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1

Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy: Neurological follow-up in 161 recurrence-free breast cancer patients  

SciTech Connect

The purpose was to assess the incidence and clinical manifestations of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients, treated according to the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group protocols. One hundred and sixty-one recurrence-free breast cancer patients were examined for radiation-induced brachial plexopathy after a median follow-up period of 50 months (13-99 months). After total mastectomy and axillary node sampling, high-risk patients were randomized to adjuvant therapy. One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy with 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions over 5 weeks. In addition, 82 of these patients received cytotoxic therapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and 46 received tamoxifen. Five percent and 9% of the patients receiving radiotherapy had disabling and mild radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, respectively. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy was more frequent in patients receiving cytotoxic therapy (p = 0.04) and in younger patients (p = 0.04). The clinical manifestations were paraesthesia (100%), hypaesthesia (74%), weakness (58%), decreased muscle stretch reflexes (47%), and pain (47%). The brachial plexus is more vulnerable to large fraction size. Fractions of 2 Gy or less are advisable. Cytotoxic therapy adds to the damaging effect of radiotherapy. Peripheral nerves in younger patients seems more vulnerable. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy occurs mainly as diffuse damage to the brachial plexus. 24 refs., 9 tabs.

Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Johannsen, L.; Schroder, H.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark))

1993-04-30

2

Brachial plexopathy  

MedlinePLUS

Neuropathy - brachial plexus; Brachial plexus dysfunction; Parsonage Turner syndrome; Pancoast syndrome ... inflammatory or postviral brachial plexus disease called Parsonage Turner syndrome. Tests that may be done to diagnose this ...

3

Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective trials with high-dose radiation therapy for unresectable lung cancer.

Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McBurney, Michelle L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erasmus, Jeremy [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-03-01

4

Brachial plexopathy as a rare presenting manifestation of scorpion envenomation.  

PubMed

We report a patient who experienced a rare manifestation of an acute, severe brachial plexopathy as the initial complication of scorpion (presumed Hemiscorpius lepturus species) envenomation. Features suggesting conduction block, due to either proximal demyelination or ion channel dysfunction, along with axonal loss were seen on serial electrophysiological studies. Possible mechanisms of the brachial plexopathy include direct compression from tissue edema or a toxic effect on the membrane channels along the nerve. PMID:21674527

Rubin, Devon I; Vavra, Michael

2011-07-01

5

Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy.  

PubMed

We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered. PMID:25288846

Bhargava, Amita N; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S K

2014-10-01

6

Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy  

PubMed Central

We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered. PMID:25288846

Bhargava, Amita N.; Kasundra, Gaurav M.; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S. K.

2014-01-01

7

A Case Report of an Unusual Complication from Bee Sting: Acute Brachial Plexopathy  

PubMed Central

Brachial plexopathy is usually related to trauma like direct injury to the nerve and stretching injuries. Neurological complications following bee sting are uncommon. Here, we describe a rare case of acute brachial plexopathy as a neurological complication following bee sting. A23-year-old maleinitially presented with angioedema and anaphylactic shock one hour after a bee stung at his neck. Twenty four hours after the incidence, he presented with sudden onset of left upper limb weakness. Nerve conduction study and electromyography had shown evidence of left brachial plexopathy. PMID:24772163

Fan Kee, Hoo; Hasan, Shariful; Aliaa WS, Wan; B. Basri, Hamidon

2014-01-01

8

Brachial Plexopathy/Nerve Root Avulsion in a Football Player: The Role of Electrodiagnostics  

PubMed Central

Electromyography (EMG) studies are a useful tool in anatomical localization of peripheral nerve and brachial plexus injuries. They are especially helpful in distinguishing between brachial plexopathy and nerve root injuries where surgical intervention may be indicated. EMG can also assist in providing prognostic information after nerve injury as well as after nerve repair. In this case report, a football player presented with weakness in his right upper limb after a traction/traumatic injury to the right brachial plexus. EMG studies revealed evidence of both pre- and postganglionic injury to multiple cervical roots. The injury was substantial enough to cause nerve root avulsions involving the C6 and C7 levels. Surgical referral led to nerve grafts targeted at regaining function in shoulder abduction and elbow flexion. After surgery, the patient’s progress was monitored utilizing EMG to assist in identifying true axonal regeneration. PMID:18751870

Radecki, Jeffrey; Wolfe, Scott W.; Strauss, Helene L.; Mintz, Douglas N.

2008-01-01

9

Characteristic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy in soldiers.  

PubMed

A brachial plexus lesion is not common in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of young soldiers with HNPP presenting with brachial plexopathy. By reviewing 2year medical records from Korean military hospitals, we identified soldiers with brachial plexus lesions. Among them, patients diagnosed with HNPP were determined and clinical and electrophysiological findings were compared between HNPP and non-HNPP patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Thirteen patients (6.8%) were diagnosed with HNPP among 189 patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Push-ups, as either a punishment or an exercise, was the most frequent preceding event in HNPP patients (76.9%), whereas it was rare in non-HNPP patients. The distal motor latency of the median nerve showed the highest sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (100%) for HNPP in patients with a brachial plexus lesion. In conclusion, HNPP should be suspected in patients with brachial plexopathy if brachial plexopathy develops after push-ups or if the distal motor latency of median nerves is prolonged. PMID:25175852

Kim, Kyoung-Eun

2014-11-15

10

Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24- year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy. PMID:21386953

Shahien, Radi; Bowirrat, Abdalla

2011-01-01

11

Clinical, Electrophysiological Findings in Adult Patients with Non-traumatic Plexopathies  

PubMed Central

Objective To ascertain the etiology of non-traumatic plexopathy and clarify the clinical, electrophysiological characteristics according to its etiology. Method We performed a retrospective analysis of 63 non-traumatic plexopathy patients that had been diagnosed by nerve conduction studies (NCS) and needle electromyography (EMG). Clinical, electrophysiological, imaging findings were obtained from medical records. Results We identified 36 cases with brachial plexopathy (BP) and 27 cases with lumbosacral plexopathy (LSP). The causes of plexopathy were neoplastic (36.1%), thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) (25.0%), radiation induced (16.7%), neuralgic amyotrophy (8.3%), perioperative (5.6%), unknown (8.3%) in BP, while neoplastic (59.3%), radiation induced (22.2%), neuralgic amyotrophy (7.4%), psoas muscle abscess (3.7%), and unknown (7.4%) in LSP. In neoplastic plexopathy, pain presented as the first symptom in most patients (82.8%), with the lower trunk of the brachial plexus predominantly involved. In radiation induced plexopathy (RIP), pain was a common initial symptom, but the proportion was smaller (50%), and predominant involvements of bilateral lumbosacral plexus and whole trunk of brachial or lumbosacral plexus were characteristic. Myokymic discharges were noted in 41.7% patients with RIP. Abnormal NCS finding in the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve was the most sensitive to diagnose TOS. Neuralgic amyotrophy of the brachial plexus showed upper trunk involvement in all cases. Conclusion By integrating anatomic, pathophysiologic knowledge with detailed clinical assessment and the results of ancillary studies, physicians can make an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:22506209

Ko, Kiljun; Kang, Min Jae; Ko, Moon Ju; Do, Jong Gul; Sunwoo, Hyuk; Kwon, Tae Gun; Hwang, Jung Min; Park, Yoonhong

2011-01-01

12

Lumbosacral plexus delineation, dose distribution, and its correlation with radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in cervical cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Background To evaluate the dose distribution to the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) and its correlation with radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) in patients with cervical cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Materials and methods After meeting eligibility criteria, 50 patients with cervical cancer were selected who were treated with IMRT and high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and the LSP was contoured. Mean volume; percentages of LSP volume absorbing 40, 50, 55, and 60 Gy (V30, V40, V50, V55, and V60) and point doses (P1, P2, P3, P4, P5, P6, P7, P8, P9, and P10); and RILSP incidence were calculated. Results At 60 months of follow-up, four patients (8%) were found to have grade 2/3 RILSP. The mean maximal LSP dose in patients with RILSP was 59.6 Gy compared with 53.9 Gy in patients without RILSP (control; P=0.04). The mean values of V40, V50, V55, and V60 in patients with RILSP versus control were 61.8% versus 52.8%, 44.4% versus 27.7%, 8.0% versus 0.3% and 1.8% versus 0%, respectively (P=0.01, 0.001, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively). Conclusion The delineation of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce the risk for RILSP. The mean values of V40, V50, V55, and V60 for LSP should be less than 55%, 30%, 5%, and 0.5%, respectively; however, further studies are warranted.

Tunio, Mutahir; Al Asiri, Mushabbab; Bayoumi, Yasser; Abdullah O Balbaid, Ali; AlHameed, Majid; Gabriela, Stanciu Laura; Amir O Ali, Ahmad

2015-01-01

13

Migraine complicated by brachial plexopathy as displayed by MRI and MRA: aberrant subclavian artery and cervical ribs.  

PubMed Central

This article describes migraine without aura since childhood in a patient with bilateral cervical ribs. In addition to usual migraine triggers, symptoms were triggered by neck extension and by arm abduction and external rotation; paresthesias and pain preceded migraine triggered by arm and neck movement. Suspected thoracic outlet syndrome was confirmed by high-resolution bilateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the brachial plexus. An unsuspected aberrant right subclavian artery was compressed within the scalene triangle. The aberrant subclavian artery splayed apart the recurrent laryngeal and vagus nerves, displaced the esophagus anteriorly, and effaced the right stellate ganglia and the C8-T1 nerve roots. Scarring and fibrosis of the left scalene triangle resulted in acute angulation of the neurovascular bundle and diminished blood flow in the subclavian artery and vein. A branch of the left sympathetic ganglia was displaced as it joined the C8-T1 nerve roots. Left scalenectomy and rib resection confirmed the MRI and MRA findings; the scalene triangle contents were decompressed, and migraine symptoms subsequently resolved. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:10388259

Saxton, E. H.; Miller, T. Q.; Collins, J. D.

1999-01-01

14

[Radiation-induced neuropathy].  

PubMed

Radiation-induced neuropathy is commonly observed among oncological patients. Radiation can affect the nervous tissue directly or indirectly by inducing vasculopathy or dysfunction of internal organs. Symptoms may be mild and reversible (e.g., pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, drowsiness, fatigue, paresthesia) or life-threatening (cerebral oedema, increased intracranial pressure, seizures). Such complications are clinically divided into peripheral (plexopathies, neuropathies of spinal and cranial nerves) and central neuropathy (myelopathy, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment). The degree of neuronal damages primarily depends on the total and fractional radiation dose and applied therapeutic methods. The conformal and megavoltage radiotherapy seems to be the safeties ones. Diagnostic protocol includes physical examination, imaging (in particular magnetic resonance), electromyography, nerve conduction study and sometimes histological examination. Prevention and early detection of neurological complications are necessary in order to prevent a permanent dysfunction of the nervous system. Presently their treatment is mostly symptomatic, but in same cases a surgical intervention is required. An experimental and clinical data indicates some effectiveness of different neuroprotective agents (e.g. anticoagulants, vitamin E, hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline, bevacizumab, methylphenidate, donepezil), which should be administered before and/or during radiotherapy. PMID:24490474

Kolak, Agnieszka; Staros?awska, Elzbieta; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Pawe?; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Dobrzy?ska-Rutkowska, Aneta; ?opacka-Szatan, Karolina; Burdan, Franciszek

2013-12-01

15

Brachial plexus lesions after backpack carriage in young adults.  

PubMed

Carrying a heavy backpack exerts compression on shoulders, with the potential to cause brachial plexopathy. We evaluated the incidence and predisposing factors of compression plexopathy of the shoulder region in 152,095 military conscripts, hypothesizing that a low body mass index and poor physical fitness predispose to the plexus lesion. Reports of conscripts with neural lesions of the upper arm associated with load carriage were reviewed retrospectively for details associated with the condition onset, symptoms, signs, nerve conduction studies, and electromyographic examinations. Height, weight, and physical fitness scores were obtained from their military training data. The incidence of neural compression after shoulder load carriage in Finnish soldiers was 53.7 (95% confidence interval, 39.5-67.8) per 100,000 conscripts per year. The long thoracic nerve was affected in 19, the axillary nerve in 13, the suprascapular nerve in seven, and the musculocutaneous nerve in six patients. Four patients (7%) had hereditary neuropathy with susceptibility to pressure palsies (HNPP). Symptoms were induced by lighter loads in patients with HNPP. Vulnerability to brachial plexopathy was not predictable from body structure or physical fitness level. To prevent these lesions, awareness of the condition and its symptoms should be increased and backpack designs should be improved. PMID:16906084

Mäkelä, Jyrki P; Ramstad, Raimo; Mattila, Ville; Pihlajamäki, Harri

2006-11-01

16

CT of the brachial plexus in patients with cancer  

SciTech Connect

To assess the usefulness of CT, we reviewed 51 patients with clinically diagnosed brachial plexopathy who were seen between 1977 and 1981. The established etiology was metastatic tumor in 46 and radiation fibrosis in 5. CT was abnormal in 89% of tumor patients. Myelography, bone scan, and plain cervical spine radiographs were less useful. In four of five patients with radiation fibrosis, CT showed distortion of normal tissue planes without a discrete mass, but was not always distinguishable from tumor infiltration. CT of the brachial plexus provides the best two-dimensional view of tumor infiltration and detects bony changes earlier than standard radiographs. CT is a useful guide for surgical exploration of the brachial plexus, but does not differentiate tumor infiltration from radiation fibrosis.

Cascino, T.L.; Kori, S.; Krol, G.; Foley, K.M.

1983-12-01

17

Pulsed radiofrequency treatment within brachial plexus for the management of intractable neoplastic plexopathic pain.  

PubMed

We report on the use of pulsed radiofrequency (RF) within the plexus for the management of intractable pain in three patients with metastatic or invasive plexopathy. The patients were a 38-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer 6 years earlier whose computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a mass lesion at the infraclavicular part of the right brachial plexus, a 68-year-old man diagnosed with advanced lung cancer whose CT scans revealed a bone metastasis in the right humerus invading the axillary region of the right brachial plexus, and a 67-year-old woman diagnosed with advanced lung cancer whose CT scans revealed a bone metastasis in the left humerus invading the axillary region of the left brachial plexus. Ultrasound-guided pulsed RF was performed within the interscalene brachial plexus. During the follow-up period, their intractable pain was moderately controlled. PMID:23070568

Arai, Young-Chang P; Nishihara, Makoto; Aono, Shuichi; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Suzuki, Chiharu; Kinoshita, Akiko; Ushida, Takahiro

2013-04-01

18

Brachial Plexus Neuritis Associated With Streptococcus agalactiae Infection: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Brachial plexus neuritis is reportedly caused by various factors; however, it has not been described in association with Streptococcus agalactiae. This is a case report of a patient diagnosed with brachial plexus neuritis associated with pyogenic arthritis of the shoulder. A 57-year-old man visited the hospital complaining of sudden weakness and painful swelling of the left arm. The diagnosis was pyogenic arthritis of the left shoulder, and the patient was treated with open irrigation and debridement accompanied by intravenous antibiotic therapy. S. agalactiae was isolated from a wound culture, and an electrodiagnostic study showed brachial plexopathy involving the left upper and middle trunk. Nine weeks after onset, muscle strength improved in most of the affected muscles, and an electrodiagnostic study showed signs of reinnervation. In conclusion, S. agalactiae infection can lead to various complications including brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:25229037

Seo, Yu Jung; Lee, Yu Jin; Kim, Joon Sung; Lim, Seong Hoon

2014-01-01

19

Radiation-induced gliomas  

PubMed Central

Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

2013-01-01

20

Radiation-induced meningiomas.  

PubMed

High dose radiation-induced meningiomas are a rare, severe and late complication of craniospinal radiotherapy for brain tumors. Radiation-induced meningiomas are, according to the literature, several times more frequent than radiogenic gliomas and sarcomas. It is suggested that every new case of radiogenic meningioma has to be reported to elucidate this particular pathologic entity with its many grey areas. In addition to high dose radiation-induced meningiomas, intracranial meningiomas were observed in patients who underwent low-dose radiation for tinea capitis in childhood, applied en mass to immigrants coming to Israel from the North Africa and the Middle East during the 1950. Authors summarize the data on radiogenic meningiomas from the literature and, as the previous radiotherapy may confer a low, but life-long risk for meningioma occurrence, they suggest that surveillance MRI after high dose cerebrospinal radiotherapy should be extended to several (3-5) decades after radiotherapy. PMID:11949834

Boljesíkova, E; Chorvath, M

2001-01-01

21

Radiotherapy-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in a patient with cervical cancer: a case report and literature review  

PubMed Central

Radiotherapy-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in cervical cancer treatment is a very rare, but extremely serious complication. The clinical course is associated with severe bilateral lower leg pain, reduced sensation, different degrees of weakness, paresis or paralysis, and sometimes also urinary or fecal incontinence. Patient quality of life becomes significantly deteriorated. Escalating neurological disorders may make self-sufficient functioning impossible. Neurological symptoms, most often irreversible, may develop at different times after irradiation, even after more than 30 years. We present a case of neurological toxicity in a patient successfully treated for cervical cancer with pelvis and para-aortic lymph node irradiation and weekly cisplatin. Neurological symptoms developed a few weeks after completion of external irradiation, were gradually escalating and resulted in complete immobilization of the woman. We underline the significance of long-term, systematic physiotherapy and pharmacological therapy which has resulted in significant improvement of motion efficiency. The literature review concerns the questions of frequency, clinical course and mechanisms of radiation-induced plexopathy. PMID:23788877

Kosobucki, Rados?aw; ?uczy?ska, El?bieta; Bieda, Tomasz; Urba?ski, Krzysztof

2012-01-01

22

Brachial plexus injury.  

PubMed Central

A 28-year-old man shot himself in the left posterior triangle of the neck with a shotgun. At the initial operation secondary repair of the resultant brachial plexus injury was decided upon in view of the difficulty in assessing lesions in continuity at this point after injury. The patient had total brachial plexus palsy. Nine weeks after the injury sensory and motor function were returning and the only element of the brachial plexus not showing evidence of nerve fibre continuity was the musculocutaneous nerve. Sural nerve autografts were sutured between the trimmed proximal and distal stumps of this nerve. By 4 months after the injury there was further improvement in both sensory and motor function, and by 18 months there was sensation in the autonomous zones of both median and ulnar nerves and good return of muscle power. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:603845

Hudson, A. R.; Dommisse, I.

1977-01-01

23

Radiation-Induced Bioradicals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

24

Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis  

PubMed Central

Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

2009-01-01

25

Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.  

PubMed

Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is considered to be the result of a trauma during the delivery, even if there remains some controversy surrounding the causes. Although most babies recover spontaneously in the first 3 months of life, a small number remains with poor recovery which requires surgical brachial plexus exploration. Surgical indications depend on the type of lesion (producing total or partial palsy) and particularly the nonrecovery of biceps function by the age of 3 months. In a global palsy, microsurgery will be mandatory and the strategy for restoration will focus first on hand reinnervation and secondarily on providing elbow flexion and shoulder stability. Further procedures may be necessary during growth in order to avoid fixed contractured deformities or to give or increase strength of important muscle functions like elbow flexion or wrist extension. The author reviews the history of obstetrical brachial plexus injury, epidemiology, and the specifics of descriptive and functional anatomy in babies and children. Clinical manifestations at birth are directly correlated with the anatomical lesion. Finally, operative procedures are considered, including strategies of reconstruction with nerve grafting in infants and secondary surgery to increase functional capacity at later ages. However, normal function is usually not recovered, particularly in total brachial plexus palsy. PMID:23622302

Romaña, M C; Rogier, A

2013-01-01

26

Radiation Induced Genomic Instability  

SciTech Connect

Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend themselves to prolonged study, many tend to eliminate or rearrange the target chromosome until it is too small for further rearrangement. The observed frequency of induced instability by low and high linear-energy-transfer radiations greatly exceeds that observed for nuclear gene mutations at similar doses; hence, mutation of a gene or gene family is unlikely to be the initiating mechanism. Once initiated however, there is evidence in the GM10115 model system that it can be perpetuated over time by dicentric chromosome formation followed by bridge breakage fusion cycles (Marder and Morgan 1993), as well as recombinational events involving interstitial telomere like repeat sequences (Day et al. 1998). There is also increasing evidence that inflammatory type reactions (Lorimore et al. 2001, Lorimore and Wright 2003), presumably involving reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as cytokines and chemokines might be involved in driving the ustable phenotype (Liaikis et al. 2007, Hei et al. 2008). To this end there is very convincing evidence for such reactions being involved in another non-targeted effect associated with ionizing radiation, the bystander effect (Hei et al. 2008). Clearly the link between induced instability and bystander effects suggests common processes and inflammatory type reactions will likely be the subject of future investigation.

Morgan, William F.

2011-03-01

27

Management of brachial plexus injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most brachial plexus lesions are traction injuries sustained during birth, but in adolescents and older people they are usually\\u000a caused by traffic accidents or following a fall in the home. A minority are the result of penetrating injury after civilian\\u000a assault or trauma encountered during wartime.\\u000a \\u000a Birth palsy cases (obstetric brachial plexus palsy) and the remaining cases (traumatic brachial plexus

G. Blaauw; R. S. Muhlig; J. W. Vredeveld

28

Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

Tapio, Soile

29

Pelvic radiculopathies, lumbosacral plexopathies, and neuropathies in oncologic disease: a multidisciplinary approach to a diagnostic challenge  

PubMed Central

Abstract The purpose of this article is to familiarize the reader with the anatomy of the major pelvic nerves and the clinical features of associated lumbosacral plexopathies. To demonstrate this we illustrate several cases of malignant lumbosacral plexopathy on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A new lumbosacral plexopathy in a patient with a prior history of abdominal or pelvic malignancy is usually of malignant etiology. Biopsies may be required to definitively differentiate tumour from posttreatment fibrosis, and in cases of inconclusive sampling or where biopsies are not possible, follow-up imaging may be necessary. In view of the complexity of clinical findings often confounded by a history of prior surgery and/or radiotherapy, a multidisciplinary approach between oncologists, neurologists, and radiologists is often required for what can be a diagnostic challenge. PMID:24433993

Berry, Jonathan; Nisbet, Angus; Bloomfield, David; Burkill, Guy

2013-01-01

30

Brachial neuritis following a corticosteroid injection.  

PubMed

This report presents a case of brachial neuritis following a subacromial corticosteroid injection. The patient developed an anterior interosseous neuropathy shortly after the injection, with no other trigger being identified. This neuropathy has unfortunately not shown any sign of recovery at 2 years. The authors propose that corticosteroid injection be added to the list of possible triggering events of brachial neuritis and highlight the frequent use of oral corticosteroids in its treatment. (1) The injection of local anaesthetic and corticosteroid should be considered as a potential trigger for brachial neuritis. (2) Brachial neuritis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with severe arm pain and weakness. (3) The nerves originating from the upper trunk of the brachial plexus are most commonly affected. (4) The anterior interosseous nerve is involved in one-third of cases. PMID:24596414

Robinson, Matthew; Fulcher, Mark

2014-01-01

31

Radiation-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present paper, important results of our recent computer simulation of radiation-induced amorphization in the ordered compounds CuTi and Cu4Ti3 are summarized. The energetic, structural, thermodynamic and mechanical responses of these intermetallics during chemical disordering, point-defect production and heating were simulated, using molecular dynamics and embedded-atom potentials. From the atomistic details obtained, the critical role of radiation-induced structural disorder in driving the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation is discussed.

Lam, N. Q.; Sabochick, M. J.; Okamoto, P. R.

1994-06-01

32

Molecular Pathways: Radiation-induced Cognitive Impairment  

PubMed Central

Approximately 200,000 patients/year in the US will receive partial or whole brain irradiation for the treatment of primary or metastatic brain cancer. Early and delayed radiation effects are transient and reversible with modern therapeutic standards; yet late radiation effects (?6 months postirradiation) remain a significant risk, resulting in progressive cognitive impairment. These include functional deficits in memory, attention, and executive function that severely affect the patient’s quality of life (QOL). The mechanisms underlying radiation-induced cognitive impairment remain ill defined. Classically, radiation-induced alterations in vascular and neuroinflammatory glial cell clonogenic populations were hypothesized to be responsible for radiation-induced brain injury. Recently, preclinical studies have focused on the hippocampus, one of two sites of adult neurogenesis within the brain, which plays an important role in learning and memory. Radiation ablates hippocampal neurogenesis, alters neuronal function, and induces neuroinflammation. Neuronal stem cells implanted into the hippocampus prevent the decrease in neurogenesis and improve cognition following irradiation. Clinically prescribed drugs, including PPAR ? and ? agonists, as well as RAS blockers, prevent radiation-induced neuroinflammation and cognitive impairment independent of improved neurogenesis. Translating these exciting findings to the clinic offers the promise of improving the QOL of brain tumor patients who receive radiotherapy. PMID:23388505

Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Moore, Elizabeth; Robbins, Mike E

2013-01-01

33

Nuclear Radiation Induced Noise in Infrared Detectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model for calculating the rate and amplitude of gamma ionization events in infrared detectors is presented. Several simplifying approximations to the actual, complex physical situation are applied in the model, thereby allowing an exact analytical formulation of the problem. Experimental measurements of nuclear-radiation induced noise pulse-height distributions and event rates are compared to predictions made using the model. Comparisons

J. C. Pickel; M. D. Petroff

1975-01-01

34

Nuclear radiation induced noise in infrared detectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model for calculating the rate and amplitude of gamma ionization events in infrared detectors is presented. Several simplifying approximations to the actual, complex physical situation are applied in the model, thereby allowing an exact analytical formulation of the problem. Experimental measurements of nuclear-radiation induced noise pulse-height distributions and event rates are compared to predictions made using the model. Comparisons

J. C. Pickel; M. D. Petroff

1975-01-01

35

Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.  

PubMed

Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment. PMID:10710825

Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

1999-01-01

36

Sonographic evaluation of brachial plexus pathology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pre-operative US examinations of the brachial plexus were performed with the purpose of exploring the potential of this technique in recognizing lesions in the region and defining their sonographic morphology, site, extent, and relations to adjacent anatomic structures, and comparing them to the surgical findings to obtain maximal confirmation. Twenty-eight patients with clinical, electro-conductive, and imaging findings suggestive of brachial

Moshe Graif; Carlo Martinoli; Shimon Rochkind; Anat Blank; Leonor Trejo; Judith Weiss; Ada Kessler; Lorenzo E. Derchi

2004-01-01

37

Radiation-induced brain injury: A review  

PubMed Central

Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. Recently developed techniques in neuroscience and neuroimaging provide not only an opportunity to accomplish this, but they also offer the opportunity to identify new biomarkers and new targets for interventions to prevent or ameliorate these late effects. PMID:22833841

Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

2012-01-01

38

Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

1988-04-01

39

Radiation induced fracture of the scapula  

SciTech Connect

A case of radiation induced osteonecrosis resulting in a fracture of the scapula in a 76-yr-old female patient with a history of breast carcinoma is presented. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory recommendations and clinical findings are discussed along with an algorithm for the safe management of patients with a history of cancer and musculoskeletal complaints. This case demonstrates the necessity of a thorough investigation of musculoskeletal complaints in patients with previous bone-seeking carcinomas.

Riggs, J.H. III; Schultz, G.D.; Hanes, S.A. (Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Whittier, CA (USA))

1990-10-01

40

Quercetin Inhibits Radiation-Induced Skin Fibrosis  

PubMed Central

Radiation induced fibrosis of the skin is a late toxicity that may result in loss of function due to reduced range of motion and pain. The current study sought to determine if oral delivery of quercetin mitigates radiation-induced cutaneous injury. Female C3H/HeN mice were fed control chow or quercetin-formulated chow (1% by weight). The right hind leg was exposed to 35 Gy of X rays and the mice were followed serially to assess acute toxicity and hind leg extension. Tissue samples were collected for assessment of soluble collagen and tissue cytokines. Human and murine fibroblasts were subjected to clonogenic assays to determine the effects of quercetin on radiation response. Contractility of fibroblasts was assessed with a collagen contraction assay in the presence or absence of quercetin and transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?). Western blotting of proteins involved in fibroblast contractility and TGF-? signaling were performed. Quercetin treatment significantly reduced hind limb contracture, collagen accumulation and expression of TGF-? in irradiated skin. Quercetin had no effect on the radioresponse of fibroblasts or murine tumors, but was capable of reducing the contractility of fibroblasts in response to TGF-?, an effect that correlated with partial stabilization of phosphorylated cofilin. Quercetin is capable of mitigating radiation induced skin fibrosis and should be further explored as a therapy for radiation fibrosis. PMID:23819596

Horton, Jason A.; Li, Fei; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn; White, Ayla; Krausz, Kristopher; Gonzalez, Frank; Citrin, Deborah

2013-01-01

41

Imaging Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury  

PubMed Central

Technological developments in radiation therapy and other cancer therapies have led to a progressive increase in five-year survival rates over the last few decades. Although acute effects have been largely minimized by both technical advances and medical interventions, late effects remain a concern. Indeed, the need to identify those individuals who will develop radiation-induced late effects, and to develop interventions to prevent or ameliorate these late effects is a critical area of radiobiology research. In the last two decades, preclinical studies have clearly established that late radiation injury can be prevented/ameliorated by pharmacological therapies aimed at modulating the cascade of events leading to the clinical expression of radiation-induced late effects. These insights have been accompanied by significant technological advances in imaging that are moving radiation oncology and normal tissue radiobiology from disciplines driven by anatomy and macrostructure to ones in which important quantitative functional, microstructural, and metabolic data can be noninvasively and serially determined. In the current article, we review use of positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy to generate pathophysiological and functional data in the central nervous system, lung, and heart that offer the promise of, (1) identifying individuals who are at risk of developing radiation-induced late effects, and (2) monitoring the efficacy of interventions to prevent/ameliorate them. PMID:22348250

Robbins, Mike E.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Tsien, Christina I.; Bailey, Janet E.; Marks, Lawrence B.

2013-01-01

42

Systematic Evaluation Of Brachial Plexus Injuries  

PubMed Central

Brachial plexus injuries offer a unique challenge to the athletic trainer because of their relatively high frequency rate in contact sports and because of the complexity of the neuroanatomy in the cervical area. During a game, athletic trainers must make a fast, accurate decision regarding a player's return to competition. It is imperative that the athletic trainer be able to quickly differentiate between minor injuries and more serious injuries warranting removal from the game and/or physician referral. A systematic approach to the evaluation of a brachial plexus injury is essential to ensure proper treatment. This paper will present a structured approach to an on-the-field assessment of brachial plexus injuries. PMID:16558242

Haynes, Scott

1993-01-01

43

Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials  

SciTech Connect

The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

Hanna, R. [DESP, The French Aerospace Lab, 2 avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse (France); Energie, SUPELEC, 3 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); CNES, 18 avenue Edouard Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France); Paulmier, T., E-mail: thierry.paulmier@onera.fr; Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B. [DESP, The French Aerospace Lab, 2 avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse (France); Molinie, P. [Energie, SUPELEC, 3 rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Payan, D.; Balcon, N. [CNES, 18 avenue Edouard Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France)

2014-01-21

44

Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon® FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon® FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T.; Molinie, P.; Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

2014-01-01

45

What has changed in brachial plexus surgery?  

PubMed Central

Brachial plexus injuries, in all their severity and complexity, have been extensively studied. Although brachial plexus injuries are associated with serious and often definitive sequelae, many concepts have changed since the 1950s, when this pathological condition began to be treated more aggressively. Looking back over the last 20 years, it can be seen that the entire approach, from diagnosis to treatment, has changed significantly. Some concepts have become better established, while others have been introduced; thus, it can be said that currently, something can always be offered in terms of functional recovery, regardless of the degree of injury. Advances in microsurgical techniques have enabled improved results after neurolysis and have made it possible to perform neurotization, which has undoubtedly become the greatest differential in treating brachial plexus injuries. Improvements in imaging devices and electrical studies have allowed quick decisions that are reflected in better surgical outcomes. In this review, we intend to show the many developments in brachial plexus surgery that have significantly changed the results and have provided hope to the victims of this serious injury. PMID:23644864

de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; de Paula, Emygdio José Leomil; Junior, Rames Mattar; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

2013-01-01

46

Radiation-induced intracranial meningioma and multiple cavernomas.  

PubMed

Brain irradiation has several well-known long-term side effects, including radiation-induced neoplasms and vasculopathy. In this case report, we describe an extremely rare case of meningioma and 15 cavernomas developing in a 29-year-old man, 19 years after cranial irradiation for posterior cranial fossa medulloblastoma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a radiation-induced meningioma accompanied by this many radiation-induced cavernous angiomas. PMID:24051144

Chourmouzi, Danai; Papadopoulou, Elissavet; Kontopoulos, Athanasios; Drevelegas, Antonios

2013-01-01

47

Radiation-Induced Spinal Cord Hemorrhage (Hematomyelia)  

PubMed Central

Intraspinal hemorrhage is very rare and intramedullary hemorrhage, also called hematomyelia, is the rarest form of intraspinal hemorrhage, usually related to trauma. Spinal vascular malformations such intradural arteriovenous malformations are the most common cause of atraumatic hematomyelia. Other considerations include warfarin or heparin anticoagulation, bleeding disorders, spinal cord tumors. Radiation-induced hematomyelia of the cord is exceedingly rare with only one case in literature to date. We report the case of an 8 year old girl with Ewing’s sarcoma of the thoracic vertebra, under radiation therapy, presenting with hematomyelia. We describe the clinical course, the findings on imaging studies and the available information in the literature. Recognition of the clinical pattern of spinal cord injury should lead clinicians to perform imaging studies to evaluate for compressive etiologies. PMID:25568739

Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy; Vijay, Kanupriya

2014-01-01

48

Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and

Ann Kennedy

2008-01-01

49

Treatment Options for Brachial Plexus Injuries  

PubMed Central

The incidence of brachial plexus injuries is rapidly growing due to the increasing number of high-speed motor-vehicle accidents. These are devastating injuries leading to significant functional impairment of the patients. The purpose of this review paper is to present the available options for conservative and operative treatment and discuss the correct timing of intervention. Reported outcomes of current management and future prospects are also analysed. PMID:24967125

Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Badilas, Nikolaos K.; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A.; Mazis, George; Kotoulas, Helias K.; Kyriakopoulos, Stamatios; Tagkalegkas, Ioannis; Sofianos, Ioannis P.

2014-01-01

50

Brachial plexus block in a parturient.  

PubMed

We report a novel circumstance of brachial plexus anesthesia in a parturient. A 25-year-old woman at 34 weeks of gestation presented with a pathologic proximal right humerus fracture from an intramedullary mass. She was scheduled for tumor biopsy which was performed using a two-site ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block to maximize odds of complete anesthesia while minimizing the risk of phrenic nerve paresis. After a supraclavicular block with 0.5% ropivacaine 20 mL, we translated our ultrasound probe cephalad, inferior to the root of C7 where the divisions of the superior trunk could be seen in a tightly compact arrangement. An additional injection of 0.5% ropivacaine 20 mL was administered at this site, and the patient subsequently underwent successful biopsy without sedatives or analgesics, aside from local anesthetics. In the post-anesthesia care unit, she had normal respirations and oxygen saturations breathing room air, denied any shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, and was discharged shortly after her arrival. While we did not pursue radiologic examination to rule out hemidiaphragm paralysis, we assumed, as evidenced in a previous case report, that unlike most healthy patients, a parturient would demonstrate some clinical signs and/or symptoms of hemidiaphragm paralysis, given that the diaphragm is almost totally responsible for inspiration in the term parturient. This represents only the second brachial plexus block in a parturient reported in the literature; the first using ultrasound guidance and without respiratory embarrassment. PMID:24631059

Patzkowski, M; Scheiner, J

2014-05-01

51

Radiation-induced morphea - a literature review.  

PubMed

Radiation-induced morphea (RIM) is a rare and under-recognized skin complication of radiotherapy. It is commonly wrongly diagnosed as other dermatological conditions or malignancy because of similar clinical characteristics. This literature review analyses 66 cases that have been reported in the literature since 1989. The clinical appearance often includes pain and disfiguration of affected area, which may influence the patient's quality of life. There is no clear connection between the radiotherapy dose, the fractionation scheme, the use of a boost, age, the presence of other dermatological conditions or other connective tissue diseases and the occurrence of RIM. Its pathogenesis is still unclear, but several theories are proposed to explain this phenomenon. The available data suggest that the abnormally high secretion of some cytokines (interleukin 4, interleukin 5, transforming growth factor) induced by radiation causes an extensive fibrosis after an activation of fibroblasts. Histological confirmation is crucial in distinguishing RIM from similar-looking diseases, such as chronic radiation dermatitis, cancer recurrence, radiation, recall dermatitis, new carcinoma or cellulitis. There is no clear treatment regimen for this condition. Clinical outcome after therapy is often unsatisfactory. The commonly used methods and agents include: topical and systemic steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, systemic immunosuppressants including methotrexate, tacrolimus, heparin, hyaluronidase, phototherapy (UVA, UVA1, UVB, PUVA), systemic antibiotics, imiquimod, mycophenolate mofetil, photophoresis. The differential diagnosis is challenging and requires a multidisciplinary approach to avoid misdiagnosis and to plan appropriate treatment. PMID:25174551

Spalek, M; Jonska-Gmyrek, J; Ga?ecki, J

2015-02-01

52

Radiation-Induced Amorphization of Crystalline Ice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Crystalline ice has been unambiguously identified on the surface of most of the Jovian, Saturnian and Uranian satellites, and on the surface of some trans-Neptunian objects such as Quaoar, and 2003 EL61. This result is surprising, as the low surface temperatures of these objects should cause the ice condensed on them to be amorphous. Moreover, the surface of these bodies is constantly exposed to UV photons, solar wind, cosmic rays or energetic charged particles trapped by the planetary magnetic fields, which are known to amorphize crystalline ice. Here, we review 30 years of experimental studies of radiation-induced amorphization of crystalline ice analyzing the differences found between light and heavy ions, electrons and photons. We also present high quality near-infrared absorption spectra for amorphous and crystalline ice before and after we irradiated them with 225 keV protons. After irradiation at 80 K, the crystalline ice spectrum is altered so that it is indistinguishable from the spectrum of amorphous ice, indicating that irradiation can fully amorphize crystalline ice. We will compare these results with previous studies and discuss the astrophysical implication for planetary bodies.

Fama, Marcelo A.; Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

2008-09-01

53

Radiation-induced amorphization of crystalline ice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study radiation-induced amorphization of crystalline ice, analyzing the results of three decades of experiments with a variety of projectiles, irradiation energy, and ice temperature, finding a similar trend of increasing resistance of amorphization with temperature and inconsistencies in results from different laboratories. We discuss the temperature dependence of amorphization in terms of the 'thermal spike' model. We then discuss the common use of the 1.65 ?m infrared absorption band of water as a measure of degree of crystallinity, an increasingly common procedure to analyze remote sensing data of astronomical icy bodies. The discussion is based on new, high quality near-infrared reflectance absorption spectra measured between 1.4 and 2.2 ?m for amorphous and crystalline ices irradiated with 225 keV protons at 80 K. We found that, after irradiation with 10 15 protons cm -2, crystalline ice films thinner than the ion range become fully amorphous, and that the infrared absorption spectra show no significant changes upon further irradiation. The complete amorphization suggests that crystalline ice observed in the outer Solar System, including trans-neptunian objects, may results from heat from internal sources or from the impact of icy meteorites or comets.

Famá, M.; Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

2010-05-01

54

Radiation-induced segregation in complex alloys  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of alloying elements to the surface during 3 MeV /sup 58/Ni/sup +/ ion bombardment was investigated in alloys of Fe-200Cr-12Ni (at. %) containing controlled additions of Si and Mo. The segregation profiles, determined by Auger electron spectroscopy, show that Ni and Si are enriched, while Cr and Mo are depleted at the irradiated surfaces. The data indicates that the RIS of Ni and Cr are affected by the presence of Mo and Si in the alloy. However, no obvious trends are observed as a function of the minor solute element concentration. The temperature dependence of the RIS of the alloying elements was also investigated. A maximum of segregation at approx. 500/sup 0/C is observed for Si followed by a minimum and then a sharp increase in segregation at temperatures above 600/sup 0/C. The temperature dependence of segregation for Cr, Ni and Mo shows continous increase with temperature in the temperature regime investigated. The void swelling data on these alloys is also presented as a function of temperature and composition. Additions of Si reduce the swelling by affecting both the nucleation and the growth of the voids. The peak swelling temperature for all the alloys containing minor solutes are found to be lower (approx. 50/sup 0/C) than that of the base alloy (peak swelling temperature approx. 660/sup 0/C).

Sethi, V.K.; Okamoto, P.R.

1980-01-01

55

Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

Rauch, Philipp J. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Park, Henry S. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (United States); Chiang, Veronica L. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Vortmeyer, Alexander O., E-mail: alexander.vortmeyer@yale.edu [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2012-05-01

56

Radiation-induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides  

SciTech Connect

Capacitance-voltage and thermally stimulated current methods are used to investigate radiation induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides. Results are compared with models of oxide and interface trap charge buildup at low electric fields.

Fleetwood, D.M.; Riewe, L.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Witczak, Schrimpf, R.D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1996-03-01

57

Ultrasonography for neonatal brachial plexus palsy.  

PubMed

Ultrasonography has previously been reported for use in the evaluation of compressive or traumatic peripheral nerve pathology and for its utility in preoperative mapping. However, these studies were not performed in infants, and they were not focused on the brachial plexus. The authors report a case in which ultrasonography was used to improve operative management of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP). An infant boy was born at term, complicated by right-sided shoulder dystocia. Initial clinical evaluation revealed proximal arm weakness consistent with an upper trunk injury. Unlike MRI or CT myelography that focus on proximal nerve roots, ultrasonography of the brachial plexus in the supraclavicular fossa was able to demonstrate a small neuroma involving the upper trunk (C-5 and C-6) and no asymmetry in movement of the diaphragm or in the appearance of the rhomboid muscle when compared with the unaffected side. However, the supra- and infraspinatus muscles were significantly asymmetrical and atrophied on the affected side. Importantly, ultrasound examination of the shoulder revealed posterior glenohumeral laxity. Instead of pursuing the primary nerve reconstruction first, timely treatment of the shoulder subluxation prevented formation of joint dysplasia and formation of a false glenoid, which is a common sequela of this condition. Because the muscles innervated by proximal branches of the cervical nerve roots/trunks were radiographically normal, subsequent nerve transfers were performed and good functional results were achieved. The authors believe this to be the first report describing the utility of ultrasonography in the surgical treatment planning in a case of NBPP. Noninvasive imaging, in addition to thorough history and physical examination, reduces the intraoperative time required to determine the extent and severity of nerve injury by allowing improved preoperative planning of the surgical strategy. Inclusion of ultrasonography as a preoperative modality may yield improved outcomes for children with NBPP. PMID:25216291

Joseph, Jacob Rahul; DiPietro, Michael A; Somashekar, Deepak; Parmar, Hemant A; Yang, Lynda J S

2014-11-01

58

A Comparison between Brachial and Echocardiographic Systolic Time Intervals  

PubMed Central

Systolic time interval (STI) is an established noninvasive technique for the assessment of cardiac function. Brachial STIs can be automatically determined by an ankle-brachial index (ABI)-form device. The aims of this study are to evaluate whether the STIs measured from ABI-form device can represent those measured from echocardiography and to compare the diagnostic values of brachial and echocardiographic STIs in the prediction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%. A total of 849 patients were included in the study. Brachial pre-ejection period (bPEP) and brachial ejection time (bET) were measured using an ABI-form device and pre-ejection period (PEP) and ejection time (ET) were measured from echocardiography. Agreement was assessed by correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plot. Brachial STIs had a significant correlation with echocardiographic STIs (r?=?0.644, P<0.001 for bPEP and PEP; r ?=?0.850, P<0.001 for bET and ET; r?=?0.708, P<0.001 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET). The disagreement between brachial and echocardiographic STIs (brachial STIs minus echocardiographic STIs) was 28.55 ms for bPEP and PEP, -4.15 ms for bET and ET and -0.11 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The areas under the curve for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET in the prediction of LVEF <50% were 0.771 and 0.765, respectively. Brachial STIs were good alternatives to STIs obtained from echocardiography and also helpful in prediction of LVEF <50%. Brachial STIs automatically obtained from an ABI-form device may be helpful for evaluation of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. PMID:23409059

Su, Ho-Ming; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Lee, Wen-Hsien; Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Chee-Siong; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

2013-01-01

59

Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity  

PubMed Central

AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ?60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ?60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

2005-01-01

60

Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury  

PubMed Central

Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats’ upper limbs was significantly attenuated. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the expression of ?-endorphins in the arcuate nucleus was significantly increased after therapy. Thus, experimental findings indicate that electroacupuncture can attenuate neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury through upregulating ?-endorphin expression. PMID:25221593

Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

2014-01-01

61

Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models  

PubMed Central

The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:25062865

2014-01-01

62

The Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect  

PubMed Central

The radiation-induced bystander effect is the phenomenon which non-irradiated cells exhibit effects along with their different levels as a result of signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Responses of non-irradiated cells may include changes in process of translation, gene expression, cell proliferation, apoptosis and cells death. These changes are confirmed by results of some In-Vivo studies. Most well-known important factors affecting radiation-induced bystander effect include free radicals, immune system factors, expression changes of some genes involved in inflammation pathway and epigenetic factors. PMID:25599062

Najafi, M; Fardid, R; Hadadi, Gh; Fardid, M

2014-01-01

63

[Radiation-induced meningioma: the changing pattern of the disease].  

PubMed

In this country radiation-induced meningiomas were usually associated with low-dose irradiation of the scalp of immigrants from North Africa, given as part of the treatment of tinea capitis. An Ashkenazi patient developed meningiomas 15 years after high-dose irradiation for a benign lesion in the parasellar region. The accumulating literature about high-dose radiation-induced meningiomas is reviewed and attention is drawn to the ever increasing number of meningiomas observed in immigrants from the former Soviet Union. PMID:9153891

Sviri, G; Sahar, A; Feinsod, M

1997-02-16

64

[Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma of the brachial plexus].  

PubMed

Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma that is extremely rare in the brachial plexus. We report a case of a myxoid/round cell liposarcoma originating in the brachial plexus that was surgically resected and evolved well, with no deficit or recurrence after 2 years of follow-up. To date, there has been no other case of this sarcoma in the literature. PMID:25126709

Giner, Javier; Isla, Alberto; Hernández, Borja; Nistal, Manuel

2014-01-01

65

Cosmology for grand unified theories with radiatively induced symmetry breaking  

Microsoft Academic Search

The treatment of first-order phase transitions for standard grand unified theories is shown to break down for models with radiatively induced spontaneous symmetry breaking. It is argued that proper analysis of these transitions which would take place in the early history of the universe can lead to an explanation of the cosmological homogeneity, flatness, and monopole puzzles.

Andreas Albrecht; P. J. Steinhardt

1982-01-01

66

Introduction Mammals suffering from radiation-induced anemia or  

E-print Network

Introduction Mammals suffering from radiation-induced anemia or neutropenia can be rescued by stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) neutralization or CXCR4-blocking antibody, but could be reduced by addition of c-met-blocking antibody and augmented by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), the putative ligand

Zandstra, Peter W.

67

Radiation induces senescence and a bystander effect through metabolic alterations.  

PubMed

Cellular senescence is a state of irreversible growth arrest; however, the metabolic processes of senescent cells remain active. Our previous studies have shown that radiation induces senescence of human breast cancer cells that display low expression of securin, a protein involved in control of the metaphase-anaphase transition and anaphase onset. In this study, the protein expression profile of senescent cells was resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to investigate associated metabolic alterations. We found that radiation induced the expression and activation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that has an important role in glycolysis. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase A, which is involved in the conversion of pyruvate to lactate, the release of lactate and the acidification of the extracellular environment, was also induced. Inhibition of glycolysis by dichloroacetate attenuated radiation-induced senescence. In addition, radiation also induced activation of the 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) pathways to promote senescence. We also found that radiation increased the expression of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) that facilitates the export of lactate into the extracellular environment. Inhibition of glycolysis or the AMPK/NF-?B signalling pathways reduced MCT1 expression and rescued the acidification of the extracellular environment. Interestingly, these metabolic-altering signalling pathways were also involved in radiation-induced invasion of the surrounding, non-irradiated breast cancer and normal endothelial cells. Taken together, radiation can induce the senescence of human breast cancer cells through metabolic alterations. PMID:24853433

Liao, E-C; Hsu, Y-T; Chuah, Q-Y; Lee, Y-J; Hu, J-Y; Huang, T-C; Yang, P-M; Chiu, S-J

2014-01-01

68

Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. (Technion Medical School, Haifa (Israel))

1993-01-15

69

SENSITIVITY TO RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER IN HEMOCHROMATOSIS  

EPA Science Inventory

Determination of dose-response relationships for radiation-induced cancer in segments of the population with high susceptibility is critical for understanding the risks of low dose and low dose rates to humans. Clean-up levels for radionuclides will depend upon the fraction of t...

70

Halofuginone mediated protection against radiation-induced leg contracture.  

PubMed

Fibrosis of normal tissues often accompanies radiation treatment of cancer. Activation of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling pathway is thought to play a major role in radiation-induced fibrosis and has prompted the development and assessment of low molecular weight inhibitors of the pathway. Previous studies with halofuginone have shown it to inhibit TGF-beta signaling in vitro and protect mice from radiation-induced leg contraction (a model for soft tissue fibrosis). The current study confirms these findings for HaCaT cells stimulated with exogenous TGF-beta treatment. Reducing the halifuginone treatment from 7 days/week (used previously) to 5 days/week post-radiation exposure provided significant protection against radiation-induced leg contraction in mice 3 and 4 months post-radiation treatment. Halofuginone treatment was shown to attenuate TGF-beta signaling molecules taken from irradiated skin including TGF-betaRII, pSmad3, Smad7, and TSP1. The latter, TSP1, a co-activator of TGF-beta may serve as a suitable biomarker for monitoring the efficacy of halofuginone should it be evaluated in a clinical setting for protection against radiation-induced fibrosis. PMID:19578745

Ishii, Hisanari; Choudhuri, Rajani; Mathias, Askale; Sowers, Anastasia L; Flanders, Kathleen C; Cook, John A; Mitchell, James B

2009-08-01

71

Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

1998-01-01

72

Kinetics of radiation-induced segregation in ternary alloys. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

Model calculations of radiation-induced segregation in ternary alloys have been performed, using a simple theory. The theoretical model describes the coupling between the fluxes of radiation-induced defects and alloying elements in an alloy A-B-C by partitioning the defect fluxes into those occurring via A-, B-, and C-atoms, and the atom fluxes into those taking place via vacancies and interstitials. The defect and atom fluxes can be expressed in terms of concentrations and concentration gradients of all the species present. With reasonable simplifications, the radiation-induced segregation problem can be cast into a system of four coupled partial-differential equations, which can be solved numerically for appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Model calculations have been performed for ternary solid solutions intended to be representative of Fe-Cr-Ni and Ni-Al-Si alloys under various irradiation conditions. The dependence of segregation on both the alloy properties and the irradiation variables, e.g., temperature and displacement rate, was calculated. The sample calculations are in good qualitative agreement with the general trends of radiation-induced segregation observed experimentally.

Lam, N.Q.; Kumar, A.; Wiedersich, H.

1982-01-01

73

Radiation induces senescence and a bystander effect through metabolic alterations  

PubMed Central

Cellular senescence is a state of irreversible growth arrest; however, the metabolic processes of senescent cells remain active. Our previous studies have shown that radiation induces senescence of human breast cancer cells that display low expression of securin, a protein involved in control of the metaphase–anaphase transition and anaphase onset. In this study, the protein expression profile of senescent cells was resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to investigate associated metabolic alterations. We found that radiation induced the expression and activation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that has an important role in glycolysis. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase A, which is involved in the conversion of pyruvate to lactate, the release of lactate and the acidification of the extracellular environment, was also induced. Inhibition of glycolysis by dichloroacetate attenuated radiation-induced senescence. In addition, radiation also induced activation of the 5?-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) pathways to promote senescence. We also found that radiation increased the expression of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) that facilitates the export of lactate into the extracellular environment. Inhibition of glycolysis or the AMPK/NF-?B signalling pathways reduced MCT1 expression and rescued the acidification of the extracellular environment. Interestingly, these metabolic-altering signalling pathways were also involved in radiation-induced invasion of the surrounding, non-irradiated breast cancer and normal endothelial cells. Taken together, radiation can induce the senescence of human breast cancer cells through metabolic alterations. PMID:24853433

Liao, E-C; Hsu, Y-T; Chuah, Q-Y; Lee, Y-J; Hu, J-Y; Huang, T-C; Yang, P-M; Chiu, S-J

2014-01-01

74

Modeling radiation-induced mixing at interfaces between low solubility metals  

E-print Network

This thesis studies radiation-induced mixing at interfaces between low solubility metals using molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. It provides original contributions on the fundamental mechanisms of radiation-induced ...

Zhang, Liang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01

75

Automatic brachial ankle pulse wave velocity measurements for vascular damage assessments  

Microsoft Academic Search

An automatic brachial ankle pulse wave velocity device was developed using plethysmographic method based on blood pressure cuffs wrapped on arm brachial artery and tibial artery of ankle. Three electrodes of electrocardiogram were placed on ventral surface of both wrists and medial side of right ankle. The acquired signals of automatic brachial ankle pulse wave velocity device was developed using

R. Gonzalez; O. Morales; J. Delgado; J. M. Padilla; J. M. Ferrero; J. Saiz

2008-01-01

76

Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy ?-particle irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensitive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose ?-particle radiation-induced damage in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

Jiang, Erkang; Wu, Lijun

2009-04-01

77

Radiation induced viscous flow in amorphous thin films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate surface roughness and stress relaxation in amorphous thin films during ion beam irradiation by a combination of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. These experiments show, that smoothing occurs by a viscous mechanism. With computer simulations we investigate the model system CuTi, and find that radiation induced viscous flow is independent of the recoil energy between 100 and 15keV, when compared on the basis of defect production. Additionally we can identify a threshold recoil energy for flow of approximately 10eV. We show, that point defects can mediate the flow, by injection of interstitial and vacancy-like defects, which induce the same amount of flow as recoil events. The results are compared with the thermal spike model of radiation induced viscous flow.

Mayr, S. G.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Averback, R. S.

2003-03-01

78

The radiation-induced chemistry in solid xenon matrices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper presents an overview of recent studies of the radiation-chemical transformations of guest molecules in solid xenon induced by fast electrons and x-ray irradiation. Specific features of the experimental approach based on the combination of matrix isolation IR and EPR spectroscopy are briefly outlined (with a particular emphasis on monoisotopic and isotopically enriched xenon matrices). The results reveal rich and diverse radiation-induced chemistry in solid xenon, which is considered in the following major aspects: (1) matrix-induced and matrix-assisted transformations of the primary guest radical cations; (2) production and dynamics of hydrogen atoms; (3) formation of xenon hydrides. Finally, preliminary results on the radiation-induced generation of oxygen atoms and ions in solid xenon are presented.

Feldman, V. I.; Kobzarenko, A. V.; Orlov, A. Y.; Sukhov, F. F.

2012-08-01

79

Transcatheter brachial fistula creation for treatment of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.  

PubMed

Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) are thought to form as a result of exclusion of hepatic venous blood from part of the pulmonary circulation. Surgical arteriovenous (AV) fistula creation has demonstrated therapeutic potential to reverse PAVM formation. We sought to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of transcatheter AV fistula creation for this indication. Fluoroscopically guided puncture from the basilic vein into the brachial artery using a Brockenbrough needle and sharpened 0.014" wire created a tract between these vessels. After balloon dilation of the tract, a covered stent was deployed, resulting in a functioning brachial AV fistula. The procedure was technically successful, with no clinical complications at 4 months follow-up. Repeat diagnostic catheterization revealed marked improvement in systemic saturation and near-resolution of PAVMs in the pilot patient. This report suggests that transcatheter brachial arteriovenous fistula formation is technically feasible, and may be effective in managing PAVMs in select single-ventricle patients. PMID:23765690

Esch, Jesse J; Marshall, Audrey C; Porras, Diego

2014-04-01

80

Radiation Induced Charge Trapping in Ultrathin Based MOSFETs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiation induced charge trapping in ultrathin HfO2 -based n-channel MOSFETs is characterized as a function of dielectric thickness and irradiation bias following exposure to 10 keV X-rays and\\/or constant voltage stress. Positive and negative oxide-trap charges are observed, depending on irradiation and bias stress conditions. No significant interface-trap buildup is found in these devices under these irradiation and stress conditions.

Sriram K. Dixit; Xing J. Zhou; Ronald D. Schrimpf; Daniel M. Fleetwood; Sokrates T. Pantelides; Rino Choi; Gennadi Bersuker; Leonard C. Feldman

2007-01-01

81

Radiation-induced adaptive response in fish cell lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is considerable interest at present in low-dose radiation effects in non-human species. In this study gamma radiation-induced adaptive response, a low-dose radiation effect, was examined in three fish cell lines, (CHSE-214 (Chinook salmon), RTG-2 (rainbow trout) and ZEB-2J (zebrafish)). Cell survival after exposure to direct radiation with or without a 0.1Gy priming dose, was determined using the colony forming

Lorna A. Ryan; Colin B. Seymour; Alicia O'Neill-Mehlenbacher; Carmel E. Mothersill

2008-01-01

82

Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis by thiolamines.  

PubMed

Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8.3 hybridoma after a 60-min (LD50 = 4.5 mM) or during a 20-h (LD50 = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-h exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50% apoptosis within 20 h. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-min or 20-h exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidine prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4 mM for 15 min) or cysteine (10 mM for 60 min) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 h) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 min beginning 60 min after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 h beginning 60 min after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations. PMID:9343109

Warters, R L; Roberts, J C; Wilmore, B H; Kelley, L L

1997-10-01

83

Radiation-induced defect centers in glass ceramics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to characterize the radiation-induced defect centers in low-thermal-expansion glass ceramics, including two types of Zerodur and Astrositall. The observed ESR spectra can be associated with different types of defect centers: a Zn\\/sup +\\/ center, several types of oxygen hole centers (OHCs), an aluminum-oxygen hole center (Al-OHC), an Fe\\/sup 3 +\\/ center, Ti\\/sup 3 +\\/

T. E. Tsai; E. J. Friebele; D. L. Griscom; W. Pannhorst

1989-01-01

84

Radiation-induced defect centers in glass ceramics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to characterize the radiation-induced defect centers in low-thermal-expansion glass ceramics, including two types of Zerodur and Astrositall. The observed ESR spectra can be associated with different types of defect centers: a Zn+ center, several types of oxygen hole centers (OHCs), an aluminum-oxygen hole center (Al-OHC), an Fe3+ center, Ti3+ and Zr3+ centers, and three

T. E. Tsai; E. J. Friebele; D. L. Griscom; W. Pannhorst

1989-01-01

85

Repair of radiation-induced genetic damage under microgravity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of microgravity on the repair of radiation induced genetic damage in a temperature-conditional repair mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (rad 54-3) was investigated onboard the IML-1 mission (January 22th - 30th 1992, STS-42). Cells were irradiated before the flight, incubated under microgravity at the permissive (22°C) and restrictive (36°C) temperature and afterwards tested for survival. The results

H.-D. Pross; M. Kost; J. Kiefer

1994-01-01

86

Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

1997-01-01

87

Radiation-induced apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.  

PubMed

The response of the microvasculature to ionizing radiation is thought to be an important factor in the overall response of both normal tissues and tumours. It has recently been reported that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a potent mitogen for endothelial cells, protects large vessel endothelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro. Microvessel cells are phenotypically distinct from large vessel cells. We studied the apoptotic response of confluent monolayers of capillary endothelial cells (ECs) to ionizing radiation and bFGF. Apoptosis was assessed by identifying changes in nuclear morphology, recording cell detachment rates and by detecting internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Withdrawal of bFGF alone induces apoptosis in these monolayers. The magnitude of this apoptotic response depends upon the duration of bFGF withdrawal. Irradiation (2-10 Gy) induces apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Radiation-induced apoptosis occurs in a discrete wave 6-10 h after irradiation, and radiation-induced apoptosis is enhanced in cultures that are simultaneously deprived of bFGF. For example, 6 h after 10 Gy, 44.3% (s.e. 6.3%) of cells in the monolayer simultaneously deprived of bFGF exhibit apoptotic morphology compared with 19.8% (s.e. 3.8%) in the presence of bFGF. These studies show that either bFGF withdrawal or ionizing radiation can induce apoptosis in confluent monolayers of capillary endothelial cells and that radiation-induced apoptosis can be modified by the presence of bFGF. PMID:9043022

Langley, R E; Bump, E A; Quartuccio, S G; Medeiros, D; Braunhut, S J

1997-01-01

88

Retinal Vascular Caliber and Brachial Flow-Mediated Dilation  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose Retinal vascular caliber changes have been shown to predict stroke, but the underlying mechanism of this association is unknown. We examined the relationship between retinal vascular caliber with brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of systemic endothelial function. Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a population-based study of persons 45 to 84 years of age residing in 6 US communities free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline. Brachial FMD data were collected at baseline (July 2000 to June 2002), and retinal vascular caliber was measured from digital retinal photographs at the second examination, immediately after the first (August 2002 to January 2004). Data were available for 2851 participants for analysis. Results The mean brachial FMD was 4.39±2.79%. After adjusting for age and gender, brachial FMD was reduced in persons with wider retinal venular caliber (changes in FMD ?0.25, 95% CI, ?0.36, ? 0.13; P<0.001, per SD increase in venular caliber). This relationship persists after adjusting for systolic blood pressure, serum total cholesterol, use of lipid-lowering and antihypertensive medication, body mass index, current smoking status, and hemoglobinA1C (?0.18; 95% CI ?0.30, ? 0.06; P=0.004, per SD increase in venular caliber). Brachial FMD was not associated with retinal arteriolar caliber. Conclusions Persons with wider retinal venules have reduced brachial FMD, independent of other vascular risk factors. This suggests that retinal venular caliber, previously shown to predict stroke, may be a marker of underlying systemic endothelial dysfunction. PMID:20508189

Nguyen, Thanh T.; Islam, F.M. Amirul; Farouque, H.M. Omar; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Herrington, David M.; Wong, Tien Yin

2010-01-01

89

Brachial plexus injury during surgery--report of two cases.  

PubMed

Brachial plexus is the most commonly injured peripheral nerve by malposition during operation. We present two cases of transient brachial palsy after surgery under general anesthesia. Symptoms of the first case persisted about 60 min. Electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) revealed no abnormal finding three days later. In the second case, axonal neuropathy was found at left axillary and suprascapular nerves by EMG and NCV three weeks later. Symptoms persisted for three months and had complete remission after conservative treatment. PMID:9407684

Liu, S T; Huang, S J; Chu, Y H; Wong, C S; Wu, C T; Ho, S T

1997-09-01

90

MRI of axillary brachial plexus blocks  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Axillary plexus blocks are usually guided by ultrasound, but alternative methods may be used when ultrasound equipment is lacking. For a nonultrasound-guided axillary block, the need for three injections has been questioned. OBJECTIVES Could differences in block success between single, double and triple deposits methods be explained by differences in local anaesthetic distribution as observed by MRI? DESIGN A blinded and randomised controlled study. SETTING Conducted at Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Norway from 2009 to 2011. PATIENTS Forty-five ASA 1 to 2 patients scheduled for surgery were randomised to three equally sized groups. All patients completed the study. INTERVENTIONS Patients in the single-deposit group had an injection through a catheter parallel to the median nerve. In the double-deposit group the patients received a transarterial block. In the triple-deposit group the injections of the two other groups were combined. Upon completion of local anaesthetic injection the patients were scanned by MRI, before clinical block assessment. The distribution of local anaesthetic was scored by its closeness to terminal nerves and cords of the brachial plexus, as seen by MRI. The clinical effect was scored by the degree of sensory block in terminal nerve innervation areas. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Sensory block effect and MRI distribution pattern. RESULTS The triple-deposit method had a higher success rate (100%) than the single-deposit method (67%) and the double-deposit method (67%) in blocking all cutaneous nerves distal to the elbow (P?=?0.04). The patients in the triple-deposit group most often had the best MRI scores. For any nerve or cord, at least one of the single-deposit or double-deposit groups had a similarly high MRI score as the triple-deposit group. CONCLUSION Distal to the elbow, the triple-deposit method had the highest sensory block success rate. This could be explained to some extent by analysis of the magnetic resonance images. TRIAL REGISTRATION ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01033006. PMID:25051144

Kjelstrup, Trygve; Hol, Per K.; Courivaud, Frédéric; Smith, Hans-Jørgen; Røkkum, Magne; Klaastad, Øivind

2014-01-01

91

Learn the Brachial Plexus in Five Minutes or Less  

E-print Network

is the result of work supported with resources and the use of facilities at the VA Gulf Coast Veterans Health and Rehabilitation Department of Veterans Affairs, Biloxi, Mississippi and Dennis A. Chu, M.D. This material view of the Department of Veterans Affairs of the U.S. Government. #12;The brachial plexus contains

Finley Jr., Russell L.

92

Uterine necrosis and lumbosacral-plexopathy following pelvic vessel embolization for postpartum haemorrhage: report of two cases and review of literature.  

PubMed

We are reporting two cases of uterine necrosis and lumbosacral-plexopathy in patients, who underwent pelvic vessel embolization (PVE) following postpartum hemorrhage. Embolization was performed with gelfoam slurry, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles and coil in one patient and with gelfoam slurry only, in second patient. Both patients had lower limbs weakness and had persistent fever in the postembolization period. Nerve conduction study in both were suggestive of common peroneal and tibial neuropathy. An ultrasonography and computed tomography of abdomen and pelvis revealed bulky uterus with no identifiable endometrium and multiple air foci in subendometrial region suggestive of uterine necrosis, confirmed later by histology of expelled uterine mass. Lumbosacral ischemia resulting in paraparesis and uterine necrosis presenting as longstanding fever after embolization are extremely rare but overwhelming complications of embolization. Only 19 cases of uterine necrosis and <10 cases of lumbosacral plexopathy have been reported in the literature. The overall effectiveness of PVE is high in treatment of obstetric hemorrhage with low complication rate and highly selective PVE may further prevent these complication. To the best of our knowledge the co-existing uterine necrosis and lumbosacral plexopathy secondry to PVE has not been described prevoiusly in patients with postpartum hemorrhage. Both patients recovered with conservative management. PMID:24947325

Rohilla, Minakshi; Singh, Purnima; Kaur, Jaswinder; Prasad, G R V; Jain, Vanita; Lal, Anupam

2014-10-01

93

Quantifying Local Radiation-Induced Lung Damage From Computed Tomography  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Optimal implementation of new radiotherapy techniques requires accurate predictive models for normal tissue complications. Since clinically used dose distributions are nonuniform, local tissue damage needs to be measured and related to local tissue dose. In lung, radiation-induced damage results in density changes that have been measured by computed tomography (CT) imaging noninvasively, but not yet on a localized scale. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop a method for quantification of local radiation-induced lung tissue damage using CT. Methods and Materials: CT images of the thorax were made 8 and 26 weeks after irradiation of 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% lung volume of rats. Local lung tissue structure (S{sub L}) was quantified from local mean and local standard deviation of the CT density in Hounsfield units in 1-mm{sup 3} subvolumes. The relation of changes in S{sub L} (DELTAS{sub L}) to histologic changes and breathing rate was investigated. Feasibility for clinical application was tested by applying the method to CT images of a patient with non-small-cell lung carcinoma and investigating the local dose-effect relationship of DELTAS{sub L}. Results: In rats, a clear dose-response relationship of DELTAS{sub L} was observed at different time points after radiation. Furthermore, DELTAS{sub L} correlated strongly to histologic endpoints (infiltrates and inflammatory cells) and breathing rate. In the patient, progressive local dose-dependent increases in DELTAS{sub L} were observed. Conclusion: We developed a method to quantify local radiation-induced tissue damage in the lung using CT. This method can be used in the development of more accurate predictive models for normal tissue complications.

Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Hogeweg, Laurens E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen/University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Faber, Hette [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen/University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen/University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Tukker, Wim G.J. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen/University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schippers, Jacobus M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen/University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Accelerator Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen/University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen/University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen/University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@rt.umcg.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen/University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2010-02-01

94

Radiation-induced segregation in candidate fusion-reactor alloys  

SciTech Connect

The effect of radiation on surface segregation of minor and impurity elements has been studied in four candidate fusion reactor alloys. Radiation induced surface segregation of phosphorus was found in both 316 type stainless steel and in Nimonic PE-16. Segregation and depletion of the other alloying elements in 316 stainless steel agreed with that reported by other investigators. Segregation of nitrogen in ferritic HT-9 was enhanced by radiation but no phosphorus segregation was detected. No significant radiation enhanced or induced segregation was observed in a Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The results indicate that radiaton enhanced grain boundary segregation could contribute to the embrittlement of 316 SS and PE-16.

Brimhall, J.L.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.

1981-07-01

95

Radiation-induced premelting of ice at silica interfaces.  

PubMed

The existence of surface and interfacial melting of ice below 0 degrees C has been confirmed by many different experimental techniques. Here we present a high-energy x-ray reflectivity study of the interfacial melting of ice as a function of both temperature and x-ray irradiation dose. We found a clear increase of the thickness of the quasiliquid layer with the irradiation dose. By a systematic x-ray study, we have been able to unambiguously disentangle thermal and radiation-induced premelting phenomena. We also confirm the previously announced very high water density (1.25 g/cm(3)) within the emerging quasiliquid layer. PMID:19792807

Schöder, S; Reichert, H; Schröder, H; Mezger, M; Okasinski, J S; Honkimäki, V; Bilgram, J; Dosch, H

2009-08-28

96

Facial reconstruction for radiation-induced skin cancer  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced skin cancers can be difficult to diagnose and treat. Typically, a patient who has received orthovoltage radiotherapy for disorders such as acne, eczema, tinea capitis, skin tuberculosis, and skin cancer can expect that aggressive skin cancers and chronic radiodermatitis may develop subsequently. Cryptic facial cancers can lead to metastases and death. Prophylactic widefield excision of previously irradiated facial skin that has been subject to multiple recurrent skin cancers is suggested as a method of deterring future cutaneous malignancy and metastases. The use of tissue expanders and full-thickness skin grafts offers an expedient and successful method of subsequent reconstruction.

Panje, W.R.; Dobleman, T.J. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

1990-04-01

97

Transient radiation-induced absorption in laser materials  

SciTech Connect

Transient radiation-induced absorption losses in laser materials have been measured using a pulsed nuclear reactor. Reactor pulse widths of 70 to 90 {mu}s and absorbed doses of 1 to 7.5 krad have been used. Transmission recovery times and peak absorption coefficients are given. Materials tested include LiNbO{sub 3}, GSGG, silica substrates, and filter glasses used in the laser cavity. The filter glasses are tested at discrete wavelengths in the range 440--750 nm. Lithium niobate , MgO doped LiNbO{sub 3}, GSGG, and the silica substrates are tested at 1061 nm.

Brannon, P.J.

1994-12-31

98

Radiation-induced morphoea treated with UVA-1 phototherapy.  

PubMed

Morphoea is a localized inflammatory disorder of the dermis and subcutaneous fat and radiotherapy is a rarely reported cause (estimated incidence of 2 per 1000). Morphoea is commonly mistaken for an inflammatory recurrence of breast cancer, resulting in unnecessary investigations and treatment. We report the case of a 40-year-old woman who developed radiation-induced morphoea of the breast 7 months following adjuvant radiotherapy. She was treated with topical and systemic steroids as well as psoralen plus ultraviolet (UV)A before proceeding to UVA1 phototherapy. We also review the literature and discuss other management options. PMID:24890985

Lim, D; Johnston, S; Novakovic, L; Fearfield, L

2014-07-01

99

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).  

SciTech Connect

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E. [ITT Exelis Mission Systems, Colorado Springs, CO

2013-05-01

100

Sensitivity to Radiation-Induced Cancer in Hemochromatosis  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this pilot project using HFE-knockout homozygotes and heterozygotes are to (1) determine whether the knock-out mice have greater sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer of the colon, liver and breast, (2) establish the dependence of this sensitivity on the accumulation of iron, (3) determine the extent to which cell replication and apoptosis occur in these target tissues with varying iron load, and (4) correlate the increases in sensitivity with changes in insulin-related signaling in tumors and normal tissue from each target organ. Three experimental designs will be used in the pilot project. The sequence of experiments is designed to first explore the influence of iron load on the response and demonstrate that HFE knockout mice are more sensitive than the wild type to radiation-induced cancer in one or more of three target tissues (liver, colon and breast). The dose response relationships with a broader set of radiation doses will be explored in the second experiment. The final experiment is designed to explore the extent to which heterozygotes display the increased susceptibility to cancer induction and to independently assess the importance of iron load to the initiation versus promotion of tumors.

Bull. Richard J.; Anderson, Larry E.

2000-06-01

101

Radiation-induced defect centers in glass ceramics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to characterize the radiation-induced defect centers in low-thermal-expansion glass ceramics, including two types of Zerodur and Astrositall. The observed ESR spectra can be associated with different types of defect centers: a Zn+ center, several types of oxygen hole centers (OHCs), an aluminum-oxygen hole center (Al-OHC), an Fe3+ center, Ti3+ and Zr3+ centers, and three types of As centers. An Sb4+ center, which is not observed in Zerodur, is tentatively identified in Astrositall. From the effect of crystallization on the observed defect concentrations in Zerodur and computer simulation of the spectral lines of some of the centers, we infer that among the nine defect centers observed in the Zerodurs, the As-associated centers are located in the glassy phase and/or at the interface between the glassy and crystalline phases, Zn+ and Al-OHC are in the crystalline phase, and the rest (including most of the OHCs) are in the glassy phase. Radiation-induced compaction in these materials appears to be related to the generation of OHCs in the glass phase.

Tsai, T. E.; Friebele, E. J.; Griscom, D. L.; Pannhorst, W.

1989-01-01

102

Radiation-induced defect centers in glass ceramics  

SciTech Connect

Electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to characterize the radiation-induced defect centers in low-thermal-expansion glass ceramics, including two types of Zerodur and Astrositall. The observed ESR spectra can be associated with different types of defect centers: a Zn/sup +/ center, several types of oxygen hole centers (OHCs), an aluminum-oxygen hole center (Al-OHC), an Fe/sup 3 +/ center, Ti/sup 3 +/ and Zr/sup 3 +/ centers, and three types of As centers. An Sb/sup 4 +/ center, which is not observed in Zerodur, is tentatively identified in Astrositall. From the effect of crystallization on the observed defect concentrations in Zerodur and computer simulation of the spectral lines of some of the centers, we infer that among the nine defect centers observed in the Zerodurs, the As-associated centers are located in the glassy phase and/or at the interface between the glassy and crystalline phases, Zn/sup +/ and Al-OHC are in the crystalline phase, and the rest (including most of the OHCs) are in the glassy phase. Radiation-induced compaction in these materials appears to be related to the generation of OHCs in the glass phase.

Tsai, T.E.; Friebele, E.J.; Griscom, D.L.; Pannhorst, W.

1989-01-15

103

Radiation-induced dural fibrosarcoma with unusually short latent period  

SciTech Connect

Although rare, the occurrence of radiation-induced intracranial neoplasms of various types is well known. Among these tumors, fibrosarcomas, especially in the region of seila turcica, seem to be the most common type. These tumors characteristically occur after a long latent period, usually several years, following radiation therapy. The authors now report a case of apparently radiation-induced fibrosarcoma with some unusual features in a 10-year-old boy who was treated with radiation for medulloblastoma. He received a total dose of 53.2 Gy radiation delivered at 1.8 per fraction with 6 MV acceleration using the standard craniospinal technique. An MRI at 15 months after the completion of radiotherapy showed a mass over the cerebral convexity, which increased two-fold in size within a period of 4 months. A well circumscribed tumor was removed from the fronto-parietal convexity. The tumor measured 5x4.5x1.5 cm and was attached to the dura with invasion of the overlying bone. Histologically, it displayed the characteristic features of a low-grade fibrosarcoma. The patient remains free of tumor 18 months after the surgery. This case emphasizes the potential risk for the development of a second neoplasm following therapeutic radiation and also documents, to the authors' knowledge, the shortest latent period reported so far between administration of radiotherapy and development of an intracranial tumor.

Ghatak, N.R.; Aydin, F.; Leshner, R.T. (Medical College of Virginia, Richmond (United States) Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States))

1993-05-01

104

Should Cancer Survivors Fear Radiation-Induced Sarcomas?  

PubMed Central

Purpose/Results. Ionizing radiation is carcinogenic and the induction of a second malignancy is a serious potential long-term complication of radiotherapy. The incidence of radiation-induced sarcomas was evaluated from many large epidemiological surveys of long-term cancer survivors reported in the literature over the past 30 years and only one case was found for every 1000 patients irradiated. Discussion. Although greater numbers of cancer patients are receiving radical radiotherapy and surviving free of disease for longer intervals, cases of radiation-induced sarcomas are rare and should not deter patients from accepting radiotherapy as treatment for curable cancers. With improvements in the administration of radiotherapy over the past two decades which are resulting in less damage to bone and soft tissues, it is likely that fewer cases of this condition will be seen in the future. If these sarcomas are diagnosed early, long-term survival can be achieved with surgical excision and possibly re-irradiation, as occurs in other types of sarcomas. PMID:18521195

1997-01-01

105

Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells repairs brachial plexus injury: pathological and biomechanical analyses  

PubMed Central

A brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits by stretching the C6 nerve root. Immediately after the stretching, a suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was injected into the injured brachial plexus. The results of tensile mechanical testing of the brachial plexus showed that the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress, and maximum strain of the injured brachial plexuses were significantly increased at 24 weeks after the injection. The treatment clearly improved the pathological morphology of the injured brachial plexus nerve, as seen by hematoxylin eosin staining, and the functions of the rabbit forepaw were restored. These data indicate that the injection of human amniotic epithelial cells contributed to the repair of brachial plexus injury, and that this technique may transform into current clinical treatment strategies.

Yang, Qi; Luo, Min; Li, Peng; Jin, Hai

2014-01-01

106

Reoperation for failed shoulder reconstruction following brachial plexus birth injury  

PubMed Central

Background Various approaches have been developed to treat the progressive shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Reconstructive surgery for this condition consists of complex procedures with a risk for failure. Case presentations This is a retrospective case review of the outcome in eight cases referred to us for reoperation for failed shoulder reconstructions. In each case, we describe the initial attempt(s) at surgical correction, the underlying causes of failure, and the procedures performed to rectify the problem. Results were assessed using pre- and post-operative Mallet shoulder scores. All eight patients realized improvement in shoulder function from reoperation. Conclusions This case review identifies several aspects of reconstructive shoulder surgery for brachial plexus birth injury that may cause failure of the index procedure(s) and outlines critical steps in the evaluation and execution of shoulder reconstruction. PMID:23883413

2013-01-01

107

Secondary operation for elbow flexion reconstruction after brachial plexus lesion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a Elbow flexion plays a key role in the overall function of the upper extremity. In the case of unilateral complete brachial\\u000a plexus lesion, restoration of elbow flexion will dramatically increase the patient's chances of regaining bimanual prehension.\\u000a Furthermore, depending on the type of reconstruction, stability of the glenohumeral joint as well as some supination function\\u000a of the forearm can

A. Berger; R. Hierner; M. H.-J. Becker

1997-01-01

108

Aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch and mortality in dialysis population.  

PubMed

We hypothesized that increased aortic stiffness (central elastic artery) combined with a decrease in brachial stiffness (peripheral muscular artery) leads to the reversal of the physiological stiffness gradient (ie, mismatch), promoting end-organ damages through increased forward pressure wave transmission into the microcirculation. We, therefore, examined the effect of aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch on mortality in patients in need of dialysis. In a prospective observational study, aortic-brachial arterial stiffness mismatch (pulse wave velocity ratio) was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity divided by carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in 310 adult patients on dialysis. After a median follow-up of 29 months, 146 (47%) deaths occurred. The hazard ratio (HR) for mortality related to PWV ratio in a Cox regression analysis was 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.64; P<0.001 per 1 SD) and was still significant after adjustments for confounding factors, such as age, dialysis vintage, sex, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, smoking status, and weight (HR, 1.23; 95% CI: 1.02-1.49). The HRs for changes in 1 SD of augmentation index (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.12-1.63), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.11-1.50), and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67-0.95) were statistically significant in univariate analysis, but were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for age. In conclusion, aortic-brachial arterial stiffness mismatch was strongly and independently associated with increased mortality in this dialysis population. Further studies are required to confirm these finding in lower-risk groups. PMID:25452473

Fortier, Catherine; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Desmeules, Simon; Marquis, Karine; De Serres, Sacha A; Lebel, Marcel; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Agharazii, Mohsen

2015-02-01

109

Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that of the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.

Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Veronese, F.M.

1987-06-01

110

Modulation of radiation-induced hemopoietic suppression by acute thrombocytopenia  

SciTech Connect

Modifications of radiation-induced hemopoietic suppression by acute thrombocytopenia were evaluated. Immediately before or after exposure to sublethal irradiation, mice were given a single injection of anti-mouse platelet serum (APS), normal heterologous serum, neuraminidase (N'ase), or saline, or no further treatment was provided. Hemopoiesis was evaluated by blood cell counts, hematocrits, and incorporation of (75Se)selenomethionine into platelets. APS and N'ase induced an acute thrombocytopenia from which there was partial recovery before the platelet count started to fall from the radiation. During the second post-treatment week, both thrombocytopoiesis and erythropoiesis were greater in mice that received APS or N'ase in addition to radiation than in control irradiated mice. Differences in leukopoiesis were not apparent. Therefore, both thrombocytopoiesis and erythropoiesis appeared to be responsive to a stimulus generated by acute thrombocytopenia in sublethally irradiated mice.

Ebbe, S.; Phalen, E.; Threatte, G.; Londe, H.

1985-01-01

111

Ventricular Tachycardia Associated with Radiation-Induced Cardiac Sarcoma  

PubMed Central

Cardiac tumors can lead to distinct electrocardiographic changes and ventricular arrhythmias. Benign and malignant cardiac tumors have been associated with ventricular tachycardia. When possible, benign tumors should be resected when ventricular arrhythmias are intractable. Chemotherapy can shrink malignant tumors and eliminate arrhythmias. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman with breast sarcoma whom we diagnosed with myocardial metastasis after she presented with palpitations. The initial electrocardiogram revealed sinus rhythm with new right bundle branch block and ST-segment elevation in the anterior precordial leads. During telemetry, hemodynamically stable, sustained ventricular tachycardia with right ventricular localization was detected. Images showed a myocardial mass in the right ventricular free wall. Amiodarone suppressed the arrhythmia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ventricular tachycardia associated with radiation-induced undifferentiated sarcoma. We discuss the distinct electrocardiographic changes and ventricular arrhythmias that can be associated with cardiac tumors, and we review the relevant medical literature. PMID:25593527

Beaty, Elijah H.; Ballany, Wassim; Trohman, Richard G.

2014-01-01

112

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Caused by Schwannoma of Brachial Plexus  

PubMed Central

Schwannomas are benign, usually slow-growing tumors that originate from Schwann cells surrounding peripheral, cranial, or autonomic nerves. The most common form of these tumors is acoustic neuroma. Schwannomas of the brachial plexus are quite rare, and symptomatic schwannomas of the brachial plexus are even rarer. A 47-year-old woman presented with a 1-year history of dysesthesia, neuropathic pain, and mild weakness of the right upper limb. Results of physical examination and electrodiagnostic studies supported a diagnosis as thoracic outlet syndrome. Conservative treatment did not relieve her symptoms. After 9 months, a soft mass was found at the upper margin of the right clavicle. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 3.0×1.8×1.7 cm ovoid mass between the inferior trunk and the anterior division of the brachial plexus. Surgical mass excision and biopsy were performed. Pathological findings revealed the presence of schwannoma. After schwannoma removal, the right hand weakness did not progress any further and neuropathic pain gradually reduced. However, dysesthesia at the right C8 and T1 dermatome did not improve. PMID:24466527

Yun, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hee-Sang; Chon, Jinmann; Jung, Pil Kyo

2013-01-01

113

Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

2002-01-01

114

Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man  

SciTech Connect

We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

Haas, M.

1991-01-01

115

Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

2012-10-01

116

Idiopathic brachial neuritis in a child: A case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Brachial neuritis is a rare disease in children, affecting mainly the lower motor neurons of the brachial plexus and/or individual nerves or nerve branches. We report a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis in a 2½-year-old female child admitted with acute respiratory distress and given antibiotic therapy following which she developed weakness of the left hand. She was diagnosed as a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis and was given supportive care. Although, the association with antibiotic therapy in this case could be incidental, indeed it is intriguing and requires further studies.

Jain, Shikha; Bhatt, Girish Chandra; Rai, Nirendra; Bhan, Bhavna Dhingra

2014-01-01

117

Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment  

PubMed Central

Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results. PMID:25140251

Tetik, Cihangir; Uzun, Metin

2014-01-01

118

Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries.  

PubMed

This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed. PMID:25593443

Thomas, Jimmy

2014-01-01

119

Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries  

PubMed Central

This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed. PMID:25593443

Thomas, Jimmy

2014-01-01

120

Involvement of prostaglandins and histamine in radiation-induced temperature responses in rats  

SciTech Connect

Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy of gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas exposure to 20-150 Gy produced hypothermia. Since radiation exposure induced the release of prostaglandins (PGs) and histamine, the role of PGs and histamine in radiation-induced temperature changes was examined. Radiation-induced hyper- and hypothermia were antagonized by pretreatment with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Intracerebroventricular administration of PGE2 and PGD2 induced hyper- and hypothermia, respectively. Administration of SC-19220, a specific PGE2 antagonist, attenuated PGE2- and radiation-induced hyperthermia, but it did not antagonize PGD2- or radiation-induced hypothermia. Consistent with an apparent role of histamine in hypothermia, administration of disodium cromoglycate (a mast cell stabilizer), mepyramine (H1-receptor antagonist), or cimetidine (H2-receptor antagonist) attenuated PGD2- and radiation-induced hypothermia. These results suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia is mediated via PGE2 and that radiation-induced hypothermia is mediated by another PG, possibly PGD2, via histamine.

Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1990-01-01

121

Debris and Radiation-Induced Damage Effects on EUV Nanolithography Source Collector Mirror Optics Performance  

E-print Network

Debris and Radiation-Induced Damage Effects on EUV Nanolithography Source Collector Mirror Optics-based EUV light sources to debris (fast ions, neutrals, off-band radiation, droplets) remains one sputtering. In this paper we study several aspects of debris and radiation-induced damage to candidate EUVL

Harilal, S. S.

122

Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy Technique to Analyze Radiation Induced Defects in Power Transistors  

SciTech Connect

Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) technique is useful tool to study process and radiation induced defects in semiconductor materials and devices. The different types of radiation induced trap levels in the collector-base depletion region of the transistors were studied by DLTS technique.

Prakash, A. P. Gnana [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore, Karnataka-570006 (India)

2011-07-15

123

Mechanism of radiation-induced bystander effect: Role of the cyclooxygenase-2 signaling pathway  

E-print Network

Mechanism of radiation-induced bystander effect: Role of the cyclooxygenase-2 signaling pathway 25, 2005 (received for review June 30, 2005) The radiation-induced bystander effect is defined are likely to be directly dam- aged, the deleterious effect of radiation is expected to decline

Brenner, David Jonathan

124

Radiation-induced segregation and phase stability in ferritic-martensitic alloy T 91  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation-induced segregation in ferritic-martensitic alloy T 91 was studied to understand the behavior of solutes as a function of dose and temperature. Irradiations were conducted using 2 MeV protons to doses of 1, 3, 7 and 10 dpa at 400 °C. Radiation-induced segregation at prior austenite grain boundaries was measured, and various features of the irradiated microstructure were characterized, including grain boundary carbide coverage, the dislocation microstructure, radiation-induced precipitation and irradiation hardening. Results showed that Cr, Ni and Si segregate to prior austenite grain boundaries at low dose, but segregation ceases and redistribution occurs above 3 dpa. Grain boundary carbide coverage mirrors radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation induces formation of Ni-Si-Mn and Cu-rich precipitates that account for the majority of irradiation hardening. Radiation-induced segregation behavior is likely linked to the evolution of the precipitate and dislocation microstructures.

Wharry, Janelle P.; Jiao, Zhijie; Shankar, Vani; Busby, Jeremy T.; Was, Gary S.

2011-10-01

125

Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-?1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together, oral supplementation with antioxidants appears to be an effective approach for the radioprotection of hematopoietic cells against the cell killing effects of radiation, and for improving survival in irradiated animals. Preliminary data suggest similar antioxidant protective effects for animals exposed to potentially lethal doses of proton radiation. Studies were also performed to determine whether dietary antioxidants could affect the incidence rates of malignancies in CBA mice exposed to 300 cGy proton (1 GeV/n) radiation or 50 cGy iron ion (1 GeV/n) radiation [9]. Two antioxidant formulations were utilized in these studies; an AOX formulation containing the mixture of antioxidant agents developed from our previous studies and an antioxidant dietary formulation containing the soybean-derived protease inhibitor known as the Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI). BBI was evaluated in the form of BBI Concentrate (BBIC), which is the form of BBI utilized in human trials. BBIC has been utilized in human trials since 1992, as described [10]. The major finding in the long-term animal studies was that there was a reduced risk of malignant lymphoma in mice exposed to space radiations and maintained on diets containing the antioxidant formulations. In addition, the two different dietary countermeasures also reduced the yields of a variety of different rare tumor types, arising from both epithelial and connective tissue cells, observed in the animals exposed to space radiation. REFERENCES [1] Guan J. et al (2004) Radiation Research 162, 572-579. [2] Wan X.S. et al (2005) Radiation Research 163, 364-368. [3] Wan X.S. et al (2005) Radiation Research 163, 232-240. [4] Guan J. et al (2006) Radiation Research 165, 373-378. [5] Wan X.S. et al (2006) International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics 64, 1475-1481. [6] Kennedy A.R. et al (2006) Radiation Research 166, 327-332. [7] Kennedy A.R. et al (2007) Radiation & Environmental Biophysics 46(2), 201-3. [8]Wambi, C., Sanzari, J., Wan, X.S., Nuth, M., Davis, J., Ko, Y.-H., Sayers, C.M., Baran, M., Ware, J.H. and Kennedy, A

Kennedy, Ann

126

Structure of the brachial plexus root and adjacent regions displayed by ultrasound imaging?  

PubMed Central

Brachial plexuses of 110 healthy volunteers were examined using high resolution color Doppler ultrasound. Ultrasonic characteristics and anatomic variation in the intervertebral foramen, interscalene, supraclavicular and infraclavicular, as well as the axillary brachial plexus were investigated. Results confirmed that the normal brachial plexus on cross section exhibited round or elliptic hypoechoic texture. Longitudinal section imaging showed many parallel linear hypo-moderate echoes, with hypo-echo. The transverse processes of the seventh cervical vertebra, the scalene space, the subclavian artery and the deep cervical artery are important markers in an examination. The display rates for the interscalene, and supraclavicular and axillary brachial plexuses were 100% each, while that for the infraclavicular brachial plexus was 97%. The region where the normal brachial plexus root traversed the intervertebral foramen exhibited a regular hypo-echo. The display rate for the C5-7 nerve roots was 100%, while those for C8 and T1 were 83% and 68%, respectively. A total of 20 of the 110 subjects underwent cervical CT scan. High-frequency ultrasound can clearly display the outline of the transverse processes of the vertebrae, which were consistent with CT results. These results indicate that high-frequency ultrasound provides a new method for observing the morphology of the brachial plexus. The C7 vertebra is a marker for identifying the position of brachial plexus nerve roots.

Li, Zhengyi; Xia, Xun; Rong, Xiaoming; Tang, Yamei; Xu, Dachuan

2012-01-01

127

Penile erectile dysfunction after brachial plexus root avulsion injury in rats.  

PubMed

Our previous studies have demonstrated that some male patients suffering from brachial plexus injury, particularly brachial plexus root avulsion, show erectile dysfunction to varying degrees. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the erectile function after establishing brachial plexus root avulsion models with or without spinal cord injury in rats. After these models were established, we administered apomorphine (via a subcutaneous injection in the neck) to observe changes in erectile function. Rats subjected to simple brachial plexus root avulsion or those subjected to brachial plexus root avulsion combined with spinal cord injury had significantly fewer erections than those subjected to the sham operation. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase did not change in brachial plexus root avulsion rats. However, neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression was significantly decreased in brachial plexus root avulsion + spinal cord injury rats. These findings suggest that a decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in the penis may play a role in erectile dysfunction caused by the combination of brachial plexus root avulsion and spinal cord injury. PMID:25422647

Fu, Guo; Qin, Bengang; Jiang, Li; Huang, Xijun; Lu, Qinsen; Zhang, Dechun; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jiakai; Zheng, Jianwen; Li, Xuejia; Gu, Liqiang

2014-10-15

128

False aneurysm and brachial plexus palsy complicating a proximal humeral exostosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An unusual case is described in which a false aneurysm of the brachial artery secondary to an exostosis of the proximal humerus caused a compressive lesion of the brachial plexus. Surgical treatment of the exostosis and the false aneurysm relieved the symptoms.

C. H. Gerrand

1997-01-01

129

Penile erectile dysfunction after brachial plexus root avulsion injury in rats  

PubMed Central

Our previous studies have demonstrated that some male patients suffering from brachial plexus injury, particularly brachial plexus root avulsion, show erectile dysfunction to varying degrees. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the erectile function after establishing brachial plexus root avulsion models with or without spinal cord injury in rats. After these models were established, we administered apomorphine (via a subcutaneous injection in the neck) to observe changes in erectile function. Rats subjected to simple brachial plexus root avulsion or those subjected to brachial plexus root avulsion combined with spinal cord injury had significantly fewer erections than those subjected to the sham operation. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase did not change in brachial plexus root avulsion rats. However, neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression was significantly decreased in brachial plexus root avulsion + spinal cord injury rats. These findings suggest that a decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in the penis may play a role in erectile dysfunction caused by the combination of brachial plexus root avulsion and spinal cord injury. PMID:25422647

Fu, Guo; Qin, Bengang; Jiang, Li; Huang, Xijun; Lu, Qinsen; Zhang, Dechun; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jiakai; Zheng, Jianwen; Li, Xuejia; Gu, Liqiang

2014-01-01

130

Anatomical Variations of Brachial Artery - Its Morphology, Embryogenesis and Clinical Implications  

PubMed Central

Background: Accurate knowledge of variation pattern of the major arteries of upper limb is of considerable practical importance in the conduct of reparative surgery in the arm, forearm and hand however brachial artery and its terminal branches variations are less common. Aim: Accordingly the present study was designed to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial artery and its morphology, embryogenesis and clinical implications. Materials and Methods: In an anatomical study 140 upper limb specimens of 70 cadavers (35 males and 35 females) were used and anatomical variations of the brachial artery have been documented. Results: Accessory brachial artery was noted in eight female cadavers (11.43%). Out of eight cadavers in three cadavers (4.29%) an unusual bilateral accessory brachial artery arising from the axillary artery and it is continuing in the forearm as superficial accessory ulnar artery was noted. Rare unusual variant unilateral accessory brachial artery and its reunion with the main brachial artery in the cubital fossa and its variable course in relation to the musculocutaneous nerve and median nerve were also noted in five cadavers (7.14%). Conclusion: As per our knowledge such anatomical variations of brachial artery and its terminal branches with their relation to the surrounding structures are not reported in the modern medical literature. An awareness of such a presence is valuable for the surgeons and radiologists in evaluation of angiographic images, vascular and re-constructive surgery or appropriate treatment for compressive neuropathies.

KS, Siddaraju; Venumadhav, Nelluri; Sharma, Ashish; Kumar, Neeraj

2014-01-01

131

Temperature Dependence of Radiation Induced Conductivity in Insulators  

SciTech Connect

This study measures Radiation Induced Conductivity (RIC) of Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) over temperatures ranging from {approx}110 K to {approx}350 K. RIC occurs when incident ionizing radiation deposits energy and excites electrons into the conduction band of insulators. Conductivity was measured when a voltage was applied across vacuum-baked, thin film LDPE polymer samples in a parallel plate geometry. RIC was calculated as the difference in sample conductivity under no incident radiation and under an incident {approx}4 MeV electron beam at low incident fluxes of 10{sup -4}-10{sup -1} Gr/sec. The steady-state RIC was found to agree well with the standard power law relation, {sigma}{sub RIC} = k{sub RIC}{center_dot}D ring {sup {delta}} between conductivity, {sigma} and adsorbed dose rate, D ring . Both the proportionality constant, k{sub RIC}, and the power, {delta}, were found to be temperature dependant above {approx}250 K, with behavior consistent with photoconductivity models developed for localized trap states in disordered semiconductors. Below {approx}250 K, kRIC and {delta} exhibited little change. The observed difference in temperature dependence might be related to a structural phase transition seen at T{sub {beta}}{approx}256 K in prior studies of mechanical and thermodynamic properties of LDPE.

Dennison, J. R.; Gillespie, Jodie; Hodges, Joshua; Hoffmann, R. C.; Abbott, J.; Hart, Steven [Physics Department, Utah State University 4415 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322 (United States); Hunt, Alan W. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

2009-03-10

132

Radiation-Induced Bystander Response: Mechanism and Clinical Implications.  

PubMed

Significance: Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation (IR) to the genetic material in the cell gives rise to damage to DNA in a dose-dependent manner. There are two types of DNA damage; by a high dose (causing acute or deterministic effects) and by a low dose (related to chronic or stochastic effects), both of which induce different health effects. Among radiation effects, acute cutaneous radiation syndrome results from cell killing as a consequence of high-dose exposure. Recent advances: Recent advances in radiation biology and oncology have demonstrated that bystander effects, which are emerged in cells that have never been exposed, but neighboring irradiated cells, are also involved in radiation effects. Bystander effects are now recognized as an indispensable component of tissue response related to deleterious effects of IR. Critical issues: Evidence has indicated that nonapoptotic premature senescence is commonly observed in various tissues and organs. Senesced cells were found to secrete various proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, most of which are equivalent to those identified as bystander factors. Secreted factors could trigger cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell migration, inflammatory response, etc., which provide a tissue microenvironment assisting tissue repair and remodeling. Future directions: Understandings of the mechanisms and physiological relevance of radiation-induced bystander effects are quite essential for the beneficial control of wound healing and care. Further studies should extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of bystander effects and mode of cell death in response to IR. PMID:24761341

Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

2014-01-01

133

Does oxygen enhance the radiation-induced inactivation of penicillinase  

SciTech Connect

The radiation-induced inactivation of penicillinase (..beta..-lactamase, EC 3.5.2.6) in dilute aqueous solutions buffered with phosphate was studied by examining enzyme radiosensitivity in the presence of various gases (He, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O and N/sub 2/O + O/sub 2/). The introduction of either N/sub 2/O or O/sub 2/ was found to reduce the radiodamage. On the other hand, H/sub 2/ or N/sub 2/O + O/sub 2/ gas mixture enhanced the radiosensitivity. In the presence of formate and oxygen no enzyme inactivation was detected. The results indicated that the specific damaging efficiency of H atoms is more than twofold higher than that of OH radicals; therefore, in 50 mM phosphate buffer, where more than half the free radicals are H atoms, the H radicals are responsible for the majority of the damage. The superoxide radicals appeared to be completely inactive and did not contribute to enzyme inactivation. Oxygen affected the radiosensitivity in two ways: (1) it protected by converting e/sub aq//sup -/ and H into harmless O/sub 2/-radicals; and (2) it increased inactivation by enhancing the damage brought about by OH radicals (OER = 2.6). In oxygenated buffer the protection effect of oxygen exceeded that of sensitization, thus giving rise to a moderate overall protection effect.

Samuni, A.; Kalkstein, A.; Czapski, G.

1980-04-01

134

Radiation induced thyroid neoplasms 1920 to 1987: A vanishing problem  

SciTech Connect

Radiation for benign diseases has been implicated as an etiologic factor in thyroid cancer. From 1930-60, over 2 million children may have been exposed to therapeutic radiation and it is estimated that up to 7% may develop thyroid cancer after a 5-40 year latency. Thyroid stimulating hormone, secondary to radioinduced hypothyroidism, has been implicated as causative in animals. Such data has led to expensive screening programs in high risk patients. Because of a decline in irradiation for benign diseases in children over the last 2 decades, we questioned whether the incidence of radiation induced thyroid neoplasms (RITN) was also decreasing. Twenty-six of 227 patients (11%) with thyroid malignancies seen at our institution from 1974-87 had a history of previous head and neck irradiation. These included 13 papillary, 3 follicular, and 7 mixed carcinomas as well as 2 lymphomas and 1 synovial cell sarcoma. None of these 26 patients had abnormal thyroid function tests at presentation. Mean latency from irradiation to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer was 25.4 years (6-55 year range). Compared to the reported increasing incidence of RITN from 1940-70, there appears to be a significant decrease since 1970. Based on our analysis, the use of expensive screening programs in high risk populations may no longer be warranted. Additionally, the routine use of thyroid replacement in previously irradiated chemically hypothyroid patients is not recommended.30 references.

Mehta, M.P.; Goetowski, P.G.; Kinsella, T.J.

1989-06-01

135

Outcome of Carotid Artery Stenting for Radiation-Induced Stenosis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients who have been irradiated at the neck have an increased risk of symptomatic stenosis of the carotid artery during follow-up. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) can be a preferable alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy, which is associated with increased operative risks in these patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective cohort study of 24 previously irradiated patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis. We assessed periprocedural and nonprocedural events including transient ischemic attack (TIA), nondisabling stroke, disabling stoke, and death. Patency rates were evaluated on duplex ultrasound scans. Restenosis was defined as a stenosis of >50% at the stent location. Results: Periprocedural TIA rate was 8%, and periprocedural stroke (nondisabling) occurred in 4% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 0.3-11.0 years), only one ipsilateral incident event (TIA) had occurred (4%). In 12% of patients, a contralateral incident event was present: one TIA (4%) and two strokes (12%, two disabling strokes). Restenosis was apparent in 17%, 33%, and 42% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively, although none of the patients with restenosed vessels became symptomatic. The length of the irradiation to CAS interval proved the only significant risk factor for restenosis. Conclusions: The results of CAS for radiation-induced carotid stenosis are favorable in terms of recurrence of cerebrovascular events at the CAS site.

Dorresteijn, Lucille, E-mail: L.Dorresteijn@mst.n [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vogels, Oscar [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Leeuw, Frank-Erik de [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vos, Jan-Albert [Department of Radiology, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Christiaans, Marleen H. [Department of Neurology, Diakonessenhuis, Utrecht (Netherlands); Ackerstaff, Rob [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kappelle, Arnoud C. [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2010-08-01

136

Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for ?-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dose–dependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a ?-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, ?-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells.

Lagadec, Chann [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Vlashi, Erina [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Alhiyari, Yazeed; Phillips, Tiffany M.; Bochkur Dratver, Milana [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Pajonk, Frank, E-mail: fpajonk@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2013-11-01

137

Radiation-induced conductivity control in polyaniline blends/composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polyaniline (PANI) blends with chlorine-containing polymers and copolymers and composites with HCl-releasing compounds were prepared to investigate their radiation response in terms of induced conductivities. Blends of non-conductive PANI with poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), poly(vinylidene chloride- co-vinyl acetate), [P(VDC- co-VAc)], poly(vinylidene chloride- co-vinyl chloride), [P(VDC- co-VC)] were prepared in the form of as-cast films. A number of blends which are different in composition were exposed to gamma radiation and accelerated electrons to various doses, and the effects of irradiation type and composition of polymers on the conductivity of films were investigated by using conductivity measurements and UV-vis and FT-IR spectroscopy. The results clearly showed that ionizing radiation is an effective tool to induce and control conductivity in the blends of PANI-base with chlorine-carrying polymers as well as its composites prepared from HCl-releasing compounds such as chloral hydrate. The main mechanism behind this radiation-induced conductivity is in situ doping of PANI-base with HCl released from partner polymers and low molecular weight compounds by the effect of radiation.

Güven, Olgun

2007-08-01

138

Radiation-induced sarcomas of the head and neck  

PubMed Central

With improved outcomes associated with radiotherapy, radiation-induced sarcomas (RIS) are increasingly seen in long-term survivors of head and neck cancers, with an estimated risk of up to 0.3%. They exhibit no subsite predilection within the head and neck and can arise in any irradiated tissue of mesenchymal origin. Common histologic subtypes of RIS parallel their de novo counterparts and include osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma/sarcoma nitricoxide synthase, and fibrosarcoma. While imaging features of RIS are not pathognomonic, large size, extensive local invasion with bony destruction, marked enhancement within a prior radiotherapy field, and an appropriate latency period are suggestive of a diagnosis of RIS. RIS development may be influenced by factors such as radiation dose, age at initial exposure, exposure to chemotherapeutic agents and genetic tendency. Precise pathogenetic mechanisms of RIS are poorly understood and both directly mutagenizing effects of radiotherapy as well as changes in microenvironments are thought to play a role. Management of RIS is challenging, entailing surgery in irradiated tissue and a limited scope for further radiotherapy and chemotherapy. RIS is associated with significantly poorer outcomes than stage-matched sarcomas that arise independent of irradiation and surgical resection with clear margins seems to offer the best chance for cure. PMID:25493233

Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna

2014-01-01

139

Molecular Mechanisms and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis  

PubMed Central

Radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) is a severe side effect of radiotherapy in lung cancer patients that presents as a progressive pulmonary injury combined with chronic inflammation and exaggerated organ repair. RILF is a major barrier to improving the cure rate and well-being of lung cancer patients because it limits the radiation dose that is required to effectively kill tumor cells and diminishes normal lung function. Although the exact mechanism is unclear, accumulating evidence suggests that various cells, cytokines and regulatory molecules are involved in the tissue reorganization and immune response modulation that occur in RILF. In this review, we will summarize the general symptoms, diagnostics, and current understanding of the cells and molecular factors that are linked to the signaling networks implicated in RILF. Potential approaches for the treatment of RILF will also be discussed. Elucidating the key molecular mediators that initiate and control the extent of RILF in response to therapeutic radiation may reveal additional targets for RILF treatment to significantly improve the efficacy of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients. PMID:23909719

Ding, Nian-Hua; Li, Jian Jian; Sun, Lun-Quan

2014-01-01

140

Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of ?-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

Pandey, B. N.; Mishra, K. P.

1999-05-01

141

Investigations of radiation-induced and carrier-enhanced conductivity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A steady-state carrier computer code, PECK (Parker Enhanced Carrier Kinetics), that predicts the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced in a dielectric by an electron beam was developed. The model, which assumes instantly-trapped holes, was then applied to experimental measurements on thin Kapton samples penetrated by an electron beam. Measurements at high bias were matched in the model by an appropriate choice for the trap-modulated electron mobility. A fractional split between front and rear currents measured at zone bias is explained on the basis of beam-scattering. The effects of carrier-enhanced conductivity (CEC) on data obtained for thick, free-surface Kapton samples is described by using an analytical model that incorporates field injection of carriers from the RIC region. The computer code, LWPCHARGE, modified for carrier transport, is also used to predict partial penetration effects associated with CEC in the unirradiated region. Experimental currents and surface voltages, when incorporated in the appropriate models, provide a value for the trap modulated mobility that is in essential agreement with the RIC results.

Meulenberg, A., Jr.; Parker, L. W.; Yadlowski, E. J.; Hazelton, R. C.

1985-01-01

142

Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

1996-01-01

143

Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

2011-11-01

144

Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation  

SciTech Connect

Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

1984-04-01

145

Nerve transfer helps repair brachial plexus injury by increasing cerebral cortical plasticity  

PubMed Central

In the treatment of brachial plexus injury, nerves that are functionally less important are transferred onto the distal ends of damaged crucial nerves to help recover neuromuscular function in the target region. For example, intercostal nerves are transferred onto axillary nerves, and accessory nerves are transferred onto suprascapular nerves, the phrenic nerve is transferred onto the musculocutaneous nerves, and the contralateral C7 nerve is transferred onto the median or radial nerves. Nerve transfer has become a major method for reconstructing the brachial plexus after avulsion injury. Many experiments have shown that nerve transfers for treatment of brachial plexus injury can help reconstruct cerebral cortical function and increase cortical plasticity. In this review article, we summarize the recent progress in the use of diverse nerve transfer methods for the repair of brachial plexus injury, and we discuss the impact of nerve transfer on cerebral cortical plasticity after brachial plexus injury.

Sun, Guixin; Wu, Zuopei; Wang, Xinhong; Tan, Xiaoxiao; Gu, Yudong

2014-01-01

146

Finger movement at birth in brachial plexus birth palsy  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate whether the finger movement at birth is a better predictor of the brachial plexus birth injury. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study reviewing pre-surgical records of 87 patients with residual obstetric brachial plexus palsy in study 1. Posterior subluxation of the humeral head (PHHA), and glenoid retroversion were measured from computed tomography or Magnetic resonance imaging, and correlated with the finger movement at birth. The study 2 consisted of 141 obstetric brachial plexus injury patients, who underwent primary surgeries and/or secondary surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Information regarding finger movement was obtained from the patient’s parent or guardian during the initial evaluation. RESULTS: Among 87 patients, 9 (10.3%) patients who lacked finger movement at birth had a PHHA > 40%, and glenoid retroversion < -12°, whereas only 1 patient (1.1%) with finger movement had a PHHA > 40%, and retroversion < -8° in study 1. The improvement in glenohumeral deformity (PHHA, 31.8% ± 14.3%; and glenoid retroversion 22.0° ± 15.0°) was significantly higher in patients, who have not had any primary surgeries and had finger movement at birth (group 1), when compared to those patients, who had primary surgeries (nerve and muscle surgeries), and lacked finger movement at birth (group 2), (PHHA 10.7% ± 15.8%; Version -8.0° ± 8.4°, P = 0.005 and P = 0.030, respectively) in study 2. No finger movement at birth was observed in 55% of the patients in this study group. CONCLUSION: Posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion measurements indicated significantly severe shoulder deformities in children with finger movement at birth, in comparison with those lacked finger movement. However, the improvement after triangle tilt surgery was higher in patients who had finger movement at birth. PMID:23362472

Nath, Rahul K; Benyahia, Mohamed; Somasundaram, Chandra

2013-01-01

147

Evaluation and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.  

PubMed

Brachial plexus birth palsy can result in permanent lifelong deficits and unfortunately continues to be relatively common despite advancements in obstetric care. The diagnosis can be made shortly after birth by physical examination, noting a lack of movement in the affected upper extremity. Treatment begins with passive range-of-motion exercises to maintain flexibility and tactile stimulation to provide sensory reeducation. Primary surgery consists of microsurgical nerve surgery, whereas secondary surgery consists of alternative microsurgical procedures, tendon transfers, or osteotomies, all of which improve outcomes in the short term. However, the long-term outcomes of current treatment recommendations remain unknown. PMID:24684916

Abzug, Joshua M; Kozin, Scott H

2014-04-01

148

Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of nerve arising in the brachial plexus.  

PubMed

Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of nerve is a rare benign infiltrating condition of peripheral nerves leading to progressive functional loss. Previous descriptions have virtually all been confined to the distal part of the upper limb, with the median nerve being the commonest reported site. Most cases occur in the first 3 decades of life and a third are associated with macrodactyly. A case is described in a 63-year-old woman, involving the whole of the brachial plexus, a previously unreported site for this particular lesion. PMID:7759925

Price, A J; Compson, J P; Calonje, E

1995-02-01

149

Transient radiation-induced absorption in the materials for a GSGG laser  

SciTech Connect

Materials used in the optical elements of a 1,061 m GSGG (gadolinium scandium gallium garnet) laser have been tested for transient radiation-induced absorption. The transient radiation-induced absorption in KK1, Schott S7005 and S7010, and M382 glasses have been determined for discrete wavelengths in the range 440--750 nm. Also, the transient radiation-induced absorption in {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} and MgO doped LiNbO{sub 3} has been measured at 1,061 nm. Mathematical expressions composed of exponentials are fitted to the data.

Brannon, P.J.

1993-11-01

150

Targeting CREB inhibits radiation-induced neuroendocrine differentiation and increases radiation-induced cell death in prostate cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) is a process by which prostate cancer cells transdifferentiate into neuroendocrine-like (NE-like) cancer cells. Accumulated evidence suggests that NED is associated with disease progression and therapy resistance in prostate cancer patients. We previously reported that by mimicking a clinical radiotherapy protocol, fractionated ionizing radiation (FIR) induces NED in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, FIR-induced NED constitutes two distinct phases: a radioresistance phase in which a fraction of cells selectively survive during the first two week irradiation, and a neuroendocrine differentiation phase in which surviving cells differentiate into NE-like cancer cells during the second two week irradiation. We have also observed increased activation of the transcription factor cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein during the course of FIR-induced NED. To determine whether targeting NED can be explored as a radiosensitization approach, we employed two CREB targeting strategies, CREB knockdown and overexpression of ACREB, a dominant-negative mutant of CREB, to target both phases. Our results showed that ACREB expression increased FIR-induced cell death and sensitized prostate cancer cells to radiation. Consistent with this, knockdown of CREB also inhibited FIR-induced NED and sensitized prostate cancer cells to radiation. Molecular analysis suggests that CREB targeting primarily increases radiation-induced pre-mitotic apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that targeting NED could be developed as a radiosensitization approach for prostate cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25520873

Suarez, Christopher D; Deng, Xuehong; Hu, Chang-Deng

2014-01-01

151

Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Normolle, Daniel [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Pan, Charlie C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Amarnath, Sudha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ensminger, William D. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-09-01

152

Molecular responses of radiation-induced liver damage in rats.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular responses involved in radiation?induced liver damage (RILD). Sprague?Dawley rats (6?weeks?old) were irradiated once at a dose of 20 Gy to the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. The rats were then sacrificed 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after irradiation and rats, which were not exposed to irradiation were used as controls. Weight measurements and blood was obtained from the rats and liver tissues were collected for histological and apoptotic analysis. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT?qPCR) and western blot analysis were performed to measure the expression levels of mRNAs and proteins, respectively. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were increased significantly in the RILD rats. Histological investigation revealed the proliferation of collagen and the formation of fibrotic tissue 12 weeks after irradiation. Apoptotic cells were observed predominantly 2 and 4 weeks after irradiation. The immunohistochemistry, RT?qPCR and western blot analysis all revealed the same pattern of changes in the expression levels of the molecules assessed. The expression levels of transforming growth factor??1 (TGF??1), nuclear factor (NF)??B65, mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (Smad3) and Smad7 and connective tissue growth factor were increased during the recovery period following irradiation up to 12 weeks. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor??, Smad7 and Smad4 were only increased during the early phase (first 4 weeks) of recovery following irradiation. In the RILD rat model, the molecular responses indicated that the TGF??1/Smads and NF??B65 signaling pathways are involved in the mechanism of RILD recovery. PMID:25483171

Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Ainiwaer, Aimudula; Wang, Yunlian; Wu, Ge; Mao, Rui; Yang, Ying; Bao, Yongxing

2014-12-01

153

The effect of Halofuginone in the amelioration of radiation induced-lung fibrosis.  

PubMed

The lung is one of the most sensitive organs to ionizing radiation, and damage to normal lung tissue remains a major dose limiting factor for patients receiving radiation to the thorax. Radiation induced lung injury (RILI) which is also named as "radiation pneumonpathy" is a continuous process and regarded as the result of an abnormal healing response. It has been shown that transforming growth factor ?-1 (TGF-?1) plays an integral role in the radiation induced lung fibrosis formation by promoting the chemoattraction of fibroblasts and their conversion to myofibroblasts. Halofuginone is a, low molecular weight plant derived alkaloid, isolated from the Dichroa febrifuga plant that exhibits antifibrotic activity and inhibition of type I collagen synthesis. Halofuginone has been shown to protect against radiation induced soft tissue fibrosis by virtue of inhibiting various members of TFG-? signaling pathway. By the light of these findings, we hypothesize that Halofuginone may be able to ameliorate the radiation induced lung fibrosis. PMID:23352286

Yavas, Guler; Calik, Mustafa; Calik, Goknil; Yavas, Cagdas; Ata, Ozlem; Esme, Hidir

2013-04-01

154

Complications of Lower-Extremity Outpatient Arteriography via Low Brachial Artery  

SciTech Connect

We retrospectively evaluated low brachial artery puncture for arteriography and its complications as an alternative approach route for bilateral lower extremity run-off. Using the Seldinger technique and catheterization with a sheathless 4-F multiple side-hole pigtail catheter, we performed 2250 low brachial artery punctures in outpatients.The right brachial artery (RBA) was successfully punctured in 2039 patients; the left brachial artery (LBA) in 200. The transfemoral approach was used in 11 patients when catheterizing either of brachial arteries failed. Ten major or moderate complications (2 pseudoaneurysms, 2 thrombosis, 1 dissection and 5 hematomas) were encountered. Surgical intervention was necessary in three cases. There were no transient ischemic attacks. Twenty-one patients suffered temporary loss of radial pulse which returned spontaneously in less than 1 hour. One patient demonstrated prolonged loss of pulse which required heparin. Low brachial artery puncture and catheterization at the antecubital fossa is a very safe and cost-effective alternative to the femoral artery approach for lower extremity intra-arterial arteriography in the hands of experienced operators. The success rate in catheterizing one of the brachial arteries was 99.52% with a low significant complications rate of 0.44%. The transbrachial approach should be used as a standard method for lower extremity IA - DSA in an outpatient setting.

Chatziioannou, A.; Ladopoulos, C.; Mourikis, D. [Areteion Hospital, Athens, Departments of Radiology (Greece); Katsenis, K. [Areteion Hospital, Athens, Vascular Surgery (Greece); Spanomihos, G.; Vlachos, L. [Areteion Hospital, Athens, Departments of Radiology (Greece)

2004-01-15

155

PAI-1-Dependent Endothelial Cell Death Determines Severity of Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury  

PubMed Central

Normal tissue toxicity still remains a dose-limiting factor in clinical radiation therapy. Recently, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (SERPINE1/PAI-1) was reported as an essential mediator of late radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, it is not clear whether PAI-1 plays a role in acute radiation-induced intestinal damage and we hypothesized that PAI-1 may play a role in the endothelium radiosensitivity. In vivo, in a model of radiation enteropathy in PAI-1 ?/? mice, apoptosis of radiosensitive compartments, epithelial and microvascular endothelium was quantified. In vitro, the role of PAI-1 in the radiation-induced endothelial cells (ECs) death was investigated. The level of apoptotic ECs is lower in PAI-1 ?/? compared with Wt mice after irradiation. This is associated with a conserved microvascular density and consequently with a better mucosal integrity in PAI-1 ?/? mice. In vitro, irradiation rapidly stimulates PAI-1 expression in ECs and radiation sensitivity is increased in ECs that stably overexpress PAI-1, whereas PAI-1 knockdown increases EC survival after irradiation. Moreover, ECs prepared from PAI-1 ?/? mice are more resistant to radiation-induced cell death than Wt ECs and this is associated with activation of the Akt pathway. This study demonstrates that PAI-1 plays a key role in radiation-induced EC death in the intestine and suggests that this contributes strongly to the progression of radiation-induced intestinal injury. PMID:22563394

Abderrahmani, Rym; François, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Tarlet, Georges; Blirando, Karl; Hneino, Mohammad; Vaurijoux, Aurelie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

2012-01-01

156

Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

1989-01-01

157

Radiation-Induced Topological Disorder in Irradiated Network Structures  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of a research program investigating the fundamental principles underlying the phenomenon of topological disordering in a radiation environment. This phenomenon is known popularly as amorphization, but is more formally described as a process of radiation-induced structural arrangement that leads in crystals to loss of long-range translational and orientational correlations and in glasses to analogous alteration of connectivity topologies. The program focus has been on a set compound ceramic solids with directed bonding exhibiting structures that can be described as networks. Such solids include SiO2, Si3N4, SiC, which are of interest to applications in fusion energy production, nuclear waste storage, and device manufacture involving ion implantation or use in radiation fields. The principal investigative tools comprise a combination of experimental diffraction-based techniques, topological modeling, and molecular-dynamics simulations that have proven a rich source of information in the preceding support period. The results from the present support period fall into three task areas. The first comprises enumeration of the rigidity constraints applying to (1) more complex ceramic structures (such as rutile, corundum, spinel and olivine structures) that exhibit multiply polytopic coordination units or multiple modes of connecting such units, (2) elemental solids (such as graphite, silicon and diamond) for which a correct choice of polytope is necessary to achieve correct representation of the constraints, and (3) compounds (such as spinel and silicon carbide) that exhibit chemical disorder on one or several sublattices. With correct identification of the topological constraints, a unique correlation is shown to exist between constraint and amorphizability which demonstrates that amorphization occurs at a critical constraint loss. The second task involves the application of molecular dynamics (MD) methods to topologically-generated models of amorphized network silicas. These methods are shown to generate fully connected topologically-disordered networks, equilibrated to achieve accurately-specified atomic coordinates that can be compared to correlation data derived from diffraction experiments. The MD equilibrations demonstrate the insensitivity of diffraction methods to substantial differences in intermediate-range topology, with the exception of the first diffraction peak which is shown to be uniquely sensitive to topological differences. The third task concerns application of MD simulations to amorphization of silicon carbide, which exhibits anomalous amorphizability. Amorphization of this compound is shown to derive from its facility for tolerating chemical disorder, and a critical homonuclear bond density threshold is established as a criterion for its amorphization.

Hobbs, Linn W.

2002-12-21

158

Radiation Induced Segregation in High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels including nano-featured oxide dispersion strengthened steels (NF-ODS) are a candidate material class for advanced fission and fusion nuclear reactor designs. F/M steels have excellent high temperature strength, low swelling rates and the recent developments in NF-ODS steels has improved their high temperature creep performance. A concern for F/M steels is their radiation induced segregation (RIS) response while in-service. RIS occurs when atomic fluxes preferentially couple to point defect fluxes to defect sinks such as grain boundaries (GBs). For F/M steels no conclusive trends or dependencies on the RIS response have been drawn. Interfaces, including grain boundaries and precipitate-matrix interfaces can alter the RIS response. The grain boundary structure could change the point defect interaction at the GB. Changes in the point defect kinetics at a grain boundary could therefore alter the RIS response at the boundary. Furthermore, oxide nanoclusters in NF-ODS steel act as sinks for point defects under irradiation. The surface area and number density of these nanoclusters in NF-ODS steels could alter the point defect fluxes to GBs. Analytical microscopy techniques were conducted to determine the role of grain boundary structure and nanocluster dispersion on the RIS response in irradiated F/M steels. Here, a 9 wt. % Cr model alloy which simulates the structure of commercially available steels and 14YWT NF-ODS alloy was irradiated under numerous conditions. Both alloys were investigated using STEM/EDS and GB misorientation analysis. Experimental results indicate a preferential segregation of Cr to specific GB misorientations in the model F/M steel. Findings in the NF-ODS alloy indicates the stability of nanoclusters within the alloy alters the concentration gradient of the point defects near irradiated GBs. Based on these results, new theories on the role of interfaces in irradiated F/M steels was developed including a rate theory model which accounts for the GB misorientation angle within the RIS model. These theories will stimulate the development of new F/M steels which are highly resistant to RIS while in-service.

Field, Kevin G.

159

Radiation-induced changes affecting polyester based polyurethane binder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers as binders in the high energy explosives particularly when used in weapons presents a significantly complex and challenging problem due to the impact of the aging of this polymer on the useful service life of the explosive. In this work, the effects of radiation on the aging of the polyester based polyurethane were investigated using both electron beam and gamma irradiation at various dose rates in the presence and absence of oxygen. It was found by means of GPC that, in the presence and absence of oxygen, the poly (ester urethane) primarily undergoes cross-linking, by means of a carbon-centered secondary alkyl radical. It was also concluded that the polymer partially undergoes scission of the backbone of the main chain at C-O, N-C, and C-C bonds. Substantial changes in the conditions of irradiation and in dose levels did not affect the cross-linking and scission yields. Experiments were also performed with EPR spectroscopy for the purpose of identifying the initial carbon-centered free radicals and for studying the decay mechanisms of these radicals. It was found that the carbon-centered radical which is produced via C-C scission (primary alkyl radical) is rapidly converted to a long-lived allylic species at higher temperatures; more than 80% radicals are converted to allyl species in 2.5 hours. In the presence of oxygen, the allyl radical undergoes a fast reaction to produce a peroxyl radical; this radical decays with a 1.7 hour half-life by pseudo first-order kinetics to negligible levels in 13 hours. FTIR measurements were conducted to identify the radiation-induced changes to the functional groups in the polyester polyurethane. These measurements show an increase in carbonyl, amine and carboxylic groups as a result of reaction of H atoms with R-C-O·, ·NH-R and R-COO·. The FTIR results also demonstrate the production of the unsaturation resulting from hydrogen atom transfer during intrachain conversion of the primary alkyl radical to the allyl species, prompt trans-vinylene production in tetramethylene units, and hydrogen atom abstraction by alkyl radicals on neighboring chains. The production of unsaturation is substantiated by the EPR studies. Finally, a free radical mechanism is proposed for the production of cross-linking in polyester polyurethane.

Pierpoint, Sujita Basi

160

Targets for, and consequences of, radiation-induced chromosomal instability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chromosomal instability has been demonstrated in a human- hamster hybrid cell line, GM10115, after exposure to x- rays. Chromosomal instability in these cells is characterized by the appearance of novel chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after exposure to ionizing radiation. To identify the cellular target(s) for radiation-induced chromosomal instability, cells were treated with 125I-labeled compounds. Labeling cells with 125I-iododeoxyuridine, which caused radiation damage to the DNA and associated nuclear structures, did induce chromosomal instability. While cell killing and first-division chromosomal rearrangements increased with increasing numbers of 125I decays, the frequency of chromosomal instability was independent of dose. Incorporation of an 125I-labeled protein, 125I-succinyl- concanavalin A, into either the plasma membrane or the cytoplasm, failed to elicit chromosomal instability. These results show that radiation damage to the nucleus, and not to extranuclear regions, contributes to the induction of chromosomal instability. To determine the role of DNA strand breaks as a molecular lesion responsible for initiating chromosomal instability, cells were treated with a variety of DNA strand breaking agents. Agents capable of producing complex DNA double strand breaks, including X-rays, Neocarzinostatin and bleomycin, were able to induce chromosomal instability. In contrast, double strand breaks produced by restriction endonucleases as well as DNA strand breaks produced by hydrogen peroxide failed to induce chromosomal instability. This demonstrates that the type of DNA breakage is important in the eventual manifestation of chromosomal instability. In order to understand the relationship between chromosomal instability and other end points of genomic instability, chromosomally stable and unstable clones were analyzed for sister chromatid exchange, delayed reproductive cell death, delayed mutation, mismatch repair and delayed gene amplification. Although individual clones within each group were significantly different from unirradiated clones for many of the endpoints, there was no significant correlation between chromosomal instability and the phenotypes of sister chromatid exchange, delayed mutation, and mismatch repair. Delayed gene amplification weakly correlated chromosomal instability (0.05 < p < 0.1) and delayed reproductive cell death correlated strongly (p < 0.05) with chromosomal instability. These data indicate that multiple pathways exist for inducing genomic instability in GM10115 cells after radiation exposure.

Kaplan, Mark Isaac

161

Double aortic arch anomalies: diagnosis by countercurrent right brachial arteriography.  

PubMed

The clinical, radiologic, angiographic, and operative findings in 15 patients with double aortic arch are described. In five patients, both arches were functional; in the other 10, a portion of the left arch was atretic. Depending on the location of the atretic segment, the anomalies were classified into types A, B, and C double aortic arch. We considered an additional type D double aortic arch which as yet remains a theoretical possibility. With the help of refined angiographic signs obtained by countercurrent right brachial angiography and on the basis of clinical and radiologic signs of tracheoesophageal compression, the differential diagnosis among various types of double aortic arch and right aortic arch anomalies was improved. PMID:110089

Garti, I J; Aygen, M M; Levy, M J

1979-08-01

162

A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report  

PubMed Central

We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enlarged by the tumor, which was approximately 40 cm in length, and showed no response to electric stimulation. We resected a part of the musculocutaneous nerve for biopsy and performed latissimus dorsi muscle transposition in order to repair elbow flexion. Morphologically, the tumor consisted of typical Antoni A areas, and immunohistochemistry revealed a Schwann cell origin of the tumor cells moreover, there was no sign of axon differentiation in the tumor. Therefore, the final diagnosis of plexiform Schwannoma was confirmed. PMID:22044580

2011-01-01

163

[Rare variants of formation of human brachial nerves and arteries].  

PubMed

In the course of preparing muscular and neurovascular specimen of human right arm a combination of several rare anatomic variants was discovered which, to the authors opinion, are worth attention. 1. Formation of the median nerve at the border between middle and inferior thirds of brachium. 2. Variant of n. musculocutaneus origination from the lateral fascicle of plexus brachialis by several branches. 3. Variant of n. antebrachii cutaneous lateralis origination from the lateral fascicle by two branches. 4. Radial artery branching from humeral artery at the level of middle third of the brachium. 5. Three heads were discovered in m. biceps brachii. The variants described are interesting from scientific and clinical interest: they contribute to general conception of human anatomy and clinical manifestations of injuries of brachial nerves and arteries. PMID:11558412

Vyshnepol'ski?, A Iu; Guzhov, D A

2001-01-01

164

Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults ... is peripheral artery disease? What is cardiovascular disease? Cardiovascular disease affects the heart and blood vessels. It is ...

165

Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade.  

PubMed

Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research. PMID:25374596

Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

2014-09-15

166

Rare variant of the brachial artery: superficial lateral inferior type VII EAB.  

PubMed

This study concerns a variant of the brachial artery with a modified origin and course. The artery was studied in 418 upper limbs removed from cadavers. In one upper limb the left brachial artery bifurcated into: (1) a superficial brachial a. (the variant) crossing superficially to the bicipital aponeurosis in the cubital region and assuming the course, position, and supply area of the radial artery, and (2) the deep brachial a. (another variant). An embryologic interpretation of this anomaly is based on a variant vascular development derived from the eighth intersegmental artery. The variant is termed according to Adachi's classification schedule as arteria brachialis superficialis lateralis inferior Type VII with the addition EAB (epiaponeurosis bicipitalis, i.e., superficial to the bicipital aponeurosis). Accurate information concerning unusual patterns of the arteries in the upper limbs is clinically relevant, especially in the avoidance of accidental intra-arterial injection with reflectory vascular occlusion leading to necrosis. PMID:10797631

Melling, M; Wilde, J; Schnallinger, M; Karimian-Teherani, D; Behnam, M; Firbas, W

2000-01-01

167

Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia  

SciTech Connect

Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

Shankar, Sridhar, E-mail: shankars@ummhc.org; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Flanagan, Hugh L. [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Anesthesia (United States); Whang, Edward E. [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Surgery (United States)

2005-06-15

168

Image-based modeling of radiation-induced foci  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several proteins involved in the response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB) form microscopically visible nuclear domains, or foci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF) are believed to be located where DNA damage occurs. To test this assumption, we used Monte Carlo simulations to predict the spatial distribution of DSB in human nuclei exposed to high or low-LET radiation. We then compared these predictions to the distribution patterns of three DNA damage sensing proteins, i.e. 53BP1, phosphorylated ATM and ?H2AX in human mammary epithelial. The probability to induce DSB can be derived from DNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We first used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations to predict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by a complete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope optics from real experiments. Simulations showed a very good agreement for high-LET, predicting 0.7 foci/µm along the path of a 1 GeV/amu Fe particle against measurement of 0.69 to 0.82 foci/µm for various RIF 5 min following exposure (LET 150 keV/µm). On the other hand, discrepancies were shown in foci frequency for low-LET, with measurements 20One drawback using a theoretical model for the nucleus is that it assumes a simplistic and static pattern for DNA densities. However DNA damage pattern is highly correlated to DNA density pattern (i.e. the more DNA, the more likely to have a break). Therefore, we generalized our Monte Carlo approach to real microscope images, assuming pixel intensity of DAPI in the nucleus was directly proportional to the amount of DNA in that pixel. With such approach we could predict DNA damage pattern in real images on a per nucleus basis. Since energy is randomly deposited along high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also be randomly distributed. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weighted random (Poisson) distributions. In contrast, the distributions of RIF obtained as early as 5 min after exposure to high LET (1 GeV/amu Fe) were non-random. This deviation from the expected DNA-weighted random pattern was further characterized by "relative DNA image measurements". This novel imaging approach showed that RIF were located preferentially at the interface between high and low DNA density regions, and were more frequent than predicted in regions with lower DNA density. The same preferential nuclear location was also measured for RIF induced by 1 Gy of low-LET radiation. This deviation from random behavior was evident only 5 min after irradiation for phosphorylated ATM RIF, while ?H2AX and 53BP1 RIF showed pronounced deviations up to 30 min after exposure. These data suggest that RIF within a few minutes following exposure to radiation cluster into open regions of the nucleus (i.e. euchromatin). It is possible that DNA lesions are collected in these nuclear sub-domains for more efficient repair. If so, this would imply that DSB are actively transported within the nucleus, a phenomenon that has not yet been considered in modeling DNA misrepair following exposure to radiation. These results are thus critical for more accurate risk models of radiation and we are actively working on characterizing further RIF movement in human nuclei using live cell imaging.

Costes, Sylvain; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Chen, James; Chou, William; Gascard, Philippe

169

Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)  

SciTech Connect

Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

Jones, Keith W.

1999-09-01

170

Report of the anatomic variation of the brachial artery in a patient undergoing transradial cardiac catheterization.  

PubMed

The arterial pattern of the upper limb is one of the systems that shows a large number of variations in the adult human body. Most of these variations occur in either the radial or ulnar artery; brachial artery variations are less common. In this case report we describe the anomaly in the formation of the brachial artery system. Appreciation of variations in the upper extremity vasculature is essential to prevent injury, particularly in patients undergoing arteriography. PMID:17324765

Cavolli, Raif; Eryilmaz, Sadik; Kaya, Bulent; Ozyurda, Umit

2007-03-01

171

Spatial mapping of the brachial plexus using three-dimensional ultrasound.  

PubMed

Imaging of the brachial plexus with MRI and standard two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound has been reported, and 2D ultrasound-guided regional anaesthetic block is an established technique. The aim of this study was to map the orientation of the brachial plexus in relation to the first rib, carotid and subclavian arteries, using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. A free-hand optically tracked 3D ultrasound system was used with a 12 MHz transducer. 10 healthy volunteers underwent 3D ultrasound of the neck. From the 3D ultrasound data sets, the outlines of the brachial plexus, subclavian artery and first rib were manually segmented. A surface was interpolated from the series of outlines to produce a spatially orientated 3D reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexus could be mapped in all volunteers, although a variation in image resolution between individuals existed. Anatomical variations were demonstrated between the 10 volunteers; the most notable and clinically relevant was the alignment of the plexus divisions. 3D reconstructions illustrated the plexus, changing its orientation from a vertical alignment in the interscalene region to a more horizontal alignment in the supraclavicular fossa. Spatial mapping of the brachial plexus is possible with 3D ultrasound using the subclavian artery and first rib as landmarks. There is a deviation from the conventionally described anatomy and this may have implications for the administration of regional anaesthesia. PMID:16352583

Cash, C J C; Sardesai, A M; Berman, L H; Herrick, M J; Treece, G M; Prager, R W; Gee, A H

2005-12-01

172

Effect of radiation-induced damage on deuterium retention in tungsten, tungsten coatings and Eurofer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An influence of radiation-induced damage on hydrogen isotope retention and transport in a bulk tungsten (W), dense nano-structured W coatings and Eurofer was investigated under well-defined laboratory conditions. Radiation-induced defects in W materials and Eurofer were created by irradiation with 20 MeV W ions. Following the damage production, samples were exposed to low-energy deuterium plasma. The deuterium (D) retention in each sample was subsequently measured by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for the depth profiling up to 6 ?m. It was shown that the D retention at radiation-induced damage is almost equivalent for different W grades after irradiation at high enough fluence. The kinetic of D migration and trapping in damaged area as well as recovery of radiation-induced damage were investigated by loading at different temperatures. It was shown that deuterium retention in tungsten in fusion environment will be dominated by radiation-induced effect in a wide range of investigated temperatures, namely, from room temperature to 1100 K. Whereas displacement damage produced in Eurofer has less pronounced effect on the deuterium accumulation.

Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Sugiyama, K.

2013-11-01

173

Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

2003-01-01

174

RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial functions linked to actin cytoskeleton.

Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France)] [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France); Corre, Isabelle, E-mail: icorre@nantes.inserm.fr [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France)] [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France)

2011-11-04

175

Non-Problematic Risks from Low-Dose Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Clusters  

PubMed Central

Radiation-induced DNA damage clusters have been proposed and are usually considered to pose the threat of serious biological damage. This has been attributed to DNA repair debilitation or cessation arising from the complexity of cluster damage. It will be shown here, contrary to both previous suggestions and perceived wisdom, that radiation induced damage clusters contribute to non-problematic risks in the low-dose, low-LET regime. The very complexity of cluster damage which inhibits and/or compromises DNA repair will ultimately be responsible for the elimination and/or diminution of precancer-ous and cancerous cells. PMID:18648573

Hayes, Daniel P.

2008-01-01

176

Antimicrobial fabric adsorbed iodine produced by radiation-induced graft polymerization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Antimicrobial fabric was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of N-vinyl pyrrolidone onto polyolefine nonwoven fabric and subsequent adsorption of iodine. In response of the huge request for the antimicrobial material applied to face masks for swine flu in 2009, operation procedure of continuous radiation-induced graft polymerization apparatus was improved. The improved grafting production per week increased 3.8 times compared to the production by former operation procedure. Shipped antimicrobial fabric had reached 130,000 m2 from June until December, 2009.

Aoki, Shoji; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sugo, Takanobu; Suzuki, Koichi

2013-03-01

177

Compositional trends of radiation-induced effects in ternary systems of chalcogenide glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of gamma-irradiation on the optical transmittance spectra of pseudobinary stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric cuts of ternary systems of chalcogenide glasses was studied. The application of chemical-bond approach is proposed to explain the features of compositional dependencies of radiation-induced effects in these materials. It is shown that free volume concept must be taken into consideration at the presence of different radiation-sensitive structural units. The creation processes of coordination defects connected with the formation of free volume and coupled with the capability of the constituent atoms to passivation are the main factors determining the magnitude of the radiation-induced effects in chalcogenide glasses.

Kovalskiy, A.

2003-01-01

178

Results and current approach for Brachial Plexus reconstruction  

PubMed Central

We review our experience treating 335 adult patients with supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries over a 7-year period at the University of Southern Santa Catarina, in Brazil. Patients were categorized into 8 groups, according to functional deficits and roots injured: C5-C6, C5-C7, C5-C8 (T1 Hand), C5-T1 (T2 Hand), C8-T1, C7-T1, C6-T1, and total palsy. To restore function, nerve grafts, nerve transfers, and tendon and muscle transfers were employed. Patients with either upper- or lower-type partial injuries experienced considerable functional return. In total palsies, if a root was available for grafting, 90% of patients had elbow flexion restored, whereas this rate dropped to 50% if no roots were grafted and only nerve transfers performed. Pain resolution should be the first priority, and root exploration and grafting helped to decrease or eliminate pain complaints within a short time of surgery. PMID:21676269

2011-01-01

179

Surgical and postpartum hereditary brachial plexus attacks and prophylactic immunotherapy  

PubMed Central

Introduction Surgery and childbirth can trigger attacks of hereditary brachial plexus neuropathy (HBPN), and inflammation was suggested as a component of the pathogenesis. Methods HBPN patients who underwent surgery or parturition from Jan.1,1996 to Dec.31,2009 were studied. Results Twenty-five HBPN patients underwent 48 surgeries or parturitions. Seventeen patients (68%) had attacks, including 13 periprocedural and 7 postpartum by varied anesthesia types. Three patients who had 8 earlier combined attacks (after thyroidectomy, laminectomy, and Caesarean section) were given prophylactic immunosuppressive therapy (corticosteroids ± immunoglobulin). None suffered postoperative attacks, which is uncharacteristic of their prior experience. Five had perioperative attacks as their first HBPN manifestation. Median follow-up was 11(3-48) months. Attacks occurred in the operated limb (n=6) or distant (n=7) to surgical sites. All attacks interfered with daily living, with frequent incomplete recovery. Five patients had a SEPT9 mutation. Conclusions Corticosteroid may prevent parturition and surgical HBPN attacks in some patients. Diverse surgeries, anesthesia and childbirth frequently trigger HBPN attacks. PMID:23042485

Klein, Christopher J.; Barbara, David W.; Sprung, Juraj; Dyck, Peter J.; Weingarten, Toby N.

2012-01-01

180

Variations of the Superficial Brachial Artery in Korean Cadavers  

PubMed Central

The superficial brachial artery (SBA), a branch of the axillary artery, is one of the most common arterial variations in this area. While it is more vulnerable to accidental arterial injection or injury, it could be useful for the nourishment of a medial arm skin free flap. To analyze the relationship between the SBA of axillary origin and segmental variation of the axillary artery, we dissected 304 arms of Korean cadavers. We found an SBA of axillary origin in 12.2% of cadaveric arms. Unilateral occurrence was detected in 16 cadavers and bilateral in 10. SBAs gave rise to radial and ulnar arteries in the cubital fossa (8.9%), continued in the forearm as the radial artery (2.3%), or ended in the upper arm (1.0%). The SBA ended as ulnar artery was not found in any of the cadavers. The bifurcation of the SBA into the radial and ulnar arteries, presence of an SBA that ends in the upper arm, and the lack of continuation as the ulnar artery are characteristics of SBAs in Korean cadavers. PMID:18955798

Yang, Hee-Jun; Gil, Young-Chun; Jung, Won-Sug

2008-01-01

181

Radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary fibroblast and carcinoma cells: dose effect and ploidy. [X-ray  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the Gâ transition point for and the duration of radiation-induced division delay in diploid and tetraploid Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts and in Chinese hamster ovarian carcinoma cells. The location of the radiation-induced division delay transition point was dose independent at high doses and located approximately 42 min

B. F. Kimler; D. B. Leeper; M. H. Schneiderman

1981-01-01

182

Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs  

SciTech Connect

A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

2013-10-01

183

Effects of radiation-induced carbon contamination on the printing performance of extreme ultraviolet masks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation investigates one of the remaining issues for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, the effects of radiation induced carbon contamination on the printing performance of patterned EUV masks. The impact of carbon contamination on EUV masks is significant due to the throughput loss and potential effects on imaging performance, and occurs when multilayer surfaces are exposed to EUV radiation with

Yu-Jen Fan

2011-01-01

184

Radiation-induced preferential dissolution of specific planes of carbon steel in high-temperature water  

Microsoft Academic Search

With respect to carbon steel, corrosion examinations are performed in boiling water under the conditions of with and without exposure to ?-rays. Simulating a radiation-induced concentration cell, one set of samples is connected to the anode of external battery, while the other to the cathode. The corrosion current monitored during the corrosion and weight loss measurement after a prescribed corrosion

Norihiko Fujita; Chihiro Matsuura; Kazuhiko Saigo

2001-01-01

185

Protective effect of tanshinone IIA against radiation-induced ototoxicity in HEI-OC1 cells  

PubMed Central

Radiotherapy is a highly efficient treatment method for nasopharyngeal carcinoma that is often accompanied by significant ototoxic side-effects. The inner ear hair cells are particularly prone to serious injury following radiotherapy. Tanshinone IIA is a transcription factor inhibitor that is extracted from the traditional herbal medicine, Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. The present study investigated the effects of tanshinone IIA treatment on radiation-induced toxicity in the HEI-OC1 hair cell line. Using an MTT assay and flow cytometry, the radiation-induced weakening of the cells was observed to be alleviated when the cells were pre-treated with tanshinone IIA. Radiation exposure promoted p65/nuclear factor (NF)-?B nuclear translocation and activated the p53/p21 pathway, two processes which play a significant role in radiation-induced cell apoptosis. However, pre-treatment of the cells with tanshinone IIA inhibited p65/NF-?B nuclear translocation and p53/p21 pathway activation. These results demonstrate that tanshinone IIA is capable of protecting cochlear cells from radiation-induced injury through the suppression of p65/NF-?B nuclear translocation and the p53/p21 signaling pathway. PMID:24137434

DU, SHASHA; YAO, QIWEI; TAN, PEIXIN; XIE, GUOZHU; REN, CHEN; SUN, QUANQUAN; ZHANG, XIAO; ZHENG, RONG; YANG, KAIJUN; YUAN, YAWEI; YUAN, QUAN

2013-01-01

186

A mitochondria-targeted inhibitor of cytochrome c peroxidase mitigates radiation-induced death  

Microsoft Academic Search

The risk of radionuclide release in terrorist acts or exposure of healthy tissue during radiotherapy demand potent radioprotectants\\/radiomitigators. Ionizing radiation induces cell death by initiating the selective peroxidation of cardiolipin in mitochondria by the peroxidase activity of its complex with cytochrome c leading to release of haemoprotein into the cytosol and commitment to the apoptotic program. Here we design and

Jeffrey Atkinson; Alexandr A. Kapralov; Naveena Yanamala; Yulia Y. Tyurina; Andrew A. Amoscato; Linda Pearce; Jim Peterson; Zhentai Huang; Jianfei Jiang; Alejandro K. Samhan-Arias; Akihiro Maeda; Weihong Feng; Karla Wasserloos; Natalia A. Belikova; Vladimir A. Tyurin; Hong Wang; Jackie Fletcher; Yongsheng Wang; Irina I. Vlasova; Judith Klein-Seetharaman; Detcho A. Stoyanovsky; Hülya Bayîr; Bruce R. Pitt; Michael W. Epperly; Joel S. Greenberger; Valerian E. Kagan

2011-01-01

187

Effect of chemical doping on the radiation-induced conductivity of polyethylene terephthalate  

SciTech Connect

A large decrease in the radiation-induced conductivity of polyethylene terephthalate was produced upon doping films with an electron acceptor molecule. Transient x-ray photoconductivity data verify that this impurity acts as a deep trap. Charge transfer occurs in the doped dielectric which may be associated with this trapping process.

Kurtz, S.R.; Arnold C. Jr.; Hughes, R.C.

1983-12-15

188

Radiation-Induced Apoptosis Varies Among Individuals and is Modified by Sex and Age  

PubMed Central

Purpose Although there are considerable data on mechanisms of radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro and in animal models, little is known about functional variation in these pathways in humans. We sought to develop a tractable system to evaluate this. Materials and methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from 90 healthy volunteers, divided into two aliquots, one irradiated with a 5 Gy dose and the other sham-treated (0 Gy), and assessed for damage-induced apoptosis after 24 hours. To investigate reproducibility, ten individuals spanning the entire radiation-induced apoptotic range were tested three times each, with 3–6 months between replicates. Results We observed surprising heterogeneity in apoptosis among individuals, ranging from 21–62%. Biological replicates from a single individual, however, were completely concordant, suggesting the variability observed across individuals is not the result of stochastic or short-term effects. We found significantly higher radiation-induced apoptosis in males than in females (Mean: 41.0% vs. 30.7%; p < 3.5 × 10?7). Moreover, advancing age was associated with decreasing radiation-induced apoptosis in males (p = 0.01) but not females (p = 0.82).a Conclusions Our results provide evidence that the function of cellular pathways crucial for stress-induced apoptosis varies by sex and could decline with age in humans. PMID:24882388

Applebaum, Mark A.; Skol, Andrew D.; Bond, Elisabeth E.; Overholtzer, Michael; Bond, Gareth L.; Onel, Kenan

2014-01-01

189

Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats  

PubMed Central

Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage. PMID:23969972

Bakkal, B.H.; Gultekin, F.A.; Guven, B.; Turkcu, U.O.; Bektas, S.; Can, M.

2013-01-01

190

Radiation induces genomic instability and mammary ductal dysplasia in Atm heterozygous mice  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic syndrome resulting from the inheritance of two defective copies of the ATM gene that includes among its stigmata radiosensitivity and cancer susceptibility. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that although women with a single defective copy of ATM (AT heterozygotes) appear clinically normal, they may never the less have an increased relative risk of developing breast cancer. Whether they are at increased risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from medical exposures to ionizing radiation is unknown. We have used a murine model of AT to investigate the effect of a single defective Atm allele, the murine homologue of ATM, on the susceptibility of mammary epithelial cells to radiation-induced transformation. Here we report that mammary epithelial cells from irradiated mice with one copy of Atm truncated in the PI-3 kinase domain were susceptible to radiation-induced genomic instability and generated a 10% incidence of dysplastic mammary ducts when transplanted into syngenic recipients, whereas cells from Atm(+/+) mice were stable and formed only normal ducts. Since radiation-induced ductal dysplasia is a precursor to mammary cancer, the results indicate that AT heterozygosity increases susceptibility to radiogenic breast cancer in this murine model system.

Weil, M. M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Yu, Y.; McCarthy, M.; Zabriskie, R. C.; Ullrich, R. L.

2001-01-01

191

Ionizing radiation induces caspase-dependent but Chk2-and p53-independent cell death  

E-print Network

radiation (IR) can induce apoptosis via p53, which is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers. Loss after exposure to a LD50 dose. In mutants of Drosophila Chk2 or p53 homologs, apoptosis is severelyIonizing radiation induces caspase-dependent but Chk2- and p53-independent cell death in Drosophila

Su, Tin Tin

192

Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability  

E-print Network

Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91­100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability. PII: S0027-5107(02)00083-0 #12;92 W.F. Morgan et al. / Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91 as chromosomal rearrangements, delayed mutation, DNA nucleotide repeat instability, cellular transforma- tion

193

Cellular Mechanisms for Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Perturbation of the Breast Tissue Microenvironment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiation exposure is an important form of environmental carcinogen and has been associated with increased risk of breast cancer. Epigenetic events, especially those involving alterations in the breast stromal microenvironment, may play an important role in radiation-induced carcinogenesis but remain not well understood. We here show that human mammary stromal fibroblasts respond to protracted low-dose ionizing radiation exposures by displaying

Kelvin K. C. Tsai; Eric Yao-Yu Chuang; John B. Little

2005-01-01

194

A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury  

SciTech Connect

Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ?40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

2014-02-01

195

A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism: Development of an NTCP Model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively measured during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Hypothyroidism was defined as elevated serum TSH with decreased or normal free thyroxin (T4). A multivariate logistic regression model with bootstrapping was used to determine the most important prognostic variables for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Results: Thirty-five patients (33%) developed primary hypothyroidism within 2 years after radiation therapy. An NTCP model based on 2 variables, including the mean thyroid gland dose and the thyroid gland volume, was most predictive for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. NTCP values increased with higher mean thyroid gland dose (odds ratio [OR]: 1.064/Gy) and decreased with higher thyroid gland volume (OR: 0.826/cm{sup 3}). Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85. Conclusions: This is the first prospective study resulting in an NTCP model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The probability of hypothyroidism rises with increasing dose to the thyroid gland, whereas it reduces with increasing thyroid gland volume.

Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Oosting, Sjoukje F. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schilstra, Cornelis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A., E-mail: j.a.langendijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-11-01

196

CT appearance of acute radiation-induced injury in the lung  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine how soon radiation-induced lung injury is detectable, to compare the CT findings with those on chest radiographs, and to observe the appearance of the abnormality during the acute phase, we performed 83 CT studies in 17 radiotherapy patients at relatively short intervals. All 17 patients received fractionated radiotherapy to the thorax with a large irradiated lung volume. The

Junpei Ikezoe; Shodayu Takashima; S. Morimoto; Koichi Kadowaki; N. Takeuchi; T. Yamamoto; K. Nakanishi; M. Isaza; J. Arisawa; H. Ikeda

1988-01-01

197

Radiation-induced meningioma after treatment for pituitary adenoma: Case report and literature review  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced meningiomas are becoming increasingly well-recognized. We report a case of a 35-year-old man who developed a suprasellar meningioma 9 years after receiving a radiation dose of 4480 cGy for a pituitary adenoma. The literature is also reviewed. 10 references.

Partington, M.D.; Davis, D.H. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

1990-02-01

198

Cytogenetic Changes in Radiation-induced Tumors of the Thyroid1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thyroid carcinoma incidence is increased significantly after ionizing irradiation; however, the possible mechanisms have not yet been identi- fied. To provide clues for an understanding of the radiation-induced transformation of thyroid epithelium, we analyzed the karyotypes of 56 childhood thyroid tumors that appeared in Belarus after the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986. We also studied eight secondary thyroid tumors that

Horst Zitzelsberger; Lars Lehmann; Ludwig Hieber; Heinz-Ulrich G. Weier; Catherine Janish; Jingly Fung; Thomas Negele; Fritz Spelsberg; Edmund Lengfelder; Eugene P. Demidchik; Konstatinos Salassidis; Albrecht M. Kellerer; Martin Werner; Manfred Bauchinger

1992-01-01

199

On the mechanisms of the radiation-induced degradation of cellulosic substances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much interest has been generated in utilizing ionizing radiation for the production of bio-fuels from cellulosic plant materials. It is well known that exposure of cellulose to ionizing radiation causes significant breakdown of the polysaccharide. Radiation-induced degradation of cellulose may reduce or replace ecologically hazardous chemical steps in addition to reducing the number of processing stages and decreasing energy consumption.

Tissot, Chanel; Grdanovska, Slavica; Barkatt, Aaron; Silverman, Joseph; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad

2013-03-01

200

Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation  

E-print Network

Pressure-sensitive blackbody point radiation induced by infrared diode laser irradiation Feng Qin,1 Ultrabroadband radiation from Yb2O3 at ambient and low air pressures was investigated under the excitation to environmental air pressure in the way that the integrated radiation intensity decreases linearly with increasing

Cao, Wenwu

201

Management of late radiation-induced rectal injury after treatment of carcinoma of the uterus  

SciTech Connect

Sixty-one of 1418 (4.3 per cent) patients treated with radiation for carcinoma of the uterus from 1963 to 1983 had significant radiation-induced complications of the intestine develop which required a surgical opinion considering further management. Ninety-three per cent of these complications involved the rectum. Florid proctitis resolved within two years of onset in 33 per cent of the patients who were managed conservatively while 22 per cent of the patients died of disseminated disease within the same time period. Surgical treatment was eventually necessary in 39 per cent of the patients who were initially treated conservatively for radiation induced proctitis. Rectal excision with coloanal sleeve anastomosis produced a satisfactory result in eight of 11 patients with severe radiation injury involving the rectum. The incidence of radiation-induced and malignant rectovaginal fistula were similar (1 per cent), but disease-induced symptoms tended to occur earlier after primary treatment (a median of eight months) compared with radiation-induced symptoms (a median of 16 months).

Allen-Mersh, T.G.; Wilson, E.J.; Hope-Stone, H.F.; Mann, C.V.

1987-06-01

202

Mechanisms of Enhanced Radiation-Induced Degradation Due to Excess Molecular Hydrogen in Bipolar Oxides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bipolar junction test structures packaged in hermetically sealed packages with excess molecular hydrogen (H2) showed enhanced degradation after radiation exposure. Using chemical kinetics, we propose a model that quantitatively establishes the relationship between excess H2 and radiation-induced interface trap formation. Using environments with different molecular hydrogen concentrations, radiation experiments were performed and the experimental data showed excellent agreement with the

X. J. Chen; H. J. Barnaby; B. Vermeire; K. Holbert; D. Wright; R. L. Pease; G. Dunham; D.G. Platteter; J. Seiler; S. McClure; P. Adell

2007-01-01

203

Trifurcation of superficial brachial artery: a rare case with its clinico-embryological implications.  

PubMed

Literatures on vasculature of upper limbs are crammed with reports of distinctly deviant version of normally prevalent vessels having modified origins, altered branching and odd courses. A unique anatomical variation in vascular pattern was observed during routine dissection of right upper limb in gross anatomy laboratory, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The brachial artery was placed superficial to median nerve in the arm and therefore it was called superficial brachial artery. In the cubital fossa, 2.8 cm distal to intercondylar line of elbow joint, this superficial brachial artery terminated by trifurcation into radial, common interosseous and ulnar branches. Strikingly the ulnar branch, after its origin ran superficially over the median nerve and epitrochlear superficial flexor group of muscles of forearm in succession for the initial third of its course in the forearm, consequently it was addressed as superficial ulnar artery. The existence of superficial brachial artery in place of normal brachial artery, its termination by trifurcation into radial, common interosseous and superficial ulnar arteries with remarkably different courses, leads to confusing disposition of structures in the arm, cubital fossa and in the forearm and collectively makes this myriad of anatomical variations even rarer. The clinico-embryological revelations for combination of these unconventional observations, apprises and guides the specialized medical personnel attempting blind and invasive procedures in brachium and ante-brachium. This case report depicts the anatomical perspective and clinical implications on confronting a rare variant vasculature architecture pattern of upper limb. PMID:25366943

Gupta, N; Anshu, A; Dada, R

2014-01-01

204

The rabbit brachial plexus as a model for nerve repair surgery-histomorphometric analysis.  

PubMed

One of the most devastating injuries to the upper limb is trauma caused by the avulsion. The anatomical structure of the rabbit's brachial plexus is similar to the human brachial plexus. The aim of our study was to analyze the microanatomy and provide a detailed investigation of the rabbit's brachial plexus. The purpose of our research project was to evaluate the possibility of utilizing rabbit's plexus as a research model in studying brachial plexus injury. Studies included histomorphometric analysis of sampled ventral branches of spinal nerves C5, C6, C7, C8, and Th1, the cranial trunk, the medial part of the caudal trunk, the lateral part of the caudal trunk and peripheral nerve. Horizontal and vertical analysis was done considering following features: the axon diameter, fiber diameter and myelin sheath. The number of axons, nerve area, myelin fiber density and minimal diameter of myelin fiber, minimal axon diameter and myelin area was marked for each element. The changes between ventral branches of spinal nerves C5-Th1, trunks and peripheral nerve in which the myelin sheath, axon diameter and fiber diameter was assessed were statistically significant. It was found that the g-ratio has close value in the brachial plexus as in the peripheral nerve. The peak of these parameters was found in nerve trunks, and then decreased coherently with the nerves travelling peripherally. Anat Rec, 298:444-454, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25284580

Reichert, Pawe?; Kie?bowicz, Zdzis?aw; Dzi?giel, Piotr; Pu?a, Bartosz; Kuryszko, Jan; Gosk, Jerzy; Boche?ska, Aneta

2015-02-01

205

Use of a Collagen-Based Device for Closure of Low Brachial Artery Punctures  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. To report our experience with the Angioseal vascular closure device for hemostasis of distal brachial artery puncture. Methods. Between September 2003 and August 2005, 64 Angioseal vascular closure devices were inserted in 64 patients (40 men, 24 women; mean age 65 years) immediately after diagnostic or therapeutic arterial angiographies performed through a 5 Fr to 7 Fr sheath via the distal brachial artery. Ultrasound examination of the brachial artery preceded the angiography in all cases and only arteries wider than 4 mm were closed by the Angioseal. In cases of a sonographically evident thin subcutaneous space of the cubital fossa, tissue tumescence, using 1% Lidocaine, was performed prior to the arterial closure. Results. The deployment success rate was 100%. No major complications were encountered; only 2 patients developed puncture site hematoma, and these were followed conservatively. Conclusions. Closure of low brachial artery punctures with the Angioseal is simple and safe. No additional manual compression is required. We recommend its use after brachial artery access interventions, through appropriately wide arteries, to improve early patient ambulation and potentially reduce possible puncture site complications.

Belenky, A. [Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson and Glolda Campuses, Petah Tiqwa, Sakler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Department of Interventional Radiology (Israel)], E-mail: atareli@hotmail.com; Aranovich, D.; Greif, F. [Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson and Glolda Campuses, Petah Tiqwa, Sakler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Department of Surgery (Israel); Bachar, G. [Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson and Glolda Campuses, Petah Tiqwa, Sakler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Department of Radiology (Israel); Bartal, G. [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Israel); Atar, E. [Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson and Glolda Campuses, Petah Tiqwa, Sakler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Department of Interventional Radiology (Israel)

2007-04-15

206

Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance—and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials. For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase ii and phase iii trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho–McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6). In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus on comparing agents and approaches that, in phase i and ii trials, suggest efficacy. These future phase iii randomized controlled trials must clearly distinguish between preventive and management strategies for radiation-induced dermatitis. Only then can evidence-based guidelines be developed, with the hope of standardizing the approach across centres and of improving the prevention and management of radiation-induced dermatitis. PMID:20697521

Salvo, N.; Barnes, E.; van Draanen, J.; Stacey, E.; Mitera, G.; Breen, D.; Giotis, A.; Czarnota, G.; Pang, J.; De Angelis, C.

2010-01-01

207

Physiology of Hormone Autonomous Tissue Lines Derived From Radiation-Induced Tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana 1  

PubMed Central

?-Radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana L. have been produced as a novel approach to isolation of genes that regulate plant development. Tumors excised from irradiated plants are hormone autonomous in culture and have been maintained on hormone-free medium for up to 4 years. Five tumor tissue lines having different morphologies and growth rates were analyzed for auxin, cytokinin, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) content, ethylene production, and response to exogenous growth regulators. Normal tissues and two crown gall tissue lines were analyzed for comparison. Rosettes and whole seedlings each contained approximately 30 nanograms· (gram fresh weight)?1 free indoleacetic acid (IAA), 150 nanograms· (gram fresh weight)?1 ester-conjugated IAA, and 10 to 20 micrograms· (gram fresh weight)?1 amide-conjugated IAA. The crown gall lines contained similar amounts of free and ester-conjugated IAA but less amide conjugates. Whereas three of the radiation-induced tumor lines had IAA profiles similar to normal tissues, one line had 10- to 100-fold more free IAA and three- to 10-fold less amide-conjugated IAA. The fifth line had normal free IAA levels but more conjugated IAA than control tissues. Whole seedlings contained approximately 2 nanograms· (gram fresh weight)?1 of both zeatin riboside and isopentenyladenosine. The crown gall lines had 100- to 1000-fold higher levels of each cytokinin. In contrast, the three radiation-induced tumor lines analyzed contained cytokinin levels similar to the control tissue. The radiation-induced tumor tissues produced very little ethylene, although each contained relatively high levels of ACC. Normal callus contained similar amounts of ACC but produced several times more ethylene than the radiation-induced tumor lines. Each of the radiation-induced tumor tissues displayed a unique set of responses to exogenously supplied growth regulators. Only one tumor line showed the same response as normal callus to both auxin and cytokinin feeding. In some cases, one or more tumor lines showed increased sensitivity to certain growth substances. In other cases, growth regulator feeding had no significant effect on tumor tissue growth. Morphology of the radiation-induced tumor tissues generally did not correlate with auxin to cytokinin ratio in the expected manner. The results suggest that a different primary genetic event led to the formation of each tumor and that growth and differentiation in the tumor tissue lines are uncoupled from the normal hormonal controls. PMID:16668504

Campell, Bruce R.; Town, Christopher D.

1991-01-01

208

Insertion or Deletion of the Cheo Box Modifies Radiation Inducibility of Clostridium Promoters  

PubMed Central

Radiation-inducible promoters are being used in many viral vector systems to obtain spatial and temporal control of gene expression. It was previously proven that radiation-induced gene expression can also be obtained in a bacterial vector system using anaerobic apathogenic clostridia. The effect of radiation inducibility was detected using mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha (mTNF-?) as a model protein under regulation of the radiation-inducible recA promoter. In this report, experiments are described in which this recA promoter was modified in order to increase radiation responsiveness. Incorporation of an extra Cheo box in the recA promoter region resulted in an increase in mTNF-? secretion from 44% for the wild-type promoter to 412% for the promoter with an extra Cheo box after a single irradiation dose of 2 Gy. Deletion of the Cheo box in the promoter region eliminated radiation inducibility. These results prove that the Cheo box in the recA promoter is indeed the radiation-responsive element. We also tested whether we could induce the constitutive endo-?-1,4-glucanase promoter (eglA) via ionizing irradiation by introducing a Cheo box in the promoter region. While the use of the constitutive promoter did not lead to an increase in mTNF-? secretion after irradiation, the introduction of a Cheo box resulted in a 242% increase in mTNF-? secretion. Reverse transcriptase PCR of RNA samples isolated from irradiated and nonirradiated bacterial cultures demonstrated that the increase in secretion was the result of enhanced transcription of the mTNF-? gene. PMID:11571144

Nuyts, S.; Van Mellaert, L.; Barbé, S.; Lammertyn, E.; Theys, J.; Landuyt, W.; Bosmans, E.; Lambin, P.; Anné, J.

2001-01-01

209

On the mechanism of radiation-induced emesis: The role of serotonin  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of radiation-induced emesis by determining the incidence of radiation-induced emesis following hemibody irradiation; the effects of specific antiemetics especially ondansetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist, and to determine the relationship between radiation-induced emesis and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) through its active metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). Forty-one patients received 53 hemibody treatments of 5-8 Gy following intravenous hydration. The patients were divided into three groups according to prehemibody irradiation treatment: Group A: no pretreatment antiemetics, 30 patients; Group B: nonondansetron antiemetics (metoclopramide, dexamethasone, prochlorperazine), ten patients; and Group C: ondansetron, 13 patient. The incidence of radiation-induced emesis was determined prehemibody irradiation or baseline and at 1 h posthemibody irradiation in 38 patients and the results expressed as the percent change in 5-HIAA (ng/ug creatinine). The incidence of radiation-induced emesis was 82% (14/17) following upper/mid hemibody irradiation and 15% (2/11) following lower hemibody irradiation in Group A; 50% (3/6) and 25% (1/4) following upper/mid and lower hemibody irradiation respectively, in Group B/; and 0% (p/13) after upper/mid hemibody irradiation in Group C. The incidence of emesis was significantly different (p<0.001) between the patients of Group A and C who received upper/mid hemibody irradiation. The percent change in 5-HIAA excretion following upper/mid hemibody irradiation were greatest in Group A and smallest in Group C (p<0.002). The degree of change following lower hemibody irradiation (15% incidence of emesis) in Group A was lower than upper/mid hemibody irradiation of the same group. 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Scarantino, C.W.; Ornitz, R.D.; Hoffman, L.G. [Rex Cancer Center, Raleigh, NC (United States)] [and others

1994-11-15

210

Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

Buesch, Francisca Eugster

2010-01-01

211

Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

2012-01-01

212

Outcome in adolescence of brachial plexus birth palsy.  

PubMed

Background and purpose - The frequency and severity of a permanent lesion after brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and its impact on activities of daily living are not well documented. We therefore investigated the outcome of BPBP in adolescents, regarding arm function and consequences for activity and participation. Participants and methods - Of 30,574 babies born at St. Olavs University Hospital in 1991-2000, 91 had BPBP (prevalence 3 per 1,000), and 69 of these individuals were examined at a median age of 14 (10-20) years. The examination included the modified Mallet classification, range of motion, shoulder rotation and grip strength, Assisting Hand Assessment, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Of the 22 subjects who were not examined, 3 could not be traced and 19 reported having no problems in the affected arm. Results - At follow-up, 17 adolescents had a permanent lesion (i.e. individual Mallet subscore below 4) with a median Mallet total score of 15 (9-19), while 52 had good or normal shoulder function (median Mallet total score 25 (23-25)). All participants with a permanent lesion had reduced active shoulder rotation (? 15°), 16 had elbow extension deficit, and 10 had subnormal grip strength. External rotation was considerably weaker in the affected shoulder. In addition, they had ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities. Even so, all except 1 were independent in activities of daily living, although 15 experienced minor difficulties. Interpretation - Every fourth to fifth child with BPBP had a permanent lesion as an adolescent. External rotation was the most impaired movement. Despite ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities, all of the participants except one were independent in activities of daily living. PMID:25238434

Hulleberg, Gunn; Elvrum, Ann-Kristin G; Brandal, Merethe; Vik, Torstein

2014-12-01

213

Outcome in adolescence of brachial plexus birth palsy  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose — The frequency and severity of a permanent lesion after brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and its impact on activities of daily living are not well documented. We therefore investigated the outcome of BPBP in adolescents, regarding arm function and consequences for activity and participation. Participants and methods — Of 30,574 babies born at St. Olavs University Hospital in 1991–2000, 91 had BPBP (prevalence 3 per 1,000), and 69 of these individuals were examined at a median age of 14 (10–20) years. The examination included the modified Mallet classification, range of motion, shoulder rotation and grip strength, Assisting Hand Assessment, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Of the 22 subjects who were not examined, 3 could not be traced and 19 reported having no problems in the affected arm. Results — At follow-up, 17 adolescents had a permanent lesion (i.e. individual Mallet subscore below 4) with a median Mallet total score of 15 (9–19), while 52 had good or normal shoulder function (median Mallet total score 25 (23–25)). All participants with a permanent lesion had reduced active shoulder rotation (? 15°), 16 had elbow extension deficit, and 10 had subnormal grip strength. External rotation was considerably weaker in the affected shoulder. In addition, they had ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities. Even so, all except 1 were independent in activities of daily living, although 15 experienced minor difficulties. Interpretation — Every fourth to fifth child with BPBP had a permanent lesion as an adolescent. External rotation was the most impaired movement. Despite ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities, all of the participants except one were independent in activities of daily living. PMID:25238434

Hulleberg, Gunn; Elvrum, Ann-Kristin G; Brandal, Merethe; Vik, Torstein

2014-01-01

214

Repair of ruptured spinal nerve roots in a brachial plexus lesion. Case report.  

PubMed

A 22-year-old woman sustained a brachial plexus injury with supraganglionic rupture of the C-8 and T-1 nerve roots as a result of a traffic accident. She was operated on approximately 1 week following the accident. After a hemilaminectomy, the intradural defects in the ruptured roots were bridged with sural nerve grafts. Within 3 years she recovered function in all muscles supplied from the lower roots in the plexus except for the intrinsic hand muscles, but she had a persisting, complete sensory loss in the ulnar nerve distribution. The possibility for functional gain after repair of spinal root lesions in brachial plexus patients is discussed. PMID:7897534

Carlstedt, T; Norén, G

1995-04-01

215

Brachial plexus birth palsy: multimodality imaging of spine and shoulder abnormalities in children.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the imaging of brachial plexus palsy, including both pathologic conditions of the spine and shoulder and clinical background and management. CONCLUSION. Brachial plexus birth palsy can result in permanent disability and limb deformity. Identifying the lesion type and associated sequelae is important in clinical management aimed at optimizing outcome. The imaging algorithms used are guided by clinical presentation and are designed to assess the extent of injury to guide possible surgical intervention. PMID:25615781

Menashe, Sarah J; Tse, Raymond; Nixon, Jason N; Ishak, Gisele E; Thapa, Mahesh M; McBroom, Jennifer A; Iyer, Ramesh S

2015-02-01

216

Brachial Plexus Injury as a Complication after Nerve Block or Vessel Puncture  

PubMed Central

Brachial plexus injury is a potential complication of a brachial plexus block or vessel puncture. It results from direct needle trauma, neurotoxicity of injection agents and hematoma formation. The neurological presentation may range from minor transient pain to severe sensory disturbance or motor loss with poor recovery. The management includes conservative treatment and surgical exploration. Especially if a hematoma forms, it should be removed promptly. Comprehensive knowledge of anatomy and adept skills are crucial to avoid nerve injuries. Whenever possible, the patient should not be heavily sedated and should be encouraged to immediately inform the doctor of any experience of numbness/paresthesia during the nerve block or vessel puncture. PMID:25031806

Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, Sang Hyun; Shin, Hye Young

2014-01-01

217

Traumatic vertebral artery dissection in an adult with brachial plexus injury and cervical spinal fractures  

PubMed Central

We present a case of a 32 year-old right-hand dominant woman who sustained a right brachial plexus injury, ipsilateral fractures of the cervical spine transverse processes, and vertebral artery dissection. She presented to us four days following the initiating accident. Magnetic Resonance Imaging showed normal brachial plexus along with vertebral artery dissection with intramural thrombus and vascular lumen occlusion. The dissection was managed conservatively. A repeat CAT-SCAN Angiography three months later showed healing of the dissection plus vascular lumen re-canalization. There were no sequelae due to the dissection. The details of the case are discussed in this report. PMID:17822530

2007-01-01

218

Brachial plexus injury in two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).  

PubMed

Two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), found near Deltaville, Virginia (USA), were evaluated because of inability to use a wing. Results of needle electromyographic studies of the affected wing muscles in both hawks were compatible with denervation. On euthanasia, one hawk had extensive axon and myelin loss with multifocal perivascular lymphocytic inflammation of its brachial plexus and radial nerve. Demyelination and axon loss in the dorsal white matter of the spinal cord on the affected side also were found at the origin of the brachial plexus. The other hawk's wing had not returned to functional status > 2 yr after injury. PMID:8383253

Shell, L; Richards, M; Saunders, G

1993-01-01

219

Sup-ER orthosis: an innovative treatment for infants with birth related brachial plexus injury.  

PubMed

Impairments in active and passive range of upper extremity supination and shoulder external rotation are common sequelae for children with delayed recovery from birth related brachial plexus injury. Orthotic intervention may complement traditional treatment strategies commonly employed in the newborn period. These authors describe their custom fabricated orthosis designed to balance shoulder growth and muscular function, and improve prognosis of long term functional outcomes for children with birth related brachial plexus injury. - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:25042285

Durlacher, Kim M; Bellows, Doria; Verchere, Cynthia

2014-01-01

220

Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

1995-03-01

221

Mechanisms of radiation-induced viscous flow: role of point defects.  

PubMed

Mechanisms of radiation-induced flow in amorphous solids have been investigated using molecular dynamics computer simulations. It is shown for a model glass system, CuTi, that the radiation-induced flow is independent of recoil energy between 100 eV and 10 keV when compared on the basis of defect production and that there is a threshold energy for flow of approximately 10 eV. Injection of interstitial- and vacancylike defects induces the same amount of flow as the recoil events, indicating that point-defect-like entities mediate the flow process, even at 10 K. Comparisons of these results with experiments and thermal spike models are made. PMID:12633371

Mayr, S G; Ashkenazy, Y; Albe, K; Averback, R S

2003-02-01

222

Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Viscous Flow: Role of Point Defects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mechanisms of radiation-induced flow in amorphous solids have been investigated using molecular dynamics computer simulations. It is shown for a model glass system, CuTi, that the radiation-induced flow is independent of recoil energy between 100eV and 10keV when compared on the basis of defect production and that there is a threshold energy for flow of ?10 eV. Injection of interstitial- and vacancylike defects induces the same amount of flow as the recoil events, indicating that point-defect-like entities mediate the flow process, even at 10K. Comparisons of these results with experiments and thermal spike models are made.

Mayr, S. G.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Albe, K.; Averback, R. S.

2003-02-01

223

Spontaneous perseverative turning in rats with radiation-induced hippocampal damage  

SciTech Connect

This study found a new behavioral correlate of lesions specific to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus: spontaneous perseverative turning. Irradiation of a portion of the neonatal rat cerebral hemispheres produced hypoplasia of the granule cell layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus while sparing the rest of the brain. Radiation-induced damage to the hippocampal formation caused rats placed in bowls to spontaneously turn in long, slow bouts without reversals. Irradiated subjects also exhibited other behaviors characteristic of hippocampal damage (e.g., perseveration in spontaneous exploration of the arms of a T-maze, retarded acquisition of a passive avoidance task, and increased horizontal locomotion). These data extend previously reported behavioral correlates of fascia dentata lesions and suggest the usefulness of a bout analysis of spontaneous bowl turning as a measure of nondiscrete-trial spontaneous alternation and a sensitive additional indicator of radiation-induced hippocampal damage.

Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.; Nemeth, T.J.; Mulvihill, M.A.; Alderks, C.E. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1989-08-01

224

Evaluating radiation induced noise effects on pixelated sensors for the National Ignition Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) utilizes several different pixelated sensor technologies for various measurement systems that include alignment cameras, laser energy sensors, and high-speed framing cameras. These systems remain in the facility where they are exposed to 14MeV neutrons during a NIF shot. The image quality of the sensors degrades as a function of radiation-induced damage. This article reports on a figure-of-merit technique that aids in the tracking of the performance of pixelated sensors when exposed to neutron radiation from NIF. The sensor dark current growth can be displayed over time in a 2D visual representation for tracking radiation induced damage. Predictions of increased noise as a function of neutron fluence for future NIF shots allow simulation of reduced performance for each of the individual camera applications. This predicted longevity allows for proper management of the camera systems.

Datte, Philip; Manuel, Anastacia M.; Eckart, Mark; Jackson, Mark; Khater, Hesham; Newton, Mark

2013-09-01

225

Radiation-induced aortoesophageal fistula: an unusual case of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding.  

PubMed

Aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) is an unusual cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Thoracic aortic aneurysm is the most common etiology of primary AEF followed by, respectively, foreign body ingestion, esophageal malignancy, and postsurgical fistulization. Radiation-induced damage to the great vessels is well recognized and some authors in the past have suggested that AEF may be caused by radiotherapy. However, previous case reports of radiation-induced AEF involved patients who received radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma, and precise histopathologic differentiation between AEF secondary to esophageal malignancy and that induced by radiation was difficult. We present here the unique case of a patient with a non-esophageal carcinoma who received radiotherapy before the development of an AEF, thus providing further evidence for the role of radiation injury in the development of this condition. As well, we discuss current opinion regarding etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of this entity. PMID:12359287

Sivaraman, Sujith K; Drummond, Robert

2002-08-01

226

Nonlinear growth with the microwave intensity in radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations  

E-print Network

We report the observation of inverse-magnetic-field-periodic, radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures prepared in W. Wegscheider's group, compare their characteristics with similar oscillations in V. Umansky's material, and describe the lineshape variation vs. the radiation power, $P$, in the two systems. We find that the radiation-induced oscillatory $\\Delta R_{xx}$, in both materials, can be described by $\\Delta R_{xx} = -A exp(-\\lambda/B)sin(2 \\pi F/B)$, where $A$ is the amplitude, $\\lambda$ is the damping parameter, and $F$ is the oscillation frequency. Both $\\lambda$ and $F$ turn out to be insensitive to $P$. On the other hand, $A$ grows nonlinearly with $P$.

Mani, R G; Schmult, S; Wegscheider, W; Umansky, V; 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.125320

2010-01-01

227

Nonlinear growth with the microwave intensity in radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations  

E-print Network

We report the observation of inverse-magnetic-field-periodic, radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures prepared in W. Wegscheider's group, compare their characteristics with similar oscillations in V. Umansky's material, and describe the lineshape variation vs. the radiation power, $P$, in the two systems. We find that the radiation-induced oscillatory $\\Delta R_{xx}$, in both materials, can be described by $\\Delta R_{xx} = -A exp(-\\lambda/B)sin(2 \\pi F/B)$, where $A$ is the amplitude, $\\lambda$ is the damping parameter, and $F$ is the oscillation frequency. Both $\\lambda$ and $F$ turn out to be insensitive to $P$. On the other hand, $A$ grows nonlinearly with $P$.

R. G. Mani; C. Gerl; S. Schmult; W. Wegscheider; V. Umansky

2010-11-18

228

Relation between measurable and principal characteristics of radiation-induced shape-change of graphite  

E-print Network

On the basis of studies of radiation-induced shape-change of reactor graphite GR-280, through the series of measurements of samples with different orientation of cutting with respect to the direction of extrusion, a conclusion is made about the existence of polycrystal substructural elements - domains. Domains, like graphite as a whole, possess the property of transverse isotropy, but have different amplitudes of shape-change and random orientations of the axes of axial symmetry. The model of graphite, constructed on the basis of the concept of domains allowed to explain from a unified point of view most of existing experimental data. It is shown that the presence of the disoriented domain structure leads to the development of radiation-induced stresses and to the dependence of the shape-change on the size of graphite samples. We derive the relation between the shape-change of finite size samples and the actual shape-change of macro-graphite.

M. V. Arjakov; A. V. Subbotin; S. V. Panyukov; O. V. Ivanov; A. S. Pokrovskii; D. V. Kharkov

2011-04-12

229

Gamma radiation induced effects in floppy and rigid Ge-containing chalcogenide thin films  

SciTech Connect

We explore the radiation induced effects in thin films from the Ge-Se to Ge-Te systems accompanied with silver radiation induced diffusion within these films, emphasizing two distinctive compositional representatives from both systems containing a high concentration of chalcogen or high concentration of Ge. The studies are conducted on blanket chalcogenide films or on device structures containing also a silver source. Data about the electrical conductivity as a function of the radiation dose were collected and discussed based on material characterization analysis. Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction Spectroscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy provided us with data about the structure, structural changes occurring as a result of radiation, molecular formations after Ag diffusion into the chalcogenide films, Ag lateral diffusion as a function of radiation and the level of oxidation of the studied films. Analysis of the electrical testing suggests application possibilities of the studied devices for radiation sensing for various conditions.

Ailavajhala, Mahesh S.; Mitkova, Maria [Department of Electrical Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr. Boise, Idaho 83725-2075 (United States); Gonzalez-Velo, Yago; Barnaby, Hugh; Kozicki, Michael N.; Holbert, Keith [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-9309 (United States); Poweleit, Christian [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Butt, Darryl P. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr. Boise, Idaho 83725-2090 (United States)

2014-01-28

230

Energy Distribution of Electrons in Radiation Induced-Helium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Energy distribution of high energy electrons as they slow down and thermalize in a gaseous medium is studied. The energy distribution in the entire energy range from source energies down is studied analytically. A helium medium in which primary electrons are created by the passage of heavy-charged particles from nuclear reactions is emphasized. A radiation-induced plasma is of interest in a variety of applications, such as radiation pumped lasers and gaseous core nuclear reactors.

Lo, R. H.

1972-01-01

231

Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD® in mice  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to assess recovery from hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD®, also known as ON01210.Na (4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone, sodium salt), after total body radiation. In our previous study, we reported that Ex-RAD, a small-molecule radioprotectant, enhances survival of mice exposed to gamma radiation, and prevents radiation-induced apoptosis as measured by the inhibition of radiation-induced protein 53 (p53) expression in cultured cells. We have expanded this study to determine best effective dose, dose-reduction factor (DRF), hematological and gastrointestinal protection, and in vivo inhibition of p53 signaling. A total of 500 mg/kg of Ex-RAD administered at 24 h and 15 min before radiation resulted in a DRF of 1.16. Ex-RAD ameliorated radiation-induced hematopoietic damage as monitored by the accelerated recovery of peripheral blood cells, and protection of granulocyte macrophage colony-forming units (GM-CFU) in bone marrow. Western blot analysis on spleen indicated that Ex-RAD treatment inhibited p53 phosphorylation. Ex-RAD treatment reduces terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay (TUNEL)-positive cells in jejunum compared with vehicle-treated mice after radiation injury. Finally, Ex-RAD preserved intestinal crypt cells compared with the vehicle control at 13 and 14 Gy. The results demonstrated that Ex-RAD ameliorates radiation-induced peripheral blood cell depletion, promotes bone marrow recovery, reduces p53 signaling in spleen and protects intestine from radiation injury. PMID:22843617

Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Perkins, Michael W.; Hieber, Kevin; Pessu, Roli L.; Gambles, Kristen; Maniar, Manoj; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Seed, Thomas M.; Kumar, K. Sree

2012-01-01

232

MCPH1\\/BRIT1 limits ionizing radiation-induced centrosome amplification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microcephalin (MCPH1\\/BRIT1) is a potential tumour suppressor that localizes to the centrosome, forms ionizing radiation-induced nuclear foci (IRIF) and is involved in the DNA damage checkpoints that ensure genome stability. Here, we report the impact of Mcph1 disruption in the hyper-recombinogenic DT40 cell line. Mcph1?\\/? cells were viable and proliferated at the same rate as wild-type controls. Mcph1-deficient cells had

J A L Brown; E Bourke; C Liptrot; P Dockery; C G Morrison

2010-01-01

233

Calpain activation is upstream of caspases in radiation-induced apoptosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The molecular events involved in apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation remain unresolved. In this paper we show that the cleavage of fodrin to a 150 kDa fragment is an early proteolytic event in radiation-induced apoptosis in the Burkitts' Lymphoma cell line BL30A and requires 100 ?M zVAD-fmk for inhibition. Caspases-1, -3, -6 and -7 were shown to cleave fodrin to

Nigel J Waterhouse; Debra M Finucane; Douglas R Green; John S Elce; Sharad Kumar; Emad S Alnemri; Gerald Litwack; KumKum Khanna; Martin F Lavin; Dianne J Watters

1998-01-01

234

Radiation induced G 1-block and p53 status in six human cell lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considerable attention has recently been focused on the fact that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is involved in the cellular response to radiation. In its wild-type form the protein appears to control a cell cycle checkpoint, preventing entry into S-phase following DNA damage. A number of authors observed a radiation induced G1-block in cells expressing wild-type p53, but not in

F. Zölzer; S. Hillebrandt; C. Streffer

1995-01-01

235

Radiation induced noise in x-ray imagers for high-yield inertial confinement fusion experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The large fluence of 14-MeV neutrons produced in high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments creates a variety of backgrounds in x-ray imagers viewing the implosion. Secondary charged particles produce background light by Cherenkov emission, phosphor screen excitation and possibly scintillation in the optical components of the imager. In addition, radiation induced optical absorption may lead to attenuation of the signal.

C. Hagmann; J. Ayers; P. M. Bell; J.-L. Bourgade; D. K. Bradley; J. Celeste; C. Cerjan; S. Darbon; J. Emig; B. Felker; S. Glenn; J. Holder; N. Izumi; J. D. Kilkenny; J. Moody; K. Piston; A. Rousseau; V. A. Smalyuk; C. Sorce

2011-01-01

236

Radiation-induced Breast Telangiectasias Treated with the Pulsed Dye Laser  

PubMed Central

Background and objectives: Radiation dermatitis is a frequent sequela of adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Clinical manifestations include prominent telangiectasias that may be physically disfiguring and psychologically distressing for the patient. The objective of this study was to review cases of breast cancer patients with radiation-induced breast telangiectasias treated with the pulsed dye laser and assess clinical efficacy. The patient’s perception of treatment was also reviewed. Study design: A retrospective chart review of patients treated for radiation-induced telangiectasias was conducted at the Dermatology Division of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Materials and methods: Pre- and post-clinical photos were used to assess clearance by two independent raters. Patient’s comments were assessed from visit notes and the treating physicians for the impact of treatment on the patient’s overall well-being. Results: All patients (n=11) experienced clinical improvement in the radiation-induced telangiectasias. The mean number of treatments was 4.3 (2–9) with an average fluence of 4.2J/cm2 (585nm platform) and 7.8J/cm2 (595nm) (4–8 J/cm2) used. The mean percent clearance was 72.7 percent (50–90%). Adverse effects were not encountered including those with breast implants or flap reconstruction. Patients reported an improvement in their well-being, including an improved sense of confidence. Limitations: Limitations include the small sample size, nonstandardized digital images, and nonsystematic collection of patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: The pulsed dye laser is an efficacious treatment for radiation-induced breast telangiectasias. Multiple treatments are required for greater than 50-percent clearance and conservative treatment parameters are advised. Patients also reported an improved quality of life. PMID:25584136

Rossi, Anthony M.; Nehal, Kishwer S.

2014-01-01

237

C/EBP? Deficiency Sensitizes Mice to Ionizing Radiation-Induced Hematopoietic and Intestinal Injury  

PubMed Central

Knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the radiation response is critical for developing interventions to mitigate radiation-induced injury to normal tissues. Exposure to radiation leads to increased oxidative stress, DNA-damage, genomic instability and inflammation. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein delta (Cebpd; C/EBP? is implicated in regulation of these same processes, but its role in radiation response is not known. We investigated the role of C/EBP? in radiation-induced hematopoietic and intestinal injury using a Cebpd knockout mouse model. Cebpd?/? mice showed increased lethality at 7.4 and 8.5 Gy total-body irradiation (TBI), compared to Cebpd+/+ mice. Two weeks after a 6 Gy dose of TBI, Cebpd?/? mice showed decreased recovery of white blood cells, neutrophils, platelets, myeloid cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells, decreased colony-forming ability of bone marrow progenitor cells, and increased apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells compared to Cebpd+/+ controls. Cebpd?/? mice exhibited a significant dose-dependent decrease in intestinal crypt survival and in plasma citrulline levels compared to Cebpd+/+ mice after exposure to radiation. This was accompanied by significantly decreased expression of ?-H2AX in Cebpd?/? intestinal crypts and villi at 1 h post-TBI, increased mitotic index at 24 h post-TBI, and increase in apoptosis in intestinal crypts and stromal cells of Cebpd?/? compared to Cebpd+/+ mice at 4 h post-irradiation. This study uncovers a novel biological function for C/EBP? in promoting the response to radiation-induced DNA-damage and in protecting hematopoietic and intestinal tissues from radiation-induced injury. PMID:24747529

Chang, Jianhui; Wang, Wenze; Pathak, Rupak; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Junru; Hendrickson, Howard; Boerma, Marjan; Sterneck, Esta; Zhou, Daohong; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

2014-01-01

238

On the mechanisms of radiation-induced curing of epoxy-fiber composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Depending on the monomer molecular structure, the mechanisms of radiation-induced polymerization proceed via either C-centered radical mechanisms or cationic polymerization. While polymerization via C-centered radicals can be impeded by the presence of oxygen and high dose-rate, polymerization through cationic polymerization is inhibited even by the presence of trace amounts of water. Synergy by the combination of radiation and thermal curing can help to achieve various desired properties of polymer-fiber composite materials.

Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; McLaughlin, William L.

1996-08-01

239

Giant Goos-Hänchen shifts and radiation-induced trapping of Helmholtz solitons at nonlinear interfaces.  

PubMed

Giant Goos-Hänchen shifts and radiation-induced trapping are studied at the planar boundary separating two focusing Kerr media within the framework of the Helmholtz theory. The analysis, valid for all angles of incidence, reveals that interfaces exhibiting linear external refraction can also accommodate both phenomena. Numerical evidence of these effects is provided, based on analytical predictions derived from a generalized Snell's law. PMID:21931405

Sánchez-Curto, Julio; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; McDonald, Graham S

2011-09-15

240

Radiation induced brainstem glioblastoma in a patient treated for glomus jugulare tumour.  

PubMed

The intensive utilisation of cranial irradiation in young individuals with benign intracranial pathologies are of particular concern because of the potential for delayed development of radiation-induced neoplasms. We present a 48-year-old man who developed a second metachronous brainstem glioblastoma 10years following adjuvant radiotherapy for a partially resected glomus jugulare tumour. The current patient highlights the importance of judicious and individualised consideration for irradiation treatment in benign pathologies that are associated with long-term survival. PMID:25085729

Na, Angelika F; Lai, Leon T; Kaye, Andrew H

2015-01-01

241

Calculation of radiation-induced DNA damage from photons and tritium beta-particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiation-induced damage in nucleosomal DNA was modelled by Monte Carlo means. An atomistic representation of DNA with a first\\u000a hydration shell was used. DNA single- and double-strand break (SSB and DSB) yields were calculated for 137Cs photons, x-rays and tritium beta-particles. Monte Carlo-generated electron tracks for liquid water were used to model energy\\u000a deposition. Chemical evolution of a track and

V. V. Moiseenko; R. N. Hamm; A. J. Waker; W. V. Prestwich

2001-01-01

242

Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C., E-mail: prabhat-goswami@uiowa.edu

2013-11-01

243

Study on chemical, UV and gamma radiation-induced grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate onto chitosan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present study, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate has been grafted onto chitosan by using either chemical initiation, or photo-induction or gamma radiation-induced polymerisation, all under heterogeneous conditions. The evidence of grafting was provided by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The results concerning the effect of initiator concentration, initial monomer concentration and dose rate influencing on the yield of grafting reactions are presented. These suggest that gamma irradiation is the method that leads to higher yields of grafting.

Casimiro, M. H.; Botelho, M. L.; Leal, J. P.; Gil, M. H.

2005-04-01

244

Homeopathic treatment of radiation-induced itching in breast cancer patients. A prospective observational study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following surgery for carcinoma of the breast, patients receive local radiotherapy. This can cause itching, which may be severe, in the radiation field. The affected skin usually is dry, rough and red. Twenty-five patients were treated homeopathically for radiation-induced itching. Fourteen patients developed itching during their course of postoperative radiation at 27 days median (range: 14–40). Eleven patients experienced itching

O Schlappack

2004-01-01

245

Protective effects of fucoidan against ?-radiation-induced damage of blood cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown algae including Fucus vesiculosus and Laminaria japonica, has a variety of biological activities, including antioxidant and antitumor activities. Here, we investigated the radioprotective\\u000a effects of fucoidan on human monoblastic leukemia cell line U937. Further, animal tests were carried out using Balb\\/c mice\\u000a in order to determine the radiation-induced changes in the counts of

Ki Hyeong Rhee; Keyong Ho Lee

2011-01-01

246

Radiation-induced thyroid cancer: What we have learned from Chernobyl  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increased incidence of thyroid cancer in the exposed children remains the most well-documented long-term effect of radioactive\\u000a contamination after the Chernobyl nuclear accident in April, 1986. Multiple studies on approx 4000 children and adolescents\\u000a with thyroid cancer have provided important new information about the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, and molecular\\u000a aspects of radiation-induced carcinogenesis in the thyroid gland. They revealed

Yuri E. Nikiforov

2006-01-01

247

Protection from radiation-induced apoptosis by the radioprotector amifostine (WR-2721) is radiation dose dependent.  

PubMed

The radioprotective agent amifostine is a free radical scavenger that can protect cells from the damaging effects of ionising radiation when administered prior to radiation exposure. However, amifostine has also been shown to protect cells from chromosomal mutations when administered after radiation exposure. As apoptosis is a common mechanism by which cells with mutations are removed from the cell population, we investigated whether amifostine stimulates apoptosis when administered after radiation exposure. We chose to study a relatively low dose which is the maximum radiation dose for radiation emergency workers (0.25 Gy) and a high dose relevant to radiotherapy exposures (6 Gy). Mice were administered 400 mg/kg amifostine 30 min before, or 3 h after, whole-body irradiation with 0.25 or 6 Gy X-rays and apoptosis was analysed 3 or 7 h later in spleen and bone marrow. We observed a significant increase in radiation-induced apoptosis in the spleen of mice when amifostine was administered before or after 0.25 Gy X-rays. In contrast, when a high dose of radiation was used (6 Gy), amifostine caused a reduction in radiation-induced apoptosis 3 h post-irradiation in spleen and bone marrow similar to previously published studies. This is the first study to investigate the effect of amifostine on radiation-induced apoptosis at a relatively low radiation dose and the first to demonstrate that while amifostine can reduce apoptosis from high doses of radiation, it does not mediate the same effect in response to low-dose exposures. These results suggest that there may be a dose threshold at which amifostine protects from radiation-induced apoptosis and highlight the importance of examining a range of radiation doses and timepoints. PMID:24459009

Ormsby, Rebecca J; Lawrence, Mark D; Blyth, Benjamin J; Bexis, Katrina; Bezak, Eva; Murley, Jeffrey S; Grdina, David J; Sykes, Pamela J

2014-02-01

248

Implication of replicative stress-related stem cell ageing in radiation-induced murine leukaemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:The essential aetiology of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in mice is the downregulation of the transcription factor PU.1. The causative mutation of the PU.1-endocing Sfpi1 gene consists mostly of C:G to T:A transitions at a CpG site and is likely to be of spontaneous origin. To work out a mechanism underlying the association between radiation exposure and the AML

N Ban; M Kai

2009-01-01

249

Predictive factors of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Background To assess the factors affecting the incidence of radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant 3 D conformal radiotherapy by the analysis of dosimetry and topical treatments. Methods Between September 2002 and July 2009, 158 breast cancer patients were treated with adjuvant 3 D conformal radiotherapy after undergoing surgery. Before November 2006, 90 patients were subjected to therapeutic skin care group and topical corticosteroid therapy was used for acute radiation dermatitis. Thereafter, 68 patients received prophylactic topical therapy from the beginning of radiotherapy. The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinical and treatment factors. Furthermore, the possible mechanisms responsible for the effects of topical treatment on radiation-induced dermatitis were investigated in vivo. Results The incidence of radiation-induced moist desquamation was 23% across 158 patients. Higher volume receiving 107% of prescribed dose within PTV (PTV-V107%; >28.6%) and volume receiving 110% of prescribed dose within treated volume (TV-V110%; > 5.13%), and no prophylactic topical therapy for irradiated skin, were associated with higher incidence of acute radiation dermatitis. The protective effect of prophylactic topical treatment was more pronounced in patients with TV-V110% > 5.13%. Furthermore, using irradiated mice, we demonstrated that topical steroid cream significantly attenuated irradiation-induced inflammation, causing a decrease in expression of inflammatory cytokines and TGF-beta 1. Conclusion TV-V110% > 5.13% may be an important predictor for radiation induced dermatitis. Prophylactic topical treatment for irradiated skin can significantly improve the tolerance of skin to adjuvant radiotherapy, especially for patients with higher TV-V110%. PMID:20860847

2010-01-01

250

Modeling of Ionizing Radiation-Induced Degradation in Multiple Gate Field Effect Transistors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The radiation response of advanced non-planar mul- tiple gate field effect transistors (MuGFETs) has been shown to have a strong dependence on fin width . The incorporation of total ionizing dose (TID) effects into a physics-based surface-po- tential compact model allows for the effects of radiation-induced degradation in MuGFET devices to be modeled in circuit sim- ulators, e.g., SPICE. A

Ivan Sanchez Esqueda; Hugh J. Barnaby; Keith E. Holbert; Farah El-Mamouni; Ronald D. Schrimpf

2011-01-01

251

Mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity and implications for future clinical trials  

PubMed Central

To summarize current knowledge regarding mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue injury and medical countermeasures available to reduce its severity. Advances in radiation delivery using megavoltage and intensity-modulated radiation therapy have permitted delivery of higher doses of radiation to well-defined tumor target tissues. Injury to critical normal tissues and organs, however, poses substantial risks in the curative treatment of cancers, especially when radiation is administered in combination with chemotherapy. The principal pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of tissue stem cells and progenitor cells and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Emerging concepts of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity suggest that the recovery and repopulation of stromal stem cells remain chronically impaired by long-lived free radicals, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines resulting in progressive damage after radiation exposure. Better understanding the mechanisms mediating interactions among excessive generation of reactive oxygen species, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated macrophages, and role of bone marrow-derived progenitor and stem cells may provide novel insight on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury of tissues. Further understanding the molecular signaling pathways of cytokines and chemokines would reveal novel targets for protecting or mitigating radiation injury of tissues and organs. PMID:25324981

Jenrow, Kenneth A.; Brown, Stephen L.

2014-01-01

252

Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells Do Not Restore Radiation-Induced Microvascular Damage  

PubMed Central

Background. Radiotherapy is commonly used to treat breast and thoracic cancers but it also causes delayed microvascular damage and increases the risk of cardiac mortality. Endothelial cell proliferation and revascularization are crucial to restore microvasculature damage and maintain function of the irradiated heart. We have therefore examined the potential of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (BM-derived EPCs) for restoration of radiation-induced microvascular damage. Material & Methods. 16?Gy was delivered to the heart of adult C57BL/6 mice. Mice were injected with BM-derived EPCs, obtained from Eng+/+ or Eng+/? mice, 16 weeks and 28 weeks after irradiation. Morphological damage was evaluated at 40 weeks in transplanted mice, relative to radiation only and age-matched controls. Results. Cardiac irradiation decreased microvascular density and increased endothelial damage in surviving capillaries (decrease alkaline phosphatase expression and increased von Willebrand factor). Microvascular damage was not diminished by treatment with BM-derived EPCs. However, BM-derived EPCs from both Eng+/+ and Eng+/? mice diminished radiation-induced collagen deposition. Conclusion. Treatment with BM-derived EPCs did not restore radiation-induced microvascular damage but it did inhibit fibrosis. Endoglin deficiency did not impair this process. PMID:25101181

Seemann, Ingar; te Poele, Johannes A. M.; Hoving, Saske; Stewart, Fiona A.

2014-01-01

253

The role of secretory granules in radiation-induced dysfunction of rat salivary glands  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the possible role of secretory granules in radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction, rats were pretreated with isoproterenol (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to degranulate salivary gland acini. At maximal depletion, salivary glands were locally irradiated with a single dose of 15 Gy of X rays. Parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva samples were collected before and 1-10 days after irradiation. The lag phase, flow rate, concentrations of potassium and sodium, and amylase secretion were determined. Sham-treated, isoproterenol-treated and irradiated animals provided reference data. In the parotid gland, but not in the submandibular gland, protection against radiation-induced changes in flow rate and composition of saliva occurred after pretreatment with isoproterenol. Combining morphological data from a previous study with data from the current study, it is suggested that improvement of parotid gland function is attributed predominantly to a proliferative stimulus on acinar cells by isoproterenol and not to its degranulation effect. After pretreatment with isoproterenol, an earlier expression of radiation-induced acinar cell damage leading to death was observed, followed by a faster tissue recovery. Thus the proliferative stimulus on acinar cells may accelerate the unmasking of latent lethal damage, resulting in the earlier replacement of dead cells by new, functionally intact cells. 33 refs., 2 figs.

Peter, B.; Van Waarde, M.A.W.H.; Konings, A.W.T. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands); Vissink, A. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)]|[Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); `s-Gravenmade, E.J. [Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)

1995-02-01

254

Mint oil (Mentha spicata Linn.) offers behavioral radioprotection: a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion study.  

PubMed

Mentha spicata Linn. (mint), a herb well known for its gastroprotective properties in the traditional system of medicine has been shown to protect against radiation-induced lethality, and recently its constituents have been found to possess calcium channel antagonizing properties. The present study examined the behavioral radioprotective efficacy of mint oil (obtained from Mentha spicata), particularly in mitigating radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA), which has been proposed as a behavioral endpoint that is mediated by the toxic effects of gamma radiation on peripheral systems, primarily the gastrointestinal system in the Sprague-Dawley rat model. Intraperitoneal administration of Mentha spicata oil 10% (v/v), 1 h before 2 Gy gamma radiation, was found to render significant radioprotection against CTA (p < 0.05), by blocking the saccharin avoidance response within 5 post-treatment observational days, with the highest saccharin intake being observed on day 5. This finding clearly demonstrates that gastroprotective and calcium channel antagonizing properties of Mentha spicata can be effectively utilized in preventing radiation-induced behavioral changes. PMID:18853399

Haksar, A; Sharma, A; Chawla, R; Kumar, Raj; Lahiri, S S; Islam, F; Arora, M P; Sharma, R K; Tripathi, R P; Arora, Rajesh

2009-02-01

255

Loss of Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Attenuates Murine Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pulmonary fibrosis is a disorder of the lungs with limited treatment options. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of proteases that degrade extracellular matrix with roles in fibrosis. Here we studied the role of MMP13 in a radiation-induced lung fibrosis model using a MMP13 knockout mouse. Methods and Materials: We investigated the role of MMP13 in lung fibrosis by investigating the effects of MMP13 deficiency in C57Bl/6 mice after 20-Gy thoracic irradiation (6-MV Linac). The morphologic results in histology were correlated with qualitative and quantitative results of volume computed tomography (VCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical outcome. Results: We found that MMP13 deficient mice developed less pulmonary fibrosis than their wildtype counterparts, showed attenuated acute pulmonary inflammation (days after irradiation), and a reduction of inflammation during the later fibrogenic phase (5-6 months after irradiation). The reduced fibrosis in MMP13 deficient mice was evident in histology with reduced thickening of alveolar septi and reduced remodeling of the lung architecture in good correlation with reduced features of lung fibrosis in qualitative and quantitative VCT and MRI studies. The partial resistance of MMP13-deficient mice to fibrosis was associated with a tendency towards a prolonged mouse survival. Conclusions: Our data indicate that MMP13 has a role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Further, our findings suggest that MMP13 constitutes a potential drug target to attenuate radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

Flechsig, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center and University Hospital Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Hartenstein, Bettina; Teurich, Sybille [Department of Signal Transduction, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dadrich, Monika; Hauser, Kai; Abdollahi, Amir; Groene, Hermann-Josef [Department of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center and University Hospital Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Angel, Peter [Department of Signal Transduction, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter E., E-mail: p.huber@dkfz.d [Department of Molecular Pathology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

2010-06-01

256

Total-dose radiation-induced degradation of thin film ferroelectric capacitors  

SciTech Connect

Thin film PbZr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PZT) ferroelectric memories offer the potential for radiation-hardened, high-speed nonvolatile memories with good retention and fatigue properties. In this paper we explore in detail the radiation hardness of PZT ferroelectric capacitors. Ferroelectric capacitors were irradiated using x-ray and Co-60 sources to dose levels up to 16 Mrad(Si). The capacitors were characterized for their memory properties both before and after irradiation. The radiation hardness was process dependent. Three out of four processes resulted in capacitors that showed less than 30% radiation-induced degradation in retained polarization charge and remanent polarization after irradiating to 16 Mrad(Si). On the other hand, one of the processes showed significant radiation-induced degradation in retained polarization charge and remanent polarization at dose levels above 1 Mrad(Si). The decrease in retained polarization charge appears to be due to an alteration of the switching characteristics of the ferroelectric due to changes in the internal fields. The radiation-induced degradation is recoverable by a postirradiation biased anneal and can be prevented entirely if devices are cycled during irradiation. The authors have developed a model to simulate the observed degradation.

Schwank, J.R.; Nasby, R.D.; Miller, S.L.; Rodgers, M.S.; Dressendorfer, P.V. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-12-01

257

AVULSION OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS IN A GREAT HORNED OWL (Bubo virginianus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating

MICHAEL P. MOORE; FRIK STAUBER; NANCY THOMAS

1989-01-01

258

Efficacy of clonidine as an adjuvant to ropivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A prospective study  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims: Bupivacaine has been the most frequently used local anaesthetic in brachial plexus block, but ropivacaine has also been successfully tried in the recent past. It is less cardiotoxic, less arrhythmogenic, less toxic to the central nervous system than bupivacaine, and it has intrinsic vasoconstrictor property. The effects of clonidine have been studied in peripheral nerve blockade. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of clonidine on nerve blockade during brachial plexus block with ropivacaine using peripheral nerve stimulator. Methods: Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups, Group A and B. Group A received 30 ml of 0.5% of ropivacaine with 0.5 ml normal saline while Group B received same amount of ropivacaine with 0.5 ml (equivalent to 75 ?g) of clonidine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. The groups were compared regarding quality of sensory and motor blockade, duration of post-operative analgesia and intra and post-operative complications. Results: There was a significant increase in duration of motor and sensory block and analgesia in Group B as compared to Group A patients (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in onset time in either group (P = 0.304). No significant side effects were noted. Conclusion: The addition of 75 ?g of clonidine to ropivacaine for brachial plexus block prolongs motor and sensory block and analgesia without significant side effects.

Ali, Qazi Ehsan; Manjunatha, L; Amir, Syed Hussain; Jamil, Shaista; Quadir, Abdul

2014-01-01

259

The C5 root dermatome enlarges and modulates hand pain in total brachial plexus palsy.  

PubMed

Hand pain is a major complaint in 80% of the patients with complete brachial plexus palsy; and, in 80% of these patients, the C5 root is ruptured and the C6-T1 roots avulsed from the spinal cord. It has been suggested that pain in brachial plexus injuries may not arise from avulsed roots, but rather from ruptured roots. Traditionally the C5 root dermatome does not extend to the hand. We have hypothesized that in total lesions of the brachial plexus the C5 root dermatome expands, reaching the hand. In 20 patients with confirmed C5 root rupture and C6-T1 root avulsion, we investigated the distribution of C5 root paresthesia six to eight weeks after grafting. After cervical percussion in search of Tinel’s sign, maps related to reported paresthesia were drawn on the affected limb. We observed that paresthesia following C5 root percussion reached the hands and fingers, dermatomes linked to the C6 and C8 roots. Immediately after percussion, for a few seconds, 14 patients who complained of pain during examination reported the augmentation of numbness and pain resolution. After brachial plexus injury, the C5 root dermatome expands and modulates hand pain. PMID:24822255

Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

2014-05-01

260

Dynamic properties of partially denervated muscle in children with brachial plexus birth palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contraction time, time to peak rate of tension development, half-relaxation time and maximum twitch tension of partially denervated flexor carpi ulnaris muscle were measured in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. The extent of weakness of the affected muscle was assessed by expressing its maximum twitch tension as a percentage of the tension of the contralateral normal muscle. Contraction time,

M Stefanova-Uzunova; L Stamatova; V Gatev

1981-01-01

261

Robot-Assisted Surgery of the Shoulder Girdle and Brachial Plexus  

PubMed Central

New developments in the surgery of the brachial plexus include the use of less invasive surgical approaches and more precise techniques. The theoretical advantages of the use of robotics versus endoscopy are the disappearance of physiological tremor, three-dimensional vision, high definition, magnification, and superior ergonomics. On a fresh cadaver, a dissection space was created and maintained by insufflation of CO2. The supraclavicular brachial plexus was dissected using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A segment of the C5 nerve root was grafted robotically. A series of eight clinical cases of nerve damage around the shoulder girdle were operated on using the da Vinci robot. The ability to perform successful microneural repair was confirmed in both the authors' clinical and experimental studies, but the entire potential of robotically assisted microneural surgery was not realized during these initial cases because an open incision was still required. Robotic-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus is still in its early stages. It would be ideal to have even finer and more suitable instruments to apply fibrin glue or electrostimulation in nerve surgery. Nevertheless, the prospects of minimally invasive techniques would allow acute and subacute surgical approach of traumatic brachial plexus palsy safely, without significant and cicatricial morbidity. PMID:24872778

Facca, Sybille; Hendriks, Sarah; Mantovani, Gustavo; Selber, Jesse C.; Liverneaux, Philippe

2014-01-01

262

Central hemodynamics for risk reduction strategies: additive value over and above brachial blood pressure.  

PubMed

Reduction strategies of blood pressure, as a modifiable cardiovascular risk, are currently based on office assessment of brachial artery blood pressure. However, antihypertensive treatment based on brachial BP values reduces cardiovascular risk but cannot completely reverse the hypertension-induced risk of morbidity events. As is well known, BP varies in different arterial systems and invasive and non-invasive studies have demonstrated that brachial BP does not necessarily reflect central aortic BP. Emerging evidences now suggest that central pressure may predict cardiovascular diseases better than brachial BP; moreover, it may differently respond to certain antihypertensive drugs. The potential effects beyond peripheral BP control may be due to specific protective properties of different antihypertensive drugs in affecting central aortic pressure and arterial stiffness. Although data on direct cardiovascular benefit impact of central blood pressure treatment in randomized clinical trials are still lacking, it is likely that the improvement of quality of care and the individualized assessment of the hypertension-associated cardiovascular risk are achievable with the use of central hemodynamics. Therefore, basing antihypertensive treatment guidance on central pressures rather than on peripheral blood pressure may be the key for future antihypertensive strategies. PMID:25341860

Rinaldi, Elisa R; Yannoutsos, Alexandra; Borghi, Claudio; Safar, Michel E; Blacher, Jacques

2014-10-23

263

Brachial plexus injury management in military casualties: who, what, when, why, and how.  

PubMed

The Global War on Terrorism has achieved an unprecedented 90% casualty survival rate because of far forward surgical support, rapid transport, and body armor. Despite the remarkable protection body armor affords, peripheral nerve injuries continue to occur. The brachial plexus in particular is still susceptible to penetrating trauma through the axilla as well as blunt mechanisms. We report 1,818 individuals with reported cases of peripheral nerve injury, 97 of which had brachial plexus injury incident from Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. We suspect that true prevalence is higher as initial focus on vascular and orthopedic reconstruction in complex shoulder injuries may overlook brachial plexus lesions. Accordingly, emergency physicians, general and orthopedic trauma surgeons, and vascular surgeons should all consider the possibility of brachial plexus and other peripheral nerve injury for early and appropriate referral to surgeons (plastic, orthopedic, or neurosurgical) for further evaluation and reconstruction. The latter group should be familiar with appropriate modern diagnostic and initial as well as salvage therapeutic options. PMID:24902131

Chambers, James A; Hiles, Claire L; Keene, Brian P

2014-06-01

264

Cost analysis of brachial plexus injuries: variability of compensation by insurance companies before and after surgery.  

PubMed

Traumatic paralysis of the brachial plexus is an extremely disabling pathology. The type of trauma most frequently suffered by this group of patients is due to motorcycle injuries. It therefore affects a population of young patients. In the majority of cases, these patients receive compensation for permanent damage from insurance companies. Surgery of the brachial plexus enables various forms of functional recovery, depending on the number of roots of the brachial plexus involved in the injury. The aim of this study is to compare the functional deficit and the extent of the related compensation before and after surgical intervention, and to evaluate the saving in economic terms (understood as the cost of compensation paid by insurance companies) obtainable through surgical intervention. The authors analysed the functional recovery obtained through surgery in 134 patients divided into 4 groups on the basis of the number of injured roots. The levels of compensation payable to the patient before surgical intervention, and 3 years after, were then compared. The results showed that the saving obtainable through surgical treatment of brachial plexus injuries may exceed 65% of the economic value of the compensation that would have been attributable to the same patients if they had not undergone surgical treatment. PMID:24777457

Felici, N; Zaami, S; Ciancolini, G; Marinelli, E; Tagliente, D; Cannatà, C

2014-04-01

265

Nicardipine: pharmacokinetics and effects on carotid and brachial blood flows in normal volunteers.  

PubMed Central

The effects of nicardipine, 20 mg, three times daily, nicardipine slow release, 30 mg, twice daily and a placebo on brachial and carotid arteries diameters and flows have been investigated by the pulsed Doppler technique during a single blind and cross-over study performed in six healthy volunteers. Simultaneously, nicardipine plasma levels and relative bioavailability were determined. Nicardipine significantly increased brachial and carotid arteries diameters (by 16 and 10% respectively) and flows (by 60 and 35% respectively). These effects peaked after 4 h and lasted no longer than 6 h. Forearm vascular resistance was significantly decreased. Hence nicardipine dilated both large and small arteries. Nicardipine slow release elicited the same effects on brachial and carotid arteries diameters and flows as nicardipine. These effects peaked at 6 h and lasted up to 10 h. Although the profiles of the pharmacodynamic effects and of the kinetics of nicardipine were almost parallel in each individual after administration of both nicardipine formulations, there was no correlation between the nicardipine plasma relative bioavailability and its effects on brachial and carotid arteries blood flows when considering all subjects together. PMID:6397218

Thuillez, C; Gueret, M; Duhaze, P; Lhoste, F; Kiechel, J R; Giudicelli, J F

1984-01-01

266

Luxation de l’épaule compliquée de paralysie du plexus brachial  

PubMed Central

Les auteurs rapportent l'observation d'une paralysie totale du plexus brachial survenue trois mois après un épisode de luxation antéro-interne sous coracoïdienne associée à une fracture du trochiter chez une patiente âgée de 88 ans. PMID:25426187

Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; EL Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

2014-01-01

267

Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

268

Protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells by treatment with antioxidant agents  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of antioxidant agents against space radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of selected concentrations of N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, co-enzyme Q10, {alpha}-lipoic acid, L-selenomethionine, and vitamin E succinate on radiation-induced oxidative stress were evaluated in MCF10 human breast epithelial cells exposed to radiation with X-rays, {gamma}-rays, protons, or high mass, high atomic number, and high energy particles using a dichlorofluorescein assay. Results: The results demonstrated that these antioxidants are effective in protecting against radiation-induced oxidative stress and complete or nearly complete protection was achieved by treating the cells with a combination of these agents before and during the radiation exposure. Conclusion: The combination of antioxidants evaluated in this study is likely be a promising countermeasure for protection against space radiation-induced adverse biologic effects.

Wan, X. Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ware, Jeffrey H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zhou, Zhaozong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Donahue, Jeremiah J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Guan, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kennedy, Ann R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]. E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

2006-04-01

269

Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.  

PubMed

It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M; Azzam, Edouard I; Sabatier, Laure

2014-01-31

270

Radiation-induced multi-organ involvement and failure: challenges for radiation accident medical management and future research  

Microsoft Academic Search

A common feature of radiation accidents is the medical consequences of dose-dependent radiation- induced multi-organ involvement (RIMOI) and radiation-induced multi-organ failure (RIMOF). Both RIMOI and RIMOF contribute to the clinical outcome and prognosis of radiation accident victims. A most remarkable fact in this context is that the specific pathophysiological mechanisms involved in RIMOI and RIMOF as a function of time

V Meineke; T M FLIEDNER

2005-01-01

271

Spectroscopic Study of ? Ray and Pulsed XRay Radiation-Induced Point Defects in Pure-Silica-Core Optical Fibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the radiation-induced effects on pure-silica-core (PSC) optical fibers. For this, we measured the radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) growth and decay kinetics in four fibers with different hydroxyl and chorine contents. Our results show that PSC fibers exhibit different transient and continuous radiation responses depending of the silica-glass composition. Self-trapped charges [self-trapped excitons (STEs) and self-trapped holes (STHs)] seem mainly

S. Girard; Y. Ouerdane; B. Vincent; J. Baggio; K. Medjahdi; J. Bisutti; B. Brichard; A. Boukenter; A. Boudrioua; J.-P. Meunier

2007-01-01

272

Role of the impurities in production rates of radiation-induced defects in silicon materials and solar cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present extensive systematic study of defect introduction rates as a function of boron, gallium, oxygen, and carbon concentrations by means of deep level transient spectroscopy has drawn a quite complete picture towards the identification of the dominant radiation-induced defects in Si. The radiation-induced defect EV+0.36 eV has been identified as Ci-Oi complexes. The absence of an EC-0.18 eV complex

Aurangzeb Khan; Masafumi Yamaguchi; Y. Ohshita; N. Dharmarasu; K. Araki; Takao Abe; Hisayoshi Itoh; T. Ohshima; M. Imaizumi; S. Matsuda

2001-01-01

273

Impaired permeability in radiation-induced lung injury detected by technetium-99m-DTPA lung clearance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluates the use of the {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA aerosol lung clearance method to investigate radiation-induced lung changes in eight patients undergoing radiotherapy for lung or breast carcinoma. The sensitivity of the method was compared with chest radiography for detecting radiation-induced changes in the lung, regional alterations within and outside the treatment ports, effect of irradiated lung volume, and dependence

Herbert Susskind; David A. Weber; Yat Hong Lau

1997-01-01

274

Higher Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity Is Associated with More Advanced Carotid Atherosclerosis in End-Stage Renal Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity is a new measure of arterial stiffness. We examined whether higher brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity is associated with more advanced carotid atherosclerosis and left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with end-stage renal disease, and whether this effect would be mediated by the influence of wave reflection on central arterial pressure. In 68 patients with end stage renal

Masanori Munakata; Junko Sakuraba; Jun Tayama; Takashi Furuta; Akira Yusa; Tohru Nunokawa; Kaoru Yoshinaga; Takayoshi Toyota

2005-01-01

275

Recurrent brachial artery embolism caused by a crutch-induced axillary artery aneurysm: report of a case.  

PubMed

We report a case of axillary artery aneurysm with brachial artery embolism in a 60-year-old man who had walked with the assistance of axillary crutches all of his life since poliomyelitis during infancy had left him with lower limb paralysis. We performed bypass grafting from the axillary to brachial artery with exclusion of the aneurysm. An axillary artery aneurysm is rare, but potentially lethal for the upper extremity; therefore, surgical treatment should be considered. PMID:23807637

Morisaki, Koichi; Kuma, Sosei; Okazaki, Jin

2014-07-01

276

Brachial artery reactivity in patients with severe sepsis: an observational study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Ultrasound measurements of brachial artery reactivity in response to stagnant ischemia provide estimates of microvascular function and conduit artery endothelial function. We hypothesized that brachial artery reactivity would independently predict severe sepsis and severe sepsis mortality. Methods This was a combined case-control and prospective cohort study. We measured brachial artery reactivity in 95 severe sepsis patients admitted to the medical and surgical intensive care units of an academic medical center and in 52 control subjects without acute illness. Measurements were compared in severe sepsis patients versus control subjects and in severe sepsis survivors versus nonsurvivors. Multivariable analyses were also conducted. Results Hyperemic velocity (centimeters per cardiac cycle) and flow-mediated dilation (percentage) were significantly lower in severe sepsis patients versus control subjects (hyperemic velocity: severe sepsis = 34 (25 to 48) versus controls = 63 (52 to 81), P < 0.001; flow-mediated dilation: severe sepsis = 2.65 (0.81 to 4.79) versus controls = 4.11 (3.06 to 6.78), P < 0.001; values expressed as median (interquartile range)). Hyperemic velocity, but not flow-mediated dilation, was significantly lower in hospital nonsurvivors versus survivors (hyperemic velocity: nonsurvivors = 25 (16 to 28) versus survivors = 39 (30 to 50), P < 0.001; flow-mediated dilation: nonsurvivors = 1.90 (0.68 to 3.41) versus survivors = 2.96 (0.91 to 4.86), P = 0.12). Lower hyperemic velocity was independently associated with hospital mortality in multivariable analysis (odds ratio = 1.11 (95% confidence interval = 1.04 to 1.19) per 1 cm/cardiac cycle decrease in hyperemic velocity; P = 0.003). Conclusions Brachial artery hyperemic blood velocity is a noninvasive index of microvascular function that independently predicts mortality in severe sepsis. In contrast, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, reflecting conduit artery endothelial function, was not associated with mortality in our severe sepsis cohort. Brachial artery hyperemic velocity may be a useful measurement to identify patients who could benefit from novel therapies designed to reverse microvascular dysfunction in severe sepsis and to assess the physiologic efficacy of these treatments. PMID:22390813

2012-01-01

277

Are there modifiable risk factors that may predict the occurrence of brachial plexus injury?  

PubMed

Objective:To identify risk factors, particularly modifiable, associated with brachial plexus injury.Study Design:A retrospective case-control study conducted at a single hospital between the years 1993 and 2012. All neonates who were diagnosed of brachial plexus injury were included. A control group matched at a ratio of 1:2 was randomly selected. Demographic and obstetric data were obtained from the hospital discharge register with ICD-9 codes and crosschecked with the labor medical records. All medical files were manually checked and validated. A stepwise logistic regression model was performed to identify independent predictors for brachial plexus injury before delivery among those found significant in the univariate analysis.Results:Of all 83?806 deliveries that took place during this period, 144 cases of brachial plexus injury were identified (1.7/1000 deliveries). Overall, 142 cases and 286 controls had available data. Among the study group, 41 (28.9%) had documented shoulder dystocia compared with 1 (0.4%) among the controls (P<0.0001). Logistic regression analysis revealed that maternal age above 35 years (P=0.01; odds ratio (OR) 2.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 5.7), estimated fetal weight before delivery (P<0.0001; OR 2.5; 95% CI 1.7 to 3.8, for each 500?g increase), vaginal birth after cesarean (P=0.02; OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.2 to 8.8) and vacuum extraction (P=0.02; OR 3.6; 95% CI 1.2 to 10.3) were all found to be independent predictors for developing brachial plexus injury. When stratifying the analysis according to parity, vacuum delivery was found to be an independent risk factor only among primiparous women (OR 6.0; 95% CI 1.7 to 21.6).Conclusions:The findings suggest that very few factors contributing to brachial plexus injury are modifiable. For that reason, it remains an unpredictable and probably an unavoidable event.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 27 November 2014; doi:10.1038/jp.2014.215. PMID:25429385

Zuarez-Easton, S; Zafran, N; Garmi, G; Nachum, Z; Salim, R

2014-11-27

278

Radiation-induced bowel injury: the impact of radiotherapy on survivorship after treatment for gynaecological cancers  

PubMed Central

Background: The number of women surviving cancer who live with symptoms of bowel toxicity affecting their quality of life continues to rise. In this retrospective study, we sought to describe and analyse the presenting clinical features in our cohort, and evaluate possible predictors of severity and chronicity in women with radiation-induced bowel injury after treatment for cervical and endometrial cancers. Methods: Review of records of 541 women treated within the North London Gynaecological Cancer Network between 2003 and 2010 with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for cervical and endometrial cancer identified 152 women who reported significant new bowel symptoms after pelvic radiation. Results: Factor analysis showed that the 14 most common and important presenting symptoms could be ‘clustered' into 3 groups with predictive significance for chronicity and severity of disease. Median follow-up for all patients was 60 months. Univariate analysis showed increasing age, smoking, extended field radiation, cervical cancer treatment and the need for surgical intervention to be significant predictors for severity of ongoing disease at last follow-up. On multivariate analysis, only age, cancer type (cervix) and symptom combinations/‘cluster' of (bloating, flatulence, urgency, rectal bleeding and per-rectal mucus) were found to be significant predictors of disease severity. Fifteen (19%) women in the cervical cancer group had radiation-induced bowel injury requiring surgical intervention compared with five (6.7%) in the endometrial cancer group. Conclusion: Women with cervical cancer are younger and appear to suffer more severe symptoms of late bowel toxicity, whereas women treated for endometrial cancer suffer milder more chronic disease. The impact of radiation-induced bowel injury and the effect on cancer survivorship warrants further research into investigation of predictors of severe late toxicity. There is a need for prospective trials to aid early diagnosis, while identifying the underlying patho-physiological process of the bowel injury. PMID:24002603

Kuku, S; Fragkos, C; McCormack, M; Forbes, A

2013-01-01

279

Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT. The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.

Li Guanghui [Institute for Cancer Research in People's Liberation Army, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhang Yaping [Institute of Burn Research, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Tang Jinliang [Department of Pathology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chen Zhengtang; Hu Yide [Institute for Cancer Research in People's Liberation Army, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wei Hong [Department of Plastic Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Li Dezhi; Hao Ping [Institute for Cancer Research in People's Liberation Army, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wang Donglin, E-mail: wdl_tmmu@yahoo.c [Institute for Cancer Research in People's Liberation Army, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China)

2010-08-01

280

Radiation-induced alterations of histone post-translational modification levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines  

PubMed Central

Background Radiation-induced alterations in posttranslational histone modifications (PTMs) may affect the cellular response to radiation damage in the DNA. If not reverted appropriately, altered PTM patterns may cause long-term alterations in gene expression regulation and thus lead to cancer. It is therefore important to characterize radiation-induced alterations in PTM patterns and the factors affecting them. Methods A lymphoblastoid cell line established from a normal donor was used to screen for alterations in methylation levels at H3K4, H3K9, H3K27, and H4K20, as well as acetylation at H3K9, H3K56, H4K5, and H4K16, by quantitative Western Blot analysis at 15 min, 1 h and 24 h after irradiation with 2 Gy and 10 Gy. The variability of alterations in acetylation marks was in addition investigated in a panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines with differing radiosensitivity established from lung cancer patients. Results The screening procedure demonstrated consistent hypomethylation at H3K4me3 and hypoacetylation at all acetylation marks tested. In the panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines, however, a high degree of inter-individual variability became apparent. Radiosensitive cell lines showed more pronounced and longer lasting H4K16 hypoacetylation than radioresistant lines, which correlates with higher levels of residual ?-H2AX foci after 24 h. Conclusion So far, the factors affecting extent and duration of radiation-induced histone alterations are poorly defined. The present work hints at a high degree of inter-individual variability and a potential correlation of DNA damage repair capacity and alterations in PTM levels. PMID:24406105

2014-01-01

281

Carboplatin enhances the production and persistence of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks  

SciTech Connect

Fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding and alkaline elution were used to investigate the production and persistence of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) in Chinese hamster V79 and xrs-5 cells treated with the chemotherapeutic agent carboplatin in combination with radiation. Carboplatin was administered to cells before irradiation in hypoxic conditions, or the drug was added immediately after irradiation during the postirradiation recovery period in air. The results of DNA unwinding studies suggest that carboplatin enhances the production of radiation-induced SSBs in hypoxic V79 cells and xrs-5 cells by a factor of 1.86 and 1.83, respectively, when combined with radiation compared to the SSBs produced by irradiation alone. Carboplatin alone did not produce a measureable number of SSBs. Alkaline elution profiles also indicated that the rate of elution of SSBs was higher in cells treated with the carboplatin is present after irradiation and during the postirradiation recovery period, the rejoining of radiation-induced SSBs by a factor of 1.46 in V79 cells with 20 Gy irradiation and by a factor of 2.02 in xrs-5 cells with 20 Gy irradiation. When carboplatin is present after irradiation and during the postirradiation recovery period, the rejoining of radiation-induced SSBs is inhibited during this postirradiation incubation period (radiopotentiation) with a relative inhibition factor at 1 h postirradiation of 1.25 in V79 cells and 1.15 in xrs-5 cells. An increased production and persistence of SSBs resulting from the interaction of carboplatin with radiation may be an important step in the mechanism responsible for the potentiated cell killing previously from studies in animal tumors and in cultured cells. 31 refs., 7 figs.

Yang, L.; Douple, E.B.; O`Hara, J.A.; Wang, H.J. [Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH (United States)

1995-09-01

282

Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

Yano, Hiroyuki [Department of Matrix Medicine, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593 (Japan) [Department of Matrix Medicine, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593 (Japan); Division of Radioisotope Research, Department of Research Support, Research Promotion Project, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593 (Japan); Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki [Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593 (Japan)] [Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka [Department of Matrix Medicine, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593 (Japan)] [Department of Matrix Medicine, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593 (Japan); Yoshioka, Hidekatsu, E-mail: hidey@oita-u.ac.jp [Department of Matrix Medicine, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593 (Japan)] [Department of Matrix Medicine, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593 (Japan)

2012-02-17

283

Regulation of ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis by a manganese porphyrin complex  

SciTech Connect

Ionizing radiation induces the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important causative role in apoptotic cell death. Therefore, compounds that scavenge reactive oxygen species may confer regulatory effects on apoptosis. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics have been shown to be protective against cell injury caused by reactive oxygen species. We investigated the effects of the manganese (III) tetrakis(N-methyl-2-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP), a cell-permeable SOD mimetic, on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis. Upon exposure to 2 Gy of {gamma}-irradiation, there was a distinct difference between the control cells and the cells pre-treated with 5 {mu}M MnTMPyP for 2 h with regard to apoptotic parameters, cellular redox status, mitochondria function, and oxidative damage to cells. MnTMPyP effectively suppressed morphological evidence of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation in U937 cells exposed to ionizing radiation. The [GSSG]/[GSH + GSSG] ratio and the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species were higher and the [NADPH]/[NADP{sup +} + NADPH] ratio was lower in control cells compared to MnTMPyP-treated cells. The ionizing radiation-induced mitochondrial damage reflected by the altered mitochondrial permeability transition, the increase in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and the reduction of ATP production were significantly higher in control cells compared to MnTMPyP-treated cells. MnTMPyP pre-treated cells showed significant inhibition of apoptotic features such as activation of caspase-3, up-regulation of Bax and p53, and down-regulation of Bcl-2 compared to control cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation. This study indicates that MnTMPyP may play an important role in regulating the apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation presumably through scavenging of reactive oxygen species.

Lee, Jin Hyup [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Taegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, You Mie [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Taegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeen-Woo [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Taegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: parkjw@knu.ac.kr

2005-08-26

284

Radiation-induced photoconductivity in polymers: Poly(vinylidene fluoride) compared with polyethylene terephthalate  

SciTech Connect

Transient and dc photoconductivity measurements are presented for two low-mobility dielectrics, poly (vinylidene fluoride) and polyethylene terephthalate. In each case, the data are analyzed using the present models for dispersive transport, and the inadequacies of these theories when applied to these low-mobility dielectrics are illustrated. In this paper we report an anomalously small transient photoresponse in poly (vinylidene fluoride); from our analysis, we attribute this result to the dispersive transport limited drift mobility in this material. Polymer structure and electric field contributions to the radiation-induced conductivity in these dielectrics are also discussed.

Kurtz, S.R.; Hughes, R.C.

1983-01-01

285

Radiation-induced brain tumours after central nervous system irradiation in childhood: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objects  Radiation-induced cerebral tumours constitute a significant risk for subjects undergoing radiotherapy for the management of\\u000a cerebral neoplasms. Age-related cerebral vulnerability could be a specific factor in the genesis of these complications.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The pertinent literature of both paediatric and adult series has been reviewed. Three personal cases were added.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  One hundred forty-two paediatric second brain tumours were evaluated. Out of them,

Benedetta Ludovica Pettorini; Young-Soo Park; Massimo Caldarelli; Luca Massimi; Gianpiero Tamburrini; Concezio Di Rocco

2008-01-01

286

Study of gamma-ray radiation-induced polymerization of butadiene in ethanol  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Co 60 ?-ray radiation induced polymerization of butadiene in bulk and in ethanol at temperatures ranging from 15 to 45°C was studied. Hydrogen peroxide was used as initiator on some occasions. The mechanism of the polymerization in ethanol seems to be fitted to the no energy transfer kinetics as described by Chapiro (1962). The ratio of relative rate of free radical production of solvent/monomer ? rel is 19. When hydrogen peroxide was added, the polymerization rate increased and hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene was obtained. The microstructure of polybutadiene was studied by i.r. and NMR spectra.

Jian, Zhang; Zhiping, Zhang; Shengkang, Ying

287

Study of gamma-ray radiation induced polymerization of butadiene in ethanol  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 60Co ?-ray radiation induced polymerization of butadiene in bulk and in ethanol at temperature ranging from 15 to 45°C has been studied. Hydrogen peroxide was used as initiator in some occasions. The mechanisms of polymerization in ethanol seems to fit the no-energy transfer kinetics described by Chapiro (1962) and the ratio of relative rate of free radical production of solvent/monomer ? rel is 19. When hydrogen peroxide was added to the butadiene-ethanol system the polymerization rate increased and hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene was obtained. The microstructure of polybutadiene was studied by IR and NMR spectra.

Jian, Zhang; Zhi-Ping, Zhang; Shang-Kang, Ying

288

Thermal stability of radiation-induced free radicals in ? -irradiated l-alanine single crystals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decay of the radiation-induced stable free radicals in l-alanine single crystals and powders at the temperatures from 379 to 476K was examined by electron paramagnetic resonance. For single crystals, the calculated activation energy of the radical decay is 104.3±1.7kJ\\/mol (i.e. 12 538±202K) and the frequency factor ln?0 is 24.1±0.4min?1. The lifetime of the radical in single crystals at 296K is

N. Maltar-Strme?ki; B. Rakvin

2005-01-01

289

Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after ?-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

2006-03-01

290

Modification of poly(vinyltrimethylsilane) by radiation-induced graft polymerization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The modification of polyvinyltrimethylsilane (PVTMS) has been carried out using the radiation-induced graft polymerization. PVTMS is applied as a basis for gas-separating membranes. Acrylonitrile, acrolein, ethyl acrylate, acrylic acid and acrylamide were used as monomers. The grafting was performed both from vapour and liquid phase of monomers and their solutions by the direct radiation method. Some kinetic regularities of radiation graft polymerization of monomers and the character of distribution of grafted polymers along the thickness of PVTMS films were studied. It was shown that grafting improves the chemical resistance, the selective permeability of gases and some mechanical properties of PVTMS films.

Kudryavtsev, Val. N.; Starannikova, L. E.; Teplyakov, V. V.; Kabanov, V. Ya.

1999-05-01

291

Effect of bentonite on radiation induced dissolution of UO2 in an aqueous system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to elucidate the impact of bentonite on the process of radiation induced oxidative dissolution of UO2 in an aqueous system, the dissolution of U(VI) and consumption of H2O2 over time has been studied. In addition, ?-irradiation experiments were performed to study a more relevant and complex system, serving as a comparison with the previously stated system. In both cases, the experiments revealed that the presence of bentonite in water could either delay or prevent in part the release of uranium to the environment. The cause is mainly attributed to the scavenging of radiolytic oxidants rather than to the adsorption of uranium onto bentonite.

Barreiro Fidalgo, Alexandre; Sundin, Sara; Jonsson, Mats

2014-04-01

292

Bias control of long term radiation-induced transients in GaAs MESFETS  

SciTech Connect

The effect of guard ring bias and of self bias on radiation-induced long term transients in GaAs D-MESFETs has been measured for dose rates up to 10/sup 12/ Rads(GaAs)/s. Results are presented for ohmic and for Schottky guard rings with the substrate-bottom grounded as well as separately biased. Significant reduction in recovery times and transient amplitudes suggests that these are viable radiation hardening techniques allowing less dependence on the device fabrication process.

Casey, R.H.; Herman, W.N.; LaCombe, D.J.; Ragonese, L.J.; Immorlica, A.; Anderson, W.T.

1988-12-01

293

Remote sensor response study in the regime of the microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations  

SciTech Connect

A concurrent remote sensing and magneto-transport study of the microwave excited two dimensional electron system (2DES) at liquid helium temperatures has been carried out using a carbon detector to remotely sense the microwave activity of the 2D electron system in the GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure during conventional magneto-transport measurements. Various correlations are observed and reported between the oscillatory magnetotransport and the remotely sensed reflection. In addition, the oscillatory remotely sensed signal is shown to exhibit a power law type variation in its amplitude, similar to the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations.

Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Wegscheider, W. [Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

2013-11-04

294

Radiation-induced "zero-resistance state" and the photon-assisted transport.  

PubMed

We demonstrate that the radiation-induced "zero-resistance state" observed in a two-dimensional electron gas is a result of the nontrivial structure of the density of states of the systems and the photon-assisted transport. A toy model of a quantum tunneling junction with oscillatory density of states in leads catches most of the important features of the experiments. We present a generalized Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula for the photon-assisted transport in a general system and show essentially the same nature of the transport anomaly in a uniform system. PMID:14525265

Shi, Junren; Xie, X C

2003-08-22

295

Radiation-induced electron paramagnetic resonance signal and soybean isoflavones content  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a well-known spectroscopic technique that detects paramagnetic centers and can detect free radicals with high sensitivity. In food, free radicals can be generated by several commonly used industrial processes, such as radiosterilization or heat treatment. EPR spectroscopy is used to detect radioinduced free radicals in food. In this work the relation between EPR signal induced by gamma irradiation treatment and soybean isoflavones content was investigated. Present results did not show correlation between total isoflavones content and the EPR signal. Nevertheless, some isoflavone contents had a negative correlation with the radiation-induced EPR signal.

de Oliveira, Marcos R. R.; Mandarino, José M. G.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

2012-09-01

296

Observation of linear-polarization-sensitivity in the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations  

SciTech Connect

We examine the linear polarization sensitivity of the radiation- induced magneto-resistance oscillations by investigating the effect of rotating in-situ the electric field of linearly polarized microwaves relative to the current, in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. We find that the frequency and the phase of the photo-excited magneto-resistance oscillations are insensitive to the polarization. On the other hand, the amplitude of the resistance oscillations are strongly sensitive to the relative orientation between the microwave antenna and the current-axis in the specimen.

Mani, R. G.; Ramanayaka, A. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Wegscheider, W. [Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

2013-12-04

297

Transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for the DOI laser  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report on a series of experiments concerned with transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for a Cr,Nd:GSGG laser. Both the Sandia National Laboratories SPR III pulsed reactor and the Hermes III pulsed X-ray machine are used as radiation sources. The time dependence and the magnitude of the induced absorption in filter glasses and in doped and undoped LiNbO{sub 3} Q-switch materials have been measured. Gain has been observed in Cr,Nd:GSGG, the laser medium, when it is irradiated by X-rays.

Brannon, P.J.

1995-01-01

298

The influence of infrared radiation on short-term ultraviolet-radiation-induced injuries  

SciTech Connect

Because heat has been reported to influence adversely short- and long-term ultraviolet (UV)-radiation-induced skin damage in animals, we investigated the short-term effects of infrared radiation on sunburn and on phototoxic reactions to topical methoxsalen and anthracene in human volunteers. Prior heating of the skin caused suppression of the phototoxic response to methoxsalen as evidenced by an increase in the threshold erythema dose. Heat administered either before or after exposure to UV radiation had no detectable influence on sunburn erythema or on phototoxic reactions provoked by anthracene.

Kaidbey, K.H.; Witkowski, T.A.; Kligman, A.M.

1982-05-01

299

Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.  

PubMed

Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have been shown to be activated in cells exposed to radiation from photons (like cell cycle arrest in G1/S), and that supplementation with SeM abolishes HZE particle-induced differential expression of many genes. Understanding the roles that these genes play in the radiation-induced transformation of cells may help to decipher the origins of radiation-induced cancer. PMID:17265150

Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

2007-06-01

300

Differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells in adult versus neonatal rats after brachial plexus root avulsion injury?  

PubMed Central

An experimental model of brachial plexus root avulsion injury of cervical dorsal C5-6 was established in adult and neonatal rats. Real-time PCR showed that the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 in adult rats increased rapidly 1 day after brachial plexus root avulsion injury, and then gradually decreased to normal levels by 21 days. In neonatal rats, levels of the three neurotrophic factors were decreased on the first day after injury, and then gradually increased from the seventh day and remained at high levels for an extended period of time. We observed that greater neural plasticity contributed to better functional recovery in neonatal rats after brachial plexus root avulsion injury compared with adult rats. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining showed that the number of bromodeoxyuridine/nestin-positive cells increased significantly in the spinal cords of the adult rats compared with neonatal rats after brachial plexus root avulsion injury. In addition, the number of bromodeoxyuridine/glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells in adult rats was significantly higher than in neonatal rats 14 and 35 days after brachial plexus injury. Bromodeoxyuridine/?-tubulin-positive cells were not found in either adult or neonatal rats. These results indicate that neural stem cells differentiate mainly into astrocytes after brachial plexus root avulsion injury. Furthermore, the degree of neural stem cell differentiation in neonatal rats was lower than in adult rats.

Wang, Bingqi; Chen, Lei; Liu, Bin; Liu, Zhigang; Zhang, Zhixin; Pan, Yuehai; Song, Liangsong; Lu, Laijin

2012-01-01

301

Obstetrical brachial plexus injuries: late functional results of the Steindler procedure.  

PubMed

We reviewed late functional results of a modified Steindler procedure in patients with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy and poor active elbow flexion. From 1982 to 2005, we reviewed final functional results and complications of 27 cases with flexion weakness of the elbow secondary to obstetrical brachial plexus injury, treated with a modified Steindler procedure. At the end of the follow-up, the mean active elbow flexion was 97° and the mean extensor lag was 10°. In the long-term follow-up, the modified Steindler procedure maintained good results in 67% of the cases in our series, and this percentage raised by 82% when the wrist extensor was present or restored before the Steindler procedure. There were poor results in 19% of the patients, but no major complications. PMID:24893931

Gilbert, A; Valbuena, S; Posso, C

2014-10-01

302

Neurochemical markers during selective cerebral perfusion via the right brachial artery.  

PubMed

Unilateral selective cerebral perfusion through right brachial artery is one of the cerebral protection methods for aortic arch repair. The purpose of this study is to determine whether cerebral perfusion through contra-lateral hemisphere is adequate or not. Seventeen consecutive patients underwent aortic arch repair using low flow antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (ASCP) through right brachial artery under moderate hypothermia. We measured S100beta and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels, venous O(2) saturation, lactate, and glucose from both left and right jugular vein blood samples before, during and following ASCP and cardiopulmonary bypass. There was no operative mortality or neurological complication in these patients. No significant differences were observed in S100beta and NSE levels, venous saturation, glucose and lactate between the blood samples which were gathered from both jugular veins, statistically. This technique, as far as biochemical markers are concerned, seems to provide adequate perfusion for both right and left cerebral hemispheres. PMID:20233805

Ozatik, Mehmet Ali; Kocabeyoglu, Sabit; Küçüker, Seref A; Saritas, Ahmet; Altintas, Garip; Kervan, Umit; Yavas, Soner; Paç, Mustafa

2010-06-01

303

A Case of Horner's Syndrome following Ultrasound-Guided Infraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block.  

PubMed

Horner's syndrome results from paralysis of the ipsilateral sympathetic cervical chain (stellate ganglion) caused by surgery, drugs (mainly high concentrations of local anesthetics), local compression (hematoma or tumor), or inadequate perioperative positioning of the patient. It occurs in 100% of the patients with an interscalene block of the brachial plexus and can also occur in patients with other types of supraclavicular blocks.In this case report, we presented a case of Horner's syndrome after performing an ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block with 15?mL of bupivacaine 0.5%. It appeared 40 minutes after the block with specific triad (ptosis, miosis, and exophtalmia) and quickly disappears within 2 hours and a half without any sequelae. Horner's syndrome may be described as an unpleasant side effect because it has no clinical consequences in itself. For this reason anesthesiologists should be aware of this syndrome, and if it occurs patients should be reassured and monitored closely. PMID:22957277

Walid, Trabelsi; Mondher, Belhaj Amor; Mohamed Anis, Lebbi; Mustapha, Ferjani

2012-01-01

304

Medial Antebrachial Cutaneous Nerve Injury After Brachial Plexus Block: Two Case Reports  

PubMed Central

Medial antebrachial cutaneous (MABC) nerve injury associated with iatrogenic causes has been rarely reported. Local anesthesia may be implicated in the etiology of such injury, but has not been reported. Two patients with numbness and painful paresthesia over the medial aspect of the unilateral forearm were referred for electrodiagnostic study, which revealed MABC nerve lesion in each case. The highly selective nature of the MABC nerve injuries strongly suggested that they were the result of direct nerve injury by an injection needle during previous brachial plexus block procedures. Electrodiagnostic studies can be helpful in evaluating cases of sensory disturbance after local anesthesia. To our knowledge, these are the first documented cases of isolated MABC nerve injury following ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block. PMID:24466530

Jung, Mi Jin; Byun, Ha Young; Lee, Chang Hee; Moon, Seung Won; Oh, Min-Kyun

2013-01-01

305

Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block with a Continuous Catheter Insertion System and a Disposable Infusion Pump  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continuous interscalene brachial plexus blockade tra- ditionally requires a hospital stay for local anesthetic infusion, and achieving consistent catheter insertion may be difficult. Incorporating long-acting pain relief from a continuous peripheral nerve block, with a reli- able method of catheter insertion, and a self-contained infusion system would be a valuable asset for short-stay care. We compared the efficacy of single

Stephen M. Klein; Stuart A. Grant; Roy A. Greengrass; Karen C. Nielsen; Kevin P. Speer; William White; David S. Warner; Susan M. Steele

2000-01-01

306

Functional connectivity of the transected brachial plexus after intercostal neurotization in monkeys.  

PubMed

Microsurgical reconstructions of brachial plexuses were performed on twelve monkeys by using ipsilateral intercostal nerves (T3-9). Reinnervation in individual nerves was evaluated monthly by observations of neuromuscular and electromyographic improvements. The electromyographic studies revealed reappearance of motor unit potentials. According to a motor scale ranging from 0 to 4, the mean muscle power 6 months after operation improved to 2.75 in the deltoid muscles, 2 in the biceps muscles, 1.22 in the triceps muscles, 1.13 in the flexor carpi radialis muscles, and 1.6 in the intrinsic muscles of the hands. Retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) from the neuromuscular junctions of the reconstructed musculocutaneous nerves 6 months after complete brachial plexus lesion in four animals demonstrated HRP-labeled neurons in the anterior horns, spinal ganglia and sympathetic ganglia of the thoracic spinal cords. It suggested that the regenerated afferent and efferent circuits in the thoracic cords innervating the transected brachial plexuses were able to generate the movements in the paralyzed upper limbs. However, as evidenced by the behavior patterns and the fact that retrograde-labeled neurons were all found in the thoracic cords, the novel movements observed in the reconstructed brachial plexuses were in synchrony with respiration. These results suggested that the plasticity of central neural networks is limited between two widely separated areas, such as between the midcervical and midthoracic motor cortical areas in the present studies, and therefore, the efforts to reconstruct neural networks, both centrally and peripherally, should aim at rebuilding situations as nearly to the original status as possible. PMID:9100129

Cheng, H; Shoung, H M; Wu, Z A; Chen, K C; Lee, L S

1997-04-01

307

Clonidine as an adjuvant to local anaesthetic axillary brachial plexus block: a randomized, controlled study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. We compared the effects of clonidine added to levobupivacaine and bupivacaine on axillary brachial plexus block as well as the effectiveness of levobupivacaine alone compared with bupivacaine alone. Methods. In this prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind trial, four groups of 20 patients each were investigated, using (i) 40 ml of levobupivacaine 0.5% plus 0.150 mg of clonidine, (ii) 40 ml

A. Duma; B. Urbanek; C. Sitzwohl; A. Kreiger; M. Zimpfer; S. Kapral

2005-01-01

308

Increased Susceptibility of Radiation-Induced Intestinal Apoptosis in SMP30 KO Mice  

PubMed Central

Recently, senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) knockout (KO) mice have been reported to be susceptible to apoptosis, however, the role of SMP30 has not been characterized in the small intestine. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of SMP30 in the process of spontaneous and ?-radiation-induced apoptosis in mouse small intestine. Eight-week-old male wild-type (WT) mice and SMP30 KO mice were examined after exposure to 0, 1, 3, 5, and 9 Gy of ?-radiation. Apoptosis in the crypts of the small intestine increased in the 0 to 5 Gy radiated SMP30 KO and WT mice. Radiation-induced apoptosis and the BAX/Bcl-2 ratio in the SMP30 KO mice were significantly increased in comparison to each identically treated group of WT mice (p < 0.05). The levels of spontaneous apoptosis in both WT and KO mice were similar (p > 0.05), indicating that increased apoptosis of crypt cells of SMP30 KO by irradiation can be associated with SMP30 depletion. These results suggested that SMP30 might be involved in overriding the apoptotic homeostatic mechanism in response to DNA damage. PMID:23708106

Goo, Moon-Jung; Park, Jin-Kyu; Hong, Il-Hwa; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Lee, Eun-Joo; Hwang, Meeyul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

2013-01-01

309

Radiation-Induced Testicular Injury and Its Amelioration by Tinospora cordifolia (An Indian Medicinal Plant) Extract  

PubMed Central

The primary objective of this investigation is to determine the deleterious effects of sub lethal gamma radiation on testes and their possible inhibition by Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE). For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 7.5?Gy gamma radiation to serve as the irradiated control, while the other group received TCE (75?mg/kg?b.?wt./day) orally for 5 consecutive days half an hr before irradiation to serve as experimental. Exposure of animals to 7.5?Gy gamma radiation resulted into significant decrease in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter up to 15 days of irradiation. Cent percent mortality was recorded by day 17th in irradiated control, whereas all animals survived in experimental group. TCE pretreatment rendered significant increase in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter at various intervals as compared to irradiated group. Radiation induced histological lesions in testicular architecture were observed more severe in irradiated control then the experimental. TCE administration before irradiation significantly ameliorated radiation induced elevation in lipid peroxidation and decline in glutathione concentration in testes. These observations indicate the radio- protective potential of Tinospora cordifolia root extract in testicular constituents against gamma irradiation in mice. PMID:21350610

Sharma, Priyanka; Parmar, Jyoti; Sharma, Priyanka; Verma, Preeti; Goyal, P. K.

2011-01-01

310

Blockade of TLR3 protects mice from lethal radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.  

PubMed

High-dose ionizing radiation induces severe DNA damage in the epithelial stem cells in small intestinal crypts and causes gastrointestinal syndrome (GIS). Although the tumour suppressor p53 is a primary factor inducing death of crypt cells with DNA damage, its essential role in maintaining genome stability means inhibiting p53 to prevent GIS is not a viable strategy. Here we show that the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is critical for the pathogenesis of GIS. Tlr3(-/-) mice show substantial resistance to GIS owing to significantly reduced radiation-induced crypt cell death. Despite showing reduced crypt cell death, p53-dependent crypt cell death is not impaired in Tlr3(-/-) mice. p53-dependent crypt cell death causes leakage of cellular RNA, which induces extensive cell death via TLR3. An inhibitor of TLR3-RNA binding ameliorates GIS by reducing crypt cell death. Thus, we propose blocking TLR3 activation as a novel approach to treat GIS. PMID:24637670

Takemura, Naoki; Kawasaki, Takumi; Kunisawa, Jun; Sato, Shintaro; Lamichhane, Aayam; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ito, Junichi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Karuppuchamy, Thangaraj; Matsunaga, Kouta; Miyatake, Shoichiro; Mori, Nobuko; Tsujimura, Tohru; Satoh, Takashi; Kumagai, Yutaro; Kawai, Taro; Standley, Daron M; Ishii, Ken J; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi

2014-01-01

311

Radiation-induced cardiovascular diseases: Is the epidemiologic evidence compatible with the radiobiologic data?  

SciTech Connect

The Life Span Study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors demonstrates that radiation exposure significantly increased the risk of developing ischemic heart disease, in particular myocardial infarction. Similarly, epidemiologic investigations in very large populations of patients who had received postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer or for peptic ulcer demonstrate that radiation exposure of the heart with an average equivalent single dose of approximately 2 Gy significantly increased the risk of developing ischemic heart disease more than 10 years after irradiation. These epidemiologic findings are compatible with radiobiologic data on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced heart disease in experimental animals. The critical target structure appears to be the endothelial lining of blood vessels, in particular arteries, leading to early functional alterations such as pro-inflammatory responses and other changes, which are slowly progressive. Research should concentrate on the interaction of these radiation-induced endothelial changes with the early stages of age-related atherosclerosis to develop criteria for optimizing treatment plans in radiotherapy and also potential interventional strategies.

Schultz-Hector, Susanne [Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft, Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: susanne.schultz-hector@helmholtz.de; Trott, Klaus-Ruediger Prof. [Gray Cancer Institute, Northwood (United Kingdom)

2007-01-01

312

PHD inhibition mitigates and protects against radiation-induced gastrointestinal toxicity via HIF2.  

PubMed

Radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity can be a major source of morbidity and mortality after radiation exposure. There is an unmet need for effective preventative or mitigative treatments against the potentially fatal diarrhea and water loss induced by radiation damage to the GI tract. We report that prolyl hydroxylase inhibition by genetic knockout or pharmacologic inhibition of all PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain) isoforms by the small-molecule dimethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG) increases hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) expression, improves epithelial integrity, reduces apoptosis, and increases intestinal angiogenesis, all of which are essential for radioprotection. HIF2, but not HIF1, is both necessary and sufficient to prevent radiation-induced GI toxicity and death. Increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression contributes to the protective effects of HIF2, because inhibition of VEGF function reversed the radioprotection and radiomitigation afforded by DMOG. Additionally, mortality from abdominal or total body irradiation was reduced even when DMOG was given 24 hours after exposure. Thus, prolyl hydroxylase inhibition represents a treatment strategy to protect against and mitigate GI toxicity from both therapeutic radiation and potentially lethal radiation exposures. PMID:24828078

Taniguchi, Cullen M; Miao, Yu Rebecca; Diep, Anh N; Wu, Colleen; Rankin, Erinn B; Atwood, Todd F; Xing, Lei; Giaccia, Amato J

2014-05-14

313

Preclinical evaluation of erythropoietin administration in a model of radiation-induced kidney dysfunction  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test whether the clinically available growth factor erythropoietin (EPO) influences radiation-induced normal-tissue damage in a model of kidney dysfunction. Methods: Animal experiments were conducted to test the role of EPO administration in a C3H mouse model of unilateral kidney irradiation with 6, 8, and 10 Gy and to assess the effects of 2 different dose levels of EPO. The kidney function was assessed before radiotherapy, as well as 19, 25, 31, and 37 weeks thereafter by means of {sup 99m}Tc-dimercaptosuccinat scans (static scintigraphy). Results: Concomitant EPO administration significantly increased the degree of radiation-induced kidney dysfunction. A dose of 2,000 IU/kg body weight per injection tended to cause more damage than the lower dose of 500 IU/kg. Conclusion: Administration of growth factors concomitant to radiotherapy might modify the development of kidney dysfunction. Although insulin-like growth factor-1 has previously been shown to protect the kidney, such an effect could not be demonstrated for EPO. The latter agent even increased the development of nephropathy.

Andratschke, Nicolaus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Schnaitera, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Weber, Wolfgang A. [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Center, The University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Caia, Lu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Schill, Sabine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Wiedenmann, Nicole [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Schwaiger, Markus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Molls, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Nieder, Carsten [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com

2006-04-01

314

Possible role of nitric oxide in radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction.  

PubMed

In this study, we developed a murine model of xerostomia to elucidate the mechanism of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction and determined the levels of nitric oxide (NO) in the salivary glands to assess its involvement in the salivary dysfunction induced by radiation. In addition, an inhibitor of NO synthesis was administered to the model in vivo, and its effect on saliva secretion was investigated. Salivary gland irradiation at a dose of 15 Gy caused a significant decrease in secretion compared to unirradiated salivary glands. There were no marked differences between the irradiated mice and unirradiated mice in water or food consumption or in body weight changes. The NO levels in the cultured salivary gland epithelial cells were increased by treatment with a combination of interferon gamma (Ifng), interleukin 1-beta (Il1b), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnfa). Irradiation increased the NO level in the salivary gland tissue. The presence of N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine acetate (l-NMMA), an inhibitor of NO synthesis, caused a decrease in the NO level in cultured salivary gland tissues after irradiation. Administration of l-NMMA to irradiated mice improved saliva secretion. These results suggest that excessive production of NO induced by radiation is involved in the formation of radiation-induced xerostomia. The finding that administration of an inhibitor of NO synthesis ameliorated the dysfunction of irradiated salivary glands indicates that NO plays a role as a mediator of the dry mouth symptoms that occur after irradiation. PMID:12643791

Takeda, Ienaka; Kizu, Yasuhiro; Yoshitaka, Okamoto; Saito, Ichiro; Yamane, Gen-Yuki

2003-04-01

315

Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

2011-02-01

316

Radiation-induced acid ceramidase confers prostate cancer resistance and tumor relapse  

PubMed Central

Escape of prostate cancer (PCa) cells from ionizing radiation–induced (IR-induced) killing leads to disease progression and cancer relapse. The influence of sphingolipids, such as ceramide and its metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate, on signal transduction pathways under cell stress is important to survival adaptation responses. In this study, we demonstrate that ceramide-deacylating enzyme acid ceramidase (AC) was preferentially upregulated in irradiated PCa cells. Radiation-induced AC gene transactivation by activator protein 1 (AP-1) binding on the proximal promoter was sensitive to inhibition of de novo ceramide biosynthesis, as demonstrated by promoter reporter and ChIP-qPCR analyses. Our data indicate that a protective feedback mechanism mitigates the apoptotic effect of IR-induced ceramide generation. We found that deregulation of c-Jun induced marked radiosensitization in vivo and in vitro, which was rescued by ectopic AC overexpression. AC overexpression in PCa clonogens that survived a fractionated 80-Gy IR course was associated with increased radioresistance and proliferation, suggesting a role for AC in radiotherapy failure and relapse. Immunohistochemical analysis of human PCa tissues revealed higher levels of AC after radiotherapy failure than those in therapy-naive PCa, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or benign tissues. Addition of an AC inhibitor to an animal model of xenograft irradiation produced radiosensitization and prevention of relapse. These data indicate that AC is a potentially tractable target for adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:24091326

Cheng, Joseph C.; Bai, Aiping; Beckham, Thomas H.; Marrison, S. Tucker; Yount, Caroline L.; Young, Katherine; Lu, Ping; Bartlett, Anne M.; Wu, Bill X.; Keane, Barry J.; Armeson, Kent E.; Marshall, David T.; Keane, Thomas E.; Smith, Michael T.; Jones, E. Ellen; Drake, Richard R.; Bielawska, Alicja; Norris, James S.; Liu, Xiang

2013-01-01

317

Contribution to the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to large arteries.  

PubMed

We report a case of a 35-year-old man who died of a brain infarct 20 months after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the tonsil with metastases to the cervical lymph nodes. Histology revealed mild atherosclerosis, necrotizing vasculitis, and occlusive thrombosis of the internal carotid artery. Significant changes were observed in the vasa vasorum: swelling and detachment of the endothelium, subendothelial oedema, hyaline change, fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel walls with mononuclear cellular infiltration, accompanied by focal haemorrhages and chronic inflammation in the periadventitial soft tissue. We believe that these changes of the vasa vasorum and necrotizing vasculitis are causally related and that vasculitis represents focal ischaemic necroses with inflammatory reaction. Our findings support the hypothesis, based on experimental studies, that injury to the vasa vasorum is an important mechanism in the development of radiation-induced vasculopathy of large arteries. They also suggest an evolution of the injury to the vasa vasorum and periadventitial tissue from the early lesions described in our patient, to late stages resulting in dense periadventitial fibrosis as reported previously. We suggest that injury to the vasa vasorum and the consequent ischaemic lesions of the arterial wall are morphological features distinguishing radiation-induced arterial injury from spontaneous atherosclerosis. PMID:9425496

Zidar, N; Ferluga, D; Hvala, A; Popovi?, M; Soba, E

1997-10-01

318

Radiation-induced malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the occipital: a case report  

PubMed Central

Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a rare neoplasm exhibiting a propensity for aggressive clinical behavior. Effective treatment modality is surgical resection with wide margins, but its rate of recurrence and metastasis is still high. Early detection and complete excision of the tumor is necessary. A MFH of the occipital developed in a 51-year-old woman eight years after surgery and radiation for medulloblastoma of the cerebellar vermis. The secondary neoplasm arose at the site of tumor resection within the irradiated field, and was resected. The development of sarcomas is a recognized complication of radiation therapy. The final diagnosis after the operation was MFH. Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is well known, but radiation-induced MFH is relatively rare in the head and neck region, especially in the occipital. The imaging findings are not diagnosis specific, but strict follow-up within the radiation field by computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and appreciation of the expected latency period may help in providing the diagnosis of RIS. PMID:24742094

2014-01-01

319

PHD Inhibition Mitigates and Protects Against Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Toxicity via HIF2  

PubMed Central

Radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity can be a major source of morbidity and mortality after radiation exposure. There is an unmet need for effective preventative or mitigative treatments against the potentially fatal diarrhea and water loss induced by radiation damage to the GI tract. We report that prolyl hydroxylase inhibition by genetic knockout or pharmacologic inhibition of all PHD isoforms by the small molecule dimethyloxyallylglycine (DMOG) increases HIF expression, improves epithelial integrity, reduces apoptosis, and increases intestinal angiogenesis, all of which are essential for radioprotection. HIF2, but not HIF1, is both necessary and sufficient to prevent radiation-induced GI toxicity and death. Increased VEGF expression contributes to the protective effects of HIF2, since inhibition of VEGF function reversed the radioprotection and radiomitigation afforded by DMOG. Additionally, mortality is reduced from abdominal or total body irradiation even when DMOG is given 24 hours after exposure. Thus, prolyl hydroxylase inhibition represents a new treatment strategy to protect against and mitigate GI toxicity from both therapeutic radiation and potentially lethal radiation exposures. PMID:24828078

Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Miao, Yu Rebecca; Diep, Anh N.; Wu, Colleen; Rankin, Erinn B.; Atwood, Todd F.; Xing, Lei; Giaccia, Amato J.

2014-01-01

320

Transient radiation-induced effects on solid core microstructured optical fibers.  

PubMed

We report transient radiation-induced effects on solid core microstructured optical fibers (MOFs). The kinetics and levels of radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) in the visible and near-infrared part of the spectrum (600 nm-2000 nm) were characterized. It is found that the two tested MOFs, fabricated by the stack-and-draw technique, present a good radiation tolerance. Both have similar geometry but one has been made with pure-silica tubes and the other one with Fluorine-doped silica tubes. We compared their pulsed X-ray radiation sensitivities to those of different classes of conventional optical fibers with pure-silica-cores or cores doped with Phosphorus or Germanium. The pulsed radiation sensitivity of MOFs seems to be mainly governed by the glass composition whereas their particular structure does not contribute significantly. Similarly for doped silica fibers, the measured spectral dependence of RIA for the MOFs cannot be correctly reproduced with the various absorption bands associated with the Si-related defects identified in the literature. However, our analysis confirms the preponderant role of self-trapped holes with their visible and infrared absorption bands in the transient behaviors of pure-silica of F-doped fibers. The results of this study showed that pure-silica or fluorine-doped MOFs, which offers specific advantages compared to conventional fibers, are promising for use in harsh environments due to their radiation tolerance. PMID:22109027

Girard, S; Ouerdane, Y; Bouazaoui, M; Marcandella, C; Boukenter, A; Bigot, L; Kudlinski, A

2011-10-24

321

MRI findings of radiation-induced changes of masticatory muscles: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Radiotherapy to the head and neck regions can result in serious consequences to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and chewing muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrates soft-tissue alterations after radiotherapy, such as morphology and signal intensity. Objective The purpose of this review is to critically and systematically analyse the available evidence regarding the masticatory muscles alterations, as demonstrated on MRI, after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Data sources Electronic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBM reviews and Scopus. Inclusion criteria Reports of any study design investigating radiation-induced changes in masticatory muscles after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer were included. Results and synthesis methods An electronic database search resulted in 162 papers. Sixteen papers were initially selected as potentially relevant studies; however, only four papers satisfied all inclusion criteria. The included papers focused on the MRI appearance of masticatory muscles following radiotherapy protocol. Two papers reported outcome based on retrospective clinical and imaging records, whereas the remaining two papers were case reports. Irradiated muscles frequently show diffuse increase in T2 signal and post-gadolinium enhancement post-irradiation. Also, muscle size changes were reported based on subjective comparison with the contralateral side. The quality of all included papers was considered poor with high risk of bias. Conclusion There is no evidence that MRI interpretations indicate specific radiation-induced changes in masticatory muscles. There is a clear need for a cohort study comparing patients with pre- and post-radiotherapy MRI. PMID:23663414

2013-01-01

322

Sorafenib Enhances Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inhibiting STAT3  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and lethal human malignancies. Lack of efficient therapy for advanced HCC is a pressing problem worldwide. This study aimed to determine the efficacy and mechanism of combined sorafenib and radiation therapy treatment for HCC. Methods and Materials: HCC cell lines (PLC5, Huh-7, Sk-Hep1, and Hep3B) were treated with sorafenib, radiation, or both, and apoptosis and signal transduction were analyzed. Results: All 4 HCC cell lines showed resistance to radiation-induced apoptosis; however, this resistance could be reversed in the presence of sorafenib. Inhibition of phospho-STAT3 was found in cells treated with sorafenib or sorafenib plus radiation and subsequently reduced the expression levels of STAT3-related proteins, Mcl-1, cyclin D1, and survivin. Silencing STAT3 by RNA interference overcame apoptotic resistance to radiation in HCC cells, and the ectopic expression of STAT3 in HCC cells abolished the radiosensitizing effect of sorafenib. Moreover, sorafenib plus radiation significantly suppressed PLC5 xenograft tumor growth. Conclusions: These results indicate that sorafenib sensitizes resistant HCC cells to radiation-induced apoptosis via downregulating phosphorylation of STAT3 in vitro and in vivo.

Huang, Chao-Yuan [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiological Technology, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chen-Si [School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tai, Wei-Tien; Hsieh, Chi-Ying [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shiau, Chung-Wai [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Ann-Lii [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuen-Feng, E-mail: kfchen1970@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2013-07-01

323

Investigation of radiation-induced free radicals and luminescence properties in fresh pomegranate fruits.  

PubMed

Radiation-induced free radicals and luminescence properties were investigated in ?-irradiated (0-3 kGy) pomegranate ( Punica granatum L.) fruits. Photostimulated luminescence (PSL) analysis showed limited applicability, and only 3 kGy-irradiated pomegranates showed positive PSL values (>5000 PCs). Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve features, such as intensity and the presence of maximum glow peak in radiation-specific temperature range (150-250 °C), provided definite proof of irradiation, and the TL ratios (TL1/TL2) also confirmed the reliability of TL results. Scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analysis of the separated minerals showed that feldspar and quartz minerals were responsible for the luminescence properties. Radiation-induced cellulose radicals were detected in the seeds and rinds by ESR analysis. The ESR results were better in freeze-dried samples than in alcohol-extracted ones. A positive correlation was found between the ESR and TL signal intensities and irradiation doses; however, the most promising detection of the irradiation status was possible through TL analysis. PMID:23565691

Shahbaz, Hafiz M; Akram, Kashif; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

2013-05-01

324

A biological approach to the interspecies prediction of radiation-induced mortality risk  

SciTech Connect

Evolutionary explanations for why sexually reproducing organisms grow old suggest that the forces of natural selection affect the ages when diseases occur that are subject to a genetic influence (referred to here as intrinsic diseases). When extended to the population level for a species, this logic leads to the general prediction that age-specific death rates from intrinsic causes should begin to rise as the force of selection wanes once the characteristic age of sexual maturity is attained. Results consistent with these predictions have been found for laboratory mice, beagles, and humans where, after adjusting for differences in life span, it was demonstrated that these species share a common age pattern of mortality for intrinsic causes of death. In quantitative models used to predict radiation-induced mortality, risks are often expressed as multiples of those observed in a control population. A control population, however, is an aging population. As such, mortality risks related to exposure must be interpreted relative to the age-specific risk of death associated with aging. Given the previous success in making interspecies predictions of age-related mortality, the purpose of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced mortality observed in one species could also be predicted quantitatively from a model used to describe the mortality consequences of exposure to radiation in a different species. Mortality data for B6CF{sub 1} mice and beagles exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays for the duration of life were used for analysis.

Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Olshansky, S.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Medicine

1997-08-01

325

CT appearance of acute radiation-induced injury in the lung  

SciTech Connect

To determine how soon radiation-induced lung injury is detectable, to compare the CT findings with those on chest radiographs, and to observe the appearance of the abnormality during the acute phase, we performed 83 CT studies in 17 radiotherapy patients at relatively short intervals. All 17 patients received fractionated radiotherapy to the thorax with a large irradiated lung volume. The CT findings were variable; pulmonary infiltrates were homogeneous, patchy, or discrete. CT abnormalities were evident in 15 of 17 cases within 16 weeks after radiotherapy; in 13 of these it was detected within 4 weeks. In three of these 15 cases, no abnormality was detected on chest radiographs, and in three other cases, the change was observed much later on chest radiographs than on CT scans. In the other nine cases, abnormalities were detected simultaneously on CT scans and chest radiographs. In four cases, extensive radiation pneumonitis was observed on CT, but in two of these, the change was misdiagnosed on the chest radiograph. We conclude that CT is useful in the detection of acute radiation-induced pulmonary disease.

Ikezoe, J.; Takashima, S.; Morimoto, S.; Kadowaki, K.; Takeuchi, N.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Isaza, M.; Arisawa, J.; Ikeda, H.

1988-04-01

326

Three-dimensional culture conditions lead to decreased radiation induced cytotoxicity in human mammary epithelial cells.  

PubMed

For both targeted and non-targeted exposures, the cellular responses to ionizing radiation have predominantly been measured in two-dimensional monolayer cultures. Although convenient for biochemical analysis, the true interactions in vivo depend upon complex interactions between cells themselves and the surrounding extracellular matrix. This study directly compares the influence of culture conditions on radiation induced cytotoxicity following exposure to low-LET ionizing radiation. Using a three-dimensional (3D) human mammary epithelial tissue model, we have found a protective effect of 3D cell culture on cell survival after irradiation. The initial state of the cells (i.e., 2D versus 3D culture) at the time of irradiation does not alter survival, nor does the presence of extracellular matrix during and after exposure to dose, but long term culture in 3D which offers significant reduction in cytotoxicity at a given dose (e.g. approximately 4-fold increased survival at 5Gy). The cell cycle delay induced following exposure to 2 and 5Gy was almost identical between 2D and 3D culture conditions and cannot account for the observed differences in radiation responses. However the amount of apoptosis following radiation exposure is significantly decreased in 3D culture relative to the 2D monolayer after the same dose. A likely mechanism of the cytoprotective effect afforded by 3D culture conditions is the down regulation of radiation induced apoptosis in 3D structures. PMID:20211636

Sowa, Marianne B; Chrisler, William B; Zens, Kyra D; Ashjian, Emily J; Opresko, Lee K

2010-05-01

327

Three-dimensional Culture Conditions Lead to Decreased Radiation Induced Crytoxicity in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells  

SciTech Connect

For both targeted and non-targeted exposures, the cellular responses to ionizing radiation have predominantly been measured in two dimensional monolayer cultures. Although convenient for biochemical analysis, the true interactions in vivo depend upon complex interactions between cells themselves and the surrounding extra cellular matrix. This study directly compares the influence of culture conditions on radiation induced cytotoxicity following exposure to low-LET ionizing radiation. Using a three dimensional (3D) human mammary epithelial tissue model, we have found a protective effect of 3D cell culture on cell survival after irradiation. The initial state of the cells (i.e., 2D vs. 3D culture) at the time of irradiation does not alter survival, nor does the presence of extracellular matrix during and after exposure to dose, but long term culture in 3D which offers significant reduction in cytotoxicity at a given dose (e.g. ~4 fold increased survival at 5 Gy). The cell cycle delay induced following exposure to 2 and 5 Gy was almost identical between 2D and 3D culture conditions and cannot account for the observed differences in radiation responses. However the amount of apoptosis following radiation exposure is significantly decreased in 3D culture relative to the 2D monolayer after the same dose. A likely mechanism of the cytoprotective effect afforded by 3D culture conditions is the down regulation of radiation induced apoptosis in 3D structures

Sowa, Marianne B.; Chrisler, William B.; Zens, Kyra D.; Ashjian, Emily J.; Opresko, Lee K.

2010-05-01

328

Does altered fractionation influence the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the parameters that influence the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1964 and 2000, 273 patients with tumors of the nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, nasal cavity, and hard palate adenoid cystic carcinomas were treated with curative intent and had radiation fields that included the optic nerves and/or chiasm. Patients were followed for at least 1 year after radiotherapy. Results: Radiation-induced optic neuropathy developed in 32 eyes of 24 patients (9%). The 5-year rates of freedom from RION according to the total dose and once- vs. twice-daily fractionation were as follows: {<=}63 Gy once daily, 95%; {<=}63 Gy twice daily, 98%; >63 Gy once daily, 78%; and >63 Gy twice daily, 91%. Multivariate analysis revealed that the total dose affected the risk of RION (p = 0.0047), with patient age (p = 0.0909), once-daily vs. twice-daily fractionation (p = 0.0684), and overall treatment time (p = 0.0972) were marginally significant. The use of adjuvant chemotherapy did not significantly influence the likelihood of developing RION. Conclusion: The likelihood of developing RION is primarily influenced by the total dose. Hyperfractionation may reduce the risk of experiencing this complication.

Bhandare, Niranjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Monroe, Alan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bhatti, M. Tariq [Department of Ophthalmology, Neurology, and Neurosurgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)]. E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu

2005-07-15

329

Protein Kinase C epsilon is involved in ionizing radiation induced bystander response in human cells  

PubMed Central

Our earlier study demonstrated the induction of PKC isoforms (beta II, PKC-alpha/beta, PKC-theta) by ionizing radiation induced bystander response in human cells. In this study, we extended our investigation to yet another important member of PKC family, PKC epsilon (PKC?). PKC? functions both as an anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic protein and it is the only PKC isozyme implicated in oncogenesis. Given the importance of PKC? in oncogenesis, we wished to determine whether or not PKC? is involved in bystander response. Gene expression array analysis demonstrated a 2-3 fold increase in PKC? expression in the bystander human primary fibroblast cells that were co-cultured in double sided Mylar dishes for 3 h with human primary fibroblast cells irradiated with 5 Gy of ?-particles. The elevated PKC? expression in bystander cells was verified by quantitative real time PCR. Suppression of PKC? expression by small molecule inhibitor Bisindolylmaleimide IX (Ro 31-8220) considerably reduced the frequency of micronuclei (MN) induced both by 5 Gy of ?-rays (low LET) and ?-particles (high LET) in bystander cells. Similar cytoprotective effects were observed in bystander cells after siRNA mediated silencing of PKC? suggestive of its critical role in mediating some of the bystander effects (BE). Our novel study suggests the possibility that PKC signaling pathway may be a critical molecular target for suppression of ionizing radiation induced biological effects in bystander cells. PMID:19577658

Hu, Burong; Shen, Bo; Su, Yanrong; Geard, Charles R.; Balajee, Adayabalam S.

2009-01-01

330

Genetic analysis of radiation-induced changes in human gene expression  

PubMed Central

Humans are exposed to radiation through the environment and in medical settings. To deal with radiation-induced damage, cells mount complex responses that rely on changes in gene expression. These gene expression responses differ greatly between individuals1 and contribute to individual differences in response to radiation2. Here we identify regulators that influence expression levels of radiation-responsive genes. We treated radiation-induced changes in gene expression as quantitative phenotypes3,4, and conducted genetic linkage and association studies to map their regulators. For more than 1,200 of these phenotypes there was significant evidence of linkage to specific chromosomal regions. Nearly all of the regulators act in trans to influence the expression of their target genes; there are very few cis-acting regulators. Some of the transacting regulators are transcription factors, but others are genes that were not known to have a regulatory function in radiation response. These results have implications for our basic and clinical understanding of how human cells respond to radiation. PMID:19349959

Smirnov, Denis A.; Morley, Michael; Shin, Eunice; Spielman, Richard S.; Cheung, Vivian G.

2010-01-01

331

Radiation-induced electronic and ionic charge storage and release in sapphire  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation-induced thermally stimulated relaxation (TSR) processes in the reduced alpha-Al2O3 (sapphire) crystal were investigated at 290-650 K by means of the TS current (TSC), ionic depolarisation current (TSDC) and electron emission (TSEE) techniques. After thermal (ionic) polarisation of sapphire wide (similar to75 K) and asymmetric ionic dipolar TSDC peak at T max approximate to590 K (disorientation of the anion vacancy-related dipoles) was detected. This peak correlates with the wide TSEE peak at T max approximate to615 K, the radiation-induced electrical degradation (RIED) yield rise above 550 K ( T max approximate to745 K) and the chromium emission line broadening in ruby. Above 450-500 K the anion vacancy hopping (migration) starts. This can lead to lattice dynamic disordering and anion vacancy diffusion-controlled processes in sapphire (especially in vacuo near the sample surface, grain boundaries, dislocations) in various TSR (TSC, TSDC, TS heat release and bleaching) and RIED phenomena. Surface structure and impurity content, surrounding atmosphere (vacuum or air) and electric fields determine these phenomena.

Ziraps, V.; Graveris, V.; Springis, M.

332

Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.  

PubMed

Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against ?-irradiation exposure. PMID:23541438

Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

2013-07-01

333

Mitigating the risk of radiation-induced cancers: limitations and paradigms in drug development.  

PubMed

The United States radiation medical countermeasures (MCM) programme for radiological and nuclear incidents has been focusing on developing mitigators for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure (DEARE), and biodosimetry technologies to provide radiation dose assessments for guiding treatment. Because a nuclear accident or terrorist incident could potentially expose a large number of people to low to moderate doses of ionising radiation, and thus increase their excess lifetime cancer risk, there is an interest in developing mitigators for this purpose. This article discusses the current status, issues, and challenges regarding development of mitigators against radiation-induced cancers. The challenges of developing mitigators for ARS include: the long latency between exposure and cancer manifestation, limitations of animal models, potential side effects of the mitigator itself, potential need for long-term use, the complexity of human trials to demonstrate effectiveness, and statistical power constraints for measuring health risks (and reduction of health risks after mitigation) following relatively low radiation doses (<0.75 Gy). Nevertheless, progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms resulting in radiation injury, along with parallel progress in dose assessment technologies, make this an opportune, if not critical, time to invest in research strategies that result in the development of agents to lower the risk of radiation-induced cancers for populations that survive a significant radiation exposure incident. PMID:24727460

Yoo, Stephen S; Jorgensen, Timothy J; Kennedy, Ann R; Boice, John D; Shapiro, Alla; Hu, Tom C-C; Moyer, Brian R; Grace, Marcy B; Kelloff, Gary J; Fenech, Michael; Prasanna, Pataje G S; Coleman, C Norman

2014-06-01

334

Implication of prostaglandins and histamine h1 and h2 receptors in radiation-induced temperature responses of rats  

SciTech Connect

Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy cobalt 60 gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas 20-200 Gy induced hypothermia. Exposure either to the head or to the whole body to 10 Gy induced hyperthermia, while body-only exposure produced hypothermia. This observation indicates that radiation-induced fever is a result of a direct effect on the brain. The hyperthermia due to 10 Gy was significantly attenuated by the pre- or post-treatment with a cyclooxgenase inhibitor, indomethacin. Hyperthermia was also altered by the central administration of a mu receptor antagonist naloxone but only at low doses of radiation. These findings suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia may be mediated through the synthesis and release of prostaglandins in the brain and to a lesser extent to the release of endogenous opioid peptides. The release of histamine acting on H(1) and H(2) receptors may be involved in radiation-induced hypothermia since both the H(1) receptor antagonist, mepyramine, and H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine, antagonized the hypothermia. The results of these studies suggested that the release of neurohumoral substances induced by exposure to ionizing radiation is dose dependent and has different consequences on physiological processes such as the regulation of body temperature. Furthermore, the antagonism of radiation-induced hyperthermia by indomethacin may have potential therapeutic implications in the treatment of fever resulting from accidental irradiations.

Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Mickley, G.A .

1988-01-01

335

Repeated Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Injections Improve Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Pigs  

PubMed Central

The management of proctitis in patients who have undergone very-high-dose conformal radiotherapy is extremely challenging. The fibrosis-necrosis, fistulae, and hemorrhage induced by pelvic overirradiation have an impact on morbidity. Augmenting tissue repair by the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be an important advance in treating radiation-induced toxicity. Using a preclinical pig model, we investigated the effect of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs on high-dose radiation-induced proctitis. Irradiated pigs received repeated intravenous administrations of autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs. Immunostaining and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis were used to assess the MSCs' effect on inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and angiogenesis, in radiation-induced anorectal and colon damages. In humans, as in pigs, rectal overexposure induces mucosal damage (crypt depletion, macrophage infiltration, and fibrosis). In a pig model, repeated administrations of MSCs controlled systemic inflammation, reduced in situ both expression of inflammatory cytokines and macrophage recruitment, and augmented interleukin-10 expression in rectal mucosa. MSC injections limited radiation-induced fibrosis by reducing collagen deposition and expression of col1a2/col3a1 and transforming growth factor-?/connective tissue growth factor, and by modifying the matrix metalloproteinase/TIMP balance. In a pig model of proctitis, repeated injections of MSCs effectively reduced inflammation and fibrosis. This treatment represents a promising therapy for radiation-induced severe rectal damage. PMID:24068742

Busson, Elodie; Holler, Valerie; Strup-Perrot, Carine; Lacave-Lapalun, Jean-Victor; Lhomme, Bruno; Prat, Marie; Devauchelle, Patrick; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Simon, Jean-Marc; Bonneau, Michel; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Benderitter, Marc

2013-01-01

336

Mepilex Lite dressings for the management of radiation-induced erythema: a systematic inpatient controlled clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Erythema occurs in 80–90% of women treated for breast cancer with radiation therapy. There is currently no standard treatment for radiation-induced skin reactions. This study investigates the clinical efficacy of Mepilex Lite dressings in reducing radiation-induced erythema in women with breast cancer. A total of 28 patients were recruited; of these, 24 participants presented with 34 erythematous areas of skin for analysis. When erythema was visible, each affected skin area was randomly divided into two similar halves: one half was treated using Mepilex Lite dressings, the other half with standard aqueous cream. Skin reactions were assessed by the Radiation-Induced Skin Reaction Assessment Scale. We also evaluated any potential dose build-up by the dressings using a white water phantom, the dose distribution over the breast via thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and the surface skin temperature with an infrared thermographic scanner. Mepilex Lite dressings significantly reduced the severity of radiation-induced erythema compared with standard aqueous cream (p <0.001), did not affect surface skin temperature and caused only a small (0.5 mm) dose build-up. TLD measurements showed that the inframammary fold was exposed to significantly higher doses of radiation than any other breast region (p <0.0001). Mepilex dressings reduce radiation-induced erythema. PMID:20647511

Diggelmann, K V; Zytkovicz, A E; Tuaine, J M; Bennett, N C; Kelly, L E; Herst, P M

2010-01-01

337

Gene expression differences in healthy brachial and femoral arteries of Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic swine.  

PubMed

The mechanisms underlying the unequal distribution of atherosclerotic disease in the peripheral arteries are currently unclear. Gene expression differences in healthy arteries may influence the heterogeneous distribution of atherosclerosis. Therefore, this investigation compares gene expression in healthy atheroprotected brachial and atherosusceptible femoral arteries of young and disease free Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic (FHC) swine. We hypothesized that transcripts related to atherosusceptibility would be differentially expressed between these arteries prior to the onset of disease. Femoral and brachial arteries were harvested from four 13-day-old Rapacz FHC swine. No atherosclerotic disease was detected using Sudan IV, Verhoeff-van Gieson, and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Gene expression was quantified using Affymetrix GeneChip Porcine Genome Arrays. An average of 15,552 probe sets had detectable transcripts, while 430 probe sets showed a significant differential expression between arteries (false discovery rate < 0.05). The human orthologs of 63 probe sets with differential expression and a 1.5-fold or greater transcript abundance between arteries are associated with Wnt/?-catenin, lysophospholipid, and Ca-signaling, as well as apoptosis. This is the first investigation reporting that differences in relative abundance of gene expression exist between brachial and femoral arteries in young Rapacz FHC swine prior to the development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:21505098

Bahls, Martin; Bidwell, Christopher A; Hu, Juan; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D; Tellez, Armando; Kaluza, Greg L; Granada, Juan F; Van Alstine, William G; Newcomer, Sean C

2011-06-28

338

Central hemodynamics in risk assessment strategies: Additive value over and above brachial blood pressure.  

PubMed

Although the clinical relevance of brachial blood pressure (BP) measurement for cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification is nowadays widely accepted, this approach can nevertheless present several limitations. Pulse pressure (PP) amplification accounts for the notable increase in PP from central to peripheral arterial sites. Target organs are more greatly exposed to central hemodynamic changes than peripheral organs. The pathophysiological significance of local BP pulsatility, which has a role in the pathogenesis of target organ damage in both the macro- and the microcirculation, may therefore not be accurately captured by brachial BP as traditionally evaluated with cuff measurements. The predictive value of central systolic BP and PP over brachial BP for major clinical outcomes has been demonstrated in the general population, in elderly adults and in patients at high CV risk, irrespective of the invasive or non-invasive methods used to assess central BP. Aortic stiffness, timing and intensity of wave reflections, and cardiac performance appear as major factors influencing central PP. Great emphasis has been placed on the role of aortic stiffness, disturbed arterial wave reflections and their intercorrelation in the pathophysiological mechanisms of CV diseases as well as on their capacity to predict target organ damage and clinical events. Comorbidities and age-related changes, together with gender-related specificities of arterial and cardiac parameters, are known to affect the predictive ability of central hemodynamics on individual CV risk. PMID:25341861

Yannoutsos, Alexandra; Rinaldi, Elisa R; Zhang, Yi; Protogerou, Athanassios D; Safar, Michel E; Blacher, Jacques

2014-10-23

339

Risk Factors at Birth for Permanent Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury and Associated Osseous Deformities  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To examine the most prevalent risk factors found in patients with permanent obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) to identify better predictors of injury. Methods. A population-based study was performed on 241 OBPI patients who underwent surgical treatment at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Results. Shoulder dystocia (97%) was the most prevalent risk factor. We found that 80% of the patients in this study were not macrosomic, and 43% weighed less than 4000?g at birth. The rate of instrument use was 41% , which is 4-fold higher than the 10% predicted for all vaginal deliveries in the United States. Posterior subluxation and glenoid version measurements in children with no finger movement at birth indicated a less severe shoulder deformity in comparison with those with finger movement. Conclusions. The average birth weight in this study was indistinguishable from the average birth weight reported for all brachial plexus injuries. Higher birth weight does not, therefore, affect the prognosis of brachial plexus injury. We found forceps/vacuum delivery to be an independent risk factor for OBPI, regardless of birth weight. Permanently injured patients with finger movement at birth develop more severe bony deformities of the shoulder than patients without finger movement. PMID:22518326

Nath, Rahul K.; Kumar, Nirupama; Avila, Meera B.; Nath, Devin K.; Melcher, Sonya E.; Eichhorn, Mitchell G.; Somasundaram, Chandra

2012-01-01

340

Range of motion and strength after surgery for brachial plexus birth palsy  

PubMed Central

Background There is little information about the range of motion (ROM) and strength of the affected upper limbs of patients with permanent brachial plexus birth palsy. Patients and methods 107 patients who had brachial plexus surgery in Finland between 1971 and 1998 were investigated in this population-based, cross-sectional, 12-year follow-up study. During the follow-up, 59 patients underwent secondary procedures. ROM and isometric strength of the shoulders, elbows, wrists, and thumbs were measured. Ratios for ROM and strength between the affected and unaffected sides were calculated. Results 61 patients (57%) had no active shoulder external rotation (median 0° (-75–90)). Median active abduction was 90° (1–170). Shoulder external rotation strength of the affected side was diminished (median ratio 28% (0–83)). Active elbow extension deficiency was recorded in 82 patients (median 25° (5–80)). Elbow flexion strength of the affected side was uniformly impaired (median ratio 43% (0–79)). Median active extension of the wrist was 55° (-70–90). The median ratio of grip strength for the affected side vs. the unaffected side was 68% (0–121). Patients with total injury had poorer ROM and strength than those with C5–6 injury. Incongruity of the radiohumeral joint and avulsion were associated with poor strength values. Interpretation ROM and strength of affected upper limbs of patients with surgically treated brachial plexus birth palsy were reduced. Patients with avulsion injuries and/or consequent joint deformities fared worst. PMID:21142823

2011-01-01

341

Iatropathic brachial plexus injury: a complication of delayed fixation of clavicle fractures.  

PubMed

We present our experience of managing patients with iatropathic brachial plexus injury after delayed fixation of a fracture of the clavicle. It is a retrospective cohort study of patients treated at our peripheral nerve injury unit and a single illustrative case report. We identified 21 patients in whom a brachial plexus injury occurred as a direct consequence of fixation of a fracture of the clavicle between September 2000 and September 2011.The predominant injury involved the C5/C6 nerves, upper trunk, lateral cord and the suprascapular nerve. In all patients, the injured nerve was found to be tethered to the under surface of the clavicle by scar tissue at the site of the fracture and was usually associated with pathognomonic neuropathic pain and paralysis.Delayed fixation of a fracture of the clavicle, especially between two and four weeks after injury, can result in iatropathic brachial plexus injury. The risk can be reduced by thorough release of the tissues from the inferior surface of the clavicle before mobilisation of the fracture fragments. If features of nerve damage appear post-operatively urgent specialist referral is recommended. PMID:23307682

Jeyaseelan, L; Singh, V K; Ghosh, S; Sinisi, M; Fox, M

2013-01-01

342

Gross anatomy of the brachial plexus in the giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).  

PubMed

Ten forelimbs of five Myrmecophaga tridactyla were examined to study the anatomy of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexuses of the M. tridactyla observed in the present study were formed by the ventral rami of the last four cervical spinal nerves, C5 through C8, and the first thoracic spinal nerve, T1. These primary roots joined to form two trunks: a cranial trunk comprising ventral rami from C5-C7 and a caudal trunk receiving ventral rami from C8-T1. The nerves originated from these trunks and their most constant arrangement were as follows: suprascapular (C5-C7), subscapular (C5-C7), cranial pectoral (C5-C8), caudal pectoral (C8-T1), axillary (C5-C7), musculocutaneous (C5-C7), radial (C5-T1), median (C5-T1), ulnar (C5-T1), thoracodorsal (C5-C8), lateral thoracic (C7-T1) and long thoracic (C6-C7). In general, the brachial plexus in the M. tridactyla is similar to the plexuses in mammals, but the number of rami contributing to the formation of each nerve in the M. tridactyla was found to be larger than those of most mammals. This feature may be related to the very distinctive anatomical specializations of the forelimb of the anteaters. PMID:23952693

Souza, P R; Cardoso, J R; Araujo, L B M; Moreira, P C; Cruz, V S; Araujo, E G

2014-10-01

343

Gamma radiation induced cell cycle perturbations and DNA damage in Catla Catla as measured by flow cytometry.  

PubMed

Gamma radiation induced cell cycle perturbations and DNA damage in Catla catla were analyzed in erythrocytes at different time points using flow cytometry (FCM). Protracted exposure to radiation induced damage between days 12 and 45. Disturbances in cell cycle machinery, i.e., proportional increase and decrease in Gap0 or quiescent/Gap1 (G0/G1), Synthesis (S) and Gap2/Mitotic (G2/M) phases were observed at both acute and protracted treatments. Both acute and protracted exposures induced apoptosis with a notable significance between days 3 and 6 at protracted and on day 45 at acute doses. Fish exposed protractedly avail some DNA repair mechanisms than acutely exposed. This is the first study to analyze radiation induced DNA damage under laboratory conditions and suggests that flow cytometry can also be an alternate tool to screen genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in fish. PMID:25483367

Anbumani, S; Mohankumar, Mary N

2015-03-01

344

Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a result of improvements in cancer therapy and health care, the population of long-term cancer survivors is growing. For these approximately 12 million long-term cancer survivors, brain metastases are a significant risk. Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) is often required to treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury, including progressive cognitive impairment, however, can significantly affect the well-being of the approximately 200,000 patients who receive these treatments each year. Recent reports indicate that radiation-induced brain injury is associated with chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, as well as increased microglial activation in the brain. Anti-inflammatory drugs may, therefore, be a beneficial therapy to mitigate radiation-induced brain injury. We hypothesized that activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR?) would prevent or ameliorate radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment, in part, by alleviating inflammatory responses in microglia. For our in vitro studies, we hypothesized that PPAR? activation would prevent the radiation-induced inflammatory response in microglia following irradiation. Incubating BV-2 murine microglial cells with the (PPAR)? agonist, L-165041, prevented the radiation-induced increase in: i) intracellular ROS generation, ii) Cox-2 and MCP-1 expression, and iii) IL-1? and TNF-? message levels. This occured, in part, through PPAR?-mediated modulation of stress activated kinases and proinflammatory transcription factors. PPAR? inhibited NF-?B via transrepression by physically interacting with the p65 subunit, and prevented activation of the PKC?/MEK1/2/ERK1/2/AP-1 pathway by inhibiting the radiation-induced increase in intracellular ROS generation. These data support the hypothesis that PPAR? activation can modulate the radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in microglia in vitro. To extend our in vitro findings in vivo, we investigated whether administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)ä agonist, GW0742, prevented radiation-induced brain injury in C57Bl/6 WT mice. Our data demonstrate that GW0742 prevented the radiation-induced increase in the number of activated microglia (CD68+ cells) in wild-type (WT) mice 1 week following 10 Gy WBI. Furthermore, GW0742 inhibited the WBI-induced increase in IL-1? message levels and ERK phosphorylation observed 3 h post-irradiation. In contrast, GW0742 administration failed to modulate the radiation-induced decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis (NeuN+/BrdU+ cells) determined 2 months after irradiation, or mitigate hippocampal-dependent spatial memory impairment observed 3 months post-irradiation using the Barnes Maze task. We used PPAR? knockout (KO) mice to examine if the effects of GW0742 are PPAR?-dependent. Unexpectedly, PPAR? KO mice exhibited a differential response following WBI compared to WT mice; therefore, we were unable to make mechanistic conclusions about GW0742. KO mice do not exhibit a WBI-induced increase in activated microglia; however, they appeared to display a pronounced astrocytic response. In particular, PPAR? KO but not WT mice displayed increased GFAP message levels 2 months after WBI. Additionally, the number of GFAP+ cells was reduced significantly in the WT mice 2 months after WBI, but it was not in the PPAR? KO mice. These results demonstrate that: i) GW0742 prevents the radiation-induced increase in microglial activation and inflammatory markers, and ii) WT and PPAR? KO mice have a differential response to WBI.

Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

345

Biceps Brachii Long Head Overactivity Associated with Elbow Flexion Contracture in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy  

PubMed Central

Background: The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Methods: Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. Results: The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Conclusions: Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion contracture may not be associated with an elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, as previously hypothesized. The negative impact of elbow flexion contracture on upper extremity function warrants future research in the development of preventive and therapeutic techniques to address elbow flexion contractures in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22336968

Sheffler, Lindsey C.; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A.

2012-01-01

346

The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects Ann R. Kennedy Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 195 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA, United States 19104-6072 The development of countermeasures for radiation induced adverse health effects is a lengthy process, particularly when the countermeasure/drug has not yet been evaluated in human trials. One example of a drug developed from the bench to the clinic is the soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), which has been developed as a countermeasure for radiation induced cancer. It was originally identified as a compound/drug that could prevent the radiation induced carcinogenic process in an in vitro assay system in 1975. The first observation that BBI could inhibit carcinogenesis in animals was in 1985. BBI received Investigational New Drug (IND) Status with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1992 (after several years of negotiation with the FDA about the potential IND status of the drug), and human trials began at that time. Phase I, II and III human trials utilizing BBI have been performed under several INDs with the FDA, and an ongoing Phase III trial will be ending in the very near future. Thus, the drug has been in development for 35 years at this point, and it is still not a prescription drug on the market which is available for human use. A somewhat less time-consuming process is to evaluate compounds that are on the GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) list. These compounds would include some over-the-counter medications, such as antioxidant vitamins utilized in human trials at the levels for which Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) have been established. To determine whether GRAS substances are able to have beneficial effects on radiation induced adverse health effects, it is still likely to be a lengthy process involving many years to potentially decades of human trial work. The human trials necessary to demonstrate "efficacy" for a beneficial effect on the long term adverse health effects of radiation, such as the development of cancer, cataracts, etc., is expected to take particularly long periods of time. To avoid the long time delay in the development of new drugs as countermeasures for radiation induced adverse health effects, the NSBRI Center for Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is currently focused on the use of drugs that have already been approved for human use by the FDA. Currently there are no approved countermeasures for external radiation exposure by the US Army or by NASA. The appropriate medications for symptoms of the Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) due to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation are unknown, but there are medications appropriate for ARS symptoms caused by exposure to conventional ra-diation. The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) has medical guidelines for ARS medications (http://www.afrri.usuhs.mil/outreach/guidance.htm#policies), as does the US Dept. of Health and Human Services (the REMM (Radiation Event Medical Manage-ment) site (http://www.remm.nlm.gov). Supportive care when ARS symptoms develop include the administration of antimicrobial agents (which can include systemic antibiotics [especially those directed at gram-negative bacteria]), antiemetic agents, antidiarrheal agents, fluids, elec-trolytes, analgesic agents and topical burn creams (Waselenko, J.K. et al. Ann. Intern. Med. 140: 1037, 2004). For nausea and vomiting, serotonin receptor antagonists (5HT3 receptor antagonists) are very effective prophylaxis. There are two drugs that have been approved by the FDA (Zofran and Kytril) for radiation induced nausea and vomiting. Kytril (granisetron) is preferred by the US Army and is currently maintained in the US National Stockpile. Both of these drugs are known to stop retching and vomiting when given either before or after irradi-ation, even when vomiting and/or retching are occurring. Immune suppression can occur due to declines in white blood cells and infe

Kennedy, Ann

347

A Survey of Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy in Japan  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We observed a rare and unique occurrence of radiation-induced pulmonary injury outside the tangential field for early breast cancer treatment. The findings appeared to be idiopathic and were called radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome. We surveyed major hospitals in Japan to review their findings of radiation-induced BOOP, in particular the clinical and pictorial characteristics of the entity. Methods and Materials: We reviewed surveys completed and returned by 20 institutions. The survey responses were based on a total of 37 cases of BOOP syndrome. We also reviewed X-ray and computed tomography scans provided by these institutions. We discussed the information derived from the questionnaire and analyzed patients' characteristics, methods used in the treatment of BOOP syndrome, and prognosis. Results: The incidence of the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was about 1.8% (37 of 2,056). We did not find a relationship between the characteristics of patients and the occurrence of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. The pulmonary findings were classified into four patterns on chest computed tomography scans. Progression of the pulmonary lesions observed on chest X-ray was classified into three patterns. Pneumonitis appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy was completed and disappeared within 6-12 months after its onset. At 5-year follow-up, 2 patients had died, 1 of breast cancer and the other of interstitial pneumonitis, which seemed to be idiopathic and unrelated to the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Although the incidence of BOOP syndrome and its associated prognosis are not significant, the patients' clinical condition must be carefully followed.

Ogo, Etsuyo [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)], E-mail: etsuogo@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fujimoto, Kiminori; Uchida, Masafumi; Abe, Toshi [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Sekiguchi, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kaneyasu, Yuko [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hayabuchi, Naofumi [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

2008-05-01

348

Patients with Testicular Cancer Undergoing CT Surveillance Demonstrate a Pitfall of Radiation-induced Cancer Risk Estimates: The Timing Paradox  

PubMed Central

Purpose: To demonstrate a limitation of lifetime radiation-induced cancer risk metrics in the setting of testicular cancer surveillance—in particular, their failure to capture the delayed timing of radiation-induced cancers over the course of a patient’s lifetime. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for the use of computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry data in this study. Informed consent was waived. This study was HIPAA compliant. A Markov model was developed to project outcomes in patients with testicular cancer who were undergoing CT surveillance in the decade after orchiectomy. To quantify effects of early versus delayed risks, life expectancy losses and lifetime mortality risks due to testicular cancer were compared with life expectancy losses and lifetime mortality risks due to radiation-induced cancers from CT. Projections of life expectancy loss, unlike lifetime risk estimates, account for the timing of risks over the course of a lifetime, which enabled evaluation of the described limitation of lifetime risk estimates. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the uncertainty of the results. Results: As an example of evidence yielded, 33-year-old men with stage I seminoma who were undergoing CT surveillance were projected to incur a slightly higher lifetime mortality risk from testicular cancer (598 per 100 000; 95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 302, 894) than from radiation-induced cancers (505 per 100 000; 95% UI: 280, 730). However, life expectancy loss attributable to testicular cancer (83 days; 95% UI: 42, 124) was more than three times greater than life expectancy loss attributable to radiation-induced cancers (24 days; 95% UI: 13, 35). Trends were consistent across modeled scenarios. Conclusion: Lifetime radiation risk estimates, when used for decision making, may overemphasize radiation-induced cancer risks relative to short-term health risks. © RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.12121015/-/DC1 PMID:23249573

Eisenberg, Jonathan D.; Lee, Richard J.; Gilmore, Michael E.; Turan, Ekin A.; Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Kong, Chung Yin; Gazelle, G. Scott

2013-01-01

349

The flavonolignan-silymarin protects enzymatic, hematological, and immune system against ?-radiation-induced toxicity.  

PubMed

The main focus of this study is evaluation of radioprotective efficacy of silymarin, a flavonolignan, against ?-radiation-induced damage to hematological, vital organs (liver and intestine), and immune system. Survival studies revealed that silymarin (administered orally for 3 days) provided maximum protection (67%) at 70 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.) against lethal 9 Gy ?-irradiation (dose reduction factor?=?1.27). The study revealed significant (p < 0.05) changes in levels of catalase (12.57?±?2.58 to 30.24?±?4.89 units), glutathione peroxidase (6.23?±?2.95 to 13.26?±?1.36 µg of reduced glutathione consumed/min/mg protein), glutathione reductase (0.25?±?5.6 to 11.65?±?2.83 pM NADPH consumed/min/mg protein), and superoxide dismutase (11.74?±?0.2 to 16.09?±?3.47 SOD U/mg of protein) activity at 30th day. Silymarin pretreated irradiated group exhibited increased proliferation in erythrocyte count (1.76?±?0.41 × 10(6) to 9.25?±?0.24 × 10(6) ), hemoglobin (2.15?±?0.48g/dL to 14.77?±?0.25g/dL), hematocrit (4.55?±?0.24% to 37.22?±?0.21%), and total leucocyte count (1.4?±?0.15 × 10(6) to 8.31?±?0.47 × 10(6) ) as compared with radiation control group on 15th day. An increase in CD4:CD8 ratio was witnessed (0.2-1%) at 30th day time interval using flow cytometry. Silymarin also countered radiation-induced decrease (p < 0.05) in regulatory T-cells (Tregs ) (11.23% in radiation group at 7th day versus 0.1% in pretreated silymarin irradiated group at 15th day). The results of this study indicate that flavonolignan-silymarin protects enzymatic, hematological, and immune system against ?-radiation-induced toxicity and might prove useful in management of nuclear and radiological emergencies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2014. PMID:25411116

Adhikari, Manish; Arora, Rajesh

2014-11-20

350

Alpha Lipoic Acid Attenuates Radiation-Induced Thyroid Injury in Rats  

PubMed Central

Exposure of the thyroid to radiation during radiotherapy of the head and neck is often unavoidable. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of ?-lipoic acid (ALA) on radiation-induced thyroid injury in rats. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: healthy controls (CTL), irradiated (RT), received ALA before irradiation (ALA + RT), and received ALA only (ALA, 100 mg/kg, i.p.). ALA was treated at 24 h and 30 minutes prior to irradiation. The neck area including the thyroid gland was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose of 18 Gy) using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Greater numbers of abnormal and unusually small follicles in the irradiated thyroid tissues were observed compared to the controls and the ALA group on days 4 and 7 after irradiation. However, all pathologies were decreased by ALA pretreatment. The quantity of small follicles in the irradiated rats was greater on day 7 than day 4 after irradiation. However, in the ALA-treated irradiated rats, the numbers of small and medium follicles were significantly decreased to a similar degree as in the control and ALA-only groups. The PAS-positive density of the colloid in RT group was decreased significantly compared with all other groups and reversed by ALA pretreatment. The high activity index in the irradiated rats was lowered by ALA treatment. TGF-ß1 immunoreactivity was enhanced in irradiated rats and was more severe on the day 7 after radiation exposure than on day 4. Expression of TGF-ß1 was reduced in the thyroid that had undergone ALA pretreatment. Levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-?, IL-1ß and IL-6) did not differ significantly between the all groups. This study provides that pretreatment with ALA decreased the severity of radiation-induced thyroid injury by reducing inflammation and fibrotic infiltration and lowering the activity index. Thus, ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced thyroid injury. PMID:25401725

Jung, Jung Hwa; Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Woo, Seung Hoon; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae-Kwon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyun; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

2014-01-01

351

Reduction of radiation-induced cell cycle blocks by caffeine does not necessarily lead to increased cell killing  

SciTech Connect

The effect of caffeine upon the radiosensitivities of three human tumor lines was examined and correlated with its action upon the radiation-induced S-phase and G2-phase blocks. Caffeine was found to reduce at least partially the S-phase and G2-phase blocks in all the cell lines examined but potentiated cytotoxicity in only one of the three tumor lines. That reductions have been demonstrated to occur in the absence of increased cell killing provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that reductions may not be causal in those cases when potentiation of radiation-induced cytotoxicity is observed in the presence of caffeine.

Musk, S.R. (Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (England))

1991-03-01

352

Protection of the hemopoietic system by Podophyllum hexandrum against gamma radiation-induced damage.  

PubMed

A semi-purified extract of low-altitude Podophyllum hexandrum (REC-2001) containing a relatively low content of podophyllotoxin (3.25 %) exhibited potent antioxidant ability in lipid media (at 1000 microg/mLagainst 0.25 kGy) and significant (p < 0.05) hydroxyl ion scavenging potential (78.83 % at 500 microg/mL). In vitro investigations revealed the ability of REC-2001 to significantly (p < 0.05) reduce radiation-induced hemolysis (2 microg/mL; 46.184 %) and nitric oxide scavenging levels (IC (50): 792 +/- 1.25 microg/mL). Protection of the hemopoietic system of Strain 'A' mice administered 20 mg/kg BW REC-2001 30 min prior to lethal irradiation (10 Gy) was recorded and was mediated by free radical scavenging and lowering of lipid oxidation. Further studies investigating the effects of REC-2001 on stem cell modulation are warranted. PMID:16491445

Sagar, Ravinder Kumar; Chawla, Raman; Arora, Rajesh; Singh, Shikha; Krishna, Bal; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Puri, Satish Chandra; Singh, Pankaj; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Surender; Prasad, Jagdish; Gupta, Vinay; Ahmed, Bilal; Dhar, Kanaya Lal; Khan, Haider Ali; Gupta, Manju Lata; Qazi, Ghulam Nabi

2006-02-01

353

A mitochondria-targeted inhibitor of cytochrome c peroxidase mitigates radiation induced death  

PubMed Central

The risk of radionuclide release in terrorist acts or exposure of healthy tissue during radiotherapy demand potent radioprotectants/radiomitigators. Ionizing radiation induces cell death by initiating the selective peroxidation of cardiolipin in mitochondria by the peroxidase activity of its complex with cytochrome c leading to release of hemoprotein into the cytosol and commitment to the apoptotic program. Here we design and synthesize mitochondria-targeted triphenylphosphonium-conjugated imidazole-substituted oleic and stearic acids which blocked peroxidase activity of cytochrome c/cardiolipin complex by specifically binding to its heme-iron. We show that both compounds inhibit pro-apoptotic oxidative events, suppress cyt c release, prevent cell death, and protect mice against lethal doses of irradiation. Significant radioprotective/radiomitigative effects of imidazole-substituted oleic acid are observed after pretreatment of mice from 1 hr before through 24 hrs after the irradiation. PMID:21988913

Atkinson, Jeffrey; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Pearce, Linda; Peterson, Jim; Huang, Zhentai; Jiang, Jianfei; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K.; Maeda, Akihiro; Feng, Weihong; Wasserloos, Karla; Belikova, Natalia A.; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Wang, Hong; Fletcher, Jackie; Wang, Yongsheng; Vlasova, Irina I.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Stoyanovsky, Detcho A.; Bayîr, Hülya; Pitt, Bruce R.; Epperly, Michael W.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Kagan, Valerian E.

2013-01-01

354

Functional properties of nisin-carbohydrate conjugates formed by radiation induced Maillard reaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates were prepared by irradiating nisin either with glucose or dextran. Increase in browning and formation of intermediate products was observed with a concomitant decrease in free amino and reducing sugar groups indicating occurrence of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by irradiation. Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates showed a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescence) as well as Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus). Results of antioxidant assays, including that of DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power, showed that the nisin-dextran conjugates possessed better antioxidant potential than nisin-glucose conjugate. These results suggested that it was possible to enhance the functional properties of nisin by preparing radiation induced conjugates suitable for application in food industry.

Muppalla, Shobita R.; Sonavale, Rahul; Chawla, Surinder P.; Sharma, Arun

2012-12-01

355

Characterization of Network Structure of Polyacrylamide Based Hydrogels Prepared By Radiation Induced Polymerization  

SciTech Connect

In this study network structure of polyacrylamide based hydrogels prepared by radiation induced polymerization has been investigated. Polyacrylamide based hydrogels in the rod form were prepared by copolymerization of acrylamide(AAm) with hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate(HEMA) and methyl acrylamide(MAAm) in the presence of cross-linking agent and water by gamma rays at ambient temperature. Molecular weight between cross-links and effective cross-link density of hydrogels were calculated from swelling as well as shear modulus data obtained from compression tests. The results have shown that simple compression analyses can be used for the determination of effective cross-link density of hydrogels without any need to some polymer-solvent based parameters as in the case of swelling based determinations. Diffusion of water into hydrogels was examined by analyzing water absorption kinetics and the effect of network, structure on the diffusion type and coefficient was discussed.

Mahmudi, Naim [State University of Tetovo, Faculty of Natural Science and Mathematics, 1200 Tetovo (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Sen, Murat; Gueven, Olgun [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry Division, 06532, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Rendevski, Stojan [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Science and Mathematics, University 'Ss Cyril and Methodius', Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

2007-04-23

356

Molecular targets in radiation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption  

SciTech Connect

Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key feature of radiation injury to the central nervous system. Studies suggest that endothelial cell apoptosis, gene expression changes, and alteration of the microenvironment are important in initiation and progression of injury. Although substantial effort has been directed at understanding the impact of radiation on endothelial cells and oligodendrocytes, growing evidence suggests that other cell types, including astrocytes, are important in responses that include induced gene expression and microenvironmental changes. Endothelial apoptosis is important in early BBB disruption. Hypoxia and oxidative stress in the later period that precedes tissue damage might lead to astrocytic responses that impact cell survival and cell interactions. Cell death, gene expression changes, and a toxic microenvironment can be viewed as interacting elements in a model of radiation-induced disruption of the BBB. These processes implicate particular genes and proteins as targets in potential strategies for neuroprotection.

Nordal, Robert A. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wong, C. Shun [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: shun.wang@sw.ca

2005-05-01

357

Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses  

PubMed Central

Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

2010-01-01

358

X-ray microdiffraction analysis of radiation-induced defects in single grains of polycrystalline Fe  

SciTech Connect

Single-crystal diffuse X-ray scattering was analyzed to characterize radiation-induced defects in individual grains of a polycrystalline proton-irradiated Fe foil. The grains were probed with an intense submicron x-ray beam to demonstrated that both polycrystalline and micrometer-scale samples can be studied with single-crystal-like signal-to-noise. Scattering was measured with an x-ray sensitive area detector, which measures intensity over a surface in reciprocal space. By scanning the x-ray energy, intensity was measured over reciprocal-space volumes. Since the sample is not rotated, the real-space scattering volume does not change. We discuss methods to minimize experimental artifacts arising from the use of an area detector.

Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Walker, Frederick J. [Yale University; Liu, W. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

2010-01-01

359

Influence of matrix porosity on the immobilization of penicillin acylase by radiation-induced polymerization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Penicillin acylase was immobilized by low temperature radiation-induced polymerization into polymer matrices obtained from monomers of different hydrophilicities, at various ratios of monomer to enzyme solution and at different polymerization conversions. It was found that the penicillin acylase retention (60-85% of the starting enzyme) is independent of the monomer used in thepolymerization, of the polymerization conversion and of the porosity of the polymer matrix. On the other hand, the penicillin acylase retention strongly depends on the presence in the irradiation mixture of the hydrophobic crosslinking agent, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, even in low amounts. The data suggest that the enzyme is bound to the polymer matrix by hydrophobic interactions through crosslinking agent molecules.

Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Boccù, E.; Largajolli, R.; Veronese, F. M.

360

A computational approach to the relationship between radiation induced double strand breaks and translocations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A theoretical framework is presented which provides a quantitative analysis of radiation induced translocations between the ab1 oncogene on CH9q34 and a breakpoint cluster region, bcr, on CH 22q11. Such translocations are associated frequently with chronic myelogenous leukemia. The theory is based on the assumption that incorrect or unfaithful rejoining of initial double strand breaks produced concurrently within the 200 kbp intron region upstream of the second abl exon, and the 16.5 kbp region between bcr exon 2 and exon 6 interact with each other, resulting in a fusion gene. for an x-ray dose of 100 Gy, there is good agreement between the theoretical estimate and the one available experimental result. The theory has been extended to provide dose response curves for these types of translocations. These curves are quadratic at low doses and become linear at high doses.

Holley, W. R.; Chatterjee, A.

1994-01-01

361

Rb1 haploinsufficiency promotes telomere attrition and radiation-induced genomic instability.  

PubMed

Germline mutations of the retinoblastoma gene (RB1) predispose to both sporadic and radiation-induced osteosarcoma, tumors characterized by high levels of genomic instability, and activation of alternative lengthening of telomeres. Mice with haploinsufficiency of the Rb1 gene in the osteoblastic lineage reiterate the radiation susceptibility to osteosarcoma seen in patients with germline RB1 mutations. We show that the susceptibility is accompanied by an increase in genomic instability, resulting from Rb1-dependent telomere erosion. Radiation exposure did not accelerate the rate of telomere loss but amplified the genomic instability resulting from the dysfunctional telomeres. These findings suggest that telomere maintenance is a noncanonical caretaker function of the retinoblastoma protein, such that its deficiency in cancer may potentiate DNA damage-induced carcinogenesis by promoting formation of chromosomal aberrations, rather than simply by affecting cell-cycle control. PMID:23687339

Gonzalez-Vasconcellos, Iria; Anastasov, Natasa; Sanli-Bonazzi, Bahar; Klymenko, Olena; Atkinson, Michael J; Rosemann, Michael

2013-07-15

362

Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin  

PubMed Central

Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment. PMID:23958412

Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter; Costes, Sylvain V.

2013-01-01

363

Molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability in human cells  

SciTech Connect

The overall strategy was to create a series of isogenic human cell lines that differ in key elements of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, or DNA repair in response to radiation-induced damage. The goal then was to quantify the fractions of cells within a population that exhibit reduced telomere lengths and relate this to the genetic background of the cell, as well as to the response to ionizing radiation. Association between telomere length and degree of genomic instability in the population is being examined for seven closely related cell lines, that vary in p53 status, bcl-2 status, or ability to repair double strand breaks. Experiments utilize gamma rays at doses of 0, 10, and 200 cGy. During this time period the effort concentrated on generating data with two cell lines. Approximately one-third of the required clones were isolated, and analyses for mutagenesis and chromosome aberrations were undertaken.

Liber, Howard L.

2003-02-13

364

Low-dose radiation induces Drosophila innate immunity through Toll pathway activation.  

PubMed

Numerous studies report that exposing certain organisms to low-dose radiation induces beneficial effects on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and immunity. By analyzing survival after bacterial infection and antimicrobial peptide gene expression in irradiated flies, we demonstrate that low-dose irradiation of Drosophila enhances innate immunity. Low-dose irradiation of flies significantly increased resistance against gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial infections, as well as expression of several antimicrobial peptide genes. Additionally, low-dose irradiation also resulted in a specific increase in expression of key proteins of the Toll signaling pathway and phosphorylated forms of p38 and JNK. These results indicate that innate immunity is activated after low-dose irradiation through Toll signaling pathway in Drosophila. PMID:22374403

Seong, Ki Moon; Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, Byung-Sub; Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Park, Joong-Jean; Min, Kyung-Jin; Jin, Young-Woo

2012-01-01

365

Modeling and optimization aspects of radiation induced grafting of 4-vinylpyridene onto partially fluorinated films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modeling and optimization aspects of radiation induced grafting (RIG) of 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) onto partially fluorinated polymers such as poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethene) (ETFE) and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) films were comparatively investigated using response surface method (RSM). The effects of independent parameters: absorbed dose, monomer concentration, grafting time and reaction temperature on the response, grafting yield (GY) were correlated through two quadratic models. The results of this work confirm that RSM is a reliable tool not only for optimization of the reaction parameters and prediction of GY in RIG processes, but also for the reduction of the number of the experiments, monomer consumption and absorbed dose leading to an improvement of the overall reaction cost.

Nasef, Mohamed Mahmoud; Ahmad Ali, Amgad; Saidi, Hamdani; Ahmad, Arshad

2014-01-01

366

The complex interactions between radiation induced non-targeted effects and cancer.  

PubMed

Radiation induced non-targeted effects have been widely investigated in the last two decades for their potential impact on low dose radiation risk. In this paper we will give an overview of the most relevant aspects related to these effects, starting from the definition of the low dose scenarios. We will underline the role of radiation quality, both in terms of mechanisms of interaction with the biological matter and for the importance of charged particles as powerful tools for low dose effects investigation. We will focus on cell communication, representing a common feature of non-targeted effects, giving also an overview of cancer models that have explicitly considered such effects. PMID:24139968

Campa, Alessandro; Balduzzi, Maria; Dini, Valentina; Esposito, Giuseppe; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella

2015-01-01

367

A Human Espophageal Epithelial Cell Model for Study of Radiation Induced Cancer and DNA Damage Repair  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma, a type of cancer found to have a significant enhancement in incidence in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Here we present the results of our preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of - H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron).

Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

2008-01-01

368

Karyotype reconstruction modulates the sensitivity of barley genome to radiation-induced DNA and chromosomal damage.  

PubMed

The potential of cytologically reconstructed barley line D-2946 to cope with the major lesions that hamper genome integrity, namely DNA single- and double-strand breaks was investigated. Strand breaks induced by ?-rays and Li ions were assessed by neutral and alkaline comet assay. Repair capacity after bleomycin treatment was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis under neutral and alkaline conditions. Frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations were also determined. Results indicate that radiation-mediated constitutive rearrangement of the chromosome complement has led to a substantial modulation of the sensitivity of barley genome towards DNA strand breaks, produced by ionising radiation, Li ion implantation and bleomycin in an agent-specific manner, as well as of the clastogenic response to ?-rays. Based on these findings, reconstructed barley karyotype D-2946 can be considered a candidate radio-sensitive line with reduced ability to maintain genome integrity with respect to both DNA and chromosomal damage. PMID:23221036

Stoilov, Lubomir; Georgieva, Mariyana; Manova, Vasilissa; Liu, Luxiang; Gecheff, Kostadin

2013-03-01

369

Radiation induced noise in x-ray imagers for high-yield inertial confinement fusion experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The large fluence of 14-MeV neutrons produced in high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments creates a variety of backgrounds in x-ray imagers viewing the implosion. Secondary charged particles produce background light by Cherenkov emission, phosphor screen excitation and possibly scintillation in the optical components of the imager. In addition, radiation induced optical absorption may lead to attenuation of the signal. Noise is also produced directly in the image recorder itself (CCD or film) via energy deposition by electrons and heavy charged particles such as protons and alphas. We will present results from CCD background measurements and compare them to Monte Carlo calculations. In addition we show measurements of luminescence and long-term darkening for some of the glasses employed in imagers.

Hagmann, C.; Ayers, J.; Bell, P. M.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Bradley, D. K.; Celeste, J.; Cerjan, C.; Darbon, S.; Emig, J.; Felker, B.; Glenn, S.; Holder, J.; Izumi, N.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Moody, J.; Piston, K.; Rousseau, A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Sorce, C.

2011-09-01

370

New era of radiotherapy: an update in radiation-induced lung disease  

PubMed Central

Over the last few decades, advances in radiotherapy (RT) technology have improved delivery of radiation therapy dramatically. Advances in treatment planning with the development of image-guided radiotherapy and in techniques such as proton therapy, allows the radiation therapist to direct high doses of radiation to the tumour. These advancements result in improved local regional control while reducing potentially damaging dosage to surrounding normal tissues. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the radiological findings from these advances in order to differentiate expected radiation-induced lung injury (RILD) from recurrence, infection, and other lung diseases. In order to understand these changes and correlate them with imaging, the radiologist should have access to the radiation therapy treatment plans. PMID:23473474

Benveniste, M. F. K.; Welsh, J.; Godoy, M. C. B.; Betancourt, S. L.; Mawlawi, O. R; Munden, R. F.

2014-01-01

371

Modeling of radiation-induced bystander effect using Monte Carlo methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments showed that the radiation-induced bystander effect exists in cells, or tissues, or even biological organisms when irradiated with energetic ions or X-rays. In this paper, a Monte Carlo model is developed to study the mechanisms of bystander effect under the cells sparsely populated conditions. This model, based on our previous experiment which made the cells sparsely located in a round dish, focuses mainly on the spatial characteristics. The simulation results successfully reach the agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, other bystander effect experiment is also computed by this model and finally the model succeeds in predicting the results. The comparison of simulations with the experimental results indicates the feasibility of the model and the validity of some vital mechanisms assumed.

Xia, Junchao; Liu, Liteng; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang; Wu, Lijun

2009-03-01

372

In situ studies of radiation induced crystallization in Fe/a-Y2O3 nanolayers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys have superior radiation tolerance and thus become appealing candidates as fuel cladding materials for next generation nuclear reactors. In this study we constructed a model system, Fe/Y2O3 nanolayers with individual layer thicknesses of 10 and 50 nm, in order to understand their radiation response and corresponding damage mitigation mechanisms. These nanolayers were subjected to in situ Kr ion irradiation at room temperature up to ?8 displacements-per-atom. As-deposited Y2O3 layers had primarily amorphous structure. Radiation induced prominent nanocrystallization and grain growth in 50 nm thick Y2O3 layers. Conversely, little crystallization occurred in 10 nm thick Y2O3 layers implying size dependent enhancement of radiation tolerance. In situ video also captured grain growth in both Fe and Y2O3 and outstanding morphological stability of layer interfaces against Kr ion irradiation.

Chen, Y.; Jiao, L.; Sun, C.; Song, M.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Kirk, M.; Li, M.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

2014-09-01

373

In vitro radiation induced alterations in heavy metals and metallothionein content in Plantago ovata Forsk.  

PubMed

Proton Induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) have been used to study the effects of gamma irradiation on heavy metal accumulation in callus tissue of Plantago ovata-an important cash crop of India. PIXE analysis revealed radiation-induced alteration in trace element profile during developmental stages of the callus of P. ovata. Subsequent experiments showed antagonism between Fe and Cu and also Cu and Zn and synergistic effect between Fe and Zn. FACS analysis showed significant induction of the metallothionein (MT) protein following gamma-irradiation, and maximum induction was noted at the 50-Gy absorbed dose. This indicated a progressive increment of MTs as a measure for protection against gamma-rays, to combat alteration in the homeostasis of heavy metals like Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn. PMID:18493724

Saha, Priyanka; Mishra, Debadutta; Chakraborty, Anindita; Sudarshan, Mathummal; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen

2008-09-01

374

Acquired Brachial Cutaneous Dyschromatosis in a 60-Year-Old Male: A Case Report and Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis is an acquired pigmentary disorder that has been described in only 20 patients but likely affects many more. This case of a man with acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis is unique as most reports are in women. We report the case of a 60-year-old male who presents with an asymptomatic eruption characterized by hyperpigmented and telangiectatic macules coalescing into patches on the bilateral extensor aspects of the forearms which is consistent clinically and histopathologically with acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis. Given its presence in patients with clinical evidence of chronic sun exposure and its histopathological finding of solar elastosis, acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis is likely a disorder caused by cumulative UV damage. However, a possible association between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis exists. Further investigation is needed to elucidate both the pathogenesis of the disorder and forms of effective management. Treatment of the disorder should begin with current established treatments for disorders of dyspigmentation. PMID:25610668

Foering, Kristen

2014-01-01

375

Radiation-Inducible Caspase-8 Gene Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with malignant gliomas have a poor prognosis. To explore a novel and more effective approach for the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, we designed a strategy that combines caspase-8 (CSP8) gene therapy and radiation treatment (RT). In addition, the specificity of the combined therapy was investigated to decrease the unpleasant effects experienced by the surrounding normal tissue. Methods and Materials: We constructed the plasmid pEGR-green fluorescence protein that included the radiation-inducible early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) promoter and evaluated its characteristics. The pEGR-CSP8 was constructed and included the Egr-1 promoter and CSP8 complementary DNA. Assays that evaluated the apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity caused by CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were performed using U251 and U87 glioma cells. The pEGR-CSP8 was transfected into the subcutaneous U251 glioma cells of nude mice by means of in vivo electroporation. The in vivo effects of CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were evaluated. Results: The Egr-1 promoter yielded a better response with fractionated RT than with single-dose RT. In the assay of apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity, pEGR-CSP8 showed response for RT. The pEGR-CSP8 combined with RT is capable of inducing cell death effectively. In mice treated with pEGR-CSP8 and RT, apoptotic cells were detected in pathologic sections, and a significant difference was observed in tumor volumes. Conclusions: Our results indicate that radiation-inducible gene therapy may have great potential because this can be spatially or temporally controlled by exogenous RT and is safe and specific.

Tsurushima, Hideo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical School, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Nanotechnology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)], E-mail: hideo-tsurushima@aist.go.jp; Yuan Xuan; Dillehay, Larry E. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Leong, Kam W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical School, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2008-06-01

376

Protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline against radiation-induced immune dysfunction.  

PubMed

Recent studies showed that hydrogen can be used as an effective radioprotective agent through scavenging free radicals. This study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective effects of hydrogen on immune system in mice. H(2) was dissolved in physiological saline using an apparatus produced by our department. Spleen index and histological analysis were used to evaluate the splenic structural damage. Spleen superoxide dismutase, GSH, MDA were measured to appraise the antioxidant capacity and a DCF assay for the measurement of radical oxygen species. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by an Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining method as well as the apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and c-caspase-3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subtypes were detected by flow cytometry with FITC-labelled antimouse CD4 and PE antimouse CD8 staining. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the CD4+ T cell subtypes and related cytokines. Our study demonstrated that pre-treatment with H(2) could increase the spleen index and attenuate the radiation damage on splenic structure. Radical oxygen species level was also reduced by H(2) treatment. H(2) also inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in splenocytes and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins in living mice. Radiation-induced imbalance of T cells was attenuated by H(2). Finally, we found that H(2) could regulate the polarization of CD4+ T cells and the level of related cytokines. This study suggests H(2) as an effective radioprotective agent on immune system by scavenging reactive oxygen species. PMID:24618260

Zhao, Sanhu; Yang, Yanyong; Liu, Wen; Xuan, Zhiqiang; Wu, Shouming; Yu, Shunfei; Mei, Ke; Huang, Yijuan; Zhang, Pei; Cai, Jianming; Ni, Jin; Zhao, Yaoxian

2014-05-01

377

Effects of ozone oxidative preconditioning on radiation-induced organ damage in rats  

PubMed Central

Because radiation-induced cellular damage is attributed primarily to harmful effects of free radicals, molecules with direct free radical scavenging properties are particularly promising as radioprotectors. It has been demonstrated that controlled ozone administration may promote an adaptation to oxidative stress, preventing the damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Thus, we hypothesized that ozone would ameliorate oxidative damage caused by total body irradiation (TBI) with a single dose of 6 Gy in rat liver and ileum tissues. Rats were randomly divided into groups as follows: control group; saline-treated and irradiated (IR) groups; and ozone oxidative preconditioning (OOP) and IR groups. Animals were exposed to TBI after a 5-day intraperitoneal pretreatment with either saline or ozone (1 mg/kg/day). They were decapitated at either 6 h or 72 h after TBI. Plasma, liver and ileum samples were obtained. Serum AST, ALT and TNF-? levels were elevated in the IR groups compared with the control group and were decreased after treatment with OOP. TBI resulted in a significant increase in the levels of MDA in the liver and ileal tissues and a decrease of SOD activities. The results demonstrated that the levels of MDA liver and ileal tissues in irradiated rats that were pretreated with ozone were significantly decreased, while SOD activities were significantly increased. OOP reversed all histopathological alterations induced by irradiation. In conclusion, data obtained from this study indicated that ozone could increase the endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism in rats and there by protect the animals from radiation-induced organ toxicity. PMID:22915786

Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Bakkal, Bekir Hakan; Guven, Berrak; Tasdoven, Ilhan; Bektas, Sibel; Can, Murat; Comert, Mustafa

2013-01-01

378

Homeopathic treatment of radiation-induced itching in breast cancer patients. A prospective observational study.  

PubMed

Following surgery for carcinoma of the breast, patients receive local radiotherapy. This can cause itching, which may be severe, in the radiation field. The affected skin usually is dry, rough and red. Twenty-five patients were treated homeopathically for radiation-induced itching. Fourteen patients developed itching during their course of post-operative radiation at 27 days median (range: 14-40). Eleven patients experienced itching in the radiation field after completion of treatment (median 21 days) after the end of their radiation treatment. A single dose of an individually selected homeopathic medicine in 30C dilution was given in the clinic, on the basis of repertorisation. Patients were asked to record a visual analogue scale (VAS) before prescription of the homeopathic medicine and at follow-up. Patients were evaluated at median 3 days (range: 1-27 days) after administration of the homeopathic medicine. In total, 14 of 25 patients (56%) responded to the first medicine. Nine patients had a second medicine, seven responded. Altogether 21 of 25 (84%) patients were successfully treated. The following medicines were employed successfully: Fl-ac 9/13, Rhus-t 3/5, Caust 2/3, Ign 2/2, Psor 2/2, gamma-ray 2/2 and Kali-bi 1/1. The VAS measurements before and after homeopathic treatment showed a reduction of the median value of 64mm (range: 20-100mm) to 34mm (median; range: 0-84mm). Homeopathic treatment of radiation-induced itching appears quite successful. The most frequently indicated and most frequently effective medicine was Fluoric acid. An approach that allows greater understanding of the patient as a whole in the short time available in a busy clinic may be required. PMID:15532701

Schlappack, O

2004-10-01

379

The Role of Platelet Factor 4 in Radiation-Induced Thrombocytopenia  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Factors affecting the severity of radiation-induced thrombocytopenia (RIT) are not well described. We address whether platelet factor 4 (PF4; a negative paracrine for megakaryopoiesis) affects platelet recovery postradiation. Methods and Materials: Using conditioned media from irradiated bone marrow (BM) cells from transgenic mice overexpressing human (h) PF4 (hPF4+), megakaryocyte colony formation was assessed in the presence of this conditioned media and PF4 blocking agents. In a model of radiation-induced thrombocytopenia, irradiated mice with varying PF4 expression levels were treated with anti-hPF4 and/or thrombopoietin (TPO), and platelet count recovery and survival were examined. Results: Conditioned media from irradiated BM from hPF4+ mice inhibited megakaryocyte colony formation, suggesting that PF4 is a negative paracrine released in RIT. Blocking with an anti-hPF4 antibody restored colony formation of BM grown in the presence of hPF4+ irradiated media, as did antibodies that block the megakaryocyte receptor for PF4, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). Irradiated PF4 knockout mice had higher nadir platelet counts than irradiated hPF4+/knockout litter mates (651 vs. 328 x 106/mcL, p = 0.02) and recovered earlier (15 days vs. 22 days, respectively, p <0.02). When irradiated hPF4+ mice were treated with anti-hPF4 antibody and/or TPO, they showed less severe thrombocytopenia than untreated mice, with improved survival and time to platelet recovery, but no additive effect was seen. Conclusions: Our studies show that in RIT, damaged megakaryocytes release PF4 locally, inhibiting platelet recovery. Blocking PF4 enhances recovery while released PF4 from megakaryocytes limits TPO efficacy, potentially because of increased release of PF4 stimulated by TPO. The clinical value of blocking this negative paracrine pathway post-RIT remains to be determined.

Lambert, Michele P., E-mail: lambertm@email.chop.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiao Liqing; Nguyen, Yvonne [Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kowalska, M. Anna [Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Science, Lodz (Poland); Poncz, Mortimer [Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2011-08-01

380

Persistence of Space Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cytogenetic damage in astronaut's peripheral blood lymphocytes is a useful in vivo marker of space radiation induced damage. Moreover, if radiation induced chromosome translocations persist in peripheral blood lymphocytes for many years, as has been assumed, they could potentially be used to measure retrospective doses or prolonged low dose rate exposures. However, as more data becomes available, evidence suggests that the yield of translocations may decline with time after exposure, at least in the case of space radiation exposures. We present our latest follow-up measurements of chromosome aberrations in astronauts blood lymphocytes assessed by FISH painting and collected a various times beginning directly after return from space to several years after flight. For most individuals the analysis of individual time-courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with different half-lives. Since the level of stable aberrations depends on the interplay between natural loss of circulating T-lymphocytes and replenishment from the stem or progenitor cells, the differences in the rates of decay could be explained by inter-individual variation in lymphocyte turn over. Biodosimetry estimates derived from cytogenetic analysis of samples collected a few days after return to earth lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, a temporal decline in yields may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure. In addition, limited data on multiple flights show a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields. Data from one crewmember who has participated in two separate long-duration space missions and has been followed up for over 10 years provides limited information on the effect of repeat flights and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

2008-01-01

381

Radiation-induced diamond crystallization: Origin of carbonados and its implications on meteorite nano-diamonds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ten carbonados from Central Africa were studied for U-Th-Pb systematics. To extract U, Th, and Pb from the samples, we developed a cold combustion technique wherein diamond was burnt in liquid oxygen. The technique gave low blanks; 25-50 pg for Pb, 3 pg for U, and 5 pg for Th. After very thorough acid treatments of the carbonados with hot HNO3, HF, and HCl over one week, most of U, Th, and Pb were removed from the samples. Lead in the acid-leached diamonds was highly radiogenic (206Pb/204Pb up to 470). However, the amounts of U and Th in the acid-leached diamonds are too low to account for the radiogenic Pb even if we assume 4.5 Ga for the age of the diamonds. Therefore, we conclude that the radiogenic Pb was implanted into the diamonds from surroundings by means of recoil energy of radioactive decays of U and Th. From the radiogenic lead isotopic composition, we estimate a minimum age of 2.6 Ga and a maximum age of 3.8 Ga for the formation of the carbonados. The above findings of the implantation of recoiled radiogenic Pb into carbonados is consistent with the process of radiation-induced crystallization which was proposed for carbonado by Kaminsky (1987). We show from some theoretical considerations that when highly energetic particles, such as those emitted from radioactive decay of U and Th, interact with carbonaceous materials, they give rise to cascades of atomic disturbance (over regions of about a few nanometer), and the disturbed atoms are likely to recrystallize to form micro-diamonds because of increasing surface energy due to small size. The radiation-induced diamond formation mechanism may be relevant to the origin of nano-diamonds in primitive meteorites. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Ozima, M.; Tatsumoto, M.

1997-01-01

382

Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization  

PubMed Central

DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatiotemporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and chromatin territories. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX), with an emphasis on the later. This review discusses the importance of not equating RIF with DSB in all situations and shows how dose and time dependence of RIF frequency is inconsistent with a one to one equivalence. Instead, we propose that RIF mark regions of the chromatin that would serve as scaffolds rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery to access the damage site. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. We suggest that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear marks of permanent rearrangement of the chromatin architecture. Such chromatin alterations may not always lead to growth arrest as cells have been shown to replicate these in progeny. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may reflect persistent changes in the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. Such model opens the door to a “non-DNA-centric view” of radiation-induced phenotypes. PMID:20060491

Costes, S.V.; Chiolo, I.; Pluth, J.M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.; Jakob, B.

2014-01-01

383

Mitigation and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Thoracic Injury With a Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor, Celecoxib  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test whether a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) could reduce mortality resulting from radiation-induced pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: Celecoxib was given to mice twice daily for 40 consecutive days starting on the day of local thoracic irradiation (LTI) or 40 or 80 days later. C3Hf/KamLaw mice were observed for morbidity, and time to death was determined. Results were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Timing of celecoxib relative to LTI determined efficacy. A significant reduction in time to death was achieved only when celecoxib was started 80 days after LTI, corresponding to the time when pneumonitis is expressed. For these mice the reduction in mortality was quantified as a hazard ratio for mortality of treated vs untreated of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24-0.53), thus significantly less than 1.0. Correspondingly, the median lethal dose for treated mice (12.9 Gy; 95% CI 12.55-13.25 Gy) was significantly (P=.026) higher than for untreated mice (12.4 Gy; 95% CI 12.2-12.65 Gy). Conclusions: Celecoxib significantly reduced lung toxicity when administered months after LTI when the deleterious effects of radiation were expressed. The schedule-dependent reduction in fatal pneumonitis suggests that celecoxib could be clinically useful by reintroduction of treatment months after completion of radiation therapy. These findings may be important for designing clinical trials using cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to treat radiation-induced lung toxicity as a complement to concurrent radiation therapy of lung cancers.

Hunter, Nancy R.; Valdecanas, David [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao Zhongxing [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Milas, Luka [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thames, Howard D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mason, Kathy A., E-mail: kmason@mdanderson.org [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-02-01

384

Radiation-Induced Segregation and Phase Stability in Candidate Alloys for the Advanced Burner Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Major accomplishments of this project were the following: 1) Radiation induced depletion of Cr occurs in alloy D9, in agreement with that observed in austenitic alloys. 2) In F-M alloys, Cr enriches at PAG grain boundaries at low dose (<7 dpa) and at intermediate temperature (400°C) and the magnitude of the enrichment decreases with temperature. 3) Cr enrichment decreases with dose, remaining enriched in alloy T91 up to 10 dpa, but changing to depletion above 3 dpa in HT9 and HCM12A. 4) Cr has a higher diffusivity than Fe by a vacancy mechanism and the corresponding atomic flux of Cr is larger than Fe in the opposite direction to the vacancy flux. 5) Cr concentration at grain boundaries decreases as a result of vacancy transport during electron or proton irradiation, consistent with Inverse Kirkendall models. 6) Inclusion of other point defect sinks into the KLMC simulation of vacancy-mediated diffusion only influences the results in the low temperature, recombination dominated regime, but does not change the conclusion that Cr depletes as a result of vacancy transport to the sink. 7) Cr segregation behavior is independent of Frenkel pair versus cascade production, as simulated for electron versus proton irradiation conditions, for the temperatures investigated. 8) The amount of Cr depletion at a simulated planar boundary with vacancy-mediated diffusion reaches an apparent saturation value by about 1 dpa, with the precise saturation concentration dependent on the ratio of Cr to Fe diffusivity. 9) Cr diffuses faster than Fe by an interstitial transport mechanism, and the corresponding atomic flux of Cr is much larger than Fe in the same direction as the interstitial flux. 10) Observed experimental and computational results show that the radiation induced segregation behavior of Cr is consistent with an Inverse Kirkendall mechanism.

Gary S. Was; Brian D. Wirth

2011-05-29

385

Modulation of ionizing radiation induced oxidative imbalance by semi-fractionated extract of Piper betle  

PubMed Central

The study was planned to evaluate modulatory effect of aqueous extract of Piper betle leaf (PBL) on ionizing radiation mediated oxidative stress leading to normal tissues damage during radiotherapy and other radiation exposures. The total polyphenols and flavonoids known as free radical scavenger (chelators) were measured in the extract. To ascertain antioxidant potential of PBL extract, we studied free radical scavenging, metal chelation, reducing power, lipid peroxidation inhibition and ferric reducing antioxidant properties (FRAP ) using in vitro assays. Mice were exposed to varied radiation doses administered with the same extract prior to irradiation to confirm its oxidative stress minimizing efficacy by evaluating ferric reducing ability of plasma, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation and micro-nuclei frequency. PBL extract was effective in scavenging DPPH (up to 92% at 100 µg/ml) and superoxide radicals (up to 95% at 80 µg/ml), chelated metal ions (up to 83% at 50 µg/ml) and inhibited lipid peroxidation (up to 45.65% at 500 µg/ml) in a dose dependant manner using in vitro model. Oral administration of PBL extract (225 mg/kg body weight) 1 hr before irradiation in mice significantly enhanced (p < 0.01) radiation abated antioxidant potential of plasma and GSH level in all the observed organs. The treatment with extract effectively lowered the radiation induced lipid peroxidation at 24 hrs in all the selected organs with maximum inhibition in thymus (p < 0.01). After 48 hrs, lipid peroxidation was maximally inhibited in the group treated with the extract. Frequency of radiation induced micronucleated cells declined significantly (34.78%, p < 0.01) at 24 hrs post-irradiation interval by PBL extract administration. The results suggest that PBL extract has high antioxidant potential and relatively non-toxic and thus could be assertively used to mitigate radiotherapy inflicted normal tissues damage and also injuries caused by moderate doses of radiation during unplanned exposures. PMID:20716927

Verma, Savita; Dutta, Ajaswrata; Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar

2010-01-01

386

Dragon's blood and its extracts attenuate radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice  

PubMed Central

Dragon's blood (DB) possesses great medicinal values due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. This study was designed to investigate the effects of DB and its extracts (DBEs) on oxidative stress in mice exposed to whole body 60Co-? irradiation (4 Gy). DB and DBEs were intragastrically administered to mice for 5 d prior to radiation. The antioxidant activities, including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) levels in liver and spleen were measured using kits. Furthermore, DB and DBE effects were determined by organ indices and histology of liver and spleen. Our results indicated that the DB and DBE-treated groups showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in levels of MDA in liver and spleen compared with the irradiation-only group. Moreover, the activity of SOD, CAT and the level of GSH in liver and spleen tissue were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) in the DB and DBE groups. DB and DBE also had a significant effect on the recovery of thymus indices. The histological observations of groups having treatment with DB and DBE indicated significant reduction in the radiation-induced damage to the liver and spleen, together with improvement in the morphology of the liver and spleen. These results suggest that DB and DBE treatment prevents radiation-induced oxidative stress injury and restores antioxidant status and histopathological changes in the liver and spleen, but there is need for further study to explore the precise molecular mechanism and strategy for optimal practical application of DB and DBE. PMID:24634306

Ran, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Awan, Muhammad Umer Farooq; Tang, Bo; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Yiming; Wang, Xiao; Li, Qiang; Ma, Hong; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

2014-01-01

387

Whole Brain Radiation-Induced Cognitive Impairment: Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets  

PubMed Central

Radiation therapy, the most commonly used for the treatment of brain tumors, has been shown to be of major significance in tu-mor control and survival rate of brain tumor patients. About 200,000 patients with brain tumor are treated with either partial large field or whole brain radiation every year in the United States. The use of radiation therapy for treatment of brain tumors, however, may lead to devastating functional deficits in brain several months to years after treatment. In particular, whole brain radiation therapy results in a significant reduction in learning and memory in brain tumor patients as long-term consequences of treatment. Although a number of in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the pathogenesis of radiation-mediated brain injury, the cel-lular and molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces damage to normal tissue in brain remain largely unknown. Therefore, this review focuses on the pathophysiological mechanisms of whole brain radiation-induced cognitive impairment and the iden-tification of novel therapeutic targets. Specifically, we review the current knowledge about the effects of whole brain radiation on pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory pathways, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) system and extracellular matrix (ECM), and physiological angiogenesis in brain. These studies may provide a foundation for defin-ing a new cellular and molecular basis related to the etiology of cognitive impairment that occurs among patients in response to whole brain radiation therapy. It may also lead to new opportunities for therapeutic interventions for brain tumor patients who are undergoing whole brain radiation therapy. PMID:24009822

Lee, Yong Woo; Cho, Hyung Joon; Lee, Won Hee; Sonntag, William E.

2012-01-01

388

Dragon's blood and its extracts attenuate radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.  

PubMed

Dragon's blood (DB) possesses great medicinal values due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. This study was designed to investigate the effects of DB and its extracts (DBEs) on oxidative stress in mice exposed to whole body (60)Co-? irradiation (4 Gy). DB and DBEs were intragastrically administered to mice for 5 d prior to radiation. The antioxidant activities, including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) levels in liver and spleen were measured using kits. Furthermore, DB and DBE effects were determined by organ indices and histology of liver and spleen. Our results indicated that the DB and DBE-treated groups showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in levels of MDA in liver and spleen compared with the irradiation-only group. Moreover, the activity of SOD, CAT and the level of GSH in liver and spleen tissue were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) in the DB and DBE groups. DB and DBE also had a significant effect on the recovery of thymus indices. The histological observations of groups having treatment with DB and DBE indicated significant reduction in the radiation-induced damage to the liver and spleen, together with improvement in the morphology of the liver and spleen. These results suggest that DB and DBE treatment prevents radiation-induced oxidative stress injury and restores antioxidant status and histopathological changes in the liver and spleen, but there is need for further study to explore the precise molecular mechanism and strategy for optimal practical application of DB and DBE. PMID:24634306

Ran, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ran; Gao, Qian; Jia, Qiutian; Hasan, Murtaza; Awan, Muhammad Umer Farooq; Tang, Bo; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Yiming; Wang, Xiao; Li, Qiang; Ma, Hong; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

2014-07-01

389

The radiation-induced fibroatrophic process: therapeutic perspective via the antioxidant pathway.  

PubMed

The radiation-induced fibroatrophic process (RIF) constitutes a late, local and unavoidable sequela to high-dose radiotherapy, traditionally considered irreversible. Today, this process is partly reversible, thanks to recent progress in understanding the physiopathology of the lesions it causes and the results of recent clinical trials using antioxidant therapy. This review includes a synthetic description of the static and dynamic features of the RIF process, as reflected by its clinical, instrumental and histopathological characteristics, and by its cellular and molecular regulation. Schematically, three successive clinical and histopathological phases can be distinguished: a pre-fibrotic aspecific inflammatory phase, a constitutive fibrotic cellular phase, and a matrix densification and remodelling phase, possibly ending in terminal tissular necrosis. The respective roles of the chief actors in the RIF process are defined, as well as their development with time. A fibroblastic stromal hypothesis is suggested revolving around a 'gravitational effect' exerted by the couple ROS (reactive oxygen species)--fibroblasts, and partly mediated by TGF-beta1. A variety of strategies have been tested for the management of RIF. In the light of the mechanisms described, a curative procedure has been proposed via the antioxidant pathway. In particular, it was showed that superoxide dismutase and combined pentoxifylline-tocopherol treatment enables the process of established radiation-induced fibroatrophy to be greatly reduced or even reversed, both in clinical practice and animal experiments. The efficacy of combined pentoxifylline-tocopherol treatment in superficial RIF was confirmed in a randomised clinical trial, and then in successful phase II trials especially in uterine fibroatrophy and osteoradionecrosis. It is of critical importance to evaluate these new management approaches in larger clinical trials and to improve the recording of results for better outcome analysis. Mechanistic studies are always necessary to improve understanding of the RIF process and the antifibrotic drug action. PMID:15542158

Delanian, Sylvie; Lefaix, Jean-Louis

2004-11-01

390

Biological consequences of radiation-induced DNA damage: relevance to radiotherapy.  

PubMed

DNA damage of exposed tumour tissue leading to cell death is one of the detrimental effects of ionising radiation that is exploited, with beneficial consequences, for radiotherapy. The pattern of the discrete energy depositions during passage of the ionising track of radiation defines the spatial distribution of lesions induced in DNA with a fraction of the DNA damage sites containing clusters of lesions, formed over a few nanometres, against a background of endogenously induced individual lesions. These clustered DNA damage sites, which may be considered as a signature of ionising radiation, underlie the deleterious biological consequences of ionising radiation. The concepts developed rely in part on the fact that ionising radiation creates significant levels of clustered DNA damage, including complex double-strand breaks (DSB), to kill tumour cells as clustered damage sites are difficult to repair. This reduced repairability of clustered DNA damage using specific repair pathways is exploitable in radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer. We discuss some potential strategies to enhance radiosensitivity by targeting the repair pathways of radiation-induced clustered damage and complex DNA DSB, through inhibition of specific proteins that are not required in the repair pathways for endogenous damage. The variety and severity of DNA damage from ionising radiation is also influenced by the tumour microenvironment, being especially sensitive to the oxygen status of the cells. For instance, nitric oxide is known to influence the types of damage induced by radiation under hypoxic conditions. A potential strategy based on bioreductive activation of pro-drugs to release nitric oxide is discussed as an approach to deliver nitric oxide to hypoxic tumours during radiotherapy. The ultimate aim of this review is to stimulate thinking on how knowledge of the complexity of radiation-induced DNA damage may contribute to the development of adjuncts to radiotherapy. PMID:23849504

Lomax, M E; Folkes, L K; O'Neill, P

2013-10-01

391

Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect.

Dianna B. Roberts; Elizabeth L. Travis

1995-01-01

392

Implication of prostaglandins and histamine H1 and H2 receptors in radiation-induced temperature responses of rats  

SciTech Connect

Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy gamma radiation (/sup 60/Co) induced hyperthermia, whereas 20-200 Gy induced hypothermia. Exposure either to the head or to the whole body to 10 Gy induced hyperthermia, while body-only exposure produced hypothermia. This observation indicates that radiation-induced fever is a result of a direct effect on the brain. The hyperthermia due to 10 Gy was significantly attenuated by the pre- or post-treatment with a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin. Hyperthermia was also altered by the central administration of a mu-receptor antagonist naloxone but only at low doses of radiation. These findings suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia may be mediated through the synthesis and release of prostaglandins in the brain and to a lesser extent to the release of endogenous opioid peptides. The release of histamine acting on H1 and H2 receptors may be involved in radiation-induced hypothermia, since both the H1 receptor antagonist, mepyramine, and H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine, antagonized the hypothermia. The results of these studies suggest that the release of neurohumoral substances induced by exposure to ionizing radiation is dose dependent and has different consequences on physiological processes such as the regulation of body temperature. Furthermore, the antagonism of radiation-induced hyperthermia by indomethacin may have potential therapeutic implications in the treatment of fever resulting from accidental irradiations.

Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Mickley, G.A.

1988-04-01

393

Radiation-induced immunogenic modulation of tumor enhances antigen processing and calreticulin exposure, resulting in enhanced T-cell killing  

PubMed Central

Radiation therapy (RT) is used for local tumor control through direct killing of tumor cells. Radiation-induced cell death can trigger tumor antigen-specific immune responses, but these are often noncurative. Radiation has been demonstrated to induce immunogenic modulation (IM) in various tumor types by altering the biology of surviving cells to render them more susceptible to T cell-mediated killing. Little is known about the mechanism(s) underlying IM elicited by sub-lethal radiation dosing. We have examined the molecular and immunogenic consequences of radiation exposure in breast, lung, and prostate human carcinoma cells. Radiation induced secretion of ATP and HMGB1 in both dying and surviving tumor cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor irradiation induced significant upregulation of multiple components of the antigen-processing machinery and calreticulin cell-surface expression. Augmented CTL lysis specific for several tumor-associated antigens was largely dictated by the presence of calreticulin on the surface of tumor cells and constituted an adaptive response to endoplasmic reticulum stress, mediated by activation of the unfolded protein response. This study provides evidence that radiation induces a continuum of immunogenic alterations in tumor biology, from immunogenic modulation to immunogenic cell death. We also expand the concept of immunogenic modulation, where surviving tumor cells recovering from radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress become more sensitive to CTL killing. These observations offer a rationale for the combined use of radiation with immunotherapy, including for patients failing RT alone. PMID:24480782

Gameiro, Sofia R.; Jammed, Momodou L.; Wattenberg, Max M.; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Ferrone, Soldano; Hodge, James W.

2014-01-01

394

RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION-INDUCED CALCIUM-ION-EFFLUX ENHANCEMENT FROM HUMAN AND OTHER NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS IN CULTURE  

EPA Science Inventory

In order to test the generality of radiofrequency-radiation-induced change in alteration 45Ca2+ efflux from avian and feline brain tissues, human neuroblastoma cells were exposed to electromagnetic radiation at 147 MHz, amplitude modulated (AM) at 16 Hz, at specific absorption ra...

395

Gene expression analysis reveals inhibition of radiation-induced TGF?-signaling by hyperbaric oxygen therapy in mouse salivary glands.  

PubMed

A side effect of radiation therapy in the head and neck region is injury to surrounding healthy tissues such as irreversible impaired function of the salivary glands. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is clinically used to treat radiation-induced damage but its mechanism of action is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the molecular pathways that are affected by HBOT in mouse salivary glands two weeks after radiation therapy by microarray analysis. Interestingly, HBOT led to significant attenuation of the radiation-induced expression of a set of genes and upstream regulators that are involved in processes such as fibrosis and tissue regeneration. Our data suggest that the TGF?-pathway, which is involved in radiation-induced fibrosis and chronic loss of function after radiation therapy, is affected by HBOT. On the longer term, HBOT reduced the expression of the fibrosis-associated factor ?-smooth muscle actin in irradiated salivary glands. This study highlights the potential of HBOT to inhibit the TGF?-pathway in irradiated salivary glands and to restrain consequential radiation induced tissue injury. PMID:24849810

Spiegelberg, Linda; Swagemakers, Sigrid M A; Van Ijcken, Wilfred F J; Oole, Edwin; Wolvius, Eppo B; Essers, Jeroen; Braks, Joanna A M

2014-01-01

396

Gene Expression Analysis Reveals Inhibition of Radiation-Induced TGF?-Signaling by Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Mouse Salivary Glands  

PubMed Central

A side effect of radiation therapy in the head and neck region is injury to surrounding healthy tissues such as irreversible impaired function of the salivary glands. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is clinically used to treat radiation-induced damage but its mechanism of action is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the molecular pathways that are affected by HBOT in mouse salivary glands two weeks after radiation therapy by microarray analysis. Interestingly, HBOT led to significant attenuation of the radiation-induced expression of a set of genes and upstream regulators that are involved in processes such as fibrosis and tissue regeneration. Our data suggest that the TGF?-pathway, which is involved in radiation-induced fibrosis and chronic loss of function after radiation therapy, is affected by HBOT. On the longer term, HBOT reduced the expression of the fibrosis-associated factor ?-smooth muscle actin in irradiated salivary glands. This study highlights the potential of HBOT to inhibit the TGF?-pathway in irradiated salivary glands and to restrain consequential radiation induced tissue injury. PMID:24849810

Spiegelberg, Linda; Swagemakers, Sigrid MA; van IJcken, Wilfred FJ; Oole, Edwin; Wolvius, Eppo B; Essers, Jeroen; Braks, Joanna AM

2014-01-01

397

Radiation-induced attenuation of high-OH optical fibers after hydrogen treatment in the presence of ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect

High purity, high-OH, optical fibers were irradiated in a hydrogen atmosphere to explore hydrogen binding into defects created by the ionizing radiation. Significant improvements in subsequent measurements of radiation-induced attenuation were observed. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Lyons, P.B; Looney, L.D.

1991-01-01

398

Assessment of space proton radiation-induced charge transfer inefficiency in the CCD204 for the Euclid space observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Euclid is a medium class European Space Agency mission candidate for launch in 2019 with a primary goal to study the dark universe using the weak lensing and baryonic acoustic oscillations techniques. Weak lensing depends on accurate shape measurements of distant galaxies. Therefore it is beneficial that the effects of radiation-induced charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) in the Euclid CCDs over

J P D Gow; N J Murray; A D Holland; D J Hall; M Cropper; D Burt; G Hopkinson; L Duvet

2012-01-01

399

Radiation-induced equilibrium is a balance between tumor cell proliferation and T cell-mediated killing  

PubMed Central

Local failures following radiation therapy are multifactorial and the contributions of the tumor and the host are complex. Current models of tumor equilibrium suggest that a balance exists between cell birth and cell death due to insufficient angiogenesis, immune effects, or intrinsic cellular factors. We investigated whether host immune responses contribute to radiation induced tumor equilibrium in animal models. We report an essential role for immune cells and their cytokines in suppressing tumor cell regrowth in two experimental animal model systems. Depletion of T cells or neutralization of interferon-gamma reversed radiation-induced equilibrium leading to tumor regrowth. We also demonstrate that PD-L1 blockade augments T cell responses leading to rejection of tumors in radiation induced equilibrium. We identify an active interplay between tumor cells and immune cells that occurs in radiation-induced tumor equilibrium and suggest a potential role for disruption of the PD-L1/PD-1 axis in increasing local tumor control. PMID:23630355

Liang, Hua; Deng, Liufu; Chmura, Steven; Burnette, Byron; Liadis, Nicole; Darga, Thomas; Beckett, Michael A.; Lingen, Mark W.; Witt, MaryEllyn; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Fu, Yang-Xin

2013-01-01

400

Amelioration of Radiation-Induced Hematological and Biochemical Alterations in Swiss Albino Mice by Panax ginseng Extract  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. This study was carried out to observe the radioprotective effect of Panax ginseng root extract (PGE) against radiation-induced hematological and biochemical alterations in blood and liver of mice. Materials and methods. Adult Swiss albino mice were exposed to 6 Gy gamma radiation in the presence (experimental) or absence (control) of PGE to study the quantitative and qualitative alterations in

Preeti Verma; Priyanka Sharma; Jyoti Parmar; Annapurna Agrawal; P. K. Goyal

2011-01-01

401

Radiation-Induced Formation of Chlorine Oxides and Their Potential Role in the Origin of Martian Perchlorates  

E-print Network

Radiation-Induced Formation of Chlorine Oxides and Their Potential Role in the Origin of Martian Information ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide (CO2) rich chlorine-bear- ing ices were exposed to energetic electrons in laboratory simulation experiments to investigate the formation of chlorine oxides (ClxOy) in the condensed

Kaiser, Ralf I.

402

Secondary Procedures for Elbow Flexion Restoration in Late Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy  

PubMed Central

Even though total absence of elbow flexion in obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) is rare, weakness is a frequent problem. Numerous procedures for elbow flexion restoration in late obstetric brachial plexus palsy have been described. In this study, children with OBPP who underwent secondary reconstruction for elbow flexion restoration were studied. A retrospective review of 15 patients (16 elbows) who underwent 16 pedicled and eight free-muscle transfers for elbow flexion restoration was conducted. The mean follow-up period was 8.4?±?2.9 years (range, 25 months to 12.2 years). The mean age at operation (elbow surgery) was 5.4?±?1.9 years. The total arc of elbow motion was the result of the active elbow flexion less the flexion contracture. There was significant improvement in biceps muscle power from an average grading of 2.49?±?0.80 preoperatively to 3.64?±?0.46 postoperatively (p?brachial plexus palsy. Choice of the procedure should be individualized and determined on the basis of the type of paralysis, availability of donor muscles, previous reconstruction, and experience of the surgeon. PMID:19430848

Kokkalis, Zinon T.

2009-01-01

403

Brachial plexus block using lidocaine/epinephrine or lidocaine/xylazine in fat-tailed sheep  

PubMed Central

This blinded, randomized experimental study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding epinephrine or xylazine to lidocaine solution for brachial plexus block (BPB) in sheep. Nine healthy, fat-tailed female lambs (26.6 ± 1.5 kg) were randomly allocated into three groups: lidocaine 2%, 5 mg kg-1 (LID, n = 6), lidocaine (5 mg kg-1) with epinephrine 5 µg mL-1 (LIDEP, n = 6) or lidocaine (5 mg kg-1) with xylazine 0.05 mg kg-1 (LIDXY, n = 6). Each animal was tested twice. The sheep received a total volume of 0.25 mL kg-1 for BPB. A nerve stimulator was used to locate the nerves of the brachial plexus. Onset and duration of analgesia of the forelimb were evaluated using superficial and deep pin prick and pinching of skin with a hemostat clamp. Heart and respiratory rates, and rectal temperature were recorded before and at predetermined intervals following the completion of the block. Brachial administration of LID, LIDEP or LIDXY produced forelimb analgesia within 11.3, 11.0 and 7.0 minutes, respectively. The mean duration of analgesia was 100.0 min in LID and 133.2 min in LIDEP group. The mean duration of analgesia in LIDXY group (186.8 min) was significantly longer compared with LID group. In LIDEP group a significant increase in heart rate occurred 5 min after drug administration. Heart rate decreased from 35 to 80 min in sheep received LIDXY. In conclusion, the addition of xylazine to lidocaine solution for BBP provided a prolonged duration of action without any adverse effects in fat-tailed sheep.

Ghadirian, Safoura; Vesal, Nasser

2013-01-01

404

Effect of salt intake and potassium supplementation on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in Chinese subjects: an interventional study  

PubMed Central

Accumulating evidence has suggested that high salt and potassium might be associated with vascular function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salt intake and potassium supplementation on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) in Chinese subjects. Forty-nine subjects (28-65 years of age) were selected from a rural community of northern China. All subjects were sequentially maintained on a low-salt diet for 7 days (3.0 g/day NaCl), a high-salt diet for an additional 7 days (18.0 g/day NaCl), and a high-salt diet with potassium supplementation for a final 7 days (18.0 g/day NaCl+4.5 g/day KCl). Brachial-ankle PWV was measured at baseline and on the last day of each intervention. Blood pressure levels were significantly increased from the low-salt to high-salt diet, and decreased from the high-salt diet to high-salt plus potassium supplementation. Baseline brachial-ankle PWV in