Of the 32 injured vessels; 8 were external iliac artery, 5 were renal vein, 4 were abdominal aorta, 3 were common iliac artery, common iliac vein, external iliac vein and inferior vena cava, and 1 was superior mesenteric artery, superior mesenteric vein and median sacral artery. Treatments included: 13 lateral repair, 4 prosthetic grafting, 4 nephrectomy, 3 ligation, 3 reversed saphenous vein grafting, 2 end to end anastomosis, 1 internal iliac artery grafting, 1 intravascular shunt and packing and 1 perihepatic packing. Nine patients (36%) died. High mortality was observed in injuries to the abdominal aorta (75%), inferior vena cava (66.7%), common iliac vein (66.7%) and associated major pelvic fractures (50%). Factors significantly associated with mortality were the presence of shock on arrival, associated injuries and high Injury Severity Score. The author concludes that short prehospital time, effective resuscitation and proper surgical decision making are important for survival in these critically injured patients. PMID:10710864

  20. Pediatric equestrian injuries.

    PubMed

    Bixby-Hammett, D M

    1992-06-01

    Using data from four sources, horse-related injuries are summarized for persons younger than 25 years of age. Head injury caused 57% of deaths. The upper extremity was the most common area injured, with the next most frequent areas the lower extremity (National Park Service data) and the head (United States Pony Clubs [USPC] data). Injured females outnumbered injured males and had a greater percentage of participants injured (USPC data). Injuries occurred at home in 41% (National Electronic Injury Surveillance System data). USPC figures suggest that greater knowledge may reduce the severity of horse-related injuries. Previous horse-related injury had occurred in 1 of 4 of those injured (USPC data). One third of accidents occurred during lessons (USPC data). Riding instructors should be certified by a recognized organization, and parents should evaluate an instructor's personal riding and their safety records with students. The pediatrician's role should be in counseling parents with children who ride and in offering recommendations for safety to governing boards of youth horse activities. PMID:1594372

  1. Peroxisomes and Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Peroxisomes are organelles present in most eukaryotic cells. The organs with the highest density of peroxisomes are the liver and kidneys. Peroxisomes possess more than fifty enzymes and fulfill a multitude of biological tasks. They actively participate in apoptosis, innate immunity, and inflammation. In recent years, a considerable amount of evidence has been collected to support the involvement of peroxisomes in the pathogenesis of kidney injury. Recent Advances: The nature of the two most important peroxisomal tasks, beta-oxidation of fatty acids and hydrogen peroxide turnover, functionally relates peroxisomes to mitochondria. Further support for their communication and cooperation is furnished by the evidence that both organelles share the components of their division machinery. Until recently, the majority of studies on the molecular mechanisms of kidney injury focused primarily on mitochondria and neglected peroxisomes. Critical Issues: The aim of this concise review is to introduce the reader to the field of peroxisome biology and to provide an overview of the evidence about the contribution of peroxisomes to the development and progression of kidney injury. The topics of renal ischemia–reperfusion injury, endotoxin-induced kidney injury, diabetic nephropathy, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as well as the potential therapeutic implications of peroxisome activation, are addressed in this review. Future Directions: Despite recent progress, further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms induced by dysfunctional peroxisomes and the role of the dysregulated mitochondria–peroxisome axis in the pathogenesis of renal injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 217–231. PMID:26972522

  2. 76 FR 80226 - Technical Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Part 701 Technical Amendments AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION... designation to make minor, nonsubstantive technical corrections. The technical amendments update the... technical corrections. The corrections are necessary to update and conform the regulation to current...

  3. Imaging of meniscus and ligament injuries of the knee.

    PubMed

    Faruch-Bilfeld, M; Lapegue, F; Chiavassa, H; Sans, N

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has now an indisputable role for the diagnosis of meniscus and ligament injuries of the knee. Some technical advances have improved the diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging so that diagnoses, which may change the therapeutic approach, such as a partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament or confirmation of unstable meniscal injuries, are now made easier. This article describes the essential about magnetic resonance imaging technique and pathological results for the menisci, collateral ligaments and damage to the central pivot of the cruciate knee ligaments. PMID:27452631

  4. [Extragenital injuries in rape].

    PubMed

    Kernbach, G; Püschel, K; Brinkmann, B

    1984-10-01

    The documentation of extragenital injuries to verify violent cohabitation has considerable forensic relevance. 1,875 police files in Hamburg were investigated. Injuries were analysed under the following aspects: kinds, localisations and patterns. According to the most frequent conduct of the doer (manual fixation of the victim and beats in 60% of all cases), consequences of contused violence (i.e. effusions of blood, contusions, dehiscences) were found in 50% of all cases. Injuries due to semi-sharp violence, wounds of genitals or signs of choke were relatively rare (15-3-3%). An isolated state of genital organs is of minor importance. The most frequent localisations of injuries were face and arms, less frequently legs and back. Injuries as result of manual fixation, defence or abutment formed the main patterns. "Banal" hurts were also found. In numerous cases, the outer appearance of the lesions enabled conclusions regarding the instrument used (i.e. double wales after beats with a stick). Self-inflicted injuries can mostly be discerned by their kind and localisation. Rape without any injuries is conceivable as the result of missing defence in the presence of severe threat. Psychic alterations were found in 20% of the cases, half of them continuing for a long time. The medical examination of the suspected man must include the search of signs of a fight (scratch marks, bites), localised at the hands, face and neck (besides ascertainment of traces, for example, smears of semen and smegma, i.e. from the glans penis). Extent and thoroughness of medical examinations as presently practised are discussed critically. The manner in which these examinations are conducted, is considered to be the main cause of a "secondary victimisation" of the raped woman. PMID:6569844

  5. Brain injury in sports.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, John; Conidi, Frank

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Helmets are used for sports, military, and transportation to protect against impact forces and associated injuries. The common belief among end users is that the helmet protects the whole head, including the brain. However, current consensus among biomechanists and sports neurologists indicates that helmets do not provide significant protection against concussion and brain injuries. In this paper the authors present existing scientific evidence on the mechanisms underlying traumatic head and brain injuries, along with a biomechanical evaluation of 21 current and retired football helmets. METHODS The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) standard test apparatus was modified and validated for impact testing of protective headwear to include the measurement of both linear and angular kinematics. From a drop height of 2.0 m onto a flat steel anvil, each football helmet was impacted 5 times in the occipital area. RESULTS Skull fracture risk was determined for each of the current varsity football helmets by calculating the percentage reduction in linear acceleration relative to a 140-g skull fracture threshold. Risk of subdural hematoma was determined by calculating the percentage reduction in angular acceleration relative to the bridging vein failure threshold, computed as a function of impact duration. Ranking the helmets according to their performance under these criteria, the authors determined that the Schutt Vengeance performed the best overall. CONCLUSIONS The study findings demonstrated that not all football helmets provide equal or adequate protection against either focal head injuries or traumatic brain injuries. In fact, some of the most popular helmets on the field ranked among the worst. While protection is improving, none of the current or retired varsity football helmets can provide absolute protection against brain injuries, including concussions and subdural hematomas. To maximize protection against head and

  6. Pediatric elbow injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Jegede, Kola A; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Elbow injuries in pediatric and adolescent population represent a spectrum of pathology that can range from medial tension injuries to posterior shear injuries. Elbow injuries in this population continue to rise in parallel with the increase in youth participation in sports both throughout the calendar year and across multiple sports. Many of these injuries are noncontact and are attributed to overuse. Evaluation and management of youth and adolescent athletic elbow injuries requires knowledge of developmental anatomy, injury pathophysiology, and established treatment algorithms. Furthermore, risk factors contributing to elbow injuries must be recognized, with education and recommendations for safe play continually advocated. This education--of parents, athletes, and coaches--is paramount in reducing the climbing incidence of elbow injuries in our youth athletes. PMID:25077752

  7. [Prospective study on injuries of the German national ice hockey teams in more than 1000 games].

    PubMed

    Gröger, A; Kuropkat, C; Mang, A; Gradinger, R

    2010-06-01

    Due to the fast and physical nature of the game, prevention of injuries is an important issue in ice hockey. The injuries of the German male senior and junior (U16, U17, U18, U19, U20) national ice hockey teams were documented and analyzed in 1006 games between 1986 and 2006. This unique long observation period over 20 years, as well as the standardized protocol of documentation provides reliable data concerning injury pattern in German international ice hockey. Overall 277 injuries were recorded. Comparing the first and the last ten years of observation, the number did not decline over the time, despite various national and international efforts of injury prevention. The majority of the injuries, almost 60%, were caused by body contact with increasing tendency. Remarkably, the injuries with no body or puck/stick contact more than doubled in the last ten years compared to the first ten years of observation. Most injuries happened to the extremities with decreasing tendency to lower body and increasing tendency to upper body injuries. The number of head injuries did not change significantly. More injuries occurred in the second and third period compared to the first period of the game. The data of this study indicate that many injuries might be due to insufficient physical condition with consecutive lack of concentration and coordination. Players do not seem to meet the increasing technical and athletic requirements of international ice-hockey. The increasing speed and physical energy in international ice-hockey make the game unique and fascinating. Therefore, the aim must be to decrease the number and above all the severity of injuries by further development and adjustment of the player's equipment. Also, a better cooperation of players, coaches, sports medicine and referees seems to be necessary for injury prevention in the future. PMID:20517801

  8. Prevention of Eye Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Pashby, Tom

    1981-01-01

    In Canada 30,000 people are registered as blind; in one third of these, blindness might have been avoided. Prevention is the key to reducing the number of eye injuries and blind eyes. The role of the family physician in early identification of treatable conditions and in the education of patients is discussed, but responsibility for prevention belongs to all physicians. The success of prevention is seen in the great reduction in eye injuries in industry and sports since eye protectors have been commonly used. However, many dangers to the eyes are either not recognized or are not taken seriously enough. This paper discusses some of the common causes of serious eye injuries in the home, in sports and in industry. Imagesp464-aFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21289691

  9. Catastrophic pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Luckstead, Eugene F; Patel, Dilip R

    2002-06-01

    The high school sports of wrestling, gymnastics, ice hockey, baseball, track, and cheerleading should receive closer attention to prevent injury. Safer equipment and sport-specific conditioning should be provided and injuries strictly monitored. Greater attention must also be paid to swimming and diving techniques, and continued observation is needed for heat stroke and heat intolerance in sports such as football, wrestling, basketball, track and field, and cross-country. An increased awareness of commotio cordis in sports other than baseball should include ice hockey, football, track field events, and lacrosse. American football because of the sheer numbers and associated catastrophic injury potential must continue to be monitored at the highest medical levels! PMID:12119866

  10. Renal injury in sport.

    PubMed

    Holmes, F Clarke; Hunt, Jeremy J; Sevier, Thomas L

    2003-04-01

    Hematuria is the most common presenting sign of renal injury. Its presence in athletes may indicate a benign entity such as exercise-induced hematuria or a more serious injury in the presence of trauma. Exercise-induced hematuria can originate in the kidney, bladder, urethra, or prostate. The type of activity, as well as activity duration and intensity, contributes to its development. A wide differential diagnosis must be considered if hematuria persists longer than 24 to 72 hours. Trauma to the kidney can occur from a direct blow or deceleration; contact and collision sports are most commonly involved. Fortunately, most sports-related renal trauma is mild, and can be managed expectantly. A sporting injury rarely results in nephrectomy. Determining return to play for the athlete with a single kidney remains a controversial issue that requires patient education and an individualized approach. PMID:12831667

  11. A season of football injuries.

    PubMed

    Stokes, M A; McKeever, J A; McQuillan, R F; O'Higgins, N J

    1994-06-01

    All rugby and soccer players presenting to the Accident & Emergency department during the football season 1992-1993 (a total of 871) were prospectively studied to compare the injuries sustained in the two sports. The nature and site of injury, treatment required, age, fitness, experience and position of the player, situation giving rise to injury, and medical attention at the grounds were all analysed. The results show that rugby and soccer players had the same number of injuries, and while there were some differences in the nature of the injuries, there was no difference in overall severity. Rugby flankers and soccer goalkeepers are particularly at risk. Competitive matches produce more injuries than training sessions. Experience or fitness did not appear to be a factor and 45% of rugby injuries and 15% of soccer injuries were from school matches. Law changes (e.g. the rugby scrum and the use of gum-shields) have reduced some injuries, but other areas (e.g. jumping for the ball in soccer, rucks and mauls in rugby) also warrant consideration. There was one death, but no spinal cord injuries. Medical attention at the grounds was limited. Rugby injuries, therefore, do not appear to be more numerous or severe than soccer injuries. Law changes have been of benefit but they need to be enforced and perhaps more should be considered. Medical attention at sports grounds could be improved and Registers of injuries kept by the sporting bodies would be of benefit. PMID:8050871

  12. Mountain biking injuries: an update.

    PubMed

    Kronisch, Robert L; Pfeiffer, Ronald P

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the available literature regarding injuries in off-road bicyclists. Recent progress in injury research has allowed the description of several patterns of injury in this sport. Mountain biking remains popular, particularly among young males, although sales and participation figures have decreased in the last several years. Competition in downhill racing has increased, while cross-country racing has decreased somewhat in popularity. Recreational riders comprise the largest segment of participants, but little is known about the demographics and injury epidemiology of noncompetitive mountain cyclists. Most mountain bikers participating in surveys reported a history of previous injuries, but prospective studies conducted at mountain bike races have found injury rates of <1%. The most common mechanism of injury involves a forward fall over the handlebars, usually while riding downhill, which can result in direct trauma to the head, torso and upper extremities. A variety of factors can be associated with this type of fall, including trail surface irregularities, mechanical failures and loss of control. In mountain bike racing the risk of injury may be higher for women than men. Minor injuries such as abrasions and contusions occur frequently, but are usually of little consequence. Fractures usually involve the torso or upper extremities, and shoulder injuries are common. Head and face injuries are not always prevented by current helmet designs. Fatal injuries are rare but have been reported. Improvements in safety equipment, rider training and racecourse design are suggested injury prevention measures. The authors encourage continued research in this sport. PMID:12076178

  13. Head Injury and Aging: The Importance of Bleeding Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mallory, Ann

    The current study analyzed 1993–2007 data from NASS/CDS (National Automotive Sampling System / Crashworthiness Data System) to explore the types of serious head injuries sustained by adult motor vehicle crash occupants and how the types of head injuries sustained shifted with age. The purpose was to determine which head injuries are most important for older occupants by identifying specific injuries that become more likely for aging occupants and taking into consideration previous reports on the potential outcome of those injuries for an older population. Results confirmed previous reports that older head injury victims in motor vehicle collisions were more likely to sustain bleeding injuries than younger head injury victims. The current study showed that, in particular, the rate of extra-axial bleeding injury (which includes epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid bleeding) increased with age. The increase in extra-axial bleeding injury rate was especially prominent in relatively low Delta-V crashes. Among the extra-axial bleeding injuries that had increased odds of injury for older occupants, subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage were notable, with increased odds of injury for occupants age 50 to 69 as well as for occupants age 70 and older. The importance of subdural hematoma for aging occupants is emphasized by previous studies showing its high mortality rate, while the impact of subarachnoid hemorrhage is linked in previous studies to its aggravating effect on other injuries. The results highlight a need to further explore the injury mechanisms of subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage in older occupants in order to define age-adjusted injury tolerance and develop countermeasures. PMID:21050591

  14. Inflammation and Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    The invited special lecture at the 76th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society focused on the central role of inflammation in vascular injury and repair. Early studies pioneered the concept that mechanical injury, such as balloon angioplasty and endovascular stent deployment, elicits an inflammatory response from the vessel wall. This hypothesis was developed and substantiated at a time when the prevailing dogma viewed restenosis following angioplasty as a primarily proliferative smooth muscle cell disease. Antibody targeting of Mac-1 reduced leukocyte accumulation and limited neointimal formation following balloon injury or stent implantation. Genetic absence of Mac-1 resulted in diminished leukocyte accumulation and neointimal thickening after carotid artery injury in mice. In the course of those studies, our laboratory made fundamental discoveries regarding the mechanism of leukocyte recruitment at sites of vascular injury and identified platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, a component of the GPIb-IX-V complex, as the previously unknown platelet counter-receptor for Mac-1. Follow-on studies have focused extensively on the structure, function, and signaling of the leukocyte integrin Mac-1. The binding site for GPIbα in Mac-1 has been mapped and subsequently showed that leukocyte engagement of platelet GPIbα via Mac-1 is critical not only for the biological response to vascular injury, but also for thrombosis, vasculitis, glomerulonephritis, and multiple sclerosis, thereby advancing the hypothesis that virtually all inflammation is platelet-dependent. Furthermore, ligand engagement of Mac-1 initiates a novel gene program that promotes inflammation by activating NFκB and downregulating the expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxp1 that controls monocyte differentiation. Small molecule inhibitors of Mac-1 function have been pursued, including targeting of Mac-1-GPIbα binding or the downstream tyrosine kinase spleen tyrosine kinase

  15. 15 CFR 990.51 - Injury assessment-injury determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.51 Injury assessment—injury... this part, trustees must determine if injuries to natural resources and/or services have resulted from... natural resource has been exposed to the discharged oil, and a pathway can be established from...

  16. 15 CFR 990.51 - Injury assessment-injury determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.51 Injury assessment—injury... this part, trustees must determine if injuries to natural resources and/or services have resulted from... natural resource has been exposed to the discharged oil, and a pathway can be established from...

  17. 15 CFR 990.51 - Injury assessment-injury determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.51 Injury assessment—injury... this part, trustees must determine if injuries to natural resources and/or services have resulted from... natural resource has been exposed to the discharged oil, and a pathway can be established from...

  18. 15 CFR 990.51 - Injury assessment-injury determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.51 Injury assessment—injury... this part, trustees must determine if injuries to natural resources and/or services have resulted from... natural resource has been exposed to the discharged oil, and a pathway can be established from...

  19. 15 CFR 990.51 - Injury assessment-injury determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.51 Injury assessment—injury... this part, trustees must determine if injuries to natural resources and/or services have resulted from... natural resource has been exposed to the discharged oil, and a pathway can be established from...

  20. Injury Risk Estimation Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Petushek, Erich J.; Ward, Paul; Cokely, Edward T.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Simple observational assessment of movement is a potentially low-cost method for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury screening and prevention. Although many individuals utilize some form of observational assessment of movement, there are currently no substantial data on group skill differences in observational screening of ACL injury risk. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare various groups’ abilities to visually assess ACL injury risk as well as the associated strategies and ACL knowledge levels. The hypothesis was that sports medicine professionals would perform better than coaches and exercise science academics/students and that these subgroups would all perform better than parents and other general population members. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 428 individuals, including physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, strength and conditioning coaches, exercise science researchers/students, athletes, parents, and members of the general public participated in the study. Participants completed the ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz (ACL-IQ) and answered questions related to assessment strategy and ACL knowledge. Results: Strength and conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, physical therapists, and exercise science students exhibited consistently superior ACL injury risk estimation ability (+2 SD) as compared with sport coaches, parents of athletes, and members of the general public. The performance of a substantial number of individuals in the exercise sciences/sports medicines (approximately 40%) was similar to or exceeded clinical instrument-based biomechanical assessment methods (eg, ACL nomogram). Parents, sport coaches, and the general public had lower ACL-IQ, likely due to their lower ACL knowledge and to rating the importance of knee/thigh motion lower and weight and jump height higher. Conclusion: Substantial cross-professional/group differences in visual ACL

  1. Severe Traumatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Minei, Joseph P.; Schmicker, Robert H.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Bulger, Eileen; Tisherman, Samuel; Hoyt, David B.; Nichol, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The public health implications of regional variation in incidence and outcome of severe traumatic injury remain to be analyzed. The objective of this study was to determine whether the incidence and outcome associated with severe traumatic injury differs across geographic regions of North America. Methods A prospective, observational study was conducted of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium of all patients in 9 North American sites (6 US and 3 Canadian) sustaining severe traumatic injury from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007 followed to hospital discharge. Eligible patients were assessed by organized emergency medical services, and had field-based physiologic criteria including systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg, Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤12, respiratory rate <10 or >29 per minute, advanced airway procedure, or traumatic death in the field. Census data were used to determine rates adjusted for age and sex. The main outcome measures were incidence rate, mortality rate, case fatality rate, and survival to discharge for patients sustaining severe traumatic injury assessed by EMS. Results The total catchment population of 20.5 million yielded 7080 cases of severe traumatic injury. Median age was 36 years and 67% were male. The median incidence of EMS-assessed severe traumatic injury per 100,000 population across sites was 37.4 (interquartile range [IQR] = 24.6 – 69.6); survival ranged from 39.8% to 80.8%, with a median of 64.5% (IQR = 55.5–78.4). About 942 cases were pronounced dead at the scene and 5857 patients were transported to hospital; 4477 (63.2%) were discharged alive. The median incidence of severe trauma due to a blunt mechanism, transported to hospital, was 25.8 (IQR = 13.1–44.3); survival ranged from 52.6% to 87.3%, with a median of 78.0% (IQR = 68.4–83.5). The median incidence of severe penetrating trauma, transported to hospital, was 2.6 (IQR = 1.5–10.4); survival ranged from 37.5% to 84.7%, with a median of 67.5% (IQR = 54.1

  2. High Median Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Jonathan; Ugwu-Oju, Obinna

    2016-08-01

    The median nerve serves a crucial role in extrinsic and intrinsic motor and sensory function to the radial half of the hand. High median nerve injuries, defined as injuries proximal to the anterior interosseous nerve origin, therefore typically result in significant functional loss prompting aggressive surgical management. Even with appropriate recognition and contemporary nerve reconstruction, however, motor and sensory recovery may be inadequate. With isolated persistent high median nerve palsies, a variety of available tendon transfers can improve key motor functions and salvage acceptable use of the hand. PMID:27387077

  3. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePlus

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Types of bladder injuries include: Blunt trauma (such as a blow to the body) Penetrating wounds (such as bullet or stab wounds) The ...

  4. Injury surveillance in Victoria, Australia: developing comprehensive injury incidence estimates.

    PubMed

    Watson, W L; Ozanne-Smith, J

    2000-03-01

    This study aimed to develop an estimate of the incidence of all medically-treated injury by level of severity and to broadly describe the epidemiology of injury in the Australian State of Victoria in a given year. Victoria has developed a relatively comprehensive injury surveillance system. Data is currently collected by various agencies on injury deaths, hospitalisations and emergency department attendances. The method used to establish the incidence of both unintentional and intentional injury is described. Incidence figures were directly derived, or estimated from, the available Victorian health sector and Coronial data bases for three level of severity (deaths, hospitalisations and medical treatment only) and for causes of injury, age and gender groups, location of the injury event and activity at the time of injury. In 1993/1994, injuries resulted in at least 1487 deaths, 67,402 persons hospitalised and an estimated 397,160 medically-treated, non-hospitalised injured persons in Victoria. In total, over 466,000 people were injured or 10.5 persons per year for every 100 residents. Males sustain 62% of all injuries yet represent 49.5% of the population. Almost three-quarters of injury fatalities and over 60% of non-fatal injuries occur among males. Young people aged 15-24 years account for 22% of all injuries yet represent only about 16% of the Victorian population. Children (0-14 years) also suffer relatively high injury rates, although mainly less severe, while the elderly are at risk of more severe injuries. The leading cause of injury death in Victoria is suicide, followed by motor vehicle accidents, whereas falls are the leading cause of all non-fatal injury. Most injuries occur in the home (36%), areas of sport and recreation (12.5%) and transport (11.7%). They are mainly associated with leisure activities (33.1%), work (11%) and transportation (10.8%). This study demonstrates a method for the development of comprehensive injury incidence estimates. The

  5. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Traumatic Brain Injury National Data Center (TBINDC) at Kessler Medical Rehabilitation Research and Education Center is the coordinating center for the research and dissemination efforts of the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) program funded by the National Instit...

  6. Intangibles in Evaluating Athletic Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hair, Judson E.

    1977-01-01

    Examples are presented of four categories of intangibles sometimes encountered in diagnosing sports injuries: (1) predominantly psychological causes; (2) the con artist; (3) illnesses mimicing injuries; (4) bizarre activities fitting no categorization. (MJB)

  7. Travelers' Health: Injuries and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... optimal care for serious injuries are uncommon outside urban areas in many foreign destinations. Travelers should be ... poor in many countries, victims of injuries and violence can die before reaching a hospital, and there ...

  8. Exertion injuries in female athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Orava, S.; Hulkko, A.; Jormakka, E.

    1981-01-01

    Because sports injuries in men form most of the available statistics, the reportage of injuries in female athletes is sparse. We describe exertion injuries and disorders in 281 women athletes, all of which hampered athletic training or performances. Sixty per cent of the injuries occurred to girls ages between 12-19 years, and about forty-eight per cent were track and field athletes. The most common sites of injury were the ankle, foot, heel and leg. Osteochondritic disorders were the most typical injuries in the series, and the chronic medical tibial syndrome was the injury that needed surgical treatment most frequently. Overuse injuries seem to differ very little from each other in the events included in this survey. Images p229-a p229-b p229-c PMID:6797496

  9. Exertion injuries in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Orava, S; Hulkko, A; Jormakka, E

    1981-12-01

    Because sports injuries in men form most of the available statistics, the reportage of injuries in female athletes is sparse. We describe exertion injuries and disorders in 281 women athletes, all of which hampered athletic training or performances. Sixty per cent of the injuries occurred to girls ages between 12-19 years, and about forty-eight per cent were track and field athletes. The most common sites of injury were the ankle, foot, heel and leg. Osteochondritic disorders were the most typical injuries in the series, and the chronic medical tibial syndrome was the injury that needed surgical treatment most frequently. Overuse injuries seem to differ very little from each other in the events included in this survey. PMID:6797496

  10. Radiation Injury to the Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hits since January 2003 RADIATION INJURY TO THE BRAIN Radiation treatments affect all cells that are targeted. ... fractions, duration of therapy, and volume of [healthy brain] nervous tissue irradiated influence the likelihood of injury. ...

  11. Key Injury and Violence Data

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Data & Statistics Home & Recreational Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Prescription Drug Overdose Traumatic Brain Injury Violence ... from violence and injuries — such as motor vehicle crashes, falls, or homicides — than from any ...

  12. Profile of infections and antimicrobial treatment among burn-injury patients.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, Delmo; Del Fiol, Fernando de Sá

    2016-08-01

    Infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among burn-injury patients. Even in the absence of documented infection, antibiotics are often given to burn-injury patients at the beginning of treatment, an empirical measure in response to signs and symptoms of infection. The choice of antimicrobial therapy for these patients should be based on technical criteria, based on laboratory findings, at the risk of further increasing antimicrobial resistance levels. PMID:27324611

  13. Inferior vena cava injury repair, a successful outcome.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, S; Shakya, V C; Dhungel, K; Rajbanshi, S; Shakya, V; Khaniya, S; Maskey, P

    2012-03-01

    Inferior ver a cava (IVC) injuries are very very infrequent; yet it still happens to be the most frequently injured retroperitoneal vascular structure. Fifty percent of the patients can't even make it to the hospital. Even when half of them manage to attend the hospital the mortality rates for the great vessel injury are still very high perhaps due to the low index of suspicion, delayed or inadequate volume resuscitation, difficulty in diagnosis and also due to some technical problems associated in its repair. We present a young male with an abdominal stab injury who had a near transected inferior vena cava at operation. Aggressive perioperative management and the correct judgement by our team at the right time possibly made the patient survive. The rarity of this condition and a review of the literature with some discussion are presented. PMID:23441500

  14. Ballet injuries: the Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Quirk, R

    1983-11-01

    There is a distinct difference between ballet injuries and sports injuries in general, and the sports medicine physician needs to study the technique of dance and the specific injuries that it may produce in order to treat dancers effectively. In Australia, which is typical of other countries where ballet is performed, ballet injuries include strained lumbar muscles, sprained ankle, Achilles tendinitis, clicking hip, jumper's knee, chondromalacia, stress fractures, patellar subluxation, and other knee and tendon problems. PMID:6652700

  15. Radiology of musculoskeletal stress injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Keats, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    With the new emphasis on physical fitness, musculoskeletal stress injuries are being seen with greater frequency in children and adults, and in locations that are not widely associated with stress injury. Some of the injuries continue to be mistaken for signs of more serious illnesses, such as infection and neoplasm, and this may lead to unnecessary investigative effort. This book covers both the classic stress injuries and the new manifestations.

  16. Injury prevention in youth sports.

    PubMed

    Veigel, Jake D; Pleacher, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Sport is the principal cause of injury in children and adolescents. Youth participation in organized athletics is estimated to be 45 million in the United States alone. These injuries influence health and fitness and have socioeconomic impact. Many injuries can be prevented. This article outlines the efficacy of current injury prevention strategies in youth sports through the use of educational programs, rule changes in baseball and hockey, safety equipment, and conditioning programs. PMID:19005358

  17. Technical Mathematics: Restructure of Technical Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Carol A.

    Designed to accompany a series of videotapes, this textbook provides information, examples, problems, and solutions relating to mathematics and its applications in technical fields. Chapter I deals with basic arithmetic, providing information on fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, percentages, and order of operations. Chapter II focuses on…

  18. Scientific and Technical English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaclavik, Jaroslav

    Technical English differs from everyday English because of the specialized contexts in which it is used and because of the specialized interests of scientists and engineers. This text provides exercises in technical and scientific exposition in the following fields: mathematics, physics, temperature effects, mechanics, dynamics, conservation of…

  19. Technical and Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocational Training, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This issue focuses on the various forms that secondary technical and vocational education takes in different European Community Member States. "The Future for Skilled Workers" is an interview with Burkart Lutz, a German researcher. Other articles are as follows: "Contradictions in Technical and Vocational Education: The Outlook" (Paolo Garonna);…

  20. Technical Education in Cyprus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Larry L.

    1993-01-01

    Since independence from Britain in 1960, the establishment and organization of technical education has been one of the Cyprus government's primary concerns. Recently, Cyprus has stressed the college-preparatory course in both the gymnasium (high school) and vocational/technical curriculum. The Cyprus education system produces highly qualified…

  1. Technical Training for Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haverland, Edgar M.

    The question has arisen as to what kind of information a manager without extensive technical training needs to learn to supervise effectively. For example, the Nike Hercules fire control platoon leader, usually an officer in his first active duty assignment, seldom has had extensive technical training. Yet he is responsibile for the…

  2. Toward a Technical Humanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malassis, Louis

    1977-01-01

    Examines the relationship between education and development in developing nations. Advocates the fostering of a technical humanism--the development of knowledge in all its forms as a basis for action. In this system, technical education is as highly valued as general education. The system, and its applications to rural education is discussed. (CP)

  3. Databases Improve Technical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graube, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    In Lower Saxony, technology studies as part of preparing technical education teachers for primary and partly for secondary education can be studied only at two universities--the Technical University of Brunswick and the University of Oldenburg. Technology education is not available at the Gymnasium (a type of secondary school leading to the…

  4. Technical Manual. The ACT®

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2014

    2014-01-01

    This manual contains technical information about the ACT® college readiness assessment. The principal purpose of this manual is to document the technical characteristics of the ACT in light of its intended purposes. ACT regularly conducts research as part of the ongoing formative evaluation of its programs. The research is intended to ensure that…

  5. Research in Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLennan, A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to list and demonstrate areas in which research needs to be carried out, or questions answered, in order to raise the quality of technical education. Design/methodology/approach: The area of technical education expanded very rapidly in the late 1950s, and there was little comprehensive knowledge regarding the…

  6. RADIATION SITES TECHNICAL WORKGROUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much of the radiation expertise in EPA is located in the Region Offices. The EPA Radiation Sites Technical Workgroup is an interoffice technical workgroup within EPA which provides a focal point for radiation expertise. The Workgroup has members from each region, as well as the...

  7. Evaluation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudel, Tina M.; Halper, James; Pines, Hayley; Cancro, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to determine if a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred when an individual is assessed in a hospital emergency room after a car accident, fall, or other injury that affects the head. This determination influences decisions about treatment. It is essential to screen for the injury, because the sooner they begin appropriate…

  8. Brain Injury Association of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Only) 1-800-444-6443 Welcome to the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) Brain injury is not an event or an outcome. ... misunderstood, under-funded neurological disease. People who sustain brain injuries must have timely access to expert trauma ...

  9. Throwing Injuries of the Shoulder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCue, Frank C., III; and Others

    The majority of shoulder injuries occurring in throwing sports involve the soft tissue structures. Injuries often occur when the unit is overstretched to a point near its greatest length, involving the elastic tissues. The other injury mechanism involves the contractural unit of the muscle, which occurs near the midpoint of contractions, involving…

  10. Acute forefoot and midfoot injuries.

    PubMed

    Laird, R Clinton

    2015-04-01

    Forefoot and midfoot injuries in the athlete are common. Injuries of the digits include subungual hematomas and fractures. Metatarsal fractures occur frequently in sports, and their treatments range greatly. Hyperflexion and extension injuries about the first metatarsophalangeal joint can be very debilitating. Midfoot sprains and fractures require a high index of suspicion for diagnosis. PMID:25804712