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Sample records for radiation-induced brachial plexopathy

  1. Brachial plexopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - brachial plexus; Brachial plexus dysfunction; Parsonage Turner syndrome; Pancoast syndrome ... dysfunction (brachial plexopathy) is a form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ...

  2. Brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Khade, Snehaldatta S.

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN), often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise. PMID:23661957

  3. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy: Neurological follow-up in 161 recurrence-free breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Johannsen, L.; Schroder, H.; Rose, C. )

    1993-04-30

    The purpose was to assess the incidence and clinical manifestations of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients, treated according to the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group protocols. One hundred and sixty-one recurrence-free breast cancer patients were examined for radiation-induced brachial plexopathy after a median follow-up period of 50 months (13-99 months). After total mastectomy and axillary node sampling, high-risk patients were randomized to adjuvant therapy. One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy with 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions over 5 weeks. In addition, 82 of these patients received cytotoxic therapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and 46 received tamoxifen. Five percent and 9% of the patients receiving radiotherapy had disabling and mild radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, respectively. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy was more frequent in patients receiving cytotoxic therapy (p = 0.04) and in younger patients (p = 0.04). The clinical manifestations were paraesthesia (100%), hypaesthesia (74%), weakness (58%), decreased muscle stretch reflexes (47%), and pain (47%). The brachial plexus is more vulnerable to large fraction size. Fractions of 2 Gy or less are advisable. Cytotoxic therapy adds to the damaging effect of radiotherapy. Peripheral nerves in younger patients seems more vulnerable. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy occurs mainly as diffuse damage to the brachial plexus. 24 refs., 9 tabs.

  4. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Arya; Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan; McBurney, Michelle L.; Erasmus, Jeremy; Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James; Dong, Lei; Welsh, James

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective trials with high-dose radiation therapy for unresectable lung cancer.

  5. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Arya; Yang, Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan; McBurney, Michelle L.; Erasmus, Jeremy; Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James; Dong, Lei; Welsh, James

    2013-01-01

    Purpose As the recommended radiation dose for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum tolerated dose to the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010 who had received>55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multi-atlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexuson the original planning CT scans and scoredplexopathy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.03. Results The median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range 56-87.5 Gy, 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients had had brachial plexopathy (16%) (8 [9%] grade 1 and 6 [7%] grade ?2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of median brachial plexus dose >69 Gy(odds ratio [OR] 10.091, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.512-67.331, P=0.005), maximum dose >75 Gy to 2 cm3 of the brachial plexus(OR 4.909, 95% CI 0.966-24.952, P=0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation(OR 4.722, 95% CI 1.267-17.606, P=0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method which allowed us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective trialswithhigh dose radiation therapy for unresectable lung cancer. PMID:22284035

  6. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Mitra, Nandita; Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James; Rengan, Ramesh; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received {>=}50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received {<=}78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving {>=}1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of patients.

  7. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amita N; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S K

    2014-10-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered. PMID:25288846

  8. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Amita N.; Kasundra, Gaurav M.; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S. K.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered. PMID:25288846

  9. A Case Report of an Unusual Complication from Bee Sting: Acute Brachial Plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fan Kee, Hoo; Hasan, Shariful; Aliaa WS, Wan; B. Basri, Hamidon

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexopathy is usually related to trauma like direct injury to the nerve and stretching injuries. Neurological complications following bee sting are uncommon. Here, we describe a rare case of acute brachial plexopathy as a neurological complication following bee sting. A23-year-old maleinitially presented with angioedema and anaphylactic shock one hour after a bee stung at his neck. Twenty four hours after the incidence, he presented with sudden onset of left upper limb weakness. Nerve conduction study and electromyography had shown evidence of left brachial plexopathy. PMID:24772163

  10. Une cause rare de plexopathie brachiale: une metastase d'un cancer du sein

    PubMed Central

    Maâroufi, Mustapha; Kamaoui, Imane; Boubbou, Meriem; Sqalli, Nadia; Tizniti, Siham

    2014-01-01

    Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente de 50 ans ayant une histoire de cancer du sein et qui accuse une symptomatologie d'atteinte du plexus brachial. L'IRM montre une masse qui envahie le plexus brachial compatible avec une métastase. L'IRM est très utile pour le diagnostic et l'orientation thérapeutique des plexopathies brachiales chez les femmes présentant un cancer du sein PMID:25360196

  11. Characteristic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Eun

    2014-11-15

    A brachial plexus lesion is not common in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of young soldiers with HNPP presenting with brachial plexopathy. By reviewing 2year medical records from Korean military hospitals, we identified soldiers with brachial plexus lesions. Among them, patients diagnosed with HNPP were determined and clinical and electrophysiological findings were compared between HNPP and non-HNPP patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Thirteen patients (6.8%) were diagnosed with HNPP among 189 patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Push-ups, as either a punishment or an exercise, was the most frequent preceding event in HNPP patients (76.9%), whereas it was rare in non-HNPP patients. The distal motor latency of the median nerve showed the highest sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (100%) for HNPP in patients with a brachial plexus lesion. In conclusion, HNPP should be suspected in patients with brachial plexopathy if brachial plexopathy develops after push-ups or if the distal motor latency of median nerves is prolonged. PMID:25175852

  12. The H-reflex of the flexor carpi radialis muscle; a study in controls and radiation-induced brachial plexus lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Schimsheimer, R J; Hart, A A

    1984-01-01

    H-reflexes of the flexor carpi radialis muscle were studied in 52 controls and 25 cancer patients with radiation-induced brachial plexopathy. It was found that H-reflex conduction velocity (H-RCV) decreased with increasing age. This was not true for H-reflex latency (H-RL) and inter-latency times. There were no H-RCV and latency differences between age-matched male and female subjects. In the affected arm the reflex was absent in nine patients and delayed in 16 patients in whom H-RCV was decreased in 13 patients. Three patients showed large H-RL differences which were also notable features in median nerve disease in the region of the brachial plexus. PMID:6094729

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of lumbosacral plexopathies in patients with cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pettigrew, L.C.; Glass, J.P.; Maor, M.; Zornoza, J.

    1984-12-01

    Eleven patients were diagnosed as having lumbosacral plexopathy at M. D. Anderson Hospital, Houston, from August 1981 through July 1982. Four causes were documented: plexopathy secondary to metastatic disease (six cases); radiation-induced plexopathy (two cases); plexopathy secondary to intra-arterial chemotherapy (two cases); and plexopathy as the result of a second primary tumor (one case). Patients with plexopathies secondary to tumor or irradiation complained of pain in the ipsilateral lower extremity. Computed tomography of the pelvis was the most accurate method of documenting tumor in the region of the lumbosacral plexus. Radiation therapy records of patients with cervical carcinoma were reviewed with respect to positioning of intracavitary radium, which was thought to be responsible for the development of radiation-induced plexopathies. Radiation therapy and/or systemic chemotherapy provided relief of pain and improvement of neurologic deficits in three patients with metastatic involvement.

  14. Development of a Standardized Method for Contouring the Lumbosacral Plexus: A Preliminary Dosimetric Analysis of this Organ at Risk Among 15 Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lower Gastrointestinal Cancers and the Incidence of Radiation-Induced Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Sun K.; Mak, Walter; Yang, Claus C.; Liu Tianxiao; Cui Jing; Chen, Allen M.; Purdy, James A.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Do, Ly

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To generate a reproducible step-wise guideline for the delineation of the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) on axial computed tomography (CT) planning images and to provide a preliminary dosimetric analysis on 15 representative patients with rectal or anal cancers treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: A standardized method for contouring the LSP on axial CT images was devised. The LSP was referenced to identifiable anatomic structures from the L4-5 interspace to the level of the sciatic nerve. It was then contoured retrospectively on 15 patients treated with IMRT for rectal or anal cancer. No dose limitations were placed on this organ at risk during initial treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated. The incidence of radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) was calculated. Results: Total prescribed dose to 95% of the planned target volume ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy (median 54 Gy). The mean ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) LSP volume for the 15 patients was 100 {+-} 22 cm{sup 3} (range, 71-138 cm{sup 3}). The mean maximal dose to the LSP was 52.6 {+-} 3.9 Gy (range, 44.5-58.6 Gy). The mean irradiated volumes of the LSP were V40Gy = 58% {+-} 19%, V50Gy = 22% {+-} 23%, and V55Gy = 0.5% {+-} 0.9%. One patient (7%) was found to have developed RILSP at 13 months after treatment. Conclusions: The true incidence of RILSP in the literature is likely underreported and is not a toxicity commonly assessed by radiation oncologists. In our analysis the LSP commonly received doses approaching the prescribed target dose, and 1 patient developed RILSP. Identification of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce RILSP. We have provided a reproducible method for delineation of the LSP on CT images and a preliminary dosimetric analysis for potential future dose constraints.

  15. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  16. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  17. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend themselves to prolonged study, many tend to eliminate or rearrange the target chromosome until it is too small for further rearrangement. The observed frequency of induced instability by low and high linear-energy-transfer radiations greatly exceeds that observed for nuclear gene mutations at similar doses; hence, mutation of a gene or gene family is unlikely to be the initiating mechanism. Once initiated however, there is evidence in the GM10115 model system that it can be perpetuated over time by dicentric chromosome formation followed by bridge breakage fusion cycles (Marder and Morgan 1993), as well as recombinational events involving interstitial telomere like repeat sequences (Day et al. 1998). There is also increasing evidence that inflammatory type reactions (Lorimore et al. 2001, Lorimore and Wright 2003), presumably involving reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as cytokines and chemokines might be involved in driving the ustable phenotype (Liaikis et al. 2007, Hei et al. 2008). To this end there is very convincing evidence for such reactions being involved in another non-targeted effect associated with ionizing radiation, the bystander effect (Hei et al. 2008). Clearly the link between induced instability and bystander effects suggests common processes and inflammatory type reactions will likely be the subject of future investigation.

  18. Brachial plexus injury in newborns

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pressure on the baby's raised arms during a breech (feet-first) delivery There are different forms of ... factors increase the risk of brachial plexus injury: Breech delivery Larger-than-average newborn (such as an ...

  19. Pitfalls in the electrodiagnostic studies of sacral plexopathies.

    PubMed

    Tavee, Jinny; Mays, Maryann; Wilbourn, Asa J

    2007-06-01

    This retrospective review characterizes the electrodiagnostic (EDX) features and etiologies of sacral plexopathies (SPs) and discusses difficulties in their identification. The EDX findings of 171 clinically suspected SPs were reviewed using the following criteria: reduced/absent sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) of the sural or superficial peroneal nerve, denervation of plexus-innervated muscles, and the absence of paraspinal denervation. Sixty cases localized unequivocally to the sacral plexus. The majority were cancer-related, followed by traumatic, idiopathic, and iatrogenic causes. Final diagnoses in the remaining 111 cases were indeterminate. Lesions localized to either the plexus or L4-5, S1 roots in 52 cases, the plexus or sciatic nerve in 32 cases, and were equally compatible with an SP, sciatic neuropathy, or radiculopathy in 27 cases. Findings in the EDX evaluation of SPs are often complex and difficult to localize to a specific site due to multiple complicating factors. Frequently, SPs cannot be diagnosed definitively by EDX assessment alone. PMID:17366592

  20. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  1. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  2. Endovascular repair of a life-threatening radiation-induced ruptured false aneurysm of the intrathoracic left subclavian artery: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hizette, Pascale; Horn, David; Lemaitre, Jean; Segers, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Massive hemorrhage in tracheostomy patients is generally described as a result of a tracheoinnominate artery fistula. Other etiologies for rupture of a false aneurysm are rare. The classical procedure for subclavian artery aneurysm is open surgery. Endovascular techniques have been accepted by several authors as a possible minimally invasive alternative. We report a life-threatening radiation-induced ruptured false aneurysm of the intrathoracic subclavian artery successfully treated by endovascular stent graft through left brachial access in a tracheostomy patient. PMID:25878503

  3. Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles, with radiation, radiotherapy, and moyamoya syndrome used as search key words, yielded 33 articles from 1967 to 2002. Results: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47). Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%. Fourteen of 54 patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma. The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy). For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy. The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240). Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT. Conclusions: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome. The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years. Patients with NF-1 have a lower radiation-dose threshold for development of moyamoya syndrome.

  4. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  5. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    PubMed

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment. PMID:10710825

  6. Radiation Dose to the Brachial Plexus in Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Its Relationship to Tumor and Nodal Stage

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Minh Tam; Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Orlina, Lawrence; Willins, John

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine tumor factors contributing to brachial plexus (BP) dose in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) when the BP is routinely contoured as an organ at risk (OAR) for IMRT optimization. Methods and Materials: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 114 HNC patients underwent IMRT to a total dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left BP prospectively contoured as separate OARs in 111 patients and the ipsilateral BP contoured in 3 patients (total, 225 BP). Staging category T4 and N2/3 disease were present in 34 (29.8%) and 74 (64.9%) patients, respectively. During IMRT optimization, the intent was to keep the maximum BP dose to {<=}60 Gy, but prioritizing tumor coverage over achieving the BP constraints. BP dose parameters were compared with tumor and nodal stage. Results: With a median follow-up of 16.2 months, 43 (37.7%) patients had {>=}24 months of follow-up with no brachial plexopathy reported. Mean BP volume was 8.2 {+-} 4.5 cm{sup 3}. Mean BP maximum dose was 58.1 {+-} 12.2 Gy, and BP mean dose was 42.2 {+-} 11.3 Gy. The BP maximum dose was {<=}60, {<=}66, and {<=}70 Gy in 122 (54.2%), 185 (82.2%), and 203 (90.2%) BP, respectively. For oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx sites, the mean BP maximum dose was 58.4 Gy and 63.4 Gy in T0-3 and T4 disease, respectively (p = 0.002). Mean BP maximum dose with N0/1 and N2/3 disease was 52.8 Gy and 60.9 Gy, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: In head-and-neck IMRT, dose constraints for the BP are difficult to achieve to {<=}60 to 66 Gy with T4 disease of the larynx, hypopharynx, and oropharynx or N2/3 disease. The risk of brachial plexopathy is likely very small in HNC patients undergoing IMRT, although longer follow-up is required.

  7. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. Recently developed techniques in neuroscience and neuroimaging provide not only an opportunity to accomplish this, but they also offer the opportunity to identify new biomarkers and new targets for interventions to prevent or ameliorate these late effects. PMID:22833841

  8. Postpartum lumbosacral plexopathy limited to autonomic and perineal manifestations: clinical and electrophysiological study of 19 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ismael, S. S.; Amarenco, G.; Bayle, B.; Kerdraon, J.

    2000-01-01

    The objective was to describe perineal electrophysiological findings and to determine their diagnostic value in a type of lumbosacral plexopathy after vaginal delivery, which only involves the lower part of the plexus (S2-S4).? Consecutive female patients referred to an outpatients' urodynamic clinic were the source. Nineteen previously healthy women, 13 multiparae and six para 1, were investigated. Mean age was 33.7 (SD 5.4) (range 28-41) years. All of them presented with urinary (stress incontinence 14, dysuria five), anorectal (faecal incontinence eight, dyskesia one), or sexual dysfunctions (hypoorgasmia or anorgasmia six) after vaginal delivery. No associated lower limb sensory or motor deficits were noted. All the patients had electrophysiological recordings (bulbocavernosus muscle EMG, measurements of the bulbocavernosus reflex latencies (BCRLs), somatosensory evoked potentials of the pudendal nerve (SEPPNs), and pudendal nerve terminal motor latencies (PNTMLs)). Cystometry and urethral pressure profile (UPP) were performed in the 14 patients with stress urinary incontinence.? Perineal electrophysiological examination disclosed signs of denervation in the perineal muscles in all the cases, prolonged BCRLs in 17/19, and abolished BCRLs in 2/19, abnormal SEPPN in 1/19, and normal PNTMLs in all the patients. Urodynamic investigations disclosed low urethral closure pressure for age (< 50 cm H2O) in half of the patients.? In conclusion, Lower postpartum lumbosacral plexopathy is evoked when perineal sensory disturbances whether or not associated with urinary or faecal incontinence persist after a history of a difficult vaginal delivery. Electrophysiological investigations precisely identify the site of the lesion and demonstrate distal innervation integrity.?? PMID:10811704

  9. Brachial Artery Injury Accompanying Closed Elbow Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Harnarayan, Patrick; Cawich, Shamir O.; Harnanan, Dave; Budhooram, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Brachial artery injuries from elbow dislocations are uncommon, but they may lead to disastrous consequences if the diagnosis is delayed. Presentation of case We report a case of a patient who sustained a fall onto the elbow, with dislocation and brachial artery injury, despite an ipsilateral radial pulse being palpable. Discussion Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for brachial injury when patients present with a fall onto the elbow coupled with signs suggestive of fracture-dislocation, nerve injury and/or signs of limb ischemia. Frank ischamia, however, is uncommon as there is a rich collateral anastomosis in the upper limb. Conclusion A high index of suspicion should be maintained in order to make the diagnosis early. Exploration with excision of the injured segment and reverse vein interposition grafting is the treatment of choice in these cases. PMID:25644552

  10. Calculation of radiation-induced stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakawa, Johsei

    1994-09-01

    A numerical calculation based on point defect kinetics under stress was carried out to evaluate radiation-induced stress relaxation in a solution-annealed 316 stainless steel at low and medium temperatures (60 and 300°C). The calculation shows that the stress relaxation relative to the initial stress is almost independent of the initial stress under irradiation. At 1 × 10 -6 dpa/s, stress relaxation at 60°C is greater than that at 300°C and the stress almost disappears in a month of continuous irradiation. Even with a low damage rate of 1 × 10 -8 dpa/s, the stress relaxation at 60°C is considerable and exceeding that at 300°C and 1 × 10 -6 dpa/s during the first several months of irradiation. The results indicate the importance of the radiation-induced stress relaxation in experimental fusion reactors.

  11. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style.

  12. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  13. CT of radiation-induced hepatic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Moss, A.A.; Quivey, J.M.; Federle, M.P.; Wara, W.M.

    1980-09-01

    The CT findings in three patients with radiation-induced hepatic injury are discussed. In each patient a sharply defined band of low density was identified within the liver in an area of prior radiation. The low density bands resolved on follow-up examination. Computed tomography is useful in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with suspected radiation hepatitis and in differentiating radiation change from metastatic disease.

  14. Magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, Divya Narain; Kumar, Adarsh; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Gujral, Ratni; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is being increasingly recognised all over the world as the imaging modality of choice for brachial plexus and peripheral nerve lesions. Recent refinements in MRI protocols have helped in imaging nerve tissue with greater clarity thereby helping in the identification, localisation and classification of nerve lesions with greater confidence than was possible till now. This article on Magnetic Resonance Neurography (MRN) is based on the authors’ experience of imaging the brachial plexus and peripheral nerves using these protocols over the last several years. PMID:26424974

  15. Imaging Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Mike E.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Tsien, Christina I.; Bailey, Janet E.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2013-01-01

    Technological developments in radiation therapy and other cancer therapies have led to a progressive increase in five-year survival rates over the last few decades. Although acute effects have been largely minimized by both technical advances and medical interventions, late effects remain a concern. Indeed, the need to identify those individuals who will develop radiation-induced late effects, and to develop interventions to prevent or ameliorate these late effects is a critical area of radiobiology research. In the last two decades, preclinical studies have clearly established that late radiation injury can be prevented/ameliorated by pharmacological therapies aimed at modulating the cascade of events leading to the clinical expression of radiation-induced late effects. These insights have been accompanied by significant technological advances in imaging that are moving radiation oncology and normal tissue radiobiology from disciplines driven by anatomy and macrostructure to ones in which important quantitative functional, microstructural, and metabolic data can be noninvasively and serially determined. In the current article, we review use of positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy to generate pathophysiological and functional data in the central nervous system, lung, and heart that offer the promise of, (1) identifying individuals who are at risk of developing radiation-induced late effects, and (2) monitoring the efficacy of interventions to prevent/ameliorate them. PMID:22348250

  16. Quercetin inhibits radiation-induced skin fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jason A; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-08-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-? signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-? in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-?, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis. PMID:23819596

  17. Quercetin Inhibits Radiation-Induced Skin Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jason A.; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-? signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-? in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-?, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis. PMID:23819596

  18. What has changed in brachial plexus surgery?

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; de Paula, Emygdio José Leomil; Junior, Rames Mattar; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries, in all their severity and complexity, have been extensively studied. Although brachial plexus injuries are associated with serious and often definitive sequelae, many concepts have changed since the 1950s, when this pathological condition began to be treated more aggressively. Looking back over the last 20 years, it can be seen that the entire approach, from diagnosis to treatment, has changed significantly. Some concepts have become better established, while others have been introduced; thus, it can be said that currently, something can always be offered in terms of functional recovery, regardless of the degree of injury. Advances in microsurgical techniques have enabled improved results after neurolysis and have made it possible to perform neurotization, which has undoubtedly become the greatest differential in treating brachial plexus injuries. Improvements in imaging devices and electrical studies have allowed quick decisions that are reflected in better surgical outcomes. In this review, we intend to show the many developments in brachial plexus surgery that have significantly changed the results and have provided hope to the victims of this serious injury. PMID:23644864

  19. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  20. Mechanism of Radiation-Induced Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Dougauchi, Hiroshi; Yamano, Tadaomi; Ichikawa, Tsuneki

    2003-11-01

    Poly(3-octylthiophene) was irradiated with X-rays in atmospheres of CH3Br, SF6, and N2O gases. The electrical conductivity was increased after the irradiations. The electrical conductivity was also increased by irradiating the gases near the polymer film without irradiating the film itself. This result indicates that dopants were generated upon irradiation in the gas phase and the polymer was doped through reactions of the dopants with the polymer. The radiation-induced doping effects were also observed for poly(3-octylthiophene) coated with solid 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane.

  1. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T.; Molinie, P.; Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon® FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon® FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  2. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T. Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Molinie, P.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  3. Triptolide Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Chun; Cao, Yongbin; Tian, Yeping; Guo, Yangsong; Zhang, Bingrong; Wang, Xiaohui; Yin, Liangjie; Zhang, Zhenhuan; O'Dell, Walter; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2015-11-01

    Triptolide (TPL) may mitigate radiation-induced late pulmonary side effects through its inhibition of global pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we evaluated the effect of TPL in C57BL/6 mice, the animals were exposed to radiation with vehicle (15 Gy), radiation with TPL (0.25 mg/kg i.v., twice weekly for 1, 2 and 3 months), radiation and celecoxib (CLX) (30 mg/kg) and sham irradiation. Cultured supernatant of irradiated RAW 264.7 and MLE-15 cells and lung lysate in different groups were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 33 h. Respiratory rate, pulmonary compliance and pulmonary density were measured at 5 months in all groups. The groups exposed to radiation with vehicle and radiation with TPL exhibited significant differences in respiratory rate and pulmonary compliance (480 ± 75/min vs. 378 ± 76/min; 0.6 ± 0.1 ml/cm H2O/p kg vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ml/cm H2O/p kg). Seventeen cytokines were significantly reduced in the lung lysate of the radiation exposure with TPL group at 5 months compared to that of the radiation with vehicle group, including profibrotic cytokines implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, such as IL-1?, TGF- ?1 and IL-13. The radiation exposure with TPL mice exhibited a 41% reduction of pulmonary density and a 25% reduction of hydroxyproline in the lung, compared to that of radiation with vehicle mice. The trichrome-stained area of fibrotic foci and pathological scaling in sections of the mice treated with radiation and TPL mice were significantly less than those of the radiation with vehicle-treated group. In addition, the radiation with TPL-treated mice exhibited a trend of improved survival rate compared to that of the radiation with vehicle-treated mice at 5 months (83% vs. 53%). Three radiation-induced profibrotic cytokines in the radiation with vehicle-treated group were significantly reduced by TPL treatment, and this partly contributed to the trend of improved survival rate and pulmonary density and function and the decreased severity of pulmonary fibrosis at 5 months. Our findings indicate that TPL could be a potential new agent to mitigate radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26488756

  4. Treatment Options for Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Badilas, Nikolaos K.; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A.; Mazis, George; Kotoulas, Helias K.; Kyriakopoulos, Stamatios; Tagkalegkas, Ioannis; Sofianos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of brachial plexus injuries is rapidly growing due to the increasing number of high-speed motor-vehicle accidents. These are devastating injuries leading to significant functional impairment of the patients. The purpose of this review paper is to present the available options for conservative and operative treatment and discuss the correct timing of intervention. Reported outcomes of current management and future prospects are also analysed. PMID:24967125

  5. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  6. Radiation induced carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Amendola, M.A.; McClatchey, K.D.

    1985-07-01

    A squamous cell carcinoma presented in a 20 year old female nonsmoker three years after receiving a high dosage of radiation therapy to the base of the skull, face and entire neuroaxis and intense combination chemotherapy for a parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is reported. The larynx received a dose of about 3,500 rads over an eight week period. This dosage in conjunction with the associated intense chemotherapy regimen given to the patient may explain the appearance of a radiation induced tumor in an unusually short latent period. This certainly represents a risk in young patients in whom an aggressive combined approach is taken and the physician should be aware of.

  7. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  8. Cathodoluminescence of radiation-induced zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Nishido, H.; Kayama, M.; Noumi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Zircon occurs as a common accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, and maintains much information on thermal history, metamorphic process and natural radiation dose accumulated in the mineral. U-Pb zircon dating (e.g., SHRIMP) is an important tool to interpret a history of the minerals at a micrometer-scale, where cathodoluminescence (CL) image has been used for identification of internal zones and domains having different chemical compositions and/or structures with a high spatial resolution. The CL of zircon is derived from various types of emission centers, which are derived from impurities such as rare earth elements (REE) and structural defects. In fact, the CL features of zircon are closely related to metamorphic process and radiation from contained radionuclides as well as geochemical condition of its formation. Most zircon has yellow emission, which seems to be assigned to UO2 centers or radiation-induced defect during metamictization of the lattice by alpha particles from the decay of U and Th. In this study, the radiation effects on zircon CL have been studied for He+ ion-implanted samples annealed at various temperatures to clarify radiation-induced defect centers involved with the yellow CL emission in zircon. Single crystals of zircon from Malawi (MZ), Takidani granodiorite (TZ) and Kurobegawa granite (KZ) were selected for He+ ion implantation experiments. The polished plates of the samples were implanted by He+ ion 4.0 MeV corresponding to energy of alpha particle from 238 U and 232Th. CL spectra in the range from 300 to 800 nm with 1 nm step were measured by a scanning electron microscopy-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL). CL spectra of untreated and annealed zircon show emission bands at ~370 nm assigned to intrinsic defect centers and at ~480, ~580 and ~760 nm to trivalent Dy impurity centers (Cesbron et al., 1995; Gaft et al, 2005). CL emissions in the yellow-region were observed in untreated zircon. The TZ and KZ indicate youngest formation ages of 1.93-1.20 Ma and 1.7-0.9 Ma, respectively (Harayama,1994; Harayama et al., 2010) in the world. In this case, it is hardly to detect yellow CL emissions derived from radiation-induced defect center, suggesting low radiation dose of alpha radiation from 238U and 232Th on them. CL spectra of MZ, TZ and KZ showed an increase in the intensities of yellow emissions with an increase in radiation dose of He+ ion implantation, though He+ ion implantation reduces the intensities of their impurity centers. CL intensity in the yellow region depends on radiation dose of He+ ion implantation. Therefore, if the component of yellow emission could be deconvoluted from the CL spectra in zircon, its intensity will be used for an indicator to evaluate total exposure doses on it during geological age.

  9. Motor Cortex Neuroplasticity Following Brachial Plexus Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dimou, Stefan; Biggs, Michael; Tonkin, Michael; Hickie, Ian B.; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27-year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralized to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain (PLP) before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced PLP. PMID:23966938

  10. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Philipp J.; Park, Henry S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  11. Radiation-induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Riewe, L.C.; Witczak, Schrimpf, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    Capacitance-voltage and thermally stimulated current methods are used to investigate radiation induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides. Results are compared with models of oxide and interface trap charge buildup at low electric fields.

  12. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

    2014-07-15

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats' upper limbs was significantly attenuated. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the expression of ?-endorphins in the arcuate nucleus was significantly increased after therapy. Thus, experimental findings indicate that electroacupuncture can attenuate neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury through upregulating ?-endorphin expression. PMID:25221593

  13. Ionizing radiation induces myofibroblast differentiation via lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Judge, J L; Owens, K M; Pollock, S J; Woeller, C F; Thatcher, T H; Williams, J P; Phipps, R P; Sime, P J; Kottmann, R M

    2015-10-15

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a common and dose-limiting side-effect of ionizing radiation used to treat cancers of the thoracic region. Few effective therapies are available for this disease. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by an accumulation of myofibroblasts and excess deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Although prior studies have reported that ionizing radiation induces fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation and collagen production, the mechanism remains unclear. Transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) is a key profibrotic cytokine that drives myofibroblast differentiation and extracellular matrix production. However, its activation and precise role in radiation-induced fibrosis are poorly understood. Recently, we reported that lactate activates latent TGF-? through a pH-dependent mechanism. Here, we wanted to test the hypothesis that ionizing radiation leads to excessive lactate production via expression of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDHA) to promote myofibroblast differentiation. We found that LDHA expression is increased in human and animal lung tissue exposed to ionizing radiation. We demonstrate that ionizing radiation induces LDHA, lactate production, and extracellular acidification in primary human lung fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrate that genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of LDHA protects against radiation-induced myofibroblast differentiation. Furthermore, LDHA inhibition protects from radiation-induced activation of TGF-?. We propose a profibrotic feed forward loop, in which radiation induces LDHA expression and lactate production, which can lead to further activation of TGF-? to drive the fibrotic process. These studies support the concept of LDHA as an important therapeutic target in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26254422

  14. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:25062865

  15. The Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, M; Fardid, R; Hadadi, Gh; Fardid, M

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect is the phenomenon which non-irradiated cells exhibit effects along with their different levels as a result of signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Responses of non-irradiated cells may include changes in process of translation, gene expression, cell proliferation, apoptosis and cells death. These changes are confirmed by results of some In-Vivo studies. Most well-known important factors affecting radiation-induced bystander effect include free radicals, immune system factors, expression changes of some genes involved in inflammation pathway and epigenetic factors. PMID:25599062

  16. Panretinal photocoagulation for radiation-induced ocular ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Roth, S.E.; Magargal, L.E.; Shields, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    We present preliminary findings on the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in preventing neovascular glaucoma in eyes with radiation-induced ocular ischemia. Our study group consisted of 20 patients who developed radiation-induced ocular ischemia following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy for a choroidal or ciliary body melanoma. Eleven of the 20 patients were treated by panretinal photocoagulation shortly after the diagnosis of ocular ischemia, but nine patients were left untreated. In this non-randomized study, the rate of development of neovascular glaucoma was significantly lower (p = 0.024) for the 11 photocoagulated patients than for the nine who were left untreated.

  17. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults The U.S. Preventive Services ... PAD) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) in Adults . This final recommendation ...

  18. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  19. SENSITIVITY TO RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER IN HEMOCHROMATOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of dose-response relationships for radiation-induced cancer in segments of the population with high susceptibility is critical for understanding the risks of low dose and low dose rates to humans. Clean-up levels for radionuclides will depend upon the fraction of t...

  20. Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. )

    1993-01-15

    The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

  1. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  2. Modeling radiation-induced mixing at interfaces between low solubility metals

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Liang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies radiation-induced mixing at interfaces between low solubility metals using molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. It provides original contributions on the fundamental mechanisms of radiation-induced ...

  3. Mitochondrial Function and Nuclear Factor-KBMediated Signaling in Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    E-print Network

    , New York Abstract Although radiation-induced bystander effects have been well described over the past of radiation-induced bystander effects and that mitochondria- dependent NF-KB/iNOS/NO and NF-KB/COX-2 Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of biological effects in cells

  4. Mini-review Radiation-induced bystander effect: Early process and rapid assessment

    E-print Network

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Mini-review Radiation-induced bystander effect: Early process and rapid assessment Hongzhi Wang September 2013 Accepted 26 September 2013 Keywords: Radiation-induced bystander effect Rapid assessment Early process a b s t r a c t Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is a biological process that has

  5. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy ?-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose ?-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  6. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  7. Radiation-Induced Attenuation In Integrated Optical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Bruce D.

    1990-01-01

    Three materials commonly employed in opto-electronic intregrated circuits were evaluated for radiation-induced optical attenuation in the range 300 nm to 3000 nm. These include optically clear epoxy and crystalline lithium niobate after Co-60 exposure and crystalline tellurium dioxide after mixed gamma/fast-neutron exposure. In all these materials, however, induced loss was restricted to shorter wavelengths; attenuation induced at the telecommnications windows near 850, 1300 and 1550 nm was <0.1 dB/cm.

  8. Modeling of radiation induced defects in space solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Robert J.; Messenger, Scott; Warner, Jeffrey H.; Cress, Cory D.; Gonzalez, Maria; Maximenko, Serguei

    2011-02-01

    The radiation response mechanisms operative in space solar cells are described. The effects of electron and proton radiation-induced defects on the cell performance are identified and methods for modeling the radiation response are presented. The space radiation environment is described, and a methodology for modeling the response of a solace cell to exposure to the space radiation environment is presented. It is shown how this model an be used to predict on orbit performance, and examples from space experiments are shown.

  9. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  10. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-?1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  11. Facial reconstruction for radiation-induced skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Panje, W.R.; Dobleman, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Radiation-induced skin cancers can be difficult to diagnose and treat. Typically, a patient who has received orthovoltage radiotherapy for disorders such as acne, eczema, tinea capitis, skin tuberculosis, and skin cancer can expect that aggressive skin cancers and chronic radiodermatitis may develop subsequently. Cryptic facial cancers can lead to metastases and death. Prophylactic widefield excision of previously irradiated facial skin that has been subject to multiple recurrent skin cancers is suggested as a method of deterring future cutaneous malignancy and metastases. The use of tissue expanders and full-thickness skin grafts offers an expedient and successful method of subsequent reconstruction.

  12. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Eric F.; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur

    2010-10-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

  13. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E.

    2013-05-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

  14. Radiation-Induced Premelting of Ice at Silica Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeder, S.; Reichert, H.; Schroeder, H.; Mezger, M.; Okasinski, J. S.; Dosch, H.; Honkimaeki, V.; Bilgram, J.

    2009-08-28

    The existence of surface and interfacial melting of ice below 0 deg. C has been confirmed by many different experimental techniques. Here we present a high-energy x-ray reflectivity study of the interfacial melting of ice as a function of both temperature and x-ray irradiation dose. We found a clear increase of the thickness of the quasiliquid layer with the irradiation dose. By a systematic x-ray study, we have been able to unambiguously disentangle thermal and radiation-induced premelting phenomena. We also confirm the previously announced very high water density (1.25 g/cm{sup 3}) within the emerging quasiliquid layer.

  15. Radiation-induced sarcoma following radiotherapy for testicular tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, D.F. Jr.; Herr, H.W.

    1981-12-01

    We report 4 cases of soft tissue sarcoma following radiation therapy for testicular tumor. The tumors included leiomyosarcoma, fibroxanthosarcoma, reticulum cell sarcoma and spindle cell sarcoma. Each malignancy arose within the irradiated area after a long latent period (mean 12 years) and each was histologically proved. Total radiation doses ranged from 3,500 to 9,000 rad. Three patients died as a result of the second neoplasm. Radiation-induced sarcomas are rare but must be considered in the differential diagnosis of new tumor growth in patients treated previously with radiotherapy. Full evaluation of such new tumor growth, including tissue diagnosis, is necessary before additional therapy is prescribed.

  16. Management of radiation-induced accelerated carotid atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, C.M.; Biller, J.; Hart, M.N.; Cornell, S.H.; Hiratzka, L.F.

    1987-07-01

    Patients with long survival following cervical irradiation are at risk for accelerated carotid atherosclerosis. The neurologic presentation in these patients mimics naturally occurring atheromatous disease, but patients often present at younger ages and with less concurrent coronary or systemic vascular disease. Hypercholesterolemia also contributes to this accelerated arteriosclerosis. Angiographic findings in this disorder include disproportionate involvement of the distal common carotid artery and unusually long carotid lesions. Pathologic findings include destruction of the internal elastic lamina and replacement of the normal intima and media with fibrous tissue. This article describes two surgical patients with radiation-induced accelerated carotid atherosclerosis who typify the presentation and characteristics of this disease.

  17. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells repairs brachial plexus injury: pathological and biomechanical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Luo, Min; Li, Peng; Jin, Hai

    2014-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits by stretching the C6 nerve root. Immediately after the stretching, a suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was injected into the injured brachial plexus. The results of tensile mechanical testing of the brachial plexus showed that the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress, and maximum strain of the injured brachial plexuses were significantly increased at 24 weeks after the injection. The treatment clearly improved the pathological morphology of the injured brachial plexus nerve, as seen by hematoxylin eosin staining, and the functions of the rabbit forepaw were restored. These data indicate that the injection of human amniotic epithelial cells contributed to the repair of brachial plexus injury, and that this technique may transform into current clinical treatment strategies. PMID:25657737

  18. The thermal stability of radiation-induced defects in illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, T.; Allard, T.; Beaufort, D.; Cantin, J.-L.; Van Bardeleben, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    High-purity illite specimens from the Mesoproterozoic unconformity-related uranium deposits of Kiggavik, Thelon basin, Nunavut (Canada), and Shea Creek (Athabasca basin, Saskatchewan, Canada) have been studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the thermal stability of the main radiation-induced defects and question the potential of using illite as a natural dosimeter. The observed spectra are complex as they can show in the same region several contributions: (1) an unstable native defect, (2) the main stable defect named Ai by reference to a previous study (Morichon et al. in Phys Chem Minerals 35:339-346, 2008), (3) a signal at g = 2.063 assigned to a new defect, not yet fully characterized, named Ai2 center and (4) impurities such as vanadyl complex or divalent manganese. Isochronal heating shows that the new signal corresponds to a stable species. Isothermal heating experiments at 400 and 450 °C provide values of half-life extrapolated at room temperature and activation energy of 1.9-29,109 years and 1.3-1.4 eV, respectively, corresponding to the Ai center. These parameters allow the use of stable radiation-induced defects as a record of radioactivity down to the Paleoproterozoic period.

  19. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  20. Radiation-induced skin carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, E.; Modan, B.; Preston, D.; Alfandary, E.; Stovall, M.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Radiation exposures to the scalp during childhood for tinea capitis were associated with a fourfold increase in skin cancer, primarily basal cell carcinomas, and a threefold increase in benign skin tumors. Malignant melanoma, however, was not significantly elevated. Overall, 80 neoplasms were identified from an extensive search of the pathology logs of all major hospitals in Israel and computer linkage with the national cancer registry. Radiation dose to the scalp was computed for over 10,000 persons irradiated for ringworm (mean 7 Gy), and incidence rates were contrasted with those observed in 16,000 matched comparison subjects. The relative risk of radiogenic skin cancer did not differ significantly between men or women or by time since exposure; however, risk was greatest following exposures in early childhood. After adjusting for sex, ethnic origin, and attained age, the estimated excess relative risk was 0.7 per Gy and the average excess risk over the current follow-up was 0.31/10(4) PY-Gy. The risk per Gy of radiation-induced skin cancer was intermediate between the high risk found among whites and no risk found among blacks in a similar study conducted in New York City. This finding suggests the role that subsequent exposure to uv radiation likely plays in the expression of a potential radiation-induced skin malignancy.

  1. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore »that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  2. Nature of Radiation-Induced Defects in Quartz

    E-print Network

    Wang, Bu; Pignatelli, Isabella; Sant, Gaurav N; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Although quartz ($\\rm \\alpha$-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage have not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si--O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si--O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on $E^{\\prime}$ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependenc...

  3. Nature of Radiation-Induced Defects in Quartz

    E-print Network

    Bu Wang; Yingtian Yu; Isabella Pignatelli; Gaurav N. Sant; Mathieu Bauchy

    2015-04-10

    Although quartz ($\\rm \\alpha$-form) is a mineral used in numerous applications wherein radiation exposure is an issue, the nature of the atomistic defects formed during radiation-induced damage have not been fully clarified. Especially, the extent of oxygen vacancy formation is still debated, which is an issue of primary importance as optical techniques based on charged oxygen vacancies have been utilized to assess the level of radiation damage in quartz. In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are applied to study the effects of ballistic impacts on the atomic network of quartz. We show that the defects that are formed mainly consist of over-coordinated Si and O, as well as Si--O connectivity defects, e.g., small Si--O rings and edge-sharing Si tetrahedra. Oxygen vacancies, on the contrary, are found in relatively low abundance, suggesting that characterizations based on $E^{\\prime}$ centers do not adequately capture radiation-induced structural damage in quartz. Finally, we evaluate the dependence on the incident energy, of the amount of each type of the point defects formed, and quantify unambiguously the threshold displacement energies for both O and Si atoms. These results provide a comprehensive basis to assess the nature and extent of radiation damage in quartz.

  4. Radiation induced corrosion of copper for spent nuclear fuel storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkbacka, Åsa; Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus; Leygraf, Christofer; Jonsson, Mats

    2013-11-01

    The long term safety of repositories for radioactive waste is one of the main concerns for countries utilizing nuclear power. The integrity of engineered and natural barriers in such repositories must be carefully evaluated in order to minimize the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. One of the most developed concepts of long term storage of spent nuclear fuel is the Swedish KBS-3 method. According to this method, the spent fuel will be sealed inside copper canisters surrounded by bentonite clay and placed 500 m down in stable bedrock. Despite the importance of the process of radiation induced corrosion of copper, relatively few studies have been reported. In this work the effect of the total gamma dose on radiation induced corrosion of copper in anoxic pure water has been studied experimentally. Copper samples submerged in water were exposed to a series of total doses using three different dose rates. Unirradiated samples were used as reference samples throughout. The copper surfaces were examined qualitatively using IRAS and XPS and quantitatively using cathodic reduction. The concentration of copper in solution after irradiation was measured using ICP-AES. The influence of aqueous radiation chemistry on the corrosion process was evaluated based on numerical simulations. The experiments show that the dissolution as well as the oxide layer thickness increase upon radiation. Interestingly, the evaluation using numerical simulations indicates that aqueous radiation chemistry is not the only process driving the corrosion of copper in these systems.

  5. The Relationship between Multiple Health Behaviours and Brachial Artery Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jennifer L.; Lavoie, Kim L.; Arsenault, André; Meloche, Bernard; Ditto, Blaine; Campbell, Tavis S.; Bacon, Simon L.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The effects of smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle on endothelial function (EF) have only been examined separately. The relative contributions of these behaviours on EF have therefore not been compared. Purpose. To compare the relative associations between these four risk factors and brachial artery reactivity in the same sample. Methods. 328 patients referred for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) exercise stress tests completed a nuclear-medicine-based forearm hyperaemic reactivity test. Self-reported exercise behaviour, smoking habits, and alcohol consumption were collected and waist circumference was measured. Results. Adjusting for relevant covariates, logistic regression analyses revealed that waist circumference, abstinence from alcohol, and past smoking significantly predicted poor brachial artery reactivity while physical activity did not. Only waist circumference predicted continuous variations in EF. Conclusions. Central adiposity, alcohol consumption, and smoking habits but not physical activity are each independent predictors of poor brachial artery reactivity in patients with or at high risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:22518294

  6. Décompression chirurgicale du syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial

    PubMed Central

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Ismael, Farid; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Le syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial est une pathologie souvent méconnue à cause de diagnostic difficile par manque des signes pathognomoniques conduisant souvent à des errances. Les manifestations cliniques dépendent selon qu'il s'agit d'une compression nerveuse, vasculaire ou vasculo-nerveuse. Le but de cette étude est de décrire certains aspects cliniques particuliers et évaluer le résultat fonctionnel après la décompression chirurgicale du paquet vasculo-nerveux. Notre étude rétrospective a porté sur l'analyse des données cliniques, radiologiques, IRM et EMG sur les patients opérés entre janvier 2010 et juillet 2013 du syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial dans le service de traumatologie orthopédie de l'hôpital Ibn Sina de Rabat. 15 cas ont été colligés: 12 cas post traumatiques (fracture de la clavicule) et 3 cas d'origines congénitales, dont l’âge moyen était 35 ans (20 à 50 ans) avec 9 femmes et 6 hommes. A la fin du traitement, le score de Dash est passé de 109 (46% Normal=0) à 70 (20%), et le stress test de Roos était de 70/100 à 80/100. Le résultat était excellent dans 12 cas soit (80%) et moins bon dans dans 3 cas (20%). En définitive, la résection de malformations osseuses, l'excision des brides et la neurolyse du plexus brachial suivie de la rééducation a donné une bonne évolution fonctionnelle. PMID:25709735

  7. Conception of the cervico-brachial protector for motorcycle drivers.

    PubMed

    Radek, A; Zapa?owicz, K; Nawrocki, A; Demus, J; Maklewska, E; Matyjewski, M

    2000-01-01

    The increasing popularity of motorcycles increases the role of motorcycle accidents as a main cause of brachial plexus injuries. In view of the high social cost of treatment of the victims it seemed desirable to devise some kind of protective clothing for motorcyclists. The protective clothing devised by teams from Department of Neurosurgery, TRICOTEXTIL--and Aeronautics and Applied Mechanics Institute, consists of the following parts: cervical collar--acting against force causing lateral bending and extension of cervical spine, shock-absorptive shoulder pads--acting against the impact energy partially absorbing it and partially transmitting to the dorsal stiff bar, dorsal stiff bar and sacroiliac belt--partially immobilizes the thoracic and lumbar spine, acts against its compression, transmits the impact energy to the iliac crests and hips. The expected biomechanical effects of the cervico-brachial protector are as follows: In brachial region it should diminish the impact energy by its partial absorption and partial transmission along dorsal stiff bar to sacroiliac belt. It should act against excessive cervical spine motion--mainly against lateral bending and extension. It should act against excessive depression of the shoulder. The protective system built in the jacket should co-operate with the helmet of motorcycle driver. It should be comfortable for the driver and conform to security standards. Prototype of the protector underwent kinetic sledge tests in Industrial Motorization Institute (PIMOT), Warsaw, with the use of Hybrid Dummy II. PMID:11452862

  8. Delayed rupture of a pseudoaneurysm in the brachial artery of a burn reconstruction patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A brachial artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare but serious condition that can be limb threatening. A number of reports have found that it may be the result of damage to the blood vessels around the brachial artery, either directly or indirectly, due to trauma or systemic diseases. We present our experience of delayed pseudoaneurysm rupture of the brachial artery in a rehabilitation patient with burns of the upper extremity who underwent fasciotomy and musculocutaneous flap coverage. We also provide a review of the brachial artery pseudoaneurysm. PMID:23758847

  9. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  10. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature cells during genome reprogramming by the oncogene c-myc and three additional transcription factors. These and other data reveal the need for generalisation of current model of GI. One can expect that different early events of both DNA damaging and non-damaging origins merge in a single late pathway. To search for a deeper view we propose to redefine GI as genome destabilisation manifested in erosion of genome states and altered transitions between states. This changing view on GI may help to integrate the inducing factors of various origins in the single basic model of GI.

  11. Calculation of radiation-induced creep and stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakawa, Johsei

    1995-08-01

    Numerical calculation based on a computer simulation of point defect kinetics under stress was performed to predict radiation-induced deformation in an Inconel X-750 bolt in a LWR core and for a 316 stainless steel blanket in experimental fusion reactors with the water-coolant scenario. Although the displacement rate is rather low, modest irradiation creep with nearly linear stress dependence was predicted below 200 MPa at 300°C in the LWR core. This low stress dependence causes significant stress relaxation, which coincides with the experimental data to 2 dpa. An almost equal amount of enhanced irradiation creep strain was predicted at 60°C in both solution annealed and cold worker 316 stainless steel in the water-cooled blanket. The stress relaxation is practically not expected without irradiation in both the cases, but the calculation predicts that it is definitely expected under irradiation.

  12. Radiation-Induced Heart Disease: Pathologic Abnormalities and Putative Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Taunk, Neil K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Kostis, John B.; Goyal, Sharad

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common diagnosis in women. Breast radiation has become critical in managing patients who receive breast conserving surgery, or have certain high-risk features after mastectomy. Most patients have an excellent prognosis, therefore understanding the late effects of radiation to the chest is important. Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) comprises a spectrum of cardiac pathology including myocardial fibrosis and cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, pericardial disease, and arrhythmias. Tissue fibrosis is a common mediator in RIHD. Multiple pathways converge with both acute and chronic cellular, molecular, and genetic changes to result in fibrosis. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of cardiac disease related to radiation therapy to the chest. Our understanding of these mechanisms has improved substantially, but much work remains to further refine radiation delivery techniques and develop therapeutics to battle late effects of radiation. PMID:25741474

  13. Radiation-induced cerebral meningioma: a recognizable entity

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Shalit, M.N.; Cohen, M.L.; Zandbank, U.; Reichenthal, E.

    1984-11-01

    The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical and histopathological findings in 201 patients with intracranial meningiomas operated on in the period 1978 to 1982. Forty-three of the patients (21.4%) had at some previous time received radiation treatment to their scalp, the majority for tinea capitis. The findings in these 43 irradiated patients were compared with those in the 158 non-irradiated patients. Several distinctive clinical and histological features were identified in the irradiated group, which suggest that radiation-induced meningiomas can be defined as a separate nosological subgroup. The use of irradiation in large numbers of children with tinea capitis in the era prior to the availability of griseofulvin may be responsible for a significantly increased incidence of intracranial meningiomas.

  14. Radioprotectors and Mitigators of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Hyodo, Fuminori; Baum, Bruce J.; Krishna, Murali C.; Mitchell, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation is used in the treatment of a broad range of malignancies. Exposure of normal tissue to radiation may result in both acute and chronic toxicities that can result in an inability to deliver the intended therapy, a range of symptoms, and a decrease in quality of life. Radioprotectors are compounds that are designed to reduce the damage in normal tissues caused by radiation. These compounds are often antioxidants and must be present before or at the time of radiation for effectiveness. Other agents, termed mitigators, may be used to minimize toxicity even after radiation has been delivered. Herein, we review agents in clinical use or in development as radioprotectors and mitigators of radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Few agents are approved for clinical use, but many new compounds show promising results in preclinical testing. PMID:20413641

  15. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of alumina and sapphire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, Eric F.

    2011-04-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Alumina and Sapphire at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Five mil thick samples were irradiated with pulses of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E7 to 1E9 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 1 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 1E10 and 1E9 mho/m/(rad/s), depending on the dose rate and the pulse width for Alumina and 1E7 to 6E7 mho/m/(rad/s) for Sapphire.

  16. Probabilistic methodology for estimating radiation-induced cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Williams, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    The RICRAC computer code was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide a versatile and convenient methodology for radiation risk assessment. The code allows as input essentially any dose pattern commonly encountered in risk assessments for either acute or chronic exposures, and it includes consideration of the age structure of the exposed population. Results produced by the analysis include the probability of one or more radiation-induced cancer deaths in a specified population, expected numbers of deaths, and expected years of life lost as a result of premature fatalities. These calculatons include consideration of competing risks of death from all other causes. The program also generates a probability frequency distribution of the expected number of cancers in any specified cohort resulting from a given radiation dose. The methods may be applied to any specified population and dose scenario.

  17. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors).

  18. Modification of microcrystalline cellulose by gamma radiation-induced grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-10-01

    Modified microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was prepared through gamma radiation-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). Simultaneous grafting was employed wherein MCC with GMA in methanol was irradiated with gamma radiation in nitrogen atmosphere. The effects of different experimental factors such as monomer concentration, type of solvent and absorbed dose on the degree of grafting, Dg, were studied. The amount of grafted GMA, expressed as Dg, was determined gravimetrically. Information from grafted samples subjected to Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in attenuated total reflectance (ATR) mode showed peaks corresponding to GMA which indicates successful grafting. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the crystalline region of MCC was not adversely affected after grafting with GMA. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data showed that the decomposition of grafted MCC occurred at higher temperature compared to the base MCC polymer.

  19. Radiatively Induced Breaking of Conformal Symmetry in a Superpotential

    E-print Network

    Arbuzov, A B

    2015-01-01

    Radiatively induced symmetry breaking is considered for a toy model with one scalar and one fermion field unified in a superfield. It is shown that the classical quartic self-interaction of the superfield possesses a quantum infrared singularity. Application of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism for effective potential leads to the appearance of condensates and masses for both scalar and fermion components. That induces a spontaneous breaking of the initial classical symmetries: the supersymmetry and the conformal one. The energy scales for the scalar and fermion condensates appear to be of the same order, while the renormalization scale is many orders of magnitude higher. A possibility to relate the considered toy model to conformal symmetry breaking in the Standard Model is discussed.

  20. Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase

    SciTech Connect

    Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Veronese, F.M.

    1987-06-01

    The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that of the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.

  1. Pulsed radiation-induced attenuation in certain optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.D. )

    1992-05-01

    Using the X-ray pulse from the HERMES II simulation machine at Sandia National Laboratories, the pulsed radiation-induced attenuation was measured in two optical fibers considered to be 'nonrad-hard': the 50-micron-core, graded-index fiber from Corning and the plastic (PMMA) fiber from the Mitsubishi Rayon Company. These fibers were exposed to radiation up to doses of 19.5 and 28 krad(Si), respectively. In addition, fits of their post-radiation recovery were made to the geminate recombination model, from which the recombination-rate and generation constants, characteristic of this theory, were determined. These parameters should be useful in determining the response of the fibers to radiation conditions other than those encountered here. 18 refs.

  2. Radiation induced heart disease: Pathogenesis, management and review literature.

    PubMed

    Madan, R; Benson, R; Sharma, D N; Julka, P K; Rath, G K

    2015-12-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a very important part of multimodality cancer therapy. Addition of RT improves survival in many cancers, but there are some accompaniments of radiation. One of them is radiation induced heart disease (RIHD). RT for mediastinal lymphoma, breast, lung and oesophageal cancer is associated with the development of RIHD. The problem can be intensified with the addition of chemotherapy. Therapeutic modalities for RIHD are the same as in the non-irradiated population. However, surgery may be difficult in the irradiated patients. The long latent period is the reason why RIHD is not extensively studied. Survival of cancer patients has improved over past few decades, so RIHD is a growing concern especially in younger patients. In this review article, we have discussed the pathogenesis, clinical manifestation and management of RIHD along with impact of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26296945

  3. Radiation-induced microstructural change in ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, C.

    1992-09-01

    What is the characteristic difference between radiation-induced microstructural changes in ceramic and metallic materials? A review is given of the current state of knowledge regarding this question. Elementary properties, which are indispensable for describing the displacement process, are described for ionic and covalent crystals. The structure of cascade damage and its stability are described in terms of the effects of deposited energy density and electronic excitation as well as the characteristics of ceramic materials. The characteristic behavior of the nucleation and growth process of defect clusters in various ceramic materials irradiated with electrons, ions and neutrons, which have been observed mainly through transmission electron microscopy, is also reviewed. This review also considers the effects of irradiation which is concurrent with an applied electric field, transmutation-produced gases and atmosphere, though little definitive work has been done.

  4. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of radiation induced segregation and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soisson, Frédéric

    2006-03-01

    Kinetics of radiation induced segregation and precipitation in binary alloys are studied by Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations are based on a simple atomic model of diffusion under electron irradiation, which takes into account the creation of point defects, the recombination of close vacancy-interstitial pairs and the point defect annihilation at sinks. They can reproduce the coupling between point defect fluxes towards sinks and atomic fluxes, which controls the segregation tendency. In pure metals and ideal solid solutions, the Monte Carlo results are found to be in very good agreement with classical models based on rate equations. In alloys with an unmixing tendency, we show how the interaction between the point defect distribution, the solute segregation and the precipitation driving force can generate complex microstructural evolutions, which depend on the very details of atomic-scale diffusion properties.

  5. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  6. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Knockout Abrogates Radiation Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallahan, Dennis E.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi

    1997-06-01

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung.

  7. Effect of estrogen on radiation-induced cataractogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dynlacht, Joseph R; Tyree, Craig; Valluri, Shailaja; DesRosiers, Colleen; Caperell-Grant, Andrea; Mendonca, Marc S; Timmerman, Robert; Bigsby, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Cataractogenesis is a widely reported late effect that is observed in patients receiving total-body irradiation (TBI) prior to bone marrow transplantation or radiotherapy for ocular or head and neck cancers. Recent studies indicate that estrogens may protect against age-related and drug-induced cataracts. Moreover, other reports suggest that estrogen possesses antioxidant properties. Since the effect of estrogen on radiation cataractogenesis is unknown, we wished to determine whether estrogen modulates radiation-induced opacification of the lens. Intact or ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either 17-beta-estradiol or an empty silastic capsule. The right orbit was then irradiated with either 10 or 15 Gy of (60)Co gamma rays using a Leksell Gamma Knife, and lenses were examined at various times postirradiation with a slit lamp or evaluated for light transmission. We found that for ovariectomized rats irradiated with 15 Gy, the lens opacity and the incidence of cataract formation in the estradiol-treated group were significantly increased compared to the control group at the end of the 25-week period of observation. Cataract incidence was also high in irradiated eyes of ovary-intact animals at 25 weeks postirradiation but was greatly reduced in the ovariectomized control group, with less than half of irradiated eyes showing evidence of cataractogenesis. Thus, after irradiation with 15 Gy of gamma rays, estrogen increased the incidence of cataract formation. We also observed that although the incidence of cataract formation in rats irradiated with 10 Gy and receiving continuous estrogen treatment was not altered compared to rats in the control group that did not receive estrogen, the latent period for posterior subcapsular cataract formation decreased and the severity of the anterior cataract increased. Taken together, our data suggest that estrogen accelerates progression of radiation-induced opacification. PMID:16392957

  8. Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.

    1991-01-01

    We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

  9. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  10. Environmental applications of radiation-induced defects in clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, T.

    2011-12-01

    Radiation effects on clay minerals have been studied over the last 35 years, providing a wealth of information on environmental and geological processes. They have been applied to the reconstruction of past radioelement migrations in the geosphere, the dating of clay minerals from soils or the evolution of the physico-chemical properties under irradiation. All known radiation-induced point defects in clay minerals are detected using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. They mostly consist in electron holes located on oxygen atoms of the structure, and can be differentiated through their nature and their thermal stability. For instance, several are associated to a ? orbital on a Si-O bond. One defect, namely the A-center, is stable over geological periods at ambiant temperature. These point defects are produced mainly by ionizing radiations. By contrast to point defects, it was shown that electron or heavy ion irradiation easily produces amorphization in smectites. Two main applications of radiation-induced defects in clay minerals are derived : (i) the use of defects as tracers of past radioactivity. In geosystems where the age of the clay can be constrained, migrations of radioelements can be reconstructed in natural analogues of the far field of high level nuclear waste repositories. When the dose rate may be assumed constant over time, the paleodose is used to date clay populations, an approach applied to laterites of the Amazon basin. (ii) The influence of radiation on clay mineral properties that remains poorly documented, although it is an important issue in various domains such as the safety assessment of the high level nuclear waste repositories. In case of a leakage of transuranic elements from the radioactive wasteform, alpha recoil nuclei would amorphize smectite after a period much lower than the disposal lifetime. By contrast, amorphisation from ionizing radiation is unlikely over 1 million years. Furthermore, it was shown that amorphization greatly enhances the dissolution kinetics of smectite, a result that must be taken into account in the safety assessment of engineered barriers.

  11. Involvement of prostaglandins and histamine in radiation-induced temperature responses in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy of gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas exposure to 20-150 Gy produced hypothermia. Since radiation exposure induced the release of prostaglandins (PGs) and histamine, the role of PGs and histamine in radiation-induced temperature changes was examined. Radiation-induced hyper- and hypothermia were antagonized by pretreatment with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Intracerebroventricular administration of PGE2 and PGD2 induced hyper- and hypothermia, respectively. Administration of SC-19220, a specific PGE2 antagonist, attenuated PGE2- and radiation-induced hyperthermia, but it did not antagonize PGD2- or radiation-induced hypothermia. Consistent with an apparent role of histamine in hypothermia, administration of disodium cromoglycate (a mast cell stabilizer), mepyramine (H1-receptor antagonist), or cimetidine (H2-receptor antagonist) attenuated PGD2- and radiation-induced hypothermia. These results suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia is mediated via PGE2 and that radiation-induced hypothermia is mediated by another PG, possibly PGD2, via histamine.

  12. Mechanism of radiation-induced bystander effect: Role of the cyclooxygenase-2 signaling pathway

    E-print Network

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Mechanism of radiation-induced bystander effect: Role of the cyclooxygenase-2 signaling pathway 25, 2005 (received for review June 30, 2005) The radiation-induced bystander effect is defined but are in close proximity to cells that are.'' Although these bystander effects have been demonstrated

  13. Simulating and Detecting Radiation-Induced Errors for Onboard Machine Learning

    E-print Network

    Simulating and Detecting Radiation-Induced Errors for Onboard Machine Learning Robert Granat, Kiri-based fault tolerance (ABFT) methods into onboard data analysis algorithms to detect radiation-induced errors" machine learning algorithms. I. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES Onboard data analysis is a powerful capability

  14. Debris and Radiation-Induced Damage Effects on EUV Nanolithography Source Collector Mirror Optics Performance

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    Debris and Radiation-Induced Damage Effects on EUV Nanolithography Source Collector Mirror Optics-based EUV light sources to debris (fast ions, neutrals, off-band radiation, droplets) remains one sputtering. In this paper we study several aspects of debris and radiation-induced damage to candidate EUVL

  15. Industrialization of radiation-induced emulsion polymerization ----technological process and its advantages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhicheng, Zhang; Manwei, Zhang

    1993-07-01

    A technological process for industrialization of radiation induced emulsion polymerization was introduced briefly. A batch process rather than continuous one was adopted in the industrial-scale production. The advantages of radiation induced emulsion polymerization were described in comparison with chemical initiated process.

  16. Effects of exogenous carbon monoxide on radiation-induced bystander effect in zebrafish embryos in vivo

    E-print Network

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Effects of exogenous carbon monoxide on radiation-induced bystander effect in zebrafish embryos Zebrafish embryos CO CORM-3 a b s t r a c t In the present work, the influence of a low concentration) on the radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in vivo between embryos of the zebrafish was studied. RIBE

  17. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s) The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events (SPEs), as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials Ferrets were exposed to 0 – 2 Gray (Gy) of whole body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population, known as the LD50, of ferrets was established at ~ 1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 post-irradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early times post-irradiation when coagulopathies were present and progressively becoming more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions The data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD50 in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is solely due to the cell killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals. PMID:24495588

  18. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ?1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.

  19. Nerve transfer helps repair brachial plexus injury by increasing cerebral cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guixin; Wu, Zuopei; Wang, Xinhong; Tan, Xiaoxiao; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of brachial plexus injury, nerves that are functionally less important are transferred onto the distal ends of damaged crucial nerves to help recover neuromuscular function in the target region. For example, intercostal nerves are transferred onto axillary nerves, and accessory nerves are transferred onto suprascapular nerves, the phrenic nerve is transferred onto the musculocutaneous nerves, and the contralateral C7 nerve is transferred onto the median or radial nerves. Nerve transfer has become a major method for reconstructing the brachial plexus after avulsion injury. Many experiments have shown that nerve transfers for treatment of brachial plexus injury can help reconstruct cerebral cortical function and increase cortical plasticity. In this review article, we summarize the recent progress in the use of diverse nerve transfer methods for the repair of brachial plexus injury, and we discuss the impact of nerve transfer on cerebral cortical plasticity after brachial plexus injury. PMID:25657729

  20. Increased radiosensitivity and radiation-induced apoptosis in SRC-3 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jie; Wang, Yu; Wang, Jin; Xu, Yang; Chen, Shilei; Wang, Junping; Ran, Xinze; Su, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3), a multifunctional transcriptional coactivator, plays an important role in regulation of cell apoptosis in chemoresistant cancer cells. However, its role in radiation-induced apoptosis in hematopoietic cells is still unclear. In this study, we used SRC-3 knockout (SRC-3-/-) mice to assess the role of SRC-3 in radiation-induced hematopoietic injury in vivo. After a range of doses of irradiation, SRC-3-/- mice exhibited lower counts of peripheral blood cells and bone marrow (BM) mononuclear cells and excessive BM depression, which resulted in a significantly higher mortality compared with wildtype mice. Moreover, BM mononuclear cells obtained from SRC-3-/- mice showed a remarkable increase in radiation-induced apoptosis. Collectively, our data demonstrate that SRC-3 plays a role in radiation-induced apoptosis of BM hematopoietic cells. Regulation of SRC-3 might influence the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic cells, which highlights a potential therapeutic target for radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. PMID:24309719

  1. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-?1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together, oral supplementation with antioxidants appears to be an effective approach for the radioprotection of hematopoietic cells against the cell killing effects of radiation, and for improving survival in irradiated animals. Preliminary data suggest similar antioxidant protective effects for animals exposed to potentially lethal doses of proton radiation. Studies were also performed to determine whether dietary antioxidants could affect the incidence rates of malignancies in CBA mice exposed to 300 cGy proton (1 GeV/n) radiation or 50 cGy iron ion (1 GeV/n) radiation [9]. Two antioxidant formulations were utilized in these studies; an AOX formulation containing the mixture of antioxidant agents developed from our previous studies and an antioxidant dietary formulation containing the soybean-derived protease inhibitor known as the Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI). BBI was evaluated in the form of BBI Concentrate (BBIC), which is the form of BBI utilized in human trials. BBIC has been utilized in human trials since 1992, as described [10]. The major finding in the long-term animal studies was that there was a reduced risk of malignant lymphoma in mice exposed to space radiations and maintained on diets containing the antioxidant formulations. In addition, the two different dietary countermeasures also reduced the yields of a variety of different rare tumor types, arising from both epithelial and connective tissue cells, observed in the animals exposed to space radiation. REFERENCES [1] Guan J. et al (2004) Radiation Research 162, 572-579. [2] Wan X.S. et al (2005) Radiation Research 163, 364-368. [3] Wan X.S. et al (2005) Radiation Research 163, 232-240. [4] Guan J. et al (2006) Radiation Research 165, 373-378. [5] Wan X.S. et al (2006) International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics 64, 1475-1481. [6] Kennedy A.R. et al (2006) Radiation Research 166, 327-332. [7] Kennedy A.R. et al (2007) Radiation & Environmental Biophysics 46(2), 201-3. [8]Wambi, C., Sanzari, J., Wan, X.S., Nuth, M., Davis, J., Ko, Y.-H., Sayers, C.M., Baran, M., Ware, J.H. and Kennedy, A

  2. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Radiation-Induced Cystitis and Proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    Oliai, Caspian; Fisher, Brandon; Jani, Ashish; Wong, Michael; Poli, Jaganmohan; Brady, Luther W.; Komarnicky, Lydia T.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To provide a retrospective analysis of the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for treating hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) and proctitis secondary to pelvic- and prostate-only radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients were treated with HBOT for radiation-induced HC and proctitis. The median age at treatment was 66 years (range, 15-84 years). The range of external-beam radiation delivered was 50.0-75.6 Gy. Bleeding must have been refractory to other therapies. Patients received 100% oxygen at 2.0 atmospheres absolute pressure for 90-120 min per treatment in a monoplace chamber. Symptoms were retrospectively scored according to the Late Effects of Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management, Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scale to evaluate short-term efficacy. Recurrence of hematuria/hematochezia was used to assess long-term efficacy. Results: Four of the 19 patients were lost to follow-up. Fifteen patients were evaluated and received a mean of 29.8 dives: 11 developed HC and 4 proctitis. All patients experienced a reduction in their LENT-SOMA score. After completion of HBOT, the mean LENT-SOMA score was reduced from 0.78 to 0.20 in patients with HC and from 0.66 to 0.26 in patients with proctitis. Median follow-up was 39 months (range, 7-70 months). No cases of hematuria were refractory to HBOT. Complete resolution of hematuria was seen in 81% (n = 9) and partial response in 18% (n = 2). Recurrence of hematuria occurred in 36% (n = 4) after a median of 10 months. Complete resolution of hematochezia was seen in 50% (n = 2), partial response in 25% (n = 1), and refractory bleeding in 25% (n = 1). Conclusions: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is appropriate for radiation-induced HC once less time-consuming therapies have failed to resolve the bleeding. In these conditions, HBOT is efficacious in the short and long term, with minimal side effects.

  3. Radiation-induced defects in clay minerals: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Th.; Balan, E.; Calas, G.; Fourdrin, C.; Morichon, E.; Sorieul, S.

    2012-04-01

    Extensive information has been collected on radiation effects on clay minerals over the last 35 years, providing a wealth of information on environmental and geological processes. The fields of applications include the reconstruction of past radioelement migrations, the dating of clay minerals or the evolution of the physico-chemical properties under irradiation. The investigation of several clay minerals, namely kaolinite, dickite, montmorillonite, illite and sudoite, by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy has shown the presence of defects produced by natural or artificial radiations. These defects consist mostly of electron holes located on oxygen atoms of the structure. The various radiation-induced defects are differentiated through their nature and their thermal stability. Most of them are associated with a ? orbital on a Si-O bond. The most abundant defect in clay minerals is oriented perpendicular to the silicate layer. Thermal annealing indicates this defect in kaolinite (A-center) to be stable over geological periods at ambient temperature. Besides, electron or heavy ion irradiation easily leads to an amorphization in smectites, depending on the type of interlayer cation. The amorphization dose exhibits a bell-shaped variation as a function of temperature, with a decreasing part that indicates the influence of thermal dehydroxylation. Two main applications of the knowledge of radiation-induced defects in clay minerals are derived: (i) The use of defects as tracers of past radioactivity. In geological systems where the age of the clay can be constrained, ancient migrations of radioelements can be reconstructed in natural analogues of high level nuclear waste repositories. When the dose rate may be assumed constant over time, the paleodose is used to date clay populations, an approach applied to fault gouges or laterites of the Amazon basin. (ii) The influence of irradiation over physico-chemical properties of clay minerals. An environmental application concerns the performance assessment of the engineered barrier of nuclear waste disposals. In case of a leakage of transuranic elements from the radioactive waste form, alpha recoil nuclei can amorphize smectite after periods of the order of 1000 years according to a worst case scenario, whereas amorphization from ionizing radiation is unlikely. As amorphization greatly enhances the dissolution kinetics of smectite, the sensitivity of the smectites must be taken into account in the prediction of the long term behavior of engineered barriers.

  4. Low velocity gun shot wounds of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Vrettos, B C; Rochkind, S; Boome, R S

    1995-04-01

    28 patients with low velocity gunshot wounds of the brachial plexus were treated at Groote Schuur Hospital from 1980 to 1991. Delayed exploration of the brachial plexus (up to 7 months after injury) was performed in nine (30%) of the patients. The other 19 patients did not have exploration of the plexus; most of these patients showed signs of recovery within 2 to 4 weeks of injury. Injury to the subclavian or axillary artery occurred in nine (30%) of the cases. The average length of follow-up of the patients was 19 months (range 2-90 months). Of the 19 patients treated non-operatively, 15 (79%) had an excellent or good result and four (21%) a fair result. The indications for surgery were the absence of improvement within 3 months of injury or persistent pain. Surgery was indicated for significant pain in five of the nine patients; postoperatively two had complete relief of pain, two improvement in the pain and one no improvement. Of the nine surgically treated patients, three (33%) had a good result, two (22%) a fair result and four (45%) a poor result. The potential for recovery was not dependent on the severity of the injury at presentation or the presence of vascular injury but on the appearance of signs of recovery within 4 weeks of injury. PMID:7797973

  5. Effects of contrast medium on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, H.; Kuwabara, Y.; Okano, T.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of contrast material (meglumine iothalamate) on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations were investigated in studies on the lymphocytes of patients who had undergone diagnostic radiography and in in vitro experiments with diagnostic x rays and /sup 60/Co gamma rays. Chromosome and chromatid aberrations were found to increase significantly with increasing concentrations of contrast material that were added at irradiation. However, the aberrations were not associated with elevation of the ratio of dicentric and ring chromosomes to the number of cells with unstable chromosome aberrations at the first mitosis. Lymphocytes irradiated in the absence of contrast material did not show an increase in chromosome-type aberrations when the agent was given in increasing concentrations during subsequent incubation, but there were greater numbers of chromatid gaps and breaks. When lymphocytes were exposed to 400 R (103.2 mC/kg) of /sup 60/Co gamma rays, the presence of contrast agent did not increase the yield of dicentric and ring chromosomes, but induced a marked delay in cell proliferation, especially in lymphocytes with more heavily damaged chromosomes. In additional examination, the contrast agent itself induced sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes.

  6. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  7. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  8. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  9. Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  10. Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagadec, Chann; Vlashi, Erina; Alhiyari, Yazeed; Phillips, Tiffany M.; Bochkur Dratver, Milana; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for ?-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dose–dependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a ?-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, ?-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells.

  11. Prevention and Management of Radiation-induced Late Gastrointestinal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Teo, M T W; Sebag-Montefiore, D; Donnellan, C F

    2015-11-01

    In the UK, about 90 000 cancer survivors will suffer from pelvic radiation disease (PRD) due to their curative treatment including radiotherapy. The National Cancer Survivorship Initiative aims to improve the understanding and management of PRD by the oncology community. This overview covers the prevention, investigation and treatment for late radiation-induced gastrointestinal symptoms in PRD. Multiple pharmacological and nutritional interventions have been studied, as prophylaxis for acute gastrointestinal toxicity (aiming to prevent late consequential effects), although predominantly only small randomised controlled trials have been conducted. These have produced mixed results, although promising signals for some agents have been observed. Evidence for the pharmacological prevention of late gastrointestinal toxicity is scarce. Even fewer randomised controlled trials have investigated the late gastrointestinal toxicity profile of advanced radiotherapy technologies. There are nationally agreed algorithms for the investigation and management of PRD, but a lack of awareness means patients still do not get referred appropriately. This overview outlines the management of radiation proctopathy and diarrhoea, and signposts other accessible resources. Finally, we provide recommendations for the management of late gastrointestinal symptoms in PRD and research in this field, especially the need for high-quality clinical trials. PMID:26129746

  12. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  13. Chromatin Structure and Radiation-Induced Intrachromosome Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangala; Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    We have recently investigated the location of breaks involved in intrachromosomal type exchange events, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique for human chromosome 3. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intrachromosome exchanges were found to occur preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions were on the same arm of the chromosome. To explore the relationships between intrachromosome exchanges and chromatin structure, we used probes that hybridize the three regions of 3p21, 3q11 and 3q26, and measured the distance between two of the three regions in interphase cells. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced intrachromosome aberrations depends upon both the location of fragile sites and the folding of chromatins

  14. Does oxygen enhance the radiation-induced inactivation of penicillinase

    SciTech Connect

    Samuni, A.; Kalkstein, A.; Czapski, G.

    1980-04-01

    The radiation-induced inactivation of penicillinase (..beta..-lactamase, EC 3.5.2.6) in dilute aqueous solutions buffered with phosphate was studied by examining enzyme radiosensitivity in the presence of various gases (He, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O and N/sub 2/O + O/sub 2/). The introduction of either N/sub 2/O or O/sub 2/ was found to reduce the radiodamage. On the other hand, H/sub 2/ or N/sub 2/O + O/sub 2/ gas mixture enhanced the radiosensitivity. In the presence of formate and oxygen no enzyme inactivation was detected. The results indicated that the specific damaging efficiency of H atoms is more than twofold higher than that of OH radicals; therefore, in 50 mM phosphate buffer, where more than half the free radicals are H atoms, the H radicals are responsible for the majority of the damage. The superoxide radicals appeared to be completely inactive and did not contribute to enzyme inactivation. Oxygen affected the radiosensitivity in two ways: (1) it protected by converting e/sub aq//sup -/ and H into harmless O/sub 2/-radicals; and (2) it increased inactivation by enhancing the damage brought about by OH radicals (OER = 2.6). In oxygenated buffer the protection effect of oxygen exceeded that of sensitization, thus giving rise to a moderate overall protection effect.

  15. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  16. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Cataract in Interventional Cardiology Staff

    PubMed Central

    Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Noohi, Feridoun; Hashemi, Hassan; Haghjoo, Majid; Miraftab, Mohammad; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Rastgou, Fereydon; Malek, Hadi; Faghihi, Hoshang; Firouzabadi, Hassan; Asgari, Soheila; Rezvan, Farhad; Khosravi, Hamidreza; Soroush, Sara; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of ionizing radiation has led to advances in medical diagnosis and treatment. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of radiation cataractogenesis in the interventionists and staff performing various procedures in different interventional laboratories. Patients and Methods: This cohort study included 81 interventional cardiology staff. According to the working site, they were classified into 5 groups. The control group comprised 14 professional nurses who did not work in the interventional sites. Participants were assigned for lens assessment by two independent trained ophthalmologists blinded to the study. Results: The electrophysiology laboratory staff received higher doses of ionizing radiation (17.2 ± 11.9 mSv; P < 0.001). There was a significant positive correlation between the years of working experience and effective dose in the lens (P < 0.001). In general, our findings showed that the incidence of lens opacity was 79% (95% CI, 69.9-88.1) in participants with exposure (the case group) and our findings showed that the incidence of lenses opacity was 7.1% (95% CI:2.3-22.6) with the relative risk (RR) of 11.06 (P < 0.001). Conclusions: We believe that the risk of radiation-induced cataract in cardiology interventionists and staff depends on their work site. As the radiation dose increases, the prevalence of posterior eye changes increases. PMID:25789258

  17. Radiation-induced sarcomas of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna

    2014-01-01

    With improved outcomes associated with radiotherapy, radiation-induced sarcomas (RIS) are increasingly seen in long-term survivors of head and neck cancers, with an estimated risk of up to 0.3%. They exhibit no subsite predilection within the head and neck and can arise in any irradiated tissue of mesenchymal origin. Common histologic subtypes of RIS parallel their de novo counterparts and include osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma/sarcoma nitricoxide synthase, and fibrosarcoma. While imaging features of RIS are not pathognomonic, large size, extensive local invasion with bony destruction, marked enhancement within a prior radiotherapy field, and an appropriate latency period are suggestive of a diagnosis of RIS. RIS development may be influenced by factors such as radiation dose, age at initial exposure, exposure to chemotherapeutic agents and genetic tendency. Precise pathogenetic mechanisms of RIS are poorly understood and both directly mutagenizing effects of radiotherapy as well as changes in microenvironments are thought to play a role. Management of RIS is challenging, entailing surgery in irradiated tissue and a limited scope for further radiotherapy and chemotherapy. RIS is associated with significantly poorer outcomes than stage-matched sarcomas that arise independent of irradiation and surgical resection with clear margins seems to offer the best chance for cure. PMID:25493233

  18. Radiation induced spent nuclear fuel dissolution under deep repository conditions.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Mats; Nielsen, Fredrik; Roth, Olivia; Ekeroth, Ella; Nilsson, Sara; Hossain, Mohammad Mohsin

    2007-10-15

    The dynamics of spent nuclear fuel dissolution in groundwater is an important part of the safety assessment of a deep geological repository for high level nuclear waste. In this paperwe discussthe most important elementary processes and parameters involved in radiation induced oxidative dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. Based on these processes, we also present a new approach for simulation of spent nuclear fuel dissolution under deep repository conditions. This approach accounts for the effects of fuel age, burn up, noble metal nanoparticle contents, aqueous H2 and HCO3- concentration, water chemistry, and combinations thereof. The results clearly indicate that solutes consuming H202 and combined effects of noble metal nanoparticles and H2 have significant impact on the rate of spent nuclear fuel dissolution. Using data from the two possible repository sites in Sweden, we have employed the new approach to estimate the maximum rate of spent nuclear fuel dissolution. This estimate indicates that H2 produced from radiolysis of groundwater alone will be sufficient to inhibit the dissolution completely for spent nuclear fuel older than 100 years. PMID:17993152

  19. Space-radiation-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas; Lee, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of a study of the photon luminescence of the Moon induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and space radiation from the Sun, using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) above 1 keV in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence albedo produced by the Moon's surface when there is no sunlight and Earthshine. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior of the Moon. From the photon fluence we derive the spectrum which can be utilized to examine existing lunar spectral data and to design orbiting instrumentation for measuring various components of the space-radiation-induced photon luminescence present on the Moon.

  20. Effect of Epicatechin against Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Un; Kim, Jang Hee; Oh, Young-Taek; Park, Keun Hyung; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced oral mucositis limits the delivery of high-dose radiation to head and neck cancer. This study investigated the effectiveness of epicatechin (EC), a component of green tea extracts, on radiation-induced oral mucositis in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design The effect of EC on radiation-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed in the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Radiation-induced apoptosis, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and changes in the signaling pathway were investigated. In vivo therapeutic effects of EC for oral mucositis were explored in a rat model. Rats were monitored by daily inspections of the oral cavity, amount of oral intake, weight change and survival rate. For histopathologic evaluation, hematoxylin-eosin staining and TUNEL staining were performed. Results EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis, change of MMP, and intracellular ROS generation in HaCaT cells. EC treatment markedly attenuated the expression of p-JNK, p-38, and cleaved caspase-3 after irradiation in the HaCaT cells. Rats with radiation-induced oral mucositis showed decreased oral intake, weight and survival rate, but oral administration of EC significantly restored all three parameters. Histopathologic changes were significantly decreased in the EC-treated irradiated rats. TUNEL staining of rat oral mucosa revealed that EC treatment significantly decreased radiation-induced apoptotic cells. Conclusions This study suggests that EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in keratinocytes and rat oral mucosa and may be a safe and effective candidate treatment for the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. PMID:23874895

  1. Concomitant Traumatic Spinal Cord and Brachial Plexus Injuries in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Peter C.; Pirola, Elena; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Kircher, Michelle F.; Spinner, Robert J.; Bishop, Allen T.; Shin, Alexander Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Combined injuries to the spinal cord and brachial plexus present challenges in the detection of both injuries as well as to subsequent treatment. The purpose of this study is to describe the epidemiology and clinical factors of concomitant spinal cord injuries in patients with a known brachial plexus injury. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all patients who were evaluated for a brachial plexus injury in a tertiary, multidisciplinary brachial plexus clinic from January 2000 to December 2008. Patients with clinical and/or imaging findings for a coexistent spinal cord injury were identified and underwent further analysis. Results: A total of 255 adult patients were evaluated for a traumatic traction injury to the brachial plexus. We identified thirty-one patients with a combined brachial plexus and spinal cord injury, for a prevalence of 12.2%. A preganglionic brachial plexus injury had been sustained in all cases. The combined injury group had a statistically greater likelihood of having a supraclavicular vascular injury (odds ratio [OR] = 22.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 271.9) and a cervical spine fracture (OR = 3.44; 95% CI = 1.6, 7.5). These patients were also more likely to exhibit a Horner sign (OR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.5, 7.2) and phrenic nerve dysfunction (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.0, 5.8) compared with the group with only a brachial plexus injury. Conclusion: Heightened awareness for a combined spinal cord and brachial plexus injury and the presence of various associated clinical and imaging findings may aid in the early recognition of these relatively uncommon injuries. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22258773

  2. Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

  3. Radiation-induced epigenetic bystander effects demonstrated in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Ting; Xu, Shuyan; Xu, Shaoxin; Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin; Bian, Po

    2015-05-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in vivo in the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana ( A. thaliana ) have been well demonstrated in terms of effects on development and genetics. However, there is not yet robust evidence regarding RIBE-mediated epigenetic changes in plants. To address this, in the current work the roots of A. thaliana seedlings were locally irradiated with 10 Gy of ? particles, after which DNA methylation in bystander aerial plants were detected using the methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) and bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP). Results showed that irradiation of the roots led to long-distance changes in DNA methylation patterns at some CCGG sites over the whole genome, specifically from hemi-methylation to non-methylation, and the methylation ratios, mainly at CG sites, strongly indicating the existence of RIBE-mediated epigenetic changes in higher plants. Root irradiation also influenced expressions of DNA methylation-related MET1, DRM2 and SUVH4 genes and demethylation-related DML3 gene in bystander aerial plants, suggesting a modulation of RIBE to the methylation machinery in plants. In addition, the multicopy P35S:GUS in A. thaliana line L5-1, which is silenced epigenetically by DNA methylation and histone modification, was transcriptionally activated through the RIBE. The transcriptional activation could be significantly inhibited by the treatment with reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), indicative of a pivotal role of ROS in RIBE-mediated epigenetic changes. Time course analyses showed that the bystander signaling molecule(s) for transcriptional activation of multicopy P35S:GUS, although of unknown chemical nature, were generated in the root cells within 24 h postirradiation. PMID:25938771

  4. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  5. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-Induced Gastric Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we describe dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiotherapy and compare several predictive models. Materials & Methods The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies between January 1999 and April 2002 were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. Logistic regression and Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for the occurrence of ? grade 3 gastric bleed were fit to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for all models. Results Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds, at a median time of 4.0 months (mean 6.5 months, range 2.1–28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean of the maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range 46 Gy–86 Gy), respectively, after bio-correction to equivalent 2 Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis was most predictive of gastric bleed (AUROC=0.92). Best fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n =0.10, and m =0.21, with TD50(normal) =56 Gy and TD50(cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD50 value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding, and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation. PMID:22541965

  6. Radiation-Induced Phase Transformations in Ilmenite-Group Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J. N.

    1997-12-31

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool for characterizing and understanding radiation-induced structural changes in materials. We have irradiated single crystals of ilmenite (FeTiO{sub 3}) and geikielite (MgTiO{sub 3}) using ions and electrons to better understand the response of complex oxides to radiation. Ion irradiation experiments of bulk single crystals at 100 K show that ilmenite amorphized at doses of less than 1x10(exp15) Ar(2+)/sq cm and at a damage level in the peak damage region of 1 displacement per atom (dpa). Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction of a cross-sectioned portion of this crystal confirmed the formation of a 150 am thick amorphous layer. Geikielite proved to be more radiation resistant, requiring a flux of 2x10(exp 15) Xe(2+)/sq cm to induce amorphization at 100 K. This material did not amorphize at 470 K, despite a dose of 2.5 x10(exp 16) Xe(2+)/sq cm and a damage level as high as 25 dpa. Low temperature irradiations of electron- transparent crystals with 1 MeV Kr(+) also show that ilmenite amorphized after a damage level of 2.25 dpa at 175 K.Similar experiments on geikielite show that the microstructure is partially amorphous and partially crystalline after 10 dpa at 150 K. Concurrent ion and electron irradiation of both materials with 1 MeV Kr(+) and 0.9 MeV electrons produced dislocation loops in both materials, but no amorphous regions were formed. Differences in the radiation response of these isostructural oxides suggests that in systems with Mg-Fe solid solution, the Mg-rich compositions may be more resistant to structural changes.

  7. Role of PECAM-1 in radiation-induced liver inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ihtzaz Ahmed; Stange, Ina; Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Ellenrieder, Volker; Wolff, Hendrik Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31) is known to play an important role in hepatic inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the role of PECAM-1 in wild-type (WT) and knock-out (KO)-mice after single-dose liver irradiation (25 Gy). Both, at mRNA and protein level, a time-dependent decrease in hepatic PECAM-1, corresponding to an increase in intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) (6 hrs) was detected in WT-mice after irradiation. Immunohistologically, an increased number of neutrophil granulocytes (NG) (but not of mononuclear phagocytes) was observed in the liver of WT and PECAM-1-KO mice at 6 hrs after irradiation. The number of recruited NG was higher and prolonged until 24 hrs in KO compared to WT-mice. Correspondingly, a significant induction of hepatic tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-? and CXC-chemokines (KC/CXCL1 interleukin-8/CXCL8) was detected together with an elevation of serum liver transaminases (6–24 hrs) in WT and KO-mice. Likewise, phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) was observed in both animal groups after irradiation. The level of all investigated proteins as well as of the liver transaminases was significantly higher in KO than WT-mice. In the cell-line U937, irradiation led to a reduction in PECAM-1 in parallel to an increased ICAM-1 expression. TNF-?-blockage by anti-TNF-? prevented this change in both proteins in cell culture. Radiation-induced stress conditions induce a transient accumulation of granulocytes within the liver by down-regulation/absence of PECAM-1. It suggests that reduction/lack in PECAM-1 may lead to greater and prolonged inflammation which can be prevented by anti-TNF?. PMID:26177067

  8. Irradiated Esophageal Cells are Protected from Radiation-Induced Recombination by MnSOD Gene Therapy

    E-print Network

    Niu, Yunyun

    Radiation-induced DNA damage is a precursor to mutagenesis and cytotoxicity. During radiotherapy, exposure of healthy tissues can lead to severe side effects. We explored the potential of mitochondrial SOD (MnSOD) gene ...

  9. Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity: Myths, Misconceptions, and Realities

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Jun; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    A variety of techniques to evaluate central arterial stiffness have been developed and introduced. None of these techniques, however, have been implemented widely in regular clinical settings, except for brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The most prominent procedural advantage of baPWV is its ease of use, since it only requires the wrapping of blood pressure cuffs on the 4 extremities. There is mounting evidence indicating the ability of baPWV to predict the risk of future cardiovascular events and total mortality. Additionally, the guidelines for the management of hypertension in Japan recommended the measurement of baPWV be included in the assessment of subclinical target organ damage. However, baPWV has not been fully accepted worldwide due to perceived theoretical and methodological issues. In this review, we address the most frequently mentioned questions and concerns regarding baPWV to shed some light on this simple and easy arterial stiffness measurement.

  10. A Case of Radiation-Induced Osteosarcoma after the Treatment of Pineoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Noah; Yoo, Heon; Shin, Sang Hoon; Gwak, Ho Shin

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has an important role in postoperative treatment of neoplasms originated from central nervous system, but may induce secondary malignancies like as sarcomas, gliomas, and meningiomas. The prognosis of radiation-induced osteosarcomas is known as poor, because they has aggressive nature invasive locally and intractable to multiple treatment strategies like as surgical resection, chemotherapy, and so on. We report a case of radiation-induced osteosarcoma developed from skull after 7 years of craniospinal radiotherapy for pineoblastoma. PMID:26605276

  11. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  12. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: incidence, prevalence, and temporal trends.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Suneet P; Blackwell, Sean B; Ananth, Cande V

    2014-06-01

    Epidemiological knowledge of the incidence, prevalence, and temporal changes of neonatal brachial plexuses palsy (NBPP) should assist the clinician, avert unnecessary interventions, and help formulate evidence-based health policies. A summary of 63 publications in the English language with over 17 million births and 24,000 NBPPs is notable for six things. First, the rate of NBPP in the US and other countries is comparable: 1.5 vs. 1.3 per 1000 total births, respectively. Second, the rate of NBPP may be decreasing: 0.9, 1.0 and 0.5 per 1,000 births for publications before 1990, 1990-2000, and after 2000, respectively. Third, the likelihood of not having concomitant shoulder dystocia with NBPP was 76% overall, though it varied by whether the publication was from the US (78%) vs. other countries (47%). Fourth, the likelihood of NBPP being permanent (lasting at least 12 months) was 10-18% in the US-based reports and 19-23% in other countries. Fifth, in studies from the US, the rate of permanent NBPP is 1.1-2.2 per 10,000 births and 2.9-3.7 per 10,000 births in other nations. Sixth, we estimate that approximately 5000 NBPPs occur every year in the US, of which over 580-1050 are permanent, and that since birth, 63,000 adults have been afflicted with persistent paresis of their brachial plexus. The exceedingly infrequent nature of permanent NBPP necessitates a multi-center study to improve our understanding of the antecedent factors and to abate the long-term sequela. PMID:24863027

  13. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Sridhar Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Flanagan, Hugh L.; Whang, Edward E.

    2005-06-15

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

  14. Radiation-induced osteosarcomas in the pediatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Matthew; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced osteosarcomas (R-OS) have historically been high-grade, locally invasive tumors with a poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive literature review and analysis of reported cases dealing with R-OS in the pediatric population to identify the characteristics, prognostic factors, optimal treatment modalities, and overall survival of these patients. Methods and Materials: A MEDLINE/PubMed search of articles written in the English language dealing with OSs occurring after radiotherapy (RT) in the pediatric population yielded 30 studies from 1981 to 2004. Eligibility criteria included patients <21 years of age at the diagnosis of the primary cancer, cases satisfying the modified Cahan criteria, and information on treatment outcome. Factors analyzed included the type of primary cancer treated with RT, the radiation dose and beam energy, the latency period between RT and the development of R-OS, and the treatment, follow-up, and final outcome of R-OS. Results: The series included 109 patients with a median age at the diagnosis of primary cancer of 6 years (range, 0.08-21 years). The most common tumors treated with RT were Ewing's sarcoma (23.9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (17.4%), retinoblastoma (12.8%), Hodgkin's disease (9.2%), brain tumor (8.3%), and Wilms' tumor (6.4%). The median radiation dose was 47 Gy (range, 15-145 Gy). The median latency period from RT to the development of R-OS was 100 months (range, 36-636 months). The median follow-up after diagnosis of R-OS was 18 months (1-172 months). The 3- and 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 43.6% and 42.2%, respectively, and the 3- and 5-year overall survival rate was 41.7% and 40.2%, respectively. Variables, including age at RT, primary site, type of tumor treated with RT, total radiation dose, and latency period did not have a significant effect on survival. The 5-year cause-specific and overall survival rate for patients who received treatment for R-OS involving chemotherapy alone, surgery alone, and surgery plus chemotherapy was 17.3% and 17.3%, 56.6% and 50.3%, and 71.0% and 68.3%, respectively (p < 0.0001, log-rank test). Conclusion: The type of treatment for R-OS was the most significant factor for cause-specific and overall survival. Patients who develop R-OS should be aggressively treated, because the outcome is not as dismal as once thought.

  15. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

  16. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, P. S.; Sadhotra, L. P.; Bhargava, P.; Bath, A. S.; Mukherjee, M. K.; Bhatti, Tejinder; Maurya, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years) in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations), surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients), and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient). In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients), intercostal nerves (2 patients), and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients). Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients), both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients), spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient), intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th) to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients) and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient). Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC) Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170 degrees). Eight patients scored M4 power in elbow flexion and assessed as excellent results. Good results (M3+) were obtained in seven patients. Five patients had fair results (M2+ to M3). PMID:20368849

  17. Blueberry anthocyanins ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury through the protein kinase RNA-activated pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunen; Tan, Dehong; Tong, Changci; Zhang, Yubiao; Xu, Ying; Liu, Xinwei; Gao, Yan; Hou, Mingxiao

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of blueberry anthocyanins (BA) on radiation-induced lung injury and investigate the mechanism of action. Seven days after BA(20 and 80 mg/kg/d)administration, 6 weeks old male Sprague-Dawley rats rats were irradiated by LEKTA precise linear accelerator at a single dose of 20 Gy only once. and the rats were continuously treated with BA for 4 weeks. Moreover, human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC) were transfected with either control-siRNA or siRNA targeting protein kinase R (PKR). Cells were then irradiated and treated with 75 ?g/mL BA for 72 h. The results showed that BA significantly ameliorated radiation-induced lung inflammation, lung collagen deposition, apoptosis and PKR expression and activation. In vitro, BA significantly protected cells from radiation-induced cell death through modulating expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3. Suppression of PKR by siRNA resulted in ablation of BA protection on radiation-induced cell death and modulation of anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic proteins, as well as Caspase-3 expression. These findings suggest that BA is effective in ameliorating radiation-induced lung injury, likely through the PKR signaling pathway. PMID:26551926

  18. Radioprotective effect of geraniin via the inhibition of apoptosis triggered by ?-radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, In Kyung; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Sang Young; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-04-01

    The radioprotective effect of geraniin, a tannin compound isolated from Nymphaea tetragona Georgi var. (Nymphaeaceae), against ?-radiation-induced damage was investigated in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Geraniin recovered cell viability detected by MTT test and colony formation assay, which was compromised by ?-radiation, and reduced the ?-radiation-induced apoptosis by the inhibition of loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Geraniin protected cellular components (lipid membrane, cellular protein, and DNA) damaged by ?-radiation, which was detected by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation, and comet assay. Geraniin significantly reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by ?-radiation, which was detected using spectrofluorometer, flow cytometer, and confocal microscope after 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. Geraniin normalized the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, which were decreased by ?-radiation. These results suggest that geraniin protects cells against radiation-induced oxidative stress via enhancing of antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuating of cellular damage. PMID:20680428

  19. Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

  20. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois; Corre, Isabelle

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial functions linked to actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery. PMID:25883637

  2. Above Elbow Amputation Under Brachial Plexus Block at Supraclavicular and Interscalene Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hassan; Yadagiri, Manjula; Macrosson, Duncan; Majeed, Amer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The brachial plexus block is a commonly performed procedure in the anesthetic practice today. It is performed for analgesia as well as anesthesia for upper limb procedures. It has been used for amputation and replantation surgeries of the upper limb. Case presentation: We present the case of a 68-year-old gentleman who had brachial plexus block at supraclavicular and interscalene levels as the sole anesthetic for undergoing above elbow amputation. He was deemed to be very high risk for a general anesthetic as he suffered from severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a very poor exercise tolerance (NYHA Class III). The supraclavicular brachial plexus block was supplemented with an interscalene brachial plexus block due to inadequate surgical anesthesia encountered with the former. The procedure was successfully completed under regional anesthesia. Conclusions: The brachial plexus block can be performed at different levels in the same patient to achieve desired results, while employing sound anatomical knowledge and adhering to the maximum safe dose limit of the local anesthetic. PMID:26705518

  3. Antimicrobial fabric adsorbed iodine produced by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Shoji; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sugo, Takanobu; Suzuki, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    Antimicrobial fabric was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of N-vinyl pyrrolidone onto polyolefine nonwoven fabric and subsequent adsorption of iodine. In response of the huge request for the antimicrobial material applied to face masks for swine flu in 2009, operation procedure of continuous radiation-induced graft polymerization apparatus was improved. The improved grafting production per week increased 3.8 times compared to the production by former operation procedure. Shipped antimicrobial fabric had reached 130,000 m2 from June until December, 2009.

  4. Growth hormone used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Xia, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Sen; Lu, Xin-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis is rare. We describe a 69-year-old man with intractable hemorrhagic gastritis induced by postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Although anti-secretory therapy with or without octreotide was initiated for hemostasis over three months, melena still occurred off and on, and the patient required blood transfusions to maintain stable hemoglobin. Finally growth hormone was used in the treatment of hemorrhage for two weeks, and hemostasis was successfully achieved. This is the first report that growth hormone has been used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis. PMID:26309374

  5. Observation of linear-polarization-sensitivity in the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, R. G.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Wegscheider, W.

    2011-08-01

    In the quasi two-dimensional GaAs/AlGaAs system, we investigate the effect of rotating in situ the electric field of linearly polarized microwaves relative to the current, on the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations. We find that the frequency and the phase of the photoexcited magnetoresistance oscillations are insensitive to the polarization. On the other hand, the amplitudes of the magneto resistance oscillations are remarkably responsive to the relative orientation between the microwave antenna and the current-axis in the specimen. The results suggest a striking linear-polarization-sensitivity in the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations.

  6. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  7. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  8. Outcome in adolescence of brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Hulleberg, Gunn; Elvrum, Ann-Kristin G; Brandal, Merethe; Vik, Torstein

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — The frequency and severity of a permanent lesion after brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and its impact on activities of daily living are not well documented. We therefore investigated the outcome of BPBP in adolescents, regarding arm function and consequences for activity and participation. Participants and methods — Of 30,574 babies born at St. Olavs University Hospital in 1991–2000, 91 had BPBP (prevalence 3 per 1,000), and 69 of these individuals were examined at a median age of 14 (10–20) years. The examination included the modified Mallet classification, range of motion, shoulder rotation and grip strength, Assisting Hand Assessment, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Of the 22 subjects who were not examined, 3 could not be traced and 19 reported having no problems in the affected arm. Results — At follow-up, 17 adolescents had a permanent lesion (i.e. individual Mallet subscore below 4) with a median Mallet total score of 15 (9–19), while 52 had good or normal shoulder function (median Mallet total score 25 (23–25)). All participants with a permanent lesion had reduced active shoulder rotation (? 15°), 16 had elbow extension deficit, and 10 had subnormal grip strength. External rotation was considerably weaker in the affected shoulder. In addition, they had ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities. Even so, all except 1 were independent in activities of daily living, although 15 experienced minor difficulties. Interpretation — Every fourth to fifth child with BPBP had a permanent lesion as an adolescent. External rotation was the most impaired movement. Despite ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities, all of the participants except one were independent in activities of daily living. PMID:25238434

  9. Exercise-induced brachial artery vasodilation: role of free radicals.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Russell S; Donato, Anthony J; Uberoi, Abhimanyu; Wray, D Walter; Lawrenson, Lesley; Nishiyama, Steven; Bailey, Damian M

    2007-03-01

    Originally thought of as simply damaging or toxic "accidents" of in vivo chemistry, free radicals are becoming increasingly recognized as redox signaling molecules implicit in cellular homeostasis. Indeed, at the vascular level, it is plausible that oxidative stress plays a regulatory role in normal vascular function. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we sought to document the ability of an oral antioxidant cocktail (vitamins C, E, and alpha-lipoic acid) to reduce circulating free radicals, and we employed Doppler ultrasound to examine the consequence of an antioxidant-mediated reduction in oxidative stress on exercise-induced vasodilation. A total of 25 young (18-31 yr) healthy male subjects partook in these studies. EPR spectroscopy revealed a reduction in circulating free radicals following antioxidant administration at rest ( approximately 98%) and as a consequence of exercise ( approximately 85%). Plasma total antioxidant capacity and vitamin C both increased following the ingestion of the antioxidant cocktail, whereas vitamin E levels were not influenced by the ingestion of the antioxidants. Brachial artery vasodilation during submaximal forearm handgrip exercise was greater with the placebo (7.4 +/- 1.8%) than with the antioxidant cocktail (2.3 +/- 0.7%). These data document the efficacy of an oral antioxidant cocktail in reducing free radicals and suggest that, in a healthy state, the aggressive disruption of the delicate balance between pro- and antioxidant forces can negatively impact vascular function. These findings implicate an exercise-induced reliance upon pro-oxidant-stimulated vasodilation, thereby revealing an important and positive vascular role for free radicals. PMID:17114239

  10. Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

    2013-10-01

    A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

  11. Assessment of Low Linear Energy Transfer RadiationInduced Bystander Mutagenesis in a Three-Dimensional Culture Model

    E-print Network

    Res 2005; 65(21): 9876-82) Introduction The radiation-induced ``bystander effect'' refers to the induc but are in close proximity to cells that are. The bystander effect has been shown for a variety of end pointsAssessment of Low Linear Energy Transfer Radiation­Induced Bystander Mutagenesis in a Three

  12. A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism: Development of an NTCP Model

    SciTech Connect

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively measured during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Hypothyroidism was defined as elevated serum TSH with decreased or normal free thyroxin (T4). A multivariate logistic regression model with bootstrapping was used to determine the most important prognostic variables for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Results: Thirty-five patients (33%) developed primary hypothyroidism within 2 years after radiation therapy. An NTCP model based on 2 variables, including the mean thyroid gland dose and the thyroid gland volume, was most predictive for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. NTCP values increased with higher mean thyroid gland dose (odds ratio [OR]: 1.064/Gy) and decreased with higher thyroid gland volume (OR: 0.826/cm{sup 3}). Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85. Conclusions: This is the first prospective study resulting in an NTCP model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The probability of hypothyroidism rises with increasing dose to the thyroid gland, whereas it reduces with increasing thyroid gland volume.

  13. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  14. Radiation-induced bystander effect and adaptive response in mammalian cells

    E-print Network

    Radiation-induced bystander effect and adaptive response in mammalian cells H. Zhou a,*, G. Randers conflicting phenomena, bystander effect and adaptive response, are important in determining the biological. First, there is the bystander effect, the term used to describe the bio- logical effects observed

  15. Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91­100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate reserved. Keywords: Bystander effects; Genomic instability; Ionizing radiation 1. Introduction Exposure

  16. Atm heterozygous mice are more sensitive to radiation-induced cataracts than are their

    E-print Network

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Atm heterozygous mice are more sensitive to radiation-induced cataracts than are their wild for cataract development by conventional slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Cataract development in the animals of all at any given dose. Most important in the present context is that cataracts appeared earlier

  17. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  18. Oxidative lipidomics of ?-radiation-induced lung injury: mass spectrometric characterization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Tyurina, Yulia Y; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Kapralova, Valentyna I; Wasserloos, Karla; Mosher, Mackenzie; Epperly, Michael W; Greenberger, Joel S; Pitt, Bruce R; Kagan, Valerian E

    2011-05-01

    Oxidative damage plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of ?-radiation-induced lung injury. Endothelium is a preferred target for early radiation-induced damage and apoptosis. Given the newly discovered role of oxidized phospholipids in apoptotic signaling, we performed oxidative lipidomics analysis of phospholipids in irradiated mouse lungs and cultured mouse lung endothelial cells. C57BL/6NHsd female mice were subjected to total-body irradiation (10 Gy, 15 Gy) and euthanized 24 h thereafter. Mouse lung endothelial cells were analyzed 48 h after ? irradiation (15 Gy). We found that radiation-induced apoptosis in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by non-random oxidation of phospholipids. Cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine were the major oxidized phospholipids, while more abundant phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine) remained non-oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis revealed the formation of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine oxygenated molecular species in the irradiated lung and cells. Analysis of fatty acids after hydrolysis of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine by phospholipase A(2) revealed the presence of mono-hydroperoxy and/or mono-hydroxy/mono-epoxy, mono-hydroperoxy/mono-oxo molecular species of linoleic acid. We speculate that cyt c-driven oxidations of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine associated with the execution of apoptosis in pulmonary endothelial cells are important contributors to endothelium dysfunction in ?-radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:21338246

  19. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  20. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  1. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ?40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  2. In vivo evidence for an endothelium-dependent mechanism in radiation-induced normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Emilie; François, Agnès; Toullec, Aurore; Guipaud, Olivier; Buard, Valérie; Tarlet, Georges; Mintet, Elodie; Jaillet, Cyprien; Iruela-Arispe, Maria Luisa; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism involved in side effects of radiation therapy, and especially the role of the endothelium remains unclear. Previous results showed that plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) contributes to radiation-induced intestinal injury and suggested that this role could be driven by an endothelium-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether endothelial-specific PAI-1 deletion could affect radiation-induced intestinal injury. We created a mouse model with a specific deletion of PAI-1 in the endothelium (PAI-1KOendo) by a Cre-LoxP system. In a model of radiation enteropathy, survival and intestinal radiation injury were followed as well as intestinal gene transcriptional profile and inflammatory cells intestinal infiltration. Irradiated PAI-1KOendo mice exhibited increased survival, reduced acute enteritis severity and attenuated late fibrosis compared with irradiated PAI-1flx/flx mice. Double E-cadherin/TUNEL labeling confirmed a reduced epithelial cell apoptosis in irradiated PAI-1KOendo. High-throughput gene expression combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed a putative involvement of macrophages. We observed a decrease in CD68+cells in irradiated intestinal tissues from PAI-1KOendo mice as well as modifications associated with M1/M2 polarization. This work shows that PAI-1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury by an endothelium-dependent mechanism and demonstrates in vivo that the endothelium is directly involved in the progression of radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:26510580

  3. Radiation induces genomic instability and mammary ductal dysplasia in Atm heterozygous mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, M. M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Yu, Y.; McCarthy, M.; Zabriskie, R. C.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic syndrome resulting from the inheritance of two defective copies of the ATM gene that includes among its stigmata radiosensitivity and cancer susceptibility. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that although women with a single defective copy of ATM (AT heterozygotes) appear clinically normal, they may never the less have an increased relative risk of developing breast cancer. Whether they are at increased risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from medical exposures to ionizing radiation is unknown. We have used a murine model of AT to investigate the effect of a single defective Atm allele, the murine homologue of ATM, on the susceptibility of mammary epithelial cells to radiation-induced transformation. Here we report that mammary epithelial cells from irradiated mice with one copy of Atm truncated in the PI-3 kinase domain were susceptible to radiation-induced genomic instability and generated a 10% incidence of dysplastic mammary ducts when transplanted into syngenic recipients, whereas cells from Atm(+/+) mice were stable and formed only normal ducts. Since radiation-induced ductal dysplasia is a precursor to mammary cancer, the results indicate that AT heterozygosity increases susceptibility to radiogenic breast cancer in this murine model system.

  4. 3D ultrasound Nakagami imaging for radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Bruner, Debrorah; Tridandapani, Srini; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis is a debilitating side-effect affecting up to 80% of women receiving radiotherapy for their gynecological (GYN) malignancies. Despite the significant incidence and severity, little research has been conducted to identify the pathophysiologic changes of vaginal toxicity. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami shape and PDF parameters can be used to quantify radiation-induced vaginal toxicity. These Nakagami parameters are derived from the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals to capture the physical properties (e.g., arrangement and distribution) of the biological tissues. In this paper, we propose to expand this Nakagami imaging concept from 2D to 3D to fully characterize radiation-induced changes to the vaginal wall within the radiation treatment field. A pilot study with 5 post-radiotherapy GYN patients was conducted using a clinical ultrasound scanner (6 MHz) with a mechanical stepper. A serial of 2D ultrasound images, with radio-frequency (RF) signals, were acquired at 1 mm step size. The 2D Nakagami shape and PDF parameters were calculated from the RF signal envelope with a sliding window, and then 3D Nakagami parameter images were generated from the parallel 2D images. This imaging method may be useful as we try to monitor radiation-induced vaginal injury, and address vaginal toxicities and sexual dysfunction in women after radiotherapy for GYN malignancies.

  5. Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation

    E-print Network

    Cao, Wenwu

    Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation Feng Qin,1 Ultrabroadband radiation from Yb2O3 at ambient and low air pressures was investigated under the excitation to environmental air pressure in the way that the integrated radiation intensity decreases linearly with increasing

  6. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors. PMID:26610477

  7. Use of iron colloid-enhanced MRI for study of acute radiation-induced hepatic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yuji; Ametani, Masaki; Kato, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Kamba, Masayuki; Sugihara, Syuji; Ohta, Yoshio

    1996-03-01

    We present a case with acute radiation-induced hepatic injury using chondroitin sulfate iron colloid (CSIC)-enhanced MRI. Uptake of CSIC was decreased in the irradiated portion of the liver. CSIC-enhanced MRI is useful for obtaining information on the function of the reticuloendothelial system and demarcates between irradiated and nonirradiated zones. 18 refs., 3 figs

  8. Preparation of amidoxime-fiber adsorbents by radiation-induced grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabay, Nalan; Katakai, Akio; Sugo, Takanobu

    1995-02-01

    The fibrous adsorbents containing amidoxime groups were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto polypropylene fibers, followed by functionalization of cyano groups to amidoxime groups with hydroxylamine. The polypropylene-based fibrous adsorbents exhibited a high grafting rate. The adsorption tests proved the performance of these fibrous adsorbents as a promising material for uranium recovery from seawater.

  9. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review.

    PubMed

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors. PMID:26610477

  10. Ankle brachial index screening in asymptomatic older adults

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E.; Fair, Joan M.; Varady, Ann N.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Norton, Linda C.; Iribarren, Carlos; Go, Alan S.; Fortmann, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) by measuring ankle brachial index (ABI) in asymptomatic older adults is currently recommended to improve cardiovascular disease risk assessment and establish early treatment, but it is not clear if the strategy is useful in all populations. We examined the prevalence and independent predictors of an abnormal ABI (<0.90), in an asymptomatic sample of 1,017 adults, 60 to 69 years old, enrolled in the ADVANCE study. Methods Baseline data collected between December 2001 and January 2004 among the healthy older controls enrolled in ADVANCE was examined. Frequency distributions and prevalence estimates of an abnormal ABI were calculated, using both standard and modified definitions of ABI. Stepwise logistic regression was used to examine independent predictors of ABI <0.90. Signal detection analysis using recursive partitioning was employed to explore potential demographic and clinical variables related to ABI <0.90. Results The prevalence of ABI <0.90 was 2% when using the standard definition and 5% when using a modified definition. ABI prevalence did not differ by gender (P >.05). Compared with subjects who had a normal ABI (0.90–1.39), subjects with an ABI <0.90 were more likely to currently smoke, be physically inactive, have a coronary artery calcium score >10, and an FRS >20% (P ?.02). Independent predictors of ABI <0.90 when using the standard definition included currently smoking, physical inactivity, and body mass index >30 (all P values ?.03), and when using the modified definition included currently smoking, physical inactivity, and hypertension (all P values ?.04). Currently, smoking was the only significant variable for ABI <0.90 derived through recursive partitioning (P = .02), and indicated that prevalence of ABI <0.90 was 1.5% for nonsmokers, while it was 6.6% for current smokers. Conclusions ABI screening in generally healthy individuals 60 to 69 years old may result in lower prevalence rates of a positive result than estimates based on studies in clinical populations. The modified definition for calculating ABI captured more asymptomatic adults with suspected peripheral arterial disease. More evaluation of the appropriate role of ABI screening in unselected populations is needed before routine screening is implemented. PMID:21570532

  11. Robot-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Facca, Sybille; Hendriks, Sarah; Mantovani, Gustavo; Selber, Jesse C; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    New developments in the surgery of the brachial plexus include the use of less invasive surgical approaches and more precise techniques. The theoretical advantages of the use of robotics versus endoscopy are the disappearance of physiological tremor, three-dimensional vision, high definition, magnification, and superior ergonomics. On a fresh cadaver, a dissection space was created and maintained by insufflation of CO2. The supraclavicular brachial plexus was dissected using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A segment of the C5 nerve root was grafted robotically. A series of eight clinical cases of nerve damage around the shoulder girdle were operated on using the da Vinci robot. The ability to perform successful microneural repair was confirmed in both the authors' clinical and experimental studies, but the entire potential of robotically assisted microneural surgery was not realized during these initial cases because an open incision was still required. Robotic-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus is still in its early stages. It would be ideal to have even finer and more suitable instruments to apply fibrin glue or electrostimulation in nerve surgery. Nevertheless, the prospects of minimally invasive techniques would allow acute and subacute surgical approach of traumatic brachial plexus palsy safely, without significant and cicatricial morbidity. PMID:24872778

  12. The technique comparison of brachial plexus blocks by ultrasound guided with blocks by nerve stimulator guided

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Ying; Chen, Zhen-Qiang; Jia, Hai-Yan; Dai, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Brachial plexus perineural blocks provide specific analgesia for upper limb surgery. We present our experience with ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus perineural blocks for distal upper limb surgery. Although single-injection ultrasound-guided supraclavicular blocks have been reported, little is known about the advantages using this approach compared with nerve stimulator guided. Methods: There were 60 patients who underwent upper limb surgery for orthopedic trauma and received a supraclavicular brachial plexus anesthesia. 30 patients (U-group) were injected by an ultrasound-guided technique with the needle tip remaining under direct vision. 30 patients (NS-group) were inserted by nerve stimulator guided. Recorded the onset time, puncture times, pains cases with tourniquet in each group. Compared the difference between two groups. Results: In U-group, all cases had successful perineural injection. Most of them, effect of anesthesia was fast onset and needed insert only once. No pains were reported under using tourniquet. There were no vessel punctures or other direct procedure-related complications. In NS-group, most injections were successful, but slow onset and needed multiply insert needle. 5 patients said pains under using tourniquet when surgery started and had to add opioid by vein. One patients’ lung were puncture and result in pneumothorax. One patient’s was intravascular injection. Conclusions: Supraclavicular brachial plexus perineural insertion using ultrasound guidance is feasible and almost have no complications, deserves further study with a randomized controlled trial comparing this relatively new technique with only using nerve stimulator. PMID:26629206

  13. Robot-Assisted Surgery of the Shoulder Girdle and Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Facca, Sybille; Hendriks, Sarah; Mantovani, Gustavo; Selber, Jesse C.; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    New developments in the surgery of the brachial plexus include the use of less invasive surgical approaches and more precise techniques. The theoretical advantages of the use of robotics versus endoscopy are the disappearance of physiological tremor, three-dimensional vision, high definition, magnification, and superior ergonomics. On a fresh cadaver, a dissection space was created and maintained by insufflation of CO2. The supraclavicular brachial plexus was dissected using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A segment of the C5 nerve root was grafted robotically. A series of eight clinical cases of nerve damage around the shoulder girdle were operated on using the da Vinci robot. The ability to perform successful microneural repair was confirmed in both the authors' clinical and experimental studies, but the entire potential of robotically assisted microneural surgery was not realized during these initial cases because an open incision was still required. Robotic-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus is still in its early stages. It would be ideal to have even finer and more suitable instruments to apply fibrin glue or electrostimulation in nerve surgery. Nevertheless, the prospects of minimally invasive techniques would allow acute and subacute surgical approach of traumatic brachial plexus palsy safely, without significant and cicatricial morbidity. PMID:24872778

  14. Changes in Spinal Cord Architecture after Brachial Plexus Injury in the Newborn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korak, Klaus J.; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa; Frey, Manfred; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a devastating birth injury. While many children recover spontaneously, 20-25% are left with a permanent impairment of the affected limb. So far, concepts of pathology and recovery have focused on the injury of the peripheral nerve. Proximal nerve injury at birth, however, leads to massive injury-induced…

  15. The Association of Homocysteine and Related Factors to Brachial Artery Diameter and Flow-Mediated Dilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BAFMD) has been proposed as a measurement of the degree and severity of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the associations between BAFMD and homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, (2) examine the influence of 5,10-me...

  16. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Automatic contouring of brachial plexus using a multi-atlas approach for lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinzhong; Amini, Arya; Williamson, Ryan; Zhang, Lifei; Zhang, Yongbin; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Cox, James; Welsh, James; Court, Laurence; Dong, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate a multi-atlas segmentation approach to facilitating accurate and consistent delineation of low-contrast brachial plexuses on CT images for lung cancer radiotherapy. Materials and Methods We retrospectively identified 90 lung cancer patients with treatment volumes near the brachial plexus. Ten representative patients were selected to form an atlas group, and their brachial plexuses were delineated manually. We used deformable image registration to map each atlas brachial plexus to the remaining 80 patients. In each patient, a composite contour was created from 10 individual segmentations using the Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm. This auto-delineated contour was reviewed and modified appropriately for each patient. We also performed 10 leave-one-out tests using the 10 atlases to validate the segmentation accuracy and demonstrate the contouring consistency using multi-atlas segmentation. Results The multi-atlas segmentation took less than 2 minutes to complete. Contour modification took 5 minutes compared with 20 minutes for manual contouring from scratch. The multi-atlas segmentation from the 10 leave-one-out tests had a mean 3D volume overlap of 59.2% ± 8.2% and a mean 3D surface distance of 2.4 mm ± 0.5 mm. The distances between the individual and average contours in the 10 leave-one-out tests demonstrated much better contouring consistency for modified contours than for manual contours. The auto-segmented contours did not require substantial modification, demonstrated by the good agreement between the modified and auto-segmented contours in the 80 patients. Dose volume histograms of auto-segmented and modified contours were also in good agreement, showing that editing auto-segmented contours is clinically acceptable in view of the dosimetric impact. Conclusions Multi-atlas segmentation greatly reduced contouring time and improved contouring consistency. Editing auto-segmented contours to delineate the brachial plexus proved to be a better clinical practice than manually contouring from scratch. PMID:24273627

  18. The potential influence of radiation-induced microenvironments in neoplastic progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a complete carcinogen, able both to initiate and promote neoplastic progression and is a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland. Tissue response to radiation is a composite of genetic damage, cell death and induction of new gene expression patterns. Although DNA damage is believed to initiate carcinogenesis, the contribution of these other aspects of radiation response are beginning to be explored. Our studies demonstrate that radiation elicits rapid and persistent global alterations in the mammary gland microenvironment. We postulate that radiation-induced microenvironments may affect epithelial cells neoplastic transformation by altering their number or susceptibility. Alternatively, radiation induced microenvironments may exert a selective force on initiated cells and/or be conducive to progression. A key impetus for these studies is the possibility that blocking these events could be a strategy to interrupt neoplastic progression.

  19. Radiation-induced carcinoma of the lung--the St. Lawrence tragedy.

    PubMed

    Wright, E S; Couves, C M

    1977-10-01

    This paper reviews the problem of radiation-induced carcinoma of the lung in the fluorspar mines of Newfoundland. Seventy-eight workers have died from this disease since commercial operation commenced in 1933. In 1959 the source of the radiation was identified as radon, and its daughter nucleotides present as contaminants in water seeping into the mines. Heavy smoking is probably a synergistic cocarcinogen. The histology in this group of patients with radiation-induced lung cancers is unusual, since squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 90 percent of all cases. There have been four patients with second primary lung cancers. Radical radiotherapy has been the primary mode of treatment based on the reluctance of the miners to undergo operation. Surprisingly good results have been obtained, with an average survival time of 34 months after treatment. Institution of improved ventilation has reduced radiation to safe levels, but an estimated 120 miners from the pre-1960 era are still at risk. PMID:904348

  20. Relation between measurable and principal characteristics of radiation-induced shape-change of graphite

    E-print Network

    M. V. Arjakov; A. V. Subbotin; S. V. Panyukov; O. V. Ivanov; A. S. Pokrovskii; D. V. Kharkov

    2011-04-12

    On the basis of studies of radiation-induced shape-change of reactor graphite GR-280, through the series of measurements of samples with different orientation of cutting with respect to the direction of extrusion, a conclusion is made about the existence of polycrystal substructural elements - domains. Domains, like graphite as a whole, possess the property of transverse isotropy, but have different amplitudes of shape-change and random orientations of the axes of axial symmetry. The model of graphite, constructed on the basis of the concept of domains allowed to explain from a unified point of view most of existing experimental data. It is shown that the presence of the disoriented domain structure leads to the development of radiation-induced stresses and to the dependence of the shape-change on the size of graphite samples. We derive the relation between the shape-change of finite size samples and the actual shape-change of macro-graphite.

  1. Investigation of radiation-induced multilayered signalling response of the inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Babini, G; Ugolini, M; Morini, J; Baiocco, G; Mariotti, L; de Fatis, P Tabarelli; Liotta, M; Ottolenghi, A

    2015-09-01

    Ionising radiation exposure of cells might induce the perturbation of cell functions and, in particular, the activation or inhibition of several important pathways. This perturbation can cause the deregulation of both intra- and extra-cellular signalling cascades (such as the inflammatory pathway) and alter not only the behaviour of directly exposed cells but also the neighbouring non-irradiated ones, through the so-called bystander effect. The aim of the present work was to investigate the complex nonlinear interactions between the inflammatory pathway and other strictly interlaced signalling pathways, such as Erk1/2 and Akt/PKB, focusing on the radiation-induced perturbation of such pathways in the dose range of 0-2 Gy. The results show how radiation affects these interconnected pathways and how confounding factors, such as the change of culture medium, can hide radiation-induced perturbations. PMID:25877540

  2. Gamma radiation induced effects in floppy and rigid Ge-containing chalcogenide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ailavajhala, Mahesh S.; Mitkova, Maria; Gonzalez-Velo, Yago; Barnaby, Hugh; Kozicki, Michael N.; Holbert, Keith; Poweleit, Christian; Butt, Darryl P.

    2014-01-28

    We explore the radiation induced effects in thin films from the Ge-Se to Ge-Te systems accompanied with silver radiation induced diffusion within these films, emphasizing two distinctive compositional representatives from both systems containing a high concentration of chalcogen or high concentration of Ge. The studies are conducted on blanket chalcogenide films or on device structures containing also a silver source. Data about the electrical conductivity as a function of the radiation dose were collected and discussed based on material characterization analysis. Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction Spectroscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy provided us with data about the structure, structural changes occurring as a result of radiation, molecular formations after Ag diffusion into the chalcogenide films, Ag lateral diffusion as a function of radiation and the level of oxidation of the studied films. Analysis of the electrical testing suggests application possibilities of the studied devices for radiation sensing for various conditions.

  3. Gamma radiation induced effects in floppy and rigid Ge-containing chalcogenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailavajhala, Mahesh S.; Gonzalez-Velo, Yago; Poweleit, Christian; Barnaby, Hugh; Kozicki, Michael N.; Holbert, Keith; Butt, Darryl P.; Mitkova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    We explore the radiation induced effects in thin films from the Ge-Se to Ge-Te systems accompanied with silver radiation induced diffusion within these films, emphasizing two distinctive compositional representatives from both systems containing a high concentration of chalcogen or high concentration of Ge. The studies are conducted on blanket chalcogenide films or on device structures containing also a silver source. Data about the electrical conductivity as a function of the radiation dose were collected and discussed based on material characterization analysis. Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction Spectroscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy provided us with data about the structure, structural changes occurring as a result of radiation, molecular formations after Ag diffusion into the chalcogenide films, Ag lateral diffusion as a function of radiation and the level of oxidation of the studied films. Analysis of the electrical testing suggests application possibilities of the studied devices for radiation sensing for various conditions.

  4. Radiation-induced skin cancer and radiodermatitis of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    van Vloten, W.A.; Hermans, J.; van Daal, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    From a cohort of 2400 patients who had been irradiated 19 to 48 years previously for benign diseases in the head and neck region a randomly selected group of 605 patients was selected and traced back. From the 360 patients alive, 257 were examined clinically and 49 were examined by questionnaire for radiation-induced skin tumors and radiodermatitis. In 21 patients, a total of 30 skin tumors were diagnosed. In 8 of 21 patients, 10 skin carcinomas were detected at recall. A dose-effect relationship of 40 carcinomas/10(4) persons/Gy for a median follow-up period of 41 years for the area exposed was calculated. The severity of radiodermatitis is associated with a higher prevalence of skin cancer. The number of radiation-induced skin cancers rises with the post-treatment time. Because of these late radiation effects, radiotherapy of benign skin lesions is contraindicated, especially now that other therapy modalities are available.

  5. A case of radiation-induced osteosarcoma treated effectively by boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Futamura, Gen; Kawabata, Shinji; Siba, Hiroyuki; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Ono, Koji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Minoru; Todo, Tomoki; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    We treated a 54-year-old Japanese female with a recurrent radiation-induced osteosarcoma arising from left occipital skull, by reactor-based boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Her tumor grew rapidly with subcutaneous and epidural extension. She eventually could not walk because of cerebellar ataxia. The tumor was inoperable and radioresistant. BNCT showed a marked initial therapeutic effect: the subcutaneous/epidural tumor reduced without radiation damage of the scalp except hair loss and the patient could walk again only 3 weeks after BNCT. BNCT seems to be a safe and very effective modality in the management of radiation-induced osteosarcomas that are not eligible for operation and other treatment modalities. PMID:25366059

  6. Radiation induced darkening of the optical elements in the Startracker camera

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.H.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1993-03-01

    Optical glass flats that closely simulate the elements used in the Startracker lens designs were exposed to doses of ionizing radiation ranging from 0.44 to 1300 krad. Photometer traces determined the transmittance of the samples as a function of both wavelength and dose for wavelengths in the range 300 to 1200 nm. Cerium stabilized glasses used in the radiation stabilized Startracker system showed only a small amount of darkening for doses up to and exceeding 1 Mrad. Glasses used in the unstabilized Startracker design showed significant darkening to visible and ultra-violet spectra for doses as low as 5 krad. Plots of transmittance versus wavelength for various doses are given for each of the Startracker optical elements. Radiation induced absorption parameters that determine the radiation induced absorption coefficient are tabulated and plotted versus wavelength.

  7. Energy Distribution of Electrons in Radiation Induced-Helium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Energy distribution of high energy electrons as they slow down and thermalize in a gaseous medium is studied. The energy distribution in the entire energy range from source energies down is studied analytically. A helium medium in which primary electrons are created by the passage of heavy-charged particles from nuclear reactions is emphasized. A radiation-induced plasma is of interest in a variety of applications, such as radiation pumped lasers and gaseous core nuclear reactors.

  8. Radiatively induced Lorentz-violating operator of mass dimension five in QED

    SciTech Connect

    Mariz, T.

    2011-02-15

    The first higher derivative term of the photon sector of Lorentz-violating QED, with an operator of mass dimension d=5, is radiatively induced from the fermion sector, which contains a derivative term with the dimensionless coefficient g{sup {lambda}{mu}{nu}}. The calculation is performed perturbatively in the coefficient for Lorentz violation, and, due to the fact that the contributions are quadratically divergent, we adopt dimensional regularization.

  9. Effects of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, W.A.; Rabin, B.M.; Lee, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced taste aversion was examined to assess the importance of the vagus nerve in transmitting information on the peripheral toxicity of radiation to the brain. Vagotomy had no effect on taste aversion learning, consistent with reports using other toxins. The data support the involvement of a blood-borne factor in the acquisition of taste aversion induced by ionizing radiation.

  10. Impact of p53 status on heavy-ion radiation-induced micronuclei in circulating erythrocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Torous, D.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice that differed in their p53 genetic status were exposed to an acute dose of highly charged and energetic (HZE) iron particle radiation. Micronuclei (MN) in two distinct populations of circulating peripheral blood erythrocytes, the immature reticulocytes (RETs) and the mature normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs), were measured using a simple and efficient flow cytometric procedure. Our results show significant elevation in the frequency of micronucleated RETs (%MN-RETs) at 2 and 3 days post-radiation. At 3 days post-irradiation, the magnitude of the radiation-induced MN-RET was 2.3-fold higher in the irradiated p53 wild-type animals compared to the unirradiated controls, 2.5-fold higher in the p53 hemizygotes and 4.3-fold higher in the p53 nullizygotes. The persistence of this radiation-induced elevation of MN-RETs is dependent on the p53 genetic background of the animal. In the p53 wild-type and p53 hemizygotes, %MN-RETs returned to control levels by 9 days post-radiation. However, elevated levels of %MN-RETs in p53 nullizygous mice persisted beyond 56 days post-radiation. We also observed elevated MN-NCEs in the peripheral circulation after radiation, but the changes in radiation-induced levels of MN-NCEs appear dampened compared to those of the MN-RETs for all three strains of animals. These results suggest that the lack of p53 gene function may play a role in the iron particle radiation-induced genomic instability in stem cell populations in the hematopoietic system.

  11. Gamma knife radiosurgery of radiation-induced intracranial tumors: Local control, outcomes, and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ashley W.; Brown, Paul D.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.; Gorman, Deborah A.; Schomberg, Paula J.

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To determine local control (LC) and complication rates for patients who underwent radiosurgery for radiation-induced intracranial tumors. Methods and Materials: Review of a prospectively maintained database (2,714 patients) identified 16 patients (20 tumors) with radiation-induced tumors treated with radiosurgery between 1990 and 2004. Tumor types included typical meningioma (n = 17), atypical meningioma (n = 2), and schwannoma (n 1). Median patient age at radiosurgery was 47.5 years (range, 27-70 years). The median tumor margin dose was 16 Gy (range, 12-20 Gy). Median follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 10.8-146.2 months). Time-to-event outcomes were calculated with Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Three-year and 5-year LC rates were 100%. Three-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 92% and 80%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 3 and 5 years were 100%. Three patients died: 1 had in-field progression 65.1 months after radiosurgery and later died of the tumor, 1 died of progression of a preexisting brain malignancy, and 1 died of an unrelated cause. One patient had increased seizure activity that correlated with development of edema seen on neuroimaging. Conclusions: LC, survival, and complication rates in our series are comparable to those in previous reports of radiosurgery for intracranial meningiomas. Also, LC rates with radiosurgery are at least comparable to those of surgical series for radiation-induced meningiomas. Radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for radiation-induced intracranial tumors, most of which are typical meningiomas.

  12. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  13. Giant Goos-Hänchen shifts and radiation-induced trapping of Helmholtz solitons at nonlinear interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Curto, Julio; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; McDonald, Graham S

    2011-09-15

    Giant Goos-Hänchen shifts and radiation-induced trapping are studied at the planar boundary separating two focusing Kerr media within the framework of the Helmholtz theory. The analysis, valid for all angles of incidence, reveals that interfaces exhibiting linear external refraction can also accommodate both phenomena. Numerical evidence of these effects is provided, based on analytical predictions derived from a generalized Snell's law. PMID:21931405

  14. Study on the radiation-induced copolymerization of acrylamide with sodium acrylate in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H. J.; Zhang, W. X.; Sun, Z. W.; Che, J. T.; Li, Z. H.

    1993-07-01

    In present work, the mechanism of radiation-induced copolymerization of acrylamide(AM) with sodium acrylate(AANa) in aqueous solution was studied. A method to protect the copolymerization system from the crosslinking and a carbon-carbon mechanism to form gel in copolymerization reaction have been proposed. The condition to prepare the products with different molecular weight, especially with very high molecular weight were found.

  15. The role of secretory granules in radiation-induced dysfunction of rat salivary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, B.; Van Waarde, M.A.W.H.; Konings, A.W.T.; Vissink, A. |; `s-Gravenmade, E.J.

    1995-02-01

    To investigate the possible role of secretory granules in radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction, rats were pretreated with isoproterenol (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to degranulate salivary gland acini. At maximal depletion, salivary glands were locally irradiated with a single dose of 15 Gy of X rays. Parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva samples were collected before and 1-10 days after irradiation. The lag phase, flow rate, concentrations of potassium and sodium, and amylase secretion were determined. Sham-treated, isoproterenol-treated and irradiated animals provided reference data. In the parotid gland, but not in the submandibular gland, protection against radiation-induced changes in flow rate and composition of saliva occurred after pretreatment with isoproterenol. Combining morphological data from a previous study with data from the current study, it is suggested that improvement of parotid gland function is attributed predominantly to a proliferative stimulus on acinar cells by isoproterenol and not to its degranulation effect. After pretreatment with isoproterenol, an earlier expression of radiation-induced acinar cell damage leading to death was observed, followed by a faster tissue recovery. Thus the proliferative stimulus on acinar cells may accelerate the unmasking of latent lethal damage, resulting in the earlier replacement of dead cells by new, functionally intact cells. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity and implications for future clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Jenrow, Kenneth A.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    To summarize current knowledge regarding mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue injury and medical countermeasures available to reduce its severity. Advances in radiation delivery using megavoltage and intensity-modulated radiation therapy have permitted delivery of higher doses of radiation to well-defined tumor target tissues. Injury to critical normal tissues and organs, however, poses substantial risks in the curative treatment of cancers, especially when radiation is administered in combination with chemotherapy. The principal pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of tissue stem cells and progenitor cells and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Emerging concepts of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity suggest that the recovery and repopulation of stromal stem cells remain chronically impaired by long-lived free radicals, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines resulting in progressive damage after radiation exposure. Better understanding the mechanisms mediating interactions among excessive generation of reactive oxygen species, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated macrophages, and role of bone marrow-derived progenitor and stem cells may provide novel insight on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury of tissues. Further understanding the molecular signaling pathways of cytokines and chemokines would reveal novel targets for protecting or mitigating radiation injury of tissues and organs. PMID:25324981

  17. Loss of Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Attenuates Murine Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, Paul; Hartenstein, Bettina; Teurich, Sybille; Dadrich, Monika; Hauser, Kai; Abdollahi, Amir; Groene, Hermann-Josef; Angel, Peter; Huber, Peter E.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary fibrosis is a disorder of the lungs with limited treatment options. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of proteases that degrade extracellular matrix with roles in fibrosis. Here we studied the role of MMP13 in a radiation-induced lung fibrosis model using a MMP13 knockout mouse. Methods and Materials: We investigated the role of MMP13 in lung fibrosis by investigating the effects of MMP13 deficiency in C57Bl/6 mice after 20-Gy thoracic irradiation (6-MV Linac). The morphologic results in histology were correlated with qualitative and quantitative results of volume computed tomography (VCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical outcome. Results: We found that MMP13 deficient mice developed less pulmonary fibrosis than their wildtype counterparts, showed attenuated acute pulmonary inflammation (days after irradiation), and a reduction of inflammation during the later fibrogenic phase (5-6 months after irradiation). The reduced fibrosis in MMP13 deficient mice was evident in histology with reduced thickening of alveolar septi and reduced remodeling of the lung architecture in good correlation with reduced features of lung fibrosis in qualitative and quantitative VCT and MRI studies. The partial resistance of MMP13-deficient mice to fibrosis was associated with a tendency towards a prolonged mouse survival. Conclusions: Our data indicate that MMP13 has a role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Further, our findings suggest that MMP13 constitutes a potential drug target to attenuate radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

  18. The Efficacy of Nardostachys Jatamansi Against The Radiation Induced Haematological Damage In Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Damodara K M; Shetty, Lathika; A P, Krishna; Kumari, Suchetha N; Sanjeev, Ganesh; P, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation is increasingly being used for medical purposes and it is an established weapon in the diagnosis and the therapy of cancer. An exposure to 1-2 Gys causes the NVD (Nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea) syndrome, whereas an exposure to 2-6 Gys causes the haematopoietic syndrome. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of the Nardostachys jatamansi root extract (NJE) on the radiation induced haematological damage in rats. Materials and Methods: EBR was performed at the Microtron Centre, Mangalore University, India. Rats were treated with NJE once daily for 15 days before and after the irradiation. After the irradiation, blood was collected for determining the peripheral blood counts (RBC and WBC), haemoglobin, the platelet count and the packed cell volume (PCV) at 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 5, 10 and 15 days post irradiation. The data was analyzed by one way ANOVA, followed by the Tukey’s test for multiple comparisons. Result: NJE provided protection against the radiation induced haematological disorders. The rats treated with NJE exhibited a time dependent significant elevation in all the haematological parameters which were studied and its modulation upto the near normal level was recorded. Conclusion: From this study, we concluded that, NJE provides protection by modulating the radiation induced damage on the haematopoietic system. PMID:23905085

  19. Altered gastric emptying and prevention of radiation-induced vomiting in dogs. [Cobalt 60 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Jacobus, J.P.; Grissom, M.P.; Eng, R.R.; Conklin, J.J.

    1984-03-01

    The relation between radiation-induced vomiting and gastric emptying is unclear and the treatment of this condition is not established. We explored, therefore, (a) the effect of cobalt 60 irradiation on gastric emptying of solids and liquids and (b) the possibility of preventing radiation-induced vomiting with the dopamine antagonist, domperidone. Twenty dogs were studied on two separate days, blindly and in random order, after i.v. injection of either a placebo or 0.06 mg/kg domperidone. On a third day, they received 8 Gy (800 rads) whole body irradiation with cobalt 60 gamma-rays after either placebo (n . 10) or domperidone (n . 10). Before each study, each dog was fed chicken liver tagged in vivo with 99mTc-sulfur colloid (solid marker), and water containing 111In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (liquid marker). Dogs were placed in a Pavlov stand for the subsequent 3 h and radionuclide imaging was performed at 10-min intervals. Irradiation produced vomiting in 9 of 10 dogs given placebo but only in 1 of 10 dogs pretreated with domperidone (p less than 0.01). Gastric emptying of liquids and solids was significantly suppressed by irradiation (p less than 0.01) after both placebo and domperidone. These results demonstrate that radiation-induced vomiting is accompanied by suppression of gastric emptying. Furthermore, domperidone prevents vomiting produced by ionizing radiation but does not alter the accompanying delay of gastric emptying.

  20. Role of the area postrema in radiation-induced taste aversion learning and emesis in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Chedester, A.L.; Lee, J.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the area postrema in radiation-induced emesis and taste aversion learning and the relationship between these behaviors were studied in cats. The potential involvement of neural factors which might be independent of the area postrema was minimized by using low levels of ionizing radiation (100 rads at a dose rate of 40 rads/min) to elicit a taste aversion, and by using body-only exposures (4500 and 6000 rads at 450 rads/min) to produce emesis. Lesions of the area postrema disrupted both taste aversion learning and emesis following irradiation. These results, which indicate that the area postrema is involved in the mediation of both radiation-induced emesis and taste aversion learning in cats under these experimental conditions, are interpreted as being consistent with the hypotheses that similar mechanisms mediate both responses to exposure to ionizing radiation, and that the taste aversion learning paradigm can therefore serve as a model system for studying radiation-induced emesis.

  1. Radiation Induced Non-targeted Response: Mechanism and Potential Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Tom K.; Zhou, Hongning; Chai, Yunfei; Ponnaiya, Brian; Ivanov, Vladimir N.

    2012-01-01

    Generations of students in radiation biology have been taught that heritable biological effects require direct damage to DNA. Radiation-induced non-targeted/bystander effects represent a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation in that extranuclear and extracellular effects may also contribute to the biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Although radiation induced bystander effects have been well documented in a variety of biological systems, including 3D human tissue samples and whole organisms, the mechanism is not known. There is recent evidence that the NF-?B-dependent gene expression of interleukin 8, interleukin 6, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 33 in directly irradiated cells produced the cytokines and prostaglandin E2 with autocrine/paracrine functions, which further activated signaling pathways and induced NF-?B-dependent gene expression in bystander cells. The observations that heritable DNA alterations can be propagated to cells many generations after radiation exposure and that bystander cells exhibit genomic instability in ways similar to directly hit cells indicate that the low dose radiation response is a complex interplay of various modulating factors. The potential implication of the non-targeted response in radiation induced secondary cancer is discussed. A better understanding of the mechanism of the non-targeted effects will be invaluable to assess its clinical relevance and ways in which the bystander phenomenon can be manipulated to increase therapeutic gain in radiotherapy. PMID:21143185

  2. Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

    Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  3. Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M; Azzam, Edouard I; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-31

    It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

  4. Protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells by treatment with antioxidant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, X. Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Zhou, Zhaozong; Donahue, Jeremiah J.; Guan, Jun; Kennedy, Ann R. . E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of antioxidant agents against space radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of selected concentrations of N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, co-enzyme Q10, {alpha}-lipoic acid, L-selenomethionine, and vitamin E succinate on radiation-induced oxidative stress were evaluated in MCF10 human breast epithelial cells exposed to radiation with X-rays, {gamma}-rays, protons, or high mass, high atomic number, and high energy particles using a dichlorofluorescein assay. Results: The results demonstrated that these antioxidants are effective in protecting against radiation-induced oxidative stress and complete or nearly complete protection was achieved by treating the cells with a combination of these agents before and during the radiation exposure. Conclusion: The combination of antioxidants evaluated in this study is likely be a promising countermeasure for protection against space radiation-induced adverse biologic effects.

  5. Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

  6. Accurate quantitative measurements of brachial artery cross-sectional vascular area and vascular volume elastic modulus using automated oscillometric measurements: comparison with brachial artery ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Ochi, Noriki; Inoue, Mamiko; Nishida, Mutumi; Aziki, Kumi; Horie, Tatsunori; Katoh, Chietsugu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-01-01

    Increasing vascular diameter and attenuated vascular elasticity may be reliable markers for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements have been complex, operator-dependent or invasive. Recently, we developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure a brachial artery's estimated area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (VE). The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and VE. Rest eA and VE were measured using the recently developed automated detector with the oscillometric method. eA was estimated using pressure/volume curves and VE was defined as follows (VE=? pressure/ (100 × ? area/area) mm?Hg/%). Sixteen volunteers (age 35.2±13.1 years) underwent the oscillometric measurements and brachial ultrasound at rest and under nitroglycerin (NTG) administration. Oscillometric measurement was performed twice on different days. The rest eA correlated with ultrasound-measured brachial artery area (r=0.77, P<0.001). Rest eA and VE measurement showed good reproducibility (eA: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.88, VE: ICC=0.78). Under NTG stress, eA was significantly increased (12.3±3.0 vs. 17.1±4.6?mm2, P<0.001), and this was similar to the case with ultrasound evaluation (4.46±0.72 vs. 4.73±0.75?mm, P<0.001). VE was also decreased (0.81±0.16 vs. 0.65±0.11?mm?Hg/%, P<0.001) after NTG. Cross-sectional vascular area calculated using this automated oscillometric measurement correlated with ultrasound measurement and showed good reproducibility. Therefore, this is a reliable approach and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings. PMID:25693851

  7. A Case of Horner's Syndrome following Ultrasound-Guided Infraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Walid, Trabelsi; Mondher, Belhaj Amor; Mohamed Anis, Lebbi; Mustapha, Ferjani

    2012-01-01

    Horner's syndrome results from paralysis of the ipsilateral sympathetic cervical chain (stellate ganglion) caused by surgery, drugs (mainly high concentrations of local anesthetics), local compression (hematoma or tumor), or inadequate perioperative positioning of the patient. It occurs in 100% of the patients with an interscalene block of the brachial plexus and can also occur in patients with other types of supraclavicular blocks.In this case report, we presented a case of Horner's syndrome after performing an ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block with 15?mL of bupivacaine 0.5%. It appeared 40 minutes after the block with specific triad (ptosis, miosis, and exophtalmia) and quickly disappears within 2 hours and a half without any sequelae. Horner's syndrome may be described as an unpleasant side effect because it has no clinical consequences in itself. For this reason anesthesiologists should be aware of this syndrome, and if it occurs patients should be reassured and monitored closely. PMID:22957277

  8. Ultrasound-guided central cluster approach for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Geum; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kim, Hong Soon; Park, Seol Ju; Suh, Young Je

    2015-01-01

    There are many different approaches to ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block (US-SCBPB), and each has a different success rate and complications. The most commonly performed US-SCBPB is the corner pocket approach in which the needle is advanced very close to the subclavian artery and pleura. Therefore, it may be associated with a risk of subclavian artery puncture or pneumothorax. We advanced the needle into the central part of the neural cluster after penetrating the sheath of the brachial plexus in US-SCBPB. We refer to this new method as the "central cluster approach." In this approach, the needle does not have to advance close to the subclavian artery or pleura. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of the central cluster approach in US-SCBPB. PMID:26634085

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Infected Brachial Pseudoaneurysm in an Intravenous Drug Abuser: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Boieru, Raluca; Georg, Yannick; Ramlugun, Dharmesh; Martinot, Martin; Camin, Amelie; Matysiak, Lucien; Kretz, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old male, admitted in the emergency room with a nonruptured brachial pseudoaneurysm after buprenorphine injection, with no signs of distal acute ischemia. After endovascular treatment with a nitinol covered stent associated with adapted antibiotherapy and 35 days of hospitalizations, the patient was discharged with good short results but stent need to be removed at 6 months for thrombosis and partial exposure through the wound. PMID:26142880

  10. Sensory Evaluation of the Hands in Children with Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmgren, Tove; Peltonen, Jari; Linder, Tove; Rautakorpi, Sanna; Nietosvaara, Yrjana

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sensory changes of the hand in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI). Ninety-five patients (43 females, 52 males) comprising two age groups, 6 to 8 years (mean age 7y 6mo) and 12 to 14 years (mean age 13y 2mo), were included. Sixty-four had upper (cervical [C] 5-6), 19 upper and middle (C5-7), and 12 had total…

  11. Documentation of brachial plexus compression in the thoracic inlet with quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Lee, G W; Massry, D R; Kupfer, D M; Abrams, R

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the cutaneous pressure threshold of subjects with and without a clinical diagnosis of brachial plexus compression in the thoracic inlet, usually termed thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). Sixty-one subjects (102 arms) made up the control population; 11 subjects 120 arms) made up the TOS population. Assessment by two upper-extremity specialists preceded the testing. The one-point cutaneous pressure threshold was measured with the Pressure-Specifying Sensory Device (PSSD) on the pulp of both the index and little finger (upper and lower brachial plexus distributions) with the arm in the unprovoked (adducted) and provoked (abducted 180 degrees) positions. In the control subjects, there was no significant change in the cutaneous pressure threshold between unprovoked and provoked positions. In contrast in patients with TOS, there was a significant increase in the cutaneous pressure threshold at both sites (p < .0001 ) between the unprovoked and the provoked positions. Furthermore, the cutaneous pressure threshold for patients with TOS was significantly higher in both positions than it was in the controls (p < .0001 ). It was concluded that measurement of changes in the cutaneous pressure threshold with the PSSD in distal sensory targets of the upper and lower trunk can identify patients symptomatic for compression, when the brachial plexus is provoked as part of the testing sequence. PMID:10668749

  12. Gross anatomy of the brachial plexus in the giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    PubMed

    Souza, P R; Cardoso, J R; Araujo, L B M; Moreira, P C; Cruz, V S; Araujo, E G

    2014-10-01

    Ten forelimbs of five Myrmecophaga tridactyla were examined to study the anatomy of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexuses of the M. tridactyla observed in the present study were formed by the ventral rami of the last four cervical spinal nerves, C5 through C8, and the first thoracic spinal nerve, T1. These primary roots joined to form two trunks: a cranial trunk comprising ventral rami from C5-C7 and a caudal trunk receiving ventral rami from C8-T1. The nerves originated from these trunks and their most constant arrangement were as follows: suprascapular (C5-C7), subscapular (C5-C7), cranial pectoral (C5-C8), caudal pectoral (C8-T1), axillary (C5-C7), musculocutaneous (C5-C7), radial (C5-T1), median (C5-T1), ulnar (C5-T1), thoracodorsal (C5-C8), lateral thoracic (C7-T1) and long thoracic (C6-C7). In general, the brachial plexus in the M. tridactyla is similar to the plexuses in mammals, but the number of rami contributing to the formation of each nerve in the M. tridactyla was found to be larger than those of most mammals. This feature may be related to the very distinctive anatomical specializations of the forelimb of the anteaters. PMID:23952693

  13. Administration of interleukin-6 stimulates multilineage hematopoiesis and accelerates recovery from radiation-induced hematopoietic depression

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Williams, J.L.; Schwartz, G.N.; Souza, L.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Hematopoietic depression and subsequent susceptibility to potentially lethal opportunistic infections are well-documented phenomena following radiotherapy. Methods to therapeutically mitigate radiation-induced myelosuppression could offer great clinical value. In vivo studies have demonstrated that interleukin-6 (IL-6) stimulates pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell (CFU-s), granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell (GM-CFC), and erythroid progenitor cell (CFU-e) proliferation in normal mice. Based on these results, the ability of IL-6 to stimulate hematopoietic regeneration following radiation-induced hematopoietic injury was also evaluated. C3H/HeN female mice were exposed to 6.5 Gy 60Co radiation and subcutaneously administered either saline or IL-6 on days 1 through 3 or 1 through 6 postexposure. On days 7, 10, 14, 17, and 22, femoral and splenic CFU-s, GM-CFC, and CFU-e contents and peripheral blood white cell, red cell, and platelet counts were determined. Compared with saline treatment, both 3-day and 6-day IL-6 treatments accelerated hematopoietic recovery; 6-day treatment produced the greater effects. For example, compared with normal control values (N), femoral and splenic CFU-s numbers in IL-6-treated mice 17 days postirradiation were 27% N and 136% N versus 2% N and 10% N in saline-treated mice. At the same time, bone marrow and splenic GM-CFC values were 58% N and 473% N versus 6% N and 196% N in saline-treated mice; bone marrow and splenic CFU-e numbers were 91% N and 250% N versus 31% N and 130% N in saline-treated mice; and peripheral blood white cell, red cell, and platelet values were 210% N, 60% N, and 24% N versus 18% N, 39% N, and 7% N in saline-treated mice. These studies demonstrate that therapeutically administered IL-6 can effectively accelerate multilineage hematopoietic recovery following radiation-induced hematopoietic injury.

  14. Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guanghui; Zhang Yaping; Tang Jinliang; Chen Zhengtang; Hu Yide; Wei Hong; Li Dezhi; Hao Ping; Wang Donglin

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT. The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  15. Detection of radiation-induced lung injury using hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Thind, K; Chen, A; Friesen-Waldner, L; Ouriadov, A; Scholl, T J; Fox, M; Wong, E; VanDyk, J; Hope, A; Santyr, G

    2013-09-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury limits radiotherapy of thoracic cancers. Detection of radiation pneumonitis associated with early radiation-induced lung injury (2-4 weeks postirradiation) may provide an opportunity to adjust treatment, before the onset of acute pneumonitis and/or irreversible fibrosis. In this study, localized magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy and imaging of hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate (pyruvate) and (13)C-lactate (lactate) were performed in the thorax and kidney regions of rats 2 weeks following whole-thorax irradiation (14 Gy). Lactate-to-pyruvate signal ratio was observed to increase by 110% (P < 0.01), 57% (P < 0.02), and 107% (P < 0.01), respectively, in the thorax, lung, and heart tissues of the radiated rats compared with healthy age-matched rats. This was consistent with lung inflammation confirmed using cell micrographs of bronchioalveolar lavage specimens and decreases in arterial oxygen partial pressure (paO2), indicative of hypoxia. No statistically significant difference was observed in either lactate-to-pyruvate signal ratios in the kidney region (P = 0.50) between the healthy (0.215 ± 0.100) and radiated cohorts (0.215 ± 0.054) or in blood lactate levels (P = 0.69) in the healthy (1.255 ± 0.247 mmol/L) and the radiated cohorts (1.325 ± 0.214 mmol/L), confirming that the injury is localized to the thorax. This work demonstrates the feasibility of hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic MR spectroscopy and imaging for detection of early radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:23074042

  16. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Division of Radioisotope Research, Department of Research Support, Research Promotion Project, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593 ; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  17. Radiation induced bystander effect by GAP junction channels in human fibroblast cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Y.; Shao, C.; Aoki, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Funayama, T.; Ando, K.

    The chemical factor involved in bystander effect and its transfer pathway were investigated in a confluent human fibroblast cell (AG1522) population. Micronuclei (MN) and G1-phase arrest were detected in cells irradiated by carbon (~100 keV/?m) ions at HIMAC. A very low dose irradiation showed a high effectiveness in producing MN, suggesting a bystander effect. This effectiveness was enhanced by 8-Br-cAMP treatment that increases gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). On the other hand, the effect was reduced by 5% DMSO treatment, which reduce the reactive oxygen species (ROS), and suppressed by 100 ?M lindane treatment, an inhibitor of GJIC. In addition, the radiation-induced G1-phase arrest was also enhanced by cAMP, and reduced or suppressed by DMSO or lindane. A microbeam device (JAERI) was also used for these studies. It was found that exposing one single cell in a confluent cell population to exactly one argon (~1260 keV/?m) or neon (~430 keV/ ?m) ion, additional MN could be detected in many other unirradiated cells. The yield of MN increased with the number of irradiated cells. However, there was no significant difference in the MN induction when the cells were irradiated by increasing number of particles. MN induction by bystander effect was partly reduced by DMSO, and effectively suppressed by lindane. Our results obtained from both random irradiation and precise numbered irradiation indicate that both GJIC and ROS contributed to the radiation-induced bystander effect, but the cell gap junction channels likely play an essential role in the release and transfer of radiation-induced chemical factors.

  18. Stem Cell Therapies for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Benderitter, Marc; Caviggioli, Fabio; Chapel, Alain; Coppes, Robert P.; Guha, Chandan; Klinger, Marco; Malard, Olivier; Stewart, Fiona; Tamarat, Radia; Luijk, Peter Van

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Targeted irradiation is an effective cancer therapy but damage inflicted to normal tissues surrounding the tumor may cause severe complications. While certain pharmacologic strategies can temper the adverse effects of irradiation, stem cell therapies provide unique opportunities for restoring functionality to the irradiated tissue bed. Recent Advances: Preclinical studies presented in this review provide encouraging proof of concept regarding the therapeutic potential of stem cells for treating the adverse side effects associated with radiotherapy in different organs. Early-stage clinical data for radiation-induced lung, bone, and skin complications are promising and highlight the importance of selecting the appropriate stem cell type to stimulate tissue regeneration. Critical Issues: While therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated in a variety of animal models and human trials, a range of additional concerns regarding stem cell transplantation for ameliorating radiation-induced normal tissue sequelae remain. Safety issues regarding teratoma formation, disease progression, and genomic stability along with technical issues impacting disease targeting, immunorejection, and clinical scale-up are factors bearing on the eventual translation of stem cell therapies into routine clinical practice. Future Directions: Follow-up studies will need to identify the best possible stem cell types for the treatment of early and late radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Additional work should seek to optimize cellular dosing regimes, identify the best routes of administration, elucidate optimal transplantation windows for introducing cells into more receptive host tissues, and improve immune tolerance for longer-term engrafted cell survival into the irradiated microenvironment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 338–355. PMID:24147585

  19. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-induced Acute Nausea and Vomiting in IMRT for Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Victor H.F.; Ng, Sherry C.Y.; Leung, T.W.; Au, Gordon K.H.; Kwong, Dora L.W.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: We wanted to investigate dosimetric parameters that would predict radiation-induced acute nausea and vomiting in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for undifferentiated carcinoma of the nasopharynx (NPC). Methods and Materials: Forty-nine consecutive patients with newly diagnosed NPC were treated with IMRT alone in this prospective study. Patients receiving any form of chemotherapy were excluded. The dorsal vagal complex (DVC) as well as the left and right vestibules (VB-L and VB-R, respectively) were contoured on planning computed tomography images. A structure combining both the VB-L and the VB-R, named VB-T, was also generated. All structures were labeled organs at risk (OAR). A 3-mm three-dimensional margin was added to these structures and labeled DVC+3 mm, VB-L+3 mm, VB-R+3 mm, and VB-T+3 mm to account for physiological body motion and setup error. No weightings were given to these structures during optimization in treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were recorded from dose-volume histograms. Statistical analysis of parameters' association with nausea and vomiting was performed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Six patients (12.2%) reported Grade 1 nausea, and 8 patients (16.3%) reported Grade 2 nausea. Also, 4 patients (8.2%) complained of Grade 1 vomiting, and 4 patients (8.2%) experienced Grade 2 vomiting. No patients developed protracted nausea and vomiting after completion of IMRT. For radiation-induced acute nausea, V40 (percentage volume receiving at least 40Gy) to the VB-T and V40>=80% to the VB-T were predictors, using univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, V40>=80% to the VB-T was the only predictor. There were no predictors of radiation-induced acute vomiting, as the number of events was too small for analysis. Conclusions: This is the first study demonstrating that a V40 to the VB-T is predictive of radiation-induced acute nausea. The vestibules should be labeled as sensitive OARs, and weightings should be considered for dose sparing during optimization in the treatment planning of IMRT.

  20. Radiation-Induced Reduction of Ceria in Single and Polycrystalline Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Shutthanandan, V.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Yang, Yong; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-01-12

    Ceria (CeO{sub 2}) is a technologically important ceramic material with a wide range of neoteric applications in catalysis, solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen gas sensors, hydrogen production, and ultraviolet shielding. Recent research has revealed promising biomedical applications of ceria. Nanoparticles of ceria have been shown to protect healthy cells from radiation-induced cellular damage. The mechanisms governing the radioprotection characteristics of ceria nanoparticles are not well understood and it has been hypothesized that reversible switching between Ce{sup 4+} and Ce{sup 3+} states may enable ceria nanoparticles to mop up free radicals.

  1. Radiation-Induced Leiomyosarcoma after Breast Cancer Treatment and TRAM Flap Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Olcina, M; Merck, B; Giménez-Climent, M J; Almenar, S; Sancho-Merle, M F; Llopis, F; Vázquez-Albadalejo, C

    2008-01-01

    The development of a radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) in the post mastectomy thoracic treatment volume is an infrequent, but recognized, event. Its frequency is rising in relation with increasing survival of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy, and is associated with poor prognosis despite treatment. We present a case of leiomyosarcoma in a patient who underwent mastectomy followed by radiotherapy for invasive ductal carcinoma. A delayed TRAM flap reconstruction was performed 10 years after and a rapid growing mass under the reconstructed flap appeared, on routine follow-up, twenty years later. This report analyzes the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of patients with RIS. PMID:18464918

  2. Radiation-Induced Leiomyosarcoma after Breast Cancer Treatment and TRAM Flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Olcina, M.; Merck, B.; Giménez-Climent, M. J.; Almenar, S.; Sancho-Merle, M. F.; Llopis, F.; Vázquez-Albadalejo, C.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) in the post mastectomy thoracic treatment volume is an infrequent, but recognized, event. Its frequency is rising in relation with increasing survival of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy, and is associated with poor prognosis despite treatment. We present a case of leiomyosarcoma in a patient who underwent mastectomy followed by radiotherapy for invasive ductal carcinoma. A delayed TRAM flap reconstruction was performed 10 years after and a rapid growing mass under the reconstructed flap appeared, on routine follow-up, twenty years later. This report analyzes the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of patients with RIS. PMID:18464918

  3. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have been shown to be activated in cells exposed to radiation from photons (like cell cycle arrest in G1/S), and that supplementation with SeM abolishes HZE particle-induced differential expression of many genes. Understanding the roles that these genes play in the radiation-induced transformation of cells may help to decipher the origins of radiation-induced cancer. PMID:17265150

  4. Radiation-induced meningiomas after BNCT in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Kageji, T; Sogabe, S; Mizobichi, Y; Nakajima, K; Shinji, N; Nakagawa, Y

    2015-12-01

    Of the 180 patients with malignant brain tumors whom we treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) since 1968, only one (0.56%) developed multiple radiation-induced meningiomas. The parasagittal meningioma that had received 42Gy (w) for BNCT showed more rapid growth on Gd-enhanced MRI scans and more atypical features on histopathologic studies than the temporal convexity tumor that had received 20Gy (w). Long-term follow up MRI studies are necessary in long-survivors of malignant brain tumors treated by BNCT. PMID:26122975

  5. Radiation-induced electron paramagnetic resonance signal and soybean isoflavones content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcos R. R.; Mandarino, José M. G.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2012-09-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a well-known spectroscopic technique that detects paramagnetic centers and can detect free radicals with high sensitivity. In food, free radicals can be generated by several commonly used industrial processes, such as radiosterilization or heat treatment. EPR spectroscopy is used to detect radioinduced free radicals in food. In this work the relation between EPR signal induced by gamma irradiation treatment and soybean isoflavones content was investigated. Present results did not show correlation between total isoflavones content and the EPR signal. Nevertheless, some isoflavone contents had a negative correlation with the radiation-induced EPR signal.

  6. Remote sensor response study in the regime of the microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-11-04

    A concurrent remote sensing and magneto-transport study of the microwave excited two dimensional electron system (2DES) at liquid helium temperatures has been carried out using a carbon detector to remotely sense the microwave activity of the 2D electron system in the GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure during conventional magneto-transport measurements. Various correlations are observed and reported between the oscillatory magnetotransport and the remotely sensed reflection. In addition, the oscillatory remotely sensed signal is shown to exhibit a power law type variation in its amplitude, similar to the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations.

  7. Radiation-induced quantum interference in low-dimensional n-p junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fistul, M. V.; Syzranov, S. V.; Kadigrobov, A. M.; Efetov, K. B.

    2010-09-01

    We predict and analyze radiation-induced quantum interference effect in low-dimensional n-p junctions. This phenomenon manifests itself by large oscillations of the photocurrent as a function of the gate voltage or the frequency of the radiation. The oscillations result from the quantum interference between two electron paths accompanied by resonant absorption of photons. They resemble Ramsey quantum beating and Stueckelberg oscillations well known in atomic physics. The effect can be observed in one- and two-dimensional n-p junctions based on nanowires, carbon nanotubes, monolayer, or bilayer graphene nanoribbons.

  8. Radiation-induced electrical breakdown of helium in fusion reactor superconducting magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.

    1983-12-02

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been performed on the reduction of the electrical breakdown potential of liquid and gaseous helium under neutron and gamma radiation. Extension of the conventional Townsend breakdown theory indicates that radiation fields at the superconducting magnets of a typical fusion reactor are potentially capable of significantly reducing currently established (i.e., unirradiated) helium breakdown voltages. Emphasis is given to the implications of these results including future deployment choices of magnet cryogenic methods (e.g., pool-boiling versus forced-flow), the possible impact on magnet shielding requirements and the analogous situation for radiation-induced electrical breakdown in fusion RF transmission systems.

  9. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mú?ka, V.; Bu?ata, M.; ?uba, V.; Silber, R.; Juha, L.

    2015-07-01

    Radiation induced dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solutions containing the active carbon (AC) or cupric oxide (CuO) as the modifiers was studied. The obtained results were compared to the previously studied dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Both modifiers were found to decrease the efficiency of dechlorination. The AC modifier acts mainly via adsorption of the aliphatic (unlike the aromatic) hydrocarbons and the CuO oxide mainly inhibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. The results presented in this paper will be also helpful for the studies of the impact of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the membrane permeability of living cells.

  10. Preparation of macroporous poly(acrylamide) hydrogels by radiation induced polymerization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çaykara, Tuncer; Bulut, Melek; Demirci, Serkan

    2007-12-01

    Macroporous poly(acrylamide) [poly(AAm)] hydrogels were prepared by using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with three different molecular weight as the pore-forming agent during the radiation induced polymerization reaction. Scanning electron microscope graphs reveal that the macroporous network structure of the hydrogels can be adjusted by applying different molecular weights of PEG during the polymerization reaction. The swelling ratios of the PEG-modified hydrogels were much higher than those for the same type of hydrogel prepared via traditional method. However, the pulsatile swelling behavior of the PEG-modified hydrogels in water and in acetone was affected slightly by the change in the amount of the PEG.

  11. Documentation of brachial plexus compression (in the thoracic inlet) utilizing provocative neurosensory and muscular testing.

    PubMed

    Howard, Michael; Lee, Cathy; Dellon, A Lee

    2003-07-01

    Diagnosis and documentation of brachial plexus compression in the thoracic inlet, "thoracic outlet syndrome", remains difficult because the syndrome complex overlaps that of patients with cervical disc disease, intrinsic shoulder pathology, and peripheral nerve compression. While traditional electrodiagnostic testing can identify cervical radiculopathy and the rare isolated lower trunk compression, it cannot identify brachial plexus compression in the thoracic inlet. In 2000, neurosensory testing with the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device (PSSD) was applied to this diagnostic dilemma, demonstrating a significant increase in the one-point static touch cutaneous pressure threshold between controls and patients, when the index finger (upper trunk) and little finger (lower trunk) were tested with the hands at rest and after provoking the plexus by elevating the hands above the head. In the present study, this approach has been extended to include two-point static touch thresholds with the PSSD, and pinch and grip strength (Digit-Grip). Sixteen controls (mean: 34.2, range: 11 to 48 years) were tested and the 99 percent upper confidence limit calculated for percent change after elevation of the hands for 3 min. Forty-one patients symptomatic for brachial plexus compression (mean: 41.0, range: 21 to 62 years) were tested. The clinical severity of the plexus compression was dichotomized as either "severe" or "not severe" judged by the Roos and Tinel sign. Results demonstrated that when five or more of the eight possible neurosensory and motor test results were > 99 percent normal confidence limit for change, this testing has a sensitivity of 82 percent, a specificity of 100 percent, and a positive predictive value of 100 percent for the diagnosis of clinically severe brachial plexus compression. Seventeen patients who were in the "severe" category prior to surgery, were tested before and after plexus neurolysis and anterior scalenectomy. All 17 patients were clinically improved and in 16 of these patients, postoperative neurosensory and motor testing returned to a normal pattern (no significant increase in thresholds with hand elevation). It is concluded that neurosensory (PSSD) and motor testing (Digit-Grip) can help in the diagnosis and documentation of brachial plexus compression. PMID:14506578

  12. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against ?-irradiation exposure. PMID:23541438

  13. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. III. Hypertonic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H. L.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that treatment in anisotonic medium modifies rejoining of radiation-induced breaks in interphase chromosomes. In previous work, we have demonstrated that formation of exchanges in human lymphocytes has a slow component (half-time of 1-2 h), but a fraction of exchanges are also observed in samples assayed soon after exposure. In this paper we studied the effect of hypertonic treatment on rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced breaks using fluorescence in situ hybridization of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with 7 Gy gamma rays, fused to mitotic hamster cells and incubated in hypertonic solution (0.5 M NaCl) for the period normally allowed for interphase chromosome condensation to occur. The data from hypertonic treatment experiments indicate the presence of a class of interphase chromosome breaks that rejoin and misrejoin very quickly (half-time of 5-6 min). The fast misrejoining of these lesions is considered to be responsible for the initial level of exchanges which we reported previously. No significant effect of hypertonic treatment on the yield of chromosome aberrations scored at the first postirradiation mitosis was detected.

  14. The nucleus is the target for radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. I.; Morgan, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously described chromosomal instability in cells of a human-hamster hybrid cell line after exposure to X rays. Chromosomal instability in these cells is characterized by the appearance of novel chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after exposure to ionizing radiation. To identify the cellular target(s) for radiation-induced chromosomal instability, cells were treated with 125I-labeled compounds and frozen. Radioactive decays from 125I cause damage to the cell primarily at the site of their decay, and freezing the cells allows damage to accumulate in the absence of other cellular processes. We found that the decay of 125I-iododeoxyuridine, which is incorporated into the DNA, caused chromosomal instability. While cell killing and first-division chromosomal rearrangements increased with increasing numbers of 125I decays, the frequency of chromosomal instability was independent of dose. Chromosomal instability could also be induced from incorporation of 125I-iododeoxyuridine without freezing the cells for accumulation of decays. This indicates that DNA double-strand breaks in frozen cells resulting from 125I decays failed to lead to instability. Incorporation of an 125I-labeled protein (125I-succinyl-concanavalin A), which was internalized into the cell and/or bound to the plasma membrane, neither caused chromosomal instability nor potentiated chromosomal instability induced by 125I-iododeoxyuridine. These results show that the target for radiation-induced chromosomal instability in these cells is the nucleus.

  15. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction: An experimental model in the old rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lamproglou, I.; Chen, Q.M.; Poisson, M.

    1995-01-01

    To develop a model of radiation-induced behavioral dysfunction. A course of whole brain radiation therapy (30 Gy/10 fractions/12 days) was administered to 26 Wistar rats ages 16-27 months, while 26 control rats received sham irradiation. Sequential behavioral studies including one-way avoidance, two-way avoidance, and a standard operant conditioning method (press-lever avoidance) were undertaken. In addition, rats were studied in a water maze 7 months postradiation therapy. Prior to radiation therapy, both groups were similar. No difference was found 1 and 3 months postradiation therapy. At 6-7 months postradiation therapy, irradiated rats had a much lower percentage of avoidance than controls for one-way avoidance (23% vs. 55%, p {le} 0.001) and two-way avoidance (18% vs. 40%, p {le} 0.01). Seven months postradiation therapy the reaction time was increased (press-lever avoidance, 11.20 s vs. 8.43 s, p {le} 0.05) and the percentage of correct response was lower (water maze, 53% vs. 82%) in irradiated rats compared with controls. Pathological examination did not demonstrate abnormalities of the irradiated brains at the light microscopic level. Behavioral dysfunction affecting mainly memory can be demonstrated following conventional radiation therapy in old rats. This model can be used to study the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive changes. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Relief of radiation-induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Putwatana, Panwadee; Sanmanowong, Phichanee; Oonprasertpong, Ladawal; Junda, Tiraporn; Pitiporn, Supaporn; Narkwong, Ladawan

    2009-01-01

    This study was a prospective, randomized clinical trial carried out to explore the efficacy of payayor in the prevention and relief of radiation-induced oral mucositis compared with benzydamine. Sixty patients with head and neck cancer, who have started to receive radiotherapy and met predetermined criteria, were randomly assigned into each group to use assigned products 3 times a day from the first to the last day of radiation. The first group used glycerin payayor, a Thai prepared herbal product, by dripping it into the mouth. Another group rinsed their mouths with benzydamine hydrochloride. The World Health Organization Mucositis Grading System was used to assess oral status every week and 2 weeks after radiation. Comparison of time to the onset, pain, severity, xerostomia, postponement of treatment, satisfaction of the solution, and body weight between the 2 groups was performed by t test. The average time to the onset of oral mucositis in the payayor group was significantly later, and its severity and pain score were less than those of the benzydamine group throughout the study period. Significantly higher satisfaction with the solution and higher body weight at the end of the study were shown in the payayor group. Payayor seemed to be superior to benzydamine for preventing and relieving radiation-induced oral mucositis. PMID:19104205

  17. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

    SciTech Connect

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

  18. Cytokine profiling for prediction of symptomatic radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Justin P.; Broadwater, Gloria; Rabbani, Zahid; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Clough, Robert; Huang, Dale; Sempowski, Gregory A.; Dewhirst, Mark; Pizzo, Salvatore V.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Anscher, Mitchell S. . E-mail: anscher@radonc.duke.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze plasma cytokine profiles before the initiation of radiation therapy to define a cytokine phenotype that correlates with risk of developing symptomatic radiation-induced lung injury (SRILI). Methods and Materials: Symptomatic radiation-induced lung injury was evaluated in 55 patients (22 with SRILI and 33 without SRILI), according to modified National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria. These plasma samples were analyzed by the multiplex suspension bead array system (Bio-Rad Laboratories; Hercules, CA), which included the following cytokines: interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon-{gamma}, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1{beta}, tumor necrosis factor {alpha}, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Results: Significant differences in the median values of IL-8 were observed between patients with and without SRILI. Patients who did not develop SRILI had approximately fourfold elevated levels of IL-8 as compared with patients who did subsequently develop SRILI. Significant correlations were not found for any other cytokine in this study, including transforming growth factor {beta}1. Conclusions: Patients with lower levels of plasma IL-8 before radiation therapy might be at increased risk for developing SRILI. Further studies are necessary to determine whether IL-8 levels are predictive of SRILI in a prospective trial and whether this marker might be used to determine patient eligibility for dose escalation.

  19. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Mohamed, F.; Siah, N. J.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-03

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60{sub rectum}, rectal mean dose and NTCP{sub rectum} with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  20. Protective effect of esculentoside A on radiation-induced dermatitis and fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Zhenyu; Su Ying; Yang Shanmin; Yin Liangjie; Wang Wei; Yi Yanghua; Fenton, Bruce M.; Zhang Lurong; Okunieff, Paul . E-mail: paul_okunieff@urmc.rochester.edu

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of esculentoside A (EsA) on radiation-induced cutaneous and fibrovascular toxicity and its possible molecular mechanisms, both in vivo and in vitro. Methods and Materials: Mice received drug intervention 18 hours before 30 Gy to the right hind leg. Alterations in several cytokines expressed in skin tissue 2 days after irradiation were determined by ELISA. Early skin toxicity was evaluated 3 to 4 weeks after irradiation by skin scoring, and both tissue contraction and expression of TGF-{beta}1 were determined for soft-tissue fibrosis 3 months after irradiation. In vitro, the effect of EsA on radiation-induced nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine production in different cell types was measured by application of 2, 4, and 8 Gy. Results: In vivo, EsA reduced levels of IL-1{alpha}, MCP-1, VEGF, and TGF-{beta}1 in cutaneous tissue and reduced soft-tissue toxicity. In vitro, EsA inhibited the IL-1{alpha} ordinarily produced after 4 Gy in A431 cells. In Raw264.7 cells, EsA reduced levels of IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and NO production costimulated by radiation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In L-929 cells, EsA inhibited VEGF, TNF, and MCP-1 production at 2, 4, and 8 Gy. Conclusions: Esculentoside A protects soft tissues against radiation toxicity through inhibiting the production of several proinflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators in epithelial cells, macrophages, fibroblasts, and skin tissue.

  1. Radiation-induced loss of unsaturation in 1,2-polybutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.; Cormia, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    The radiation induced loss of unsaturation and methyl production in 1,2-polybutadiene (VB) was studied using IR spectroscopy. It was found that G(-1,2), which depends on the initial vinyl content, decreased from approximately 550 for VB with 98.5% 1,2 initially, to approximately 270 for VB with 85% 1,2 initially. G(-trans-1,4) ranged from approximately 21 for VB with 14% trans-1,4 to nearly zero for VB with less than 1% trans-1,4 initially. Methyl production was found to equal one methyl group formed for every 4-5 vinyl units consumed in the radiation-cyclized VB, in contrast to one methyl formed for every two vinyls reacted during cationic cyclization to give monocyclic structures. The IR spectra of gamma-irradiated VB were very similar to the spectra of UV-irradiated or thermally-treated VB at the same residual vinyl contents. It is suggested that the radiation-induced cyclization of VB occurs by a nonionic, nonradical 'energy chain' mechanism, which apparently holds for the cyclization of VB, whether induced by gamma-rays, UV radiation, or heat.

  2. Mitigating the risk of radiation-induced cancers: limitations and paradigms in drug development.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Stephen S; Jorgensen, Timothy J; Kennedy, Ann R; Boice, John D; Shapiro, Alla; Hu, Tom C-C; Moyer, Brian R; Grace, Marcy B; Kelloff, Gary J; Fenech, Michael; Prasanna, Pataje G S; Coleman, C Norman

    2014-06-01

    The United States radiation medical countermeasures (MCM) programme for radiological and nuclear incidents has been focusing on developing mitigators for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure (DEARE), and biodosimetry technologies to provide radiation dose assessments for guiding treatment. Because a nuclear accident or terrorist incident could potentially expose a large number of people to low to moderate doses of ionising radiation, and thus increase their excess lifetime cancer risk, there is an interest in developing mitigators for this purpose. This article discusses the current status, issues, and challenges regarding development of mitigators against radiation-induced cancers. The challenges of developing mitigators for ARS include: the long latency between exposure and cancer manifestation, limitations of animal models, potential side effects of the mitigator itself, potential need for long-term use, the complexity of human trials to demonstrate effectiveness, and statistical power constraints for measuring health risks (and reduction of health risks after mitigation) following relatively low radiation doses (<0.75 Gy). Nevertheless, progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms resulting in radiation injury, along with parallel progress in dose assessment technologies, make this an opportune, if not critical, time to invest in research strategies that result in the development of agents to lower the risk of radiation-induced cancers for populations that survive a significant radiation exposure incident. PMID:24727460

  3. Protective Role of Rheum Tanguticum Polysaccharide 1 in Radiation- induced Intestinal Mucosal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin-Na; Shi, Lei; Li, Shi-Cao; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Pei

    2015-01-01

    The protective effects of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide 1 (RTP1), which is extracted from the Chinese traditional medicine Rheum tanguticum, on radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury was investigated. Rat intestinal crypt epithelial cells (IEC-6 cells) and Sprague-Dawley rats were each divided into control, irradiated and RTP1-pretreated irradiated groups. After irradiation, cell survival was determined by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide). assay, and the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected by fluorescent probe method. Apoptosis was observed by acridine orange staining, and cell cycle was analysed by flow cytometry. Histological analysis of the rat intestinal mucosa was conducted by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Irradiation at 8 Gy(Gray) decreased cell survival rate to only 54%, significantly increased intracellular ROS levels and induced apoptosis. RTP1 pretreatment significantly inhibited cell death, reduced the formation of intracellular ROS and partially inhibited apoptosis. Irradiation markedly reduced the height and quantity of rat intestinal villi, but it could be antagonised by RTP1 pretreatment. RTP1 can promote the recovery of intestinal mucosa damage, possibly by inhibiting radiation-induced intestinal epithelial apoptosis and intracellular ROS production. PMID:26330871

  4. Radiation-induced acid ceramidase confers prostate cancer resistance and tumor relapse

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Joseph C.; Bai, Aiping; Beckham, Thomas H.; Marrison, S. Tucker; Yount, Caroline L.; Young, Katherine; Lu, Ping; Bartlett, Anne M.; Wu, Bill X.; Keane, Barry J.; Armeson, Kent E.; Marshall, David T.; Keane, Thomas E.; Smith, Michael T.; Jones, E. Ellen; Drake, Richard R.; Bielawska, Alicja; Norris, James S.; Liu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Escape of prostate cancer (PCa) cells from ionizing radiation–induced (IR-induced) killing leads to disease progression and cancer relapse. The influence of sphingolipids, such as ceramide and its metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate, on signal transduction pathways under cell stress is important to survival adaptation responses. In this study, we demonstrate that ceramide-deacylating enzyme acid ceramidase (AC) was preferentially upregulated in irradiated PCa cells. Radiation-induced AC gene transactivation by activator protein 1 (AP-1) binding on the proximal promoter was sensitive to inhibition of de novo ceramide biosynthesis, as demonstrated by promoter reporter and ChIP-qPCR analyses. Our data indicate that a protective feedback mechanism mitigates the apoptotic effect of IR-induced ceramide generation. We found that deregulation of c-Jun induced marked radiosensitization in vivo and in vitro, which was rescued by ectopic AC overexpression. AC overexpression in PCa clonogens that survived a fractionated 80-Gy IR course was associated with increased radioresistance and proliferation, suggesting a role for AC in radiotherapy failure and relapse. Immunohistochemical analysis of human PCa tissues revealed higher levels of AC after radiotherapy failure than those in therapy-naive PCa, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or benign tissues. Addition of an AC inhibitor to an animal model of xenograft irradiation produced radiosensitization and prevention of relapse. These data indicate that AC is a potentially tractable target for adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:24091326

  5. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Clavo, Bernardino; Santana-Rodriguez, Norberto; Llontop, Pedro; Gutierrez, Dominga; Ceballos, Daniel; Méndez, Charlin; Rovira, Gloria; Suarez, Gerardo; Rey-Baltar, Dolores; Garcia-Cabrera, Laura; Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Fiuza, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n = 12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83%) patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52-119). Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p < 0.001) and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p = 0.032). Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7-14)?g/dL to 13 (10-15)?g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p = 0.008). Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation. PMID:26357522

  6. A Practical Approach to the Management of Radiation-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Liem, Xavier; Saad, Fred; Delouya, Guila

    2015-09-01

    Radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a complication of pelvic radiotherapy, mainly for prostate and uterine cancers. In the acute phase, patients feel urinary urgency and bladder pain. This phase is reversible after radiotherapy. In the chronic stage, an irritative syndrome is coupled with hematuria during the 2-10 years following radiotherapy. Cystoscopy shows white and frosted mucosa with telangiectasia. The incidence is estimated at 5 % or less. It is suggested that the radiation oncologist reviews the dosimetry plan to validate that the lesions coincide with significant radiation exposure confirming diagnosis of radiation-induced HC. The treatment for HC is first symptomatic, with bladder lavage, clot evacuation, coagulation via cystoscopy and blood transfusions if necessary. Subsequently, hyaluronic acid bladder instillation can be done with little toxicity. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy delivers pure oxygen to patients in a pressurized cabin, promoting angio-neogenesis and lowering hypoxia to the irradiated tissues. The clinical response rate is estimated to be around 80 %. Nevertheless, this approach is limited by the low availability, and length of treatment. While surgery remains an effective treatment for HC, it is the last option because of the high morbidity and mortality risks. Prospective studies need to be conducted to identify and evaluate new interventions, particularly for HC. PMID:26271398

  7. A biological approach to the interspecies prediction of radiation-induced mortality risk

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D.; Olshansky, S.J.

    1997-08-01

    Evolutionary explanations for why sexually reproducing organisms grow old suggest that the forces of natural selection affect the ages when diseases occur that are subject to a genetic influence (referred to here as intrinsic diseases). When extended to the population level for a species, this logic leads to the general prediction that age-specific death rates from intrinsic causes should begin to rise as the force of selection wanes once the characteristic age of sexual maturity is attained. Results consistent with these predictions have been found for laboratory mice, beagles, and humans where, after adjusting for differences in life span, it was demonstrated that these species share a common age pattern of mortality for intrinsic causes of death. In quantitative models used to predict radiation-induced mortality, risks are often expressed as multiples of those observed in a control population. A control population, however, is an aging population. As such, mortality risks related to exposure must be interpreted relative to the age-specific risk of death associated with aging. Given the previous success in making interspecies predictions of age-related mortality, the purpose of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced mortality observed in one species could also be predicted quantitatively from a model used to describe the mortality consequences of exposure to radiation in a different species. Mortality data for B6CF{sub 1} mice and beagles exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays for the duration of life were used for analysis.

  8. The Protective Effect of Curcumin on Ionizing Radiation-induced Cataractogenesis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Özgen, Seher Çimen; Dökmeci, Dikmen; Akpolat, Meryem; Karada?, Çetin Hakan; Gündüz, Özgür; Erba?, Hakan; Benian, Ömer; Uzal, Cem; Turan, Fatma Nesrin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the protective effect of curcumin against ionizing radiation-induced cataract in the lens of rats. Material and Methods: Rats were divided into six groups. Group 1: Control, Group 2: Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), Group 3: DMSO+curcumin, Group 4: Irradiation, Group 5: Irradiation+DMSO, Group 6: Irradiation+DMSO+curcumin. A 15 Gy total dose was given to 4, 5, 6 groups for radiation damage. Curcumin (100 mg/kg) was dissolved in DMSO and given by intragastric intubation for 28 days. At the end of the experiment, lenses were graded and enucleated. The lenticular activity of the antioxidant enzymes, total antioxidant and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured. Results: 100% Cataract was seen in the irradiation group. Cataract rate fell to 40% and was limited at grade 1 and 2 in the curcumin group. In the irradiation group, antioxidant enzyme levels were decreased, MDA levels were increased. There was an increase in antioxidant enzyme levels and a significant decrease in MDA in the group which was given curcumin. Conclusion: Curcumin has antioxidant and radioprotective properties and is likely to be a valuable agent for protection against ionizing radiation. Hence, it may be used as an antioxidant and radioprotector against radiation-induced cataractogenesis. PMID:25207034

  9. Preclinical evaluation of erythropoietin administration in a model of radiation-induced kidney dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Schnaitera, Andrea; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Caia, Lu; Schill, Sabine; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To test whether the clinically available growth factor erythropoietin (EPO) influences radiation-induced normal-tissue damage in a model of kidney dysfunction. Methods: Animal experiments were conducted to test the role of EPO administration in a C3H mouse model of unilateral kidney irradiation with 6, 8, and 10 Gy and to assess the effects of 2 different dose levels of EPO. The kidney function was assessed before radiotherapy, as well as 19, 25, 31, and 37 weeks thereafter by means of {sup 99m}Tc-dimercaptosuccinat scans (static scintigraphy). Results: Concomitant EPO administration significantly increased the degree of radiation-induced kidney dysfunction. A dose of 2,000 IU/kg body weight per injection tended to cause more damage than the lower dose of 500 IU/kg. Conclusion: Administration of growth factors concomitant to radiotherapy might modify the development of kidney dysfunction. Although insulin-like growth factor-1 has previously been shown to protect the kidney, such an effect could not be demonstrated for EPO. The latter agent even increased the development of nephropathy.

  10. Radiation-induced cardiovascular diseases: Is the epidemiologic evidence compatible with the radiobiologic data?

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz-Hector, Susanne . E-mail: susanne.schultz-hector@helmholtz.de; Trott, Klaus-Ruediger Prof.

    2007-01-01

    The Life Span Study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors demonstrates that radiation exposure significantly increased the risk of developing ischemic heart disease, in particular myocardial infarction. Similarly, epidemiologic investigations in very large populations of patients who had received postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer or for peptic ulcer demonstrate that radiation exposure of the heart with an average equivalent single dose of approximately 2 Gy significantly increased the risk of developing ischemic heart disease more than 10 years after irradiation. These epidemiologic findings are compatible with radiobiologic data on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced heart disease in experimental animals. The critical target structure appears to be the endothelial lining of blood vessels, in particular arteries, leading to early functional alterations such as pro-inflammatory responses and other changes, which are slowly progressive. Research should concentrate on the interaction of these radiation-induced endothelial changes with the early stages of age-related atherosclerosis to develop criteria for optimizing treatment plans in radiotherapy and also potential interventional strategies.

  11. Desalination by electrodialysis with the ion-exchange membrane prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong-Ho; Han Jeong, Young; Jeong Ryoo, Jae; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2001-01-01

    Ion-exchange membranes modified with the triethylamine [-N(CH 2CH 3) 3] and phosphoric acid (-PO 3 H) groups were prepared by radiation-induced grafting of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto the polyolefin nonwavon fabric (PNF) and subsequent chemical modification of poly(GMA) graft chains. The physical and chemical properties of the GMA-grafted PNF and the PNF modified with ion-exchange groups were investigated by SEM, XPS, TGA, and DSC. Furthermore, electrochemical properties such as specific electric resistance, transport number of K +, and desalination were examined. The grafting yield increased with increasing reaction time and reaction temperature. The maximum grafting yield was obtained with 40% (vol.%) monomer concentration in dioxane at 60°C. The content of the cation- and anion-exchange group increased with increasing grafting yield. Electrical resistance of the PNF modified with TEA and -PO 3 H group decreased, while the water uptake (%) increased with increasing ion-exchange group capacities. Transport number of the PNF modified with ion-exchange group were the range of ca. 0.82-0.92. The graft-type ion-exchange membranes prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization were successfully applied as separators for electrodialysis.

  12. Radiofrequency radiation-induced calcium ion efflux enhancement from human and other neuroblastoma cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.; Ghosh, B.; Blackman, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    To test the generality of radiofrequency radiation-induced changes in /sup 45/Ca2+ efflux from avian and feline brain tissues, human neuroblastoma cells were exposed to electromagnetic radiation at 147 MHz, amplitude-modulated (AM) at 16 Hz, at specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0.1, 0.05, 0.01, 0.005, 0.001, and 0.0005 W/kg. Significant /sup 45/Ca2+ efflux was obtained at SAR values of 0.05 and 0.005 W/kg. Enhanced efflux at 0.05 W/kg peaked at the 13-16 Hz and at the 57.5-60 Hz modulation ranges. A Chinese hamster-mouse hybrid neuroblastoma was also shown to exhibit enhanced radiation-induced /sup 45/Ca2+ efflux at an SAR of 0.05 W/kg, using 147 MHz, AM at 16 Hz. These results confirm that amplitude-modulated radiofrequency radiation can induce responses in cells of nervous tissue origin from widely different animal species, including humans. The results are also consistent with the reports of similar findings in avian and feline brain tissues and indicate the general nature of the phenomenon.

  13. Gene expression and hormone autonomy in radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Persinger, S.M.; Town, C.D. )

    1989-04-01

    In order to study the molecular genetics of factor controlling plant cell growth, we have isolated a group of radiation-induced tumors from Arabidopsis thaliana. Tumors appeared on plants derived from {sup 60}Co gamma-irradiated seed or seedlings, and are capable of hormone-autonomous growth in culture. We have used vertebrate oncogene probes to explore the hypothesis that the tumors arose by the radiation-induced activation of growth-regulating plant oncogenes. One probe, int-2, was used to isolate cDNA clones representing an mRNA differentially expressed between tumors and hormone-dependent callus tissue. The genomic organization and function of this and other differentially expressed Arabidopsis sequences are being further characterized. A second area of study concerns the hormonal status of individual tumors. Tumor tissue varies in color, texture, and degree of differentiation: while some tumors appear undifferentiated, one consistently produces roots, and others occasionally develop shoots or leaflets. The tumors have characteristic growth rates on hormone-free medium, and growth in response to exogenous hormones differs among the tumors themselves and from wild-type. Characterization of the relationships between hormonal status, morphogenesis, and gene expression should yield valuable insights into the mechanisms regulating plant growth and development.

  14. Astragalus polysaccharide ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Liu, Fang; Yang, Ya; Li, Di; Lv, Jun; Ou, Yangjin; Sun, Fengjun; Chen, Jianhong; Shi, Ying; Xia, Peiyuan

    2014-07-01

    Radioprotective compounds from plant resources may represent safe and cost-effective prophylactic and therapeutic agents. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of polysaccharide derived from the dried roots of the Astragalus spp. (APS) against ionizing radiation (IR) injury in liver and to explore its role in radiation-induced oxidative stress using a mouse model. Prior to (60)Co ?-irradiation (5Gy, single dose), mice received 7 days of APS at low, mid and high doses (50, 100 or 200mg/kg/day, respectively; n=6 each group), vehicle alone (5mL normal saline orally/daily; n=6). A non-irradiated control group (n=6) received the 7-day distilled water regimen only. At 24h post-irradiation, the APS pre-treated mice showed significantly decreased alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase levels, and NF-?B expression. All APS-treated mice also showed attenuation of the IR-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and resolution of the IR-induced decreases in superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione activities (all p<0.05). High dose APS pre-treatment led to remarkably less morphologic features of IR-induced hepatic and pulmonary injury. Thus, APS exerts protective effects against IR-induced injury in liver in mice, and the related molecular mechanism may involve suppressing the radiation-induced oxidative stress reaction. PMID:24820157

  15. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Clavo, Bernardino; Santana-Rodriguez, Norberto; Llontop, Pedro; Gutierrez, Dominga; Ceballos, Daniel; Méndez, Charlin; Rovira, Gloria; Suarez, Gerardo; Rey-Baltar, Dolores; Garcia-Cabrera, Laura; Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Fiuza, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n = 12) previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83%) patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119). Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p < 0.001) and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p = 0.032). Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14)?g/dL to 13 (10–15)?g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p = 0.008). Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation. PMID:26357522

  16. Radiation-induced metabolomic changes in sterile male ??nochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Qu, L J; Wang, L J; Zhang, Y A; Wang, Q H; Wang, Y Z; Zhao, T H; Cai, W Z

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced sterile insect technique is a biologically based, environment-friendly method for the suppression or eradication of a number of insect pests. Although the basic mechanisms underlying the technology have been well studied, little is known about the cell responses in organisms. Characterization of the metabolic shift associated with radiation exposure in sterile insects would be helpful for understanding the detailed mechanism underlying this technique and promote its practical application. In this article, a metabolomic study was performed to characterize the global metabolic changes induced by radiation using untreated and 40 Gy (60)Co?-irradiated testes of Japanese pine sawyer, Monochamus alternatus Hope. Differential metabolites were detected and tentatively identified. Many key metabolites in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as most fatty and amino acids, were elevated in irradiated male M. alternatus, presumably resulting from depression of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, each of which are important pathways for energy generation Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) in insect spermatozoa. The findings in this article will contribute to our knowledge of the characteristic metabolic changes associated with irradiation sterility and understand the molecular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced sterile insect technique. PMID:25368082

  17. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Siah, N. J.; Mohamed, F.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60rectum, rectal mean dose and NTCPrectum with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  18. Three-dimensional Culture Conditions Lead to Decreased Radiation Induced Crytoxicity in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Marianne B.; Chrisler, William B.; Zens, Kyra D.; Ashjian, Emily J.; Opresko, Lee K.

    2010-05-01

    For both targeted and non-targeted exposures, the cellular responses to ionizing radiation have predominantly been measured in two dimensional monolayer cultures. Although convenient for biochemical analysis, the true interactions in vivo depend upon complex interactions between cells themselves and the surrounding extra cellular matrix. This study directly compares the influence of culture conditions on radiation induced cytotoxicity following exposure to low-LET ionizing radiation. Using a three dimensional (3D) human mammary epithelial tissue model, we have found a protective effect of 3D cell culture on cell survival after irradiation. The initial state of the cells (i.e., 2D vs. 3D culture) at the time of irradiation does not alter survival, nor does the presence of extracellular matrix during and after exposure to dose, but long term culture in 3D which offers significant reduction in cytotoxicity at a given dose (e.g. ~4 fold increased survival at 5 Gy). The cell cycle delay induced following exposure to 2 and 5 Gy was almost identical between 2D and 3D culture conditions and cannot account for the observed differences in radiation responses. However the amount of apoptosis following radiation exposure is significantly decreased in 3D culture relative to the 2D monolayer after the same dose. A likely mechanism of the cytoprotective effect afforded by 3D culture conditions is the down regulation of radiation induced apoptosis in 3D structures

  19. Harnessing a radiation inducible promoter of Deinococcus radiodurans for enhanced precipitation of uranium.

    PubMed

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-11-10

    Bioremediation is an attractive option for the treatment of radioactive waste. We provide a proof of principle for augmentation of uranium bioprecipitation using the radiation inducible promoter, Pssb from Deinococcus radiodurans. Recombinant cells of D. radiodurans carrying acid phosphatase gene, phoN under the regulation of Pssb when exposed to 7 kGy gamma radiation at two different dose rates of 56.8 Gy/min and 4 Gy/min, showed 8-9 fold increase in acid phosphatase activity. Highest whole cell PhoN activity was obtained after 2h in post irradiation recovery following 8 kGy of high dose rate radiation. Such cells showed faster removal of high concentrations of uranium than recombinant cells expressing PhoN under a radiation non-inducible deinococcal promoter, PgroESL and could precipitate uranium even after continuous exposure to 0.6 Gy/min gamma radiation for 10 days. Radiation induced recombinant D. radiodurans cells when lyophilized retained high levels of PhoN activity and precipitated uranium efficiently. These results highlight the importance of using a suitable promoter for removal of radionuclides from solution. PMID:25261614

  20. Prevention effects of Schisandra polysaccharide on radiation-induced immune system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lian-Mei; Jia, Yun-Long; Ma, Ming; Duan, Yu-Qing; Liu, Li-Hua

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the efficacy of SP (Schisandra polysaccharide) in prevention of radiation-induced immune dysfunction and discussed the underlying mechanisms with a Bal/bc mouse model. The data demonstrated that SP could reverse the decreases in the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In addition, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) and complement C3 in blood serum were all decreased after radiation and SP could restore this radiation disorder. Furthermore, SP could reverse the deregulation of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell subsets in peripheral blood and thymus of mice after radiotherapy. We also performed terminal dexynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) to investigate the apoptosis and underlying mechanisms of SP in thymus. Data showed that radiation-induced apoptosis of thymocytes could be reversed by SP through inducing upregulation of Bcl-2 expression and downregulation of Fas and Bax levels. Furthermore, SP has no any side-effects on immunity of normal mice. In conclusion, our results indicated that SP could effectively prevent immune injury during radiotherapy by protecting the immune system. This valuable information should be of assistance in choosing a rational design for therapeutic interventions of prevention immune system damage in the radiation treatment. PMID:25709011

  1. Paradoxical Relationship between Mn Superoxide Dismutase Deficiency and Radiation-Induced Cognitive Defects

    PubMed Central

    Corniola, Rikki; Zou, Yani; Leu, David; Fike, John R.; Huang, Ting-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the CNS, even at low doses, can lead to deficits in neurocognitive functions. Reduction in hippocampal neurogenesis is usually, but not always, associated with cognitive deficits resulting from radiation therapy. Generation of reactive oxygen species is considered the main cause of radiation-induced tissue injuries, and elevated levels of oxidative stress persist long after the initial cranial irradiation. Consequently, mutant mice with reduced levels of the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD or Sod2), are expected to be more sensitive to radiation-induced changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and the related functions. In this study, we showed that MnSOD deficiency led to reduced generation of immature neurons in Sod2?/+ mice even though progenitor cell proliferation was not affected. Compared to irradiated Sod2+/+ mice, which showed cognitive defects and reduced differentiation of newborn cells towards the neuronal lineage, irradiated Sod2?/+ mice showed normal hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions and normal differentiation pattern for newborn neurons and astroglia. However, we also observed a disproportional decrease in newborn neurons in irradiated Sod2?/+ following behavioral studies, suggesting that MnSOD deficiency may render newborn neurons more sensitive to stress from behavioral trainings following cranial irradiation. A positive correlation between normal cognitive functions and normal dendritic spine densities in dentate granule cells was observed. The data suggest that maintenance of synaptic connections, via maintenance of dendritic spines, may be important for normal cognitive functions following cranial irradiation. PMID:23145165

  2. Radiation-induced sarcoma of bone: CT findings in 19 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Lorigan, J.G.; Libshitz, H.I.; Peuchot, M. )

    1989-10-01

    We reviewed the CT findings in 19 cases of radiation-induced sarcoma of bone. The latent period before development of the sarcoma ranged from 5 to 50 years (mean, 17 years). In all 19 lesions, a soft-tissue extraosseous component was seen on CT, and 18 of them had associated bone destruction. Expansion of the affected bone and tumor-matrix mineralization each were present in 10 patients, but occurred together in only five patients. Periosteal reaction was seen in five patients, one of whom had an associated fracture. Radiation osteitis could not be identified on CT scans in the affected bone of any of the patients when tumor was present, but it was present in contiguous bone in two patients and had been shown 6 years before tumor became apparent in the affected bone in one other patient. Radiation-induced sarcoma of bone should be considered when bone destruction and an associated soft-tissue mass are shown on CT, or when changes occur in the appearance of previously stable irradiated bone.

  3. STAT3 Blockade Inhibits Radiation-Induced Malignant Progression in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jasmine; Ilkhanizadeh, Shirin; Wang, Susan; Miroshnikova, Yekaterina A; Salvatierra, Nicolas A; Wong, Robyn A; Schmidt, Christin; Weaver, Valerie M; Weiss, William A; Persson, Anders I

    2015-10-15

    High grade gliomas (HGG) are classified into four subgroups based on transcriptional signatures and phenotypic characteristics. In particular, the proneural-to-mesenchymal transition (PMT) is associated with increased malignancy, poor prognosis, and disease recurrence, but the underlying causes of PMT are still unclear. In this study, we investigated whether radiotherapy promotes PMT using a genetically engineered mouse model of proneural HGG. We found that cranial ionizing radiation induced robust and durable PMT in tumors. Additionally, we isolated primary proneural HGG cells from mouse and human tumors and demonstrate that radiation induced a sustained cell-intrinsic mesenchymal transition associated with increased invasiveness and resistance to the alkylating agent temozolomide. Expectedly, irradiation-induced PMT was also associated with activation of the STAT3 transcription factor, and the combination of STAT3 blockade using JAK2 inhibitors with radiation abrogated the mesenchymal transition and extended survival of mice. Taken together, our data suggest that clinical JAK2 inhibitors should be tested in conjunction with radiation in patients with proneural HGG as a new strategy for blocking the emergence of therapy-resistant mesenchymal tumors at relapse. Cancer Res; 75(20); 4302-11. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26282165

  4. Comparison of radiation-induced transmission degradation of borosilicate crown optical glass from four different manufacturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusarov, Andrei; Doyle, Dominic; Glebov, Leonid; Berghmans, Francis

    2005-09-01

    Space-born optical systems must be tolerant to radiation to guarantee that the required system performance is maintained during prolonged mission times. The radiation-induced absorption in optical glasses is often related with the presence of impurities, which are, intentionally or not, introduced during the manufacturing process. Glass manufacturers use proprietary fabrication processes and one can expect that the radiation sensitivity of nominally identical optical glasses from different manufacturers is different. We studied the gamma-radiation induced absorption of several crown glasses with nd ? 1.516 and vd ? 64, i.e. NBK7 (Schott), S-BSL7 (Ohara), BSC 517642 (Pilkington) and K8 (Russia). NBK7 recently replaced the well-known BK7. We therefore also compared the radiation response of NBK7 and BK7 glass. Our results show that whereas the glasses are optically similar before irradiation, they show a different induced absorption after irradiation and also different post-radiation recovery kinetics. Taking these differences into account can help to improve the radiation tolerance of optical systems for space applications.

  5. Sorafenib Enhances Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inhibiting STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Department of Radiological Technology, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan ; Lin, Chen-Si; Tai, Wei-Tien; Hsieh, Chi-Ying; National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Cheng, Ann-Lii; National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Chen, Kuen-Feng; National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and lethal human malignancies. Lack of efficient therapy for advanced HCC is a pressing problem worldwide. This study aimed to determine the efficacy and mechanism of combined sorafenib and radiation therapy treatment for HCC. Methods and Materials: HCC cell lines (PLC5, Huh-7, Sk-Hep1, and Hep3B) were treated with sorafenib, radiation, or both, and apoptosis and signal transduction were analyzed. Results: All 4 HCC cell lines showed resistance to radiation-induced apoptosis; however, this resistance could be reversed in the presence of sorafenib. Inhibition of phospho-STAT3 was found in cells treated with sorafenib or sorafenib plus radiation and subsequently reduced the expression levels of STAT3-related proteins, Mcl-1, cyclin D1, and survivin. Silencing STAT3 by RNA interference overcame apoptotic resistance to radiation in HCC cells, and the ectopic expression of STAT3 in HCC cells abolished the radiosensitizing effect of sorafenib. Moreover, sorafenib plus radiation significantly suppressed PLC5 xenograft tumor growth. Conclusions: These results indicate that sorafenib sensitizes resistant HCC cells to radiation-induced apoptosis via downregulating phosphorylation of STAT3 in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Implication of prostaglandins and histamine h1 and h2 receptors in radiation-induced temperature responses of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Mickley, G.A .

    1988-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy cobalt 60 gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas 20-200 Gy induced hypothermia. Exposure either to the head or to the whole body to 10 Gy induced hyperthermia, while body-only exposure produced hypothermia. This observation indicates that radiation-induced fever is a result of a direct effect on the brain. The hyperthermia due to 10 Gy was significantly attenuated by the pre- or post-treatment with a cyclooxgenase inhibitor, indomethacin. Hyperthermia was also altered by the central administration of a mu receptor antagonist naloxone but only at low doses of radiation. These findings suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia may be mediated through the synthesis and release of prostaglandins in the brain and to a lesser extent to the release of endogenous opioid peptides. The release of histamine acting on H(1) and H(2) receptors may be involved in radiation-induced hypothermia since both the H(1) receptor antagonist, mepyramine, and H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine, antagonized the hypothermia. The results of these studies suggested that the release of neurohumoral substances induced by exposure to ionizing radiation is dose dependent and has different consequences on physiological processes such as the regulation of body temperature. Furthermore, the antagonism of radiation-induced hyperthermia by indomethacin may have potential therapeutic implications in the treatment of fever resulting from accidental irradiations.

  7. Sialylation of Integrin beta1 is Involved in Radiation-Induced Adhesion and Migration in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Hae-June; Seo, Woo Duck; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Previously, we reported that radiation-induced ST6 Gal I gene expression was responsible for an increase of integrin beta1 sialylation. In this study, we have further investigated the function of radiation-mediated integrin beta1 sialylation in colon cancer cells. Methods and Materials: We performed Western blotting and lectin affinity assay to analyze the expression and level of sialylated integrin beta1. After exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), adhesion and migration of cells were measured by in vitro adhesion and migration assay. Results: IR increased sialylation of integrin beta1 responsible for its increased protein stability and adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. However, for cells with an N-glycosylation site mutant of integrin beta1 located on the I-like domain (Mu3), these effects were dramatically inhibited. In addition, integrin beta1-mediated radioresistance was not observed in cells containing this mutant. When sialylation of integrin beta1 was targeted with a sulfonamide chalcone compound, inhibition of radiation-induced sialylation of integrin beta1 and inhibition of radiation-induced adhesion and migration occurred. Conclusion: The increase of integrin beta1 sialylation by ST6 Gal I is critically involved in radiation-mediated adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells. From these findings, integrin beta1 sialylation may be a novel target for overcoming radiation-induced survival, especially radiation-induced adhesion and migration.

  8. On the morphology of the brachial plexus of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Koizumi, M; Sakai, T

    1997-04-01

    Four forelimbs of 3 platypuses and 3 forelimbs of 2 echidnas were examined to study the precise form of the brachial plexus and to clarify the structural characteristics of the brachial plexus in phylogeny. The spinal components contributing to the plexus (C4-T2) and the formation patterns of the 3 trunks of the plexus were the same as those generally observed in mammals. In the cranial half of the brachial plexus from C4, 5 and 6 in monotremes, division into the ventral bundle (lateral cord) and dorsal bundle (axillary nerve) is clear, as in other mammals. However, for monotremes, in the caudal half of the plexus from C7 and T1 (+T2) and the nerves arising from the caudal plexus there is no definite division into the ventral and dorsal bundles, which distribute to the flexor and extensor parts of the forelimbs, respectively. The lower trunk of the monotreme brachial plexus forms a cord which contains both ventral and dorsal components. This characteristic diverges from the generally accepted idea that the tetrapod limb plexus is divided clearly into 2 layers: a dorsal layer for extensors and a ventral layer for flexors of the limb. Considering the incomplete dorsoventral division of forelimb nerves in some reptiles and urodeles, the caudal half of the monotreme brachial plexus has characteristics in common with those of lower tetrapods. PMID:9147230

  9. Injury to the brachial plexus during Putti-Platt and Bristow procedures. A report of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Richards, R R; Hudson, A R; Bertoia, J T; Urbaniak, J R; Waddell, J P

    1987-01-01

    Eight patients with documented recurrent anterior dislocation of the shoulder sustained iatrogenic brachial plexus injuries during either Putti-Platt or Bristow procedures. Two patients also sustained axillary artery injuries. There were six males and two females. Postoperatively, complete paralysis of the musculocutaneous nerve was noted in six cases and incomplete paralysis in one case. Two patients had complete axillary nerve palsies. There were two cases of partial paralysis of the radial, median, and ulnar nerves, respectively. Seven of the patients underwent brachial plexus exploration an average of 16 weeks following their initial operation (range, 4 to 40). Suture material was removed from around or within two musculocutaneous nerves and one ulnar, one median, and one axillary nerve. Two lacerated musculocutaneous nerves were amenable to delayed primary repair. Two musculocutaneous, one median and one axillary nerve required grafting. Injury to the brachial plexus was associated with inadequate knowledge of regional anatomy, blind clamping of axillary artery lacerations, use of axillary incisions which limited exposure, and failure to identify the musculocutaneous nerve during Bristow procedures. If a brachial plexus injury occurs during a Putti-Platt or a Bristow procedure and the lesion does not rapidly, progressively, and completely recover, the brachial plexus should be explored since there is a high likelihood of structural neurologic injury. PMID:3661820

  10. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    PubMed

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent ?-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on ?-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against ?-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy. PMID:25824410

  11. Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

    As a result of improvements in cancer therapy and health care, the population of long-term cancer survivors is growing. For these approximately 12 million long-term cancer survivors, brain metastases are a significant risk. Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) is often required to treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury, including progressive cognitive impairment, however, can significantly affect the well-being of the approximately 200,000 patients who receive these treatments each year. Recent reports indicate that radiation-induced brain injury is associated with chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, as well as increased microglial activation in the brain. Anti-inflammatory drugs may, therefore, be a beneficial therapy to mitigate radiation-induced brain injury. We hypothesized that activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR?) would prevent or ameliorate radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment, in part, by alleviating inflammatory responses in microglia. For our in vitro studies, we hypothesized that PPAR? activation would prevent the radiation-induced inflammatory response in microglia following irradiation. Incubating BV-2 murine microglial cells with the (PPAR)? agonist, L-165041, prevented the radiation-induced increase in: i) intracellular ROS generation, ii) Cox-2 and MCP-1 expression, and iii) IL-1? and TNF-? message levels. This occured, in part, through PPAR?-mediated modulation of stress activated kinases and proinflammatory transcription factors. PPAR? inhibited NF-?B via transrepression by physically interacting with the p65 subunit, and prevented activation of the PKC?/MEK1/2/ERK1/2/AP-1 pathway by inhibiting the radiation-induced increase in intracellular ROS generation. These data support the hypothesis that PPAR? activation can modulate the radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in microglia in vitro. To extend our in vitro findings in vivo, we investigated whether administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)ä agonist, GW0742, prevented radiation-induced brain injury in C57Bl/6 WT mice. Our data demonstrate that GW0742 prevented the radiation-induced increase in the number of activated microglia (CD68+ cells) in wild-type (WT) mice 1 week following 10 Gy WBI. Furthermore, GW0742 inhibited the WBI-induced increase in IL-1? message levels and ERK phosphorylation observed 3 h post-irradiation. In contrast, GW0742 administration failed to modulate the radiation-induced decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis (NeuN+/BrdU+ cells) determined 2 months after irradiation, or mitigate hippocampal-dependent spatial memory impairment observed 3 months post-irradiation using the Barnes Maze task. We used PPAR? knockout (KO) mice to examine if the effects of GW0742 are PPAR?-dependent. Unexpectedly, PPAR? KO mice exhibited a differential response following WBI compared to WT mice; therefore, we were unable to make mechanistic conclusions about GW0742. KO mice do not exhibit a WBI-induced increase in activated microglia; however, they appeared to display a pronounced astrocytic response. In particular, PPAR? KO but not WT mice displayed increased GFAP message levels 2 months after WBI. Additionally, the number of GFAP+ cells was reduced significantly in the WT mice 2 months after WBI, but it was not in the PPAR? KO mice. These results demonstrate that: i) GW0742 prevents the radiation-induced increase in microglial activation and inflammatory markers, and ii) WT and PPAR? KO mice have a differential response to WBI.

  12. The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects Ann R. Kennedy Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 195 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA, United States 19104-6072 The development of countermeasures for radiation induced adverse health effects is a lengthy process, particularly when the countermeasure/drug has not yet been evaluated in human trials. One example of a drug developed from the bench to the clinic is the soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), which has been developed as a countermeasure for radiation induced cancer. It was originally identified as a compound/drug that could prevent the radiation induced carcinogenic process in an in vitro assay system in 1975. The first observation that BBI could inhibit carcinogenesis in animals was in 1985. BBI received Investigational New Drug (IND) Status with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1992 (after several years of negotiation with the FDA about the potential IND status of the drug), and human trials began at that time. Phase I, II and III human trials utilizing BBI have been performed under several INDs with the FDA, and an ongoing Phase III trial will be ending in the very near future. Thus, the drug has been in development for 35 years at this point, and it is still not a prescription drug on the market which is available for human use. A somewhat less time-consuming process is to evaluate compounds that are on the GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) list. These compounds would include some over-the-counter medications, such as antioxidant vitamins utilized in human trials at the levels for which Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) have been established. To determine whether GRAS substances are able to have beneficial effects on radiation induced adverse health effects, it is still likely to be a lengthy process involving many years to potentially decades of human trial work. The human trials necessary to demonstrate "efficacy" for a beneficial effect on the long term adverse health effects of radiation, such as the development of cancer, cataracts, etc., is expected to take particularly long periods of time. To avoid the long time delay in the development of new drugs as countermeasures for radiation induced adverse health effects, the NSBRI Center for Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is currently focused on the use of drugs that have already been approved for human use by the FDA. Currently there are no approved countermeasures for external radiation exposure by the US Army or by NASA. The appropriate medications for symptoms of the Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) due to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation are unknown, but there are medications appropriate for ARS symptoms caused by exposure to conventional ra-diation. The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) has medical guidelines for ARS medications (http://www.afrri.usuhs.mil/outreach/guidance.htm#policies), as does the US Dept. of Health and Human Services (the REMM (Radiation Event Medical Manage-ment) site (http://www.remm.nlm.gov). Supportive care when ARS symptoms develop include the administration of antimicrobial agents (which can include systemic antibiotics [especially those directed at gram-negative bacteria]), antiemetic agents, antidiarrheal agents, fluids, elec-trolytes, analgesic agents and topical burn creams (Waselenko, J.K. et al. Ann. Intern. Med. 140: 1037, 2004). For nausea and vomiting, serotonin receptor antagonists (5HT3 receptor antagonists) are very effective prophylaxis. There are two drugs that have been approved by the FDA (Zofran and Kytril) for radiation induced nausea and vomiting. Kytril (granisetron) is preferred by the US Army and is currently maintained in the US National Stockpile. Both of these drugs are known to stop retching and vomiting when given either before or after irradi-ation, even when vomiting and/or retching are occurring. Immune suppression can occur due to declines in white blood cells and infe

  13. A Survey of Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ogo, Etsuyo Komaki, Ritsuko; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Uchida, Masafumi; Abe, Toshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Mitsumori, Michihide; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We observed a rare and unique occurrence of radiation-induced pulmonary injury outside the tangential field for early breast cancer treatment. The findings appeared to be idiopathic and were called radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome. We surveyed major hospitals in Japan to review their findings of radiation-induced BOOP, in particular the clinical and pictorial characteristics of the entity. Methods and Materials: We reviewed surveys completed and returned by 20 institutions. The survey responses were based on a total of 37 cases of BOOP syndrome. We also reviewed X-ray and computed tomography scans provided by these institutions. We discussed the information derived from the questionnaire and analyzed patients' characteristics, methods used in the treatment of BOOP syndrome, and prognosis. Results: The incidence of the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was about 1.8% (37 of 2,056). We did not find a relationship between the characteristics of patients and the occurrence of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. The pulmonary findings were classified into four patterns on chest computed tomography scans. Progression of the pulmonary lesions observed on chest X-ray was classified into three patterns. Pneumonitis appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy was completed and disappeared within 6-12 months after its onset. At 5-year follow-up, 2 patients had died, 1 of breast cancer and the other of interstitial pneumonitis, which seemed to be idiopathic and unrelated to the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Although the incidence of BOOP syndrome and its associated prognosis are not significant, the patients' clinical condition must be carefully followed.

  14. Test Characteristics of the Ankle Brachial Index and Ankle Brachial Difference for Medial Arterial Calcification on X-ray in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ix, Joachim H.; Miller, Rachel G.; Criqui, Michael H.; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Medial arterial calcification (MAC) is common in diabetes, has characteristic x-ray appearance and has been linked with peripheral arterial stiffness and CVD. However few studies have measured x-ray MAC. It has been suggested that an ankle brachial index (ABI) > 1.30 or ankle brachial difference (ABD) > 75mmHg may identify x-ray MAC, but test characteristics are unknown. We hypothesized that an ABI > 1.30 and ABD > 75mmHg would have high specificity but low sensitivity for MAC on x-ray. Study Design Cross-sectional study Setting 185 community-living individuals with type 1 diabetes. Measurements The ABI and the ABD. Outcome Linear “tram-track” calcifications in the lower limbs characteristic of MAC Results Mean age was 32±6 and mean diabetes duration was 23±7 years. Ninety seven individuals (57%) had x-ray MAC, 15 (8%) had ABI > 1.30, and 14 (8%) had ABD > 75 mmHg. Using the ABI, the area under the ROC for MAC was modest (0.65) and was slightly higher for the ABD (0.75). An ABI > 1.30 had high specificity (99%) and PPV (93%), but poor sensitivity (14%), and an overall accuracy of 55% for MAC. In turn, an ABD > 50mmHg remained highly specific (98%), but had higher sensitivity (30%) and overall accuracy (62%). Conclusions Individuals with type 1 diabetes and an ABI > 1.30 or ABD > 50mmHg are very likely to have MAC on x-ray, yet many with MAC will not have ABI or ABD above these thresholds. Given high specificity, evaluating high ABI or ABD may be useful to understand correlates of MAC, but may underestimate MAC prevalence. PMID:22560306

  15. Connecting radiation-induced bystander effects and senescence to improve radiation response prediction.

    PubMed

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Krzywon, Aleksandra; Forys, Urszula; Widel, Maria

    2015-05-01

    For the last two decades radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs) have attracted significant attention due to their possible implications for radiotherapy. However, despite extensive research, the molecular pathways associated with RIBEs are still not completely known. In the current study we investigated the role of senescence in the bystander response. Irradiated (2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy) human colorectal carcinoma cells (HCT116) with p53(+/+) (wild-type) or p53(-/-) (knockout) gene were co-incubated with nonirradiated cells of the same type. Clonogenic and senescence assays were used for both irradiated and co-incubated bystander cell populations. We also performed additional measurements on the number of remaining cells after the whole co-incubation period. For radiation doses larger than 2 Gy we observed much larger fractions of senescent cells in p53-positive populations compared to their p53-negative counterparts (15.81% vs. 3.63% in the irradiated population; 2.89% vs. 1.05% in the bystander population; 8 Gy; P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences between cell lines in the clonogenic cell surviving fraction were observed for doses higher than 4 Gy (1.61% for p53(+/+) vs. 0.19% for p53(-/-) in irradiated population; 3.57% for +/+ vs. 50.39% for -/- in bystander population; 8 Gy; P < 0.05). Our main finding was that the number of senescent cells in the irradiated population correlated strongly with the clonogenic cell surviving fraction (R = -0.98, P < 0.001) and the number of senescent cells (R = 0.97, P < 0.001) in the bystander population. We also extended the standard linear-quadratic radiation response model by incorporating the influence of the signals released by the senescent cells, which accurately described the radiation response in the bystander population. Our findings suggest that radiation-induced senescence might be a key player in RIBE, i.e., the strength of RIBE depends on the amount of radiation-induced senescence. PMID:25844948

  16. Reduction of radiation-induced cell cycle blocks by caffeine does not necessarily lead to increased cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, S.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of caffeine upon the radiosensitivities of three human tumor lines was examined and correlated with its action upon the radiation-induced S-phase and G2-phase blocks. Caffeine was found to reduce at least partially the S-phase and G2-phase blocks in all the cell lines examined but potentiated cytotoxicity in only one of the three tumor lines. That reductions have been demonstrated to occur in the absence of increased cell killing provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that reductions may not be causal in those cases when potentiation of radiation-induced cytotoxicity is observed in the presence of caffeine.

  17. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, ?. For circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to ?. PMID:26450679

  18. Automated analysis of brachial ultrasound image sequences: early detection of cardiovascular disease via surrogates of endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Sonka, Milan; Liang, Weidong; Lauer, Ronald M

    2002-10-01

    Early detection of cardiovascular disease would allow timely institution of preventive measures. Arterial endothelium play a primary role in processes leading to the development of atherosclerotic plaque and cardiovascular disease in general. Determination of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of brachial arteries from B-mode ultrasound image sequences offers a noninvasive surrogate index of endothelial function. A highly automated method for analysis of brachial ultrasound image sequences is reported and its performance assessed. The method overcomes the variability of brachial ultrasound images across subjects by incorporating machine learning and quality control steps. The automated method outperformed conventional manual analysis by providing a decreased analysis bias, increased reproducibility, and improved measurement accuracy. Consequently, it decreases inter- and intraobserver as well interinstitution variability. The method has been employed in a number of population studies with thousands of subjects analyzed. PMID:12585709

  19. Brachial plexus block using lidocaine/epinephrine or lidocaine/xylazine in fat-tailed sheep

    PubMed Central

    Ghadirian, Safoura; Vesal, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    This blinded, randomized experimental study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding epinephrine or xylazine to lidocaine solution for brachial plexus block (BPB) in sheep. Nine healthy, fat-tailed female lambs (26.6 ± 1.5 kg) were randomly allocated into three groups: lidocaine 2%, 5 mg kg-1 (LID, n = 6), lidocaine (5 mg kg-1) with epinephrine 5 µg mL-1 (LIDEP, n = 6) or lidocaine (5 mg kg-1) with xylazine 0.05 mg kg-1 (LIDXY, n = 6). Each animal was tested twice. The sheep received a total volume of 0.25 mL kg-1 for BPB. A nerve stimulator was used to locate the nerves of the brachial plexus. Onset and duration of analgesia of the forelimb were evaluated using superficial and deep pin prick and pinching of skin with a hemostat clamp. Heart and respiratory rates, and rectal temperature were recorded before and at predetermined intervals following the completion of the block. Brachial administration of LID, LIDEP or LIDXY produced forelimb analgesia within 11.3, 11.0 and 7.0 minutes, respectively. The mean duration of analgesia was 100.0 min in LID and 133.2 min in LIDEP group. The mean duration of analgesia in LIDXY group (186.8 min) was significantly longer compared with LID group. In LIDEP group a significant increase in heart rate occurred 5 min after drug administration. Heart rate decreased from 35 to 80 min in sheep received LIDXY. In conclusion, the addition of xylazine to lidocaine solution for BBP provided a prolonged duration of action without any adverse effects in fat-tailed sheep. PMID:25653791

  20. Effect of salt intake and potassium supplementation on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in Chinese subjects: an interventional study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Mu, J.J.; Geng, L.K.; Wang, D.; Ren, K.Y.; Guo, T.S.; Chu, C.; Xie, B.Q.; Liu, F.Q.; Yuan, Z.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that high salt and potassium might be associated with vascular function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salt intake and potassium supplementation on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) in Chinese subjects. Forty-nine subjects (28-65 years of age) were selected from a rural community of northern China. All subjects were sequentially maintained on a low-salt diet for 7 days (3.0 g/day NaCl), a high-salt diet for an additional 7 days (18.0 g/day NaCl), and a high-salt diet with potassium supplementation for a final 7 days (18.0 g/day NaCl+4.5 g/day KCl). Brachial-ankle PWV was measured at baseline and on the last day of each intervention. Blood pressure levels were significantly increased from the low-salt to high-salt diet, and decreased from the high-salt diet to high-salt plus potassium supplementation. Baseline brachial-ankle PWV in salt-sensitive subjects was significantly higher than in salt-resistant subjects. There was no significant change in brachial-ankle PWV among the 3 intervention periods in salt-sensitive, salt-resistant, or total subjects. No significant correlations were found between brachial-ankle PWV and 24-h sodium and potassium excretions. Our study indicates that dietary salt intake and potassium supplementation, at least in the short term, had no significant effect on brachial-ankle PWV in Chinese subjects. PMID:25493387

  1. Association of Central Versus Brachial Blood Pressure With Target-Organ Damage: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kollias, Anastasios; Lagou, Styliani; Zeniodi, Maria Elena; Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Stergiou, George S

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that central blood pressure (BP) may reflect the hemodynamic stress on target organs more accurately than brachial BP. A systematic review assessing the relationship of central versus brachial BP with preclinical target-organ damage was performed. Meta-analysis of cross-sectional data showed that central compared with brachial systolic BP was more closely associated with (1) left ventricular mass index (12 studies, n=6431; weighted age [SD], 49.9 [13.1] years; 51% hypertensives): pooled correlation coefficients r=0.30; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.23-0.37 versus r=0.26; 95% CI, 0.19-0.33, respectively; P<0.01 for difference; (2) carotid intima-media thickness (7 studies, n=6136; weighted age, 55.6 [13.2] years; 48% hypertensives): r=0.27; 95% CI, 0.19-0.34 versus r=0.23; 95% CI, 0.16-0.30, respectively; P<0.01 for difference; (3) pulse-wave velocity (14 studies, n=3699; weighted age, 53.9 [13.3] years; 53% hypertensives): r=0.42; 95% CI, 0.37-0.47 versus r=0.39; 95% CI, 0.33-0.45, respectively; P<0.01 for difference. Four studies assessing urine albumin excretion (n=3718; weighted age, 56.4 [5] years; 69% hypertensives) reported similar correlations (P=not significant) with central (r=0.22; 95% CI, 0.14-0.29) and brachial systolic BP (r=0.22; 95% CI, 0.12-0.32). Similar findings were observed for central compared with brachial pulse pressure in terms of relationship with target-organ damage. Metaregression analyses did not reveal any significant effect of age. In conclusion, central compared with brachial BP seems to be more strongly associated with most of the investigated indices of preclinical organ damage. PMID:26597821

  2. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

  3. Modeling of radiation-induced bystander effect using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Junchao; Liu, Liteng; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang; Wu, Lijun

    2009-03-01

    Experiments showed that the radiation-induced bystander effect exists in cells, or tissues, or even biological organisms when irradiated with energetic ions or X-rays. In this paper, a Monte Carlo model is developed to study the mechanisms of bystander effect under the cells sparsely populated conditions. This model, based on our previous experiment which made the cells sparsely located in a round dish, focuses mainly on the spatial characteristics. The simulation results successfully reach the agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, other bystander effect experiment is also computed by this model and finally the model succeeds in predicting the results. The comparison of simulations with the experimental results indicates the feasibility of the model and the validity of some vital mechanisms assumed.

  4. Gamma radiation-induced thermoluminescence emission of minerals adhered to Mexican sesame seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Lazcano, Y.; Correcher, V.; Garcia-Guinea, J.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.

    2013-02-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) emission of minerals isolated from Mexican sesame seeds appear as a good tool to discern between irradiated and non-irradiated samples. According to the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) data, the adhered dust in both samples is mainly composed of different amounts of quartz and feldspars. These mineral phases exhibit (i) enough sensitivity to ionizing radiation inducing good TL intensity, (ii) high stability of the TL signal during the storage of the material, i.e. low fading, and (iii) are thermally and chemically stable. Blind tests were performed under laboratory conditions, but simulating industrial preservation processes, allow us to distinguish between 1 kGy gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated samples even 15 months after irradiation processing followed the EN 1788 European Standard protocol in sesame samples.

  5. Role of distonic dimer radical cations in the radiation-induced polymerisation of vinyl ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Sergej; Janovský, Igor; Knolle, Wolfgang; Mehnert, Reiner

    2005-07-01

    The experimental low-temperature EPR results and the quantum chemical calculations suggest that dimer radical cations of cyclic and aliphatic vinyl ethers (VE) plays a key role in starting of radiation-induced polymerisation. The main species observed at high 2,3-dihydrofuran (DHF), 2,3-dihydropyran (DHP) and VE concentration is the dimer radical cation. In the case of cyclic VE the dimer radical cation transforms through H-abstraction from neutral molecule into a carbocation and radical, which could start both cationic and free-radical polymerisation. However, in the case of aliphatic VE no further reactive species, which could start polymerisation, were observed. This is caused (in agreement with experiment and quantum chemical calculations) by the very high stability of dimer radical cation and calculated endothermity of H-abstraction reaction by dimer radical cation from monomer.

  6. Prompt radiation-induced conductivity in polyurethane foam and glass microballoons

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, Eric F.

    2014-06-01

    We performed measurements and analyses of the prompt radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of polyurethane foam and glass microballoon foam at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. The RIC coefficient was non-linear with dose rate for polyurethane foam; however, typical values at 1E11 rad(si)/s dose rate was measured as 0.8E-11 mho/m/rad/s for 5 lb./cu ft. foam and 0.3E-11 mho/m/rad/s for 10 lb./cu ft. density polyurethane foam. For encapsulated glass microballoons (GMB) the RIC coefficient was approximately 1E-15 mho/m/rad/s and was not a strong function of dose rate.

  7. The correlation between swelling and radiation-induced segregation in iron-chromium-nickel alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.; Kenik, E. A.; Was, G. S.

    1998-03-05

    The magnitudes of both void swelling and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in iron-chromium-nickel alloys are dependent on bulk alloy composition. Because the diffusivity of nickel via the vacancy flux is slow relative to chromium, nickel enriches and chromium depletes at void surfaces during irradiation. This local composition change reduces the subsequent vacancy flux to the void, thereby reducing void swelling. In this work, the resistance to swelling from major element segregation is estimated using diffusivities derived from grain boundary segregation measurements in irradiated iron-chromium-nickel alloys. The resistance to void swelling in iron- and nickel-base alloys correlates with the segregation and both are functions of bulk alloy composition. Alloys that display the greatest amount of nickel enrichment and chromium depletion are found to be most resistant to void swelling, as predicted. Additionally, swelling is shown to be greater in alloys in which the RIS profiles are slow to develop.

  8. Radiation-induced grafting of sweet sorghum stalk for copper(II) removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Hu, Jun; Wang, Jianlong

    2013-11-15

    The influence of main components (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) of the sweet sorghum stalk on radiation-induced grafting reaction and adsorption of copper from aqueous solution was investigated. Sweet sorghum stalk was grafted with acrylic acid induced by ?-irradiation. The results showed that the grafted stalk contained 1.6 mmol/g carboxyl groups, and its maximal adsorption capacity was 13.32 mg/g. The cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin of the raw materials were confirmed to involve in grafting reaction through comparing the grafting yield and the structure of the grafted materials. Both the structure and the composition of the sweet sorghum stalk had influence on the grafting reaction and adsorption capacity. The adsorption capacity of the grafted sweet sorghum stalk increased about five times, and the adsorption isotherm of the grafted materials conformed to the Langmuir model. The main mechanism for copper adsorption involved in ion exchange. PMID:24140536

  9. Endogenous retrovirus and radiation-induced leukemia in the RMF mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.W.; Boone, L.R.; Lalley, P.; Yang, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of myeloid leukemia in irradiated RFM/Un mice has been associated with retrovirus infection. However, two characteristics of this strain complicate efforts to define the role of the virus. This strain possesses only one inducible host range class of endogenous virus and a unique gene, in addition to the Fv-1/sup n/ locus, which specifically restricts exogenous infection by endogenous viruses. These characteristics possibly account for absence of recombinant viruses in this strain, even though virus is amply expressed during most of the animal's life span. We have examined further the distribution of retrovirus sequences and the chromosomal locus of the inducible virus in this strain. This report describes evidence for additional viral sequences in cells of a radiation-induced myeloid leukemia line and discusses the possible origin of these added copies.

  10. A Human Espophageal Epithelial Cell Model for Study of Radiation Induced Cancer and DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma, a type of cancer found to have a significant enhancement in incidence in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Here we present the results of our preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of - H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron).

  11. CDK1 Enhances Mitochondrial Bioenergetics for Radiation-Induced DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lili; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Jiang, Guochun; Papadopoulos, Stelios; Tian, Lin; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J.; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Nuclear DNA repair capacity is a critical determinant of cell fate under genotoxic stress conditions. DNA repair is a well-defined energy consuming process; however, it is unclear how DNA repair is fueled and whether mitochondrial energy production contributes to nuclear DNA repair. Here, we report a dynamic enhancement of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial ATP generation in irradiated normal cells, paralleled with increased mitochondrial relocation of cell cycle kinase CDK1 and nuclear DNA repair. The basal and radiation-induced mitochondrial ATP generation is significantly reduced in cells harboring CDK1 phosphorylation deficient mutant complex I subunits. Similarly, mitochondrial ATP generation and nuclear DNA repair are also severely compromised in cells harboring mitochondrial-targeted kinase deficient CDK1. These results demonstrate a mechanism governing the communication between mitochondria and nucleus, by which CDK1 boosts mitochondrial bioenergetics to meet the increased cellular fuel demand for DNA repair and cell survival under genotoxic stress. PMID:26670043

  12. Polymeric nanocomposite proton exchange membranes prepared by radiation-induced polymerization for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Seok; Seo, Kwang-Seok; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The vinyl group-modified montmorillonite clay (F-MMT), vinyl group-modified graphene oxide (F-GO), and vinyl group-modified multi-walled carbon nanotube (F-MWNT) were first prepared by ion exchange reaction of 1-[(4-ethylphenyl)methyl]-3-butyl-imidazolium chloride in order to use the materials for protection against methanol cross-over in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) membrane. Then polymeric nanocomposite membranes with F-MMT, F-GO, and F-MWNT were prepared by the solvent casting method after radiation-induced polymerization of vinyl monomers in water-methanol mixture solvents. The proton conductivity, water uptake, ion-exchange capacity, methanol permeability, and DMFC performance of the polymeric nanocomposite membranes with F-MMT, F-GO, and F-MWNT were evaluated.

  13. Radiatively induced flavour violation in the general two-Higgs doublet model with Yukawa alignment

    E-print Network

    Carolin B. Braeuninger; Alejandro Ibarra; Cristoforo Simonetto

    2010-06-15

    The most general two Higgs doublet model contains new sources of flavour violation that are usually in conflict with the experimental constraints. One possibility to suppress the exotic contribution to the flavour changing neutral currents consists on imposing the alignment of the Yukawa couplings. This condition presumably holds at a high-energy scale and is spoiled by the radiative corrections. We compute in this letter the size of the radiatively induced flavour violating Higgs couplings at the electroweak scale. These also yield the absolute lower bound on the size of the exotic contributions to the flavour changing neutral currents in any two Higgs doublet model, barring cancellations and the existence of discrete symmetries. We show that these contributions are well below the experimental bounds in large regions of the parameter space.

  14. Influence of matrix porosity on the immobilization of penicillin acylase by radiation-induced polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Boccù, E.; Largajolli, R.; Veronese, F. M.

    Penicillin acylase was immobilized by low temperature radiation-induced polymerization into polymer matrices obtained from monomers of different hydrophilicities, at various ratios of monomer to enzyme solution and at different polymerization conversions. It was found that the penicillin acylase retention (60-85% of the starting enzyme) is independent of the monomer used in thepolymerization, of the polymerization conversion and of the porosity of the polymer matrix. On the other hand, the penicillin acylase retention strongly depends on the presence in the irradiation mixture of the hydrophobic crosslinking agent, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, even in low amounts. The data suggest that the enzyme is bound to the polymer matrix by hydrophobic interactions through crosslinking agent molecules.

  15. Thermal effusivity: a promising imaging biomarker to predict radiation-induced skin injuries.

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, J. C. H.; Templeton, A.; Yao, R.; Griem, K. L.; Sun, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    An effective screening technology is needed to triage individuals at the time of radiation incidents involving a large population. Three-dimensional thermal tomography is a relatively new development in active thermal imaging technology that produces cross-sectional images based on the subject's ability to transfer heat thermal effusivity at the voxel level. This noninvasive imaging modality has been used successfully in nondestructive examination of complex materials; also it has been shown to predict the severity of radiation-induced skin injuries several days before the manifestation of severe moist desquamations or blister formation symptoms in mice at 40 Gy. If these results are confirmed at lower dose levels in human subjects, a thermal tomography imaging device may be an ideal screening tool in radiation emergencies. This imaging method is non-invasive, relatively simple, easily adaptable for field use, and when properly deployed, it will enhance public emergency preparedness for incidents involving unexpected radiation exposure.

  16. Marked reduction of radiation-induced micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes pretreated with melatonin

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayalaxmi; Reiter, R.J.; Leal, B.Z.

    1995-07-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes which were pretreated in vitro with melatonin, and endogenously synthesized pineal hormone, for 20 min at 37 {plus_minus} 1{degrees}C exhibited a significant and concentration-dependent reduction in the frequency of {gamma}radiation-induced micronuclei compared with irradiated cells which did not receive the pretreatment. The extent of the reduction observed with 2.0 mM melatonin was similar to that found in lymphocytes pretreated for 20 min with 1.0 M dimethylsulfoxide, a known free radical scavenger. These observations indicate that melatonin may have an active role in protection of humans against genetic damage due to endogenously produced free radicals, and also may be of use in reducing damage due to exposure to physical and chemical mutagens and carcinogens which generate free radicals. 25 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liber, Howard L.

    2003-02-13

    The overall strategy was to create a series of isogenic human cell lines that differ in key elements of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, or DNA repair in response to radiation-induced damage. The goal then was to quantify the fractions of cells within a population that exhibit reduced telomere lengths and relate this to the genetic background of the cell, as well as to the response to ionizing radiation. Association between telomere length and degree of genomic instability in the population is being examined for seven closely related cell lines, that vary in p53 status, bcl-2 status, or ability to repair double strand breaks. Experiments utilize gamma rays at doses of 0, 10, and 200 cGy. During this time period the effort concentrated on generating data with two cell lines. Approximately one-third of the required clones were isolated, and analyses for mutagenesis and chromosome aberrations were undertaken.

  18. Microfabricated electrochemical sensor for the detection of radiation-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Rivas, G.; Ozsoz, M.; Grant, D.H.; Cai, X.; Parrado, C.

    1997-04-01

    An electrochemical biosensor protocol for the detection of radiation-induced DNA damage is described. The procedure employs a dsDNA-coated screen-printed electrode and relies on changes in the guanine-DNA oxidation signal upon exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The decreased signal is ascribed primarily to conformational changes in the DNA and to the photoconversion of the guanine-DNA moiety to a nonelectroactive monomeric base product. Factors influencing the response of these microfabricated DNA sensors, such as irradiation time, wavelength, and distance, are explored, and future prospects are discussed. Similar results are given for the use of bare strip electrodes in connection with irradiated DNA solutions. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Characterization of Network Structure of Polyacrylamide Based Hydrogels Prepared By Radiation Induced Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmudi, Naim; Sen, Murat; Gueven, Olgun; Rendevski, Stojan

    2007-04-23

    In this study network structure of polyacrylamide based hydrogels prepared by radiation induced polymerization has been investigated. Polyacrylamide based hydrogels in the rod form were prepared by copolymerization of acrylamide(AAm) with hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate(HEMA) and methyl acrylamide(MAAm) in the presence of cross-linking agent and water by gamma rays at ambient temperature. Molecular weight between cross-links and effective cross-link density of hydrogels were calculated from swelling as well as shear modulus data obtained from compression tests. The results have shown that simple compression analyses can be used for the determination of effective cross-link density of hydrogels without any need to some polymer-solvent based parameters as in the case of swelling based determinations. Diffusion of water into hydrogels was examined by analyzing water absorption kinetics and the effect of network, structure on the diffusion type and coefficient was discussed.

  20. Characterization of Network Structure of Polyacrylamide Based Hydrogels Prepared By Radiation Induced Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudi, Naim; ?en, Murat; Güven, Olgun; Rendevski, Stojan

    2007-04-01

    In this study network structure of polyacrylamide based hydrogels prepared by radiation induced polymerization has been investigated. Polyacrylamide based hydrogels in the rod form were prepared by copolymerization of acrylamide(AAm) with hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate(HEMA) and methyl acrylamide(MAAm) in the presence of cross-linking agent and water by gamma rays at ambient temperature. Molecular weight between cross-links and effective cross-link density of hydrogels were calculated from swelling as well as shear modulus data obtained from compression tests. The results have shown that simple compression analyses can be used for the determination of effective cross-link density of hydrogels without any need to some polymer-solvent based parameters as in the case of swelling based determinations. Diffusion of water into hydrogels was examined by analyzing water absorption kinetics and the effect of network, structure on the diffusion type and coefficient was discussed.

  1. Gamma radiation-induced refractive index change in Ge- and N-doped silica

    SciTech Connect

    Brichard, Benoit; Butov, Oleg V.; Golant, Konstantin M.; Fernandez Fernandez, Alberto

    2008-03-01

    We measured the change of the refractive index over a wide wavelength range in Ge- and N-doped high purity (fiber optics grade) silica glasses subjected to gamma irradiation. The radiation-induced change of the refractive index tends to be greater in the infrared part of the spectrum compare to the values measured in the UV-visible part of the spectrum. By means of the Kramers-Kronig relations, we estimate that a weak broadening of the optical vibration band of the silica network adds to this effect. The paper also discusses the difference observed in the spectral behavior of the induced refractive index change for both types of doped glass.

  2. A computational approach to the relationship between radiation induced double strand breaks and translocations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, W. R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical framework is presented which provides a quantitative analysis of radiation induced translocations between the ab1 oncogene on CH9q34 and a breakpoint cluster region, bcr, on CH 22q11. Such translocations are associated frequently with chronic myelogenous leukemia. The theory is based on the assumption that incorrect or unfaithful rejoining of initial double strand breaks produced concurrently within the 200 kbp intron region upstream of the second abl exon, and the 16.5 kbp region between bcr exon 2 and exon 6 interact with each other, resulting in a fusion gene. for an x-ray dose of 100 Gy, there is good agreement between the theoretical estimate and the one available experimental result. The theory has been extended to provide dose response curves for these types of translocations. These curves are quadratic at low doses and become linear at high doses.

  3. Ultrasound appearance of radiation-induced hepatic injury. Correlation with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Garra, B.S.; Shawker, T.H.; Chang, R.; Kaplan, K.; White, R.D.

    1988-11-01

    The ultrasound findings in three cases of radiation-induced hepatic injury are described and compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Fatty infiltration of the liver was present in two of the cases in which concurrent chemotherapy was being administered. On ultrasound B-scans, the regions of radiation injury were hypoechoic relative to the remainder of the liver. This finding was more obvious in the patients with fatty livers. CT scans on the patients with fatty infiltrated livers showed higher attenuation in the irradiated region than in unexposed liver. In the patient where no fatty infiltration was present, the radiated section of liver had lower attenuation consistent with previous reports. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decreased signal in the exposed areas on T1 weighted images.

  4. The complex interactions between radiation induced non-targeted effects and cancer.

    PubMed

    Campa, Alessandro; Balduzzi, Maria; Dini, Valentina; Esposito, Giuseppe; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Radiation induced non-targeted effects have been widely investigated in the last two decades for their potential impact on low dose radiation risk. In this paper we will give an overview of the most relevant aspects related to these effects, starting from the definition of the low dose scenarios. We will underline the role of radiation quality, both in terms of mechanisms of interaction with the biological matter and for the importance of charged particles as powerful tools for low dose effects investigation. We will focus on cell communication, representing a common feature of non-targeted effects, giving also an overview of cancer models that have explicitly considered such effects. PMID:24139968

  5. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment. PMID:23958412

  6. Radiation-induced hemopoietic and immune dysfunction. Technical report, 16 Aug 86-31 Mar 90

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Schuening, F.

    1991-06-01

    This work was aimed at investigating radiation-induced hemopoietic and immune dysfunction in the dog model. One project was to produce monoclonal antibodies directed against canine hemopoietic precursor cells and specific for pluripotent stem cells. Antibodies obtained reacted with different myeloid and erythroid precursor cells; unfortunately, none of the antibodies were specific for pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells. Positive selections for these cells were performed using magnetic beads and an antibody against class 2-antigen. Transplantation of class 2 positive marrow cells into otherwise lethally irradiated dogs led to sustained recovery in only 1 of 5 dogs. A second project established and investigated long-term marrow cultures in the dog. Culture conditions were studied and optimized, and marrow cells were transplanted into otherwise lethally irradiated dogs to investigate stem cell survival in long-term cultures. Engraftment was observed only with short-term marrow cultures.

  7. Radiation-induced degradation of water pollutants—state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    1996-04-01

    The radiation-induced decomposition of biological resistant pollutants in drinking as well as in wastewater is briefly reviewed. First, some important units, definitions etc., radiation sources, as well as dose-depth curves in water as functions of the electron energy and 60Co-?-rays are mentioned. Following is a schematical presentation of water radiolysis and of characteristics of primary free radicals. Then the degradation of some aliphatic and aromatic chlorinated compounds in the presence of air is presented. Some spectroscopic and kinetic data of transients resulting from chlorinated phenols are also quoted in order to illustrate and to explain the rather complicated degradation mechanisms. In this respect the synergistic effect of radiation and oxygen as well as that of ozone is also discussed. Finally, a scheme for technical application of high energy electron beam is presented.

  8. Serum microRNAs are early indicators of survival after radiation-induced hematopoietic injury

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Sanket S.; Fendler, Wojciech; Watson, Jacqueline; Hamilton, Abigail; Pan, Yunfeng; Gaudiano, Emily; Moskwa, Patryk; Bhanja, Payel; Saha, Subhrajit; Guha, Chandan; Parmar, Kalindi; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    Accidental radiation exposure is a threat to human health that necessitates effective clinical planning and diagnosis. Minimally invasive biomarkers that can predict long-term radiation injury are urgently needed for optimal management after a radiation accident. We have identified serum microRNA (miRNA) signatures that indicate long-term impact of total body irradiation (TBI) in mice when measured within 24 hours of exposure. Impact of TBI on the hematopoietic system was systematically assessed to determine a correlation of residual hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with increasing doses of radiation. Serum miRNA signatures distinguished untreated mice from animals exposed to radiation and correlated with the impact of radiation on HSCs. Mice exposed to sublethal (6.5 Gy) and lethal (8 Gy) doses of radiation were indistinguishable for 3 to 4 weeks after exposure. A serum miRNA signature detectable 24 hours after radiation exposure consistently segregated these two cohorts. Furthermore, using either a radioprotective agent before, or radiation mitigation after, lethal radiation, we determined that the serum miRNA signature correlated with the impact of radiation on animal health rather than the radiation dose. Last, using humanized mice that had been engrafted with human CD34+ HSCs, we determined that the serum miRNA signature indicated radiation-induced injury to the human bone marrow cells. Our data suggest that serum miRNAs can serve as functional dosimeters of radiation, representing a potential breakthrough in early assessment of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage and timely use of medical countermeasures to mitigate the long-term impact of radiation. PMID:25972001

  9. Honey and Radiation-Induced Stomatitis in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bahramnezhad, Fatemeh; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Bassampour, Shiva Sadat; Khajeh, Mahboobeh; Asgari, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stomatitis is a common oral complication which affects 100% of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy. Acute stomatitis might cause failure and delay radiotherapy. Attention to mouth hygiene, particularly using mouthwash, has a fundamental importance for these patients. Objectives: The current study came to addresses the effects of pure natural honey on radiation-induced stomatitis in patients with a variety of head and neck cancers. Patients and Methods: The present single-blinded nonrandomized controlled trial was conducted on 105 patients undergoing radiotherapy due to head and neck cancer at the radiation unit of Shafa hospital in Kerman, Iran, from October 2012 to March 2012. The research groups were selected by writing the names of the protocols (the mouthwashes of chamomile, honey and the common caring protocol at ward which uses water) on three cubes. The first extracted cube was related to the chamomile mouthwash (Matrica), the second to the honey mouthwash and the last cube to the water mouthwash. The first experimental group (n = 35) gurgled a solution containing 20 mL diluted honey, the second group gurgled a solution containing German chamomile, and the 35 patients in the control group were advised to gurgle 20 mL water (the ward routine). Results: The results showed that severe stomatitis in groups of honey, chamomile and control was 0, 5.7%, and 17.6%, respectively. On the 14th day, it was 0, 0, and 17.6%, respectively. There were significant differences between the three groups regarding the severity of stomatitis in the 14th day (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The application of natural honey is effective in managing and preventing radiation-induced stomatitis in patients with head and neck cancers. PMID:26568850

  10. Mitigation and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Thoracic Injury With a Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor, Celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Nancy R.; Valdecanas, David; Liao Zhongxing; Milas, Luka; Thames, Howard D.; Mason, Kathy A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To test whether a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) could reduce mortality resulting from radiation-induced pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: Celecoxib was given to mice twice daily for 40 consecutive days starting on the day of local thoracic irradiation (LTI) or 40 or 80 days later. C3Hf/KamLaw mice were observed for morbidity, and time to death was determined. Results were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Timing of celecoxib relative to LTI determined efficacy. A significant reduction in time to death was achieved only when celecoxib was started 80 days after LTI, corresponding to the time when pneumonitis is expressed. For these mice the reduction in mortality was quantified as a hazard ratio for mortality of treated vs untreated of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24-0.53), thus significantly less than 1.0. Correspondingly, the median lethal dose for treated mice (12.9 Gy; 95% CI 12.55-13.25 Gy) was significantly (P=.026) higher than for untreated mice (12.4 Gy; 95% CI 12.2-12.65 Gy). Conclusions: Celecoxib significantly reduced lung toxicity when administered months after LTI when the deleterious effects of radiation were expressed. The schedule-dependent reduction in fatal pneumonitis suggests that celecoxib could be clinically useful by reintroduction of treatment months after completion of radiation therapy. These findings may be important for designing clinical trials using cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to treat radiation-induced lung toxicity as a complement to concurrent radiation therapy of lung cancers.

  11. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  12. The radiation-induced fibroatrophic process: therapeutic perspective via the antioxidant pathway.

    PubMed

    Delanian, Sylvie; Lefaix, Jean-Louis

    2004-11-01

    The radiation-induced fibroatrophic process (RIF) constitutes a late, local and unavoidable sequela to high-dose radiotherapy, traditionally considered irreversible. Today, this process is partly reversible, thanks to recent progress in understanding the physiopathology of the lesions it causes and the results of recent clinical trials using antioxidant therapy. This review includes a synthetic description of the static and dynamic features of the RIF process, as reflected by its clinical, instrumental and histopathological characteristics, and by its cellular and molecular regulation. Schematically, three successive clinical and histopathological phases can be distinguished: a pre-fibrotic aspecific inflammatory phase, a constitutive fibrotic cellular phase, and a matrix densification and remodelling phase, possibly ending in terminal tissular necrosis. The respective roles of the chief actors in the RIF process are defined, as well as their development with time. A fibroblastic stromal hypothesis is suggested revolving around a 'gravitational effect' exerted by the couple ROS (reactive oxygen species)--fibroblasts, and partly mediated by TGF-beta1. A variety of strategies have been tested for the management of RIF. In the light of the mechanisms described, a curative procedure has been proposed via the antioxidant pathway. In particular, it was showed that superoxide dismutase and combined pentoxifylline-tocopherol treatment enables the process of established radiation-induced fibroatrophy to be greatly reduced or even reversed, both in clinical practice and animal experiments. The efficacy of combined pentoxifylline-tocopherol treatment in superficial RIF was confirmed in a randomised clinical trial, and then in successful phase II trials especially in uterine fibroatrophy and osteoradionecrosis. It is of critical importance to evaluate these new management approaches in larger clinical trials and to improve the recording of results for better outcome analysis. Mechanistic studies are always necessary to improve understanding of the RIF process and the antifibrotic drug action. PMID:15542158

  13. Radiation-Induced Segregation and Phase Stability in Candidate Alloys for the Advanced Burner Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was; Brian D. Wirth

    2011-05-29

    Major accomplishments of this project were the following: 1) Radiation induced depletion of Cr occurs in alloy D9, in agreement with that observed in austenitic alloys. 2) In F-M alloys, Cr enriches at PAG grain boundaries at low dose (<7 dpa) and at intermediate temperature (400°C) and the magnitude of the enrichment decreases with temperature. 3) Cr enrichment decreases with dose, remaining enriched in alloy T91 up to 10 dpa, but changing to depletion above 3 dpa in HT9 and HCM12A. 4) Cr has a higher diffusivity than Fe by a vacancy mechanism and the corresponding atomic flux of Cr is larger than Fe in the opposite direction to the vacancy flux. 5) Cr concentration at grain boundaries decreases as a result of vacancy transport during electron or proton irradiation, consistent with Inverse Kirkendall models. 6) Inclusion of other point defect sinks into the KLMC simulation of vacancy-mediated diffusion only influences the results in the low temperature, recombination dominated regime, but does not change the conclusion that Cr depletes as a result of vacancy transport to the sink. 7) Cr segregation behavior is independent of Frenkel pair versus cascade production, as simulated for electron versus proton irradiation conditions, for the temperatures investigated. 8) The amount of Cr depletion at a simulated planar boundary with vacancy-mediated diffusion reaches an apparent saturation value by about 1 dpa, with the precise saturation concentration dependent on the ratio of Cr to Fe diffusivity. 9) Cr diffuses faster than Fe by an interstitial transport mechanism, and the corresponding atomic flux of Cr is much larger than Fe in the same direction as the interstitial flux. 10) Observed experimental and computational results show that the radiation induced segregation behavior of Cr is consistent with an Inverse Kirkendall mechanism.

  14. Proximity Within Interphase Chromosome Contributes to the Breakpoint Distribution in Radiation-Induced Intrachromosomal Exchanges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Uhlemeyer, Jimmy; Hada, Megumi; Asaithamby, A.; Chen, David J.; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported that breaks involved in chromosome aberrations were clustered in several regions of chromosome3 in human mammary epithelial cells after exposures to either low-or high-LET radiation. In particular, breaks in certain regions of the chromosome tended to rejoin with each other to form an intrachromosome exchange event. This study tests the hypothesis that proximity within a single chromosome in interphase cell nuclei contributes to the distribution of radiation-induced chromosome breaks. Chromosome 3 in G1 human mammary epithelial cells was hybridized with the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probes that distinguish the chromosome in six differently colored regions, and the location of these regions was measured with a laser confocal microscope. Results of the study indicated that, on a multi-mega base pair scale of the DNA, the arrangement of chromatin was non-random. Both telomere regions tended to be located towards the exterior of the chromosome domain, whereas the centromere region towards the interior. In addition, the interior of the chromosome domain was preferentially occupied by the p-arm of the chromatin, which is consistent with our previous finding of intrachromosome exchanges involving breaks on the p-arm and in the centromere region of chromosome3. Other factors, such as the fragile sites in the 3p21 band and gene regulation, may also contribute to the breakpoint distribution in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Further investigations suggest that the 3D chromosome folding is cell type and culture condition dependent.

  15. 3D MR Sialography as a Tool to Investigate Radiation-Induced Xerostomia: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Astreinidou, Eleftheria . E-mail: E.Astreinidou@umcutrecht.nl; Roesink, Judith M.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Witkamp, Theo D.; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether magnetic-resonance (MR) sialography can be used to investigate radiation-induced xerostomia. Preradiotherapy (pre-RT) and postradiotherapy (post-RT) MR sialographic images of the major salivary ducts (parotid and submandibular) were compared. Methods and Materials: Magnetic-resonance sialography was performed pre-RT, and 6 weeks and 6 months post-RT on 9 patients with T1-4N0-2M0 naso- or oropharyngeal tumors, on a 1.5-T MR scanner. Patients were positioned in the scanner, using a radiotherapy immobilization mask. Image registration of the MR sialograms pre- and post-RT with each other and with the CT and consequently the dose distribution was performed. A categorical scoring system was used to compare the visibility of ducts pre-RT and post-RT. Results: Good-quality MR sialographic images were obtained, and image registration was successful in all cases. The visibility score of the parotid ducts and submandibular ducts was reduced at 6 weeks post-RT, which means that the full trajectory of the salivary ducts, from the intraglandular space to the mouth cavity, was only partially visualized. For some of the parotid ducts, the visibility score improved at 6 months post-RT, but not for the submandibular ducts. The mean dose for the parotid glands was 35 Gy (1 standard deviation [SD] 3 Gy), and for the submandibular glands it was 62 Gy (SD, 8 Gy). Conclusion: Three-dimensional MR sialography is a promising approach for investigating xerostomia, because radiation-induced changes to the saliva content of the ducts can be visualized.

  16. Radiation-induced diamond crystallization: Origin of carbonados and its implications on meteorite nano-diamonds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ozima, M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1997-01-01

    Ten carbonados from Central Africa were studied for U-Th-Pb systematics. To extract U, Th, and Pb from the samples, we developed a cold combustion technique wherein diamond was burnt in liquid oxygen. The technique gave low blanks; 25-50 pg for Pb, 3 pg for U, and 5 pg for Th. After very thorough acid treatments of the carbonados with hot HNO3, HF, and HCl over one week, most of U, Th, and Pb were removed from the samples. Lead in the acid-leached diamonds was highly radiogenic (206Pb/204Pb up to 470). However, the amounts of U and Th in the acid-leached diamonds are too low to account for the radiogenic Pb even if we assume 4.5 Ga for the age of the diamonds. Therefore, we conclude that the radiogenic Pb was implanted into the diamonds from surroundings by means of recoil energy of radioactive decays of U and Th. From the radiogenic lead isotopic composition, we estimate a minimum age of 2.6 Ga and a maximum age of 3.8 Ga for the formation of the carbonados. The above findings of the implantation of recoiled radiogenic Pb into carbonados is consistent with the process of radiation-induced crystallization which was proposed for carbonado by Kaminsky (1987). We show from some theoretical considerations that when highly energetic particles, such as those emitted from radioactive decay of U and Th, interact with carbonaceous materials, they give rise to cascades of atomic disturbance (over regions of about a few nanometer), and the disturbed atoms are likely to recrystallize to form micro-diamonds because of increasing surface energy due to small size. The radiation-induced diamond formation mechanism may be relevant to the origin of nano-diamonds in primitive meteorites. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  17. Radiation-Inducible Caspase-8 Gene Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurushima, Hideo Yuan Xuan; Dillehay, Larry E.; Leong, Kam W.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Patients with malignant gliomas have a poor prognosis. To explore a novel and more effective approach for the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, we designed a strategy that combines caspase-8 (CSP8) gene therapy and radiation treatment (RT). In addition, the specificity of the combined therapy was investigated to decrease the unpleasant effects experienced by the surrounding normal tissue. Methods and Materials: We constructed the plasmid pEGR-green fluorescence protein that included the radiation-inducible early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) promoter and evaluated its characteristics. The pEGR-CSP8 was constructed and included the Egr-1 promoter and CSP8 complementary DNA. Assays that evaluated the apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity caused by CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were performed using U251 and U87 glioma cells. The pEGR-CSP8 was transfected into the subcutaneous U251 glioma cells of nude mice by means of in vivo electroporation. The in vivo effects of CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were evaluated. Results: The Egr-1 promoter yielded a better response with fractionated RT than with single-dose RT. In the assay of apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity, pEGR-CSP8 showed response for RT. The pEGR-CSP8 combined with RT is capable of inducing cell death effectively. In mice treated with pEGR-CSP8 and RT, apoptotic cells were detected in pathologic sections, and a significant difference was observed in tumor volumes. Conclusions: Our results indicate that radiation-inducible gene therapy may have great potential because this can be spatially or temporally controlled by exogenous RT and is safe and specific.

  18. Persistence of Space Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytogenetic damage in astronaut's peripheral blood lymphocytes is a useful in vivo marker of space radiation induced damage. Moreover, if radiation induced chromosome translocations persist in peripheral blood lymphocytes for many years, as has been assumed, they could potentially be used to measure retrospective doses or prolonged low dose rate exposures. However, as more data becomes available, evidence suggests that the yield of translocations may decline with time after exposure, at least in the case of space radiation exposures. We present our latest follow-up measurements of chromosome aberrations in astronauts blood lymphocytes assessed by FISH painting and collected a various times beginning directly after return from space to several years after flight. For most individuals the analysis of individual time-courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with different half-lives. Since the level of stable aberrations depends on the interplay between natural loss of circulating T-lymphocytes and replenishment from the stem or progenitor cells, the differences in the rates of decay could be explained by inter-individual variation in lymphocyte turn over. Biodosimetry estimates derived from cytogenetic analysis of samples collected a few days after return to earth lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, a temporal decline in yields may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure. In addition, limited data on multiple flights show a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields. Data from one crewmember who has participated in two separate long-duration space missions and has been followed up for over 10 years provides limited information on the effect of repeat flights and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  19. Whole Brain Radiation-Induced Cognitive Impairment: Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Woo; Cho, Hyung Joon; Lee, Won Hee; Sonntag, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy, the most commonly used for the treatment of brain tumors, has been shown to be of major significance in tu-mor control and survival rate of brain tumor patients. About 200,000 patients with brain tumor are treated with either partial large field or whole brain radiation every year in the United States. The use of radiation therapy for treatment of brain tumors, however, may lead to devastating functional deficits in brain several months to years after treatment. In particular, whole brain radiation therapy results in a significant reduction in learning and memory in brain tumor patients as long-term consequences of treatment. Although a number of in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the pathogenesis of radiation-mediated brain injury, the cel-lular and molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces damage to normal tissue in brain remain largely unknown. Therefore, this review focuses on the pathophysiological mechanisms of whole brain radiation-induced cognitive impairment and the iden-tification of novel therapeutic targets. Specifically, we review the current knowledge about the effects of whole brain radiation on pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory pathways, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) system and extracellular matrix (ECM), and physiological angiogenesis in brain. These studies may provide a foundation for defin-ing a new cellular and molecular basis related to the etiology of cognitive impairment that occurs among patients in response to whole brain radiation therapy. It may also lead to new opportunities for therapeutic interventions for brain tumor patients who are undergoing whole brain radiation therapy. PMID:24009822

  20. The Role of Platelet Factor 4 in Radiation-Induced Thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Michele P.; Xiao Liqing; Nguyen, Yvonne; Kowalska, M. Anna; Poncz, Mortimer

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Factors affecting the severity of radiation-induced thrombocytopenia (RIT) are not well described. We address whether platelet factor 4 (PF4; a negative paracrine for megakaryopoiesis) affects platelet recovery postradiation. Methods and Materials: Using conditioned media from irradiated bone marrow (BM) cells from transgenic mice overexpressing human (h) PF4 (hPF4+), megakaryocyte colony formation was assessed in the presence of this conditioned media and PF4 blocking agents. In a model of radiation-induced thrombocytopenia, irradiated mice with varying PF4 expression levels were treated with anti-hPF4 and/or thrombopoietin (TPO), and platelet count recovery and survival were examined. Results: Conditioned media from irradiated BM from hPF4+ mice inhibited megakaryocyte colony formation, suggesting that PF4 is a negative paracrine released in RIT. Blocking with an anti-hPF4 antibody restored colony formation of BM grown in the presence of hPF4+ irradiated media, as did antibodies that block the megakaryocyte receptor for PF4, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). Irradiated PF4 knockout mice had higher nadir platelet counts than irradiated hPF4+/knockout litter mates (651 vs. 328 x 106/mcL, p = 0.02) and recovered earlier (15 days vs. 22 days, respectively, p <0.02). When irradiated hPF4+ mice were treated with anti-hPF4 antibody and/or TPO, they showed less severe thrombocytopenia than untreated mice, with improved survival and time to platelet recovery, but no additive effect was seen. Conclusions: Our studies show that in RIT, damaged megakaryocytes release PF4 locally, inhibiting platelet recovery. Blocking PF4 enhances recovery while released PF4 from megakaryocytes limits TPO efficacy, potentially because of increased release of PF4 stimulated by TPO. The clinical value of blocking this negative paracrine pathway post-RIT remains to be determined.

  1. Parathyroid hormone reverses radiation induced hypovascularity in a murine model of distraction osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Stephen Y.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Donneys, Alexis; Rodriguez, Joey J.; Nelson, Noah S.; Felice, Peter A.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation treatment results in a severe diminution of osseous vascularity. Intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been shown to have an anabolic effect on osteogenesis, though its impact on angiogenesis remains unknown. In this murine model of distraction osteogenesis, we hypothesize that radiation treatment will result in a diminution of vascularity in the distracted regenerate and that delivery of intermittent systemic PTH will promote angiogenesis and reverse radiation induced hypovascularity. Materials and methods Nineteen Lewis rats were divided into three groups. All groups underwent distraction of the left mandible. Two groups received radiation treatment to the left mandible prior to distraction, and one of these groups was treated with intermittent subcutaneous PTH (60 ?g/kg, once daily) beginning on the first day of distraction for a total duration of 21 days. One group underwent mandibular distraction alone, without radiation. After consolidation, the rats were perfused and imaged with micro-CT angiography and quantitative vascular analysis was performed. Results Radiation treatment resulted in a severe diminution of osseous vascularity in the distracted regenerate. In irradiated mandibles undergoing distraction osteogenesis, treatment with intermittent PTH resulted in significant increases in vessel volume fraction, vessel thickness, vessel number, degree of anisotropy, and a significant decrease in vessel separation (p < 0.05). No significant difference in quantitative vascularity existed between the group that was irradiated, distracted and treated with PTH and the group that underwent distraction osteogenesis without radiation treatment. Conclusions We quantitatively demonstrate that radiation treatment results in a significant depletion of osseous vascularity, and that intermittent administration of PTH reverses radiation induced hypovascularity in the murine mandible undergoing distraction osteogenesis. While the precise mechanism of PTH-induced angiogenesis remains to be elucidated, this report adds a key component to the pleotropic effect of intermittent PTH on bone formation and further supports the potential use of PTH to enhance osseous regeneration in the irradiated mandible. PMID:23643680

  2. Amifostine Reduces Radiation-Induced Complications in a Murine Model of Expander-Based Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Felice, Peter A.; Nelson, Noah S.; Page, Erin E.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Donneys, Alexis; Rodriguez, José; Buchman, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate expander-based breast reconstruction after mastectomy is a prevalent option for many women with breast cancer. When coupled with adjuvant radiation, however, radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury diminish the success of this reconstructive technique. We hypothesize that prophylactic administration of the cytoprotectant Amifostine will reduce soft tissue complications from irradiation, aiding expander-based reconstruction for women battling this disease. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two experimental groups, Operative Expander Placement (Expander) and Operative Sham (Sham). Expander specimens received a sub-latissimus tissue expander with a 15cc fill volume; Shams underwent identical procedures without expander placement. Experimental groups were further divided into Control specimens receiving no further intervention, XRT specimens receiving human-equivalent radiation, and AMF-XRT specimens receiving both Amifostine and human-equivalent radiation. Animals underwent a 45-day recovery period and were evaluated grossly and via ImageJ analysis for skin and soft tissue complications. Results None of the Control, XRT, or AMF-XRT Sham specimens showed skin and soft tissue complications. For Expander animals, significantly fewer AMF-XRT specimens (4 of 13, 30%) demonstrated skin and soft tissue complications compared to XRT specimens (9 of 13, 69%; p = 0.041). ImageJ evaluation of Expander specimens demonstrated a significant increase in skin and soft tissue necrosis for XRT specimens (12.94%), compared with AMF-XRT animals (6.96%, p = 0.019). Conclusions Amifostine pre-treatment significantly reduced skin and soft-tissue complications in both gross inspection and ImageJ analysis. These findings demonstrate that Amifostine prophylaxis provides protection against radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury in a murine model of expander-based breast reconstruction. Level of Evidence Animal study, not gradable for level of evidence. PMID:25357049

  3. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Kun; Wang, Shao-Xia; Sun, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII). Methods Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis. Results The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) and interferon-gamma (IFN-?), increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Conclusions Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII. PMID:25933295

  4. Polaprezinc reduces the severity of radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    DOI, HIROSHI; FUJIWARA, MASAYUKI; SUZUKI, HITOMI; NIWA, YASUE; NAKAYAMA, MASAHIRO; SHIKATA, TOSHIYUKI; ODAWARA, SOICHI; TAKADA, YASUHIRO; KIMURA, TAKESHI; KAMIKONYA, NORIHIKO; HIROTA, SHOZO

    2015-01-01

    Polaprezinc (PZ), an antiulcer drug, has been reported to have antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of administering PZ for radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Patients with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. PZ was prepared as an oral rinse. The PZ oral rinse was used four times per day during the course of radiotherapy. Sequential changes in radiation mucositis were assessed during and after radiotherapy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Furthermore, a retrospective comparison analysis was performed to assess the efficacy of PZ for radiation-induced mucositis. A total of 32 patients were enrolled in the prospective study of the PZ oral rinse. Radiotherapy was performed up to a total dose of 60–66 Gy using a conventional schedule combined with chemotherapy. Of the 32 patients, 30 (93.8%) reported no complaints due to the PZ oral rinse. In addition, PZ was not associated with severe adverse effects. Among the patients who received PZ, grade 3 mucositis was observed in 29.0% based on the mucosal findings and in 39.3% based on the symptoms. In the patients who did not receive PZ, the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 40.0% based on the mucosal findings and 60.7% based on the symptoms. Moreover, PZ promoted the recovery from mucositis caused by chemoradiotherapy and was not associated with reduced tumor response to radiotherapy. Therefore, the PZ oral rinse was well tolerated and proved to be efficient for the treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis. PMID:25798271

  5. Dragon's blood and its extracts attenuate radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Awan, Muhammad Umer Farooq; Tang, Bo; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Yiming; Wang, Xiao; Li, Qiang; Ma, Hong; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Dragon's blood (DB) possesses great medicinal values due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. This study was designed to investigate the effects of DB and its extracts (DBEs) on oxidative stress in mice exposed to whole body 60Co-? irradiation (4 Gy). DB and DBEs were intragastrically administered to mice for 5 d prior to radiation. The antioxidant activities, including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) levels in liver and spleen were measured using kits. Furthermore, DB and DBE effects were determined by organ indices and histology of liver and spleen. Our results indicated that the DB and DBE-treated groups showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in levels of MDA in liver and spleen compared with the irradiation-only group. Moreover, the activity of SOD, CAT and the level of GSH in liver and spleen tissue were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) in the DB and DBE groups. DB and DBE also had a significant effect on the recovery of thymus indices. The histological observations of groups having treatment with DB and DBE indicated significant reduction in the radiation-induced damage to the liver and spleen, together with improvement in the morphology of the liver and spleen. These results suggest that DB and DBE treatment prevents radiation-induced oxidative stress injury and restores antioxidant status and histopathological changes in the liver and spleen, but there is need for further study to explore the precise molecular mechanism and strategy for optimal practical application of DB and DBE. PMID:24634306

  6. RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION-INDUCED CALCIUM-ION-EFFLUX ENHANCEMENT FROM HUMAN AND OTHER NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS IN CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to test the generality of radiofrequency-radiation-induced change in alteration 45Ca2+ efflux from avian and feline brain tissues, human neuroblastoma cells were exposed to electromagnetic radiation at 147 MHz, amplitude modulated (AM) at 16 Hz, at specific absorption ra...

  7. Implication of prostaglandins and histamine H1 and H2 receptors in radiation-induced temperature responses of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Mickley, G.A.

    1988-04-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy gamma radiation (/sup 60/Co) induced hyperthermia, whereas 20-200 Gy induced hypothermia. Exposure either to the head or to the whole body to 10 Gy induced hyperthermia, while body-only exposure produced hypothermia. This observation indicates that radiation-induced fever is a result of a direct effect on the brain. The hyperthermia due to 10 Gy was significantly attenuated by the pre- or post-treatment with a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin. Hyperthermia was also altered by the central administration of a mu-receptor antagonist naloxone but only at low doses of radiation. These findings suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia may be mediated through the synthesis and release of prostaglandins in the brain and to a lesser extent to the release of endogenous opioid peptides. The release of histamine acting on H1 and H2 receptors may be involved in radiation-induced hypothermia, since both the H1 receptor antagonist, mepyramine, and H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine, antagonized the hypothermia. The results of these studies suggest that the release of neurohumoral substances induced by exposure to ionizing radiation is dose dependent and has different consequences on physiological processes such as the regulation of body temperature. Furthermore, the antagonism of radiation-induced hyperthermia by indomethacin may have potential therapeutic implications in the treatment of fever resulting from accidental irradiations.

  8. Radiation-induced immunogenic modulation of tumor enhances antigen processing and calreticulin exposure, resulting in enhanced T-cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Jammed, Momodou L.; Wattenberg, Max M.; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Ferrone, Soldano; Hodge, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is used for local tumor control through direct killing of tumor cells. Radiation-induced cell death can trigger tumor antigen-specific immune responses, but these are often noncurative. Radiation has been demonstrated to induce immunogenic modulation (IM) in various tumor types by altering the biology of surviving cells to render them more susceptible to T cell-mediated killing. Little is known about the mechanism(s) underlying IM elicited by sub-lethal radiation dosing. We have examined the molecular and immunogenic consequences of radiation exposure in breast, lung, and prostate human carcinoma cells. Radiation induced secretion of ATP and HMGB1 in both dying and surviving tumor cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor irradiation induced significant upregulation of multiple components of the antigen-processing machinery and calreticulin cell-surface expression. Augmented CTL lysis specific for several tumor-associated antigens was largely dictated by the presence of calreticulin on the surface of tumor cells and constituted an adaptive response to endoplasmic reticulum stress, mediated by activation of the unfolded protein response. This study provides evidence that radiation induces a continuum of immunogenic alterations in tumor biology, from immunogenic modulation to immunogenic cell death. We also expand the concept of immunogenic modulation, where surviving tumor cells recovering from radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress become more sensitive to CTL killing. These observations offer a rationale for the combined use of radiation with immunotherapy, including for patients failing RT alone. PMID:24480782

  9. Protective role of tea polyphenols in combination against radiation-induced haematopoietic and biochemical alterations in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Cao, Jing-Jing; Liu, Ping; Guo, Dai-Hong; Wang, Ya-Ping; Yin, Jian; Zhu, Ying; Rahman, Khalid

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effects of tea polyphenols (TPs) in various combinations against radiation-induced damage in mice. Mice were divided into different groups: non-irradiated control, irradiated control, amifostine (43.6?mg/kg, i.v. 30?min before irradiation; positive control) and various combinations of tea polyphenols in different doses. The radioprotective effect on the haematopoietic system, serum cytokines and endogenous antioxidant enzymes were studied. TP50, containing approximately 50% of (-)-epigallochatechin-3-gallate in addition to other catechins, showed the greatest radioprotective effect against radiation-induced changes in haematological parameters (red blood cell count, white blood cell count and haemoglobin), and maintained the spleen and thymus indices unchanged (spleen or thymus weight/body weight?×?1000). Tea polyphenols also significantly decreased radiation-induced lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde levels), elevated endogenous antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase) and reduced the serum cytokines which were elevated in radiation-induced toxicity. This evidence shows the potential of tea polyphenols, particularly in the combination found in TP50, as radioprotectors in mice, especially regarding recovery of the haematopoietic system, antioxidant potential activity and reduction of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:21452375

  10. Radiation-Induced Formation of Chlorine Oxides and Their Potential Role in the Origin of Martian Perchlorates

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    Radiation-Induced Formation of Chlorine Oxides and Their Potential Role in the Origin of Martian Information ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide (CO2) rich chlorine-bear- ing ices were exposed to energetic electrons in laboratory simulation experiments to investigate the formation of chlorine oxides (ClxOy) in the condensed

  11. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin toxicity: a survey of practice across Europe and the USA.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, A; Coleman, M; Harris, R; Herst, P

    2015-05-01

    Radiation-induced toxicity is a common adverse side effect of radiation therapy. Previous studies have demonstrated a lack of evidence to support common skincare advice for radiotherapy patients. The aim of the current study was to investigate the management of radiation-induced skin toxicity across Europe and the USA. Where previous surveys have focused on national practice or treatment of specific sites, the current study aimed to gain a broader representation of skincare practice. An anonymous online survey investigating various aspects of radiotherapy skincare management was distributed to departments across Europe and the USA (n = 181/737 responded i.e. 25%). The UK was excluded as a similar survey was carried out in 2011. The results highlight the lack of consistency in both the prevention and management of radiation-induced skin toxicity. Recommended products are often not based on evidence-based practice. Examples include the continued use of aqueous cream and gentian violet, as well as the recommendations on washing restrictions during treatment. To our knowledge, this is the most extensive survey to date on the current management of radiation-induced skin toxicity. This study highlights significant disparities between clinical practice and research-based evidence published in recent systematic reviews and guidelines. Ongoing large prospective randomised trials are urgently needed. PMID:24986477

  12. A model of interactions between radiation-induced oxidative stress, protein and DNA damage in Deinococcus radiodurans

    E-print Network

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    A model of interactions between radiation-induced oxidative stress, protein and DNA damage 2009 Keywords: Mathematical model DNA repair Protein oxidation Dose response Clonogenic survival be compromised. In contrast, if oxidation of important proteins is prevented by strong antioxidant defenses, DNA

  13. Perineural administration of dexmedetomidine in combination with ropivacaine prolongs axillary brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Chang-Song; Shi, Jing-Hui; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shu-Jie; Li, Peng; Li, En-You

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that adding dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine prolongs axillary brachial plexus block. Forty-five patients of ASA I~II and aged 25-60 yr who were scheduled for elective forearm and hand surgery were randomly divided into 3 equal groups and received 40 ml of 0.33% ropivacaine + 1 ml dexmedetomidine (50 ?g) (Group DR1), 40 ml of 0.33% ropivacaine + 1 ml dexmedetomidine (100 ?g) (group DR2) or 40 ml of 0.33% ropivacaine + 1 ml saline (group R) in a double-blind fashion. The onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks and side effects were recorded. The demographic data and surgical characteristics were similar in each group. Sensory and motor block onset times were the same in the three groups. Sensory and motor blockade durations were longer in group DR2 than in group R (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the sensory blockade duration between group DR1 and group R. Bradycardia, hypertension and hypotension were not observed in group R and occurred more often in group DR2 than in group DR1. Dexmedetomidine added to ropivacaine for an axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of the block. However, dexmedetomidine may also lead to side effects such as bradycardia, hypertension, and hypotension. PMID:24753763

  14. Pressure-specified sensory device versus electrodiagnostic testing in brachial plexus upper trunk injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul Kumar; Bowen, Margaret Elaine; Eichhorn, Mitchell George

    2010-05-01

    Brachial plexus upper trunk injury is associated with winged scapula owing to the close anatomical course of the long thoracic nerve and upper trunk. Needle electromyography is a common diagnostic test for this injury; however, it does not detect injury in most patients with upper trunk damage. The pressure-specified sensory device may be an alternative to needle electromyography. Thirty patients with winged scapula and upper trunk injury were evaluated with needle electromyography (EMG) and pressure-specified sensory device (PSSD) tests. EMG testing of the biceps muscle was compared with PSSD testing of the dorsal hand skin (C6 damage), and EMG testing of the deltoid and spinati muscles was compared with PSSD testing of the deltoid skin (C5 damage). PSSD pressure values were significantly higher on the affected arm. On the basis of published and calculated threshold values the PSSD was found to be significantly more sensitive than EMG. The PSSD tests consistently identified injuries that were not detected by needle EMG tests. These findings provide strong evidence that the PSSD is more effective than needle EMG in the detection of brachial plexus upper trunk injury. PMID:20143301

  15. Ankle Brachial Index: simple non-invasive estimation of peripheral artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Cie?licki, Krzysztof; ?yli?ski, Marek; Górski, Piotr; Murgrabia, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Gerard

    2014-11-01

    According to international guidelines, patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) are burdened with high cardiovascular risk. One of the simplest, non-invasive methods for PAD detection is the ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. The ABI is calculated as the ratio of systolic blood pressure at the ankle (pressure in the posterior tibial artery or the dorsal artery) to the systolic pressure in the arm (in the brachial artery) when the body is in a horizontal position. The physiological value of the ABI is assumed to be between 1 and 1.3; however, these limits vary from study to study. A value less than 0.9 indicates PAD. Some authors propose also measuring the ABI on both sides of the body to highlight possible differences in blood pressure between the opposite arterial segments. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the ABI diagnostic criteria used in different publications. Additionally, ABI measurements were performed on 19 healthy patients in age ranged from 20 to 63 years. The results showed a slight dependence between age and the differences between the values obtained from left and right sides of the body.

  16. Exercise intensity modulates brachial artery retrograde blood flow and shear rate during leg cycling in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Erika; Katayama, Keisho; Ishida, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of exercise intensity on retrograde blood flow and shear rate (SR) in an inactive limb during exercise under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The subjects performed two maximal exercise tests on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer to estimate peak oxygen uptake (O2peak) while breathing normoxic (inspired oxygen fraction [FIO2 = 0.21]) and hypoxic (FIO2 = 0.12 or 0.13) gas mixtures. Subjects then performed four exercise bouts at the same relative intensities (30 and 60% O2peak) for 30 min under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity were simultaneously recorded, using Doppler ultrasonography. Retrograde SR was enhanced with increasing exercise intensity under both conditions at 10 min of exercise. Thereafter, retrograde blood flow and SR in normoxia returned to pre-exercise levels, with no significant differences between the two exercise intensities. In contrast, retrograde blood flow and SR in hypoxia remained significantly elevated above baseline and was significantly greater at 60% than at 30% O2peak. We conclude that differences in exercise intensity affect brachial artery retrograde blood flow and SR during prolonged exercise under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26038470

  17. Variations of the origin of collateral branches emerging from the posterior aspect of the brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background The frequency of variation found in the arrangement and distribution of the branches in the brachial plexus, make this anatomical region extremely complicated. The medical concerns involved with these variations include anesthetic blocks, surgical approaches, interpreting tumor or traumatic nervous compressions having unexplained clinical symptoms (sensory loss, pain, wakefulness and paresis), and the possibility of these structures becoming compromised. The clinical importance of these variations is discussed in the light of their differential origins. Methods The anatomy of brachial plexus structures from 46 male and 11 female cadaverous specimens were studied. The 40–80 year-old specimens were obtained from the Universidad Industrial de Santander's Medical Faculty's Anatomy Department (dissection laboratory). Parametric measures were used for calculating results. Results Almost half (47.1%) of the evaluated plexuses had collateral variations. Subscapular nerves were the most varied structure, including the presence of a novel accessory nerve. Long thoracic nerve variations were present, as were the absence of C5 or C7 involvement, and late C7 union with C5–C6. Conclusion Further studies are needed to confirm the existence of these variations in a larger sample of cadaver specimens. PMID:17587464

  18. Brachial plexus palsy following proximal humerus fracture in patients who are skeletally immature.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Raymond W; Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M

    2008-04-01

    From 1998 to 2006, 578 patients who were skeletally immature with proximal humerus fractures were treated at our institution. During that time period, 4 patients (0.7%) had associated brachial plexus and major peripheral nerve palsies. Average age at the time of injury was 12.3 years (range 10-14 years). Two fractures were physeal and 2 were metaphyseal. In all patients, the distal fracture fragment was displaced into the axilla, with resultant adduction and valgus malalignment at the time of injury. Two patients were treated with closed reduction and sling and swathe immobilization. One patient was treated with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of the fracture. One patient was treated with sling immobilization without fracture reduction. All went on to bony healing with acceptable bony alignment. All patients were evaluated with serial physical examinations and radiographs to assess for neurologic recovery and bony healing. Average clinical and radiographic follow-up was 7.1 months (5-9 months). All patients demonstrated complete neurologic recovery by 5-9 months postinjury. All had neuropathic pain for at least 6 months after injury. No persistent neuropathic pain or functional limitations were seen at follow-up. Although rare, brachial plexus injury may accompany displaced proximal humeral fractures in patients who are skeletally immature. With careful attention to principles of fracture care, complete neurologic recovery may be expected within 9 months. PMID:18404040

  19. Endovascular salvage of a right brachial artery-right atrium hemodialysis graft using a covered endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Ismail, Nyla; Reardon, Michael J; Peden, Eric K

    2012-01-01

    Creation of a functional hemodialysis access in patients with exhausted peripheral access sites and concomitant central venous occlusive disease (CVOD) is a multifaceted challenge; often requiring complex, innovative solutions, not without their own complications. We present a 57-year-old hemodialysis patient with a history of hypercoagulable disorder and multiple failed arteriovenous accesses. Because of inadequate peripheral access sites and chronic occlusions in superior vena cava, brachiocephalic veins and inferior vena cava, in addition to multiple transhepatic catheter related issues; we decided to perform a right brachial artery to right atrium (RA) hemodialysis graft. The access was used without complications for 18 months at which point he had his first episode of thrombosis; open thrombectomy and percutaneous balloon angioplasty (PTA) at the atrial anastomosis were done with success. The following three months, he endured two more thrombectomies and PTAs. During the last intervention we performed an intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) through the atrial anastomosis, which demonstrated stenosis; and the decision was made to extend the outflow anastomosis with a covered stent into the atrium. Therefore a 10 cm x 10 mm Viabahn stent-graft (W. L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz.) was deployed and post dilated with 8 mm balloon within the graft component. Repeat injection and Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) demonstrated significant improvement and free outflow. The brachial-RA hemodialysis graft could be use immediately and at 5 months has remained fully functional and no reinterventions have been necessary. PMID:22522413

  20. Adult Sandhoff disease with 2 mutations in the HEXB gene presenting as brachial amyotrophic diplegia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sa-Yoon; Song, Sook Keun; Lee, Jung Seok; Choi, Jay Chol; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2013-12-01

    Sandhoff disease is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder of GM2 gangliosides. It is caused by a lack of functional N-acetyl-?-D-glucosaminidase A and B because of mutations in the HEXB gene. We describe a 55-year-old woman with adult Sandhoff disease presenting as brachial amyotrophic diplegia. The assay of total hexosaminidase involving A and B showed decreased level of these activities. Hex-A was 4.6 nmol·min·mL (normal: 7.0-20.0 nmol·min·mL) and Hex-B was 0.1 nmol·min·mL (normal: 1.0-10.0 nmol·min·mL), respectively. Analysis of HEXB gene demonstrated 2 point mutations that were located at the exon 5 (c.619A>G) and exon 11 (c.1250C>T). Compound heterozygosity of these 2 mutations may trigger the development of distinct adult Sandhoff disease phenotype. Sandhoff disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lower motor neuron disease, such as brachial amyotrophic diplegia, even if the age at onset is more than 50 years. PMID:24263030

  1. Ultrasonic DREZ-operations for treatment of pain due to brachial plexus avulsion.

    PubMed

    Dreval, O N

    1993-01-01

    One, if not the only effective way of treating pain due to preganglionic avulsion of the brachial plexus is the Dorsal Root Entry Zone (DREZ) lesion procedure. In 1985 the author began to use ultrasound as a lesion-maker for operations in the DREZ. Since then, 127 (3 patients were operated on twice) DREZ-Operations have been carried out on 124 patients suffering from chronic pain due to brachial plexus avulsion. Different technical lesioning modalities were employed: ultrasonic discontinuous DREZ lesions in 20 cases and a new modality: ultrasonic DREZ-sulcomyelotomy in 107 cases. Analysis of the results after ultrasonic DREZ-operations revealed that ultrasonic DREZ-sulcomyelotomy was the most effective technical modality. Immediately after operation good pain relief was obtained in 103 (96%) out of the 107 patients operated on with the ultrasonic DREZ-sulcomyelotomy method, and in 15 (75%) out of the 20 patients with ultrasonic discontinuous DREZ-lesions. The total follow-up study (47.5 months on average) revealed 87% good results overall. PMID:8333312

  2. Management of brachial plexus injuries in adults: Clinical evaluation and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sumit; Pemmaiah, Devi; Midha, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries are devastating injuries that usually affect the younger population. The usual modes of injuries are roadside accidents, falls, and assaults. The affected individuals are crippled and may suffer from excruciating peripheral or central deafferentation pain for rest of their lives. The loss of functional capacity accounts for a significant number of man-hours lost at the workplace and consequent financial burden on the family. The results of brachial plexus reconstructive surgery have generally been unsatisfactory in the past. However, in recent decades, the efficacy of surgery has been proven beyond doubt, and there have been various published series in literature that have reported a good outcome after surgical management of these injuries. This has been made possible by the use of operating microscopes, better microsuture techniques for nerve graft and nerve or tendon transfer repair, and advanced perioperative electrophysiological techniques. The key to successful management lies in the proper clinical evaluation, supplemented with electrophysiology, preoperative imaging studies, and planning of surgical strategy. The partial injuries have a better outcome as compared with global palsies, and early referral should be emphasized. Selective combinations of nerve graft and transfers provide a moderate shoulder and elbow control. However, a multispecialty approach involving hand surgeons, plastic surgeons, and physiotherapists is required. PMID:26588627

  3. Evidence for microRNA-31 dependent Bim-Bax interaction preceding mitochondrial Bax translocation during radiation-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Ghosh, Soma; Chandna, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of microRNA-31 has been linked with enhanced stress resistance, while its overexpression leads to cell death. In this study, we found mediatory role of microRNA-31 in ?-radiation-induced apoptosis in a model insect cell line Sf9 carrying well-conserved apoptotic machinery. Mature microRNA-31 is perfectly conserved amongst insects; hence we used biotinylated probes designed from Bombyx mori sequence for its successful detection in Sf9 cells. Target identification using Bombyx mori 3?UTRs predicted miR-31?s potential role in Lepidopteran apoptosis, which prompted us to investigate alterations in its expression during radiation-induced cell death. We found significant overexpression of Sf-miR-31 following lethal dose (1,000Gy–3,000Gy) irradiation. Its mediatory role was finally confirmed as antisense-microRNA-31 could successfully inhibit radiation-induced cytochrome-c release, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. While Bax/Bcl-2 expression remained unchanged, lethal radiation doses induced Bim overexpression and direct Bim-Bax interaction (co-immunoprecipitation) which is not yet unequivocally demonstrated during apoptosis. Quite important, these events were found to be dependent on radiation-induced miR-31 overexpression, as antisense-miR-31 inhibited both the responses and resulted in significant inhibition of cell death. Pro-apoptotic role of miR-31 was further confirmed when miR-31 mimic induced apoptosis involving similar Bim/Bax alterations. Therefore, our study reveals an important mediatory role of miR-31 in radiation-induced cell death. PMID:26514984

  4. Radiation-induced refraction artifacts in the optical CT readout of polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Warren G.; Jirasek, Andrew; Wells, Derek M.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to demonstrate imaging artifacts that can occur during the optical computed tomography (CT) scanning of polymer gel dosimeters due to radiation-induced refractive index (RI) changes in polyacrylamide gels. Methods: A 1 L cylindrical polyacrylamide gel dosimeter was irradiated with 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} square beams of 6 MV photons. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner was used to image the dosimeter. Investigative optical CT scans were performed to examine two types of rayline bending: (i) bending within the plane of the fan-beam and (ii) bending out the plane of the fan-beam. To address structured errors, an iterative Savitzky–Golay (ISG) filtering routine was designed to filter 2D projections in sinogram space. For comparison, 2D projections were alternatively filtered using an adaptive-mean (AM) filter. Results: In-plane rayline bending was most notably observed in optical CT projections where rays of the fan-beam confronted a sustained dose gradient that was perpendicular to their trajectory but within the fan-beam plane. These errors caused distinct streaking artifacts in image reconstructions due to the refraction of higher intensity rays toward more opaque regions of the dosimeter. Out-of-plane rayline bending was observed in slices of the dosimeter that featured dose gradients perpendicular to the plane of the fan-beam. These errors caused widespread, severe overestimations of dose in image reconstructions due to the higher-than-actual opacity that is perceived by the scanner when light is bent off of the detector array. The ISG filtering routine outperformed AM filtering for both in-plane and out-of-plane rayline errors caused by radiation-induced RI changes. For in-plane rayline errors, streaks in an irradiated region (>7 Gy) were as high as 49% for unfiltered data, 14% for AM, and 6% for ISG. For out-of-plane rayline errors, overestimations of dose in a low-dose region (?50 cGy) were as high as 13 Gy for unfiltered data, 10 Gy for AM, and 3.1 Gy for ISG. The ISG routine also addressed unrelated artifacts that previously needed to be manually removed in sinogram space. However, the ISG routine blurred reconstructions, causing losses in spatial resolution of ?5 mm in the plane of the fan-beam and ?8 mm perpendicular to the fan-beam. Conclusions: This paper reveals a new category of imaging artifacts that can affect the optical CT readout of polyacrylamide gel dosimeters. Investigative scans show that radiation-induced RI changes can cause significant rayline errors when rays confront a prolonged dose gradient that runs perpendicular to their trajectory. In fan-beam optical CT, these errors manifested in two ways: (1) distinct streaking artifacts caused by in-plane rayline bending and (2) severe overestimations of opacity caused by rays bending out of the fan-beam plane and missing the detector array. Although the ISG filtering routine mitigated these errors better than an adaptive-mean filtering routine, it caused unacceptable losses in spatial resolution.

  5. Comparison Between Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular and Interscalene Brachial Plexus Blocks in Patients Undergoing Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Taeha; Kil, Byung Tae; Kim, Jong Hae

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SCBPB) was repopularized by the introduction of ultrasound, its usefulness in shoulder surgery has not been widely reported. The objective of this study was to compare motor and sensory blockades, the incidence of side effects, and intraoperative opioid analgesic requirements between SCBPB and interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (ISBPB group: n?=?47; SCBPB group: n?=?46). The side effects of the brachial plexus block (Horner's syndrome, hoarseness, and subjective dyspnea), the sensory block score (graded from 0 [no cold sensation] to 100 [intact sensation] using an alcohol swab) for each of the 5 dermatomes (C5–C8 and T1), and the motor block score (graded from 0 [complete paralysis] to 6 [normal muscle force]) for muscle forces corresponding to the radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated 20 min after the brachial plexus block. Fentanyl was administered in 50 ?g increments when the patients complained of pain that was not relieved by the brachial plexus block. There were no conversions to general anesthesia due to a failed brachial plexus block. The sensory block scores for the C5 to C8 dermatomes were significantly lower in the ISBPB group. However, the percentage of patients who received fentanyl was comparable between the 2 groups (27.7% [ISBPB group] and 30.4% [SCBPB group], P?=?0.77). SCBPB produced significantly lower motor block scores for the radial, ulnar, and median nerves than did ISBPB. A significantly higher incidence of Horner's syndrome was observed in the ISBPB group (59.6% [ISBPB group] and 19.6% [SCBPB group], P?brachial plexus blocks. However, SCBPB produces a better motor blockade and a lower incidence of Horner's syndrome than ISBPB. PMID:26448030

  6. Imaging for Appendicitis: Should Radiation-induced Cancer Risks Affect Modality Selection?

    PubMed Central

    Kiatpongsan, Sorapop; Meng, Lesley; Eisenberg, Jonathan D.; Herring, Maurice; Avery, Laura L.; Kong, Chung Yin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare life expectancy (LE) losses attributable to three imaging strategies for appendicitis in adults—computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US) followed by CT for negative or indeterminate US results, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging—by using a decision-analytic model. Materials and Methods In this model, for each imaging strategy, LE losses for 20-, 40-, and 65-year-old men and women were computed as a function of five key variables: baseline cohort LE, test performance, surgical mortality, risk of death from delayed diagnosis (missed appendicitis), and LE loss attributable to radiation-induced cancer death. Appendicitis prevalence, test performance, mortality rates from surgery and missed appendicitis, and radiation doses from CT were elicited from the published literature and institutional data. LE loss attributable to radiation exposure was projected by using a separate organ-specific model that accounted for anatomic coverage during a typical abdominopelvic CT examination. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate effects of model input variability on results. Results Outcomes across imaging strategies differed minimally—for example, for 20-year-old men, corresponding LE losses were 5.8 days (MR imaging), 6.8 days (combined US and CT), and 8.2 days (CT). This order was sensitive to differences in test performance but was insensitive to variation in radiation-induced cancer deaths. For example, in the same cohort, MR imaging sensitivity had to be 91% at minimum (if specificity were 100%), and MR imaging specificity had to be 62% at minimum (if sensitivity were 100%) to incur the least LE loss. Conversely, LE loss attributable to radiation exposure would need to decrease by 74-fold for combined US and CT, instead of MR imaging, to incur the least LE loss. Conclusion The specific imaging strategy used to diagnose appendicitis minimally affects outcomes. Paradigm shifts to MR imaging owing to concerns over radiation should be considered only if MR imaging test performance is very high. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:24988435

  7. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low-dose-rate dose to the bone marrow (mean = 2.5 Gy) was consistent with the measured ERR (0.62, 95% Cl =-0.2 to 1.9). Conclusions: An extended, biologically based model for leukemia that includes HSC initiation, inactivation, proliferation, and, uniquely for leukemia, long-range HSC migration predicts, %Kith reasonable accuracy, risks for radiationinduced leukemia associated with exposure to therapeutic doses of radiation.

  8. Radiation-induced second cancers: the impact of 3D-CRT and IMRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Eric J.; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2003-01-01

    Information concerning radiation-induced malignancies comes from the A-bomb survivors and from medically exposed individuals, including second cancers in radiation therapy patients. The A-bomb survivors show an excess incidence of carcinomas in tissues such as the gastrointestinal tract, breast, thyroid, and bladder, which is linear with dose up to about 2.5 Sv. There is great uncertainty concerning the dose-response relationship for radiation-induced carcinogenesis at higher doses. Some animal and human data suggest a decrease at higher doses, usually attributed to cell killing; other data suggest a plateau in dose. Radiotherapy patients also show an excess incidence of carcinomas, often in sites remote from the treatment fields; in addition there is an excess incidence of sarcomas in the heavily irradiated in-field tissues. The transition from conventional radiotherapy to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) involves a reduction in the volume of normal tissues receiving a high dose, with an increase in dose to the target volume that includes the tumor and a limited amount of normal tissue. One might expect a decrease in the number of sarcomas induced and also (less certain) a small decrease in the number of carcinomas. All around, a good thing. By contrast, the move from 3D-CRT to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) involves more fields, and the dose-volume histograms show that, as a consequence, a larger volume of normal tissue is exposed to lower doses. In addition, the number of monitor units is increased by a factor of 2 to 3, increasing the total body exposure, due to leakage radiation. Both factors will tend to increase the risk of second cancers. Altogether, IMRT is likely to almost double the incidence of second malignancies compared with conventional radiotherapy from about 1% to 1.75% for patients surviving 10 years. The numbers may be larger for longer survival (or for younger patients), but the ratio should remain the same.

  9. Potential Biomarkers for Radiation-Induced Renal Toxicity following 177Lu-Octreotate Administration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Emil; Larsson, Maria; Parris, Toshima Z.; Johansson, Martin E.; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The kidneys are one of the main dose-limiting organs in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy and due to large inter-individual variations in renal toxicity, biomarkers are urgently needed in order to optimize therapy and reduce renal tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional, functional, and morphological effects on renal tissue after 177Lu-octreotate administration in normal mice, and to identify biomarkers for radiation induced renal toxicity. Methods C57BL/6N mice were i.v. injected with 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, or 150 MBq 177Lu-octreotate (0, 16, 29, 40, 48, and 54 Gy to the kidneys). At 4, 8, and 12 months after administration, radiation-induced effects were evaluated in relation to (a) global transcriptional variations in kidney tissues, (b) morphological changes in the kidneys, (c) changes in white and red blood cell count as well as blood levels of urea, and (d) changes in renal function using 99mTc-DTPA/99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy. Results In general, the highest number of differentially regulated transcripts was observed at 12 months after administration. The Cdkn1a, C3, Dbp, Lcn2, and Per2 genes displayed a distinct dose-dependent regulation, with increased expression level with increasing absorbed dose. Ifng, Tnf, and Il1B were identified as primary up-stream regulators of the recurrently regulated transcripts. Furthermore, previously proposed biomarkers for kidney injury and radiation damage were also observed. The functional investigation revealed reduced excretion of 99mTc-DTPA after 150 MBq, an increased uptake of 99mTc-DMSA at all dose levels compared with the controls, and markedly increased urea level in blood after 150 MBq at 12 months. Conclusion Distinct dose-response relationships were found for several of the regulated transcripts. The Cdkn1a, Dbp, Lcn2, and Per2 genes are proposed as biomarkers for 177Lu-octreotate exposure of kidney. Correlations to functional and morphological effects further confirm applicability of these genes as markers of radiation damage in kidney tissue. PMID:26287527

  10. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  11. Ankle-brachial index as a predictor of coronary disease events in elderly patients submitted to coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Eduardo D. E.; Helber, Izo; Ehrlichmann, Manes R.; Alves, Claudia Maria Rodrigues; Makdisse, Marcia; Matos, Livia N.; Borges, Jairo Lins; Lopes, Renato D.; Stefanini, Edson; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To correlate the importance of the ankle-brachial index in terms of cardiovascular morbimortality and the extent of coronary arterial disease amongst elderly patients without clinical manifestations of lower limb peripheral arterial disease. METHODS: We analyzed prospective data from 100 patients over 65 years of age with coronary arterial disease, as confirmed by coronary angiography, and with over 70% stenosis of at least one sub-epicardial coronary artery. We measured the ankle-brachial index immediately after coronary angiography, and a value of <0.9 was used to diagnose peripheral arterial disease. RESULTS: The patients' average age was 77.4 years. The most prevalent risk factor was hypertension (96%), and the median late follow-up appointment was 28.9 months. The ankle-brachial index was <0.9 in 47% of the patients, and a low index was more prevalent in patients with multiarterial coronary disease compared to patients with uniarterial disease in the same group. Using a bivariate analysis, only an ankle-brachial index of <0.9 was a strong predictive factor for cardiovascular events, thereby increasing all-cause deaths and fatal and non-fatal acute myocardial infarctions two- to three-fold. CONCLUSION: In elderly patients with documented coronary disease, a low ankle-brachial index (<0.9) was associated with the severity and extent of coronary arterial disease, and in late follow-up appointments, a low index was correlated with an increase in the occurrence of major cardiovascular events. PMID:24473504

  12. Clinical aspects of patients with traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus following surgical treatment?

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Kwae, Mário Yoshihide; da Silva, Ricardo Pereira; Porto, Celmo Celeno; Magalhães, Daniel de Paiva; Paulino, Matheus Veloso

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate sociodemographic and clinical aspects of patients undergoing operations due to traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus. Method This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of a convenience sample of 48 patients operated between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. The following were evaluated: (1) range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder, elbow and wrist/hand, in degrees; (2) grade of strength of the shoulder, elbow and wrist/hand; (3) sensitivity; and (4) visual analogue scale (VAS) (from 0 to 10). The Student's t, chi-square, Friedman, Wilcoxon and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used (p < 0.05). Results The patients’ mean age was 30.6 years; 60.4% of them had suffered motorcycle accidents and 52.1%, multiple trauma. The mean length of time until surgery was 8.7 months (range: 2–48). Thirty-one patients (64.6%) presented complete rupture of the plexus. The frequent operation was neurosurgery in 39 cases (81.3%). The ROM achieved was ?30° in 20 patients (41.6%), with a range from 30° to 90° and mean of 73° (p = 0.001). Thirteen (27.1%) already had shoulder strength ?M3 (p = 0.001). Twenty-seven patients (56.2%) had elbow flexion ?80°, with a range from 30° to 160° and mean of 80.6° (p < 0.001). Twenty-two had strength ?M3 (p < 0.001). Twenty-two patients (45.8%) had wrist extension ?30° starting from flexion of 45°, with a range from 30° to 90° and mean of 70° (p = 0.003). Twenty-seven (56.3%) presented wrist/hand extension strength ?M3 (p = 0.002). Forty-five (93.8%) had hypoesthesia and three (6.2%) had anesthesia (p = 0.006). The initial VAS was 4.5 (range: 1.0–9.0) and the final VAS was 3.0 (range: 1.0–7.0) (p < 0.001). Conclusion Traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus were more prevalent among young adults (21–40 years), men, people living in urban areas, manual workers and motorcycle accidents, with multiple trauma and total rupture of the plexus. Neurosurgery, with a second procedure consisting of muscle-tendon transfer, was the commonest operation. Surgery for traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus resulted in significant improvement in the ROM and strength of the shoulder, elbow and wrist/hand, improvement of the sensitivity of the limb affected and reduction of the final pain. PMID:26535203

  13. The effect of RHIZOMA COPTIDIS and COPTIS CHINENSIS aqueous extract on radiation-induced skin injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced skin injury is a common complication of radiotherapy. The RHIZOMA COPTIDIS and COPTIS CHINENSIS aqueous extract (RCE) can ameliorate radiation-induced skin injury in our clinical observation. But, the protective mechanism of RHIZOMA COPTIDIS and COPTIS CHINENSIS in radiation-induced skin injury remains unclear. Methods In this experiment, we developed a radiation-induced skin injury rat model to study the mechanism. The animals were randomly divided into control group, treatment group, radiation group, and treatment and radiation group. 5 rats in each group were separately executed on 2 d and 49 d post-radiation. The semi-quantitative skin injury score was used to measure skin reactions by unblinded observers, and hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to evaluate the damage areas by irradiation. The MDA content, SOD activity of skin and serum were measured to detect the oxidative stress. Results Acute skin reactions were caused by a single dose of 45 Gy of ?-ray irradiation, and the skin injury could be found in all rats receiving irradiation based on the observation of HE staining of skin at different time-points, while RCE could significantly ameliorate those changes. The MDA content in serum and skin of control rats was 4.13?±?0.12 mmol/ml and 4.95?±?0.35 mmol/mgprot on 2 d post-radiation. The rats receiving radiation showed an increased content of MDA (5.54?±?0.21 mmol/ml and 7.10?±?0.32 mmol/mgprot), while it was 4.57?±?0.21 mmol/ml and 5.95?±?0.24 mmol/mgprot after treated with RCE (p?radiation-induced skin damage in rats by modulating oxidative stress in skin, which may be a useful therapy for radiation-induced skin injury. PMID:23675786

  14. Effects of contrast medium on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. [X-ray; /sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, H.; Kuwabara, Y.; Okano, T.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of contrast material (meglumine iothalamate) on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations were investigated in studies on the lymphocytes of patients who had undergone diagnostic radiography and in vitro experiments with diagnostic x rays and /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays. Chromosome and chromatic aberrations were found to increase significantly with increasing concentrations of contrast material that were added at irradiation. However, the aberrations were not associated with elevation of the ratio of dicentric and ring chromosomes to the number of cells with unstable chromosome aberrations at the first mitosis. Lymphocytes irradiated in the absence of contrast material did not show an increase in chromosome-type aberrations when the agent was given in increasing concentrations during subsequent incubation, but there were greater numbers of chromatid gaps and breaks. When lymphocytes were exposed to 400 R (103.2 mC/kg) of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays, the presence of contrast agent did not increase the yield of dicentric and ring chromosomes, but induced a marked delay in cell proliferation, especially in lymphocytes with more heavily damaged chromosomes. In additional examination, the contrast agent itself induced sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes.

  15. The Effects of Fenugreek on Radiation Induced Toxicity for Human Blood T-Cells in Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Mohamed Bagher; Kiani, Ali; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular damages either in normal or cancerous tissues are the outcome of molecular events affected by ionizing radiation. T-cells are the most important among immune system agents and are used for biological radiation dose measurement in recommended standard methods. The herbs with immune modulating properties may be useful to reduce the risk of the damages and subsequently the diseases. The T-cells as the most important immune cells being targeted for biological dosimetry of radiation. This study proposes a flowcytometric-method based on fluorescein isothiocyanate- and propidium iodide (PI)-labeled annexin-V to assess apoptosis in blood T-cells after irradiation in both presence and absence of fenugreek extract. T-cells peripheral blood lymphocyte isolated from blood samples of healthy individuals with no irradiated job background. The media of cultured cells was irradiated 1-h after the fenugreek extract was added. The number of apoptotic cells was assessed by annexin-V protocol and multicolor flowcytometry. An obvious variation in apoptotic cells number was observed in presence of fenugreek extract (>80%). The results suggest that fenugreek extract can potentiate the radiation induced apoptosis or radiation toxicity in blood T-cells (P < 0.05). PMID:26284174

  16. Rhubarb extract has a protective role against radiation-induced brain injury and neuronal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kui; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Wenjun; Zhou, Min; Tang, Yamei; Peng, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress caused by ionizing radiation is involved in neuronal damage in a number of disorders, including trauma, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Ionizing radiation can lead to the formation of free radicals, which cause neuronal apoptosis and have important roles in the development of some types of chronic brain disease. The present study evaluated the effects of varying concentrations (2, 5 and 10 µg/ml) of ethanolic rhubarb extract on the neuronal damage caused by irradiation in primary neuronal cultures obtained from the cortices of rat embryos aged 20 days. Brain damage was induced with a single dose of ?-irradiation that induced DNA fragmentation, increased lactate dehydrogenase release in neuronal cells and acted as a trigger for microglial cell proliferation. Treatment with rhubarb extract significantly decreased radiation-induced lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA fragmentation, which are important in the process of cell apoptosis. The rhubarb extract exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of lactate dehydrogenase release and neuronal cell apoptosis that were induced by the administration of ionizing radiation. The effect of a 10 µg/ml dose of rhubarb extract on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by radiation was also investigated. This dose led to significant inhibition of ROS generation. In conclusion, the present study showed a protective role of rhubarb extract against irradiation-induced apoptotic neuronal cell death and ROS generation. PMID:25936269

  17. Radiation-induced hepatitis B virus reactivation in hepatocellular carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, JUN; PEI, HUAN-HUAN; SUN, JUAN; XIE, QIN-XIU; LI, JIA-BIN

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation associated with radiotherapy is rare. The present study reports the case of a 46-year-old man that experienced fatal HBV reactivation. The patient suffered from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombus, which was treated by radiotherapy at a daily fraction of 2 Gy over 5 weeks, up to a total radiation dose of ~50 Gy. The patient presented with fatigue, yellow sclera and abdominal distension ~8 weeks subsequent to the administration of radiotherapy. The liver function tests, including the level of total bilirubin and prothrombin time, suggested acute-on-chronic liver failure. The serum HBV-DNA level had also increased between undetectable levels and 7.2×104 copies/ml. Although the present patient with HCC was treated with 0.5 mg/day entecavir for 8 weeks, in addition to radiotherapy, radiation-induced HBV reactivation occurred. The condition of the patient worsened gradually. The present study emphasizes the importance of liver function and HBV-DNA screening and pre-emptive antiviral prophylaxis prior to radiotherapy in patients with HCC. PMID:26722314

  18. Ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis: radiation studies in Neurospora predictive for results in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; DeMarini, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation was the first mutagen discovered and was used to develop the first mutagenicity assay. In the ensuing 70+ years, ionizing radiation became a fundamental tool in understanding mutagenesis and is still a subject of intensive research. Frederick de Serres et al. developed and used the Neurospora crassa ad-3 system initially to explore the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. Using this system, de Serres et al. demonstrated the dependence of the frequency and spectra of mutations induced by ionizing radiation on the dose, dose rate, radiation quality, repair capabilities of the cells, and the target gene employed. This work in Neurospora predicted the subsequent observations of the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Modeled originally on the mouse specific-locus system developed by William L. Russell, the N. crassa ad-3 system developed by de Serres has itself served as a model for interpreting the results in subsequent systems in mammalian cells. This review describes the primary findings on the nature of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in the N. crassa ad-3 system and the parallel observations made years later in mammalian cells.

  19. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of alpha-tocopherol for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05%. Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t50%). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t50% values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt50%) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  20. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05% Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t/sub 50%/). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t/sub 50%/ values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt/sub 50%/) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  1. Radiation-induced bystander effect in non-irradiated glioblastoma spheroid cells.

    PubMed

    Faqihi, Fahime; Neshastehriz, Ali; Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Shabani, Robabeh; Eivazzadeh, Nazila

    2015-09-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs) are detected in cells that are not irradiated but receive signals from treated cells. The present study explored these bystander effects in a U87MG multicellular tumour spheroid model. A medium transfer technique was employed to induce the bystander effect, and colony formation assay was used to evaluate the effect. Relative changes in expression of BAX, BCL2, JNK and ERK genes were analysed using RT-PCR to investigate the RIBE mechanism. A significant decrease in plating efficiency was observed for both bystander and irradiated cells. The survival fraction was calculated for bystander cells to be 69.48% and for irradiated cells to be 34.68%. There was no change in pro-apoptotic BAX relative expression, but anti-apoptotic BCL2 showed downregulation in both irradiated and bystander cells. Pro-apoptotic JNK in bystander samples and ERK in irradiated samples were upregulated. The clonogenic survival data suggests that there was a classic RIBE in U87MG spheroids exposed to 4 Gy of X-rays, using a medium transfer technique. Changes in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes indicate involvement of both intrinsic apoptotic and MAPK pathways in inducing these effects. PMID:26160180

  2. Role of nitric oxide in the radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Vasily A

    2015-12-01

    Cells that are not irradiated but are affected by "stress signal factors" released from irradiated cells are called bystander cells. These cells, as well as directly irradiated ones, express DNA damage-related proteins and display excess DNA damage, chromosome aberrations, mutations, and malignant transformation. This phenomenon has been studied widely in the past 20 years, since its first description by Nagasawa and Little in 1992, and is known as the radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). Several factors have been identified as playing a role in the bystander response. This review will focus on one of them, nitric oxide (NO), and its role in the stimulation and propagation of RIBE. The hydrophobic properties of NO, which permit its diffusion through the cytoplasm and plasma membranes, allow this signaling molecule to easily spread from irradiated cells to bystander cells without the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication. NO produced in irradiated tissues mediates cellular regulation through posttranslational modification of a number of regulatory proteins. The best studied of these modifications are S-nitrosylation (reversible oxidation of cysteine) and tyrosine nitration. These modifications can up- or down-regulate the functions of many proteins modulating different NO-dependent effects. These NO-dependent effects include the stimulation of genomic instability (GI) and the accumulation of DNA errors in bystander cells without direct DNA damage. PMID:26355395

  3. Differential modulation of a radiation-induced bystander effect in glioblastoma cells by pifithrin-? and wortmannin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Chunlin; Zhang, Jianghong; Prise, Kevin M.

    2010-03-01

    The implication of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) for both radiation protection and radiotherapy has attracted significant attention, but a key question is how to modulate the RIBE. The present study found that, when a fraction of glioblastoma cells in T98G population were individually targeted with precise helium particles through their nucleus, micronucleus (MN) were induced and its yield increased non-linearly with radiation dose. After co-culturing with irradiated cells, additional MN could be induced in the non-irradiated bystander cells and its yield was independent of irradiation dose, giving direct evidence of a RIBE. Further results showed that the RIBE could be eliminated by pifithrin-? (p53 inhibitor) but enhanced by wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor). Moreover, it was found that nitric oxide (NO) contributed to this RIBE, and the levels of NO of both irradiated cells and bystander cells could be extensively diminished by pifithrin-? but insignificantly reduced by wortmannin. Our results indicate that RIBE can be modulated by p53 and PI3K through a NO-dependent and NO-independent pathway, respectively.

  4. Mechanisms of the induction of apoptosis mediated by radiation-induced cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Babini, G; Bellinzona, V E; Morini, J; Baiocco, G; Mariotti, L; Unger, K; Ottolenghi, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced bystander signalling leading to apoptosis in non-irradiated co-cultured cells. Cultured non-transformed cells were irradiated, and the effect on the apoptosis rate on co-cultured non-irradiated malignant cells was determined. For this, two different levels of the investigation are presented, i.e. release of signalling proteins and transcriptomic profiling of the irradiated and non-irradiated co-cultured cells. Concerning the signalling proteins, in this study, the attention was focussed on the release of the active and latent forms of the transforming growth factor-?1 protein. Moreover, global gene expression profiles of non-transformed and transformed cells in untreated co-cultures were compared with those of 0.5-Gy-irradiated non-transformed cells co-cultured with the transformed cells. The results show an effect of radiation on the release of signalling proteins in the medium, although no significant differences in release rates were detectable when varying the doses in the range from 0.25 to 1 Gy. Moreover, gene expression results suggest an effect of radiation on both cell populations, pointing out specific signalling pathways that might be involved in the enhanced induction of apoptosis. PMID:25848101

  5. Comparison of dependent measures used to quantify radiation-induced taste aversion

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, A.C.; Smith, J.C.; Hollander, G.R. . Dept. of Psychology)

    1981-11-01

    Several commonly used measures of conditioned taste aversion were compared under a variety of experimental conditions. In the first experiment an aversion to a saccharin solution (0.1%) was conditioned by pairing this taste substance with a single 100 R exposure to Cobalt-60. Comparisons were performed between the following measures: a short-term single-bottle test, a 22-hour two-bottle preference test, a measure quantifying recovery from the aversion along with other measures derived from these tests. Appropriate control groups received saccharin and sham exposure, water and sham exposure, and water and radiation exposure in order to measure both neophobia and enhanced neophobia. In Experiment 2 the total whole body radiation exposure used to condition the taste aversion was varied in different groups from 50 to 300 R exposures and the effect on conditioning was measured using the dependent variables described in Experiment 1. In Experiment 3 radiation-induced taste aversion was studied in rats which had prior exposures to the saccharin solution. In all three studies it was shown that different interpretations result from measuring the conditioned aversion with the different dependent variables commonly used, and several measures are needed to give a fair and accurate description of learned taste aversion.

  6. Identification of kinase fusion oncogenes in post-Chernobyl radiation-induced thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Ricarte-Filho, Julio C; Li, Sheng; Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E R; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Voza, Francesca; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Heguy, Adriana; Viale, Agnes; Bogdanova, Tetyana; Thomas, Geraldine A; Mason, Christopher E; Fagin, James A

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood markedly increases the risk of developing papillary thyroid cancer. We examined tissues from 26 Ukrainian patients with thyroid cancer who were younger than 10 years of age and living in contaminated areas during the time of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. We identified nonoverlapping somatic driver mutations in all 26 cases through candidate gene assays and next-generation RNA sequencing. We found that 22 tumors harbored fusion oncogenes that arose primarily through intrachromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, 23 of the oncogenic drivers identified in this cohort aberrantly activate MAPK signaling, including the 2 somatic rearrangements resulting in fusion of transcription factor ETS variant 6 (ETV6) with neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3 (NTRK3) and fusion of acylglycerol kinase (AGK) with BRAF. Two other tumors harbored distinct fusions leading to overexpression of the nuclear receptor PPAR?. Fusion oncogenes were less prevalent in tumors from a cohort of children with pediatric thyroid cancers that had not been exposed to radiation but were from the same geographical regions. Radiation-induced thyroid cancers provide a paradigm of tumorigenesis driven by fusion oncogenes that activate MAPK signaling or, less frequently, a PPAR?-driven transcriptional program. PMID:24135138

  7. Radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions by gamma ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wenbao; He, Yanquan; Ling, Yongsheng; Hei, Daqian; Shan, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiatong

    2015-04-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid under gamma ray irradiation was investigated. Degradation experiments were performed with 100 mL sealed Pyrex glass vessels loaded with 80 mL of cyclohexanebutyric acid solutions at various initial concentrations of 10, 20, and 40 mg L-1. The absorbed doses were controlled at 0, 0.65, 1.95, 3.25, 6.5, 9.75, and 13 kGy. The results showed that gamma ray irradiation could effectively degrade cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions. The removal rate of cyclohexanebutyric acid increased significantly with the increase of absorbed dose and the decrease of its initial concentration. At the same time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was as effective as that of cyclohexanebutyric acid. The kinetic studies showed that the degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid followed pseudo first-order reaction. Above all, the proposed mechanism obtained when NaNO2, NaNO3 and tert-butanol were added showed that the •OH radical played a major role in the gamma degradation process of cyclohexanebutyric acid, while •H and eaq- played a minor role in the gamma degradation process. The degradation products were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during cyclohexanebutyric acid degradation.

  8. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamarov, Konstantin P.; Osminkina, Liubov A.; Zinovyev, Sergey V.; Maximova, Ksenia A.; Kargina, Julia V.; Gongalsky, Maxim B.; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P.; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V.; Nikiforov, Vladimir N.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-11-01

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50°C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1-5 W/cm2). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy.

  9. Prevention of Spontaneous and Radiation-Induced Tumors in Rats by Reduction of Food Intake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Ludwik; Dreyfuss, Yolande

    1990-09-01

    In our previous studies carried out on inbred Sprague-Dawley rats, we reported a striking increase in the incidence of tumors following total-body ?-irradiation [150 rads (1.5 Gy) five times at weekly intervals]. Subsequently, we observed that two or three irradiations, and to a lesser extent even a single irradiation, were sufficient to induce an impressive increase in the incidence of tumors, particularly in females. A significant reduction of the incidence of radiation-induced tumors resulted when the rats were placed on calorically restricted diet. In experiments reported here, we increased slightly the amount of food given to animals on restricted diet. In the new study, among 102 irradiated females on full diet, 91 (89%) developed tumors, as compared with 29 out of 128 female rats (23%) also irradiated but maintained on restricted diet and 43 out of 89 (48%) untreated control females. None of 77 nonirradiated females on restricted diet developed tumors. Among 65 irradiated male rats, 29 (45%) developed tumors, as compared with 5 out of 74 (7%) rats also irradiated but maintained on restricted diet. Of the 49 males in the nonirradiated groups, 2 (4%) developed tumors. There was a significant weight reduction in both females and males maintained on restricted diet; animals on restricted diet lived longer than those on full diet.

  10. Ultraviolet-radiation-induced methane emissions from meteorites and the Martian atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Keppler, Frank; Vigano, Ivan; McLeod, Andy; Ott, Ulrich; Früchtl, Marion; Röckmann, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Almost a decade after methane was first reported in the atmosphere of Mars there is an intensive discussion about both the reliability of the observations--particularly the suggested seasonal and latitudinal variations--and the sources of methane on Mars. Given that the lifetime of methane in the Martian atmosphere is limited, a process on or below the planet's surface would need to be continuously producing methane. A biological source would provide support for the potential existence of life on Mars, whereas a chemical origin would imply that there are unexpected geological processes. Methane release from carbonaceous meteorites associated with ablation during atmospheric entry is considered negligible. Here we show that methane is produced in much larger quantities from the Murchison meteorite (a type CM2 carbonaceous chondrite) when exposed to ultraviolet radiation under conditions similar to those expected at the Martian surface. Meteorites containing several per cent of intact organic matter reach the Martian surface at high rates, and our experiments suggest that a significant fraction of the organic matter accessible to ultraviolet radiation is converted to methane. Ultraviolet-radiation-induced methane formation from meteorites could explain a substantial fraction of the most recently estimated atmospheric methane mixing ratios. Stable hydrogen isotope analysis unambiguously confirms that the methane released from Murchison is of extraterrestrial origin. The stable carbon isotope composition, in contrast, is similar to that of terrestrial microbial origin; hence, measurements of this signature in future Mars missions may not enable an unambiguous identification of biogenic methane. PMID:22678286

  11. Time Evolution of Radiation-Induced Luminescence in Terbium-Doped Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Michael S.; Winfree, William P.

    1996-01-01

    A study was made on two commercially available terbium-doped silicate glasses. There is an increased interest in silicate glasses doped with rare-earth ions for use in high-energy particle detection and radiographic applications. These glasses are of interest due to the fact that they can be formed into small fiber sensors; a property that can be used to increase the spatial resolution of a detection system. Following absorption of radiation, the terbium ions become excited and then emit photons via 4f-4f electronic transitions as they relax back to the ground state. The lifetime of these transitions is on the order of milliseconds. A longer decay component lasting on the order of minutes has also been observed. While radiative transitions in the 4f shell of rare-earth ions are generally well understood by the Judd-Olfelt theory, the pr'esence of a longer luminescence decay component is not. Experimental evidence that the long decay component is due, in part, to the thermal release of trapped charge carriers will be presented. In addition, a theoretical model describing the time evolution of the radiation-induced luminescence will be presented.

  12. Modification of nylon-6 fibres by radiation-induced graft polymerisation of vinylbenzyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, T. M.; Nasef, Mohamed Mahmoud; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2015-04-01

    Modification of nylon-6 fibres by radiation-induced graft copolymerisation (RIGP) of vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC) using the preirradiation method was investigated. A number of grafting parameters such as type of solvent, total dose, monomer concentrations, reaction temperature and reaction time were studied to obtain desired degree of grafting (DG). The DG was found to be a function of reaction parameters and achieved a maximum value of 130 wt% at 20 vol% VBC concentration in methanol, 300 kGy dose, 30 °C temperature and 3 h reaction time. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to evaluate the chemical, morphological and structural changes that occurred in the grafted fibres, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was also applied to determine the thermal stability, whereas differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and universal mechanical tester were used to analyse respective thermal and mechanical properties of the grafted fibres. The results of these analyses provide strong evidence for successful grafting of VBC onto nylon-6, and the variation in the properties of the grafted fibres depends on DG.

  13. A prediction study on radiation-induced second malignancies for IMRT treatment delivery.

    PubMed

    Stathakis, Sotirios; Roland, Teboh; Papanikolaou, Niko; Li, Jinseng; Ma, Charlie

    2009-04-01

    Low-level peripheral organ dose and its effect on second malignancies for patients undergoing radiation therapy have been reported in the literature. However, a comprehensive database outlining the treatment modalities, the tumor location, and a quantification of the overall relative risk of second malignancies is rather limited. In this work, we quantify the relative risks or percent likelihood of second malignancies for patients undergoing IMRT and conventional radiotherapy for four different tumor sites: breast, head and neck, lung, and prostate. We utilize Monte Carlo methods based on actual patient plans to compute the whole body effective dose equivalent for each plan and then deduce the percent likelihood of the occurrence of second malignancy. Based on an evaluation of over 30 actual patient plans and Monte Carlo simulations using 6, 10, and 18MV photon beam energies, we observed that the IMRT patients treated for head and neck cancer showed a 40% increase in risk for developing a second malignancy compared to those treated with conventional radiotherapy. The increase in risk for prostrate patients was 30% while the IMRT lung patients gave the highest relative risk almost tripling that observed in their conventionally treated counterparts. There was negligible difference in risk between breast patients undergoing IMRT treatment versus conventional therapy. The overall relative risk of radiation induced malignancy observed was below 6% in all treatment plans considered. PMID:19334795

  14. Radiation-induced cell proliferation in the parotid and submandibular glands of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, B.; Van Waarde, M.A.W.H.; Konings, A.W.T.; Vissink, A. |; `s-Gravenmade, E.J.

    1994-11-01

    Repopulation of tissues with cells at damaged sites is an important feature in the recovery of radiation-induced tissue injury. To obtain insight into the regenerative process in salivary gland tissue, proliferative activity was measured as a function of time in the different epithelial cell compartments of rat parotid and submandibular glands after local X irradiation with a single dose of 15 Gy. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeling indices were determined before and 10 h and 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 20 and 30 days after irradiation. In both glands, X irradiation caused cell death and cell cycle delay manifested during the first day. Three days after irradiation, cell proliferation started in the intercalated duct. Six days after irradiation, proliferation was also observed in acinar and granular convoluted tubule cells. The striated ducts showed proliferative activity starting at day 6 (parotid) and day 10 (submandibular), respectively. The results of this study suggest that after 15 Gy of X rays repopulation takes place in all cell compartments. From the present study it cannot be deduced if these cells are originating solely from progenitor cells residing in the intercalated duct or if cells of the other compartments are also stimulated. Proliferative activity was found to be higher in the intercalated duct compartment of the parotid gland than of the submandibular gland, which may be related to the suggested greater radiosensitivity and thus a greater demand for cell replenishment in the parotid gland. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Influence of Temperature and Oxygen Concentration on the Radiation Induced Oxidation of Phenylalanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnik, P.; Quint, R. M.; Solar, S.; Getoff, N.; Sontag, G.

    1995-09-01

    The formation of tyrosine isomers by ?-radiolysis of neutral aqueous phenylalanine solutions was found to be strongly dependent on oxygen concentration and temperature. Changing the dose rate did not influence the degradation process. In the presence of 0.25 x 10-3 mol dm-3 oxygen at room temperature the yields of o-tyrosine as well as of m- and p-tyrosine drop from G(o-Tyr) = 0.5 and G(m-Tyr) = G(p-Tyr) = 0.4 at a dose of 0.3 kGy to 0.18 and 0.16 at 2.5 kGy, respectively. In solutions containing 1.25 x 10-3 mol dm-3 oxygen the initial yields remain unchanged but decrease at 2.5 kGy only to G(o-Tyr) = 0.3 and G(m-Tyr) = G(p-Tyr) = 0.20. Under the latter reaction conditions also 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine was found. Samples irradiated in frozen state did not show remarkable radiolysis of phenylalanine and tyrosine formation. In the range between 5 and 20°C no essential influence of temperature on the phenylalanine radiolysis and tyrosine yields was observable. The obtained results are important for methods using the tyrosine yields as markers for the detection of irradiated food. Storage conditions and irradiation temperature play an essential role on radiation induced changes of food.

  16. Dislocation dynamics simulations of interactions between gliding dislocations and radiation induced prismatic loops in zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet, Julie; Dupuy, Laurent; Onimus, Fabien; Mompiou, Frédéric; Perusin, Simon; Ambard, Antoine

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of Pressurized Water Reactor fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys is strongly affected by neutron irradiation due to the high density of radiation induced dislocation loops. In order to investigate the interaction mechanisms between gliding dislocations and loops in zirconium, a new nodal dislocation dynamics code, adapted to Hexagonal Close Packed metals, has been used. Various configurations have been systematically computed considering different glide planes, basal or prismatic, and different characters, edge or screw, for gliding dislocations with -type Burgers vectors. Simulations show various interaction mechanisms such as (i) absorption of a loop on an edge dislocation leading to the formation of a double super-jog, (ii) creation of a helical turn, on a screw dislocation, that acts as a strong pinning point or (iii) sweeping of a loop by a gliding dislocation. It is shown that the clearing of loops is more favorable when the dislocation glides in the basal plane than in the prismatic plane explaining the easy dislocation channeling in the basal plane observed after neutron irradiation by transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Dysfunction Results From p53-Dependent Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Jennifer L.; Grundmann, Oliver; Burd, Randy; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer causes adverse secondary side effects in the salivary glands and results in diminished quality of life for the patient. A previous in vivo study in parotid salivary glands demonstrated that targeted head-and-neck irradiation resulted in marked increases in phosphorylated p53 (serine{sup 18}) and apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active mutant of Akt1 (myr-Akt1). Methods and Materials: Transgenic and knockout mouse models were exposed to irradiation, and p53-mediated transcription, apoptosis, and salivary gland dysfunction were analyzed. Results: The proapoptotic p53 target genes PUMA and Bax were induced in parotid salivary glands of mice at early time points after therapeutic radiation. This dose-dependent induction requires expression of p53 because no radiation-induced expression of PUMA and Bax was observed in p53-/- mice. Radiation also induced apoptosis in the parotid gland in a dose-dependent manner, which was p53 dependent. Furthermore, expression of p53 was required for the acute and chronic loss of salivary function after irradiation. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced in p53-/- mice, and their salivary function was preserved after radiation exposure. Conclusions: Apoptosis in the salivary glands after therapeutic head-and-neck irradiation is mediated by p53 and corresponds to salivary gland dysfunction in vivo.

  18. A human esophageal epithelial cell model for study of radiation induced cancer and DNA repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma. Development of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is associated with radiation exposure, as revealed by the significant enhanced in incidence rates for this type of cancer in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also associated with poor nutritional status and micronutrient deficiencies, which are also important issues for long duration spaceflight. The possible synergies between nutritional issues and radiation exposure are unknown. Here we present the results of preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of gamma-H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron.

  19. Model of radiation-induced gain degradation of NPN bipolar junction transistor at different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qifeng, Zhao; Yiqi, Zhuang; Junlin, Bao; Wei, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Ionizing-radiation-induced current gain degradation in NPN bipolar junction transistors is due to an increase in base current as a result of recombination at the surface of the device. A model is presented which identifies the physical mechanism responsible for current gain degradation. The increase in surface recombination velocity due to interface states results in an increase in base current. Besides, changing the surface potential along the base surface induced by the oxide-trapped charges can also lead to an increased base current. By combining the production mechanisms of oxide-trapped charges and interface states, this model can explain the fact that the current gain degradation is more severe at a low dose rate than at a high dose rate. The radiations were performed in a Co60 source up to a total dose of 70 krad(Si). The low dose rate was 0.1 rad(Si)/s and the high dose rate was 10 rad(Si)/s. The model accords well with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61076101, 61204092).

  20. Radiation induced bystander effects: Implications for low dose radiation risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Suzuki, M.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C.; Hei, T.

    Current model used in radiation risk assessment is based on the dogma that the DNA of the nucleus is the main target for radiation-induced genotoxicity and, as fewer cells are directly damaged at low doses, the deleterious effects of radiation proportionally decline. Using a precision microbeam to target an exact fraction of cells in a population and irradiated their nuclei with exactly one alpha particle each, we found that the frequencies of induced mutations and chromosomal changes in populations where some known fractions of nuclei were hit are consistent with non- hit cells contributing significantly to the response. In fact, irradiation of 10% of a mammalian cell population with a single alpha particle per cell results in a mutant yield similar to that observed when all of the cells in the population are irradiated. This effect was significantly eliminated in cells pretreated with gap junction inhibitor or in cells carrying a dominant negative connexin 43 vector. The data imply that the relevant target for radiation mutagenesis is larger than an individual cell and suggest a need to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimate for low dose radiation exposure.

  1. Radioprotective effect of mefenamic acid against radiation-induced genotoxicity in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nobakht, Reyhaneh; Ghasemi, Arash; Pourfallah, Tayyeb Allahverdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mefenamic acid (MEF) as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is used as a medication for relieving of pain and inflammation. Radiation-induced inflammation process is involved in DNA damage and cell death. In this study, the radioprotective effect of MEF was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human blood lymphocytes. Materials and Methods Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and incubated with MEF at different concentrations (5, 10, 50, or 100 µM) for two hours. The whole blood was exposed to ionizing radiation at a dose 1.5 Gy. Lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis blocked binucleated lymphocyte. Results A significant decreasing in the frequency of micronuclei was observed in human lymphocytes irradiated with MEF as compared to irradiated lymphocytes without MEF. The maximum decreasing in frequency of micronuclei was observed at 100 µM of MEF (38% decrease), providing maximal protection against ionizing radiation. Conclusion The radioprotective effect of MEF is probably related to anti-inflammatory property of MEF on human lymphocytes. PMID:26484310

  2. Heritability of Susceptibility to Ionizing Radiation-Induced Apoptosis of Human Lymphocyte Subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Annette; Dechamps, Nathalie; Goldin, Lynn; Thomas, Gilles

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the heritability of intrinsic radiosensitivity, the induction of apoptosis in lymphocyte subpopulations was determined on samples from related individuals belonging to large kindred families. Methods and Materials: Quiescent lymphocytes from 334 healthy individuals were gamma-irradiated in vitro. Apoptosis was determined 18 h after irradiation by eight-color flow cytometry. Radiosensitivity was quantified from dose-effect curves. Intrafamilial correlations and heritability were computed for 199 father-mother-offspring trios using the programs SOLAR (Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines) and SAGE (Statistical Analysis for Genetic Epidemiology). Segregation analyses were conducted using SAGE. Results: Marked differential susceptibility of naive and memory T lymphocytes was demonstrated. Also, although age and gender were significant covariates, their effects only accounted for a minor part of the inter-individual variation. Parent-offspring and sib-sib correlations were significant for the radiosensitivity of B cells, T4, and T8 and of effector memory T4 and T8 subpopulations. In the T4-effector memory subpopulation, the phenotype showed correlations most consistent with dominant or additive genetic effects, and the results of the segregation analysis were consistent with the contribution of a bi-allelic dominant locus. Conclusions: Heritability was demonstrated for the susceptibility to ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis of lymphocyte populations, and the segregation of the T4-effector memory radiosensitivity phenotype was consistent with a simple mendelian transmission model involving one major gene.

  3. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development

    PubMed Central

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development. PMID:25681390

  4. Modeling of excimer laser radiation induced defect generation in fluoride phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natura, U.; Ehrt, D.

    2001-03-01

    Fluoride phosphate (FP) glasses with low phosphate content are high-transparent in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range and attractive candidates for UV-optics. Their optical properties are complementary to fluoride crystals. The anomalous partial dispersion makes them desirable for optical lens designs to reduce the secondary spectrum. Their UV transmission is limited by trace impurities introduced by raw materials and decreases when exposed to UV-radiation (lamps, lasers). The experiments of the paper published previously in this journal were used in order to separate radiation induced absorption bands in the fluoride phosphate glass FP10. In this paper the generation mechanism of the phosphorus-oxygen related hole center POHC 2 is investigated in detail in glasses of various compositions (various phosphate and impurity contents) in order to predict the transmission loss in case of long-time irradiation. Experiments were carried out using ArF- and KrF-excimer lasers (ns-pulses). POHC 2 generation strongly depends on the phosphate content and on the content of Pb 2+. A model was developed on these terms. Rate equations are formulated, incorporating the influence of the Pb 2+-content on the defect generation, a two-step creation term including an energy transfer process and a one-photon bleaching term. This results in a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Absorption coefficients and lifetimes of the excited states were calculated as well. Experimental results compared well with the numerical analysis of the theoretical rate equations.

  5. Radiation-induced phase transition in a film of niobium-tin solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Volodin, V. N.; Zhakanbaev, E. A.

    2014-08-01

    A 5-?m-thick film of a niobium-tin solid solution (18.3 at % Sn) grown by ion-plasma sputtering with subsequent codeposition of ultrafine metal particles is irradiated by a fast proton flux with a fluence of 1019 p +/cm2. X-ray diffraction analysis carried out using Cu K ? (? = 0.154178 nm), Co K ? (? = 0.179021 nm), and Mo K ? (? = 0.071069 nm) radiations shows the presence of a radiation-induced stannide niobium (Nb3Sn) phase in the region of proton energy dissipation (at a depth of 2.5 ?m from the surface of the solid solution film). It is found that at the end of the particle range, nonlocal interaction between the protons and the concentrated matrix solid solution takes place. When interacting with the supersaturated solid solution, a bombarding particle covers a tangible area of the solution, so that an intermetallic phase greater than critical in size nucleates. The feasibility is demonstrated of using a fast particle flux to produce an intermetallic (superconducting) phase inside a solid solution layer with a composition close to the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic.

  6. Performance Boost in Industrial Multifilamentary Nb3Sn Wires due to Radiation Induced Pinning Centers

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, T.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.; Flükiger, R.; Scheuerlein, C.; Bottura, L.

    2015-01-01

    We report non-Cu critical current densities of 4?.?09???109?A/m2 at 12?T and 2.27???109?A/m2 at 15?T obtained from transport measurements on a Ti-alloyed RRP Nb3Sn wire after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 8.9???1021?m?2. These values are to our knowledge unprecedented in multifilamentary Nb3Sn, and they correspond to a Jc enhancement of approximately 60% relative to the unirradiated state. Our magnetometry data obtained on short wire samples irradiated to fast neutron fluences of up to 2.5???1022?m?2 indicate the possibility of an even better performance, whereas earlier irradiation studies on bronze-processed Nb3Sn wires with a Sn content further from stoichiometry attested a decline of the critical current density at such high fluences. We show that radiation induced point-pinning centers rather than an increase of the upper critical field are responsible for this Jc enhancement, and argue that these results call for further research on pinning landscape engineering. PMID:26030255

  7. Simulating and Detecting Radiation-Induced Errors for Onboard Machine Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Bornstein, Benjamin; Granat, Robert; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft processors and memory are subjected to high radiation doses and therefore employ radiation-hardened components. However, these components are orders of magnitude more expensive than typical desktop components, and they lag years behind in terms of speed and size. We have integrated algorithm-based fault tolerance (ABFT) methods into onboard data analysis algorithms to detect radiation-induced errors, which ultimately may permit the use of spacecraft memory that need not be fully hardened, reducing cost and increasing capability at the same time. We have also developed a lightweight software radiation simulator, BITFLIPS, that permits evaluation of error detection strategies in a controlled fashion, including the specification of the radiation rate and selective exposure of individual data structures. Using BITFLIPS, we evaluated our error detection methods when using a support vector machine to analyze data collected by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. We found ABFT error detection for matrix multiplication is very successful, while error detection for Gaussian kernel computation still has room for improvement.

  8. CDK1 Enhances Mitochondrial Bioenergetics for Radiation-Induced DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lili; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Jiang, Guochun; Papadopoulos, Stelios; Tian, Lin; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear DNA repair capacity is a critical determinant of cell fate under genotoxic stress conditions. DNA repair is a well-defined energy-consuming process. However, it is unclear how DNA repair is fueled and whether mitochondrial energy production contributes to nuclear DNA repair. Here, we report a dynamic enhancement of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial ATP generation in irradiated normal cells, paralleled with increased mitochondrial relocation of the cell-cycle kinase CDK1 and nuclear DNA repair. The basal and radiation-induced mitochondrial ATP generation is reduced significantly in cells harboring CDK1 phosphorylation-deficient mutant complex I subunits. Similarly, mitochondrial ATP generation and nuclear DNA repair are also compromised severely in cells harboring mitochondrially targeted, kinase-deficient CDK1. These results demonstrate a mechanism governing the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus by which CDK1 boosts mitochondrial bioenergetics to meet the increased cellular fuel demand for DNA repair and cell survival under genotoxic stress conditions. PMID:26670043

  9. Protective effect of Thuja occidentalis against radiation-induced toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sunila, E S; Kuttan, G

    2005-12-01

    The effect of Thuja occidentalis against damage induced by gamma radiation was studied. Whole-body exposure of Swiss albino mice to gamma-rays (6 Gy) reduced the total white blood cell count to 1900 cells/mm(3) on the third day, which was elevated to 2050 cells/mm(3) by the administration of alcoholic extract ofT occidentalis (5 mg/dose/animal, intraperitoneally). Six animals from each group were killed after 2, 7, and 11 days of irradiation to detect the bone marrow cellularity and radiation-induced toxicity. The number of bone marrow cells and alpha-esterase positive cells in control animals after 11 days was reduced to 12.2 x 10(6) cells/femur and 693.5/4000 cells, respectively. In T occidentalis-treated animals, bone marrow cellularity was increased to 16.9 x 10(6) cells/femur and alpha-esterase positive cells were 940/4000 cells, a nearly normal level. Alcoholic extract of T occidentalis reduced the elevated levels of GPT and alkaline phosphatase in liver and serum after irradiation. The lipid peroxidation levels were also lowered in the irradiated animals treated with the Thuja extract. PMID:16282509

  10. Quantitative evaluation of radiation-induced changes in sperm morphology and chromatin distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Aubele, M.; Juetting, U.R.; Rodenacker, K.; Gais, P.; Burger, G.; Hacker-Klom, U. )

    1990-01-01

    Sperm head cytometry provides a useful assay for the detection of radiation-induced damage in mouse germ cells. Exposure of the gonads to radiation is known to lead to an increase of diploid and higher polyploid sperm and of sperm with head shape abnormalities. In the pilot studies reported here quantitative analysis of the total DNA content, the morphology, and the chromatin distribution of mouse sperm was performed. The goal was to evaluate the discriminative power of features derived by high resolution image cytometry in distinguishing sperm of control and irradiated mice. Our results suggest that besides the induction of the above mentioned variations in DNA content and shape of sperm head, changes of the nonhomogeneous chromatin distribution within the sperm may also be used to quantify the radiation effect on sperm cells. Whereas the chromatin distribution features show larger variations for sperm 21 days after exposure (dpr), the shape parameters seem to be more important to discriminate sperm 35 dpr. This may be explained by differentiation processes, which take place in different stages during mouse spermatogenesis.

  11. Acute DNA damage activates the tumour suppressor p53 to promote radiation-induced lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Castle, Katherine D.; Moding, Everett J.; Blum, Jordan M.; Williams, Nerissa; Luo, Lixia; Ma, Yan; Borst, Luke B.; Kim, Yongbaek; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic cancer therapies, such as chemoradiation, cause haematological toxicity primarily by activating the tumour suppressor p53. While inhibiting p53-mediated cell death during cancer therapy ameliorates haematologic toxicity, whether it also impacts carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of inducible p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to show that temporarily blocking p53 during total-body irradiation (TBI) not only ameliorates acute toxicity, but also improves long-term survival by preventing lymphoma development. Using KrasLA1 mice, we show that TBI promotes the expansion of a rare population of thymocytes that express oncogenic KrasG12D. However, blocking p53 during TBI significantly suppresses the expansion of KrasG12D-expressing thymocytes. Mechanistically, bone marrow transplant experiments demonstrate that TBI activates p53 to decrease the ability of bone marrow cells to suppress lymphoma development through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism. Together, our results demonstrate that the p53 response to acute DNA damage promotes the development of radiation-induced lymphoma. PMID:26399548

  12. The role of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in radiation-induced immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Pockley, Alan G; Schmid, Thomas E; Schilling, Daniela

    2015-11-28

    Despite enormous progress in radiation technologies (high precision image-guided irradiation, proton irradiation, heavy ion irradiation) and radiotherapeutic concepts (hypofractionated irradiation schemes), the clinical outcome of radiotherapy in locally advanced and metastasized tumors and in hypoxic tumors which are radiation-resistant remains unsatisfactory. Given their key influence on a number of biological and immunological parameters, this article considers the influence of irradiation-induced stress proteins on radiation-induced immunomodulation. Depending on its location, the major stress-inducible Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has been found to fulfill multiple roles. On the one hand, increased intracellular Hsp70 levels have been found to play a key role in the recovery from stress such as radio(chemo)therapy, and on the other hand extracellular Hsp70 proteins are potent stimulators of the innate immune system and mediators of anti-tumor immunity. Furthermore, if loaded with tumor-derived peptides, members of the Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70) and 90 (HSP90) families can stimulate the adaptive immune system via antigen cross-presentation. An irradiation-induced enhancement of the selective expression of a membrane form of Hsp70 on the surface of tumor cells which can act as a recognition structure for activated NK cells might have significant clinical relevance, in that the outcome of irradiation therapy for advanced tumors could be improved by combining it with cell-based and other immunotherapies that target this membrane form of Hsp70. PMID:25681671

  13. The Effects of Fenugreek on Radiation Induced Toxicity for Human Blood T-Cells in Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohamed Bagher; Kiani, Ali; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular damages either in normal or cancerous tissues are the outcome of molecular events affected by ionizing radiation. T-cells are the most important among immune system agents and are used for biological radiation dose measurement in recommended standard methods. The herbs with immune modulating properties may be useful to reduce the risk of the damages and subsequently the diseases. The T-cells as the most important immune cells being targeted for biological dosimetry of radiation. This study proposes a flowcytometric-method based on fluorescein isothiocyanate- and propidium iodide (PI)-labeled annexin-V to assess apoptosis in blood T-cells after irradiation in both presence and absence of fenugreek extract. T-cells peripheral blood lymphocyte isolated from blood samples of healthy individuals with no irradiated job background. The media of cultured cells was irradiated 1-h after the fenugreek extract was added. The number of apoptotic cells was assessed by annexin-V protocol and multicolor flowcytometry. An obvious variation in apoptotic cells number was observed in presence of fenugreek extract (>80%). The results suggest that fenugreek extract can potentiate the radiation induced apoptosis or radiation toxicity in blood T-cells (P < 0.05). PMID:26284174

  14. Heavy-ion radiation induced Photosynthesis changes in Oryza sativa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Meng, Qingmei

    The abnormal development of rice was observed frequently after the seed was exposed to heavy-ion radiation. The heavy-ion radiation could change the chloroplast structure in mesophyll cell by decreasing chloroplast grana and loosing the thylakoid lamellas. To study the mechanism of heavy-ion radiation induced photosynthesis changes, rice seed was exposed to 0-20 Gy dose of (12) C radiation. By measuring the changes of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, the content of chlorophyll as well as the expression of CP24 in the leaves of rice at the three-leaf stage, we analyzed the influence mechanism of heavy-ion radiation on photosynthesis in rice. The results indicated that chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm and content of chlorophyll (including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll) changed significantly in different doses. Both the relative expression of CP24 and its encoding gene lhcb6 altered after exposed to different dose of radiation. By using Pearson correlation analysis, we found that the 1 Gy was the bound of low-dose radiation. The possible molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the observed changes are discussed. Key Words: Heavy-ion Radiation; Rice; Photosynthesis; Fv/Fm; CP24.

  15. UV radiation-induced immunosuppression is greater in men and prevented by topical nicotinamide.

    PubMed

    Damian, Diona L; Patterson, Clare R S; Stapelberg, Michael; Park, Joohong; Barnetson, Ross St C; Halliday, Gary M

    2008-02-01

    UV radiation-induced immunosuppression augments cutaneous carcinogenesis. The incidence of skin cancer continues to increase despite increased use of sunscreens, which are less effective at preventing immunosuppression than sunburn. Using the Mantoux reaction as a model of skin immunity, we investigated the effects of solar-simulated (ss) UV and its component UVA and UVB wavebands and tested the ability of topical nicotinamide to protect from UV-induced immunosuppression. Healthy, Mantoux-positive volunteers were UV-irradiated on their backs, with 5% nicotinamide or vehicle applied to different sites in a randomized, double-blinded manner. Subsequent Mantoux testing at irradiated and adjacent unirradiated sites enabled measurement of UV-induced immunosuppression with and without nicotinamide. Suberythemal ssUV caused significant immunosuppression, although component UVB and UVA doses delivered independently did not. Men were immunosuppressed by ssUV doses three times lower than those required to immunosuppress women. This may be an important cause of the higher skin cancer incidence and mortality observed in men. Topical nicotinamide prevented immunosuppression, with gene chip microarrays suggesting that the mechanisms of protection may include alterations in complement, energy metabolism and apoptosis pathways. Nicotinamide is a safe and inexpensive compound that could be added to sunscreens or after-sun lotions to improve protection from immunosuppression. immunosuppression.JID JOURNAL CLUB ARTICLE: For questions, answers, and open discussion about this article, please go to http://network.nature.com/group/jidclub PMID:17882270

  16. Complex-forming polymer prepared by electron beam radiation-induced graft polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Jiro; Sugo, Takanobu; Katakai, Akio; Omichi, Hideki

    In order to prepare a complex-forming polymer useful as a selective adsorbent, radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto a fibrous tetrafluoroethylene ethylene copolymer has been studied by using preirradiation method. The resulting grafted fibers were treated with 3% hydroxylamine alcohol-water solution, followed by controlling in alkali solution. The adsorbents containing amidoxime are able to take up transition metal ions from neutral and weakly acidic solutions while not sorbing the ions of alkaline and alkaline earth metals to any significant extent. It was shown that by introducing a small amount of hydrophilic groups to the fiber, it was possible to increase the exchange rate between the external water and the internal water interacted with functional groups in polymer matrix and to induce the diffusion of hydrated metal ions. The efficiency for adsorption of transition metal ions was successfully improved either by adding small amount of hydrophilic part composed of poly(acrylic acid) or by restricting the distribution of amidoxime groups at the fiber surface. A high stability of this adsorbents to various treatments ( alkali treatment at 80° C, contact with seawater for 24 h at 30° C, etc.) was confirmed. It's applicability to the recovery of uranium from seawater is demonstrated by laboratory scale experiments.

  17. Chemical reactive filter paper prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization—I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessouki, A. M.; El-Tahawy, M.; El-Boohy, H.; El-Mongy, S. A.; Badawy, S. M.

    1999-06-01

    Chelating filter papers with chemically bonded amidoxime groups were synthesized by radiation-induced grafting of acrylonitrile onto filter paper (W3) followed by chemical treatment with hydroxylamine. The effect of grafting conditions such as absorbed dose, dose rate, monomer concentration and filter paper thickness on the grafting yield was studied. It was found that the degree of grafting increases with increasing absorbed dose and dose rate, and then tends to level off at high doses. The order of the dependence of the initial grafting rate on the dose is found to be of 0.33. An increasing monomer concentration was accompanied by a significant increase in grafting. At high monomer concentration the initial rate of grafting is fast followed by a slow rate. The rate of grafting is controlled by the filter paper thickness and the diffusion of monomer into the interior of the filter paper. Mechanical properties of the prepared filter paper were improved over the ungrafted paper. The amidoxime filter papers were examined for adsorption of uranium concentration ranging between 10-100 ppm.

  18. Performance Boost in Industrial Multifilamentary Nb3Sn Wires due to Radiation Induced Pinning Centers.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, T; Eisterer, M; Weber, H W; Flükiger, R; Scheuerlein, C; Bottura, L

    2015-01-01

    We report non-Cu critical current densities of 4.?09???10(9)?A/m(2) at 12?T and 2.27???10(9)?A/m(2) at 15?T obtained from transport measurements on a Ti-alloyed RRP Nb3Sn wire after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 8.9???10(21)?m(-2). These values are to our knowledge unprecedented in multifilamentary Nb3Sn, and they correspond to a Jc enhancement of approximately 60% relative to the unirradiated state. Our magnetometry data obtained on short wire samples irradiated to fast neutron fluences of up to 2.5???10(22)?m(-2) indicate the possibility of an even better performance, whereas earlier irradiation studies on bronze-processed Nb3Sn wires with a Sn content further from stoichiometry attested a decline of the critical current density at such high fluences. We show that radiation induced point-pinning centers rather than an increase of the upper critical field are responsible for this Jc enhancement, and argue that these results call for further research on pinning landscape engineering. PMID:26030255

  19. Anisotropic Radiation-Induced Segregation in 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel with Grain Boundary Character

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher M. Barr; Gregory A. Vetterick; Kinga A. Unocic; Khalid Hattar; Xian-Ming Bai; Mitra L. Taheri

    2014-04-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) and subsequent depletion of chromium along grain boundaries has been shown to be an important factor in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic face-centered cubic (fcc)-based alloys used for nuclear energy systems. A full understanding of RIS requires examination of the effect of the grain boundary character on the segregation process. Understanding how specific grain boundary structures respond under irradiation would assist in developing or designing alloys that are more efficient at removing point defects, or reducing the overall rate of deleterious Cr segregation. This study shows that solute segregation is dependent not only on grain boundary misorientation, but also on the grain boundary plane, as highlighted by markedly different segregation behavior for the __3 incoherent and coherent grain boundaries. The link between RIS and atomistic modeling is also explored through molecular dynamic simulations of the interaction of vacancies at different grain boundary structures through defect energetics in a simple model system. A key insight from the coupled experimental RIS measurements and corresponding defect–grain boundary modeling is that grain boundary–vacancy formation energy may have a critical threshold value related to the major alloying elements’ solute segregation.

  20. HZE particle radiation induces tissue-specific and p53-dependent mutagenesis in transgenic animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic animals, with the integrated target gene, provide a unique approach for measuring and characterizing mutations in any tissue of the animal. We are using the plasmid-based lacZ transgenic mice with different p53 genetic background to examine radiation-induced genetic damage resulting from exposure to heavy particle radiation. We measured lacZ mutation frequencies (MF) in the brain and spleen tissues at various times after exposing animals to an acute dose of 1 Gy of 1GeV/amu iron particles. MF in the spleen of p53+/+ animals increased up to 2.6-fold above spontaneous levels at 8 weeks post irradiation. In contrast, brain MF from the same animals increased 1.7-fold above controls in the same period. In the p53-/- animals, brain MF increased to 2.2-fold above spontaneous levels at 1 week after treatment, but returned to control levels thereafter. Radiation also induced alterations in the spectrum of mutants in both tissues, accompanied by changes in the frequency of mutants with deletions extending past the transgene into mouse genomic DNA. Our results indicate that the accumulation of transgene MF after radiation exposure is dependant on the tissue examined as well as the p53 genetic background of the animals.

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 of 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.

  2. No Significant Endothelial Apoptosis in the Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schuller, Bradley W.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Cormier, Kathleen S.; Riley, Kent J.; Binns, Peter J.; Julius, Richard; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Coderre, Jeffrey A. . E-mail: coderre@mit.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: This report addresses the incidence of vascular endothelial cell apoptosis in the mouse small intestine in relation to the radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome. Methods and Materials: Nonanesthetized mice received whole-body irradiation at doses above and below the threshold for death from the GI syndrome with 250 kVp X-rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, epithermal neutrons alone, or a unique approach for selective vascular irradiation using epithermal neutrons in combination with boronated liposomes that are restricted to the blood. Both terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining for apoptosis and dual-fluorescence staining for apoptosis and endothelial cells were carried out in jejunal cross-sections at 4 h postirradiation. Results: Most apoptotic cells were in the crypt epithelium. The number of TUNEL-positive nuclei per villus was low (1.62 {+-} 0.03, mean {+-} SEM) for all irradiation modalities and showed no dose-response as a function of blood vessel dose, even as the dose crossed the threshold for death from the GI syndrome. Dual-fluorescence staining for apoptosis and endothelial cells verified the TUNEL results and identified the apoptotic nuclei in the villi as CD45-positive leukocytes. Conclusion: These data do not support the hypothesis that vascular endothelial cell apoptosis is the cause of the GI syndrome.

  3. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase ameliorates radiation-induced ototoxicity in zebrafish and cochlea-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoo Seob; Hwang, Hye Sook; Kang, Sung Un; Chang, Jae Won; Oh, Young-Taek; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Radiation is a widely used treatment for head and neck cancers, and one of its most severe side effects is ototoxicity. Radiation-induced ototoxicity has been demonstrated to be linked to the increased production of ROS and MAPK. We intended to investigate the effect of p38 inhibition on radiation-induced ototoxicity in cochlea-derived HEI-OC1 cells and in a zebrafish model. The otoprotective effect of p38 inhibition against radiation was tested in vitro in the organ of Corti-derived cell line, HEI-OC1, and in vivo in a zebrafish model. Radiation-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, and an increase of intracellular NO generation were demonstrated in HEI-OC1 cells. The p38-specific inhibitor, SB203580, ameliorated radiation-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial injury in HEI-OC1 cells. p38 inhibition reduced radiation-induced activation of JNK, p38, cytochrome c, and cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP in HEI-OC1 cells. Scanning electron micrography showed that SB203580 prevented radiation-induced destruction of kinocilium and stereocilia in zebrafish neuromasts. The results of this study suggest that p38 plays an important role in mediating radiation-induced ototoxicity and inhibition of p38 could be a plausible option for preventing radiation ototoxicity. PMID:24374476

  4. Brachial amyotrophic diplegia in the setting of complete HIV viral load suppression

    PubMed Central

    Cachia, David; Izzy, Saef; Ionete, Carolina; Salameh, Johnny

    2012-01-01

    Brachial amyotrophic diplegia (BAD) is a rare segmental form of motor neuron disease which presents with asymmetric lower motor neuron weakness largely confined to the upper extremities (UE). In the case being reported, a 62-year-old gentleman on antiretroviral treatment since 1993, presented with left-arm weakness in 2007 that quickly progressed to involve the right arm. Complete HIV-viral load suppression had been achieved since 2003. Examination revealed lower motor neuron weakness in both UEs, worse proximally than distally and normal strength in the lower extremities (LEs). Nerve conduction studies showed reduced amplitudes of bilateral median and ulnar nerves’ motor responses. Needle electromyography of bilateral UE showed active and chronic denervation/reinnervation changes with normal findings in both LEs. MRI of the cervical spine showed cord atrophy. This is the first case report describing a patient who presented with BAD in the setting of complete HIV-viral load suppression for many years. PMID:23220836

  5. Brachial artery perforator-based propeller flap coverage for prevention of readhesion after ulnar nerve neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Hirotake; Motomiya, Makoto; Sakurai, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Dai; Funakoshi, Tadanao; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-02-01

    It is difficult for most plastic and orthopaedic surgeons to treat nerve dysfunction related to neural adhesion because the pathophysiology and suitable treatment have not been clarified. In the current report, we describe our experience of surgical treatment for adhesive ulnar neuropathy. A 58-year-old male complained of pain radiating to the ulnar nerve-innervated area during elbow and wrist motion caused by adhesive ulnar neuropathy after complex open trauma of the elbow joint. The patient obtained a good clinical outcome by surgical neurolysis of the ulnar nerve combined with a brachial artery perforator-based propeller flap to cover the soft tissue defect after resection of the scar tissue and to prevent readhesion of the ulnar nerve. This flap may be a useful option for ulnar nerve coverage after neurolysis without microvascular anastomosis in specific cases. PMID:25088214

  6. Hypotensive bradycardic events during shoulder arthroscopic surgery under interscalene brachial plexus blocks

    PubMed Central

    Song, Seok Young

    2012-01-01

    Sudden, profound hypotensive and bradycardic events (HBEs) have been reported in more than 20% of patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy in the sitting position. Although HBEs may be associated with the adverse effects of interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in the sitting position, the underlying mechanisms responsible for HBEs during the course of shoulder surgery are not well understood. The basic mechanisms of HBEs may be associated with the underlying mechanisms responsible for vasovagal syncope, carotid sinus hypersensitivity or orthostatic syncope. In this review, we discussed the possible mechanisms of HBEs during shoulder arthroscopic surgery, in the sitting position, under ISBPB. In particular, we focused on the relationship between HBEs and various types of syncopal reactions, the relationship between HBEs and the Bezold-Jarisch reflex, and the new contributing factors for the occurrence of HBEs, such as stellate ganglion block or the intraoperative administration of intravenous fentanyl. PMID:22474545

  7. Adult Peripheral Nerve Disorders—Nerve Entrapment, Repair, Transfer and Brachial Plexus Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ida K.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Learning Objectives After reviewing this article the reader should be able to: 1. Describe the pathophysiologic bases for nerve injury and how it applies to patient evaluation and management. 2. Realize the wide variety of injury patterns and associated patient complaint and physical findings associated with peripheral nerve pathology. 3. Evaluate and recommend further tests to aid in defining the diagnosis. 4. Specify treatment options and potential risks and benefits. Summary Peripheral nerve disorders comprise a gamut of problems ranging from entrapment neuropathy, to direct open traumatic injury and closed brachial plexus injury. The pathophysiology of injury defines the patient symptoms, exam findings and treatment options and is critical to accurate diagnosis and treatment. Goals of treatment include management of often associated pain and improvement of sensory and motor function. Understanding peripheral nerve anatomy is critical to adopting novel nerve transfer procedures, which may provide superior options for a variety of injury patterns. PMID:21532404

  8. SHOULDER STRENGTH PROFILES IN CHILDREN WITH AND WITHOUT BRACHIAL PLEXUS PALSY

    PubMed Central

    BROCHARD, SYLVAIN; ALTER, KATHARINE; DAMIANO, DIANE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We characterized bilateral shoulder strength and the balance of antagonist/agonist muscle pairs in children with brachial plexus palsy (BPP) and with typical development (TD). Methods In 15 children with unilateral BPP and 11 with TD, bilateral maximal isometric shoulder strength in flexion/extension, internal/external rotation, and abduction/adduction was recorded using a hand-held dynamometer. Correlation between strength and active range of motion were evaluated using the Mallet score. Results Children with BPP had strength asymmetry in all muscles, whereas children with TD had significant strength asymmetry for flexors and abductors. In children with BPP, extensors and external rotators were the weakest muscles, leading to sagittal and transverse plane muscle imbalances. Higher strength values were related to better active range of motion. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of documenting shoulder strength profiles in children with BPP which may help predict deformity development. PMID:24307245

  9. Borderline ankle-brachial index is associated with increased prevalence of micro- and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional analysis of 12,772 patients from the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation Program.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bryan P; Zhang, Yuying; Kong, Alice P S; Luk, Andrea O Y; Ozaki, Risa; Yeung, Roseanne; Tong, Peter C Y; Chan, Wing Ban; Tsang, Chiu-Chi; Lau, Kam-Piu; Cheung, Yu; Wolthers, Troels; Lyubomirsky, Greg; So, Wing-Yee; Ma, Ronald C W; Chow, Francis C C; Chan, Juliana C N

    2015-09-01

    Borderline ankle-brachial index is increasingly recognised as a marker of cardiovascular risk. We evaluated the impact of borderline ankle-brachial index in 12,772 Chinese type 2 diabetes patients from the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation Program between 2007 and 2012. Cardiovascular risk factors, complications and health-related quality of life were compared between patients with normal ankle-brachial index (1.0-1.4), borderline ankle-brachial index (0.90-0.99) and peripheral arterial disease (ankle-brachial index?brachial index was 4.6% and 9.6%, respectively. Borderline ankle-brachial index patients were older, more likely to be smokers and hypertensive, had longer duration of diabetes, poorer kidney function and poorer health-related quality of life than patients with normal ankle-brachial index. After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, borderline ankle-brachial index was an independent predictor of diabetes-related micro- and macrovascular complications including retinopathy (odd ratios: 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.37)), macroalbuminuria (1.31 (1.10-1.56)), chronic kidney disease (1.22 (1.00-1.50)) and stroke (1.31 (1.05-1.64)). These findings suggest that patients with diabetes and borderline ankle-brachial index are at increased cardiovascular risk and may benefit from more intensive management. PMID:26141965

  10. Extended Long-Term (5 Years) Outcomes of Triangle Tilt Surgery in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the "extended" long-term (5 years) functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients, who underwent triangle tilt surgery between February 2005 and January 2008. Methods: Twenty two children (9 girls and 13 boys, mean age at surgery was 5.8 years; ranging 2.1-11.8 years old), who initially presented with medial rotation contracture and scapula deformity secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included in this study. Functional movements were evaluated pre-operatively, and 5 years following triangle tilt surgery by modified Mallet scale. Results: Here, we report long-term (5 years) follow-up of triangle tilt surgery for 22 OBPI patients. Upper extremity functional movements such as, external rotation (2.5±0.6 to 4.1±0.8, p<0.0001), hand-to-spine (2.6±0.6 to 3.4±1.1, p<0.005), hand-to-neck (2.7±0.7 to 4.3±0.7, p<0.0001), hand-to-mouth (2.3±0.9 (92º±33) to 4.2±0.5 (21º±16), p<0.0001), and supination (2.6±1.1 (-8.2º ±51) to 4.1±0.7 (61±32)) were significantly improved (p<0.0001), and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years). Total modified Mallet functional score was also shown to improve from 14.1±2.7 to 20.3±2.5. Conclusions: The triangle tilt surgery improved all shoulder functions significantly, and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years) in these patients. PMID:23730369

  11. Comparison of two approaches of infraclavicular brachial plexus block for orthopaedic surgery below mid-humerus

    PubMed Central

    Trehan, Vikas; Srivastava, Uma; Kumar, Aditya; Saxena, Surekha; Singh, Chandra Sekar; Darolia, Ankit

    2010-01-01

    The brachial plexus in infraclavicular region can be blocked by various approaches. Aim of this study was to compare two approaches (coracoid and clavicular) regarding success rate, discomfort during performance of block, tourniquet tolerance and complications. The study was randomised, prospective and observer blinded. Sixty adult patients of both sexes of ASA status 1 and 2 requiring orthopaedic surgery below mid-humerus were randomly assigned to receive nerve stimulator guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block either by lateral coracoid approach (group L, n = 30) or medial clavicular approach (group M, n = 30) with 25–30 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Sensory block in the distribution of five main nerves distal to elbow, motor block (Grade 1–4), discomfort during performance of block and tourniquet pain were recorded by a blinded observer. Clinical success of block was defined as the block sufficient to perform the surgery without any supplementation. All the five nerves distal to elbow were blocked in 77 and 67% patients in groups L and M respectively. Successful block was observed in 87 and 73% patients in groups L and M, respectively (P > 0.05). More patients had moderate to severe discomfort during performance of block due to positioning of limb in group M (14 vs. 8 in groups M and L). Tourniquet was well tolerated in most patients with successful block in both groups. No serious complication was observed. Both the approaches were equivalent regarding success rate, tourniquet tolerance and safety. Coracoid approach seemed better as positioning of operative limb was less painful, coracoids process was easy to locate and the technique was easy to learn and master. PMID:20885866

  12. Association of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity with cardiovascular risk factors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tso, T K; Huang, W N; Huang, H Y; Chang, C K

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with premature atherosclerosis. Increasing arterial stiffness is closely associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, and pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered to be an indicator of arterial stiffness. The objective of this study was to identify the relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with SLE. Age, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting blood glucose (FBS), plasma lipid profile, plasma homocysteine, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), baPWV, ankle-brachial index (ABI), and SLE-related factors were determined in a total of 83 SLE patients (12 males and 71 females). All SLE patients were further classified into two subgroups according to baPWV value (baPWV < 1400 cm/s, n=37 versus baPWV > 1400 cm/s, n=46). The mean baPWV value of studied SLE patients was 1520 +/- 381 cm/s. Age, BMI, SBP, DBP, FBS, TBARS and homocysteine levels were significantly higher in SLE patients with baPWV value > 1400cm/s than in SLE patients with baPWV value < 1400cm/s. In addition, baPWV correlated significantly with age, SBP, DBP, FBS and homocysteine. Moreover, stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that age and SBP were independently associated with baPWV. The results of this study indicate a possible link between vascular stiffness measured by baPWV and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with SLE. PMID:16335579

  13. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. “Sniff” test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  14. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. "Sniff" test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  15. Brachial artery vasomotion and transducer pressure effect on measurements by active contour segmentation on ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Theodore W.; Sultan, Laith R.; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Reamer, Courtney B.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To use feed-forward active contours (snakes) to track and measure brachial artery vasomotion on ultrasound images recorded in both transverse and longitudinal views; and to compare the algorithm's performance in each view. Methods: Longitudinal and transverse view ultrasound image sequences of 45 brachial arteries were segmented by feed-forward active contour (FFAC). The segmented regions were used to measure vasomotion artery diameter, cross-sectional area, and distention both as peak-to-peak diameter and as area. ECG waveforms were also simultaneously extracted frame-by-frame by thresholding a running finite-difference image between consecutive images. The arterial and ECG waveforms were compared as they traced each phase of the cardiac cycle. Results: FFAC successfully segmented arteries in longitudinal and transverse views in all 45 cases. The automated analysis took significantly less time than manual tracing, but produced superior, well-behaved arterial waveforms. Automated arterial measurements also had lower interobserver variability as measured by correlation, difference in mean values, and coefficient of variation. Although FFAC successfully segmented both the longitudinal and transverse images, transverse measurements were less variable. The cross-sectional area computed from the longitudinal images was 27% lower than the area measured from transverse images, possibly due to the compression of the artery along the image depth by transducer pressure. Conclusions: FFAC is a robust and sensitive vasomotion segmentation algorithm in both transverse and longitudinal views. Transverse imaging may offer advantages over longitudinal imaging: transverse measurements are more consistent, possibly because the method is less sensitive to variations in transducer pressure during imaging.

  16. Characterizing Methods of Measuring Flow-Mediated Dilation in the Brachial Artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callender, Ariane R.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of vascular tone is one of the many important functions of the vascular endothelium. Endothelial dysfunction is a critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and occurs in the absence of angiographic disease. Flow-Mediated Dilation (FMD) is a noninvasive technique commonly used to evaluate endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans and gauge the health of the cardiovascular system. Reductions in brachial artery FMD have been strongly correlated with disease progression and are predictive of future cardiac events. The flow stimulus for brachial artery FMD occurs as a result of the increased shear stress following deflation of an occlusion cuff around the upper arm. Using 2-dimensional ultrasound, changes in arterial diameter up to 5-minutes following cuff deflation are calculated from baseline image measurements. Along with pulsed Doppler measures of flow velocity through the artery, flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation can be assessed. There is debate among investigators, however, about the proper positioning of the occlusion cuff during FMD testing. It is thought that placement of the cuff around the upper arm may not accurately reflect the impact of nitric oxide, a critically important molecule released as a result of the increased shear stress created by the FMD technique. Data suggest that the production of other endogenous metabolites may also contribute to FMD-related changes when positioning the cuff around the upper arm. To overcome the potential influence of such molecules, researchers now suggest that the occlusion cuff be placed below the elbow allowing a more precise estimate of nitric oxide mediated dilation. The purpose of this study is to compare the differences in FMD between the two methodologies of occlusion cuff placement. In addition, this study will determine the method that is easier for ultrasound technicians to perform and will produce a low coefficient of variance between technicians. Ultimately, the results of this study will help in tracking any adverse cardiovascular effects of spaceflight.

  17. X-Band Rapid-Scan Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Radiation-Induced Defects in Tooth Enamel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhelin; Romanyukha, Alexander; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2015-08-01

    X-band rapid-scan electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra from tooth enamel samples irradiated with doses of 0.5, 1 and 10 Gy had substantially improved signal-to-noise relative to conventional continuous wave EPR. The radiation-induced signal in a 60 mg of a tooth enamel sample irradiated with a 0.5 Gy dose was readily characterized in spectra recorded with 34 min data acquisition times. The coefficient of variance of the calculated dose for a 1 Gy irradiated sample, based on simulation of the first-derivative spectra for three replicates as the sum of native and radiation-induced signals, was 3.9% for continuous wave and 0.4% for rapid scan. PMID:26207683

  18. EPR investigation of thermal decay of radiation-induced species of benzoic acid and its sodium and potassium salts.

    PubMed

    Tuner, Hasan; Kay?kç?, Mehmet Ali

    2015-05-01

    The structural and kinetic features of the radiation-induced radicals of benzoic acid and its sodium and potassium salts were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Two main different radicals were found to be responsible for the measured spectra of the irradiated samples. It is concluded that these two radicals have a structure similar to that of cyclohexadienyl-type (CHD) and benzyl-type (BNZ) radicals. The relative contributions of the CHD and BNZ radicals to the measured peak-to-peak amplitude and to the total spectra were calculated. The room-temperature stability of the EPR signals and the decay kinetic features of the radiation-induced radicals derived from annealing at high temperatures were determined. PMID:25744174

  19. [Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells]. Progress report, [April 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The excision of radiation-induced lesions in DNA by a DNA repair enzyme complex, namely the UvrABC nuclease complex, has been investigated. Irradiated DNA was treated with the enzyme complex. DNA fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. The results showed that a number pyrimidine- and purine-derived lesions in DNA were excised by the UvrABC nuclease complex and that the enzyme complex does not act on radiation-induced DNA lesions as a glycosylase. This means that it does not excise individual base products, but it excises oligomers containing these lesions. A number of pyrimidine-derived lesions that were no substrates for other DNA repair enzymes investigated in our laboratory were substrates for the UvrABC nuclease complex.

  20. Evolution of the linear-polarization-angle-dependence of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations with microwave power

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2014-11-10

    We examine the role of the microwave power in the linear polarization angle dependence of the microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system. The diagonal resistance R{sub xx} was measured at the fixed magnetic fields of the photo-excited oscillatory extrema of R{sub xx} as a function of both the microwave power, P, and the linear polarization angle, ?. Color contour plots of such measurements demonstrate the evolution of the lineshape of R{sub xx} versus ? with increasing microwave power. We report that the non-linear power dependence of the amplitude of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations distorts the cosine-square relation between R{sub xx} and ? at high power.

  1. Radiation-induced material changes and susceptibility to intergranular failure of light-water-reactor core internals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruemmer, S. M.; Simonen, E. P.; Scott, P. M.; Andresen, P. L.; Was, G. S.; Nelson, J. L.

    Current understanding of radiation-induced material changes that occur in light-water-reactor (LWR) core components is critically reviewed and linked to intergranular failure processes. Although the basic science of radiation damage processes in metals is reasonably well established, accurate prediction of microstructures, microchemistries and mechanical property changes in complex stainless alloys during irradiation at LWR temperatures is not possible at present. Mechanistic understanding of these radiation-induced changes in commercial alloys is considered to be of paramount importance for the mitigation of the intergranular environmental cracking that occurs in service. Fundamental research is needed to define defect-solute interactions and microstructural evolution at intermediate temperatures and dose rates pertinent to LWRs where transient effects often dominate behavior. In addition, it is essential that radiation effects on matrix microstructure and microchemistry and grain boundary microchemistry be understood. Finally, a stronger emphasis on accurately quantifying radiation effects on environmental cracking mechanisms and kinetics is needed.

  2. Radiation-Induced Cranial Nerve Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients After Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Lin; Lu, Jiade J.; Liss, Adam L.; Hu Chaosu; Guo Xiaomao; Wu Yongru; Zhang Youwang

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To address the characteristics and the causative factors of radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy (CNP) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with an extensive period of followed-up. Patients and Methods: A total of 317 consecutive and nonselected patients treated with definitive external-beam radiotherapy between November 1962 and February 1995 participated in this study. The median doses to the nasopharynx and upper neck were 71 Gy (range, 55-86 Gy) and 61 Gy (range, 34-72 Gy), respectively. Conventional fractionation was used in 287 patients (90.5%). Forty-five patients (14.2%) received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was 11.4 years (range, 5.1-38.0 years). Ninety-eight patients (30.9%) developed CNP, with a median latent period of 7.6 years (range, 0.3-34 years). Patients had a higher rate of CNP (81 cases, 25.5%) in lower-group cranial nerves compared with upper group (44 cases, 13.9%) ({chi}{sup 2} = 34.444, p < 0.001). Fifty-nine cases experienced CNP in more than one cranial nerve. Twenty-two of 27 cases (68.8%) of intragroup CNP and 11 of 32 cases (40.7%) of intergroup CNP occurred synchronously ({chi}{sup 2} = 4.661, p = 0.031). The cumulative incidences of CNP were 10.4%, 22.4%, 35.5%, and 44.5% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that CNP at diagnosis, chemotherapy, total radiation dose to the nasopharynx, and upper neck fibrosis were independent risk factors for developing radiation-induced CNP. Conclusion: Radiation-induced fibrosis may play an important role in radiation-induced CNP. The incidence of CNP after definitive radiotherapy for NPC remains high after long-term follow-up and is dose and fractionation dependent.

  3. Analysis of Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihisa Sato, Shuhei; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yoshida, Atsushi; Morito, Tsuneharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Mizuta, Akifumi; Waki, Takahiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 702 women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery at seven institutions between July 1995 and December 2006 were analyzed. In all patients, the whole breast was irradiated with two tangential photon beams. The criteria used for the diagnosis of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome were as follows: (1) radiotherapy to the breast within 12 months, (2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for {>=}2 weeks, (3) radiographs showing lung infiltration outside the radiation port, and (4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results: Radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was seen in 16 patients (2.3%). Eleven patients (68.8%) were administered steroids. The duration of steroid administration ranged from 1 week to 3.7 years (median, 1.1 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ({>=}50 years; odds ratio [OR] 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-67.76; p = 0.04) and concurrent endocrine therapy (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.09-8.54; p = 0.03) were significantly associated with BOOP syndrome. Of the 161 patients whose age was {>=}50 years and who received concurrent endocrine therapy, 10 (6.2%) developed BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Age ({>=}50 years) and concurrent endocrine therapy can promote the development of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Physicians should carefully follow patients who received breast-conserving therapy, especially those who are older than 50 years and received concurrent endocrine therapy during radiotherapy.

  4. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the breast in a female adolescent. Case report with histologic and therapeutic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, R.; Bianchi, A.; Jakate, S.M.

    1988-06-15

    A 14-year-old girl developed a radiation-induced sarcoma of the left breast after successful combined surgical and radiation therapy of a left adrenal carcinoma when she was 9 months old. The breast lesion was histologically described as a stromal sarcoma with fibrosarcomatous and myxosarcomatous areas. The second primary lesion and local recurrence of this was treated with surgery. At each recurrence the tumor became more aggressive both clinically and histologically, and eventually proved fatal.

  5. Radiation-induced lung injury and inflammation in mice: role of inducible nitric oxide synthase and surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Rama; Gow, Andrew J; Francis, Mary; Abramova, Elena V; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2015-03-01

    Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated after exposure to radiation have been implicated in lung injury. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a pulmonary collectin that suppresses inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-mediated RNS production. Herein, we analyzed the role of iNOS and SP-D in radiation-induced lung injury. Exposure of wild-type (WT) mice to ?-radiation (8 Gy) caused acute lung injury and inflammation, as measured by increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and cell content at 24?h. Radiation also caused alterations in SP-D structure at 24 h and 4 weeks post exposure. These responses were blunted in iNOS(-/-) mice. Conversely, loss of iNOS had no effect on radiation-induced expression of phospho-H2A.X or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?. Additionally, at 24 h post radiation, cyclooxygenase expression and BAL lipocalin-2 levels were increased in iNOS(-/-) mice, and heme oxygenase (HO)-1(+) and Ym1(+) macrophages were evident. Loss of SP-D resulted in increased numbers of enlarged HO-1(+) macrophages in the lung following radiation, along with upregulation of TNF-?, CCL2, and CXCL2, whereas expression of phospho-H2A.X was diminished. To determine if RNS play a role in the altered sensitivity of SP-D(-/-) mice to radiation, iNOS(-/-)/SP-D(-/-) mice were used. Radiation-induced injury, oxidative stress, and tissue repair were generally similar in iNOS(-/-)/SP-D(-/-) and SP-D(-/-) mice. In contrast, TNF-?, CCL2, and CXCL2 expression was attenuated. These data indicate that although iNOS is involved in radiation-induced injury and altered SP-D structure, in the absence of SP-D, it functions to promote proinflammatory signaling. Thus, multiple inflammatory pathways contribute to the pathogenic response to radiation. PMID:25552309

  6. Transgenerational inheritance of enhanced susceptibility to radiation-induced medulloblastoma in newborn Ptch1+/- mice after paternal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Paris, Lorena; Giardullo, Paola; Leonardi, Simona; Tanno, Barbara; Meschini, Roberta; Cordelli, Eugenia; Benassi, Barbara; Longobardi, Maria Grazia; Izzotti, Alberto; Pulliero, Alessandra; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    The hypothesis of transgenerational induction of increased cancer susceptibility after paternal radiation exposure has long been controversial because of inconsistent results and the lack of a mechanistic interpretation. Here, exploiting Ptch1 heterozygous knockout mice, susceptible to spontaneous and radiation-induced medulloblastoma, we show that exposure of paternal germ cells to 1 Gy X-rays, at the spermatogonial stage, increased by a considerable 1.4-fold the offspring susceptibility to medulloblastoma induced by neonatal irradiation. This effect gained further biological significance thanks to a number of supporting data on the immunohistochemical characterization of the target tissue and preneoplastic lesions (PNLs). These results altogether pointed to increased proliferation of cerebellar granule cell precursors and PNLs cells, which favoured the development of frank tumours. The LOH analysis of tumor DNA showed Ptch1 biallelic loss in all tumor samples, suggesting that mechanisms other than interstitial deletions, typical of radiation-induced medulloblastoma, did not account for the observed increased cancer risk. This data was supported by comet analysis showing no differences in DNA damage induction and repair in cerebellar cells as a function of paternal irradiation. Finally, we provide biological plausibility to our results offering evidence of a possible epigenetic mechanism of inheritance based on radiation-induced changes of the microRNA profile of paternal sperm. PMID:26452034

  7. Lack of evidence for low-LET radiation induced bystander response in normal human fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marianne B. Sowa; Wilfried Goetz; Janet E. Baulch; Dinah N. Pyles; Jaroslaw Dziegielewski; Susannah Yovino; Andrew R. Snyder; Sonia M. de Toledo; Edouard I. Azzam; William F. Morgan

    2008-06-30

    Purpose: To investigate radiation induced bystander responses and to determine the role of gap junction intercellular communication and the radiation environment in propagating this response. Materials and Methods: We use medium transfer and targeted irradiation to examine radiation induced bystander effects in primary human fibroblast (AG1522) and human colon carcinoma (RKO36) cells. We examined the effect of variables such as gap junction intercellular communication, linear energy transfer (LET), and the role of the radiation environment in non-targeted responses. Endpoints included clonogenic survival, micronucleus formation and foci formation at histone 2AX over doses ranging from 10 to 100 cGy. Results: The results show no evidence of a low-LET radiation induced bystander response for the endpoints of clonogenic survival and induction of DNA damage. Nor do we see evidence of a high-LET, Fe ion radiation (1 GeV/n) induced bystander effect. However, direct comparison for 3.2 MeV α-particle exposures showed a statistically significant medium transfer bystander effect for this high-LET radiation. Conclusions: From our results, it is evident that there are many confounding factors influencing bystander responses as reported in the literature. Our observations reflect the inherent variability in biological systems and the difficulties in extrapolating from in vitro models to radiation risks in humans.

  8. A Combination of Pre- and Post-Exposure Ascorbic Acid Rescues Mice from Radiation-Induced Lethal Gastrointestinal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yasutoshi; Kinoshita, Manabu; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Sato, Tomohito; Obara, Takeyuki; Saitoh, Daizoh; Seki, Shuhji; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2013-01-01

    The development of an effective therapy for radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage is important, because it is currently a major complication of treatment and there are few effective therapies available. Although we have recently demonstrated that pretreatment with ascorbic acid attenuates lethal gastrointestinal damage in irradiated mice, more than half of mice eventually died, thus indicating that better approach was needed. We then investigated a more effective therapy for radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage. Mice receiving abdominal radiation at 13 Gy were orally administered ascorbic acid (250 mg/kg/day) for three days before radiation (pretreatment), one shot of engulfment (250 mg/kg) at 8 h before radiation, or were administered the agent for seven days after radiation (post-treatment). None of the control mice survived the abdominal radiation at 13 Gy due to severe gastrointestinal damage (without bone marrow damage). Neither pretreatment with ascorbic acid (20% survival), engulfment (20%), nor post-treatment (0%) was effective in irradiated mice. However, combination therapy using ascorbic acid, including pretreatment, engulfment and post-treatment, rescued all of the mice from lethal abdominal radiation, and was accompanied by remarkable improvements in the gastrointestinal damage (100% survival). Omitting post-treatment from the combination therapy with ascorbic acid markedly reduced the mouse survival (20% survival), suggesting the importance of post-treatment with ascorbic acid. Combination therapy with ascorbic acid may be a potent therapeutic tool for radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage. PMID:24084715

  9. Curcumin Sensitizes Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells to Radiation via Suppression of Radiation-Induced NF-?B Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fei-Ting; Liu, Yu-Chang; Liu, Tsu-Te; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The effects and possible underlying mechanism of curcumin combined with radiation in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells in vitro were evaluated. The effects of curcumin, radiation, and combination of both on cell viability, apoptosis, NF-?B activation, and expressions of NF-?B downstream effector proteins were investigated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), NF-?B reporter gene, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA), and Western blot assays in Huh7-NF-?B-luc2, Hep3B, and HepG2 cells. Effect of I kappa B alpha mutant (I?B?M) vector, a specific inhibitor of NF-?B activation, on radiation-induced loss of MMP was also evaluated. Results show that curcumin not only significantly enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity and depletion of MMP but inhibits radiation-induced NF-?B activity and expressions of NF-?B downstream proteins in HCC cells. I?B?M vector also shows similar effects. In conclusion, we suggest that curcumin augments anticancer effects of radiation via the suppression of NF-?B activation. PMID:26539482

  10. Resistance to radiation-induced apoptosis in Bcl-2-expressing cells is reversed by depleting cellular thiols.

    PubMed

    Mirkovic, N; Voehringer, D W; Story, M D; McConkey, D J; McDonnell, T J; Meyn, R E

    1997-09-18

    The mechanism by which Bcl-2 oncogene expression inhibits radiation-induced apoptosis has been investigated in two mouse lymphoma cell lines: line LY-as is radiation sensitive, displays substantial radiaton-induced apoptosis, and expresses low levels of Bcl-2; line LY-ar is radiation-resistant, displays a low apoptosis propensity, and expresses 30-fold higher amount of Bcl-2 protein than does the sensitive line. We observed that upon incubation in cystine/methionine-free (C/M-) medium, radiation-induced apoptosis in the LY-ar cells was restored to levels comparable to that seen in the LY-as cells. lntracellular glutathione (GSH) concentrations in LY-ar cells incubated in C/M- medium plummeted to 50% of control values within 2 h. LY-ar cells treated with diethyl maleate (DEM) or diamide, agents that deplete cellular thiols, had increased susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis in a manner similar to C/M- medium. These results are consistent with the general idea that Bcl-2 expression blocks apoptosis through an antioxidant pathway that involves cellular thiols. That Bcl-2-expressing tumor cells can be sensitized by exogeneous agents that modify cellular thiols offers strategies for overcoming such resistance. PMID:9333022

  11. Radiation-induced photoluminescence enhancement of Bi/Al-codoped silica optical fibers via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianxiang; Liu, Wenjun; Dong, Yanhua; Luo, Yanhua; Peng, Gang-Ding; Chen, Na; Pang, Fufei; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2015-11-01

    The radiation-induced photoluminescence (PL) properties of Bi/Al-codoped silica optical fibers were investigated. The Bi/Al-related materials were doped into fiber core via atomic layer deposition. The pristine fiber samples were irradiated with different doses, and its absorption and PL properties were studied. A new absorption peak appeared at approximately 580 nm, and the intensity of absorption peaks is increased with the increasing of radiation doses. When the fiber samples were excited with a 532 nm pump, the intensity of the near infrared fluorescence decreased lightly. However, when the fiber samples were excited with a 980 nm pump the intensity of the fluorescence increased significantly with the increase of radiation doses (0-2.0 kGy). The intensity of fluorescence decreased when the radiation doses were increased up to 3.0 kGy. furthermore, the fluorescence intensity of the 1410 nm band increased much more than that the 1150 nm band. In addition, the microstructural characteristics of the Bi/Al-codoped silica optical fibers were analyzed using electron spin resonance (ESR). Many radiation-induced defect centers were present, and the intensity of the ESR signals also increased with the increase of radiation doses. The photoluminescence properties and microstructural characteristics were related in the radiated Bi-related silica optical fibers. A possible underlying mechanism for the radiation-induced photoluminescence enhancement process in the Bi/Al-doped silica fiber is discussed. PMID:26561169

  12. State-dependent interaction in the antihistamine-induced disruption of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1982-06-01

    Two experiments were run to evaluate the possibility that injection of antihistamine can produce a state-dependent acquisition of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion. In the first experiment, pretreating rats with the antihistamine chlorpheniramine maleate prior to their initial exposure to sucrose and to low-level irradiation on the conditioning day did not prevent the acquisition of a taste aversion to sucrose when the antihistamine was also administered prior to a subsequent preference test. In the second experiment, rats were both conditioned and tested for a radiation-induced aversion in a drug-free state. Under these condtions, the rats continued to show an aversion to sucrose despite pretreating them with chlorpheniramine prior to irradiation. Since rats conditioned under the antihistamine do not show the radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion when tested for sucrose preference in a nondrug state, it would seem that pretreating rats with an antihistamine prior to conditioning affects only the retrieval of the previously learned response and not its acquisition.

  13. Fucodiphlorethol G Purified from Ecklonia cava Suppresses Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress and Cellular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Cheon; Piao, Mei Jing; Zheng, Jian; Yao, Cheng Wen; Cha, Ji Won; Kumara, Madduma Hewage Susara Ruwan; Han, Xia; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-01-01

    Fucodiphlorethol G (6’-[2,4-dihydroxy-6-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenoxy)phenoxy]biphenyl-2,2’,4,4’,6-pentol) is a compound purified from Ecklonia cava, a brown alga that is widely distributed offshore of Jeju Island. This study investigated the protective effects of fucodiphlorethol G against oxidative damage-mediated apoptosis induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. Fucodiphlorethol G attenuated the generation of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals and intracellular reactive oxygen species in response to UVB irradiation. Fucodiphlorethol G suppressed the inhibition of human keratinocyte growth by UVB irradiation. Additionally, the wavelength of light absorbed by fucodiphlorethol G was close to the UVB spectrum. Fucodiphlorethol G reduced UVB radiation-induced 8-isoprostane generation and DNA fragmentation in human keratinocytes. Moreover, fucodiphlorethol G reduced UVB radiation-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, generation of apoptotic cells, and active caspase-9 expression. Taken together, fucodiphlorethol G protected human keratinocytes against UVB radiation-induced cell damage and apoptosis by absorbing UVB radiation and scavenging reactive oxygen species. PMID:25143808

  14. Fucodiphlorethol G Purified from Ecklonia cava Suppresses Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress and Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Cheon; Piao, Mei Jing; Zheng, Jian; Yao, Cheng Wen; Cha, Ji Won; Kumara, Madduma Hewage Susara Ruwan; Han, Xia; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-07-01

    Fucodiphlorethol G (6'-[2,4-dihydroxy-6-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenoxy)phenoxy]biphenyl-2,2',4,4',6-pentol) is a compound purified from Ecklonia cava, a brown alga that is widely distributed offshore of Jeju Island. This study investigated the protective effects of fucodiphlorethol G against oxidative damage-mediated apoptosis induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. Fucodiphlorethol G attenuated the generation of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals and intracellular reactive oxygen species in response to UVB irradiation. Fucodiphlorethol G suppressed the inhibition of human keratinocyte growth by UVB irradiation. Additionally, the wavelength of light absorbed by fucodiphlorethol G was close to the UVB spectrum. Fucodiphlorethol G reduced UVB radiation-induced 8-isoprostane generation and DNA fragmentation in human keratinocytes. Moreover, fucodiphlorethol G reduced UVB radiation-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, generation of apoptotic cells, and active caspase-9 expression. Taken together, fucodiphlorethol G protected human keratinocytes against UVB radiation-induced cell damage and apoptosis by absorbing UVB radiation and scavenging reactive oxygen species. PMID:25143808

  15. Beclin 1 and UVRAG Confer Protection from Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Maintain Centrosome Stability in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shengbing; Okamoto, Koichi; Sinicrope, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Beclin 1 interacts with UV-irradiation-resistance-associated gene (UVRAG) to form core complexes that induce autophagy. While cells with defective autophagy are prone to genomic instability that contributes to tumorigenesis, it is unknown whether Beclin1 or UVRAG can regulate the DNA damage/repair response to cancer treatment in established tumor cells. We found that siRNA knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG can increase radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), shown by pATM and ?H2Ax, and promote colorectal cancer cell death. Furthermore, knockdown of Beclin 1, UVRAG or ATG5 increased the percentage of irradiated cells with nuclear foci expressing 53BP1, a marker of nonhomologous end joining but not RAD51 (homologous recombination), compared to control siRNA. Beclin 1 siRNA was shown to attenuate UVRAG expression. Cells with a UVRAG deletion mutant defective in Beclin 1 binding showed increased radiation-induced DSBs and cell death compared to cells with ectopic wild-type UVRAG. Knockdown of Beclin 1 or UVRAG, but not ATG5, resulted in a significant increase in centrosome number (?-tubulin staining) in irradiated cells compared to control siRNA. Taken together, these data indicate that Beclin 1 and UVRAG confer protection against radiation-induced DNA DSBs and may maintain centrosome stability in established tumor cells. PMID:24956373

  16. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Dermatitis by Activation of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Using Topical Alda-1 in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Shoucheng; Budas, Grant R.; Churchill, Eric N.; Chen, Che-Hong; Knox, Susan J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2012-01-01

    Ning, S., Budas, G. R., Churchill, E. N., Chen, C., Knox, S. J. and Mochly-Rosen, D. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Dermatitis by Activation of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Using Topical Alda-1 in Mice. Radiation-induced dermatitis is a debilitating clinical problem in cancer patients undergoing cancer radiation therapy. It is also a possible outcome of exposure to high levels of radiation due to accident or hostile activity. We report that activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) enzymatic activity using the allosteric agonist, Alda-1, significantly reduced 4-hydroxynonenal adducts accumulation, delayed the onset of radiation dermatitis and substantially reduced symptoms in a clinically-relevant model of radiation-induced dermatitis. Importantly, Alda-1 did not radioprotect tumors in mice. Rather, it increased the sensitivity of the tumors to radiation therapy. This is the first report of reactive aldehydes playing a role in the intrinsic radiosensitivity of normal and tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that ALDH2 represents a novel target for the treatment of radiation dermatitis without reducing the benefit of radiotherapy. PMID:22404739

  17. Genetic dissection of susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis of thymocytes and mapping of Rapop1, a novel susceptibility gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Nobuko; Okumoto, Masaaki; Esaki, Kozaburo

    1995-02-10

    Genetic dissection of susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis of thymocytes was performed by counting dead cells in histologically processed thymuses after 0.5 Gy of whole-body X-irradiation, using recombinant congenic (CcS/Dem) strains derived from inbred mouse strains BALB/cHeA (susceptible) and STS/A (resistant). A high (8/20) number of strains with lower dead cell scores than BALB/cHeA among CcS/Dem recombinant congenic strains (RCS), which contain 12.5% of STS/A genome in the genetic background of BALB/cHeA strain, indicates that the difference between BALB/cHeA and STS/A is caused by several genes and that susceptibility probably requires BALB/ cHeA alleles at more than one locus. Similar results were obtained with CXS/Hg recombinant inbred (CXS/ Hg) strains. Analysis of F{sub 2} hybrids between BALB/ cHeA and CcS-7, one of the CcS/Dem strains that showed lower dead cell scores than BALB/cHeA, demonstrated that a novel gene (Rapop1, radiation-induced apoptosis 1) controlling susceptibility to radiation-induced apoptosis in the thymus is located in the proximal region of mouse chromosome 16. 40 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Favorable Outcomes of Pediatric Patients Treated With Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System Who Develop Radiation-Induced Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Thomas J.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Amdur, Robert J.; Swanson, Erika L.; Morris, Christopher G.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the outcome of patients treated at the University of Florida who developed meningiomas after radiation to the central nervous system (CNS) for childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 10 patients aged {<=}19 years who received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a meningioma. We report the histology of the radiation-induced meningioma, treatment received, and ultimate outcome among this cohort of patients. Results: Meningioma was diagnosed at a median of 23.5 years after completion of the primary radiation. Fifty percent of second meningiomas were World Health Organization Grade 2 (atypical) or higher. All cases were managed with a single modality: resection alone (n = 7), fractionated radiotherapy (n = 2), and stereotactic radiosurgery (n = 1). The actuarial event-free survival and overall survival rate at 5 years after treatment for a radiation-induced meningioma was 89%. Three patients who underwent resection for retreatment experienced a Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: Radiation-induced meningiomas after treatment of pediatric CNS tumors are effectively managed with single-modality therapy. Such late-effect data inform the overall therapeutic ratio and support the continued role of selective irradiation in managing pediatric CNS malignancies.

  19. Tangeretin enhances radiosensitivity and inhibits the radiation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xukui; Zheng, Luming; Sun, Yinggang; Wang, Tianxiao; Wang, Baocheng

    2015-07-01

    Irradiation has been reported to increase radioresistance and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in gastric cancer (GC) cells. The Notch pathway is critically implicated in cancer EMT and radioresistance. In the present study, we investigated the use of a Notch-1 inhibiting compound as a novel therapeutic candidate to regulate radiation-induced EMT in GC cells. According to previous screening, tangeretin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid from citrus fruits was selected as a Notch-1 inhibitor. Tangeretin enhanced the radiosensitivity of GC cells as demonstrated by MTT and colony formation assays. Tangeretin also attenuated radiation-induced EMT, invasion and migration in GC cells, accompanied by a decrease in Notch-1, Jagged1/2, Hey-1 and Hes-1 expressions. Tangeretin triggered the upregulation of miR-410, a tumor-suppressive microRNA. Furthermore, re-expression of miR-410 prevented radiation-induced EMT and cell invasion. An in vivo tumor xenograft model confirmed the antimetastasis effect of tangeretin as we observed in vitro. In nude mice, tumor size was considerably diminished by radiation plus tangeretin co-treatment. Tangeretin almost completely inhibited lung metastasis induced by irradiation. Tangeretin may be a novel antimetastatic agent for radiotherapy. PMID:25998143

  20. Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G.; Zheng, Junying; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

  1. Protective effect of inhalation of hydrogen gas on radiation-induced dermatitis and skin injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Sadahiro; Fujita, Masanori; Ishihara, Masayuki; Tachibana, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Kaji, Tatsumi; Kawauchi, Toshio; Kanatani, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of inhalation of hydrogen-containing gas (1.3% hydrogen + 20.8% oxygen + 77.9% nitrogen) (HCG) on radiation-induced dermatitis and on the healing of healing-impaired skin wounds in rats was examined using a rat model of radiation-induced skin injury. An X-ray dose of 20 Gy was irradiated onto the lower part of the back through two holes in a lead shield. Irradiation was performed before or after inhalation of HCG for 2 h. Inhalation of HCG significantly reduced the severity of radiodermatitis and accelerated healing-impaired wound repair. Staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and 8-hydroxy-2?-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) showed that the proportion of apoptotic keratinocytes and the level of staining in the X-irradiated skin of rats that pre-inhaled HCG were significantly lower than that of rats which did not pre-inhale HCG. Cutaneous full-thickness wounds were then created in the X-irradiated area to examine the time-course of wound healing. X-irradiation significantly increased the time required for wound healing, but the inhalation of HCG prior to the irradiation significantly decreased the delay in wound healing compared with the control and post-inhalation of HCG groups. Therefore, radiation-induced skin injury can potentially be alleviated by the pre-inhalation of HCG. PMID:25034733

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy improves nerve regeneration in a model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Holzbach, Thomas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Schlegel, Jürgen; Giunta, Riccardo E

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy has been limited to conservative therapies and surgical reconstruction of peripheral nerves. In addition to the damage of the brachial plexus itself, it also leads to a loss of the corresponding motoneurons in the spinal cord, which raises the need for supportive strategies that take the participation of the central nervous system into account. Based on the protective and regenerative effects of VEGF on neural tissue, our aim was to analyse the effect on nerve regeneration by adenoviral gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in postpartum nerve injury of the brachial plexus in rats. In the present study, we induced a selective crush injury to the left spinal roots C5 and C6 in 18 rats within 24 hours after birth and examined the effect of VEGF-gene therapy on nerve regeneration. For gene transduction an adenoviral vector encoding for VEGF165 (AdCMV.VEGF165) was used. In a period of 11 weeks, starting 3 weeks post-operatively, functional regeneration was assessed weekly by behavioural analysis and force measurement of the upper limb. Morphometric evaluation was carried out 8 months post-operatively and consisted of a histological examination of the deltoid muscle and the brachial plexus according to defined criteria of degeneration. In addition, atrophy of the deltoid muscle was evaluated by weight determination comparing the left with the right side. VEGF expression in the brachial plexus was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore the motoneurons of the spinal cord segment C5 were counted comparing the left with the right side. On the functional level, VEGF-treated animals showed faster nerve regeneration. It was found less degeneration and smaller mass reduction of the deltoid muscle in VEGF-treated animals. We observed significantly less degeneration of the brachial plexus and a greater number of surviving motoneurons (P < 0·05) in the VEGF group. The results of this study confirmed the positive effect of VEGF-gene therapy on regeneration and survival of nerve cells. We could demonstrate a significant improvement on the motor-functional as well as on the histomorphological level. However, increased vascularization of the nerve tissue caused by VEGF does not seem to be the major reason for these effects. The clinical use of adenoviral VEGF-gene therapy in the newborn cannot be justified so far. PMID:25213596

  3. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Phillips, Theodore L.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Purdy, James A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  4. Protective effect of apigenin on radiation-induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Tungjai, Montree; Whorton, Elbert B.

    2005-01-01

    The potential use of flavonoids as a radioprotector is of increasing interest because of their high antioxidant activity and abundance in the diet. The aim of this study is to examine genotoxic and radioprotective effects of one of the most common flavonoids, apigenin, on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to evaluate such effects of apigenin. Blood samples were collected from two non-smoking healthy male volunteers who had no history of previous exposure to other clastogenic agents. Isolated lymphocytes were cultured. There were two tubes per concentration for all treatments. To evaluate the genotoxicity of apigenin, cells were first treated with different concentrations of apigenin (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 25 microg/mL) at 24 h after culture initiation, followed by cytochalasin-B (Cyt-B) treatment (3 microg/mL) and cell harvest at 44 and 72 h, respectively. Secondly, to investigate the radioprotective effect, cell cultures were exposed to different concentrations of apigenin as described above for 30 min before being irradiated to 2 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (at a dose rate of 0.75 Gy/min). In all instances, the frequency of MN was scored in binucleated (BN) cells. The nuclear proliferation index also was calculated. We did not detect an increase in the frequency of MN in non-irradiated human lymphocyte cultures treated with 2.5, 5.0 or 10 microg/mL apigenin; although, we did observe an increase in cultures treated with 25 microg/mL apigenin (the highest concentration of apigenin used in our study). We also observed a significant increase in the frequency of MN in irradiated cells overall; however, the frequency was decreased as the concentration of apigenin increased, suggesting a radioprotective effect. These findings provide a basis for additional studies to help clarify the potential use and benefit of apigenin as a radioprotector.

  5. Proteomic-based mechanistic investigation of low-dose radiation-induced cellular responses/effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xian

    2013-10-23

    The goal of our project is to apply our unique systems investigation strategy to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the radiation induction and transmission of oxidative damage, adaptive response, and bystander effect at low-doses. Beginning with simple in vitro systems such as fibroblast or epithelial pure culture, our amino acid-coded mass tagging (AACT) comparative proteomic platform will be used to measure quantitatively proteomic changes at high- or low-dose level with respect to their endogenous damage levels respectively, in which a broad range of unique regulated proteins sensitive to low-dose IR will be distinguished. To zoom in how these regulated proteins interact with other in the form of networks in induction/transmission pathways, these regulated proteins will be selected as baits for making a series of fibroblast cell lines that stably express each of them. Using our newly developed method of ?dual-tagging? quantitative proteomics that integrate the capabilities of natural complex expression/formation, simple epitope affinity isolation (not through tandem affinity purification or TAP), and ?in-spectra? AACT quantitative measurements using mass spectrometry (MS), we will be able to distinguish systematically interacting proteins with each bait in real time. Further, in addition to both proteome-wide (global differentially expressed proteins) and pathway-scale (bait-specific) profiling information, we will perform a computational network analysis to elucidate a global pathway/mechanisms underlying cellular responses to real-time low-dose IR. Similarly, we will extend our scheme to investigate systematically those induction/transmission pathways occurring in a fibroblast-epithelial interacting model in which the bystander cell (fibroblast) monitor the IR damage to the target cell (epithelial cell). The results will provide the proteome base (molecular mechanisms/pathways for signaling) for the low dose radiation-induced essential tissue environment interactions, including cell-cell, extracellular matrix and extracellular paracrine interactions.

  6. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  7. [Role of DNA repair genes in radiation-induced changes of lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Shilova, L A; Pliusnina, E N; Zemskaia, N V; Moskalev, A A

    2014-01-01

    One of the main effects of various stress factors, including ionizing radiation, is DNA damage. Accumulation of DNA damage and somatic mutations in the somatic tissues is regarded as one of the basic mechanisms of aging. We have developed an approach to the study of molecular and genetic mechanisms of radioadaptation, which is based on the analysis of changes in the lifespan of Drosophila with a transformed genotype. In this study we investigated the radioadaptive response and hormesis by radiation-induced changed of the lifespan of different strains of Drosophila melanogaster, such as a wild type strain Canton-Sand strains with mutations in DNA damage response gene (homologue of GADD45), excision repair genes (homologues of XPF, XPC, PCNA) and double-strand breaks repair genes (homologues of RAD54, XRCC3, BLM). The exposure to irradiation at the dose rate of 40 cGy was performed chronically through the stages of fly development; an acute exposure at the dose rate of 30 Gy was applied to the adult stages of flies. Also, we investigated the resistance to acute gamma-radiation of Drosophila with conditional ubiquitous overexpression of genes that are involved in DNA damage recognition (homologues of GADD45, HUS1, CHK2), excision repair (homologues of XPF, XPC, AP-endonuclease-1) and double-strand break repair (homologues of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80, WRNexo). In the wild type strain Canton-S, manifestation of the radioadaptive response and radiation hormesis were observed. In individuals with DNA repair gene mutations, no radioadaptive response was observed, or observed to a lesser extent than in wild type flies. Mifepristone--inducible transgene activation does not lead to an increase in resistance to acute irradiation by the parameters of lifespan of Drosophila. Overexpression of DNA repair genes led to a sharp decline in lifespan also in the absence of irradiation. PMID:25775840

  8. Thermal injury lowers the threshold for radiation-induced neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Jonathan D; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry; Olschowka, John A

    2013-10-01

    The consequences of radiation exposure alone are relatively well understood, but in the wake of events such as the World War II nuclear detonations and accidents such as Chernobyl, other critical factors have emerged that can substantially affect patient outcome. For example, ~70% of radiation victims from Hiroshima and Nagasaki received some sort of additional traumatic injury, the most common being thermal burn. Animal data has shown that the addition of thermal insult to radiation results in increased morbidity and mortality. To explore possible synergism between thermal injury and radiation on brain, C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to either 0 or 5 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. Irradiation was immediately followed by a 10% total-body surface area full thickness thermal burn. Mice were sacrificed 6 h, 1 week or 6 month post-injury and brains and plasma were harvested for histology, mRNA analysis and cytokine ELISA. Plasma analysis revealed that combined injury synergistically upregulates IL-6 at acute time points. Additionally, at 6 h, combined injury resulted in a greater upregulation of the vascular marker, ICAM-1 and TNF-? mRNA. Enhanced activation of glial cells was also observed by CD68 and Iba1 immunohistochemistry at all time points. Additionally, doublecortin staining at 6 months showed reduced neurogenesis in all injury conditions. Finally, using a novel object recognition test, we observed that only mice with combined injury had significant learning and memory deficits. These results demonstrate that thermal injury lowers the threshold for radiation-induced neuroinflammation and long-term cognitive dysfunction. PMID:24059681

  9. ATM Polymorphisms Are Associated With Risk of Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Li; Yang Ming; Bi Nan; Fang Mingjing; Sun Tong; Ji Wei; Tan Wen; Zhao Lujun; Yu Dianke; Lin Dongxin; Wang Luhua

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Since the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein plays crucial roles in repair of double-stranded DNA breaks, control of cell cycle checkpoints, and radiosensitivity, we hypothesized that variations in this gene might be associated with radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 253 lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation between 2004 and 2006 were included in this study. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to grade RP. Five haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ATM gene were genotyped using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of RP for genotypes were computed by the Cox model, adjusted for clinical factors. The function of the ATM SNP associated with RP was examined by biochemical assays. Results: During the median 22-month follow-up, 44 (17.4%) patients developed grade {>=} 2 RP. In multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for other clinical predictors, we found two ATM variants were independently associated with increased RP risk. They were an 111G > A) polymorphism (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.07-5.80) and an ATM 126713G > A polymorphism (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.16-5.28). Furthermore, genotype-dependent differences in ATM expression were demonstrated both in cell lines (p < 0.001) and in individual lung tissue samples (p = 0.003), which supported the results of the association study. Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms of ATM are significantly associated with RP risk. These variants might exert their effect through regulation of ATM expression and serve as independent biomarkers for prediction of RP in patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy.

  10. Studies on Pentoxifylline and Tocopherol Combination for Radiation-Induced Heart Disease in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hui; Xiong Mai; Xia Yunfei; Cui Nianji; Lu Rubiao; Deng Ling; Lin Yuehao; Rong Tiehua

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the application of pentoxifylline (PTX) and tocopherol l (Vit. E) could modify the development of radiation-induced heart disease and downregulate the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}1mRNA in rats. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four groups: control group, irradiated group, experimental group 1, and experiment group 2. Supplementation was started 3 days before irradiation; in experimental group 1, injection of PTX (15 mg/kg/d) and Vit. E (5.5 mg/kg/d) continued till the 12th week postirradiation, whereas in experimental group 2 it was continued until the 24th week postirradiation. All rats were administrated a single dose of 20 Gy irradiation to the heart except the control group. Histopathologic evaluation was performed at various time points (Days 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 and 24th week) up to 24 weeks after irradiation. Changes of levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were also investigated at the same time points using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Results: Compared with the irradiated group, levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA of the rat hearts were relatively low in the two experimental groups on the 12th week postirradiation. In experimental group 1, there was a rebound expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA on the 24th week postirradiation, whereas that of the experimental group 2 remained low (p < 0.05). The proportions of collagen fibers of the two experimental groups were lower than that of irradiated group (p < 0.05). A rebound could be observed in the experimental group 1. Conclusion: PTX and Vit. E downregulated the expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA. The irradiated rat hearts showed a marked pathologic response to the drugs. The withdrawal of drugs in the 12th week postirradiation could cause rebound effects of the development of fibrosis.

  11. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, F.-S.; Lin, I-H.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  12. Radiation-induced grafting of carbon nanotubes on HPLC silica microspheres: theoretical and practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Speltini, Andrea; Merli, Daniele; Dondi, Daniele; Milanese, Chiara; Galinetto, Pietro; Bozzetti, Carlo; Profumo, Antonella

    2013-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grafted for the first time by ?-radiation onto silica microspheres in the presence of polybutadiene (PB) as the linking agent, obtaining a novel hybrid material with chromatographic properties, with an alternative approach to the existing procedures. The synthesis involves the one-pot ?-radiation-induced grafting of MWCNTs onto silica microspheres in the presence of PB as a linking agent. PB also serves as a coating layer of the silica particles, to which MWCNTs are anchored through stable chemical bonds formed via radical chain reaction with the polymer. The product (MWCNT-PB-modified silica) resulted in MWCNT bundles interlaying the silica particles which acted as a support and as a spacer. This new material highlights the unquestionable properties of CNTs also when grafted in a composite, thus allowing the disposition of a more robust material whose properties are still related to the nanotube structure. The grafting was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The surface area, determined by BET isotherms, resulted in 132 m(2) g(-1), about 34% lower than that of pure silica, pointing to the cross-linking effect of PB in the silica matrix. The evaluation of MWCNT-PB-modified silica as a LC stationary phase was performed by separation of aromatics, with satisfactory resolution and reproducibility, while structural selectivity was proved by isomer separation. A good resolution was obtained also for acid/basic compounds as barbiturates. A comparison with a commercial C18 sorbent highlighted the advantage in using the CNT column for separating aromatic hydrocarbons. Control experiments on the PB-coated silica column proved the key role of MWCNTs in the chromatographic performance. PMID:23678482

  13. Therapeutic effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on radiation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chengcheng; Chang, Pengyu; Zhang, Yuyu; Shi, Weiyan; Liu, Bin; Ding, Lijuan; Liu, Min; Gao, Ling; Dong, Lihua

    2016-02-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a fatal condition featured by interstitial pneumonitis and fibrosis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely used for treating RILI in rodent models. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether the therapeutic effects of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) on RILI were in a dose-dependent manner. A total of 100 mice were randomly divided into: a control group (n=25), subject to lung irradiation and injection of phosphate-buffered solution (PBS) via the tail vein; and the hBM-MSC group, subject to lung irradiation followed by injection of a low dose (1x103 hBM-MSCs/g), medium dose (5x103 hBM-MSCs/g) and high dose (1x104 hBM-MSCs/g) of hBM-MSCs in PBS through the tail vein, respectively. After sacrifice, the pulmonary tissues were subject to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, Masson's trichrome staining and immunohistochemical staining to investigate the pathological changes. Immunofluorescent staining was performed to evaluate the differentiation capacity of hBM-MSCs in vivo by analyzing the expression of SPC and PECAM. hBM-MSCs improved the survival rate and histopathological features in the irradiated mice, especially in the low-dose group. Marked decrease in collagen deposition was noted in the irradiated mice treated using a low dose of hBM-MSCs. In addition, hBM-MSCs attenuated secretion and expression of IL-10 and increased the expression of TNF-?. Furthermore, hBM-MSCs had the potential to differentiate into functional cells upon lung injury. Low-dose hBM-MSCs contributed to functional recovery in mice with RILI. PMID:26717975

  14. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ?8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ?8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ?12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy.

  15. Radiation-Induced Cytogenetic Damage as a Predictor of Cancer Risk for Protons and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jerry R.

    1999-01-01

    We have successfully completed the series of experiments planned for year 1 and the first part of year 2 measuring the induction of chromosome aberrations induced in multiple cell types by three model space radiations: Fe-ions, protons and photons. Most of these data have now been compiled and a significant part subjected to detailed data analyses, although continuing data analysis is an important part of our current and future efforts. These analyses are directed toward defining the patterns of chromosomal damage induction by the three radiations and the extent to which such patterns are dependent on the type of cell irradiated. Our studies show significant differences, both quantitatively and qualitatively, between response of different cell types to these radiations however there is an overall pattern that characterizes each type of radiation in most cell lines. Thus our data identifies general dose-response patterns for each radiation for induction of multiple types of chromosomal aberrations but also identifies significant differences in response between some cell types. Specifically, we observe significant resistance for induction of aberrations in rat mammary epithelial cells when they are irradiated in vivo and assayed in vitro. Further, we have observed some remarkable differences in susceptibility to certain radiation-induced aberrations in cells whose genome has been modulated for two cancer- relevant genes, TP53 and CDKNIA. This data, if confirmed, may represent the first evidence of gene-specific differences in cellular metabolism of damage induced by densely-ionizing radiation that confers substantial sensitivity to protons compared to photons.

  16. Poor Baseline Pulmonary Function May Not Increase the Risk of Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingbo; Cao, Jianzhong; Yuan, Shuanghu; Arenberg, Douglas; Stanton, Paul; Tatro, Daniel; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Poor pulmonary function (PF) is often considered a contraindication to definitive radiation therapy for lung cancer. This study investigated whether baseline PF was associated with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients treated with CRT and tested for PF at baseline were eligible. Baseline predicted values of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were analyzed. Additional factors included age, gender, smoking status, Karnofsky performance status, coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tumor location, histology, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, and mean lung dose (MLD) were evaluated for RILT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT (SRILT), including grade ?2 radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Results: There was a total of 260 patients, and SRILT occurred in 58 (22.3%) of them. Mean FEV1 values for SRILT and non-SRILT patients were 71.7% and 65.9% (P=.077). Under univariate analysis, risk of SRILT increased with MLD (P=.008), the absence of COPD (P=.047), and FEV1 (P=.077). Age (65 split) and MLD were significantly associated with SRILT in multivariate analysis. The addition of FEV1 and age with the MLD-based model slightly improved the predictability of SRILT (area under curve from 0.63-0.70, P=.088). Conclusions: Poor baseline PF does not increase the risk of SRILT, and combining FEV1, age, and MLD may improve the predictive ability.

  17. Cell Cycle Regulators Guide Mitochondrial Activity in Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrou, Aris T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: There are accruing concerns on potential genotoxic agents present in the environment including low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) that naturally exists on earth's surface and atmosphere and is frequently used in medical diagnosis and nuclear industry. Although its long-term health risk is being evaluated and remains controversial, LDIR is shown to induce temporary but significant adaptive responses in mammalian cells and animals. The mechanisms guiding the mitochondrial function in LDIR-induced adaptive response represent a unique communication between DNA damage and cellular metabolism. Elucidation of the LDIR-regulated mitochondrial activity may reveal new mechanisms adjusting cellular function to cope with hazardous environmental stress. Recent Advances: Key cell cycle regulators, including Cyclin D1/CDK4 and Cyclin B1/cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) complexes, are actively involved in the regulation of mitochondrial functions via phosphorylation of their mitochondrial targets. Accumulating new evidence supports a concept that the Cyclin B1/CDK1 complex acts as a mediator in the cross talk between radiation-induced DNA damage and mitochondrial functions to coordinate cellular responses to low-level genotoxic stresses. Critical Issues: The LDIR-mediated mitochondrial activity via Cyclin B1/CDK1 regulation is an irreplaceable network that is able to harmonize vital cellular functions with adjusted mitochondrial metabolism to enhance cellular homeostasis. Future Directions: Further investigation of the coordinative mechanism that regulates mitochondrial activities in sublethal stress conditions, including LDIR, will reveal new insights of how cells cope with genotoxic injury and will be vital for future targeted therapeutic interventions that reduce environmental injury and cancer risk. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1463–1480. PMID:24180340

  18. Cytokinesis block micronucleus assay in field plants for monitoring radiation-induced genotoxicity of the environment.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshito; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Fuma, Shoichi; Kouichi, Maruyama; Ichikawa, San'ei; Kubota, Masahide; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    Effective biomonitoring for detection of radiation-induced genotoxicity of contaminants in natural environments involves testing of field plants for cytogenetic changes. To increase the efficiency and precision of cytogenetic analyses of field plants that have naturally high individual variability, an improved micronucleus assay is proposed that employs a cytokinesis block technique similar to the lymphocyte test system used in mammals. In seed embryonic meristems of the Japanese cedar, application of a methylxanthine derivative, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), was found to be effective in inhibiting cytokinesis to make once-divided cells easily recognizable by their binucleate appearance. In the meristem of IBMX-treated seminal roots from X-ray-irradiated seeds, variation in micronucleus frequency in the binucleate cell population was reduced compared to that in the total cell population. The highest efficiency of measurement of micronucleus frequencies was obtained in the root meristems where 0.2- to 1.5-mm-long seminal roots were incubated with IBMX for 24 h. This result indicated that this root elongation stage corresponded to the first divisions of the root meristematic cells, and was therefore suitable for obtaining reliable estimations of accumulated genetic damage in the seeds. This cytokinesis block assay applied specifically at the root elongation stage was then used to examine dose-response relationships in Japanese cedar seeds irradiated either acutely with X-rays or chronically with ?-rays. The resulting dose-response curve for the acute X-ray irradiation was fitted onto a linear-quadratic regression curve, whereas the dose-response curve for the chronic ?-irradiation matched a linear regression line better. Both dose-response curves were consistent with the target theory of classical radiation biology. The good agreement of the micronucleus data to a simple dose-response model indicates the proposed accuracy of the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay for plant monitoring. PMID:25440909

  19. Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumor.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Satoru; Nomoto, Yoshihito; Yamashita, Yasufumi; Murashima, Shuuichi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kurobe, Yusuke; Toyomasu, Yutaka; Kawamura, Tomoko; Takada, Akinori; Ii, Noriko

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate characteristics of organizing pneumonia (OP) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumor. Between September 2010 and June 2014, patients who were diagnosed as Stage I lung cancer and treated with SBRT at our institution were included in this study. A total of 78 patients (47 males with a median age of 80 years) were analyzed. The median follow-up period was 23 months. Five patients (6.4%) developed OP at 6-18 months after SBRT. The cumulative incidence of OP was 4.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-11.0) and 8.2% (95% CI, 2.9-17.0) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Tumor location (superior and middle lobe vs inferior lobe) was shown to be a borderline significant factor for the occurrence of OP ( P: = 0.069). In the subgroup analysis of patients with a radiographic follow-up period at least 6 months, or who died within 6 months after SBRT, 7 of 72 patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 or 3 radiation pneumonitis (G2/3 RP) at 2-4 months after SBRT. A statistically significant association between G2/3 RP in the subacute phase and OP was shown ( P: = 0.040). In two of the five patients who developed OP, the symptoms and radiographic change were improved rapidly by corticosteroid administration. One patient had relapsed OP after suspending the treatment and re-administration was required. Three patients with minor symptoms were managed without corticosteroid administration and OP resolved without any relapse. The radiation-induced OP should be considered as one of the late lung injuries after SBRT for lung tumors. PMID:26338993

  20. Parathyroid Hormone Therapy Mollifies Radiation-Induced Biomechanical Degradation in Murine Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sagar S.; Gallagher, Katherine K.; Donneys, Alexis; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N.; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Nelson, Noah S.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Descriptions of mandibular distraction osteogenesis for tissue replacement after oncologic resection or for defects caused by osteoradionecrosis have been limited. Previous work demonstrated radiation decreases union formation, cellularity and mineral density in mandibular distraction osteogenesis. The authors posit that intermittent systemic administration of parathyroid hormone will serve as a stimulant to cellular function, reversing radiation-induced damage and enhancing bone regeneration. Methods Twenty male Lewis rats were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 (radiation and distraction osteogenesis, n = 7) and group 2 (radiation, distraction osteogenesis, and parathyroid hormone, n = 5) received a human-equivalent dose of 35 Gy of radiation (human bioequivalent, 70 Gy) fractionated over 5 days. All groups, including group 3 (distraction osteogenesis, n = 8), underwent a left unilateral mandibular osteotomy with bilateral external fixator placement. Distraction osteogenesis was performed at a rate of 0.3 mm every 12 hours to reach a gap of 5.1 mm. Group 2 was injected with parathyroid hormone (60 ?g/kg) subcutaneously daily for 3 weeks after the start of distraction osteogenesis. On postoperative day 40, all left hemimandibles were harvested. Biomechanical response parameters were generated. Statistical significance was considered at p ? 0.05. Results Parathyroid hormone–treated mandibles had significantly higher failure load and higher yield than did untreated mandibles. However, these values were still significantly lower than those of nonirradiated mandibles. Conclusions The authors have successfully demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of parathyroid hormone to stimulate and enhance bone regeneration in their irradiated murine mandibular model of distraction osteogenesis. Anabolic regimens of parathyroid hormone, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drug on formulary, significantly improve outcomes in a model of postoncologic craniofacial reconstruction. PMID:23806959

  1. Modulation of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Sun, Qiao; Xu, Wei; Li, Fanghua; Li, Huasheng; Lu, Jinying; Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin; Liu, Min; Bian, Po

    2015-03-01

    Both space radiation and microgravity have been demonstrated to have inevitable impact on living organisms during space flights and should be considered as important factors for estimating the potential health risk for astronauts. Therefore, the question whether radiation effects could be modulated by microgravity is an important aspect in such risk evaluation. Space particles at low dose and fluence rate, directly affect only a fraction of cells in the whole organism, which implement radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in cellular response to space radiation exposure. The fact that all of the RIBE experiments are carried out in a normal gravity condition bring forward the need for evidence regarding the effect of microgravity on RIBE. In the present study, a two-dimensional rotation clinostat was adopted to demonstrate RIBE in microgravity conditions, in which the RIBE was assayed using an experimental system of root-localized irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants. The results showed that the modeled microgravity inhibited significantly the RIBE-mediated up-regulation of expression of the AtRAD54 and AtRAD51 genes, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of multicopy P35S:GUS, but made no difference to the induction of homologous recombination by RIBE, showing divergent responses of RIBE to the microgravity conditions. The time course of interaction between the modeled microgravity and RIBE was further investigated, and the results showed that the microgravity mainly modulated the processes of the generation or translocation of the bystander signal(s) in roots. PMID:25769184

  2. Radiation-induced changes in magnetic properties of Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. D.; Cost, J. R.

    1988-04-01

    The high remanence and intrinsic coercivity of Nd-Fe-B magnets make them desirable for use in accelerators. Use in a radiation environment requires that the sensitivity of these magnets to radiation be determined and the mechanisms responsible be understood. We present results comparing the relative radiation sensitivity of a number of commercially available Nd-Fe-B magnets. Small samples of these magnets were irradiated to examine the decay of remanence. Our results show that the sensitivity to radiation varies widely among magnets from different vendors, indicating that microstructure and possibly composition play key roles in determining the loss of remanence. We examined optically the microstructure of several of the magnet materials and report on the correlation between microstructure and radiation-induced changes in magnetic properties. Samples were neutron irradiated at the Omega West Reactor in a neutron flux of 4×1012 n/cm2 s at a temperature of 350 K (77 °C). At various time intervals during the irradiation, samples were removed from the reactor and the open-circuit remanence measured. We also measured the quadrant II demagnetization curve of large samples before and after neutron irradiation to monitor changes in remanence and intrinsic coercivity. In general, these samples showed a decrease in the remanence and an increase in the intrinsic coercivity. We also present results comparing the relative decay of remanence for the large cylindrical samples having three different length-to-diameter ratios. This illustrates the effect of the demagnetizing field in determining the rate of remanence decay.

  3. Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Satoru; Nomoto, Yoshihito; Yamashita, Yasufumi; Murashima, Shuuichi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kurobe, Yusuke; Toyomasu, Yutaka; Kawamura, Tomoko; Takada, Akinori; II, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate characteristics of organizing pneumonia (OP) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumor. Between September 2010 and June 2014, patients who were diagnosed as Stage I lung cancer and treated with SBRT at our institution were included in this study. A total of 78 patients (47 males with a median age of 80 years) were analyzed. The median follow-up period was 23 months. Five patients (6.4%) developed OP at 6–18 months after SBRT. The cumulative incidence of OP was 4.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–11.0) and 8.2% (95% CI, 2.9–17.0) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Tumor location (superior and middle lobe vs inferior lobe) was shown to be a borderline significant factor for the occurrence of OP (P = 0.069). In the subgroup analysis of patients with a radiographic follow-up period at least 6 months, or who died within 6 months after SBRT, 7 of 72 patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 or 3 radiation pneumonitis (G2/3 RP) at 2–4 months after SBRT. A statistically significant association between G2/3 RP in the subacute phase and OP was shown (P = 0.040). In two of the five patients who developed OP, the symptoms and radiographic change were improved rapidly by corticosteroid administration. One patient had relapsed OP after suspending the treatment and re-administration was required. Three patients with minor symptoms were managed without corticosteroid administration and OP resolved without any relapse. The radiation-induced OP should be considered as one of the late lung injuries after SBRT for lung tumors. PMID:26338993

  4. Combined Tlr2 and Tlr4 Deficiency Increases Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Paun, Alexandra; Fox, Jessica; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Qureshi, Salman T.; Haston, Christina K.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether Toll-like receptor 2 or 4 genotype alters the lung response to irradiation in C57BL/6 mice using a model developing a phenotype that resembles radiotherapy-induced fibrosis in both histological characteristics and onset post-treatment. Methods and Materials: The pulmonary phenotype of C57BL/6 mice deficient in each or both of these genes was assessed after an 18-Gy single dose to the thoracic cavity by survival time postirradiation, bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential, histological evidence of alveolitis and fibrosis, and gene expression levels, and compared with that of wild-type mice. Results: The lung phenotype of Tlr4-deficient and Tlr2-deficient mice did not differ from that of wild-type mice in terms of survival time postirradiation, or by histological evidence of alveolitis or fibrosis. In contrast, mice deficient in both receptors developed respiratory distress at an earlier time than did wild-type mice and presented an enhanced fibrotic response (13.5% vs. 5.8% of the lung by image analysis of histological sections, p < 0.001). No differences in bronchoalveolar cell differential counts, nor in numbers of apoptotic cells in the lung as detected through active caspase-3 staining, were evident among the irradiated mice grouped by Tlr genotype. Gene expression analysis of lung tissue revealed that Tlr2,4-deficient mice have increased levels of hyaluronidase 2 compared with both wild-type mice and mice lacking either Tlr2 or Tlr4. Conclusion: We conclude that a combined deficiency in both Tlr2 and Tlr4, but not Tlr2 or Tlr4 alone, leads to enhanced radiation-induced fibrosis in the C57BL/6 mouse model.

  5. Recovery From Radiation-induced Bone Marrow Damage by HSP25 Through Tie2 Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Kwon, Hee-Chung; Chung, Hee-Yong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Whole-body radiation therapy can cause severe injury to the hematopoietic system, and therefore it is necessary to identify a novel strategy for overcoming this injury. Methods and Materials: Mice were irradiated with 4.5 Gy after heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) gene transfer using an adenoviral vector. Then, peripheral blood cell counts, histopathological analysis, and Western blotting on bone marrow (BM) cells were performed. The interaction of HSP25 with Tie2 was investigated with mouse OP9 and human BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells to determine the mechanism of HSP25 in the hematopoietic system. Results: HSP25 transfer increased BM regeneration and reduced apoptosis following whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The decrease in Tie2 protein expression that followed irradiation of the BM was blocked by HSP25 transfer, and Tie2-positive cells were more abundant among the BM cells of HSP25-transferred mice, even after IR exposure. Following systemic RNA interference of Tie2 before IR, HSP25-mediated radioprotective effects were partially blocked in both mice and cell line systems. Stability of Tie2 was increased by HSP25, a response mediated by the interaction of HSP25 with Tie2. IR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie2 was augmented by HSP25 overexpression; downstream events in the Tie2 signaling pathway, including phosphorylation of AKT and EKR1/2, were also activated. Conclusions: HSP25 protects against radiation-induced BM damage by interacting with and stabilizing Tie2. This may be a novel strategy for HSP25-mediated radioprotection in BM.

  6. Radiation-Induced Malignant Gliomas: Is There a Role for Reirradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, Arnold C. Mai, Wei Y.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Taher, Abida; Teh, Bin S.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To review the literature regarding the role of radiotherapy (RT) in the treatment of patients with radiation-induced malignant gliomas (RIMGs). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles dealing with RIMG was performed, yielding 52 articles with 92 patients available for review. Results: Initial tumor types treated with RT included brain tumor in 37 patients (40%), acute lymphoblastic leukemia in 33 (36%), benign disease in 11 (12%), and other in 11 (12%). Median time from RT to development of an RIMG was 8.75 years (range, 2.5-61 years). The RIMG occurred within 10 years after RT in 81% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma, 59% of patients with brain/other, and 18% of patients with benign conditions (p = 0.002). Type of RIMG was glioblastoma in 69 (75%) and anaplastic astrocytoma in 23 (25%). One-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 29.3%, 7.3%, and 0% for patients with glioblastoma and 59.7%, 30.3%, and 20.2% for patients with anaplastic astrocytoma. For the 85 patients with data regarding treatment for RIMG, 35 underwent reirradiation to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 30-76 Gy). For patients undergoing reirradiation, 1-, 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 58.9%, 20.5%, and 6.8%. For those not undergoing reirradiation, they were 15.1%, 3%, and 0% (p = 0.0009). Conclusions: The RIMG appeared earlier in patients treated for leukemia and lymphoma and latest for those treated for a benign condition. Patients who underwent reirradiation for RIMG have longer survival times compared with those not receiving RT.

  7. Risk of Radiation-Induced Malignancy With Heterotopic Ossification Prophylaxis: A Case–Control Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sheybani, Arshin; TenNapel, Mindi J.; Lack, William D.; Clerkin, Patrick; Hyer, Daniel E.; Sun, Wenqing; Jacobson, Geraldine M.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk of radiation-induced malignancy after prophylactic treatment for heterotopic ossification (HO). Methods and Materials: A matched case–control study was conducted within a population-based cohort of 3489 patients treated either for acetabular fractures with acetabular open reduction internal fixation or who underwent total hip arthroplasty from 1990 to 2009. Record-linkage techniques identified patients who were diagnosed with a malignancy from our state health registry. Patients with a prior history of malignancy were excluded from the cohort. For each documented case of cancer, 2 controls were selected by stratified random sampling from the cohort that did not develop a malignancy. Matching factors were sex, age at time of hip treatment, and duration of follow-up. Results: A total of 243 patients were diagnosed with a malignancy after hip treatment. Five patients were excluded owing to inadequate follow-up time in the corresponding control cohort. A cohort of 238 cases (control, 476 patients) was included. Mean follow-up was 10 years, 12 years in the control group. In the cancer cohort, 4% of patients had radiation therapy (RT), compared with 7% in the control group. Of the 9 patients diagnosed with cancer after RT, none occurred within the field. The mean latency period was 5.9 years in the patients who received RT and 6.6 years in the patients who did not. Median (range) age at time of cancer diagnosis in patients who received RT was 62 (43-75) years, compared with 70 (32-92) years in the non-RT patients. An ad hoc analysis was subsequently performed in all 2749 patients who were not matched and found neither an increased incidence of malignancy nor a difference in distribution of type of malignancy. Conclusion: We were unable to demonstrate an increased risk of malignancy in patients who were treated with RT for HO prophylaxis compared with those who were not.

  8. Detection and modeling of radiation induced effects in tissues by dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todor, Aurel Dorin

    The work presented here is applied physics research in the field of radiation treatment. We address the development of a new and innovative method, in vivo and possibly non-invasive, for tumor and healthy tissues control during and after the radiation treatment. The radiation treatment is delivered in an almost standardized manner for particular classes of tumors. The large variance in the individual radiosensitivity of healthy tissues and tumors often leads to local recurrence of neoplastic growth and/or distant metastatic disease which often remains untreated. The method is based on the measurement and analysis of electrical impedance data in the frequency domain from 50 mHz to 1MHz. The dielectric signature of the tissue carries information about the integrity of the plasma membrane, as well as about the tissue micro-architecture. We present dielectric models for biological materials and correlate their parameters with the subtle changes characterizing oncosis or apoptosis occurring as result of radiation or excision. Five tissue types (blood, kidney, liver, lung and heart) were studied and specific impedance models were created for each of them. Based on these models, analysis of freshly excised tissue and radiation-induced effects in excised tissue was carried out and model parameters extracted. The data we present shows correlation between known mechanisms of cellular death and the delivery of radiation, thus making possible a quantification of the individual response. Further work will be needed in order to correlate early impedance changes with late tissue changes characterizing the side effects of the radiotherapy.

  9. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56?year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4?months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders. PMID:22873795

  10. NOS Inhibition Modulates Immune Polarization and Improves Radiation-Induced Tumor Growth Delay.

    PubMed

    Ridnour, Lisa A; Cheng, Robert Y S; Weiss, Jonathan M; Kaur, Sukhbir; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Basudhar, Debashree; Heinecke, Julie L; Stewart, C Andrew; DeGraff, William; Sowers, Anastasia L; Thetford, Angela; Kesarwala, Aparna H; Roberts, David D; Young, Howard A; Mitchell, James B; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Wiltrout, Robert H; Wink, David A

    2015-07-15

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are important mediators of progrowth signaling in tumor cells, as they regulate angiogenesis, immune response, and immune-mediated wound healing. Ionizing radiation (IR) is also an immune modulator and inducer of wound response. We hypothesized that radiation therapeutic efficacy could be improved by targeting NOS following tumor irradiation. Herein, we show enhanced radiation-induced (10 Gy) tumor growth delay in a syngeneic model (C3H) but not immunosuppressed (Nu/Nu) squamous cell carcinoma tumor-bearing mice treated post-IR with the constitutive NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). These results suggest a requirement of T cells for improved radiation tumor response. In support of this observation, tumor irradiation induced a rapid increase in the immunosuppressive Th2 cytokine IL10, which was abated by post-IR administration of L-NAME. In vivo suppression of IL10 using an antisense IL10 morpholino also extended the tumor growth delay induced by radiation in a manner similar to L-NAME. Further examination of this mechanism in cultured Jurkat T cells revealed L-NAME suppression of IR-induced IL10 expression, which reaccumulated in the presence of exogenous NO donor. In addition to L-NAME, the guanylyl cyclase inhibitors ODQ and thrombospondin-1 also abated IR-induced IL10 expression in Jurkat T cells and ANA-1 macrophages, which further suggests that the immunosuppressive effects involve eNOS. Moreover, cytotoxic Th1 cytokines, including IL2, IL12p40, and IFN?, as well as activated CD8(+) T cells were elevated in tumors receiving post-IR L-NAME. Together, these results suggest that post-IR NOS inhibition improves radiation tumor response via Th1 immune polarization within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25990221

  11. Evaluation of role of natural killer cells in radiation-induced leukemogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, E.; Rosen, B.; Copeland, D.; Weatherly, B.; Herberman, R.B.

    1984-06-01

    The relationship of the leukemogenic and natural killer (NK)-suppressive effects of fractionated doses of gamma-radiation in mice was studied. A/J mice were relatively resistant; CBA/J, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 were susceptible to both the NK-suppressive and leukemogenic effects, and young (1 mo old) C57BL/6 mice were more susceptible than were 2- and 3-month-old C57BL/6 mice to both effects. Age-dependent susceptibility to radiation-induced leukemogenesis also was observed in C57BL/6 (bg/bg) (beige) mice. No differences in incidence and latent period of lymphoma development were found between C57BL/6 (+/+) and beige mice. Bone marrow cells (BMC) from normal C57BL/6 donors reconstituted the NK reactivity of irradiated C57BL/6 (+/+) or beige recipients and inhibited leukemogenesis. Although BMC of beige donors did not reconstitute the NK reactivity of irradiated C57BL/6 (+/+) or beige recipients, these cells were as efficient for antileukemic protection as were BMC from C57BL/6 (+/+) mice. The bone marrow of irradiated mice contained preleukemia cells that produced leukemias when transplanted iv into recipients preirradiated with 400 R. Inoculation (iv) of spleen cells (SpC) from syngeneic nude mice plus preleukemia bone marrow cells (PBMC) were able to inhibit leukemia formation in the 400 R-irradiated recipients. SpC from beige mice, normal C57BL/6 (+/+) mice, or C57BL/6 (+/+) mice treated with anti-asialo GM1 serum had no influence on the development of leukemia after their transplantation with PBMC.

  12. Radiation-induced cancer and its modifying factor among A-bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, H.

    1987-01-01

    The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, have conducted a long-term follow-up study of a cohort of 120,000 atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors and non-exposed controls since 1950. The most recent findings regarding cancer mortality and incidence in this cohort can be briefly summarized as follows: 1) An increase in leukemia mortality among A-bomb survivors peaked 5-6 years after the bombing and has decreased with time thereafter. In addition to leukemia, the incidence of cancer of the lung, breast, esophagus, stomach, colon, thyroid, ovary, urinary tract, and multiple myeloma increases with dose. At present, there is no indication of an increase in cancer of the rectum or uterus among A-bomb survivors. In general, radiation-induced solid cancers begin to appear after the age at which they are normally prone to develop, and have continued to increase with time in proportion to the natural increase in mortality of the control group. 2) There are factors which modify the effects of radiation, such as age at the time of bombing (ATB) and sex. Sensitivity to radiation, in terms of cancer induction, is higher for persons who were young ATB in general, than for those who were older ATB. 3) There was no increase in childhood cancer among those exposed while in utero, but there is a recent indication of an increase in cancer incidence among these persons as they age. 4) There seems to be no interaction in a multiplicative way between radiation and smoking and lung cancer induction.

  13. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Fori?, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as ?Eq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co ?-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 ?Eq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with ?-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 ?Eq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 ?Eq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  14. Subclavian artery intervention with a balloon-tipped occlusion catheter via the ipsilateral brachial artery without an introducer sheath.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A; Nakajima, S; Endo, H; Takahashi, T; Nozaki, E

    2015-04-01

    To protect against a distal embolism in the vertebral artery, subclavian artery stenting can be achieved by positioning a filter device or balloon in the ipsilateral vertebral artery. However, treatment with these devices is not easy, and it is also an inaccurate method for cerebral protection. We developed a balloon-tipped occlusion catheter (Optimo(®) occlusion catheter) without an introducer sheath, which allowed us to perform the minimally invasive endovascular therapy (EVT). Herein, we report two EVT cases for subclavian artery disease treated with an Optimo(®) occlusion catheter via the ipsilateral brachial artery. This method is effective for distal protection of both cerebral and brachial artery embolism, and also enables EVT procedure retrogradely as well. PMID:24935071

  15. Complete obstetric brachial plexus palsy: surgical improvement to recover a functional hand

    PubMed Central

    Romana, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Objective Complete obstetrical brachial plexus palsy remains a difficult situation for the child and his/her family. The quality of spontaneous reinnervation is rarely good and always leads to a non-sensitive and non-functional hand, even if abduction of the shoulder and elbow flexion do spontaneously recover. The aim of this study was to assess the results from nerve reconstruction in cases of complete palsy and to demonstrate the effect of a change in surgical technique on the outcome of hand function. Methods Thirty pediatric patients with complete obstetric brachial plexus palsy were operated on in our department between 1987 and 2003. Twenty-five of these patients were clinically reviewed and evaluated by a physiotherapist and a surgeon (not the surgeon who performed the surgery). Functional assessment was based on the Gilbert shoulder score, the Gilbert–Raimondi score for elbow function and the Raimondi hand score. All children underwent a nerve reconstruction as graft and/or intra- or extra-plexual neurotization. Our neural surgical strategy changed between 1995 and 1996 to one that addresses the function of the hand and the wrist. A secondary surgical intervention was required in 18 cases. The most frequent procedures were a radial rotation osteotomy and a tendon transfer restoring wrist extension. Results Mean follow-up was 7 years and 10 months. Among children operated on with the first surgical strategy—the pre-1995–1996 period—hand function was good in three cases, satisfactory in four cases and unsatisfactory in one case. Among children for whom the second surgical strategy was used—1995–1996 and later—hand function was good or very good in eight cases, satisfactory in four cases and unsatisfactory in two cases. When the 25 patients were assessed for shoulder function, the functional result was good or very good in 12 cases, satisfactory in seven cases and unsatisfactory in six cases. In terms of elbow function, the results were good or very good in 14 cases, satisfactory in eight cases and unsatisfactory in three cases. All hands recovered sensation to a certain degree. Conclusion The surgical results are encouraging in terms of shoulder and elbow function, but not as good for hand function. With the change in neural surgical strategy in 1995–1996, when more focus was placed on the hand (second surgical strategy), the results on hand function improved relative to those obtained with the first surgical strategy. It must also be noted that hand recovery requires more time, which may partially explain why functional results are not as good for the hand as for the shoulder and elbow. These results demonstrate that early surgical exploration is useful in complete obstetrical brachial plexus palsies and that there is a need for neural reconstruction of the lower trunk. PMID:19308620

  16. Uncertainty in assessment of radiation-induced diffusion index changes in individual patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate repeatability coefficients of diffusion tensor indices to assess whether longitudinal changes in diffusion indices were true changes beyond the uncertainty for individual patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT). Twenty-two patients who had low-grade or benign tumors and were treated by partial brain radiation therapy (PBRT) participated in an IRB-approved MRI protocol. The diffusion tensor images in the patients were acquired pre-RT, week 3 during RT, at the end of RT, and 1, 6, and 18 months after RT. As a measure of uncertainty, repeatability coefficients (RC) of diffusion indices in the segmented cingulum, corpus callosum, and fornix were estimated by using test-retest diffusion tensor datasets from the National Biomedical Imaging Archive (NBIA) database. The upper and lower limits of the 95% confidence interval of the estimated RC from the test and retest data were used to evaluate whether the longitudinal percentage changes in diffusion indices in the segmented structures in the individual patients were beyond the uncertainty and thus could be considered as true radiation-induced changes. Diffusion indices in different white matter structures showed different uncertainty ranges. The estimated RC for fractional anisotropy (FA) ranged from 5.3% to 9.6%, for mean diffusivity (MD) from 2.2% to 6.8%, for axial diffusivity (AD) from 2.4% to 5.5%, and for radial diffusivity (RD) from 2.9% to 9.7%. Overall, 23% of the patients treated by RT had FA changes, 44% had MD changes, 50% had AD changes, and 50% had RD changes beyond the uncertainty ranges. In the fornix, 85.7% and 100% of the patients showed changes beyond the uncertainty range at 6 and 18 months after RT, demonstrating that radiation has a pronounced late effect on the fornix compared to other segmented structures. It is critical to determine reliability of a change observed in an individual patient for clinical decision making. Assessments of the repeatability and confidence interval of diffusion tensor measurements in white matter structures allow us to determine the true longitudinal change in individual patients.

  17. A Monte-Carlo Model for the Formation of Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cornforth, Michael N.; Loucas, Brad D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To simulate radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells (e.g., rings, translocations, and dicentrics) and to calculate their frequency distributions following exposure to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) produced by high-LET ions. Methods: The interphase genome was assumed to be comprised of a collection of 2 kbp rigid-block monomers following the random-walk geometry. Additional details for the modeling of chromosomal structure, such as chromosomal domains and chromosomal loops, were included. A radial energy profile for heavy ion tracks was used to simulate the high-LET pattern of induced DSBs. The induced DSB pattern depended on the ion charge and kinetic energy, but always corresponded to the DSB yield of 25 DSBs/cell/Gy. The sum of all energy contributions from Poisson-distributed particle tracks was taken to account for all possible one-track and multi-track effects. The relevant output of the model was DNA fragments produced by DSBs. The DSBs, or breakpoints, were defined by (x, y, z, l) positions, where x, y, z were the Euclidian coordinates of a DSB, and where l was the relative position along the genome. Results: The code was used to carry out Monte Carlo simulations for DSB rejoinings at low doses. The resulting fragments were analyzed to estimate the frequencies of specific types of chromosomal aberrations. Histograms for relative frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and P.D.F.s (probability density functions) of a given aberration type were produced. The relative frequency of dicentrics to rings was compared to empirical data to calibrate rejoining probabilities. Of particular interest was the predicted distribution of ring sizes, irrespective of their frequencies relative to other aberrations. Simulated ring sizes were . 4 kbp, which are far too small to be observed experimentally (i.e., by microscopy) but which, nevertheless, are conjectured to exist. Other aberrations, for example, inversions, translocations, as well as multi-centrics were also recorded. Conclusion: High-LET DNA damage affects the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations. The ratio of rings to dicentrics is correct for the genomic size cut-offs corresponding to available experimental data. The present work predicts a relative abundance of small rings following irradiation by heavy ions.

  18. Role of cellular communication in the pathways of radiation-induced biological damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Facoetti, Angelica; Mariotti, Luca; Nano, Rosanna; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    During the last decade, a large number of experimental studies on the so-called "non-targeted effects", in particular bystander effects, outlined that cellular communication plays a signifi- cant role in