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Sample records for radiation-inducible telomerase upregulation

  1. Radiation-induced upregulation of telomerase activity escapes PI3-kinase inhibition in two malignant glioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    MILLET, P.; GRANOTIER, C.; ETIENNE, O.; BOUSSIN, F.D.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor relapse after radiotherapy is a great concern in the treatment of high-grade gliomas. Inhibition of the PI3-kinase/AKT pathway is known to radiosensitize cancer cells and to delay their DNA repair after irradiation. In this study, we show that the radiosensitization of CB193 and T98G, two high-grade glioma cell lines, by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, correlates with the induction of G1 and G2/M arrest, but is inconsistently linked to a delayed DNA double-strand break (DSBs) repair. The PI3K/AKT pathway has been shown to activate radioprotective factors such as telomerase, whose inhibition may contribute to the radiosensitization of cancer cells. However, we show that radiation upregulates telomerase activity in LY-294002-treated glioma cells as well as untreated controls, demonstrating a PI3K/AKT-independent pathway of telomerase activation. Our study suggests that radiosensitizing strategies based on PI3-kinase inhibition in high-grade gliomas may be optimized by additional treatments targeting either telomerase activity or telomere maintenance. PMID:23727752

  2. Leptin upregulates telomerase activity and transcription of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, He; Zhao, Tiansuo; Wang, Xiuchao; Gao, Chuntao; Wang, Jian; Yu, Ming; Hao, Jihui

    2010-03-26

    The aim was to analyze the mechanism of leptin-induced activity of telomerase in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We found that leptin activated telomerase in a dose-dependent manner; leptin upregulated the expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) at mRNA and protein levels; blockade of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation significantly counteracted leptin-induced hTERT transcription and protein expression; chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that leptin enhanced the binding of STAT3 to the hTERT promoter. This study uncovers a new mechanism of the proliferative effect of leptin on breast cancer cells and provides a new explanation of obesity-related breast cancer.

  3. Telomerase antagonist imetelstat inhibits esophageal cancer cell growth and increases radiation-induced DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuping; Smavadati, Shirin; Nordfjäll, Katarina; Karlsson, Krister; Qvarnström, Fredrik; Simonsson, Martin; Bergqvist, Michael; Gryaznov, Sergei; Ekman, Simon; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva

    2012-12-01

    Telomerase is mainly active in human tumor cells, which provides an opportunity for a therapeutic window on telomerase targeting. We sought to evaluate the potential of the thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide inhibitor of telomerase, imetelstat, as a drug candidate for treatment of esophageal cancer. Our results showed that imetelstat inhibited telomerase activity in a dose-dependent manner in esophageal cancer cells. After only 1 week of imetelstat treatment, a reduction of colony formation ability of esophageal cancer cells was observed. Furthermore, long-term treatment with imetelstat decreased cell growth of esophageal cancer cells with different kinetics regarding telomere lengths. Short-term imetelstat treatment also increased γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci staining in the esophageal cancer cell lines indicating a possible induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). We also found that pre-treatment with imetelstat led to increased number and size of 53BP1 foci after ionizing radiation. The increase of 53BP1 foci number was especially pronounced during the first 1h of repair whereas the increase of foci size was prominent later on. This study supports the potential of imetelstat as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:22906540

  4. Telomerase activation as a repair response to radiation-induced DNA damage in Y79 retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masaharu; Ozaki, Kohji; Kawano, Takeshi; Yamada, Osamu; Kawauchi, Kiyotaka; Ida, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Hisashi

    2013-10-28

    The molecular mechanism of telomerase activation induced by ionizing radiation (IR) remains poorly understood. We demonstrate that DNA damage induced by IR at doses of 2-5 Gy triggers activation of Akt, predominant to that of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), resulting in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) phosphorylation and increased telomerase activity in Y79 cells. DNA damage induced by IR at doses greater than 10 Gy might trigger PP2A activation, predominant to that of Akt, resulting in hTERT dephosphorylation and decreased telomerase activity. Our results suggest that differential activation of Akt and PP2A may be responsible for telomerase regulation. PMID:23850566

  5. Survivin enhances telomerase activity via up-regulation of specificity protein 1- and c-Myc-mediated human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Endoh, Teruo; Tsuji, Naoki; Asanuma, Koichi; Yagihashi, Atsuhito; Watanabe, Naoki . E-mail: watanabn@sapmed.ac.jp

    2005-05-01

    Suppression of apoptosis is thought to contribute to carcinogenesis. Survivin, a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis family, blocks apoptotic signaling activated by various cellular stresses. Since elevated expression of survivin observed in human cancers of varied origin was associated with poor patient survival, survivin has attracted growing attention as a potential target for cancer treatment. Immortalization of cells also is required for carcinogenesis; telomere length maintenance by telomerase is required for cancer cells to proliferate indefinitely. Yet how cancer cells activate telomerase remains unclear. We therefore examined possible interrelationships between survivin expression and telomerase activity. Correlation between survivin and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression was observed in colon cancer tissues, and overexpression of survivin enhanced telomerase activity by up-regulation of hTERT expression in LS180 human colon cancer cells. DNA-binding activities of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and c-Myc to the hTERT core promoter were increased in survivin gene transfectant cells. Phosphorylation of Sp1 and c-Myc at serine and threonine residues was enhanced by survivin, while total amounts of these proteins were unchanged. Further, 'knockdown' of survivin by a small inhibitory RNA decreased Sp1 and c-Myc phosphorylation. Thus survivin participates not only in inhibition of apoptosis, but also in prolonging cellular lifespan.

  6. Curcumin Regulates Low-Linear Energy Transfer {gamma}-Radiation-Induced NF{kappa}B-Dependent Telomerase Activity in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aravindan, Natarajan; Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Herman, Terence S.; Natarajan, Mohan

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: We recently reported that curcumin attenuates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced survival signaling and proliferation in human neuroblastoma cells. Also, in the endothelial system, we have demonstrated that NF{kappa}B regulates IR-induced telomerase activity (TA). Accordingly, we investigated the effect of curcumin in inhibiting IR-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent hTERT transcription, TA, and cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. Methods and Materials: SK-N-MC or SH-SY5Y cells exposed to IR and treated with curcumin (10-100 nM) with or without IR were harvested after 1 h through 24 h. NF{kappa}B-dependent regulation was investigated either by luciferase reporter assays using pNF{kappa}B-, pGL3-354-, pGL3-347-, or pUSE-I{kappa}B{alpha}-Luc, p50/p65, or RelA siRNA-transfected cells. NF{kappa}B activity was analyzed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hTERT expression using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. TA was determined using the telomerase repeat amplification protocol assay and cell survival using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium bromide and clonogenic assay. Results: Curcumin profoundly inhibited IR-induced NF{kappa}B. Consequently, curcumin significantly inhibited IR-induced TA and hTERT mRNA at all points investigated. Furthermore, IR-induced TA is regulated at the transcriptional level by triggering telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter activation. Moreover, NF{kappa}B becomes functionally activated after IR and mediates TA upregulation by binding to the {kappa}B-binding region in the promoter region of the TERT gene. Consistently, elimination of the NF{kappa}B-recognition site on the telomerase promoter or inhibition of NF{kappa}B by the I{kappa}B{alpha} mutant compromises IR-induced telomerase promoter activation. Significantly, curcumin inhibited IR-induced TERT transcription. Consequently, curcumin inhibited hTERT mRNA and TA in NF{kappa}B overexpressed cells. Furthermore, curcumin enhanced

  7. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  8. Role of α5β1 Integrin Up-regulation in Radiation-Induced Invasion by Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hongren; Zeng, Zhao-Zhu; Fay, Kevin S; Veine, Donna M; Staszewski, Evan D; Morgan, Meredith; Wilder-Romans, Kari; Williams, Terence M; Spalding, Aaron C; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Livant, Donna L

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy is used in the management of pancreatic cancer because of its high propensity for locoregional relapse: one third of patients succumb to localized disease. Thus, strategies to improve the efficacy of radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer are important to pursue. We used naturally serum-free, selectively permeable basement membranes and confocal microscopy of fluorescent antibody-stained human Panc-1, MiaPaCa-2, and BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cell lines to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on α5β1 integrin fibronectin receptor expression and on α5β1-mediated invasion. We report that radiation rapidly induces pancreatic cancer cell invasion, and that radiation-induced invasion is caused by up-regulation of α5β1 integrin fibronectin receptors by transcriptional and/or postendocytic recycling mechanisms. We also report that radiation causes α5β1 up-regulation in Panc-1, MiaPaCa-2, and BxPC-3 tumor xenografts and that upregulated α5β1 colocalizes with upregulated early or late endosomes in Panc-1 or BxPC-3 tumors, respectively, although it may colocalize significantly with both endosome types in MiaPaCa-2 tumors. Our results suggest that systemic inhibition of α5β1-mediated invasion might be an effective way to reduce radiation-induced pancreatic cancer cell invasion, thereby improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:21966545

  9. Radiation-induced autophagy potentiates immunotherapy of cancer via up-regulation of mannose 6-phosphate receptor on tumor cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungjune; Ramakrishnan, Rupal; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Rao, Nikhil; Fowler, Erin; Heine, John

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant body of evidence demonstrating that radiation therapy (XRT) enhances the effect of immune therapy. However, the precise mechanisms by which XRT potentiates the immunotherapy of cancer remain elusive. Here, we report that XRT potentiates the effect of immune therapy via induction of autophagy and resultant trafficking of mannose-6-phopsphate receptor (MPR) to the cell surface. Irradiation of different tumor cells caused substantial up-regulation of MPR on the cell surface in vitro and in vivo. Down-regulation of MPR in tumor cells with shRNA completely abrogated the combined effect of XRT and immunotherapy (CTLA4 antibody) in B16F10-bearing mice without changes in the tumor-specific responses of T cells. Radiation-induced MPR up-regulation was the result of redistribution of the receptor to the cell surface. This effect was caused by autophagy with redirection of MPR to autophagosomes in a clathrin-dependent manner. In autophagosomes, MPR lost its natural ligands, which resulted in subsequent trafficking of empty receptor(s) back to the surface. Together, our data demonstrated a novel mechanism by which XRT can enhance the effect of immunotherapy and the molecular mechanism of this process. PMID:24943275

  10. MiR-467a is Upregulated in Radiation-Induced Mouse Thymic Lymphomas and Regulates Apoptosis by Targeting Fas and Bax

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fu; Chen, Song; Sun, Mingjuan; Mitchel, Ronald E.J.; Li, Bailong; Chu, Zhiyong; Cai, Jianming; Liu, Cong

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported dysregulation of certain microRNAs (miRNAs / miRs) is involved in tumorigenesis. However, the miRNAs associated with radiocarcinogenesis remain undefined. In this study, we validated the upregulation of miR-467a in radiation-induced mouse thymic lymphoma tissues. Then, we investigated whether miR-467a functions as an oncogenic miRNA in thymic lymphoma cells. For this purpose, we assessed the biological effect of miR-467a on thymic lymphoma cells. Using miRNA microarray, we found four miRNAs (miR-467a, miR-762, miR-455 and miR-714) were among the most upregulated (>4-fold) miRNAs in tumor tissues. Bioinformatics prediction suggests miR-467a may potentially regulate apoptosis pathway via targeting Fas and Bax. Consistently, in miR-467a-transfected cells, both proliferation and colony formation ability were significantly increased with decrease of apoptosis rate, while, in miR-467a-knockdown cells, proliferation was suppressed with increase of apoptosis rate, indicating that miR-467a may be involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Furthermore, miR-467a-knockdown resulted in smaller tumors and better prognosis in an in vivo tumor-transplanted model. To explain the mechanism of apoptosis suppression by miR-467a, we explore the expression of candidate target genes (Fas and Bax) in miR-467a-transfected relative to negative control transfected cells using flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Fas and Bax were commonly downregulated in miR-467a-transfected EL4 and NIH3T3 cells, and all of the genes harbored miR-467a target sequences in the 3'UTR of their mRNA. Fas and Bax were actually downregulated in radiation-induced thymic lymphoma tissues, and therefore both were identified as possible targets of miR-467a in thymic lymphoma. To ascertain whether downregulation of Fas and / or Bax is involved in apoptosis suppression by miR-467a, we transfected vectors expressing Fas and Bax into miR-467a-upregulated EL4 cells. Then we found that both Fas- and Bax

  11. Virus-induced CD8+ T cell clonal expansion is associated with telomerase up-regulation and telomere length preservation: a mechanism for rescue from replicative senescence.

    PubMed

    Maini, M K; Soares, M V; Zilch, C F; Akbar, A N; Beverley, P C

    1999-04-15

    In acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM), very large clones of Ag-specific CD8+ effector T cells are generated. Many clones persist as memory cells, although the clone size is greatly reduced. It would be expected that the large number of cell divisions occurring during clonal expansion would lead to shortening of telomeres, predisposing to replicative senescence. Instead, we show that clonally expanded CD8+ T cells in AIM have paradoxical preservation of telomere length in association with marked up-regulation of telomerase. We postulate that this allows a proportion of responding T cells to enter the memory pool with a preserved capacity to continue dividing so that long-term immunological memory can be maintained. PMID:10201990

  12. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  13. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  14. Activation of Telomerase by Ionizing Radiation: Differential Response to the Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Abrogation of Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, by LY294002, or by Wortmannin

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhof, Dirk Zwicker, Felix; Kuepper, Jan-Heiner; Debus, Juergen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Telomerase activity represents a radiation-inducible function, which may be targeted by a double-strand break (DSB)-activated signal transduction pathway. Therefore, the effects of DNA-PK inhibitors (Wortmannin and LY294002) on telomerase upregulation after irradiation were studied. In addition, the role of trans-dominant inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, which strongly reduces DSB rejoining, was assessed in comparison with 3-aminobenzamide. Methods and Materials: COM3 rodent cells carry a construct for the dexamethasone-inducible overexpression of the DNA-binding domain of PARP1 and exhibit greatly impaired DSB rejoining after irradiation. Telomerase activity was measured using polymerase chain reaction ELISA 1 h after irradiation with doses up to 10 Gy. Phosphorylation status of PKB/Akt and of PKC{alpha}/{beta}{sub II} was assessed by western blotting. Results: No telomerase upregulation was detectable for irradiated cells with undisturbed DSB rejoining. In contrast, incubation with LY294002 or dexamethasone yielded pronounced radiation induction of telomerase activity that could be suppressed by Wortmannin. 3-Aminobenzamide not only was unable to induce telomerase activity but also suppressed telomerase upregulation upon incubation with LY294002 or dexamethasone. Phospho-PKB was detectable independent of irradiation or dexamethasone pretreatment, but was undetectable upon incubations with LY294002 or Wortmannin, whereas phospho-PKC rested detectable. Conclusions: Telomerase activation postirradiation was triggered by different treatments that interfere with DNA DSB processing. This telomerase upregulation, however, was not reflected by the phosporylation status of the putative mediators of TERT activation, PKB and PKC. Although an involvement of PKB in TERT activation is not supported by the present findings, a respective role of PKC isoforms other than {alpha}/{beta}{sub II} cannot be ruled out.

  15. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promotes gastric cancer invasion through cooperating with c-Myc to upregulate heparanase expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo; Xie, Rui; Qin, Yong; Xiao, Yu-Feng; Yong, Xin; Zheng, Lei; Dong, Hui; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is a central regulator of multiple hallmarks of tumors. However, the potential roles of hTERT in tumor invasion and metastasis and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we found that the expression of hTERT in gastric cancer (GC) was significantly associated with an advanced TNM stage, lymphatic metastasis. Survival analysis identified hTERT as an independent prognostic factor for survival of GC patients. hTERT promoted the invasion and metastasis of GC cells by binding to c-Myc and recruiting the complex to heparanase promoter to upregulate heparanase expression. In addition, our data demonstrated that hTERT activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling to promote c-Myc expression which could in turn activate hTERT transcription and expression, suggesting a positive feedback regulation in GC progression. Consistently, c-Myc and heparanase expression was positively correlated with hTERT levels, and was also an independent predictor of metastasis and survival. Collectively, our data provide a novel molecular mechanism for hTERT in promotion of GC invasion and metastasis, and highlight the molecular etiology and clinical significance of hTERT in GC progression. Targeting hTERT may represent a new therapeutic strategy to improve therapy and survival of GC patients. PMID:26689987

  16. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promotes gastric cancer invasion through cooperating with c-Myc to upregulate heparanase expression

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bo; Xie, Rui; Qin, Yong; Xiao, Yu-Feng; Yong, Xin; Zheng, Lei; Dong, Hui; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is a central regulator of multiple hallmarks of tumors. However, the potential roles of hTERT in tumor invasion and metastasis and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we found that the expression of hTERT in gastric cancer (GC) was significantly associated with an advanced TNM stage, lymphatic metastasis. Survival analysis identified hTERT as an independent prognostic factor for survival of GC patients. hTERT promoted the invasion and metastasis of GC cells by binding to c-Myc and recruiting the complex to heparanase promoter to upregulate heparanase expression. In addition, our data demonstrated that hTERT activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling to promote c-Myc expression which could in turn activate hTERT transcription and expression, suggesting a positive feedback regulation in GC progression. Consistently, c-Myc and heparanase expression was positively correlated with hTERT levels, and was also an independent predictor of metastasis and survival. Collectively, our data provide a novel molecular mechanism for hTERT in promotion of GC invasion and metastasis, and highlight the molecular etiology and clinical significance of hTERT in GC progression. Targeting hTERT may represent a new therapeutic strategy to improve therapy and survival of GC patients. PMID:26689987

  17. In vitro transfection of the hepatitis B virus PreS2 gene into the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 induces upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hua; Luan Fang; Ju Ying; Shen Hongyu; Gao Lifen; Wang Xiaoyan; Liu Suxia; Zhang Lining; Sun Wensheng; Ma Chunhong . E-mail: machunhong@sdu.edu.cn

    2007-04-06

    The preS2 domain is the minimal functional unit of transcription activators that is encoded by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface (S) gene. It is present in more than one-third of the HBV-integrates in HBV induced hepatocarcinoma (HCC). To further understand the functional role of PreS2 in hepatocytes, a PreS2 expression plasmid, pcS2, was constructed and stably transfected into HepG2 cells. We conducted growth curve and colony-forming assays to study the impact of PreS2 expression on cell proliferation. Cells transfected with PreS2 proliferated more rapidly and formed colonies in soft agar. PreS2 expressing cells also induced upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and telomerase activation by RT-PCR and the modified TRAP assay. Blocking expression of hTERT with antisense oligonuleotide reversed the growth rate in cells stably transfected with PreS2. Our data suggest that PreS2 may increase the malignant transformation of human HCC cell line HepG2 by upregulating hTERT and inducing telomerase activation.

  18. Radiation-Induced Thymidine Phosphorylase Upregulation in Rectal Cancer Is Mediated by Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 From Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Li Ge; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jong-Seok; Yun, Eun-Jin; Park, Jong-Il; Park, Hae-Duck; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Lim, Kyu Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The mechanisms of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) regulation induced by radiation therapy (XRT) in various tumors are poorly understood. We investigated the effect and mechanisms of preoperative XRT on TP expression in rectal cancer tissues. Methods and Materials: TP expression and CD68 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels in rectal cancer tissues and cancer cell lines were evaluated before and after XRT in Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunoassay, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction studies. Isolated peripheral blood monocytes were used in the study of chemotaxis under the influence of MCP-1 released by irradiated colon cancer cells. Results: Expression of TP was significantly elevated by 9 Gy of XRT in most rectal cancer tissues but not by higher doses of XRT. In keeping with the close correlation of the increase in both TP expression and the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), anti-TP immunoreactivity was found in the CD68-positive TAMs and not the neoplastic cells. Expression of MCP-1 was increased in most cases after XRT, and this increase was strongly correlated with TP expression. However, this increase in MCP-1 expression occurred in tumor cells and not stromal cells. The XRT upregulated MCP-1 mRNA and also triggered the release of MCP-1 protein from cultured colon cancer cells. The supernatant of irradiated colon cancer cells showed strong chemotactic activity for monocyte migration, but this activity was completely abolished by neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: Use of XRT induces MCP-1 expression in cancer cells, which causes circulating monocytes to be recruited into TAMs, which then upregulate TP expression in rectal cancer tissues.

  19. Methods of Telomerase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Lucy G.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Telomerase is central to cellular immortality and is a key component of most cancer cells although this enzyme is rarely expressed to significant levels in normal cells. Therefore, the inhibition of telomerase has garnered considerable attention as a possible anticancer approach. Many of the methods applied to telomerase inhibition focus on either of the two major components of the ribonucleoprotein holoenzyme, that is, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) catalytic subunit or the telomerase RNA (TR) component. Other protocols have been developed to target the proteins, such as tankyrase, that are associated with telomerase at the ends of chromosomes. This chapter summarizes some of these recent advances in telomerase inhibition. PMID:18369812

  20. Telomerase: The Devil Inside

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Lechel, Andre; Güneş, Çagatay

    2016-01-01

    High telomerase activity is detected in nearly all human cancers but most human cells are devoid of telomerase activity. There is well-documented evidence that reactivation of telomerase occurs during cellular transformation. In humans, tumors can rely in reactivation of telomerase or originate in a telomerase positive stem/progenitor cell, or rely in alternative lengthening of telomeres, a telomerase-independent telomere-length maintenance mechanism. In this review, we will focus on the telomerase positive tumors. In this context, the recent findings that telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations represent the most common non-coding mutations in human cancer have flared up the long-standing discussion whether cancer originates from telomerase positive stem cells or telomerase reactivation is a final step in cellular transformation. Here, we will discuss the pros and cons of both concepts in the context of telomere length-dependent and telomere length-independent functions of telomerase. Together, these observations may provoke a re-evaluation of telomere and telomerase based therapies, both in telomerase inhibition for cancer therapy and telomerase activation for tissue regeneration and anti-ageing strategies. PMID:27483324

  1. Telomerase: The Devil Inside.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Lechel, Andre; Güneş, Çagatay

    2016-01-01

    High telomerase activity is detected in nearly all human cancers but most human cells are devoid of telomerase activity. There is well-documented evidence that reactivation of telomerase occurs during cellular transformation. In humans, tumors can rely in reactivation of telomerase or originate in a telomerase positive stem/progenitor cell, or rely in alternative lengthening of telomeres, a telomerase-independent telomere-length maintenance mechanism. In this review, we will focus on the telomerase positive tumors. In this context, the recent findings that telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations represent the most common non-coding mutations in human cancer have flared up the long-standing discussion whether cancer originates from telomerase positive stem cells or telomerase reactivation is a final step in cellular transformation. Here, we will discuss the pros and cons of both concepts in the context of telomere length-dependent and telomere length-independent functions of telomerase. Together, these observations may provoke a re-evaluation of telomere and telomerase based therapies, both in telomerase inhibition for cancer therapy and telomerase activation for tissue regeneration and anti-ageing strategies. PMID:27483324

  2. Telomerase and cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Harley, Calvin B

    2008-03-01

    Telomerase is an attractive cancer target as it appears to be required in essentially all tumours for immortalization of a subset of cells, including cancer stem cells. Moreover, differences in telomerase expression, telomere length and cell kinetics between normal and tumour tissues suggest that targeting telomerase would be relatively safe. Clinical trials are ongoing with a potent and specific telomerase inhibitor, GRN163L, and with several versions of telomerase therapeutic vaccines. The prospect of adding telomerase-based therapies to the growing list of new anticancer products is promising, but what are the advantages and limitations of different approaches, and which patients are the most likely to respond? PMID:18256617

  3. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  4. Telomerase-based pharmacologic enhancement of antiviral function of human CD8+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Fauce, Steven Russell; Jamieson, Beth D; Chin, Allison C; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Parish, Stan T; Ng, Hwee L; Kitchen, Christina M Ramirez; Yang, Otto O; Harley, Calvin B; Effros, Rita B

    2008-11-15

    Telomerase reverse transcribes telomere DNA onto the ends of linear chromosomes and retards cellular aging. In contrast to most normal somatic cells, which show little or no telomerase activity, immune cells up-regulate telomerase in concert with activation. Nevertheless, during aging and chronic HIV-1 infection, there are high proportions of dysfunctional CD8(+) CTL with short telomeres, suggesting that telomerase is limiting. The present study shows that exposure of CD8(+) T lymphocytes from HIV-infected human donors to a small molecule telomerase activator (TAT2) modestly retards telomere shortening, increases proliferative potential, and, importantly, enhances cytokine/chemokine production and antiviral activity. The enhanced antiviral effects were abrogated in the presence of a potent and specific telomerase inhibitor, suggesting that TAT2 acts primarily through telomerase activation. Our study is the first to use a pharmacological telomerase-based approach to enhance immune function, thus directly addressing the telomere loss immunopathologic facet of chronic viral infection. PMID:18981163

  5. Activity of telomerase and telomeric length in Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Korandová, Michala; Frydrychová, Radmila Čapková

    2016-06-01

    Telomerase is an enzyme that adds repeats of DNA sequences to the ends of chromosomes, thereby preventing their shortening. Telomerase activity is associated with proliferative status of cells, organismal development, and aging. We report an analysis of telomerase activity and telomere length in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Telomerase activity was found to be regulated in a development and caste-specific manner. During the development of somatic tissues of larval drones and workers, telomerase activity declined to 10 % of its level in embryos and remained low during pupal and adult stages but was upregulated in testes of late pupae, where it reached 70 % of the embryo level. Upregulation of telomerase activity was observed in the ovaries of late pupal queens, reaching 160 % of the level in embryos. Compared to workers and drones, queens displayed higher levels of telomerase activity. In the third larval instar of queens, telomerase activity reached the embryo level, and an enormous increase was observed in adult brains of queens, showing a 70-fold increase compared to a brain of an adult worker. Southern hybridization of terminal TTAGG fragments revealed a high variability of telomeric length between different individuals, although the same pattern of hybridization signals was observed in different tissues of each individual. PMID:26490169

  6. Radiation-induced osteochondromas

    SciTech Connect

    Libshitz, H.I.; Cohen, M.A.

    1982-03-01

    Radiation-induced osteochondromas, either single or multiple, occur more commonly than is generally recognized. The incidence following irradiation for childhood malignancy is approximately 12%. Any open epiphysis is vulnerable. Age at irradiation, time of appearance following therapy, dose and type of radiation, and clinical course in 14 cases are dicussed. Due to growth of the lesion and/or pain, 3 tumors were excised. None revealed malignant degeneration.

  7. Strategies Targeting Telomerase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaping; Li, Yuanyuan; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase plays a pivotal role in cellular immortality and tumorigenesis. Its activity is normally not detectable in most somatic cells while it is reactivated in the vast majority of cancer cells. Therefore, inhibition of telomerase has been viewed as a promising anticancer approach due to its specificity for cancer cells. Studies so far have shown that telomerase inhibition can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells or cause apoptosis while it has no effect on most normal cells. Strategies currently being applied to induce telomerase inhibition target virtually all of the major components of the ribonucleoprotein holoenzyme and related cell signal pathways that regulate its activity. These strategies include inhibition of telomerase through targeting at the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) catalytic subunit, the telomerase RNA (TR) component, and associated proteins. Other strategies have been developed to target the proteins associated with telomerase at the telomeric ends of chromosomes such as tankyrase. The specific mechanisms that mediate those inhibition effects include small molecules, antisense RNA, and ribozymes. Although the beneficial evidence of telomerase inhibition is obvious, limitations of strategies remain to be resolved to increase the feasibility of clinical application. This analysis will summarize recent developments of strategies in telomerase inhibition. PMID:18956258

  8. Screening of telomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kleideiter, Elke; Piotrowska, Kamilla; Klotz, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Shortening of telomeres prevents cells from uncontrolled proliferation. Progressive telomere shortening occurs at each cell division until a critical telomeric length is reached. Telomerase expression is switched off after embryonic differentiation in most normal cells, but it is expressed in a very high percentage of tumors of different origin. Thus, telomerase is regarded as the best tumor marker and a promising novel molecular target for cancer treatment. Therefore, different strategies to inhibit telomerase have been developed. However, systematic screening of telomerase inhibitors has not been performed to compare their therapeutic potential. We propose a suitable strategy for estimation of the therapeutic potential of telomerase inhibitors, which is based on a systematic screening of different inhibitors in the same cell system. From the long list of compounds discussed in the literature, we have selected four telomerase inhibitors of different structure and mode of action: BRACO19 (G-quadruplex-interactive compound), BIBR1532 (non-nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitor), 2'-O-methyl RNA, and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs; hTR antisense oligonucleotides). To determine minimal effective concentrations for telomerase inhibition, telomerase activity was measured using the cell-free telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. We also tested inhibitors in long-term cell-culture experiments by exposing A-549 cells to non-cytotoxic concentrations of inhibitors for a period of 99 days. Subsequently, telomerase activity of A-549 cells was investigated using the TRAP assay, and telomere length of samples was assessed by telomere restriction fragment (TRF) Southern blot analysis. PMID:18369824

  9. [Radiation-induced cancers].

    PubMed

    Dutrillaux, B

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low dose range i.e., population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations of tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. PMID:9868399

  10. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  11. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  12. [Radiation-induced neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Dobrzyńska-Rutkowska, Aneta; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-12-01

    Radiation-induced neuropathy is commonly observed among oncological patients. Radiation can affect the nervous tissue directly or indirectly by inducing vasculopathy or dysfunction of internal organs. Symptoms may be mild and reversible (e.g., pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, drowsiness, fatigue, paresthesia) or life-threatening (cerebral oedema, increased intracranial pressure, seizures). Such complications are clinically divided into peripheral (plexopathies, neuropathies of spinal and cranial nerves) and central neuropathy (myelopathy, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment). The degree of neuronal damages primarily depends on the total and fractional radiation dose and applied therapeutic methods. The conformal and megavoltage radiotherapy seems to be the safeties ones. Diagnostic protocol includes physical examination, imaging (in particular magnetic resonance), electromyography, nerve conduction study and sometimes histological examination. Prevention and early detection of neurological complications are necessary in order to prevent a permanent dysfunction of the nervous system. Presently their treatment is mostly symptomatic, but in same cases a surgical intervention is required. An experimental and clinical data indicates some effectiveness of different neuroprotective agents (e.g. anticoagulants, vitamin E, hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline, bevacizumab, methylphenidate, donepezil), which should be administered before and/or during radiotherapy. PMID:24490474

  13. Constitutive telomerase expression promotes mammary carcinomas in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Artandi, Steven E.; Alson, Scott; Tietze, Maja K.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Ye, Siqin; Greenberg, Roger A.; Castrillon, Diego H.; Horner, James W.; Weiler, Sarah R.; Carrasco, Ruben D.; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase is up-regulated in the vast majority of human cancers and serves to halt the progressive telomere shortening that ultimately blocks would-be cancer cells from achieving a full malignant phenotype. In contrast to humans, the laboratory mouse possesses long telomeres and, even in early generation telomerase-deficient mice, the level of telomere reserve is sufficient to avert telomere-based checkpoint responses and to permit full malignant progression. These features in the mouse provide an opportunity to determine whether enforced high-level telomerase activity can serve functions that extend beyond its ability to sustain telomere length and function. Here, we report the generation and characterization of transgenic mice that express the catalytic subunit of telomerase (mTERT) at high levels in a broad variety of tissues. Expression of mTERT conferred increased telomerase enzymatic activity in several tissues, including mammary gland, splenocytes, and cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts, mTERT overexpression extended telomere lengths but did not prevent culture-induced replicative arrest, thus reinforcing the view that this phenomenon is not related to occult telomere shortening. Robust telomerase activity, however, was associated with the spontaneous development of mammary intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive mammary carcinomas in a significant proportion of aged females. These data indicate that enforced mTERT expression can promote the development of spontaneous cancers even in the setting of ample telomere reserve. PMID:12034875

  14. A molecular switch underlies a human telomerase disease

    PubMed Central

    Comolli, Luis R.; Smirnov, Ivan; Xu, Lifeng; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.; James, Thomas L.

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) required for maintenance of telomeres. Although up-regulated telomerase activity is closely linked to the cellular immortality characteristic of late stage carcinogenesis, recently, mutations in the telomerase RNA gene in humans have been associated with dyskeratosis congenita and aplastic anemia, both typified by impaired haemopoietic function. These mutations include base changes in a highly conserved putative telomerase RNA pseudoknot. Here, by using in vitro telomerase assays, NMR, and UV absorbance melting analyses of model oligonucleotides designed to form a “trans-pseudoknot,” we describe functional, structural, and energetic properties of this structure. We demonstrate that the pseudoknot domain exists in two alternative states of nearly equal stability in solution: one is the previously proposed pseudoknot formed by pairing P3 with the loop domain of P2b, and the other is a structured P2b loop alone. We show that the two-base mutation (GC107/8 → AG) present in one gene copy in a family with dyskeratosis congenita abrogates telomerase activity. This mutation hyperstabilizes the P2b intraloop structure, blocking pseudoknot formation. Conversely, when the P3 pseudoknot pairing is hyperstabilized by deleting a conserved bulge in P3, telomerase activity also decreases. We propose that the P2b/P3 pseudoknot domain acts as a molecular switch, and interconversion between its two states is important for telomerase function. Phylogenetic covariation in the P2b and P3 sequences of 35 species provides a compelling set of “natural” compensatory base pairing changes supporting the existence of the crucial molecular switch. PMID:12482936

  15. Proliferative Defects in Dyskeratosis Congenita Skin Keratinocytes are Corrected by Expression of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, TERT, or by Activation of Endogenous Telomerase through Expression of Papillomavirus E6/E7 or the Telomerase RNA Component, TERC

    PubMed Central

    Gourronc, Francoise A.; Robertson, Mckaylee M.; Herrig, Annie K.; Lansdorp, Peter M.; Goldman, Frederick D.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2010-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is characterized by the triad of reticulate skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy, and leukoplakia. Epidermal atrophy, hair growth defects, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of cancer are also common in DC patients. DC is caused by mutations in genes encoding for telomerase complex factors. Although there is an association of epidermal abnormalities with DC, epidermal cells from DC donors have not been previously characterized. We have isolated skin keratinocytes from affected members of a family with an autosomal dominant form of DC that is due to a mutation in the RNA component of telomerase, TERC. Here we demonstrate that, similar to DC fibroblasts from these donors, DC keratinocytes have short telomeres and a short lifespan. DC keratinocytes also exhibited impaired colony forming efficiency and migration capacity. Exogenous expression of the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase, TERT, activated telomerase levels to half that of TERT expressing normal cells and maintained telomeres at a short length with concomitant extension of lifespan. Unlike fibroblasts, transduction of human papillomavirus type 16 E6/E7 genes into DC keratinocytes activated telomerase to half that of E6/E7 expressing normal cells, and robust proliferation was observed. While expression of TERC has no measurable effect on telomerase in fibroblasts, expression of TERC in keratinocytes upregulated telomerase activity and, rarely, allowed rescue of proliferative defects. Our results point to important differences between DC fibroblasts and keratinocytes and show, for the first time, that expression of TERC can increase the lifespan of primary human epithelial cells. PMID:19558498

  16. Telomerase Activation in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ropio, Joana; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Soares, Paula; Chevret, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase expression and telomere maintenance are critical for cell proliferation and survival, and they play important roles in development and cancer, including hematological malignancies. Transcriptional regulation of the rate-limiting subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gen (hTERT) is a complex process, and unveiling the mechanisms behind its reactivation is an important step for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here, we review the main mechanisms of telomerase activation and the associated hematologic malignancies. PMID:27618103

  17. Targeting telomerase for cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shay, J W; Keith, W N

    2008-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of advanced malignancies is continuous cell growth and this almost universally correlates with the reactivation of telomerase. Although there is still much we do not understand about the regulation of telomerase, it remains a very attractive and novel target for cancer therapeutics. Several clinical trials have been initiated, and in this review we highlight some of the most promising approaches and conclude by speculating on the role of telomerase in cancer stem cells. PMID:18231105

  18. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  19. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein CIRP/hnRNP A18 regulates telomerase activity in a temperature-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Yangxiu; Mao, Pingsu; Li, Feng; Han, Xin; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Shuai; Chen, Yuxi; Huang, Junjiu; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Wenbin; Songyang, Zhou

    2016-01-29

    The telomerase is responsible for adding telomeric repeats to chromosomal ends and consists of the reverse transcriptase TERT and the RNA subunit TERC. The expression and activity of the telomerase are tightly regulated, and aberrant activation of the telomerase has been observed in >85% of human cancers. To better understand telomerase regulation, we performed immunoprecipitations coupled with mass spectrometry (IP-MS) and identified cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP or hnRNP A18) as a telomerase-interacting factor. We have found that CIRP is necessary to maintain telomerase activities at both 32°C and 37°C. Furthermore, inhibition of CIRP by CRISPR-Cas9 or siRNA knockdown led to reduced telomerase activities and shortened telomere length, suggesting an important role of CIRP in telomere maintenance. We also provide evidence here that CIRP associates with the active telomerase complex through direct binding of TERC and regulates Cajal body localization of the telomerase. In addition, CIRP regulates the level of TERT mRNAs. At the lower temperature, TERT mRNA is upregulated in a CIRP-dependent manner to compensate for reduced telomerase activities. Taken together, these findings highlight the dual roles that CIRP plays in regulating TERT and TERC, and reveal a new class of telomerase modulators in response to hypothermia conditions. PMID:26673712

  20. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  1. Is telomerase a viable target in cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Buseman, C.M.; Wright, W.E.; Shay, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The ideal cancer treatment would specifically target cancer cells yet have minimal or no adverse effects on normal somatic cells. Telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase that maintains the ends of human chromosome, is an attractive cancer therapeutic target for exactly this reason [1]. Telomerase is expressed in more than 85% of cancer cells, making it a nearly universal cancer marker, while the majority of normal somatic cells are telomerase negative. Telomerase activity confers limitless replicative potential to cancer cells, a hallmark of cancer which must be attained for the continued growth that characterizes almost all advanced neoplasms [2]. In this review we will summarize the role of telomeres and telomerase in cancer cells, and how properties of telomerase are being exploited to create targeted cancer therapies including telomerase inhibitors, telomerase-targeted immunotherapies and telomerase-driven virotherapies. A frank and balanced assessment of the current state of telomerase inhibitors with caveats and potential limitations will be included. PMID:21802433

  2. Advances on the regulation of telomerase.

    PubMed

    Sunyang, Ying; Jiaxiu, Xiong; Hongxu, Mai; Jiajia, Lin; Lina, Jiang; Long, Cheng; Qinong, Ye

    2016-04-01

    Telomerase is composed of the catalytic subunit TERT (Telomerase reverse transcriptase),RNA subunit TERC (Telomerase RNA component) and other telomerase associated proteins. These two compartments with other telomerase subunits can assemble a holoenzyme, which maintain the length of telomeres. Telomerase plays important roles in cell senescence and tumor formation. The molecular mechanisms of the regulation of telomerase are very complicated. These processes comprise the regulation of transcription, post-transcription, post-translation and subcellular localization. Trafficking and assemble of TERT and TERC, as well as recruitment to telomeres, are also involved in this process. Here we review the regulation mechanism of telomerase from these aspects, and aim to laid a foundation for telomerase associated research and the drug targeting the telomerase. PMID:27103453

  3. Medical genetics and epigenetics of telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Koziel, Jillian E; Fox, Melanie J; Steding, Catherine E; Sprouse, Alyssa A; Herbert, Brittney-Shea

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Telomerase is a specialized reverse transcriptase that extends and maintains the terminal ends of chromosomes, or telomeres. Since its discovery in 1985 by Nobel Laureates Elizabeth Blackburn and Carol Greider, thousands of articles have emerged detailing its significance in telomere function and cell survival. This review provides a current assessment on the importance of telomerase regulation and relates it in terms of medical genetics. In this review, we discuss the recent findings on telomerase regulation, focusing on epigenetics and non-coding RNAs regulation of telomerase, such as microRNAs and the recently discovered telomeric-repeat containing RNA transcripts. Human genetic disorders that develop due to mutations in telomerase subunits, the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding telomerase components and diseases as a result of telomerase regulation going awry are also discussed. Continual investigation of the complex regulation of telomerase will further our insight into the use of controlling telomerase activity in medicine. PMID:21323862

  4. Novel anticancer therapeutics targeting telomerase.

    PubMed

    Ruden, Maria; Puri, Neelu

    2013-08-01

    Telomeres are protective caps at the ends of human chromosomes. Telomeres shorten with each successive cell division in normal human cells whereas, in tumors, they are continuously elongated by human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Telomerase is overexpressed in 80-95% of cancers and is present in very low levels or is almost undetectable in normal cells. Because telomerase plays a pivotal role in cancer cell growth it may serve as an ideal target for anticancer therapeutics. Inhibition of telomerase may lead to a decrease of telomere length resulting in cell senescence and apoptosis in telomerase positive tumors. Several strategies of telomerase inhibition are reviewed, including small molecule inhibitors, antisense oligonucleotides, immunotherapies and gene therapies, targeting the hTERT or the ribonucleoprotein subunit hTER. G-quadruplex stabilizers, tankyrase and HSP90 inhibitors targeting telomere and telomerase assembly, and T-oligo approach are also covered. Based on this review, the most promising current telomerase targeting therapeutics are the antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor GRN163L and immunotherapies that use dendritic cells (GRVAC1), hTERT peptide (GV1001) or cryptic peptides (Vx-001). Most of these agents have entered phase I and II clinical trials in patients with various tumors, and have shown good response rates as evidenced by a reduction in tumor cell growth, increased overall disease survival, disease stabilization in advanced staged tumors and complete/partial responses. Most therapeutics have shown to be more effective when used in combination with standard therapies, resulting in concomitant telomere shortening and tumor mass shrinkage, as well as preventing tumor relapse and resistance to single agent therapy. PMID:22841437

  5. Telomerase activity in 144 brain tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Sano, T.; Asai, A.; Mishima, K.; Fujimaki, T.; Kirino, T.

    1998-01-01

    Unlimited proliferation in immortalized cells is believed to be highly dependent on the activity of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein that synthesizes telomeric repeats onto chromosome ends. Using a polymerase chain reaction-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay, we analysed telomerase activity in 99 benign and 45 malignant brain tumours. The TRAP assay results were quantitated by normalizing the telomerase activity of each specimen to that of human glioma cell line T98G to obtain the relative telomerase activity. Telomerase activity was also assessed visually from the autoradiograms as being positive or negative. One hundred and sixteen tumours with negative telomerase activity had null relative telomerase activity, whereas 28 tumours with positive telomerase activity had relative telomerase activities of 12-84.3% (mean 0% vs 36.1 +/- 19.3%, P < 0.0001). Thus, quantification of telomerase activity confirmed the results of the visual evaluation of telomerase activity on autoradiograms. Based on the assessment, malignant brain tumours had a higher positive rate of telomerase activity than benign tumours (57.8% vs 2.0%, P < 0.001). These data indicate that positive telomerase activity is strongly associated with malignant brain tumours and is rather rare in benign tumours, such as neurinomas or meningiomas. Images Figure 2 PMID:9635839

  6. TELOMERASE AND CHRONIC ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with increased risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer in humans. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are not well understood. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein containing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of eukary...

  7. Regulation of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Subunit through Epigenetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kayla A.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome-shortening is characteristic of normal cells, and is known as the end replication problem. Telomerase is the enzyme responsible for extending the ends of the chromosomes in de novo synthesis, and occurs in germ cells as well as most malignant cancers. There are three subunits of telomerase: human telomerase RNA (hTERC), human telomerase associated protein (hTEP1), or dyskerin, and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). hTERC and hTEP1 are constitutively expressed, so the enzymatic activity of telomerase is dependent on the transcription of hTERT. DNA methylation, histone methylation, and histone acetylation are basic epigenetic regulations involved in the expression of hTERT. Non-coding RNA can also serve as a form of epigenetic control of hTERT. This epigenetic-based regulation of hTERT is important in providing a mechanism for reversibility of hTERT control in various biological states. These include embryonic down-regulation of hTERT contributing to aging and the upregulation of hTERT playing a critical role in over 90% of cancers. Normal human somatic cells have a non-methylated/hypomethylated CpG island within the hTERT promoter region, while telomerase-positive cells paradoxically have at least a partially methylated promoter region that is opposite to the normal roles of DNA methylation. Histone acetylation of H3K9 within the promoter region is associated with an open chromatin state such that transcription machinery has the space to form. Histone methylation of hTERT has varied control of the gene, however. Mono- and dimethylation of H3K9 within the promoter region indicate silent euchromatin, while a trimethylated H3K9 enhances gene transcription. Non-coding RNAs can target epigenetic-modifying enzymes, as well as transcription factors involved in the control of hTERT. An epigenetics diet that can affect the epigenome of cancer cells is a recent fascination that has received much attention. By combining portions of this diet with

  8. Transcription Regulation of the Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Wang, Jing; Toh, Wei Xun; Li, Shang

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to maintain their telomere length via expression of an enzymatic complex called telomerase. Similarly, more than 85%–90% of cancer cells are found to upregulate the expression of telomerase, conferring them with the potential to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, is the rate-limiting factor in reconstituting telomerase activity in vivo. To date, the expression and function of the human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) gene are known to be regulated at various molecular levels (including genetic, mRNA, protein and subcellular localization) by a number of diverse factors. Among these means of regulation, transcription modulation is the most important, as evident in its tight regulation in cancer cell survival as well as pluripotent stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here, we discuss how hTERT gene transcription is regulated, mainly focusing on the contribution of trans-acting factors such as transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers, as well as genetic alterations in hTERT proximal promoter. PMID:27548225

  9. Transcription Regulation of the Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) Gene.

    PubMed

    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Wang, Jing; Toh, Wei Xun; Li, Shang

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to maintain their telomere length via expression of an enzymatic complex called telomerase. Similarly, more than 85%-90% of cancer cells are found to upregulate the expression of telomerase, conferring them with the potential to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, is the rate-limiting factor in reconstituting telomerase activity in vivo. To date, the expression and function of the human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) gene are known to be regulated at various molecular levels (including genetic, mRNA, protein and subcellular localization) by a number of diverse factors. Among these means of regulation, transcription modulation is the most important, as evident in its tight regulation in cancer cell survival as well as pluripotent stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here, we discuss how hTERT gene transcription is regulated, mainly focusing on the contribution of trans-acting factors such as transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers, as well as genetic alterations in hTERT proximal promoter. PMID:27548225

  10. The effect of heavy ion 12C6+on the change of telomerase activity of the human hepatocellular cells and carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Bingrong

    The effect of heavy ion 12C6+on the change of telomerase activity of the human hepatocellular cells and carcinoma cells Dang Bingrong ,Hu Kaiqian (Institute of Modern Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences£¬Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences lanzhou 730000) Abstract Objective To investigate the changes in telomerase and its activity in human tumor and normal cell after exposure of the cells to heavy ion radiation.Irradiation was performed at the Heavy Ion Researsh Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Methods We use the hepatocellular cells HL-7702 and the hepatocellular carcinoma cells SMMC-7721 from the people to experiment. Cells were exposed to 12 C6+ irradiation at 0,1,2,3 and 4Gy. The hepatocellular cells HL-7702 exposed to 12 C6+ irradiation were re-cultured for 72 hours. The hepatocellular carcinoma cells SMMC-7721 were re-cultured for 24 hours and 72 hours. PCR based telomeric repeat amplification protocol(TRAP-PCR) method were used to determine the telomerase activity in SMMC-7721and HL-7702, respectively. Result HL-7702 cells didn't have telomerase. But the cells exposed to 2Gy and 3Gy have the telomerase activity, the cells exposed to 1Gy and 4Gy didn't have the telomerase activity. After exposure to heavy ionizing radiation 1-3Gy the telomerase activity in SMMC-7721 cells were significantly increased in a dose-and timedependent manner. The cells of 7721 exposed to 4Gy was significantly lower than that 0Gy cells. Conclusion Heavy ionizing radiation, as a high LET radiation,induces the increase in telomerase activity in low dose and the decrease in high dose. It indicates that telomerase participates in the repair process of DNA injury induced by heavy ionizing radiation. Key words telomerase heavy ion hepatocellular cells SMMC-7721 cells HL-7702 cells PCR- telomeric repeat amplification protocol

  11. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  12. Radiation-induced neoplasms of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Skultety, F.M.; Leibrock, L.G.; Severson, G.S.

    1987-04-01

    The histopathology of two patients with radiation-induced neoplasms of the brain following therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancies is described. The second neoplasms were an atypical meningioma and a polymorphous cell sarcoma, respectively. They occurred 12 and 23 years after irradiation (4000 rad), within the original field of irradiation. In both cases, the radiation-induced tumors were histologically distinct from the initial medulloblastomas. Both patients were retreated with local irradiation using permanent implantation of radioactive iodine-125 seeds.

  13. Detection of Telomerase Activity Using Capacitance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bong Keun; Lee, Ri Mi; Choi, Ahmi; Jung, Hyo-Il; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2007-03-01

    Telomerase activity has been found in about 85% cancer cells, while no activity observed in normal cells, so that telomerase has been proposed as a marker for cancer detection. Here, we describe electrical detection of telomerase activity using capacitance measurements. We have investigated the length dependence of capacitance on DNA solutions and found that the capacitance of DNA solutions were dependent on the DNA length. In addition, upon adding telomerase into the solution of telomeric substrate primer, the capacitance was observed to change as a function of time due to the telomeric elongation. These results suggest that this novel nanosensor may be used for rapid detection of telomerase activity.

  14. Increased epidermal tumors and increased skin wound healing in transgenic mice overexpressing the catalytic subunit of telomerase, mTERT, in basal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    González-Suárez, Eva; Samper, Enrique; Ramírez, Angel; Flores, Juana M.; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Jorcano, José L.; Blasco, María A.

    2001-01-01

    Telomerase transgenics are an important tool to assess the role of telomerase in cancer, as well as to evaluate the potential use of telomerase for gene therapy of age-associated diseases. Here, we have targeted the expression of the catalytic component of mouse telomerase, mTERT, to basal keratinocytes using the bovine keratin 5 promoter. These telomerase-transgenic mice are viable and show histologically normal stratified epithelia with high levels of telomerase activity and normal telomere length. Interestingly, the epidermis of these mice is highly responsive to the mitogenic effects of phorbol esters, and it is more susceptible than that of wild-type littermates to the development skin tumors upon chemical carcinogenesis. The epidermis of telomerase-transgenic mice also shows an increased wound-healing rate compared with wild-type littermates. These results suggest that, contrary to the general assumption, telomerase actively promotes proliferation in cells that have sufficiently long telomeres and unravel potential risks of gene therapy for age-associated diseases based on telomerase upregulation. PMID:11387197

  15. Forms and Functions of Telomerase RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Kathleen

    Telomerase adds single-stranded telomeric DNA repeats to chromosome ends. Unlike other polymerases involved in genome replication, telomerase synthe¬sizes DNA without use of a DNA template. Instead, the enzyme active site copies a template carried within the integral RNA subunit of the telomerase ribonucleo-protein (RNP) complex. In addition to providing a template, telomerase RNA has non-template motifs with critical functions in the catalytic cycle of repeat synthesis. In its complexity of structure and function, telomerase RNA resembles the non-coding RNAs of RNP machines like the ribosome and spliceosome that evolved from catalytic RNAs of the RNA World. However, unlike these RNPs, telomerase evolved its RNP identity after advent of the Protein World. Insights about telomer-ase have broad significance for understanding non-coding RNA biology as well as chromosome end maintenance and human disease.

  16. Ticking Telomeres/Telltale Telomerase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biermann, Carol A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses telomeres, complexes of DNA and protein that form the chromatin at the ends of chromosomes. Highlights telomeres as controllers of chromosome integrity, expendable telomeres, DNA replication requirements and their consequences, protection of structural genes, telomerase as indicators of immortality, cancer cells and other immortals, and…

  17. Telomerase Repeated Amplification Protocol (TRAP)

    PubMed Central

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are found at the end of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, and proteins that bind to telomeres protect DNA from being recognized as double-strand breaks thus preventing end-to-end fusions (Griffith et al., 1999). However, due to the end replication problem and other factors such as oxidative damage, the limited life span of cultured cells (Hayflick limit) results in progressive shortening of these protective structures (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex telomerase-consisting of a protein catalytic component hTERT and a functional RNA component hTR or hTERC- counteracts telomere shortening by adding telomeric repeats to the end of chromosomes in ~90% of primary human tumors and in some transiently proliferating stem-like cells (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). This results in continuous proliferation of cells which is a hallmark of cancer. Therefore, telomere biology has a central role in aging, cancer progression/metastasis as well as targeted cancer therapies. There are commonly used methods in telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) (Mender and Shay, 2015b), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this detailed protocol we describe Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP). The TRAP assay is a popular method to determine telomerase activity in mammalian cells and tissue samples (Kim et al., 1994). The TRAP assay includes three steps: extension, amplification, and detection of telomerase products. In the extension step, telomeric repeats are added to the telomerase substrate (which is actually a non telomeric oligonucleotide, TS) by telomerase. In the amplification step, the extension products are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers (TS upstream primer and ACX downstream primer) and in the detection step, the presence or absence of telomerase is

  18. Telomere and Telomerase Therapeutics in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yucheng; Goldkorn, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase capable of utilizing an integrated RNA component as a template to add protective tandem telomeric single strand DNA repeats, TTAGGG, to the ends of chromosomes. Telomere dysfunction and telomerase reactivation are observed in approximately 90% of human cancers; hence, telomerase activation plays a unique role as a nearly universal step on the path to malignancy. In the past two decades, multiple telomerase targeting therapeutic strategies have been pursued, including direct telomerase inhibition, telomerase interference, hTERT or hTERC promoter driven therapy, telomere-based approaches, and telomerase vaccines. Many of these strategies have entered clinical development, and some have now advanced to phase III clinical trials. In the coming years, one or more of these new telomerase-targeting drugs may be expected to enter the pharmacopeia of standard care. Here, we briefly review the molecular functions of telomerase in cancer and provide an update about the preclinical and clinical development of telomerase targeting therapeutics. PMID:27240403

  19. Telomere and Telomerase Therapeutics in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yucheng; Goldkorn, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase capable of utilizing an integrated RNA component as a template to add protective tandem telomeric single strand DNA repeats, TTAGGG, to the ends of chromosomes. Telomere dysfunction and telomerase reactivation are observed in approximately 90% of human cancers; hence, telomerase activation plays a unique role as a nearly universal step on the path to malignancy. In the past two decades, multiple telomerase targeting therapeutic strategies have been pursued, including direct telomerase inhibition, telomerase interference, hTERT or hTERC promoter driven therapy, telomere-based approaches, and telomerase vaccines. Many of these strategies have entered clinical development, and some have now advanced to phase III clinical trials. In the coming years, one or more of these new telomerase-targeting drugs may be expected to enter the pharmacopeia of standard care. Here, we briefly review the molecular functions of telomerase in cancer and provide an update about the preclinical and clinical development of telomerase targeting therapeutics. PMID:27240403

  20. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  1. A novel telomerase substrate precursor rapidly induces telomere dysfunction in telomerase positive cancer cells but not telomerase silent normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Mender, Ilgen; Gryaznov, Sergei; Shay, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    Although telomerase is an almost universal target for cancer therapy, there has been no effective telomerase targeted inhibitor that has progressed to late stage human clinical trials. Recently, we reported that a telomerase-mediated telomere-disrupting compound, 6-thio-2′-deoxyguanosine (6-thio-dG), was very effective at targeting telomerase positive cancer cells while sparing telomerase silent normal cells. 6-thio-dG, a nucleoside analogue of the already-approved drug 6-thioguanine, is incorporated into telomeres by telomerase, resulting in disruption of the telomere-protecting shelterin complex. This disruption leads to Telomere dysfunction-Induced Foci (TIFs) formation and rapid cell death for the vast majority of cancer cells. Since most chemotherapies eventually fail due to drug acquired resistance, novel drugs such as 6-thio-dG, as a single first line agent or in the maintenance setting, may represent an effective new treatment for cancer patients. PMID:26425659

  2. Telomerase inhibition by siRNA causes senescence and apoptosis in Barrett's adenocarcinoma cells: mechanism and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, Masood A; Koley, Hemanta; Batchu, Ramesh B; Bertheau, Robert C; Protopopov, Alexei; Munshi, Nikhil C; Goyal, Raj K

    2005-01-01

    Background In cancer cells, telomerase induction helps maintain telomere length and thereby bypasses senescence and provides enhanced replicative potential. Chemical inhibitors of telomerase have been shown to reactivate telomere shortening and cause replicative senescence and apoptotic cell death of tumor cells while having little or no effect on normal diploid cells. Results We designed siRNAs against two different regions of telomerase gene and evaluated their effect on telomere length, proliferative potential, and gene expression in Barrett's adenocarcinoma SEG-1 cells. The mixture of siRNAs in nanomolar concentrations caused a loss of telomerase activity that appeared as early as day 1 and was essentially complete at day 3. Inhibition of telomerase activity was associated with marked reduction in median telomere length and complete loss of detectable telomeres in more than 50% of the treated cells. Telomere loss caused senescence in 40% and apoptosis in 86% of the treated cells. These responses appeared to be associated with activation of DNA sensor HR23B and subsequent activation of p53 homolog p73 and p63 and E2F1. Changes in these gene regulators were probably the source of observed up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, p16 and GADD45. Elevated transcript levels of FasL, Fas and caspase 8 that activate death receptors and CARD 9 that interacts with Bcl10 and NFKB to enhance mitochondrial translocation and activation of caspase 9 were also observed. Conclusion These studies show that telomerase siRNAs can cause effective suppression of telomerase and telomere shortening leading to both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via mechanisms that include up-regulation of several genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Telomerase siRNAs may therefore be strong candidates for highly selective therapy for chemoprevention and treatment of Barrett's adenocarcinoma. PMID:16022731

  3. Effects of PCB126 and PCB153 on telomerase activity and telomere length in undifferentiated and differentiated HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xing; Senthilkumar, P K; Schnoor, Jerald L; Ludewig, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    PCBs are persistent organic pollutants that are carcinogenic and immunotoxic and have developmental toxicity. This suggests that they may interfere with normal cell maturation. Cancer and stem/progenitor cells have telomerase activity to maintain and protect the chromosome ends, but lose this activity during differentiation. We hypothesized that PCBs interfere with telomerase activity and the telomere complex, thereby disturbing cell differentiation and stem/progenitor cell function. HL-60 cells are cancer cells that can differentiated into granulocytes and monocytes. We exposed HL-60 cells to PCB126 (dioxin-like) and PCB153 (nondioxin-like) 6 days before and during 3 days of differentiation. The differentiated cells showed G0/G1 phase arrest and very low telomerase activity. hTERT and hTR, two telomerase-related genes, were downregulated. The telomere shelterins TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 were upregulated in granulocytes, and TRF2 was upregulated and POT1 downregulated in monocytes. Both PCBs further reduced telomerase activity in differentiated cells, but had only small effects on the differentiation and telomere-related genes. Treatment of undifferentiated HL-60 cells for 30 days with PCB126 produced a downregulation of telomerase activity and a decrease of hTERT, hTR, TRF1, and POT1 gene expression. With PCB153, the effects were less pronounced and some shelterin genes were increased after 30 days of exposure. With each PCB, no differentiation of cells was observed and cells continued to proliferate despite reduced telomerase activity, resulting in shortened telomeres after 30 days of exposure. These results indicate cell-type and PCB congener-specific effects on telomere/telomerase-related genes. Although PCBs do not seem to strongly affect differentiation, they may influence stem or progenitor cells through telomere attrition with potential long-term consequences for health. PMID:26330309

  4. Telomeres and Telomerase in the Radiation Response: Implications for Instability, Reprograming, and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sishc, Brock J.; Nelson, Christopher B.; McKenna, Miles J.; Battaglia, Christine L. R.; Herndon, Andrea; Idate, Rupa; Liber, Howard L.; Bailey, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes comprised of tandem arrays of repetitive DNA sequence that serve to protect chromosomal termini from inappropriate degradation, as well as to prevent these natural DNA ends from being recognized as broken DNA (double-strand breaks) and triggering of inappropriate DNA damage responses. Preservation of telomere length requires telomerase, the specialized reverse transcriptase capable of maintaining telomere length via template-mediated addition of telomeric repeats onto the ends of newly synthesized chromosomes. Loss of either end-capping function or telomere length maintenance has been associated with genomic instability or senescence in a variety of settings; therefore, telomeres and telomerase have well-established connections to cancer and aging. It has long been recognized that oxidative stress promotes shortening of telomeres, and that telomerase activity is a radiation-inducible function. However, the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) exposure on telomeres per se are much less well understood and appreciated. To gain a deeper understanding of the roles, telomeres and telomerase play in the response of human cells to IRs of different qualities, we tracked changes in telomeric end-capping function, telomere length, and telomerase activity in panels of mammary epithelial and hematopoietic cell lines exposed to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma(γ)-rays or high LET, high charge, high energy (HZE) particles, delivered either acutely or at low dose rates. In addition to demonstrating that dysfunctional telomeres contribute to IR-induced mutation frequencies and genome instability, we reveal non-canonical roles for telomerase, in that telomerase activity was required for IR-induced enrichment of mammary epithelial putative stem/progenitor cell populations, a finding also suggestive of cellular reprograming. Taken together, the results reported here establish the critical importance of telomeres and telomerase in the

  5. Telomeres and Telomerase in the Radiation Response: Implications for Instability, Reprograming, and Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sishc, Brock J; Nelson, Christopher B; McKenna, Miles J; Battaglia, Christine L R; Herndon, Andrea; Idate, Rupa; Liber, Howard L; Bailey, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes comprised of tandem arrays of repetitive DNA sequence that serve to protect chromosomal termini from inappropriate degradation, as well as to prevent these natural DNA ends from being recognized as broken DNA (double-strand breaks) and triggering of inappropriate DNA damage responses. Preservation of telomere length requires telomerase, the specialized reverse transcriptase capable of maintaining telomere length via template-mediated addition of telomeric repeats onto the ends of newly synthesized chromosomes. Loss of either end-capping function or telomere length maintenance has been associated with genomic instability or senescence in a variety of settings; therefore, telomeres and telomerase have well-established connections to cancer and aging. It has long been recognized that oxidative stress promotes shortening of telomeres, and that telomerase activity is a radiation-inducible function. However, the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) exposure on telomeres per se are much less well understood and appreciated. To gain a deeper understanding of the roles, telomeres and telomerase play in the response of human cells to IRs of different qualities, we tracked changes in telomeric end-capping function, telomere length, and telomerase activity in panels of mammary epithelial and hematopoietic cell lines exposed to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma(γ)-rays or high LET, high charge, high energy (HZE) particles, delivered either acutely or at low dose rates. In addition to demonstrating that dysfunctional telomeres contribute to IR-induced mutation frequencies and genome instability, we reveal non-canonical roles for telomerase, in that telomerase activity was required for IR-induced enrichment of mammary epithelial putative stem/progenitor cell populations, a finding also suggestive of cellular reprograming. Taken together, the results reported here establish the critical importance of telomeres and telomerase in the

  6. The loss of telomerase activity in highly differentiated CD8+CD28-CD27- T cells is associated with decreased Akt (Ser473) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Fiona J; Franzese, Ornella; Finney, Helene M; Fletcher, Jean M; Belaramani, Lavina L; Salmon, Mike; Dokal, Inderjeet; Webster, David; Lawson, Alastair D G; Akbar, Arne N

    2007-06-15

    The enzyme telomerase is essential for maintaining the replicative capacity of memory T cells. Although CD28 costimulatory signals can up-regulate telomerase activity, human CD8(+) T cells lose CD28 expression after repeated activation. Nevertheless, telomerase is still inducible in CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells. To identify alternative costimulatory pathways that may be involved, we introduced chimeric receptors containing the signaling domains of CD28, CD27, CD137, CD134, and ICOS in series with the CD3 zeta (zeta) chain into primary human CD8(+) T cells. Although CD3 zeta-chain signals alone were ineffective, triggering of all the other constructs induced proliferation and telomerase activity. However, not all CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells could up-regulate this enzyme. The further fractionation of CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells into CD8(+)CD28(-) CD27(+) and CD8(+)CD28(-)CD27(-) subsets showed that the latter had significantly shorter telomeres and extremely poor telomerase activity. The restoration of CD28 signaling in CD8(+)CD28(-)CD27(-) T cells could not reverse the low telomerase activity that was not due to decreased expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, the enzyme catalytic subunit. Instead, the defect was associated with decreased phosphorylation of the kinase Akt, that phosphorylates human telomerase reverse transcriptase to induce telomerase activity. Furthermore, the defective Akt phosphorylation in these cells was specific for the Ser(473) but not the Thr(308) phosphorylation site of this molecule. Telomerase down-regulation in highly differentiated CD8(+)CD28(-)CD27(-) T cells marks their inexorable progress toward a replicative end stage after activation. This limits the ability of memory CD8(+) T cells to be maintained by continuous proliferation in vivo. PMID:17548608

  7. Synergistic tumor suppression by combined inhibition of telomerase and CDKN1A

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Romi; Dong, Yuying; Solomon, Peter D.; Wettersten, Hiromi I.; Cheng, Christopher J.; Min, JIn-Na; Henson, Jeremy; Dogra, Shaillay Kumar; Hwang, Sung H.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zhu, Lihua J.; Reddel, Roger R.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Weiss, Robert H.; Chang, Sandy; Green, Michael R.; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays an important role in mediating growth inhibition upon telomere dysfunction. Here, we show that loss of the p53 target gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A, also known as p21WAF1/CIP1) increases apoptosis induction following telomerase inhibition in a variety of cancer cell lines and mouse xenografts. This effect is highly specific to p21, as loss of other checkpoint proteins and CDK inhibitors did not affect apoptosis. In telomerase, inhibited cell loss of p21 leads to E2F1- and p53-mediated transcriptional activation of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis, resulting in increased apoptosis. Combined genetic or pharmacological inhibition of telomerase and p21 synergistically suppresses tumor growth. Furthermore, we demonstrate that simultaneous inhibition of telomerase and p21 also suppresses growth of tumors containing mutant p53 following pharmacological restoration of p53 activity. Collectively, our results establish that inactivation of p21 leads to increased apoptosis upon telomerase inhibition and thus identify a genetic vulnerability that can be exploited to treat many human cancers containing either wild-type or mutant p53. PMID:25024194

  8. Single cell measurement of telomerase expression and splicing using microfluidic emulsion cultures

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Richard; Hart, Kristina; Mathies, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that maintains telomeres on the ends of chromosomes, allowing rapidly dividing cells to proliferate while avoiding senescence and apoptosis. Understanding telomerase gene expression and splicing at the single cell level could yield insights into the roles of telomerase during normal cell growth as well as cancer development. Here we use droplet-based single cell culture followed by single cell or colony transcript abundance analysis to investigate the relationship between cell growth and transcript abundance of the telomerase genes encoding the RNA component (hTR) and protein component (hTERT) as well as hTERT splicing. Jurkat and K562 cells were examined under normal cell culture conditions and during exposure to curcumin, a natural compound with anti-carcinogenic and telomerase activity-reducing properties. Individual cells predominantly express single hTERT splice variants, with the α+/β− variant exhibiting significant transcript abundance bimodality that is sustained through cell division. Sub-lethal curcumin exposure results in reduced bimodality of all hTERT splice variants and significant upregulation of alpha splicing, suggesting a possible role in cellular stress response. The single cell culture and transcript abundance analysis method presented here provides the tools necessary for multiparameter single cell analysis which will be critical for understanding phenotypes of heterogeneous cell populations, disease cell populations and their drug response. PMID:26202962

  9. [Quantification of radiation-induced genetic risk].

    PubMed

    Ehling, U H

    1987-05-01

    Associated with technical advances of our civilization is a radiation- and chemically-induced increase in the germ cell mutation rate in man. This would result in an increase in the frequency of genetic diseases and would be detrimental to future generations. It is the duty of our generation to keep this risk as low as possible. The estimation of the radiation-induced genetic risk of human populations is based on the extrapolation of results from animal experiments. Radiation-induced mutations are stochastic events. The probability of the event depends on the dose; the degree of the damage does not. The different methods to estimate the radiation-induced genetic risk will be discussed. The accuracy of the predicted results will be evaluated by a comparison with the observed incidence of dominant mutations in offspring born to radiation exposed survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. These methods will be used to predict the genetic damage from the fallout of the reactor accident at Chernobyl. For the exposure dose we used the upper limits of the mean effective life time equivalent dose from the fallout values in the Munich region. According to the direct method for the risk estimation we will expect for each 100 to 500 spontaneous dominant mutations one radiation-induced mutation in the first generation. With the indirect method we estimate a ratio of 100 dominant spontaneous mutations to one radiation-induced dominant mutation. The possibilities and the limitations of the different methods to estimate the genetic risk will be discussed. The discrepancy between the high safety standards for radiation protection and the low level of knowledge for the toxicological evaluation of chemical mutagens will be emphasized. PMID:3589954

  10. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L.; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Glöckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R.; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C.; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H.; Herrmann, Carl; O’Sullivan, Roderick J.; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K.; Fischer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system1. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive2–4. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type1,2,5. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours. PMID:26466568

  11. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Gloeckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H; Herrmann, Carl; O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K; Fischer, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours. PMID:26466568

  12. Combined Treatment With Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Gamma Ligands and Gamma Radiation Induces Apoptosis by PPARγ-Independent Up-Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Deoxyribonucleic Acid Damage Signals in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Jong; Im, Chang-Nim; Park, Seon Hwa; Moon, Eun-Yi; Hong, Sung Hee

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate possible radiosensitizing activities of the well-known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ ligand ciglitazone and novel PPARγ ligands CAY10415 and CAY10506 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity was assessed using a clonogenic cell survival assay. To investigate the mechanism underlying PPARγ ligand-induced radiosensitization, the subdiploid cellular DNA fraction was analyzed by flow cytometry. Activation of the caspase pathway by combined PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation treatment was detected by immunoblot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and flow cytometry. Results: The 3 PPARγ ligands induced cell death and ROS generation in a PPARγ-independent manner, enhanced γ-radiation–induced apoptosis and caspase-3–mediated poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in vitro. The combined PPARγ ligand/γ-radiation treatment triggered caspase-8 activation, and this initiator caspase played an important role in the combination-induced apoptosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ ligands may enhance the γ-radiation-induced DNA damage response, possibly by increasing γ-H2AX expression. Moreover, the combination treatment significantly increased ROS generation, and the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine inhibited the combined treatment-induced ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Conclusions: Taken together, these results indicated that the combined treatment of PPARγ ligands and γ-radiation synergistically induced DNA damage and apoptosis, which was regulated by ROS.

  13. Purification of Human Telomerase Complexes Identifies Factors Involved in Telomerase Biogenesis and Telomere Length Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Dragony; Collins, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The identities and roles of proteins associated with human telomerase remain poorly defined. To gain insight, we undertook an affinity purification of endogenously assembled human telomerase complexes. We show that specific subsets of H/ACA, Sm, and hnRNP proteins associate with active and inactive telomerase RNPs, while two NTPase proteins associate preferentially with active enzyme. All three core H/ACA-motif binding proteins are telomerase holoenzyme components essential for RNP accumulation. On the other hand, telomerase RNPs lacking interaction with Sm proteins or hnRNP C remain fully functional for telomere elongation. Curiously, overexpression of either associated hnRNP protein (hnRNP C and hnRNP U) or either NTPase protein (NAT10 and GNL3L) induced telomere shortening. Our findings suggest that endogenous human telomerase complexes are more heterogeneous than those of single-celled eukaryotes, have predominantly shared rather than telomerase-specific proteins, and make numerous regulatory interactions. PMID:18082603

  14. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    PubMed Central

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  15. Partial pneumonectomy of telomerase null mice carrying shortened telomeres initiates cell growth arrest resulting in a limited compensatory growth response

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Sha-Ron; Lee, Jooeun; Reddy, Raghava; Williams, Genevieve N.; Kikuchi, Alexander; Freiberg, Yael; Warburton, David

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase mutations and significantly shortened chromosomal telomeres have recently been implicated in human lung pathologies. Natural telomere shortening is an inevitable consequence of aging, which is also a risk factor for development of lung disease. However, the impact of shortened telomeres and telomerase dysfunction on the ability of lung cells to respond to significant challenge is still largely unknown. We have previously shown that lungs of late generation, telomerase null B6.Cg-Terctm1Rdp mice feature alveolar simplification and chronic stress signaling at baseline, a phenocopy of aged lung. To determine the role telomerase plays when the lung is challenged, B6.Cg-Terctm1Rdp mice carrying shortened telomeres and wild-type controls were subjected to partial pneumonectomy. We found that telomerase activity was strongly induced in alveolar epithelial type 2 cells (AEC2) of the remaining lung immediately following surgery. Eighty-six percent of wild-type animals survived the procedure and exhibited a burst of early compensatory growth marked by upregulation of proliferation, stress response, and DNA repair pathways in AEC2. In B6.Cg-Terctm1Rdp mice carrying shortened telomeres, response to pneumonectomy was characterized by decreased survival, diminished compensatory lung growth, attenuated distal lung progenitor cell response, persistent DNA damage, and cell growth arrest. Overall, survival correlated strongly with telomere length. We conclude that functional telomerase and properly maintained telomeres play key roles in both long-term survival and the early phase of compensatory lung growth following partial pneumonectomy. PMID:21460122

  16. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  17. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style.

  18. Telomerase and its potential for therapeutic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, P; Burger, A M

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase and telomeres are attractive targets for anticancer therapy. This is supported by the fact that the majority of human cancers express the enzyme telomerase which is essential to maintain their telomere length and thus, to ensure indefinite cell proliferation – a hallmark of cancer. Tumours have relatively shorter telomeres compared to normal cell types, opening the possibility that human cancers may be considerably more susceptible to killing by agents that inhibit telomere replication than normal cells. Advances in the understanding of the regulation of telomerase activity and the telomere structure, as well as the identification of telomerase and telomere associated binding proteins have opened new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review telomere and telomerase biology and the various approaches which have been developed to inhibit the telomere/telomerase complex over the past decade. They include inhibitors of the enzyme catalytic subunit and RNA component, agents that target telomeres, telomerase vaccines and drugs targeting binding proteins. The emerging role of telomerase in cancer stem cells and the implications for cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:17603541

  19. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  20. Imaging Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Mike E.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Tsien, Christina I.; Bailey, Janet E.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2013-01-01

    Technological developments in radiation therapy and other cancer therapies have led to a progressive increase in five-year survival rates over the last few decades. Although acute effects have been largely minimized by both technical advances and medical interventions, late effects remain a concern. Indeed, the need to identify those individuals who will develop radiation-induced late effects, and to develop interventions to prevent or ameliorate these late effects is a critical area of radiobiology research. In the last two decades, preclinical studies have clearly established that late radiation injury can be prevented/ameliorated by pharmacological therapies aimed at modulating the cascade of events leading to the clinical expression of radiation-induced late effects. These insights have been accompanied by significant technological advances in imaging that are moving radiation oncology and normal tissue radiobiology from disciplines driven by anatomy and macrostructure to ones in which important quantitative functional, microstructural, and metabolic data can be noninvasively and serially determined. In the current article, we review use of positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy to generate pathophysiological and functional data in the central nervous system, lung, and heart that offer the promise of, (1) identifying individuals who are at risk of developing radiation-induced late effects, and (2) monitoring the efficacy of interventions to prevent/ameliorate them. PMID:22348250

  1. Management of radiation-induced urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Matthias D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation as a treatment option for prostate cancer has been chosen by many patients. One of the side effects encountered are radiation-induced urethral strictures which occur in up to 11% of patients. Radiation damage has often left the irradiated field fibrotic and with poor vascularization which make these strictures a challenging entity to treat. The mainstay of urologic management remains an urethroplasty procedure for which several approaches exist with variable optimal indication. Excision and primary anastomoses are ideal for shorter bulbar strictures that comprise the majority of radiation-induced urethral strictures. One advantage of this technique is that it does not require tissue transfers and success rates of 70-95% have consistently been reported. Substitution urethroplasty using remote graft tissue such as buccal mucosa are indicated if the length of the stricture precludes a tension-free primary anastomosis. Despite the challenge of graft survival in radiation-damaged and poorly vascularized recipient tissue, up to 83% of patients have been treated successfully although the numbers described in the literature are small. The most extensive repairs involve the use of tissue flaps, for example gracilis muscle, which may be required if the involved periurethral tissue is unable to provide sufficient vascular support for a post-operative urethral healing process. In summary, radiation-induced urethral strictures are a challenging entity. Most strictures are amenable to excision and primary anastomosis (EPA) with encouraging success rates but substitution urethroplasty may be indicated when extensive repair is needed. PMID:26816812

  2. The architecture of Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiansen; Miracco, Edward J.; Hong, Kyungah; Eckert, Barbara; Chan, Henry; Cash, Darian D.; Min, Bosun; Zhou, Z. Hong; Collins, Kathleen; Feigon, Juli

    2013-01-01

    Telomerase adds telomeric repeats to chromosome ends using an internal RNA template and specialized telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), thereby maintaining genome integrity. Little is known about the physical relationships among protein and RNA subunits within a biologically functional holoenzyme. Here we describe the architecture of Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase holoenzyme determined by electron microscopy. Six of the 7 proteins and the TERT-binding regions of telomerase RNA (TER) have been localized by affinity labeling. Fitting with high-resolution structures reveals the organization of TERT, TER, and p65 in the RNP catalytic core. p50 has an unanticipated role as a hub between the RNP catalytic core, p75-p19-p45 subcomplex, and the DNA-binding Teb1. A complete in vitro holoenzyme reconstitution assigns function to these interactions in processive telomeric repeat synthesis. These studies provide the first view of the extensive network of subunit associations necessary for telomerase holoenzyme assembly and physiological function. PMID:23552895

  3. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  4. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  5. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. PMID:25770423

  6. [Telomeres and telomerase as targeted therapies in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Souiden, Y; Bouraoui, A; Chaieb, K; Mahdouani, K

    2010-09-01

    Advances in chromosome dynamics have increased our understanding of the significant role of telomeres and telomerase in cancer. Telomerase is expressed in almost all cancer cells but is inactive in most normal somatic cells. Therefore, telomerase is an important target for the design of therapeutic agents that might have minimal side effects. Herein, we evaluate current approaches to telomerase/telomere-targeted therapy, discuss the benefits and disadvantages, and speculate on the future direction of telomerase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics. PMID:20663741

  7. Telomerase activity in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.

    2000-10-01

    The overall goal of this collaborative project was to investigate the role in malignant cells of both chromosome telomeres, and telomerase, the enzyme that replicates telomeres. Telomeres are highly conserved nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of eucaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length in somatic cells is reduced by 40--50 nucleotide pairs with every cell division due to incomplete replication of terminal DNA sequences and the absence of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein that adds telomere DNA to chromosome ends. Although telomerase is active in cells with extended proliferative capacities, including more than 85% of tumors, work performed under this contract demonstrated that the telomeres of human cancer cells are shorter than those of paired normal cells, and that the length of the telomeres is characteristic of particular types of cancers. The extent of telomere shortening ostensibly is related to the number of cell divisions the tumor has undergone. It is believed that ongoing cell proliferation leads to the accumulation and fixation of new mutations in tumor cell lineages.Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that the degree of phenotypic variability is related to the proliferative history of the tumor, and therefore to telomere length, implying a correlation with prognosis. In some human tumors, short telomeres are also correlated with genomic instabilities, including interstitial chromosome translocation, loss of heterozygosity, and aneuoploidy. Moreover, unprotected chromosome ends are highly recombinogenic and telomere shortening in cultured human cells correlates with the formation of dicentric chromosomes, suggesting that critically short telomeres not only identify, but also predispose, cells to genomic instability, again implying a correlation with prognosis. Therefore, telomere length or content could be an important predictor of metastatic potential or responsiveness to various therapeutic modalities.

  8. NADPH oxidase mediates radiation-induced oxidative stress in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Collins-Underwood, J Racquel; Zhao, Weiling; Sharpe, Jessica G; Robbins, Mike E

    2008-09-15

    The need to both understand and minimize the side effects of brain irradiation is heightened by the ever-increasing number of patients with brain metastases that require treatment with whole brain irradiation (WBI); some 200,000 cancer patients/year receive partial or WBI. At the present time, there are no successful treatments for radiation-induced brain injury, nor are there any known effective preventive strategies. Data support a role for chronic oxidative stress in radiation-induced late effects. However, the pathogenic mechanism(s) involved remains unknown. One candidate source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, which converts molecular oxygen (O(2)) to the superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) on activation. We hypothesize that brain irradiation leads to activation of NADPH oxidase. We report that irradiating rat brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro leads to increased (i) intracellular ROS generation, (ii) activation of the transcription factor NFkappaB, (iii) expression of ICAM-1 and PAI-1, and (iv) expression of Nox4, p22(phox), and p47(phox). Pharmacologic and genetic inhibition of NADPH oxidase blocked the radiation-mediated upregulation of intracellular ROS, activation of NFkappaB, and upregulation of ICAM-1 and PAI-1. These results suggest that activation of NADPH oxidase may play a role in radiation-induced oxidative stress. PMID:18640264

  9. Telomerase activity in pregnancy complications (Review)

    PubMed Central

    FRAGKIADAKI, PERSEFONI; TSOUKALAS, DIMITRIOS; FRAGKIADOULAKI, IRINI; PSYCHARAKIS, CHRISTOS; NIKITOVIC, DRAGANA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDES M.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are specific DNA regions positioned at the ends of chromosomes and composed of functional non-coding repeats. Upon cell division, the telomeres decrease in length by a preordained amount. When the telomeres become critically short, cells lose the ability to divide and enter a specific functioning mode designated as 'cellular senescence'. However, human tissues express an enzyme that deters the shrinking of the telomeres, the telomerase. Due to its ability to maintain telomere length, the telomerase slows down and possibly suspends the aging of the cells. In regard to this, solid evidence demonstrates that female human fertility decreases with increased maternal age and that various adverse factors, including alterations in telomerase activity, can contribute to age-associated infertility in women. The fact that telomerase activity is regulated in a time- and location-dependent manner in both embryo and placental tissues, highlights it potential importance to the successful completion of pregnancy. Since maternal age is a crucial determining factor for the success of in vitro and in vivo fertilization, numerous studies have focused on telomerase activity and its correlation with mammalian fertilization, as well as the following cleavage and pre-implantation developmental processes. Associations between telomerase activity and pregnancy complications have been previously observed. Our aim in this review was to summarize and critically discuss evidence correlating telomerase activity with pregnancy complications. PMID:27175856

  10. Telomerase activity in pregnancy complications (Review).

    PubMed

    Fragkiadaki, Persefoni; Tsoukalas, Dimitrios; Fragkiadoulaki, Irini; Psycharakis, Christos; Nikitovic, Dragana; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristides M

    2016-07-01

    Telomeres are specific DNA regions positioned at the ends of chromosomes and composed of functional non-coding repeats. Upon cell division, the telomeres decrease in length by a preordained amount. When the telomeres become critically short, cells lose the ability to divide and enter a specific functioning mode designated as 'cellular senescence'. However, human tissues express an enzyme that deters the shrinking of the telomeres, the telomerase. Due to its ability to maintain telomere length, the telomerase slows down and possibly suspends the aging of the cells. In regard to this, solid evidence demonstrates that female human fertility decreases with increased maternal age and that various adverse factors, including alterations in telomerase activity, can contribute to age-associated infertility in women. The fact that telomerase activity is regulated in a time- and location-dependent manner in both embryo and placental tissues, highlights it potential importance to the successful completion of pregnancy. Since maternal age is a crucial determining factor for the success of in vitro and in vivo fertilization, numerous studies have focused on telomerase activity and its correlation with mammalian fertilization, as well as the following cleavage and pre-implantation developmental processes. Associations between telomerase activity and pregnancy complications have been previously observed. Our aim in this review was to summarize and critically discuss evidence correlating telomerase activity with pregnancy complications. PMID:27175856

  11. Plant telomeres and telomerases. A review.

    PubMed

    McKnight, T D; Fitzgerald, M S; Shippen, D E

    1997-11-01

    Barbara McClintock began investigating plant telomeres during the 1930s, but little additional work was done in this area until a telomeric DNA sequence was isolated and characterized from Arabidopsis thaliana in 1988. This sequence, a simple repeat of the heptanucleotide 5'-TTTAGGG-3', has been found in telomeres of almost all plants analyzed. Telomere length in plants, which can be a long as 75 kb or as short as 2 kb, is controlled by both genetic and developmental factors. The major mechanism for synthesis of telomeres is telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein with reverse transcriptase activity. Telomerase expression is highly regulated in both plants and animals. For example, there is little or no detectable expression of telomerase in most vegetative tissues of plants nor in most somatic tissues of animals. In contrast to animals, plants do not specify a germ line until late in development, but telomerase is reactivated during flowering, possibly to ensure that gametes and embryos arising from them inherit fully functional chromosomes. Telomerase is also highly expressed in plant tissue culture cells, as might be expected for cells with an unlimited capacity for proliferation. Despite recent progress in investigating plant telomeres and telomerase at the molecular level, there is still much more to learn, especially concerning the developmental control of telomerase activity. PMID:9467846

  12. Telomerase activity and telomere length in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Schumpert, Charles; Nelson, Jacob; Kim, Eunsuk; Dudycha, Jeffry L; Patel, Rekha C

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres, comprised of short repetitive sequences, are essential for genome stability and have been studied in relation to cellular senescence and aging. Telomerase, the enzyme that adds telomeric repeats to chromosome ends, is essential for maintaining the overall telomere length. A lack of telomerase activity in mammalian somatic cells results in progressive shortening of telomeres with each cellular replication event. Mammals exhibit high rates of cell proliferation during embryonic and juvenile stages but very little somatic cell proliferation occurs during adult and senescent stages. The telomere hypothesis of cellular aging states that telomeres serve as an internal mitotic clock and telomere length erosion leads to cellular senescence and eventual cell death. In this report, we have examined telomerase activity, processivity, and telomere length in Daphnia, an organism that grows continuously throughout its life. Similar to insects, Daphnia telomeric repeat sequence was determined to be TTAGG and telomerase products with five-nucleotide periodicity were generated in the telomerase activity assay. We investigated telomerase function and telomere lengths in two closely related ecotypes of Daphnia with divergent lifespans, short-lived D. pulex and long-lived D. pulicaria. Our results indicate that there is no age-dependent decline in telomere length, telomerase activity, or processivity in short-lived D. pulex. On the contrary, a significant age dependent decline in telomere length, telomerase activity and processivity is observed during life span in long-lived D. pulicaria. While providing the first report on characterization of Daphnia telomeres and telomerase activity, our results also indicate that mechanisms other than telomere shortening may be responsible for the strikingly short life span of D. pulex. PMID:25962144

  13. Telomerase Activity and Telomere Length in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Schumpert, Charles; Nelson, Jacob; Kim, Eunsuk; Dudycha, Jeffry L.; Patel, Rekha C.

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres, comprised of short repetitive sequences, are essential for genome stability and have been studied in relation to cellular senescence and aging. Telomerase, the enzyme that adds telomeric repeats to chromosome ends, is essential for maintaining the overall telomere length. A lack of telomerase activity in mammalian somatic cells results in progressive shortening of telomeres with each cellular replication event. Mammals exhibit high rates of cell proliferation during embryonic and juvenile stages but very little somatic cell proliferation occurs during adult and senescent stages. The telomere hypothesis of cellular aging states that telomeres serve as an internal mitotic clock and telomere length erosion leads to cellular senescence and eventual cell death. In this report, we have examined telomerase activity, processivity, and telomere length in Daphnia, an organism that grows continuously throughout its life. Similar to insects, Daphnia telomeric repeat sequence was determined to be TTAGG and telomerase products with five-nucleotide periodicity were generated in the telomerase activity assay. We investigated telomerase function and telomere lengths in two closely related ecotypes of Daphnia with divergent lifespans, short-lived D. pulex and long-lived D. pulicaria. Our results indicate that there is no age-dependent decline in telomere length, telomerase activity, or processivity in short-lived D. pulex. On the contrary, a significant age dependent decline in telomere length, telomerase activity and processivity is observed during life span in long-lived D. pulicaria. While providing the first report on characterization of Daphnia telomeres and telomerase activity, our results also indicate that mechanisms other than telomere shortening may be responsible for the strikingly short life span of D. pulex. PMID:25962144

  14. Genistein mitigates radiation-induced testicular injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Heo, Kyu; Yi, Joo-Mi; Gong, Eun Ji; Yang, Kwangmo; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2012-08-01

    The present study investigated the radioprotective effect of a multifunctional soy isoflavone, genistein, with the testicular system. Genistein was administered (200 mg/kg body weight) to male C3H/HeN mice by subcutaneous injection 24 h prior to pelvic irradiation (5 Gy). Histopathological parameters were evaluated 12 h and 21 days post-irradiation. Genistein protected the germ cells from radiation-induced apoptosis (p < 0.05 vs vehicle-treated irradiated mice at 12 h post-irradiation). Genistein significantly attenuated radiation-induced reduction in testis weight, seminiferous tubular diameter, seminiferous epithelial depth and sperm head count in the testes (p < 0.05 vs vehicle-treated irradiated mice at 21 days post-irradiation). Repopulation and stem cell survival indices of the seminiferous tubules were increased in the genistein-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated irradiation group at 21 days post-irradiation (p < 0.01). The irradiation-mediated decrease in the sperm count and sperm mobility in the epididymis was counteracted by genistein (p < 0.01), but no effect on the frequency of abnormal sperm was evident. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated using DCFDA method and exposure to irradiation elevated ROS levels in the testis and genistein treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of radiation-induced ROS production. The results indicate that genistein protects from testicular dysfunction induced by gamma-irradiation by an antiapoptotic effect and recovery of spermatogenesis. PMID:22162311

  15. Protective effect of α-lipoic acid against radiation-induced fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seung-Hee; Park, Eun-Young; Kwak, Sungmin; Heo, Seung-Ho; Ryu, Je-Won; Park, Jin-Hong; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lee, Sang-Wook

    2016-03-29

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is one of the most common late complications of radiation therapy. We found that α-lipoic acid (α-LA) effectively prevents RIF. In RIF a mouse model, leg contracture assay was used to test the in vivo efficacy of α-LA. α-LA suppressed the expression of pro-fibrotic genes after irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, and inhibited the up-regulation of TGF-β1-mediated p300/CBP activity. Thus, α-LA prevents radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of NF-κB through inhibition of histone acetyltransferase activity. α-LA is a new therapeutic methods that can be used in the prevention-treatment of RIF. PMID:26799284

  16. Protective effect of α-lipoic acid against radiation-induced fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seung-Hee; Park, Eun-Young; Kwak, Sungmin; Heo, Seung-Ho; Ryu, Je-Won; Park, Jin-hong

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is one of the most common late complications of radiation therapy. We found that α-lipoic acid (α-LA) effectively prevents RIF. In RIF a mouse model, leg contracture assay was used to test the in vivo efficacy of α-LA. α-LA suppressed the expression of pro-fibrotic genes after irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, and inhibited the up-regulation of TGF-β1-mediated p300/CBP activity. Thus, α-LA prevents radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of NF-κB through inhibition of histone acetyltransferase activity. α-LA is a new therapeutic methods that can be used in the prevention-treatment of RIF. PMID:26799284

  17. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F. )

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  18. Radiation-induced intracranial malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.; Mealey, J. Jr.; Sartorius, C.

    1989-07-01

    The authors present seven cases of malignant gliomas that occurred after radiation therapy administered for diseases different from the subsequent glial tumor. Included among these seven are three patients who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy. Previously reported cases of radiation-induced glioma are reviewed and analyzed for common characteristics. Children receiving central nervous system irradiation appear particularly susceptible to induction of malignant gliomas by radiation. Interstitial brachytherapy may be used successfully instead of external beam radiotherapy in previously irradiated, tumor-free brain, and thus may reduce the risk of radiation necrosis. 31 references.

  19. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  20. Natural and pharmacological regulation of telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Mergny, Jean-Louis; Riou, Jean-François; Mailliet, Patrick; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Gilson, Eric

    2002-01-01

    The extremities of eukaryotic chromosomes are called telomeres. They have a structure unlike the bulk of the chromosome, which allows the cell DNA repair machinery to distinguish them from ‘broken’ DNA ends. But these specialised structures present a problem when it comes to replicating the DNA. Indeed, telomeric DNA progressively erodes with each round of cell division in cells that do not express telomerase, a specialised reverse transcriptase necessary to fully duplicate the telomeric DNA. Telomerase is expressed in tumour cells but not in most somatic cells and thus telomeres and telomerase may be proposed as attractive targets for the discovery of new anticancer agents. PMID:11842096

  1. Pharmaceutical regulation of telomerase and its clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Sprouse, Alyssa A; Steding, Catherine E; Herbert, Brittney-Shea

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Telomeres serve the dual function of protecting chromosomes from genomic instability as well as protecting the ends of chromosomes from DNA damage machinery. The enzyme responsible for telomere maintenance is telomerase, an enzyme capable of reverse transcription. Telomerase activity is typically limited to specific cell types. However, telomerase activation in somatic cells serves as a key step toward cell immortalization and cancer. Targeting telomerase serves as a potential cancer treatment with significant therapeutic benefits. Beyond targeting cancers by inhibiting telomerase, manipulating the regulation of telomerase may also provide therapeutic benefit to other ailments, such as those related to aging. This review will introduce human telomeres and telomerase and discuss pharmacological regulation of telomerase, including telomerase inhibitors and activators, and their use in human diseases. PMID:21973217

  2. Arsenic trioxide inhibits glioma cell growth through induction of telomerase displacement and telomere dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ye; Li, Yunqian; Ma, Chengyuan; Song, Yang; Xu, Haiyang; Yu, Hongquan; Xu, Songbai; Mu, Qingchun; Li, Haisong; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas are resistant to many kinds of treatment, including chemotherapy, radiation and other adjuvant therapies. As2O3 reportedly induces ROS generation in cells, suggesting it may be able to induce telomerase suppression and telomere dysfunction in glioblastoma cells. We show here that As2O3 induces ROS generation as well as telomerase phosphorylation in U87, U251, SHG4 and C6 glioma cells. It also induces translocation of telomerase from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, thereby decreasing total telomerase activity. These effects of As2O3 trigger an extensive DNA damage response at the telomere, which includes up-regulation of ATM, ATR, 53BP1, γ-H2AX and Mer11, in parallel with telomere fusion and 3′-overhang degradation. This ultimately results in induction of p53- and p21-mediated cell apoptosis, G2/M cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence. These results provide new insight into the antitumor effects of As2O3 and can perhaps contribute to solving the problem of glioblastoma treatment resistance. PMID:26871293

  3. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T. Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Molinie, P.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-21

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon{sup ®} FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon{sup ®} FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  4. Radiation induced conductivity in space dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, R.; Paulmier, T.; Molinie, P.; Belhaj, M.; Dirassen, B.; Payan, D.; Balcon, N.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced conductivity of some polymers was described mainly in literature by a competition between ionization, trapping/detrapping, and recombination processes or by radiation assisted ageing mechanisms. Our aim is to revise the effect of the aforementioned mechanisms on the complex evolution of Teflon® FEP under space representative ionizing radiation. Through the definition of a new experimental protocol, revealing the effect of radiation dose and relaxation time, we have been able to demonstrate that the trapping/recombination model devised in this study agrees correctly with the observed experimental phenomenology at qualitative level and allows describing very well the evolution of radiation induced conductivity with irradiation time (or received radiation dose). According to this model, the complex behavior observed on Teflon® FEP may be basically ascribed to the competition between electron/hole pairs generation and recombination: electrons are deeply trapped and act as recombination centers for free holes. Relaxation effects have been characterized through successive irradiations steps and have been again well described with the defined model at qualitative level: recombination centers created by the irradiation induce long term alteration on the electric properties, especially the effective bulk conductivity. One-month relaxation does not allow a complete recovery of the material initial charging behavior.

  5. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  6. Ionizing radiation induces human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Behrends, U; Peter, R U; Hintermeier-Knabe, R; Eissner, G; Holler, E; Bornkamm, G W; Caughman, S W; Degitz, K

    1994-11-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays a central role in various inflammatory reactions and its expression is readily induced by inflammatory stimuli such as cytokines or ultraviolet irradiation. We have investigated the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on human ICAM-1 expression in human cell lines and skin cultures. ICAM-1 mRNA levels in HL60, HaCaT, and HeLa cells were elevated at 3-6 h after irradiation and increased with doses from 10-40 Gy. The rapid induction of ICAM-1 occurred at the level of transcription, was independent of de novo protein synthesis, and did not involve autocrine stimuli including tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1. IR also induced ICAM-1 cell surface expression within 24 h. Immunohistologic analysis of cultured human split skin revealed ICAM-1 upregulation on epidermal keratinocytes and dermal microvascular endothelial cells 24 h after exposure to 6 Gy. In conclusion, we propose ICAM-1 as an important radiation-induced enhancer of immunologic cell adhesion, which contributes to inflammatory reactions after local and total body irradiation. PMID:7963663

  7. Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagadec, Chann; Vlashi, Erina; Alhiyari, Yazeed; Phillips, Tiffany M.; Bochkur Dratver, Milana; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for γ-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dose–dependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, γ-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells.

  8. A key role for telomerase reverse transcriptase unit in modulating human embryonic stem cell proliferation, cell cycle dynamics, and in vitro differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunbo; Przyborski, Stefan; Cooke, Michael J; Zhang, Xin; Stewart, Rebecca; Anyfantis, George; Atkinson, Stuart P; Saretzki, Gabriele; Armstrong, Lyle; Lako, Majlinda

    2008-04-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are a unique cell population with the ability to self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Human ESC express the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene and the telomerase RNA (TR) and show telomerase activity, but TERT, TR, and telomerase are all downregulated during the differentiation process. To examine the role of telomerase in human ESC self-renewal and differentiation, we modulated the expression of TERT. Upregulation of TERT and increased telomerase activity enhanced the proliferation and colony-forming ability of human ESC, as well as increasing the S phase of the cell cycle at the expense of a reduced G1 phase. Upregulation of TERT expression was associated with increases in CYCLIN D1 and CDC6 expression, as well as hyperphosphorylation of RB. The differentiated progeny of control ESC showed shortening of telomeric DNA as a result of loss of telomerase activity. In contrast, the differentiated cells from TERT-overexpressing ESC maintained high telomerase activity and accumulated lower concentrations of peroxides than wild-type cells, implying greater resistance to oxidative stress. Although the TERT-overexpressing human ESC are able to form teratoma composed of three germ layers in vivo, their in vitro differentiation to all primitive and embryonic lineages was suppressed. In contrast, downregulation of TERT resulted in reduced ESC proliferation, increased G1, and reduced S phase. Most importantly, downregulation of TERT caused loss of pluripotency and human ESC differentiation to extraembryonic and embryonic lineages. Our results indicate for the first time an important role for TERT in the maintenance of human ESC pluripotency, cell cycle regulation, and in vitro differentiation capacity. PMID:18203676

  9. Targeting telomerase-expressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Michel M; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The role of telomeres and telomerase as a target for cancer therapeutics is an area of continuing interest. This review is intended to provide an update on the field, pointing to areas in which our knowledge remains deficient and exploring the details of the most promising areas being advanced into clinical trials. Topics that will be covered include the role of dysfunctional telomeres in cellular aging and how replicative senescence provides an initial barrier to the emergence of immortalized cells, a hallmark of cancer. As an important translational theme, this review will consider possibilities for selectively targeting telomeres and telomerase to enhance cancer therapy. The role of telomerase as an immunotherapy, as a gene therapy approach using telomerase promoter driven oncolytic viruses and as a small oligonucleotide targeted therapy (Imetelstat) will be discussed. PMID:21332640

  10. Targeting telomerase-expressing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Michel M; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2011-07-01

    The role of telomeres and telomerase as a target for cancer therapeutics is an area of continuing interest. This review is intended to provide an update on the field, pointing to areas in which our knowledge remains deficient and exploring the details of the most promising areas being advanced into clinical trials. Topics that will be covered include the role of dysfunctional telomeres in cellular aging and how replicative senescence provides an initial barrier to the emergence of immortalized cells, a hallmark of cancer. As an important translational theme, this review will consider possibilities for selectively targeting telomeres and telomerase to enhance cancer therapy. The role of telomerase as an immunotherapy, as a gene therapy approach using telomerase promoter driven oncolytic viruses and as a small oligonucleotide targeted therapy (Imetelstat) will be discussed. PMID:21332640

  11. Cloning of mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene promoter and identification of proximal core promoter sequences essential for the expression of transgenes in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Si, Shao-Yan; Song, Shu-Jun; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Liu, Jun-Li; Liang, Shuang; Feng, Kai; Zhao, Gang; Tan, Xiao-Qing

    2011-08-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex, whose function is to add motif-specific nucleotides to the end of chromosomes. Telomerase consists of three major subunits, the telomerase RNA template (hTR), the telomerase-associated protein (TEP1) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). TERT is the most important component responsible for the catalytic activity of telomerase and a rate-limiting determinant of the activity. Telomerase activities were at high levels in approximately 90% of mouse cancers or tumor-derived cell lines through TERT transcriptional up-regulation. Unlike human telomerase, telomerase activity exists in colon, liver, ovary and testis but not in brain, heart, stomach and muscle in normal mouse tissues. In this study, we prepared 5' truncations of 1086 bp fragments upstream of the initiating ATG codon of the mTERT gene to construct luciferase reporter gene plasmids, and transfected these plasmids into a normal mouse cell line and several cancer lines to identify the core promoter region essential for transcriptional activation in cancer cells by a luciferase assay. We constructed a eukaryotic expression vector of membrane-expressing staphylococcal endotoxin A (SEA) gene driven by the core promoter region of the mTERT gene and observed if the core promoter region could express the SEA gene in these cancer cells, but not in normal cells following transfection with the construct. The results showed that the transcriptional activities of each fragment of the mTERT gene promoter in the cancer cell lines Hepa1-6, B16 and CT26 were higher than those in NIH3T3 cells, and the proximal 333-bp fragment was the core promoter of the mTERT gene in the cancer cells. The proximal 333-bp fragment was able to make the SEA express on the surface of the cancer cells, but not in NIH3T3 cells. It provides a foundation for cancer targeting gene therapy by using the mTERT gene promoter. PMID:21567104

  12. T-cell independent, B-cell receptor-mediated induction of telomerase activity differs among IGHV mutation-based subgroups of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Damle, Rajendra N; Temburni, Sonal; Banapour, Taraneh; Paul, Santanu; Mongini, Patricia K A; Allen, Steven L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Rai, Kanti R; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2012-09-20

    Although B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) clones with unmutated IGHV genes (U-CLL) exhibit greater telomerase activity than those with mutated IGHV genes (M-CLL), the extent to which B-cell receptor (BCR) triggering contributes to telomerase up-regulation is not known. Therefore, we studied the effect of BCR stimulation on modulating telomerase activity. The multivalent BCR ligand, dextran conjugated anti-μ mAb HB57 (HB57-dex), increased telomerase activity and promoted cell survival and proliferation preferentially in U-CLL cases, whereas the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 blocked HB57-dex induced telomerase activation. Although both U-CLL and M-CLL clones exhibited similar membrane proximal signaling responses to HB57-dex, telomerase activity and cell proliferation, when inducible in M-CLL, differed. B-CLL cells stimulated using bivalent F(ab')(2) -goat anti-μ antibody (goat anti-μ) exhibited higher membrane proximal response in U-CLL than M-CLL cells, whereas telomerase activity, cell survival, and proliferation were induced to lower levels than those induced by HB57-dex. In normal B lymphocytes, HB57-dex induced less protein phosphorylation but more cell proliferation and survival than goat anti-μ. Although both anti-BCR stimuli induced comparable telomerase activity, normal CD5(+) B cells preferentially exhibited higher hTERT positivity than their CD5(-) counterparts. These findings provide an understanding of how BCR-mediated signals impact telomerase modulation in IGHV mutation-based subgroups of B-CLL and normal B cells. PMID:22875913

  13. Structure and function of echinoderm telomerase RNA.

    PubMed

    Podlevsky, Joshua D; Li, Yang; Chen, Julian J-L

    2016-02-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme that requires an integral telomerase RNA (TR) subunit, in addition to the catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), for enzymatic function. The secondary structures of TRs from the three major groups of species, ciliates, fungi, and vertebrates, have been studied extensively and demonstrate dramatic diversity. Herein, we report the first comprehensive secondary structure of TR from echinoderms-marine invertebrates closely related to vertebrates-determined by phylogenetic comparative analysis of 16 TR sequences from three separate echinoderm classes. Similar to vertebrate TR, echinoderm TR contains the highly conserved template/pseudoknot and H/ACA domains. However, echinoderm TR lacks the ancestral CR4/5 structural domain found throughout vertebrate and fungal TRs. Instead, echinoderm TR contains a distinct simple helical region, termed eCR4/5, that is functionally equivalent to the CR4/5 domain. The urchin and brittle star eCR4/5 domains bind specifically to their respective TERT proteins and stimulate telomerase activity. Distinct from vertebrate telomerase, the echinoderm TR template/pseudoknot domain with the TERT protein is sufficient to reconstitute significant telomerase activity. This gain-of-function of the echinoderm template/pseudoknot domain for conferring telomerase activity presumably facilitated the rapid structural evolution of the eCR4/5 domain throughout the echinoderm lineage. Additionally, echinoderm TR utilizes the template-adjacent P1.1 helix as a physical template boundary element to prevent nontelomeric DNA synthesis, a mechanism used by ciliate and fungal TRs. Thus, the chimeric and eccentric structural features of echinoderm TR provide unparalleled insights into the rapid evolution of telomerase RNP structure and function. PMID:26598712

  14. Telomerase Activity in Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counter, Christopher M.; Hirte, Hal W.; Bacchetti, Silvia; Harley, Calvin B.

    1994-04-01

    Telomeres fulfill the dual function of protecting eukaryotic chromosomes from illegitimate recombination and degradation and may aid in chromosome attachment to the nuclear membrane. We have previously shown that telomerase, the enzyme which synthesizes telomeric DNA, is not detected in normal somatic cells and that telomeres shorten with replicative age. In cells immortalized in vitro, activation of telomerase apparently stabilizes telomere length, preventing a critical destabilization of chromosomes, and cell proliferation continues even when telomeres are short. In vivo, telomeres of most tumors are shorter than telomeres of control tissues, suggesting an analogous role for the enzyme. To assess the relevance of telomerase and telomere stability in the development and progression of tumors, we have measured enzyme activity and telomere length in metastatic cells of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We report that extremely short telomeres are maintained in these cells and that tumor cells, but not isogenic nonmalignant cells, express telomerase. Our findings suggest that progression of malignancy is ultimately dependent upon activation of telomerase and that telomerase inhibitors may be effective antitumor drugs.

  15. Role of telomeres and telomerase in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shay, Jerry W.; Wright, Woodring E.

    2012-01-01

    There is mounting evidence for the existence of an important relationship between telomeres and telomerase and cellular aging and cancer. Normal human cells progressively lose telomeres with each cell division until a few short telomeres become uncapped leading to a growth arrest known as replicative aging. In the absence of genomic alterations these cells do not die but remain quiescent producing a different constellation of proteins compared to young quiescent cells. Upon specific genetic and epigenetic alterations, normal human cells bypass replicative senescence and continue to proliferate until many telomere ends become uncapped leading to a phenomenon known as crisis. In crisis cells have critically shortened telomeres but continue to attempt to divide leading to significant cell death (apoptosis) and progressive genomic instability. Rarely, a human cell escapes crisis and these cells almost universally express the ribonucleoprotein, telomerase, and maintain stable but short telomeres. The activation of telomerase may be thought of as a mechanism to slow down the rate genomic instability due to dysfunctional telomeres. While telomerase does not drive the oncogenic process, it is permissive and required for the sustain growth of most advanced cancers. Since telomerase is not expressed in most normal human cells, this has led to the development of targeted telomerase cancer therapeutic approaches that are presently in advanced clinical trials. PMID:22015685

  16. Roles of telomeres and telomerase in cancer, and advances in telomerase-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Mohammad A; Ansari, Shakeel A; Alqahtani, Mohammed H; Shay, Jerry W

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres maintain genomic integrity in normal cells, and their progressive shortening during successive cell divisions induces chromosomal instability. In the large majority of cancer cells, telomere length is maintained by telomerase. Thus, telomere length and telomerase activity are crucial for cancer initiation and the survival of tumors. Several pathways that regulate telomere length have been identified, and genome-scale studies have helped in mapping genes that are involved in telomere length control. Additionally, genomic screening for recurrent human telomerase gene hTERT promoter mutations and mutations in genes involved in the alternative lengthening of telomeres pathway, such as ATRX and DAXX, has elucidated how these genomic changes contribute to the activation of telomere maintenance mechanisms in cancer cells. Attempts have also been made to develop telomere length- and telomerase-based diagnostic tools and anticancer therapeutics. Recent efforts have revealed key aspects of telomerase assembly, intracellular trafficking and recruitment to telomeres for completing DNA synthesis, which may provide novel targets for the development of anticancer agents. Here, we summarize telomere organization and function and its role in oncogenesis. We also highlight genomic mutations that lead to reactivation of telomerase, and mechanisms of telomerase reconstitution and trafficking that shed light on its function in cancer initiation and tumor development. Additionally, recent advances in the clinical development of telomerase inhibitors, as well as potential novel targets, will be summarized. PMID:27323951

  17. Telomerase Activation in Atherosclerosis and Induction of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Expression by Inflammatory Stimuli in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gizard, Florence; Heywood, Elizabeth B.; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Zhao, Yue; Jones, Karrie L.; Cudejko, Cèline; Post, Ginell R.; Staels, Bart; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Objective Telomerase serves as a critical regulator of tissue renewal. Although telomerase activity is inducible in response to various environmental cues, it remains unknown whether telomerase is activated during the inflammatory remodeling underlying atherosclerosis formation. To address this question, we investigated in the present study the regulation of telomerase in macrophages and during atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor-deficient mice. Methods and Results We demonstrate that inflammatory stimuli activate telomerase in macrophages by inducing the expression of the catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified a previously unrecognized NF-κB response element in the TERT promoter, to which NF-κB is recruited during inflammation. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling completely abolished the induction of TERT expression, characterizing TERT as a bona fide NF-κB target gene. Furthermore, functional experiments revealed that TERT-deficiency results in a senescent cell phenotype. Finally, we demonstrate high levels of TERT expression in macrophages of human atherosclerotic lesions and establish that telomerase is activated during atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor-deficient mice. Conclusion These results characterize TERT as a previously unrecognized NF-κB target gene in macrophages and demonstrate that telomerase is activated during atherosclerosis. This induction of TERT expression prevents macrophage senescence and may have important implications for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:21106948

  18. Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Puterman, E; Karan, Lori; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase activity plays an essential role in cel0l survival, by lengthening telomeres and promoting cell growth and longevity. It is now possible to quantify the low levels of telomerase activity in human leukocytes. Low basal telomerase activity has been related to chronic stress in people and to chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vitro. Here we test whether leukocyte telomerase activity changes under acute psychological stress. We exposed 44 elderly women, including 22 high stress dementia caregivers and 22 matched low stress controls, to a brief laboratory psychological stressor, while examining changes in telomerase activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At baseline, caregivers had lower telomerase activity levels than controls, but during stress telomerase activity increased similarly in both groups. Across the entire sample, subsequent telomerase activity increased by 18% one hour after the end of the stressor (p<0.01). The increase in telomerase activity was independent of changes in numbers or percentages of monocytes, lymphocytes, and specific T cell types, although we cannot fully rule out some potential contribution from immune cell redistribution in the change in telomerase activity. Telomerase activity increases were associated with greater cortisol increases in response to the stressor. Lastly, psychological response to the tasks (greater threat perception) was also related to greater telomerase activity increases in controls. These findings uncover novel relationships of dynamic telomerase activity with exposure to an acute stressor, and with two classic aspects of the stress response -- perceived psychological stress and neuroendocrine (cortisol) responses to the stressor. PMID:20018236

  19. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  20. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  1. Radiation induced carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; Amendola, M.A.; McClatchey, K.D.

    1985-07-01

    A squamous cell carcinoma presented in a 20 year old female nonsmoker three years after receiving a high dosage of radiation therapy to the base of the skull, face and entire neuroaxis and intense combination chemotherapy for a parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is reported. The larynx received a dose of about 3,500 rads over an eight week period. This dosage in conjunction with the associated intense chemotherapy regimen given to the patient may explain the appearance of a radiation induced tumor in an unusually short latent period. This certainly represents a risk in young patients in whom an aggressive combined approach is taken and the physician should be aware of.

  2. Radiation-induced autophagy: mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Madhuri; Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Das, Asmita; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S; Sharma, Kulbhushan

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionary conserved, indispensable, lysosome-mediated degradation process, which helps in maintaining homeostasis during various cellular traumas. During stress, a context-dependent role of autophagy has been observed which drives the cell towards survival or death depending upon the type, time, and extent of the damage. The process of autophagy is stimulated during various cellular insults, e.g. oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, imbalances in calcium homeostasis, and altered mitochondrial potential. Ionizing radiation causes ROS-dependent as well as ROS-independent damage in cells that involve macromolecular (mainly DNA) damage, as well as ER stress induction, both capable of inducing autophagy. This review summarizes the current understanding on the roles of oxidative stress, ER stress, DNA damage, altered mitochondrial potential, and calcium imbalance in radiation-induced autophagy as well as the merits and limitations of targeting autophagy as an approach for radioprotection and radiosensitization. PMID:26764568

  3. A Yeast Chemical Genetic Screen Identifies Inhibitors of Human Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lai Hong; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Spitzer, Michaela; White, Rachel; Tyers, Mike; Harrington, Lea

    2013-01-01

    Summary Telomerase comprises a reverse transcriptase and an internal RNA template that maintains telomeres in many eukaryotes, and it is a well-validated cancer target. However, there is a dearth of small molecules with efficacy against human telomerase in vivo. We developed a surrogate yeast high-throughput assay to identify human telomerase inhibitors. The reversibility of growth arrest induced by active human telomerase was assessed against a library of 678 compounds preselected for bioactivity in S. cerevisiae. Four of eight compounds identified reproducibly restored growth to strains expressing active human telomerase, and three of these four compounds also specifically inhibited purified human telomerase in vitro. These compounds represent probes for human telomerase function, and potential entry points for development of lead compounds against telomerase-positive cancers. PMID:23521791

  4. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates telomerase activity in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wetterau, Lawrence A; Francis, Malik J; Ma, Liqun; Cohen, Pinchas

    2003-07-01

    IGF-I has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. We sought to establish a role for IGF-I in the regulation of telomerase, an enzyme critically involved in cancer cell immortalization. Telomerase activity was assayed in LAPC-4, PC-3, and DU-145 prostate cancer cell lines treated with and without IGF-I/IGF-I analogs. Relative expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA and protein was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and Western immunoblot, respectively. IGF-I stimulated baseline telomerase activity in all three cell lines, ranging from 2- to 10-fold (P < 0.05). Enhancement was noted at IGF concentrations as low as 10 ng/ml and was maximal at 100 ng/ml. Stimulation was noted by 0.5 h, was maximal by 8 h, and persisted to 48 h. A similar 3-fold enhancement (P < 0.01) was noted in response to Long-R3 IGF-I, but not in response to [Ala(31),Leu(60)]IGF-I. Pretreatment with the Akt kinase inhibitor wortmannin abolished the stimulatory IGF effect, whereas blockade of MAPK activity did not. Lastly, IGF-I provoked a 2-fold increase in hTERT mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.01). In summary, IGF-I clearly stimulates telomerase activity in prostate cancer cells through a dual mode of action, including early rapid effects probably involving phosphorylation of hTERT by Akt and later up-regulation of hTERT expression. PMID:12843187

  5. MYC-Driven Neuroblastomas Are Addicted to a Telomerase-Independent Function of Dyskerin.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Rosemary; Tran, Sieu L; Maritz, Michelle F; Liu, Bing; Kong, Cheng Fei; Purgato, Stefania; Yang, Chen; Murray, Jayne; Russell, Amanda J; Flemming, Claudia L; von Jonquieres, Georg; Pickett, Hilda A; London, Wendy B; Haber, Michelle; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Norris, Murray D; Perini, Giovanni; Fletcher, Jamie I; MacKenzie, Karen L

    2016-06-15

    The RNA-binding protein dyskerin, encoded by the DKC1 gene, functions as a core component of the telomerase holoenzyme as well as ribonuclear protein complexes involved in RNA processing and ribosome biogenesis. The diverse roles of dyskerin across many facets of RNA biology implicate its potential contribution to malignancy. In this study, we examined the expression and function of dyskerin in neuroblastoma. We show that DKC1 mRNA levels were elevated relative to normal cells across a panel of 15 neuroblastoma cell lines, where both N-Myc and c-Myc directly targeted the DKC1 promoter. Upregulation of MYCN was shown to dramatically increase DKC1 expression. In two independent neuroblastoma patient cohorts, high DKC1 expression correlated strongly with poor event-free and overall survival (P < 0.0001), independently of established prognostic factors. RNAi-mediated depletion of dyskerin inhibited neuroblastoma cell proliferation, including cells immortalized via the telomerase-independent ALT mechanism. Furthermore, dyskerin attenuation impaired anchorage-independent proliferation and tumor growth. Overexpression of the telomerase RNA component, hTR, demonstrated that this proliferative impairment was not a consequence of telomerase suppression. Instead, ribosomal stress, evidenced by depletion of small nucleolar RNAs and nuclear dispersal of ribosomal proteins, was the likely cause of the proliferative impairment in dyskerin-depleted cells. Accordingly, dyskerin suppression caused p53-dependent G1 cell-cycle arrest in p53 wild-type cells, and a p53-independent pathway impaired proliferation in cells with p53 dysfunction. Together, our findings highlight dyskerin as a new therapeutic target in neuroblastoma with crucial telomerase-independent functions and broader implications for the spectrum of malignancies driven by MYC family oncogenes. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3604-17. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197171

  6. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, S.; Nishio, S.; Morioka, T.; Fukui, M.; Kitamura, K.; Hikita, K. )

    1989-10-01

    The case of a patient who developed osteosarcoma in the sphenoid bone 15 years after radiation therapy for a craniopharyngioma is reported. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the sphenoid bone has not been reported previously. Reported cases of radiation-induced osteosarcomas are reviewed.

  7. Theory Of Radiation-Induced Attenuation In Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tsuen-Hsi; Johnston, Alan R.

    1996-01-01

    Improved theory of radiation-induced attenuation of light in optical fibers accounts for effects of dose rates. Based on kinetic aspects of fundamental physics of color centers induced in optical fibers by radiation. Induced attenuation is proportional to density of color centers, and part of this density decays by thermal-annealing/recombination process after irradiation.

  8. Combined inhibition of TGFβ and PDGF signaling attenuates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dadrich, Monika; Nicolay, Nils H.; Flechsig, Paul; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Hoeltgen, Line; Roeder, Falk; Hauser, Kai; Tietz, Alexandra; Jenne, Jürgen; Lopez, Ramon; Roehrich, Manuel; Wirkner, Ute; Lahn, Michael; Huber, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Radiotherapy (RT) is a mainstay for the treatment of lung cancer, but the effective dose is often limited by the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) play crucial roles in the development of these diseases, but the effects of dual growth factor inhibition on pulmonary fibrosis development remain unclear. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20 Gy to the thorax to induce pulmonary fibrosis. PDGF receptor inhibitors SU9518 and SU14816 (imatinib) and TGFβ receptor inhibitor galunisertib were applied individually or in combinations after RT. Lung density and septal fibrosis were measured by high-resolution CT and MRI. Lung histology and gene expression analyses were performed and Osteopontin levels were studied. Results: Treatment with SU9518, SU14816 or galunisertib individually attenuated radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and decreased radiological and histological signs of lung damage. Combining PDGF and TGFβ inhibitors showed to be feasible and safe in a mouse model, and dual inhibition significantly attenuated radiation-induced lung damage and extended mouse survival compared to blockage of either pathway alone. Gene expression analysis of irradiated lung tissue showed upregulation of PDGF and TGFβ-dependent signaling components by thoracic irradiation, and upregulation patterns show crosstalk between downstream mediators of the PDGF and TGFβ pathways. Conclusion: Combined small-molecule inhibition of PDGF and TGFβ signaling is a safe and effective treatment for radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic lung diseases in humans. Translational statement: RT is an effective treatment modality for cancer with limitations due to acute and chronic toxicities, where TGFβ and PDGF play a key role. Here, we show that a combined

  9. Combined inhibition of TGFβ and PDGF signaling attenuates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dadrich, Monika; Nicolay, Nils H; Flechsig, Paul; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Hoeltgen, Line; Roeder, Falk; Hauser, Kai; Tietz, Alexandra; Jenne, Jürgen; Lopez, Ramon; Roehrich, Manuel; Wirkner, Ute; Lahn, Michael; Huber, Peter E

    2016-05-01

    Background : Radiotherapy (RT) is a mainstay for the treatment of lung cancer, but the effective dose is often limited by the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) play crucial roles in the development of these diseases, but the effects of dual growth factor inhibition on pulmonary fibrosis development remain unclear. Methods : C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20 Gy to the thorax to induce pulmonary fibrosis. PDGF receptor inhibitors SU9518 and SU14816 (imatinib) and TGFβ receptor inhibitor galunisertib were applied individually or in combinations after RT. Lung density and septal fibrosis were measured by high-resolution CT and MRI. Lung histology and gene expression analyses were performed and Osteopontin levels were studied. Results : Treatment with SU9518, SU14816 or galunisertib individually attenuated radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and decreased radiological and histological signs of lung damage. Combining PDGF and TGFβ inhibitors showed to be feasible and safe in a mouse model, and dual inhibition significantly attenuated radiation-induced lung damage and extended mouse survival compared to blockage of either pathway alone. Gene expression analysis of irradiated lung tissue showed upregulation of PDGF and TGFβ-dependent signaling components by thoracic irradiation, and upregulation patterns show crosstalk between downstream mediators of the PDGF and TGFβ pathways. Conclusion : Combined small-molecule inhibition of PDGF and TGFβ signaling is a safe and effective treatment for radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic lung diseases in humans. Translational statement : RT is an effective treatment modality for cancer with limitations due to acute and chronic toxicities, where TGFβ and PDGF play a key role. Here, we show that a combined inhibition of

  10. Cathodoluminescence of radiation-induced zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Nishido, H.; Kayama, M.; Noumi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Zircon occurs as a common accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, and maintains much information on thermal history, metamorphic process and natural radiation dose accumulated in the mineral. U-Pb zircon dating (e.g., SHRIMP) is an important tool to interpret a history of the minerals at a micrometer-scale, where cathodoluminescence (CL) image has been used for identification of internal zones and domains having different chemical compositions and/or structures with a high spatial resolution. The CL of zircon is derived from various types of emission centers, which are derived from impurities such as rare earth elements (REE) and structural defects. In fact, the CL features of zircon are closely related to metamorphic process and radiation from contained radionuclides as well as geochemical condition of its formation. Most zircon has yellow emission, which seems to be assigned to UO2 centers or radiation-induced defect during metamictization of the lattice by alpha particles from the decay of U and Th. In this study, the radiation effects on zircon CL have been studied for He+ ion-implanted samples annealed at various temperatures to clarify radiation-induced defect centers involved with the yellow CL emission in zircon. Single crystals of zircon from Malawi (MZ), Takidani granodiorite (TZ) and Kurobegawa granite (KZ) were selected for He+ ion implantation experiments. The polished plates of the samples were implanted by He+ ion 4.0 MeV corresponding to energy of alpha particle from 238 U and 232Th. CL spectra in the range from 300 to 800 nm with 1 nm step were measured by a scanning electron microscopy-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL). CL spectra of untreated and annealed zircon show emission bands at ~370 nm assigned to intrinsic defect centers and at ~480, ~580 and ~760 nm to trivalent Dy impurity centers (Cesbron et al., 1995; Gaft et al, 2005). CL emissions in the yellow-region were observed in untreated zircon. The TZ and KZ indicate

  11. Gamma-Tocotrienol Modulates Radiation-Induced MicroRNA Expression in Mouse Spleen.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanchita P; Pathak, Rupak; Kumar, Parameet; Biswas, Shukla; Bhattacharyya, Sharmistha; Kumar, Vidya P; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Biswas, Roopa

    2016-05-01

    Ionizing radiation causes depletion of hematopoietic cells and enhances the risk of developing secondary hematopoietic malignancies. Vitamin E analog gamma-tocotrienol (GT3), which has anticancer properties, promotes postirradiation hematopoietic cell recovery by enhancing spleen colony-forming capacity, and provides protection against radiation-induced lethality in mice. However, the underlying molecular mechanism involved in GT3-mediated postirradiation survival is not clearly understood. Recent studies have shown that natural dietary products including vitamin E provide a benefit to biological systems by modulating microRNA (miR) expression. In this study, we show that GT3 differentially modulates the miR footprint in the spleen of irradiated mice compared to controls at early times (day 1), as well as later times (day 4 and 15) after total-body irradiation. We observed that miR expression was altered in a dose- and time-dependent manner in GT3-pretreated spleen tissues from total-body irradiated mice. GT3 appeared to affect the expression of a number of radiation-modulated miRs known to be involved in hematopoiesis and lymphogenesis. Moreover, GT3 pretreatment also suppressed the upregulation of radiation-induced p53, suggesting the function of GT3 in the prevention of radiation-induced damage to the spleen. In addition, we have shown that GT3 significantly reduced serum levels of Flt3L, a biomarker of radiation-induced bone marrow aplasia. Further in silico analyses of the effect of GT3 implied the association of p38 MAPK, ERK and insulin signaling pathways. Our study provides initial insight into the mechanism by which GT3 mediates protection of spleen after total-body irradiation. PMID:27128741

  12. Alternatively Spliced Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Variants Lacking Telomerase Activity Stimulate Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Hrdličková, Radmila; Nehyba, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Eight human and six chicken novel alternatively spliced (AS) variants of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) were identified, including a human variant (Δ4-13) containing an in-frame deletion which removed exons 4 through 13, encoding the catalytic domain of telomerase. This variant was expressed in telomerase-negative normal cells and tissues as well as in transformed telomerase-positive cell lines and cells which employ an alternative method to maintain telomere length. The overexpression of the Δ4-13 variant significantly elevated the proliferation rates of several cell types without enhancing telomerase activity, while decreasing the endogenous expression of this variant by use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology reduced cell proliferation. The expression of the Δ4-13 variant stimulated Wnt signaling. In chicken cells, AS TERT variants containing internal deletions or insertions that eliminated or reduced telomerase activity also enhanced cell proliferation. This is the first report that naturally occurring AS TERT variants which lack telomerase activity stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:22907755

  13. TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE MODULATION BY BERGAMOT POLYPHENOLIC FRACTION IN EXPERIMENTAL PHOTOAGEING IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTES.

    PubMed

    Nisticò, S; Ehrlich, J; Gliozzi, M; Maiuolo, J; Del Duca, E; Muscoli, C; Mollace, V

    2015-01-01

    Photoageing represents the addition of extrinsic chronic ultraviolet radiation-induced damage on intrinsic ageing and accounts for most age-associated changes in skin appearance. In this study, we evaluated the effect of 38% BPF, a highly concentrated extract of the bergamot fruit (Citrus bergamia) on UVB-induced photoageing by examining inflammatory cytokine expression, telomere length/telomerase alterations and cellular viability in human immortalized HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results suggest that 38% BPF protects HaCaT cells against UVB-induced oxidative stress and markers of photoageing in a dose-dependent manner and could be a useful supplement in skin care products. Together with antioxidant properties, BPF, a highly concentrated extract of the bergamot fruit, appears to modulate basic cellular signal transduction pathways leading to anti-proliferative, anti-aging and immune modulating responses. PMID:26403416

  14. Estrogen Protects against Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Valluri, Shailaja; Lopez, Jennifer; Greer, Falon; DesRosiers, Colleen; Caperell-Grant, Andrea; Mendonca, Marc S.; Bigsby, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Cataractogenesis is a complication of radiotherapy when the eye is included in the treatment field. Low doses of densely ionizing space radiation may also result in an increased risk of cataracts in astronauts. We previously reported that estrogen (17-β-estradiol), when administered to ovariectomized rats commencing 1 week before γ irradiation of the eye and continuously thereafter, results in a significant increase in the rate and incidence of cataract formation and a decreased latent period compared to an ovariectomized control group. We therefore concluded that estrogen accelerates progression of radiation-induced opacification. We now show that estrogen, if administered continuously, but commencing after irradiation, protects against radiation cataractogenesis. Both the rate of progression and incidence of cataracts were greatly reduced in ovariectomized rats that received estrogen treatment after irradiation compared to ovariectomized rats. As in our previous study, estradiol administered 1 week prior to irradiation at the time of ovariectomy and throughout the period of observation produced an enhanced rate of cataract progression. Estrogen administered for only 1 week prior to irradiation had no effect on the rate of progression but resulted in a slight reduction in the incidence. We conclude that estrogen may enhance or protect against radiation cataractogenesis, depending on when it is administered relative to the time of irradiation, and may differentially modulate the initiation and progression phases of cataractogenesis. These data have important implications for astronauts and radiotherapy patients. PMID:19138041

  15. Organotypic culture in three dimensions prevents radiation-induced transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Coquelin, Melissa; Luitel, Krishna; Batten, Kimberly; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of radiation in two-dimensional (2D) cell culture conditions may not recapitulate tissue responses as modeled in three-dimensional (3D) organotypic culture. In this study, we determined if the frequency of radiation-induced transformation and cancer progression differed in 3D compared to 2D culture. Telomerase immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with shTP53 and mutant KRas expression were exposed to various types of radiation (gamma, +H, 56Fe) in either 2D or 3D culture. After irradiation, 3D structures were dissociated and passaged as a monolayer followed by measurement of transformation, cell growth and expression analysis. Cells irradiated in 3D produced significantly fewer and smaller colonies in soft agar than their 2D-irradiated counterparts (gamma P = 0.0004; +H P = 0.049; 56Fe P < 0.0001). The cell culture conditions did not affect cell killing, the ability of cells to survive in a colony formation assay, and proliferation rates after radiation—implying there was no selection against cells in or dissociated from 3D conditions. However, DNA damage repair and apoptosis markers were increased in 2D cells compared to 3D cells after radiation. Ideally, expanding the utility of 3D culture will allow for a better understanding of the biological consequences of radiation exposure. PMID:27539227

  16. Organotypic culture in three dimensions prevents radiation-induced transformation in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Coquelin, Melissa; Luitel, Krishna; Batten, Kimberly; Shay, Jerry W

    2016-01-01

    The effects of radiation in two-dimensional (2D) cell culture conditions may not recapitulate tissue responses as modeled in three-dimensional (3D) organotypic culture. In this study, we determined if the frequency of radiation-induced transformation and cancer progression differed in 3D compared to 2D culture. Telomerase immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with shTP53 and mutant KRas expression were exposed to various types of radiation (gamma, (+)H, (56)Fe) in either 2D or 3D culture. After irradiation, 3D structures were dissociated and passaged as a monolayer followed by measurement of transformation, cell growth and expression analysis. Cells irradiated in 3D produced significantly fewer and smaller colonies in soft agar than their 2D-irradiated counterparts (gamma P = 0.0004; (+)H P = 0.049; (56)Fe P < 0.0001). The cell culture conditions did not affect cell killing, the ability of cells to survive in a colony formation assay, and proliferation rates after radiation-implying there was no selection against cells in or dissociated from 3D conditions. However, DNA damage repair and apoptosis markers were increased in 2D cells compared to 3D cells after radiation. Ideally, expanding the utility of 3D culture will allow for a better understanding of the biological consequences of radiation exposure. PMID:27539227

  17. MiR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuai; Ding, Nan; Pei, Hailong; Hu, Wentao; Wei, Wenjun; Zhang, Xurui; Zhou, Guangming; Wang, Jufang

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are well-established phenomena, in which DNA damage responses are induced not only in the directly irradiated cells but also in the non-irradiated bystander cells through intercellular signal transmission. Recent studies hint that bystander effects are possibly mediated via small non-coding RNAs, especially microRNAs. Thus, more details about the roles of microRNA in bystander effects are urgently needed to be elucidated. Here we demonstrated that bystander effects were induced in human fetal lung MRC-5 fibroblasts through medium-mediated way by different types of radiation. We identified a set of differentially expressed microRNAs in the cell culture medium after irradiation, among which the up-regulation of miR-21 was further verified with qRT-PCR. In addition, we found significant upregulation of miR-21 in both directly irradiated cells and bystander cells, which was confirmed by the expression of miR-21 precursor and its target genes. Transfection of miR-21 mimics into non-irradiated MRC-5 cells caused bystander-like effects. Taken together, our data reveals that miR-21 is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects. Elucidation of such a miRNA-mediated bystander effect is of utmost importance in understanding the biological processes related to ionizing radiation and cell-to-cell communication. PMID:25483031

  18. New prospects for targeting telomerase beyond the telomere.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Greg M; MacKenzie, Karen L

    2016-08-01

    Telomerase activity is responsible for the maintenance of chromosome end structures (telomeres) and cancer cell immortality in most human malignancies, making telomerase an attractive therapeutic target. The rationale for targeting components of the telomerase holoenzyme has been strengthened by accumulating evidence indicating that these molecules have extra-telomeric functions in tumour cell survival and proliferation. This Review discusses current knowledge of the biogenesis, structure and multiple functions of telomerase-associated molecules intertwined with recent advances in drug discovery approaches. We also describe the fertile ground available for the pursuit of next-generation small-molecule inhibitors of telomerase. PMID:27339602

  19. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  20. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  1. Telomerase Activity in the Various Regions of Mouse Brain: Non-Radioactive Telomerase Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) Assay

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Yossi; Admoni, Tamar; Priel, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein, is responsible for maintaining the telomere length and therefore promoting genomic integrity, proliferation, and lifespan. In addition, telomerase protects the mitochondria from oxidative stress and confers resistance to apoptosis, suggesting its possible importance for the surviving of non-mitotic, highly active cells such as neurons. We previously demonstrated the ability of novel telomerase activators to increase telomerase activity and expression in the various mouse brain regions and to protect motor neurons cells from oxidative stress. These results strengthen the notion that telomerase is involved in the protection of neurons from various lesions. To underline the role of telomerase in the brain, we here compare the activity of telomerase in male and female mouse brain and its dependence on age. TRAP assay is a standard method for detecting telomerase activity in various tissues or cell lines. Here we demonstrate the analysis of telomerase activity in three regions of the mouse brain by non-denaturing protein extraction using CHAPS lysis buffer followed by modification of the standard TRAP assay. In this 2-step assay, endogenous telomerase elongates a specific telomerase substrate (TS primer) by adding TTAGGG 6 bp repeats (telomerase reaction). The telomerase reaction products are amplified by PCR reaction creating a DNA ladder of 6 bp increments. The analysis of the DNA ladder is made by 4.5% high resolution agarose gel electrophoresis followed by staining with highly sensitive nucleic acid stain. Compared to the traditional TRAP assay that utilize 32P labeled radioactive dCTP's for DNA detection and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for resolving the DNA ladder, this protocol offers a non-toxic time saving TRAP assay for evaluating telomerase activity in the mouse brain, demonstrating the ability to detect differences in telomerase activity in the various female and male mouse brain region. PMID:25225832

  2. Telomerase activity in the various regions of mouse brain: non-radioactive telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay.

    PubMed

    Grin, Yossi; Admoni, Tamar; Priel, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein, is responsible for maintaining the telomere length and therefore promoting genomic integrity, proliferation, and lifespan. In addition, telomerase protects the mitochondria from oxidative stress and confers resistance to apoptosis, suggesting its possible importance for the surviving of non-mitotic, highly active cells such as neurons. We previously demonstrated the ability of novel telomerase activators to increase telomerase activity and expression in the various mouse brain regions and to protect motor neurons cells from oxidative stress. These results strengthen the notion that telomerase is involved in the protection of neurons from various lesions. To underline the role of telomerase in the brain, we here compare the activity of telomerase in male and female mouse brain and its dependence on age. TRAP assay is a standard method for detecting telomerase activity in various tissues or cell lines. Here we demonstrate the analysis of telomerase activity in three regions of the mouse brain by non-denaturing protein extraction using CHAPS lysis buffer followed by modification of the standard TRAP assay. In this 2-step assay, endogenous telomerase elongates a specific telomerase substrate (TS primer) by adding TTAGGG 6 bp repeats (telomerase reaction). The telomerase reaction products are amplified by PCR reaction creating a DNA ladder of 6 bp increments. The analysis of the DNA ladder is made by 4.5% high resolution agarose gel electrophoresis followed by staining with highly sensitive nucleic acid stain. Compared to the traditional TRAP assay that utilize (32)P labeled radioactive dCTP's for DNA detection and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for resolving the DNA ladder, this protocol offers a non-toxic time saving TRAP assay for evaluating telomerase activity in the mouse brain, demonstrating the ability to detect differences in telomerase activity in the various female and male mouse brain region. PMID:25225832

  3. Telomerase activity in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dobija-Kubica, Katarzyna; Bruliński, Krzysztof; Rogoziński, Paweł; Wiczkowski, Andrzej; Gawrychowska, Agata; Gawrychowski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High telomerase activity has been detected in the majority of malignant neoplasms including lung cancer. The purpose of the study was to attempt to use telomerase activity as a prognostic factor in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods Telomerase activity was analyzed in 47 tissue specimens taken from patients with NSCLC. The control group consisted of 30 specimens of non-cancerous lung parenchyma. Telomerase activity was measured by means of the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). Results Telomerase activity in the neoplastic tissue was significantly higher than in the lung parenchyma that was free from neoplastic infiltration. There was no significant association between telomerase activity and age, gender, tobacco smoking, histological type of the tumor, or staging (pTNM). No association was found between the level of telomerase activity in NSCLC specimens and the two-year survival rate of patients (p = 0.326). A higher level of telomerase activity in poorly differentiated tumors (G3) as compared to moderately differentiated tumors (G2) was detected (p = 0.008). A positive association was identified between telomerase activity in pulmonary parenchyma free from tumor infiltration and the presence of leukocyte infiltration (p = 0.0001). Conclusions No association was found between the level of telomerase activity in NSCLC specimens and the two-year survival rate of patients. The study has revealed a positive association between telomerase activity and the grade of differentiation (G) in NSCLC. PMID:27212973

  4. SMN and coilin negatively regulate dyskerin association with telomerase RNA.

    PubMed

    Poole, Aaron R; Hebert, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein comprising telomerase RNA and associated proteins. The formation of the telomerase holoenzyme takes place in the Cajal body (CB), a subnuclear domain that participates in the formation of ribonucleoproteins. CBs also contribute to the delivery of telomerase to telomeres. The protein WRAP53 is enriched within the CB and is instrumental for the targeting of telomerase RNA to CBs. Two other CB proteins, SMN and coilin, are also suspected of taking part in some aspect of telomerase biogenesis. Here we demonstrate newly discovered associations between SMN and coilin with telomerase components, and further show that reduction of SMN or coilin is correlated with increased association of telomerase RNA with one these components, dyskerin. These findings argue that SMN and coilin may negatively regulate the formation of telomerase. Furthermore, clinically defined SMN mutants found in individuals with spinal muscular atrophy are altered in their association with telomerase complex proteins. Additionally, we observe that a coilin derivative also associates with dyskerin, and the amount of this protein in the complex is regulated by SMN, WRAP53 and coilin levels. Collectively, our findings bolster the link between SMN, coilin and the coilin derivative in the biogenesis of telomerase. PMID:27215323

  5. SMN and coilin negatively regulate dyskerin association with telomerase RNA

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein comprising telomerase RNA and associated proteins. The formation of the telomerase holoenzyme takes place in the Cajal body (CB), a subnuclear domain that participates in the formation of ribonucleoproteins. CBs also contribute to the delivery of telomerase to telomeres. The protein WRAP53 is enriched within the CB and is instrumental for the targeting of telomerase RNA to CBs. Two other CB proteins, SMN and coilin, are also suspected of taking part in some aspect of telomerase biogenesis. Here we demonstrate newly discovered associations between SMN and coilin with telomerase components, and further show that reduction of SMN or coilin is correlated with increased association of telomerase RNA with one these components, dyskerin. These findings argue that SMN and coilin may negatively regulate the formation of telomerase. Furthermore, clinically defined SMN mutants found in individuals with spinal muscular atrophy are altered in their association with telomerase complex proteins. Additionally, we observe that a coilin derivative also associates with dyskerin, and the amount of this protein in the complex is regulated by SMN, WRAP53 and coilin levels. Collectively, our findings bolster the link between SMN, coilin and the coilin derivative in the biogenesis of telomerase. PMID:27215323

  6. Evolutionary perspectives of telomerase RNA structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Podlevsky, Joshua D.; Chen, Julian J.-L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Telomerase is the eukaryotic solution to the ‘end-replication problem’ of linear chromosomes by synthesising the highly repetitive DNA constituent of telomeres, the nucleoprotein cap that protects chromosome termini. Functioning as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme, telomerase is minimally composed of the highly conserved catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and essential telomerase RNA (TR) component. Beyond merely providing the template for telomeric DNA synthesis, TR is an innate telomerase component and directly facilitates enzymatic function. TR accomplishes this by having evolved structural elements for stable assembly with the TERT protein and the regulation of the telomerase catalytic cycle. Despite its prominence and prevalence, TR has profoundly diverged in length, sequence, and biogenesis pathway among distinct evolutionary lineages. This diversity has generated numerous structural and mechanistic solutions for ensuring proper RNP formation and high fidelity telomeric DNA synthesis. Telomerase provides unique insights into RNA and protein coevolution within RNP enzymes. PMID:27359343

  7. Single-molecule Analysis of Telomerase Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hengesbach, Martin; Akiyama, Benjamin M.; Stone, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The telomerase ribonucleoprotein is a specialized reverse transcriptase required to maintain protective chromosome end-capping structures called telomeres. In most cells, telomerase is not active and the natural shortening of telomeres with each round of DNA replication ultimately triggers cell growth arrest. In contrast, the presence of telomerase confers a high level of renewal capacity upon rapidly dividing cells. Telomerase is aberrantly activated in 90% of human cancers and thus represents an important target for anticancer therapeutics. However, the naturally low abundance of telomerase has hampered efforts to obtain high-resolution models for telomerase structure and function. To circumvent these challenges, single molecule techniques have recently been employed to investigate telomerase assembly, structure, and catalysis. PMID:22057212

  8. Roles for RNA in Telomerase Nucleotide and Repeat Addition Processivity

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Cary K.; Miller, Michael C.; Collins, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase with two subunits critical for catalytic activity, the protein telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomerase RNA. In this study, we establish additional roles of the telomerase RNA subunit by demonstrating that RNA motifs stimulate the processivity of nucleotide and repeat addition. These functions are both functionally and physically separable from the roles of other RNA motifs in establishing a properly defined template. Binding of Tetrahymena telomerase RNA stem IV to TERT enhances nucleotide addition processivity, while a cooperation of the RNA pseudoknot and stem IV promotes repeat addition processivity. The low processivity of DNA synthesis by telomerase ribonucleoproteins lacking the pseudoknot and/or stem IV can be rescued by addition of the deleted region in trans. These findings demonstrate RNA elements with roles in telomerase elongation processivity that are distinct from RNA elements that specify the internal template. PMID:12820978

  9. Telomerase at the intersection of cancer and aging

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Bruno Bernardes; Blasco, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Although cancer and aging have been studied as independent diseases, mounting evidence suggest that cancer is an aging-associated disease and that cancer and aging share many molecular pathways. In particular, recent studies validated telomerase activation as a potential therapeutic target for age-related diseases, and at the same time, abnormal telomerase expression and telomerase mutations have been associated with many different types of human tumors. Here, we revisit the connection of telomerase to cancer and aging in light of recent findings supporting a role for telomerase not only in telomere elongation, but also in metabolic fitness and Wnt activation. Understanding the physiological impact of telomerase regulation is fundamental considering the therapeutic strategies that are being developed involving telomerase modulation. PMID:23876621

  10. Evolutionary perspectives of telomerase RNA structure and function.

    PubMed

    Podlevsky, Joshua D; Chen, Julian J-L

    2016-08-01

    Telomerase is the eukaryotic solution to the 'end-replication problem' of linear chromosomes by synthesising the highly repetitive DNA constituent of telomeres, the nucleoprotein cap that protects chromosome termini. Functioning as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme, telomerase is minimally composed of the highly conserved catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and essential telomerase RNA (TR) component. Beyond merely providing the template for telomeric DNA synthesis, TR is an innate telomerase component and directly facilitates enzymatic function. TR accomplishes this by having evolved structural elements for stable assembly with the TERT protein and the regulation of the telomerase catalytic cycle. Despite its prominence and prevalence, TR has profoundly diverged in length, sequence, and biogenesis pathway among distinct evolutionary lineages. This diversity has generated numerous structural and mechanistic solutions for ensuring proper RNP formation and high fidelity telomeric DNA synthesis. Telomerase provides unique insights into RNA and protein coevolution within RNP enzymes. PMID:27359343

  11. Telomerase stimulates ribosomal DNA transcription under hyperproliferative conditions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Omar Garcia; Assfalg, Robin; Koch, Sylvia; Schelling, Adrian; Meena, Jitendra K; Kraus, Johann; Lechel, Andre; Katz, Sarah-Fee; Benes, Vladimir; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Kestler, Hans A; Günes, Cagatay; Iben, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    In addition to performing its canonical function, Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) has been shown to participate in cellular processes independent of telomerase activity. Furthermore, although TERT mainly localizes to Cajal bodies, it is also present within the nucleolus. Because the nucleolus is the site of rDNA transcription, we investigated the possible role of telomerase in regulating RNA polymerase I (Pol I). Here we show that TERT binds to rDNA and stimulates transcription by Pol I during liver regeneration and Ras-induced hyperproliferation. Moreover, the inhibition of telomerase activity by TERT- or TERC-specific RNA interference, the overexpression of dominant-negative-TERT, and the application of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat reduce Pol I transcription and the growth of tumour cells. In vitro, telomerase can stimulate the formation of the transcription initiation complex. Our results demonstrate how non-canonical features of telomerase may direct Pol I transcription in oncogenic and regenerative hyperproliferation. PMID:25118183

  12. Radiation-induced nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mohsen; Namimoghadam, Amir; Korouni, Roghaye; Fashiri, Paria; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Elahimanesh, Farideh; Amiri, Fatemeh; Moradi, Ghobad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the improvements in cancer screening and treatment, it still remains as one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Nausea and vomiting as the side effects of different cancer treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, are multifactorial and could affect the treatment continuation and patient quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the possible linkage between ABO blood groups and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV), also its incidence and affecting factors. One hundred twenty-eight patients referring to Tohid hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, were selected and the patients and treatment-related factors were determined in a cross-sectional study. Patients’ nausea and vomiting were recorded from the onset of treatment until 1 week after treatment accomplishment. Also, previous possible nausea and vomiting were recorded. The frequencies of nausea and vomiting and their peak time were examined during the treatment period. The association between ABO blood group and the incidence of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) were significant and it seems that A blood group patients are the most vulnerable individuals to these symptoms. The association between Rhesus antigen and the time of maximum severity of RINV may indicate that Rhesus antigen affects the time of maximum severity of RINV. The incidence of RINV was not affected by karnofsky performance status, but it was related to the severity of RINV. Furthermore, among the factors affecting the incidence of nausea and vomiting, nausea and vomiting during patient's previous chemotherapy, radiotherapy region, and background gastrointestinal disease were shown to be three important factors. In addition to familiar RINV-affecting factors, ABO blood group may play an important role and these results address the needs for further studies with larger sample size. PMID:27495037

  13. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Philipp J.; Park, Henry S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  14. X-Radiation Induces Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Apoptosis by Upregulation of Axin Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yang; Wang Yan; Xu Hongtao; Yang Lianhe; Wei Qiang; Liu Yang; Zhang Yong; Zhao Yue; Dai Shundong; Miao Yuan; Yu Juanhan; Zhang Junyi; Li, Guang; Yuan Ximing; Wang Enhua

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: Axis inhibition (Axin) is an important negative regulator of the Wnt pathway. This study investigated the relationship between Axin expression and sensitivity to X-rays in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to find a useful indicator of radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Tissue from NSCLC patients, A549 cells, and BE1 cells expressing Axin were exposed to 1-Gy of X-radiation. Axin and p53 expression levels were detected by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR. Apoptosis was determined by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) assay and FACS (fluorescence-activate cell sorter) analysis. Caspase-3 activity was determined by Western blotting. Phospho-JNK expression was determined by immunofluorescence. Results: The expression of Axin was significantly lower in NSCLC tissues than in normal lung tissues (p < 0.05). Axin expression correlates with differentiation, TNM staging, and lymph node metastasis of NSCLC (p < 0.05). Its expression negatively correlates with the expression of p53(mt) (p=0.000) and positively correlates with apoptosis (p=0.002). The prognosis of patients with high expression of Axin was better than those with low expression. X-radiation increases Axin expression in NSCLC tissue, and caspase-3 is significantly higher in samples in which Axin is increased (p < 0.05). Both X-radiation and Axin induce apoptosis of A549 and BE1 cells; however, the combination of the two enhances the apoptotic effect (p < 0.05). In A549 cells, inhibition of p53 blocks Axin-induced apoptosis, whereas in BE1 cells, the JNK pathway is required. Conclusions: Axin induces the p53 apoptotic pathway in cells where this pathway is intact; however, in cells expressing p53(mt), Axin induces apoptosis via the JNK pathway. Elevated Axin expression following X-ray exposure is a reliable indicator for determining the radiosensitivity of NSCLC.

  15. Radiation-induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Riewe, L.C.; Witczak, Schrimpf, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    Capacitance-voltage and thermally stimulated current methods are used to investigate radiation induced charge trapping in bipolar base oxides. Results are compared with models of oxide and interface trap charge buildup at low electric fields.

  16. hTERT promotes cell adhesion and migration independent of telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiying; Liu, Qianqian; Ge, Yuanlong; Zhao, Qi; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    hTERT, a catalytic component of human telomerase, is undetectable in normal somatic cells but up-regulated in cancer and stem cells where telomere length is maintained by telomerase. Accumulated evidence indicates that hTERT may have noncanonical functions beyond telomerase by regulating the expression of particular genes. However, comprehensive identification of the genes regulated by hTERT is unavailable. In this report, we expressed WT hTERT and hTERTmut which displays dysfunctional catalytic activity, in human U2OS cancer cells and VA-13 immortalized fibroblast cells, both of which lack endogenous hTERT and hTR expression. Changes in gene expression induced by hTERT and hTERT-mut expression were determined by genome-wide RNA-seq and verified by qPCR. Our results showed that hTERT affects different genes in two cell lines, implying that the regulation of gene expression by hTERT is indirect and cell type dependent. Moreover, functional analysis identifies cell adhesion-related genes that have been changed by hTERT in both cell lines. Adhesion experiments revealed that hTERT expression significantly increases cell adhesion. Monolayer wound healing and transwell assays demonstrated increased cell migration upon hTERT expression. These results provide new evidence to support a noncanonical function for hTERT in promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:26971878

  17. hTERT promotes cell adhesion and migration independent of telomerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiying; Liu, Qianqian; Ge, Yuanlong; Zhao, Qi; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    hTERT, a catalytic component of human telomerase, is undetectable in normal somatic cells but up-regulated in cancer and stem cells where telomere length is maintained by telomerase. Accumulated evidence indicates that hTERT may have noncanonical functions beyond telomerase by regulating the expression of particular genes. However, comprehensive identification of the genes regulated by hTERT is unavailable. In this report, we expressed WT hTERT and hTERTmut which displays dysfunctional catalytic activity, in human U2OS cancer cells and VA-13 immortalized fibroblast cells, both of which lack endogenous hTERT and hTR expression. Changes in gene expression induced by hTERT and hTERT-mut expression were determined by genome-wide RNA-seq and verified by qPCR. Our results showed that hTERT affects different genes in two cell lines, implying that the regulation of gene expression by hTERT is indirect and cell type dependent. Moreover, functional analysis identifies cell adhesion-related genes that have been changed by hTERT in both cell lines. Adhesion experiments revealed that hTERT expression significantly increases cell adhesion. Monolayer wound healing and transwell assays demonstrated increased cell migration upon hTERT expression. These results provide new evidence to support a noncanonical function for hTERT in promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:26971878

  18. Treatment of radiation-induced cystitis with hyperbaric oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Boland, F.P.; Mori, H.; Gallagher, M.; Brereton, H.; Preate, D.L.; Neville, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of hyperbaric oxygen on radiation cystitis have been documented in 3 patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. Cessation of gross hematuria and reversal of cystoscopic bladder changes were seen in response to a series of hyperbaric oxygen treatments of 2 atmosphere absolute pressure for 2 hours. To our knowledge this is the first report of cystoscopically documented healing of radiation-induced bladder injury.

  19. ARSENIC EFFECTS ON TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic effects on telomere and telomerase activity. T-C. Zhang, M. T. Schmitt, J. Mo, J. L. Mumford, National Research Council and U.S Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
    Arsenic is a known carcinogen and also an anticancer agent for acut...

  20. Cancer vaccination with telomerase peptide GV1001.

    PubMed

    Kyte, Jon Amund

    2009-05-01

    Telomerase is highly expressed in essentially all cancer forms, while the expression in normal tissues is restricted. Moreover, telomerase activity is considered indispensable for tumor immortalization and growth. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the rate-limiting subunit of the telomerase complex, is therefore an attractive target for cancer vaccination. The present review provides an update on the development of GV1001, a peptide vaccine representing a 16-aa hTERT sequence. GV1001 binds multiple HLA class II molecules and harbors putative HLA class I epitopes. The peptide may therefore elicit combined CD4/CD8 T-cell responses, considered important to initiate tumor eradication and long-term memory. Phase I/II trials in advanced pancreatic and pulmonary cancer patients have demonstrated GV1001-specific T-cell responses in > 50% of subjects, without clinically important toxicity. The results indicate a correlation between development of GV1001-specific responses and prolonged survival. However, as in most cancer vaccine trials, a large proportion of immune responders experience no clinical benefit. Long-term survivors harbor durable GV1001-specific T-cell responses with high IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratios and polyfunctional cytokine patterns. Interestingly, the cytokine profiles do not follow a T(H)1/T(H)2 delineation. Here, the author discusses how immunomonitoring may be improved to discriminate between efficient and pointless immune responses, and which questions to address in the further development of GV1001. PMID:19388882

  1. Activin inhibits telomerase activity in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Katik, Indzi; Mackenzie-Kludas, Charley; Nicholls, Craig; Jiang, Fang-Xu; Zhou, Shufeng; Li, He; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2009-11-27

    Activin is a pleiotropic cytokine with broad tissue distributions. Recent studies demonstrate that activin-A inhibits cancer cell proliferation with unknown mechanisms. In this report, we demonstrate that recombinant activin-A induces telomerase inhibition in cancer cells. In breast and cervical cancer cells, activin-A resulted in telomerase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant inhibition was observed at 10 ng/ml of activin-A, with a near complete inhibition at 80 ng/ml. Consistently, activin-A induced repression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, with the hTERT gene to be suppressed by 60-80% within 24 h. In addition, activin-A induced a concomitant increase in Smad3 signaling and decrease of the hTERT gene promoter activity in a concentration-dependent fashion. These data suggest that activin-A triggered telomerase inhibition by down-regulating hTERT gene expression is involved in activin-A-induced inhibition of cancer cell proliferation.

  2. Pravastatin limits radiation-induced vascular dysfunction in the skin.

    PubMed

    Holler, Valerie; Buard, Valerie; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Guipaud, Olivier; Baudelin, Cedric; Sache, Amandine; Perez, Maria del R; Squiban, Claire; Tamarat, Radia; Milliat, Fabien; Benderitter, Marc

    2009-05-01

    About half of people with cancer are treated with radiation therapy; however, normal tissue toxicity still remains a dose-limiting factor for this treatment. The skin response to ionizing radiation may involve multiple inflammatory outbreaks. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced vascular injury. Furthermore, endothelial dysfunction reflects a decreased availability of nitric oxide. Statins have been reported to preserve endothelial function through their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, wild type and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)(-/-) mice were subjected to dorsal skin irradiation and treated with pravastatin for 28 days. We demonstrated that pravastatin has a therapeutic effect on skin lesions and abolishes radiation-induced vascular functional activation by decreasing interactions between leukocytes and endothelium. Pravastatin limits the radiation-induced increase of blood CCL2 and CXCL1 production expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules such as E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and inflammatory cell migration in tissues. Pravastatin limits the in vivo and in vitro radiation-induced downregulation of eNOS. Moreover, pravastatin has no effect in eNOS(-/-) mice, demonstrating that eNOS plays a key role in the beneficial effect of pravastatin in radiation-induced skin lesions. In conclusion, pravastatin may be a good therapeutic approach to prevent or reduce radiation-induced skin damage. PMID:19212344

  3. Inhibition of telomerase activity enhances hyperthermia-mediated radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manjula; Pandita, Shruti; Hunt, Clayton R; Gupta, Arun; Yue, Xuan; Khan, Saira; Pandita, Raj K; Pratt, David; Shay, Jerry W; Taylor, John-Stephen A; Pandita, Tej K

    2008-05-01

    Hyperthermia is a potent sensitizer of cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR); however, hyperthermia also induces heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) synthesis and HSP70 expression is associated with radioresistance. Because HSP70 interacts with the telomerase complex and expression of the telomerase catalytic unit (hTERT) extends the life span of the human cells, we determined if heat shock influences telomerase activity and whether telomerase inhibition enhances heat-mediated IR-induced cell killing. In the present study, we show that moderate hyperthermia (43 degrees C) enhances telomerase activity. Inhibition of telomerase activity with human telomerase RNA-targeted antisense agents, and in particular GRN163L, results in enhanced hyperthermia-mediated IR-induced cell killing, and ectopic expression of catalytic unit of telomerase (TERT) decreased hyperthermia-mediated IR-induced cell killing. The increased cell killing by heat and IR exposure in telomerase-inhibited cells correlates with delayed appearance and disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci as well as decreased chromosome repair. These results suggest that inactivation of telomerase before combined hyperthermia and radiotherapy could improve tumor killing. PMID:18451164

  4. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

  5. Imetelstat (GRN163L)--telomerase-based cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Röth, Alexander; Harley, Calvin B; Baerlocher, Gabriela M

    2010-01-01

    Telomeres and telomerase play essential roles in the regulation of the lifespan of human cells. While normal human somatic cells do not or only transiently express telomerase and therefore shorten their telomeres with each cell division, most human cancer cells typically express high levels of telomerase and show unlimited cell proliferation. High telomerase expression allows cells to proliferate and expand long-term and therefore supports tumor growth. Owing to the high expression and its role, telomerase has become an attractive diagnostic and therapeutic cancer target. Imetelstat (GRN163L) is a potent and specific telomerase inhibitor and so far the only drug of its class in clinical trials. Here, we report on the structure and the mechanism of action of imetelstat as well as about the preclinical and clinical data and future prospects using imetelstat in cancer therapy. PMID:20072842

  6. [Telomere length and telomerase activity in hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Nakashio, R; Kitamoto, M; Nakanishi, T; Takaishi, H; Takahashi, S; Kajiyama, G

    1998-05-01

    Telomerase activity and terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length were examined in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Telomerase activity was assayed by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) connected with an internal telomerase assay standard (ITAS). The incidence of strong telomerase activity (highly variable level compared with the activity of non-cancerous liver tissue) was 79% in well, 84% in moderately, and 100% in poorly differentiated HCC, while 0% in non-cancerous liver tissues. The incidence of TRF length alteration (reduction or elongation) was 53% in HCC. The incidence of TRF alteration was significantly higher in HCC exceeding 3 cm in diameter, moderately or poorly differentiated in histology. Telomerase activity was not associated with TRF length alteration in HCC. In conclusion, strong telomerase activity and TRF length alteration increased with HCC tumor progressions. PMID:9613130

  7. Characterization of radiation-induced Apoptosis in rodent cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Min; Chen, Changhu; Ling, C.C.

    1997-03-01

    For REC:myc(ch1), Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we determined the events in the development of radiation-induced apoptosis to be in the following order: cell division followed by chromatin condensation, membrane blebbing, loss of adhesion and the uptake of vital dye. Experimental data which were obtained using {sup 4}He ions of well defined energies and which compared the dependence of apoptosis and clonogenic survival on {sup 4}He range strongly suggested that in our cells both apoptosis and loss of clonogenic survival resulted from radiation damage to the cell nucleus. Corroboratory evidence was that BrdU incorporation sensitized these cells to radiation-induced apoptosis. Comparing the dose response for apoptosis and the clonogenic survival curves for Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we concluded that radiation-induced cell inactivation as assayed by clonogenic survival, and that a modified linear-quadratic model, proposed previously, modeled such a contribution effectively. In the same context, the selective increase in radiation-induced apoptosis. Comparing the dose response for apoptosis and the clonogenic survival curves for Rat1 and Rat1:myc{sub b} cells, we concluded that radiation-induced apoptosis contributed to the overall radiation-induced cell inactivation as assayed by clonogenic survival, and that a modified linear-quadratic model, proposed previously, modeled such a contribution effectively. In the same context, the selective increase in radiation-induced apoptosis during late S and G{sub 2} phases reduced the relative radioresistance observed for clonogenic survival during late S and G{sub 2} phases. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Hepatitis B virus core protein enhances human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression and hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation in a c-Ets2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Gai, Xiaoxiao; Zhao, Peiqing; Pan, Yingfang; Shan, Haixia; Yue, Xuetian; Du, Juan; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Peng; Ma, Hongxin; Guo, Min; Yang, Xiaoyun; Sun, Wensheng; Gao, Lifen; Ma, Chunhong; Liang, Xiaohong

    2013-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus core protein can regulate viral replication and host gene expression. However, it is unclear whether and how hepatitis B virus core protein regulates hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation. Induction of hepatitis B virus core protein over-expression significantly enhanced the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells, while knockdown of hepatitis B virus core protein expression inhibited the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Altered hepatitis B virus core protein expression significantly changed the growth of implanted hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo. Microarray analysis indicated that hepatitis B virus core protein up-regulated human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression, which was further validated by over-expression and knockdown assays in vitro. Furthermore, knockdown of human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression mitigated the hepatitis B virus core protein-enhanced hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and clone formation in vitro. Luciferase assays indicated that hepatitis B virus core protein enhanced the promoter activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, which was dependent on the binding of c-Ets2 to the promoter region between -192 and -187. In addition, hepatitis B virus core protein enhanced human telomerase reverse transcriptase transcription in HepG2 cells, but not in the c-Ets2-silencing HepG2 cells. Moreover, hepatitis B virus core protein promoted c-Ets2 nuclear translocation. Finally, significantly higher levels of human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression and nuclear c-Ets2 accumulation were detected in hepatitis B virus core protein-positive hepatocellular carcinoma samples. Our findings demonstrate that hepatitis B virus core protein promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by up-regulating the c-Ets2-dependent expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase. PMID:23542016

  9. Nutrition and lifestyle in healthy aging: the telomerase challenge

    PubMed Central

    Boccardi, Virginia; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Mecocci, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition and lifestyle, known to modulate aging process and age-related diseases, might also affect telomerase activity. Short and dysfunctional telomeres rather than average telomere length are associated with longevity in animal models, and their rescue by telomerase maybe sufficient to restore cell and organismal viability. Improving telomerase activation in stem cells and potentially in other cells by diet and lifestyle interventions may represent an intriguing way to promote health-span in humans. PMID:26826704

  10. Inhibition of telomerase by BIBR 1532 and related analogues.

    PubMed

    Barma, D K; Elayadi, Anissa; Falck, J R; Corey, David R

    2003-04-01

    BIBR 1532 has been reported to be a potent, small molecule inhibitor of human telomerase, suggesting it as a lead for the development of anti-telomerase therapy. We confirm the ability of BIBR 1532 to inhibit telomerase and report the discovery of an equally potent analogue. Importantly, IC(50) values in cell extract are considerably higher than those previously reported using assays for purified enzyme, indicating that substantial improvement may be necessary. PMID:12657276

  11. Nutrition and lifestyle in healthy aging: the telomerase challenge.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Virginia; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Mecocci, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition and lifestyle, known to modulate aging process and age-related diseases, might also affect telomerase activity. Short and dysfunctional telomeres rather than average telomere length are associated with longevity in animal models, and their rescue by telomerase maybe sufficient to restore cell and organismal viability. Improving telomerase activation in stem cells and potentially in other cells by diet and lifestyle interventions may represent an intriguing way to promote health-span in humans. PMID:26826704

  12. The Ku subunit of telomerase binds Sir4 to recruit telomerase to lengthen telomeres in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hass, Evan P; Zappulla, David C

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in humans, the telomerase RNA subunit is bound by Ku, a ring-shaped protein heterodimer best known for its function in DNA repair. Ku binding to yeast telomerase RNA promotes telomere lengthening and telomerase recruitment to telomeres, but how this is achieved remains unknown. Using telomere-length analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show that Sir4 - a previously identified Ku-binding protein that is a component of telomeric silent chromatin - is required for Ku-mediated telomere lengthening and telomerase recruitment. We also find that specifically tethering Sir4 directly to Ku-binding-defective telomerase RNA restores otherwise-shortened telomeres to wild-type length. These findings suggest that Sir4 is the telomere-bound target of Ku-mediated telomerase recruitment and provide one mechanism for how the Sir4-competing Rif1 and Rif2 proteins negatively regulate telomere length in yeast. PMID:26218225

  13. Cell populations can use aneuploidy to survive telomerase insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Caroline; Ausiannikava, Darya; Le Bihan, Thierry; Granneman, Sander; Makovets, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase maintains ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, telomeres. Telomerase loss results in replicative senescence and a switch to recombination-dependent telomere maintenance. Telomerase insufficiency in humans leads to telomere syndromes associated with premature ageing and cancer predisposition. Here we use yeast to show that the survival of telomerase insufficiency differs from the survival of telomerase loss and occurs through aneuploidy. In yeast grown at elevated temperatures, telomerase activity becomes limiting: haploid cell populations senesce and generate aneuploid survivors—near diploids monosomic for chromosome VIII. This aneuploidy results in increased levels of the telomerase components TLC1, Est1 and Est3, and is accompanied by decreased abundance of ribosomal proteins. We propose that aneuploidy suppresses telomerase insufficiency through redistribution of cellular resources away from ribosome synthesis towards production of telomerase components and other non-ribosomal proteins. The aneuploidy-induced re-balance of the proteome via modulation of ribosome biogenesis may be a general adaptive response to overcome functional insufficiencies. PMID:26489519

  14. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:25062865

  15. Development of small-molecule PUMA inhibitors for mitigating radiation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Mustata, Gabriela; Li, Mei; Zevola, Nicki; Bakan, Ahmet; Zhang, Lin; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel S; Yu, Jian; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-01-01

    PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only Bcl-2 family member and a key mediator of apoptosis induced by a wide variety of stimuli. PUMA is particularly important in initiating radiation-induced apoptosis and damage in the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic systems. Unlike most BH3-only proteins, PUMA neutralizes all five known antiapoptotic Bcl-2 members though high affinity interactions with its BH3 domain to initiate mitochondria-dependent cell death. Using structural data on the conserved interactions of PUMA with Bcl-2-like proteins, we developed a pharmacophore model that mimics these interactions. In silico screening of the ZINC 8.0 database with this pharmacophore model yielded 142 compounds that could potentially disrupt these interactions. Thirteen structurally diverse compounds with favorable in silico ADME/Toxicity profiles have been retrieved from this set. Extensive testing of these compounds using cell-based and cell-free systems identified lead compounds that confer considerable protection against PUMA-dependent and radiation-induced apoptosis, and inhibit the interaction between PUMA and Bcl-xL. PMID:21320058

  16. Development of Small-Molecule PUMA Inhibitors for Mitigating Radiation-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Mustata, Gabriela; Li, Mei; Zevola, Nicki; Bakan, Ahmet; Zhang, Lin; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel S.; Yu, Jian; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-01-01

    PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only Bcl-2 family member and a key mediator of apoptosis induced by a wide variety of stimuli. PUMA is particularly important in initiating radiation-induced apoptosis and damage in the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic systems. Unlike most BH3-only proteins, PUMA neutralizes all five known antiapoptotic Bcl-2 members through high affinity interactions with its BH3 domain to initiate mitochondria-dependent cell death. Using structural data on the conserved interactions of PUMA with Bcl-2-like proteins, we developed a pharmacophore model that mimics these interactions. In silico screening of the ZINC 8.0 database with this pharmacophore model yielded 142 compounds that could potentially disrupt these interactions. Thirteen structurally diverse compounds with favorable in silico ADME/Toxicity profiles have been retrieved from this set. Extensive testing of these compounds using cell-based and cell-free systems identified lead compounds that confer considerable protection against PUMA-dependent and radiation-induced apoptosis, and inhibit the interaction between PUMA and Bcl-xL. PMID:21320058

  17. The role of protein kinase C alpha translocation in radiation-induced bystander effect

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zihui; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun; Hei, Tom K.; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well known human carcinogen. Evidence accumulated over the past decade suggested that extranuclear/extracellular targets and events may also play a critical role in modulating biological responses to ionizing radiation. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of radiation-induced bystander effect is still unclear. In the current study, AL cells were irradiated with alpha particles and responses of bystander cells were investigated. We found out that in bystander AL cells, protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) translocated from cytosol to membrane fraction. Pre-treatment of cells with PKC translocation inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed the induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activity and the increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression as well as the mutagenic effect in bystander cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was elevated in directly irradiated but not bystander cells; while TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) increased in the membrane fraction of bystander cells. Further analysis revealed that PKC activation caused accelerated internalization and recycling of TNFR1. Our data suggested that PKCα translocation may occur as an early event in radiation-induced bystander responses and mediate TNFα-induced signaling pathways that lead to the activation of ERK and up-regulation of COX-2. PMID:27165942

  18. Radiation-induced acid ceramidase confers prostate cancer resistance and tumor relapse.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joseph C; Bai, Aiping; Beckham, Thomas H; Marrison, S Tucker; Yount, Caroline L; Young, Katherine; Lu, Ping; Bartlett, Anne M; Wu, Bill X; Keane, Barry J; Armeson, Kent E; Marshall, David T; Keane, Thomas E; Smith, Michael T; Jones, E Ellen; Drake, Richard R; Bielawska, Alicja; Norris, James S; Liu, Xiang

    2013-10-01

    Escape of prostate cancer (PCa) cells from ionizing radiation-induced (IR-induced) killing leads to disease progression and cancer relapse. The influence of sphingolipids, such as ceramide and its metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate, on signal transduction pathways under cell stress is important to survival adaptation responses. In this study, we demonstrate that ceramide-deacylating enzyme acid ceramidase (AC) was preferentially upregulated in irradiated PCa cells. Radiation-induced AC gene transactivation by activator protein 1 (AP-1) binding on the proximal promoter was sensitive to inhibition of de novo ceramide biosynthesis, as demonstrated by promoter reporter and ChIP-qPCR analyses. Our data indicate that a protective feedback mechanism mitigates the apoptotic effect of IR-induced ceramide generation. We found that deregulation of c-Jun induced marked radiosensitization in vivo and in vitro, which was rescued by ectopic AC overexpression. AC overexpression in PCa clonogens that survived a fractionated 80-Gy IR course was associated with increased radioresistance and proliferation, suggesting a role for AC in radiotherapy failure and relapse. Immunohistochemical analysis of human PCa tissues revealed higher levels of AC after radiotherapy failure than those in therapy-naive PCa, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or benign tissues. Addition of an AC inhibitor to an animal model of xenograft irradiation produced radiosensitization and prevention of relapse. These data indicate that AC is a potentially tractable target for adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:24091326

  19. Effects of Mitochondrial Translocation of Telomerase on Drug Resistance in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Zhou, Yuan; Chen, DaiXing; Li, LiLi; Yang, Xin; You, Yang; Ling, Xianlong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells exhibit multidrug resistance (MDR), but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Cancer cells that overexpress telomerase are resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs. This study aimed to determine the effects of mitochondrial translocation of telomerase on MDR in HCC cells. HepG2 cells were transfected with negative plasmid and PTPN11 (Shp-2) short hairpin RNA (ShRNA) plasmid to establish HepG2-negative (HepG2 transfected with negative plasmid) and HepG2-ShShp-2 (HepG2 transfected with Shp-2 ShRNA plasmid) cells. Sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays. Distribution of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) within mitochondria was detected by western blotting and immunofluorescence combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was demonstrated by flow cytometry with the mitochondrial superoxide (Mito-Sox) indicator. The frequency of damaged mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was illustrated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Expression of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex subunits ND1 and COXII were also demonstrated by western blotting. Knockdown of Shp-2 in HepG2 cells resulted in upregulation of mitochondrial TERT expression and increased resistance to cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (resistance indices, 2.094 and 1.863, respectively). In addition, both the mitochondrial ROS and the frequency of mtDNA damage were decreased, and COXII expression was upregulated. Our results suggest that Mitochondrial translocation of hTERT may lead to chemotherapeutic resistance in HCC cells. Mitochondrial hTERT contributes to the drug resistance of tumor cells by reducing ROS production and mtDNA damage, and exerting a protective effect on the mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:25561980

  20. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wesch, Neil L; Burlock, Laura J; Gooding, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed. PMID:27500377

  1. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  2. Multi-step coordination of telomerase recruitment in fission yeast through two coupled telomere-telomerase interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xichan; Liu, Jinqiang; Jun, Hyun-IK; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Qiao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Tightly controlled recruitment of telomerase, a low-abundance enzyme, to telomeres is essential for regulated telomere synthesis. Recent studies in human cells revealed that a patch of amino acids in the shelterin component TPP1, called the TEL-patch, is essential for recruiting telomerase to telomeres. However, how TEL-patch—telomerase interaction integrates into the overall orchestration of telomerase regulation at telomeres is unclear. In fission yeast, Tel1ATM/Rad3ATR-mediated phosphorylation of shelterin component Ccq1 during late S phase is involved in telomerase recruitment through promoting the binding of Ccq1 to a telomerase accessory protein Est1. Here, we identify the TEL-patch in Tpz1TPP1, mutations of which lead to decreased telomeric association of telomerase, similar to the phosphorylation-defective Ccq1. Furthermore, we find that telomerase action at telomeres requires formation and resolution of an intermediate state, in which the cell cycle-dependent Ccq1-Est1 interaction is coupled to the TEL-patch—Trt1 interaction, to achieve temporally regulated telomerase elongation of telomeres. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15470.001 PMID:27253066

  3. Telomerase reverse transcriptase acts in a feedback loop with NF-κB pathway to regulate macrophage polarization in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Qin; Yang, Yang; Li, Wan-Xia; Cheng, Ya-Hui; Li, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Bao-Ming; Liu, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Lei; Lv, Xiong-Wen; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Activation of Kupffer cells (KCs) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). C57BL/6 mice fed EtOH-containing diet showed a mixed induction of hepatic classical (M1) and alternative (M2) macrophage markers. Since telomerase activation occurs at critical stages of myeloid and lymphoid cell activation, we herein investigated the role of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the determining factor of telomerase, in macrophage activation during ALD. In our study, TERT expression and telomerase activity (TA) were remarkably increased in liver tissue of EtOH-fed mice. Moreover, EtOH significantly up-regulated TERT in isolated KCs and RAW 264.7 cells and LPS induced TERT production in vitro. These data indicate that up-regulation of TERT may play a critical role in macrophages during ALD. Furthermore, loss- and gain-of-function studies suggested that TERT switched macrophages towards M1 phenotype by regulating NF-κB signaling, but had limited effect on M2 macrophages polarization in vitro. Additionally, PDTC, a chemical inhibitor of NF-κB, could dramatically down-regulate TERT expression and the hallmarks of M1 macrophages. Therefore, our study unveils the role of TERT in macrophage polarization and the cross-talk between TERT and p65, which may provide a possible explanation for the ethanol-mediated hepatic proinflammatory response and M1 macrophage polarization. PMID:26725521

  4. Telomerase reverse transcriptase acts in a feedback loop with NF-κB pathway to regulate macrophage polarization in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-qin; Yang, Yang; Li, Wan-xia; Cheng, Ya-hui; Li, Xiao-feng; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiao-ming; Wu, Bao-ming; Liu, Xin-hua; Zhang, Lei; Lv, Xiong-wen; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Activation of Kupffer cells (KCs) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). C57BL/6 mice fed EtOH-containing diet showed a mixed induction of hepatic classical (M1) and alternative (M2) macrophage markers. Since telomerase activation occurs at critical stages of myeloid and lymphoid cell activation, we herein investigated the role of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the determining factor of telomerase, in macrophage activation during ALD. In our study, TERT expression and telomerase activity (TA) were remarkably increased in liver tissue of EtOH-fed mice. Moreover, EtOH significantly up-regulated TERT in isolated KCs and RAW 264.7 cells and LPS induced TERT production in vitro. These data indicate that up-regulation of TERT may play a critical role in macrophages during ALD. Furthermore, loss- and gain-of-function studies suggested that TERT switched macrophages towards M1 phenotype by regulating NF-κB signaling, but had limited effect on M2 macrophages polarization in vitro. Additionally, PDTC, a chemical inhibitor of NF-κB, could dramatically down-regulate TERT expression and the hallmarks of M1 macrophages. Therefore, our study unveils the role of TERT in macrophage polarization and the cross-talk between TERT and p65, which may provide a possible explanation for the ethanol-mediated hepatic proinflammatory response and M1 macrophage polarization. PMID:26725521

  5. Telomere structure and telomerase in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    GOMEZ, DANIEL E.; ARMANDO, ROMINA G.; FARINA, HERNÁN G.; MENNA, PABLO LORENZANO; CERRUDO, CAROLINA S.; GHIRINGHELLI, P. DANIEL; ALONSO, DANIEL F.

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase is the enzyme responsible for maintenance of the length of telomeres by addition of guanine-rich repetitive sequences. Telomerase activity is exhibited in gametes and stem and tumor cells. In human somatic cells, proliferation potential is strictly limited and senescence follows approximately 50–70 cell divisions. In most tumor cells, on the contrary, replication potential is unlimited. The key role in this process of the system of the telomere length maintenance with involvement of telomerase is still poorly studied. Undoubtedly, DNA polymerase is not capable of completely copying DNA at the very ends of chromosomes; therefore, approximately 50 nucleotides are lost during each cell cycle, which results in gradual telomere length shortening. Critically short telomeres cause senescence, following crisis and cell death. However, in tumor cells the system of telomere length maintenance is activated. Much work has been done regarding the complex telomere/telomerase as a unique target, highly specific in cancer cells. Telomeres have additional proteins that regulate the binding of telomerase. Telomerase, also associates with a number of proteins forming the sheltering complex having a central role in telomerase activity. This review focuses on the structure and function of the telomere/telomerase complex and its altered behavior leading to disease, mainly cancer. Although telomerase therapeutics are not approved yet for clinical use, we can assume that based on the promising in vitro and in vivo results and successful clinical trials, it can be predicted that telomerase therapeutics will be utilized soon in the combat against malignancies and degenerative diseases. The active search for modulators is justified, because the telomere/telomerase system is an extremely promising target offering possibilities to decrease or increase the viability of the cell for therapeutic purposes. PMID:22941386

  6. β-Arrestin-2 modulates radiation-induced intestinal crypt progenitor/stem cell injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Tian, H; Jiang, J; Yang, Y; Tan, S; Lin, X; Liu, H; Wu, B

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal crypt progenitor/stem (ICPS) cell apoptosis and vascular endothelial cell apoptosis are responsible for the initiation and development of ionizing radiation (IR)-evoked gastrointestinal syndrome. The signaling mechanisms underlying IR-induced ICPS cell apoptosis remain largely unclear. Our findings provide evidence that β-arrestin-2 (βarr2)-mediated ICPS cell apoptosis is crucial for IR-stimulated intestinal injury. βArr2-deficient mice exhibited decreased ICPS cell and intestinal Lgr5(+) (leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5-positive) stem cell apoptosis, promoted crypt proliferation and reproduction, and protracted survival following lethal doses of radiation. Radioprotection in the ICPS cells isolated from βarr2-deficient mice depended on prolonged nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation via direct interaction of βarr2 with IκBα and subsequent inhibition of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Unexpectedly, βarr2 deficiency had little effect on IR-induced intestinal vascular endothelial cell apoptosis in mice. Consistently, βarr2 knockdown also provided significant radioresistance by manipulating NF-κB/PUMA signaling in Lgr5(+) cells in vitro. Collectively, these observations show that targeting the βarr2/NF-κB/PUMA novel pathway is a potential radiomitigator for limiting the damaging effect of radiotherapy on the gastrointestinal system. Significance statement: acute injury to the intestinal mucosa is a major dose-limiting complication of abdominal radiotherapy. The issue of whether the critical factor for the initiation of radiation-induced intestinal injury is intestinal stem cell apoptosis or endothelial cell apoptosis remains unresolved. βArrs have recently been found to be multifunctional adaptor of apoptosis. Here, we found that β-arrestin-2 (βarr2) deficiency was associated with decreased radiation-induced ICPS cell apoptosis, which prolonged survival in

  7. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance

    PubMed Central

    Kabarriti, Rafi

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  8. Hyperbaric oxygen: Primary treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Neville, E.C.

    1989-07-01

    Of 8 patients with symptoms of advanced cystitis due to pelvic radiation treated with hyperbaric oxygen 7 are persistently improved during followup. All 6 patients treated for gross hematuria requiring hospitalization have been free of symptoms for an average of 24 months (range 6 to 43 months). One patient treated for stress incontinence currently is dry despite little change in bladder capacity, implying salutary effect from hyperbaric oxygen on the sphincter mechanism. One patient with radiation-induced prostatitis failed to respond. This experience suggests that hyperbaric oxygen should be considered the primary treatment for patients with symptomatic radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  9. Panretinal photocoagulation for radiation-induced ocular ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Roth, S.E.; Magargal, L.E.; Shields, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    We present preliminary findings on the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in preventing neovascular glaucoma in eyes with radiation-induced ocular ischemia. Our study group consisted of 20 patients who developed radiation-induced ocular ischemia following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy for a choroidal or ciliary body melanoma. Eleven of the 20 patients were treated by panretinal photocoagulation shortly after the diagnosis of ocular ischemia, but nine patients were left untreated. In this non-randomized study, the rate of development of neovascular glaucoma was significantly lower (p = 0.024) for the 11 photocoagulated patients than for the nine who were left untreated.

  10. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance.

    PubMed

    Kabarriti, Rafi; Guha, Chandan

    2014-07-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  11. The Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, M; Fardid, R; Hadadi, Gh; Fardid, M

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect is the phenomenon which non-irradiated cells exhibit effects along with their different levels as a result of signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Responses of non-irradiated cells may include changes in process of translation, gene expression, cell proliferation, apoptosis and cells death. These changes are confirmed by results of some In-Vivo studies. Most well-known important factors affecting radiation-induced bystander effect include free radicals, immune system factors, expression changes of some genes involved in inflammation pathway and epigenetic factors. PMID:25599062

  12. Prostate tumor cells with cancer progenitor properties have high telomerase activity and are rapidly killed by telomerase interference

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tong; He, Kaijie; Wang, Lina; Goldkorn, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer progenitor cells (CPC) have been postulated to promote treatment resistance and disease progression in prostate and other malignancies. We investigated whether the enzyme telomerase, which is active in cancer cells and in normal stem cells, plays an important role in CPC which can be exploited to neutralize these cells. Methods We used flow cytometry and assays of gene expression, clonogenicity and invasiveness to isolate and characterize a putative CPC subpopulation from freshly-resected human prostatectomy specimens. Telomerase activity was measured by qPCR-based Telomeric Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP). Telomerase interference was achieved by ectopic expression of a mutated telomerase RNA construct which reprograms telomerase to generate “toxic” uncapped telomeres. Treated cells were assayed for apoptosis, proliferation in culture, and xenograft tumor formation. Results CPC in prostate tumors expressed elevated levels of genes associated with a progenitor phenotype and were highly clonogenic and invasive. Significantly, CPC telomerase activity was 20 to 200-fold higher than in non-CPC from the same tumors, and CPC were exquisitely sensitive to telomerase interference which induced rapid apoptosis and growth inhibition. Similarly, induction of telomerase interference in highly-tumorigenic CPC isolated from a prostate cancer cell line abrogated their ability to form tumor xenografts. Conclusions Human prostate tumors contain a CPC subpopulation with markedly elevated telomerase activity which renders them acutely susceptible to telomerase interference. These findings offer the first tumor-derived and in vivo evidence that telomerase may constitute a CPC “Achilles heel” which may ultimately form the basis for more effective new CPC-targeting therapies. PMID:21321978

  13. Telomerase Activity is Downregulated Early During Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Ishaq, Abbas; Hanson, Peter S.; Morris, Christopher M.; Saretzki, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Changes in hTERT splice variant expression have been proposed to facilitate the decrease of telomerase activity during fetal development in various human tissues. Here, we analyzed the expression of telomerase RNA (hTR), wild type and α-spliced hTERT in developing human fetal brain (post conception weeks, pcw, 6–19) and in young and old cortices using qPCR and correlated it to telomerase activity measured by TRAP assay. Decrease of telomerase activity occurred early during brain development and correlated strongest to decreased hTR expression. The expression of α-spliced hTERT increased between pcw 10 and 19, while that of wild type hTERT remained unchanged. Lack of expression differences between young and old cortices suggests that most changes seem to occur early during human brain development. Using in vitro differentiation of neural precursor stem cells (NPSCs) derived at pcw 6 we found a decrease in telomerase activity but no major expression changes in telomerase associated genes. Thus, they do not seem to model the mechanisms for the decrease in telomerase activity in fetal brains. Our results suggest that decreased hTR levels, as well as transient increase in α-spliced hTERT, might both contribute to downregulation of telomerase activity during early human brain development between 6 and 17 pcw. PMID:27322326

  14. Telomerase Activity is Downregulated Early During Human Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Abbas; Hanson, Peter S; Morris, Christopher M; Saretzki, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Changes in hTERT splice variant expression have been proposed to facilitate the decrease of telomerase activity during fetal development in various human tissues. Here, we analyzed the expression of telomerase RNA (hTR), wild type and α-spliced hTERT in developing human fetal brain (post conception weeks, pcw, 6-19) and in young and old cortices using qPCR and correlated it to telomerase activity measured by TRAP assay. Decrease of telomerase activity occurred early during brain development and correlated strongest to decreased hTR expression. The expression of α-spliced hTERT increased between pcw 10 and 19, while that of wild type hTERT remained unchanged. Lack of expression differences between young and old cortices suggests that most changes seem to occur early during human brain development. Using in vitro differentiation of neural precursor stem cells (NPSCs) derived at pcw 6 we found a decrease in telomerase activity but no major expression changes in telomerase associated genes. Thus, they do not seem to model the mechanisms for the decrease in telomerase activity in fetal brains. Our results suggest that decreased hTR levels, as well as transient increase in α-spliced hTERT, might both contribute to downregulation of telomerase activity during early human brain development between 6 and 17 pcw. PMID:27322326

  15. Telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit expression is associated with chondrosarcoma malignancy.

    PubMed

    Martin, James A; DeYoung, Barry R; Gitelis, Steven; Weydert, Jamie A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Kurriger, Gail; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2004-09-01

    Expression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase gene is associated with most human malignancies. Because telomerase reverse transcriptase is rarely expressed in normal tissue, its presence in pathologic specimens is considered a marker of transformed cells. Moreover, high levels of expression have been correlated with poor prognosis in many cancers. Although telomerase activity has been found in chondrosarcomas, its prognostic significance in these malignant cartilage tumors is unknown. Malignancy in cartilage-derived tumors is assessed routinely by histomorphologic grading, but even well differentiated, low-grade lesions can metastasize. This unpredictable behavior greatly complicates the clinical treatment of cartilage tumors, making better prognostic indicators desirable. To address this issue we used immunohistochemistry to compare telomerase reverse transcriptase expression in a collection of 61 tumors consisting of malignant chondrosarcomas of varying grade and benign enchondromas. Associated case histories were reviewed to test the hypothesis that telomerase reverse transcriptase expression levels correlated with subsequent tumor recurrence. We found that the relative abundance of telomerase reverse transcriptase-expressing cells correlated significantly with grade and recurrence. These findings indicate that telomerase reverse transcriptase immunostaining may be a useful adjunct to the conventional three-level grading system. PMID:15346061

  16. SENSITIVITY TO RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER IN HEMOCHROMATOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of dose-response relationships for radiation-induced cancer in segments of the population with high susceptibility is critical for understanding the risks of low dose and low dose rates to humans. Clean-up levels for radionuclides will depend upon the fraction of t...

  17. SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Beutler, D.E.; Burt, M.; Dudley, K.J.; Stringer, T.A.

    1998-12-14

    Experiments on the SPHINX accelerator studying radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in foam indicate that a field-exclusion boundary layer model better describes foam than a Maxwell-Garnett model that treats the conducting gas bubbles in the foam as modifying the dielectric constant. In both cases, wall attachment effects could be important but were neglected.

  18. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  19. Kinetics of radiation-induced segregation in ternary alloys. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Kumar, A.; Wiedersich, H.

    1982-01-01

    Model calculations of radiation-induced segregation in ternary alloys have been performed, using a simple theory. The theoretical model describes the coupling between the fluxes of radiation-induced defects and alloying elements in an alloy A-B-C by partitioning the defect fluxes into those occurring via A-, B-, and C-atoms, and the atom fluxes into those taking place via vacancies and interstitials. The defect and atom fluxes can be expressed in terms of concentrations and concentration gradients of all the species present. With reasonable simplifications, the radiation-induced segregation problem can be cast into a system of four coupled partial-differential equations, which can be solved numerically for appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Model calculations have been performed for ternary solid solutions intended to be representative of Fe-Cr-Ni and Ni-Al-Si alloys under various irradiation conditions. The dependence of segregation on both the alloy properties and the irradiation variables, e.g., temperature and displacement rate, was calculated. The sample calculations are in good qualitative agreement with the general trends of radiation-induced segregation observed experimentally.

  20. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  1. Data acquisition system used in radiation induced electrical degradation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.P.

    1995-04-01

    Radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED) of ceramic materials has recently been reported and is the topic of much research at the present time. The object of this report is to describe the data acquisition system for an experiment designed to study RIED at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  2. Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. )

    1993-01-15

    The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

  3. Laser therapy for severe radiation-induced rectal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlquist, D.A.; Gostout, C.J.; Viggiano, T.R.; Pemberton, J.H.

    1986-12-01

    Four patients with chronic hematochezia and transfusion-dependent anemia from postradiation rectal vascular lesions were successfully managed by endoscopic laser coagulation. In all four patients, symptomatic, hematologic, and endoscopic improvement was evident. Laser therapy for severe radiation-induced rectal bleeding seems to be safe and efficacious and should be considered before surgical intervention.

  4. Radiation-induced segregation in alloy X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.

    1996-12-31

    Microstructural and microchemical evolution of an Alloy X-750 heat under neutron irradiation was studied in order to understand the origin of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Both clustering of point defects and radiation-induced segregation at interfaces were observed. Although no significant changes in the precipitate structure were observed, boundaries exhibited additional depletion of Cr and Fe and enrichment of Ni.

  5. TERRA promotes telomerase-mediated telomere elongation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Martin; Wischnewski, Harry; Bah, Amadou; Hu, Yan; Liu, Na; Lafranchi, Lorenzo; King, Megan C; Azzalin, Claus M

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase-mediated telomere elongation provides cell populations with the ability to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase is capable of recognizing and extending the shortest telomeres in cells; nevertheless, how this mechanism is executed remains unclear. Here, we show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, shortened telomeres are highly transcribed into the evolutionarily conserved long noncoding RNA TERRA A fraction of TERRA produced upon telomere shortening is polyadenylated and largely devoid of telomeric repeats, and furthermore, telomerase physically interacts with this polyadenylated TERRA in vivo We also show that experimentally enhanced transcription of a manipulated telomere promotes its association with telomerase and concomitant elongation. Our data represent the first direct evidence that TERRA stimulates telomerase recruitment and activity at chromosome ends in an organism with human-like telomeres. PMID:27154402

  6. Cancer. TERT promoter mutations and telomerase reactivation in urothelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Borah, Sumit; Xi, Linghe; Zaug, Arthur J; Powell, Natasha M; Dancik, Garrett M; Cohen, Scott B; Costello, James C; Theodorescu, Dan; Cech, Thomas R

    2015-02-27

    Reactivation of telomerase, the chromosome end-replicating enzyme, drives human cell immortality and cancer. Point mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene promoter occur at high frequency in multiple cancers, including urothelial cancer (UC), but their effect on telomerase function has been unclear. In a study of 23 human UC cell lines, we show that these promoter mutations correlate with higher levels of TERT messenger RNA (mRNA), TERT protein, telomerase enzymatic activity, and telomere length. Although previous studies found no relation between TERT promoter mutations and UC patient outcome, we find that elevated TERT mRNA expression strongly correlates with reduced disease-specific survival in two independent UC patient cohorts (n = 35; n = 87). These results suggest that high telomerase activity may be a better marker of aggressive UC tumors than TERT promoter mutations alone. PMID:25722414

  7. Telomerase Structure Paves the way for New Cancer Therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Skordalakes, S.

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of a single enzyme, telomerase, is associated with the uncontrollable proliferation of cells observed in as many as 90% of all of human cancers. Since the mid-1990s, when telomerase activity was detected in human tumors, scientists have eyed the enzyme as an ideal target for developing broadly effective anticancer drugs. One of the missing links in the effort to identify such therapies has been the high-resolution structure of the enzyme, a powerful tool used for the identification and development of clinical drugs. A recent structure of the catalytic subunit of teleomerase from the Skordalakes laboratory, a major advancement in the field of telomeres, has opened the door to the development of new, broadly effective cancer drugs, as well as anti-aging therapies. Here we present a brief description of telomerase biology, current efforts to identify telomerase function modulators and the potential importance of the telomerase structure in future drug development.

  8. Feedback regulation of telomerase reverse transcriptase: new insight into the evolving field of telomerase in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Qin; Huang, Cheng; He, Xu; Tian, Yuan-Yao; Zhou, De-Xi; He, Yong; Liu, Xin-Hua; Li, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the catalytic component of telomerase, especially the rate-limiting determinant of telomerase activity. So far, TERT has been reported to be over-expressed in more than 90% of cancers, thereby playing a critical role in sustained proliferation and survival potentials of various cancer cells. Over the past decade, a comprehensive network of transcription factors has been shown to be involved in the regulation of TERT. Furthermore, accumulating evidence has suggested that TERT could modulate the expression of numerous genes involved in diverse group of cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation and cellular signaling. Therefore, it indicates that TERT is both an effector and a regulator in carcinoma. However, the mechanisms of the interaction between TERT and its target genes are still not fully understood. Thus, it is necessary to consolidate and summarize recent developments of the cross-talk between TERT and related genes in cancer cells or other cells with cancer cell characteristics, and elucidate these relevant mechanisms. In this review, we focus on various signaling pathways and genes that participate in the feedback regulation of TERT and the underlying feedback loop mechanism of TERT, further providing new insights into non-telomeric functions of telomerase and potentially to be used as a novel therapeutic target for cancer. PMID:23993966

  9. Processive and Distributive Extension of Human Telomeres by Telomerase Under Homeostatic and Non-equilibrium Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Abreu, Eladio; Kim, Jinyong; Stadler, Guido; Eskiocak, Ugur; Terns, Michael P.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Shay, Jerry W.; Wright, Woodring E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Specific information about how telomerase acts in vivo is necessary for understanding telomere dynamics in human tumor cells. Our results imply that under homeostatic telomere length-maintenance conditions only one molecule of telomerase acts at each telomere during every cell division and processively adds ~60 nt to each end. In contrast, multiple molecules of telomerase act at each telomere when telomeres are elongating (non-equilibrium conditions). Telomerase extension is less processive during the first few weeks following the reversal of long-term treatment with the telomerase inhibitor GRN163L, a time when Cajal bodies fail to deliver telomerase RNA to telomeres. This result implies that processing of telomerase by Cajal bodies may affect its processivity. Overexpressed telomerase is also less processive than the endogenously expressed telomerase. These findings reveal two major distinct extension modes adopted by telomerase in vivo. PMID:21549308

  10. Processive and distributive extension of human telomeres by telomerase under homeostatic and nonequilibrium conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Abreu, Eladio; Kim, Jinyong; Stadler, Guido; Eskiocak, Ugur; Terns, Michael P; Terns, Rebecca M; Shay, Jerry W; Wright, Woodring E

    2011-05-01

    Specific information about how telomerase acts in vivo is necessary for understanding telomere dynamics in human tumor cells. Our results imply that, under homeostatic telomere length-maintenance conditions, only one molecule of telomerase acts at each telomere during every cell division and processively adds ∼60 nt to each end. In contrast, multiple molecules of telomerase act at each telomere when telomeres are elongating (nonequilibrium conditions). Telomerase extension is less processive during the first few weeks following the reversal of long-term treatment with the telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat (GRN163L), a time when Cajal bodies fail to deliver telomerase RNA to telomeres. This result implies that processing of telomerase by Cajal bodies may affect its processivity. Overexpressed telomerase is also less processive than the endogenously expressed telomerase. These findings reveal two major distinct extension modes adopted by telomerase in vivo. PMID:21549308

  11. YThe BigH3 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Radiation-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shao, G.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequences of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a 7 fold down- regulation of the novel tumor suppressor Big-h3 among radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells Furthermore ectopic re-expression of this gene suppresses tumorigenic phenotype and promotes the sensitivity of these tumor cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line we ectopically expresses the catalytic subunit of telomerase hTERT in primary human small airway epithelial SAE cells and generated several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV nucleon of 56 Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium These findings indicate

  12. Profiling mitochondrial proteins in radiation-induced genome-unstable cell lines with persistent oxidative stress by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John H.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Wan, Yunhu; Aypar, Umut; Peters, Jonathan S.; Springer, David L.

    2008-06-01

    Radiation-induced genome instability (RIGI) is a response to radiation exposure in which the progeny of surviving cells exhibit increased frequency of chromosomal changes many generations after the initial insult. Persistently elevated oxidative stress accompanying RIGI and the ability of free-radical scavengers, given before irradiation, to reduce the incidence of instability suggest that radiation induced alterations to mitochondrial function likely play a role in RIGI. To further elucidate this mechanism, we performed high-throughput quantitative mass spectrometry on samples enriched in mitochondrial proteins from three chromosomally-unstable GM10115 Chinese-hamster-ovary cell lines and their stable parental cell line. Out of several hundred identified proteins, sufficient data were collected on 74 mitochondrial proteins to test for statistically significant differences in their abundance between unstable and stable cell lines. Each of the unstable cell lines showed a distinct profile of statistically-significant differential abundant mitochondrial proteins. The LS-12 cell line was characterized by 8 downregulated proteins, whereas the CS-9 cell line exhibited 5 distinct up-regulated proteins. The unstable 115 cell line had two down-regulated proteins, one of which was also downregulated in LS-12, and one up-regulated protein relative to stable parental cells. The mitochondrial protein profiles for LS-12 and C-9 provide further evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the genome instability of these cell lines.

  13. Functional and mechanistic analysis of telomerase: An antitumor drug target.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinnan; Zhang, Yanmin

    2016-07-01

    The current research on anticancer drugs focuses on exploiting particular traits or hallmarks unique to cancer cells. Telomerase, a special reverse transcriptase, has been recognized as a common factor in most tumor cells, and in turn a distinctive characteristic with respect to non-malignant cells. This feature has made telomerase a preferred target for anticancer drug development and cancer therapy. This review aims to analyze the pharmacological function and mechanism and role of telomerase in oncogenesis; to provide fundamental knowledge for research on the structure, function, and working mechanism of telomerase; to expound the role that telomerase plays in the initiation and development of tumor and its relationship with tumor cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and related pathway molecules; and to display potential targets of antitumor drug for inhibiting the expression, reconstitution, and trafficking of the enzyme. We therefore summarize recent advances in potential telomerase inhibitors for antitumor including natural products, synthetic small molecules, peptides and proteins, which indicate that optimizing the delivery method and drug combination could be of help in a combinatorial drug treatment for tumor. More extensive understanding of the structure, biogenesis, and mechanism of telomerase will provide invaluable information for increasing the efficiency of rational antitumor drug design. PMID:27118336

  14. Perifosine as a potential novel anti-telomerase therapy

    PubMed Central

    Holohan, Brody; Hagiopian, Moriah M.; Lai, Tsung-Po; Huang, Ejun; Friedman, Daphne R.; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    Most tumors circumvent telomere-length imposed replicative limits through expression of telomerase, the reverse transcriptase that maintains telomere length. Substantial evidence that AKT activity is required for telomerase activity exists, indicating that AKT inhibitors may also function as telomerase inhibitors. This possibility has not been investigated in a clinical context despite many clinical trials evaluating AKT inhibitors. We tested if Perifosine, an AKT inhibitor in clinical trials, inhibits telomerase activity and telomere maintenance in tissue culture and orthotopic xenograft models as well as in purified CLL samples from a phase II Perifosine clinical trial. We demonstrate that Perifosine inhibits telomerase activity and induces telomere shortening in a wide variety of cell lines in vitro, though there is substantial heterogeneity in long-term responses to Perifosine between cell lines. Perifosine did reduce primary breast cancer orthotopic xenograft tumor size, but did not impact metastatic burden in a statistically significant manner. However, Perifosine reduced telomerase activity in four of six CLL patients evaluated. Two of the patients were treated for four to six months and shortening of the shortest telomeres occurred in both patients' cells. These results indicate that it may be possible to repurpose Perifosine or other AKT pathway inhibitors as a novel approach to targeting telomerase. PMID:26307677

  15. Telomerase RNA is more than a DNA template.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher J; Zakian, Virginia A

    2016-08-01

    The addition of telomeric DNA to chromosome ends is an essential cellular activity that compensates for the loss of genomic DNA that is due to the inability of the conventional DNA replication apparatus to duplicate the entire chromosome. The telomerase reverse transcriptase and its associated RNA bind to the very end of the telomere via a sequence in the RNA and specific protein-protein interactions. Telomerase RNA also provides the template for addition of new telomeric repeats by the reverse-transcriptase protein subunit. In addition to the template, there are 3 other conserved regions in telomerase RNA that are essential for normal telomerase activity. Here we briefly review the conserved core regions of telomerase RNA and then focus on a recent study in fission yeast that determined the function of another conserved region in telomerase RNA called the Stem Terminus Element (STE). (1) The STE is distant from the templating core of telomerase in both the linear and RNA secondary structure, but, nonetheless, affects the fidelity of telomere sequence addition and, in turn, the ability of telomere binding proteins to bind and protect chromosome ends. We will discuss possible mechanisms of STE action and the suitability of the STE as an anti-cancer target. PMID:27245259

  16. Radiation-induced hemorrhagic duodenitis associated with sorafenib treatment.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Shunichi; Nakamura, Shotaro; Ooho, Aritsune; Nakamura, Shigeo; Esaki, Motohiro; Azuma, Koichi; Kitazono, Takanari; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    Sorafenib, an oral inhibitor of multiple tyrosine kinase receptors, has been widely used as a standard medical treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we report a 66-year-old male patient who developed gastrointestinal bleeding due to radiation-induced hemorrhagic duodenitis associated with sorafenib treatment. We started oral administration of sorafenib because of the recurrence of HCC with lung metastases. The patient had been treated by radiotherapy for para-aortic lymph node metastases from HCC 4 months before the bleeding. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed edematous reddish mucosa with friability and telangiectasia in the second portion of the duodenum. Computed tomography and capsule endoscopy revealed that the hemorrhagic lesions were located in the distal duodenum. After discontinuation of sorafenib, the bleeding disappeared and a follow-up EGD confirmed improvement of duodenitis. Based on these findings, the diagnosis of radiation-induced hemorrhagic duodenitis associated with sorafenib was made. PMID:25832768

  17. Using Imaging Methods to Interrogate Radiation-Induced Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Weber, Thomas J.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2012-04-01

    There is increasing emphasis on the use of systems biology approaches to define radiation induced responses in cells and tissues. Such approaches frequently rely on global screening using various high throughput 'omics' platforms. Although these methods are ideal for obtaining an unbiased overview of cellular responses, they often cannot reflect the inherent heterogeneity of the system or provide detailed spatial information. Additionally, performing such studies with multiple sampling time points can be prohibitively expensive. Imaging provides a complementary method with high spatial and temporal resolution capable of following the dynamics of signaling processes. In this review, we utilize specific examples to illustrate how imaging approaches have furthered our understanding of radiation induced cellular signaling. Particular emphasis is placed on protein co-localization, and oscillatory and transient signaling dynamics.

  18. Radiation-induced decomposition of explosives under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Giefers, Hubertus; Pravica, Michael; Yang, Wenge; Liermann, Peter

    2008-11-03

    We present high-pressure and high temperature studies of the synchrotron radiation-induced decomposition of powder secondary high explosives pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) using white beam synchrotron radiation at the 16 BM-B and 16 BM-D sectors of the HP-CAT beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The radiation-induced decomposition rate TATB showed dramatic slowing with pressure up to 26.6 GPa (the highest pressure studied), implying a positive activation volume of the activated complex. The decomposition rate of PETN varied little with pressure up to 15.7 GPa (the highest pressure studied). Diffraction line intensities were measured as a function of time using energy-dispersive methods. By measuring the decomposition rate as a function of pressure and temperature, kinetic and other constants associated with the decomposition reactions were extracted.

  19. Telomeres and Telomerase in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jih-Kai; Wang, Chao-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are tandem repeat DNA sequences present at the ends of each eukaryotic chromosome to stabilize the genome structure integrity. Telomere lengths progressively shorten with each cell division. Inflammation and oxidative stress, which are implicated as major mechanisms underlying cardiovascular diseases, increase the rate of telomere shortening and lead to cellular senescence. In clinical studies, cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and hypertension have been associated with short leukocyte telomere length. In addition, low telomerase activity and short leukocyte telomere length have been observed in atherosclerotic plaque and associated with plaque instability, thus stroke or acute myocardial infarction. The aging myocardium with telomere shortening and accumulation of senescent cells limits the tissue regenerative capacity, contributing to systolic or diastolic heart failure. In addition, patients with ion-channel defects might have genetic imbalance caused by oxidative stress-related accelerated telomere shortening, which may subsequently cause sudden cardiac death. Telomere length can serve as a marker for the biological status of previous cell divisions and DNA damage with inflammation and oxidative stress. It can be integrated into current risk prediction and stratification models for cardiovascular diseases and can be used in precise personalized treatments. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of telomeres and telomerase in the aging process and their association with cardiovascular diseases. In addition, we discuss therapeutic interventions targeting the telomere system in cardiovascular disease treatments. PMID:27598203

  20. Telomerase activity in the bats Hipposideros armiger and Rousettus leschenaultia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; McAllan, B M; He, Guimei

    2011-09-01

    Telomerase activity was examined in two species of bat, Hipposideros armiger and Rousettus leschenaultia, which have similar body mass and lifespan but differ in use of hibernation. We found that telomerase activity was present in all tissues sampled, but it was greater in metabolically active tissues such as liver, spleen, and kidney. Of special interest is the raised activity found in the heterothermic bat H. armiger, and the hibernating bats having raised values for spleen, heart, and kidney. These findings show that maintenance of high levels of telomerase is an essential part of the regulation of cellular activities during hibernation. PMID:22082270

  1. NF-κB-mediated transactivation of telomerase prevents intimal smooth muscle cell from replicative senescence during vascular repair

    PubMed Central

    Bu, De-xiu; Johansson, Maria E; Ren, Jingyi; Xu, Da-wei; Johnson, F Brad; Edfeldt, Kristina; Yan, Zhong-qun

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Functional telomerase is essential to the replicative longevity of vascular cells. To gain insights into mechanisms by which intimal hyperplasia interferes with the repair process, expression and function of the telomerase catalytic subunit (TERT) were investigated following vascular injury. METHODS AND RESULTS We found that TERT was de novo activated in intima of the injured arteries, involving activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Stimulation of the isolated intimal smooth muscle cell (SMC) by basic fibroblast growth factor or tumor necrosis factor α resulted in increased TERT activity. This depends on the activation of c-Myc signaling since mutation of the E-box in the promoter or over-expression of MAD1, a c-Myc competitor, abrogated the transcriptional activity. Inhibition of NF-κB in both intimal SMC and in the injured artery attenuated TERT transcriptional activity through reduction of c-Myc expression. Pharmacological blockade of TERT led to SMC senescence. Finally, depletion of telomerase function in mice resulted in severe intimal SMC senescence following vascular injury. CONCLUSIONS These results support a model whereby vascular injury induces de novo expression of TERT in intimal SMC via activation of NF-κB and up-regulation of c-Myc. The resumed TERT activity is critical for intimal hyperplasia. PMID:20864668

  2. Sulfonic acid catalysts prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Mizota, Tomotoshi; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Saito, Kyoichi, Saito

    1994-09-01

    In this study, the authors prepared two variations of graft-type acid catalysts with different adjacent groups by radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP), and compared the hydrolytic activity of the resultant acid catalysts for methyl acetate with that of commercially available SO{sub 3}H-type ion-exchange beads with different degrees of cross-linking. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  4. Aging masks detection of radiation-induced brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Olson, John; D’Agostino, Ralph; Linville, Constance; Nicolle, Michelle M.; Robbins, Michael E.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2011-01-01

    Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) is a widely used, effective treatment for primary and metastatic brain tumors, but it also produces radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment. Radiation-induced neural changes are particularly problematic for elderly brain tumor survivors who also experience age-dependent cognitive impairment. Accordingly, we investigated, i] radiation-induced cognitive impairment, and ii] potential biomarkers of radiation-induced brain injury in a rat model of aging. Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats received fractionated whole-brain irradiation (fWBI rats, 40 Gy, 8 fractions over 4 wk) or sham-irradiation (Sham-IR rats) at 12 months of age; all analyses were performed at 26–30 months of age. Spatial learning and memory were measured using the Morris water maze (MWM), hippocampal metabolites were measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS), and hippocampal glutamate receptor subunits were evaluated using Western blots. Young rats (7–10 month-old) were included to control for age effects. The results revealed that both Sham-IR and fWBI rats exhibited age-dependent impairments in MWM performance; fWBI induced additional impairments in the reversal MWM. 1H MRS revealed age-dependent decreases in neuronal markers, increases in glial markers, but no detectable fWBI-dependent changes. Western blot analysis revealed age-dependent, but not fWBI-dependent, glutamate subunit declines. Although previous studies demonstrated fWBI-induced changes in cognition, glutamate subunits, and brain metabolites in younger rats, age-dependent changes in these parameters appear to mask their detection in old rats, a phenomenon also likely to occur in elderly fWBI patients >70 years of age. PMID:21338580

  5. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  6. Torin2 Suppresses Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Pandita, Raj K; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Qingsong; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hunt, Clayton R; Gray, Nathanael S; Minna, John D; Pandita, Tej K; Westover, Kenneth D

    2016-05-01

    Several classes of inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been developed based on its central role in sensing growth factor and nutrient levels to regulate cellular metabolism. However, its ATP-binding site closely resembles other phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members, resulting in reactivity with these targets that may also be therapeutically useful. The ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, Torin2, shows biochemical activity against the DNA repair-associated proteins ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which raises the possibility that Torin2 and related compounds might radiosensitize cancerous tumors. In this study Torin2 was also found to enhance ionizing radiation-induced cell killing in conditions where ATM was dispensable, confirming the requirement for multiple PIKK targets. Moreover, Torin2 did not influence the initial appearance of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation but significantly delayed the disappearance of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. Torin2 increased the number of radiation-induced S-phase specific chromosome aberrations and reduced the frequency of radiation-induced CtIP and Rad51 foci formation, suggesting that Torin2 works by blocking homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair resulting in an S-phase specific DNA repair defect. Accordingly, Torin2 reduced HR-mediated repair of I-Sce1-induced DNA damage and contributed to replication fork stalling. We conclude that radiosensitization of tumor cells by Torin2 is associated with disrupting ATR- and ATM-dependent DNA damage responses. Our findings support the concept of developing combination cancer therapies that incorporate ionizing radiation therapy and Torin2 or compounds with similar properties. PMID:27135971

  7. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  8. RIP1 and RIP3 complex regulates radiation-induced programmed necrosis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Das, Arabinda; McDonald, Daniel G; Dixon-Mah, Yaenette N; Jacqmin, Dustin J; Samant, Vikram N; Vandergrift, William A; Lindhorst, Scott M; Cachia, David; Varma, Abhay K; Vanek, Kenneth N; Banik, Naren L; Jenrette, Joseph M; Raizer, Jeffery J; Giglio, Pierre; Patel, Sunil J

    2016-06-01

    Radiation-induced necrosis (RN) is a relatively common side effect of radiation therapy for glioblastoma. However, the molecular mechanisms involved and the ways RN mechanisms differ from regulated cell death (apoptosis) are not well understood. Here, we compare the molecular mechanism of cell death (apoptosis or necrosis) of C6 glioma cells in both in vitro and in vivo (C6 othotopically allograft) models in response to low and high doses of X-ray radiation. Lower radiation doses were used to induce apoptosis, while high-dose levels were chosen to induce radiation necrosis. Our results demonstrate that active caspase-8 in this complex I induces apoptosis in response to low-dose radiation and inhibits necrosis by cleaving RIP1 and RI. When activation of caspase-8 was reduced at high doses of X-ray radiation, the RIP1/RIP3 necrosome complex II is formed. These complexes induce necrosis through the caspase-3-independent pathway mediated by calpain, cathepsin B/D, and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF has a dual role in apoptosis and necrosis. At high doses, AIF promotes chromatinolysis and necrosis by interacting with histone H2AX. In addition, NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-1 play a crucial role in radiation-induced inflammatory responses embedded in a complex inflammatory network. Analysis of inflammatory markers in matched plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolated from in vivo specimens demonstrated the upregulation of chemokines and cytokines during the necrosis phase. Using RIP1/RIP3 kinase specific inhibitors (Nec-1, GSK'872), we also establish that the RIP1-RIP3 complex regulates programmed necrosis after either high-dose radiation or TNF-α-induced necrosis requires RIP1 and RIP3 kinases. Overall, our data shed new light on the relationship between RIP1/RIP3-mediated programmed necrosis and AIF-mediated caspase-independent programmed necrosis in glioblastoma. PMID:26684801

  9. Radiation-induced products of peptides and their enzymatic digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, E.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical characterization of radiation-induced products of peptides and proteins is essential for understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on peptides and proteins. Furthermore, peptides containing radiation-altered amino acid residues might not be completely digestible by proteolytic enzymes. In this work, small homopeptides of Ala, Phe and Met were chosen as model peptides. Lysozyme was used to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on a small protein. All peptides and lysozyme were irradiated in diluted, oxygen free, N/sub 2/O-saturated aqueous solutions, using a /sup 60/Co-..gamma..-source. HPLC, capillary GC and GC-MS were applied to isolate and characterize the radiation-induced products. The enzymatic digestibility of the products was investigated using aminopeptidase M, leucine aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase A and carboxypeptidase Y. It was found that irradiation of peptides examined in this work leads to racemization and alteration of amino acid residues and crosslinks between the peptide chains. In addition, it was established that exopeptidases act differently on radiation-induced dimers of peptides composed of aliphatic, aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids.

  10. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  11. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  12. Essential role for telomerase in chronic myeloid leukemia induced by BCR-ABL in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; González-Herrero, Inés; Flores, Teresa; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2012-01-01

    The telomerase protein is constitutively activated in malignant cells from many patients with cancer, including the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but whether telomerase is essential for the pathogenesis of this disease is not known. Here, we used telomerase deficient mice to determine the requirement for telomerase in CML induced by BCR-ABL in mouse models of CML. Loss of one telomerase allele or complete deletion of telomerase prevented the development of leukemia induced by BCR-ABL. However, BCR-ABL was expressed and active in telomerase heterozygous and null leukemic hematopoietic stem cells. These results demonstrate that telomerase is essential for oncogene-induced reprogramming of hematopoietic stem cells in CML development and validate telomerase and the genes it regulates as targets for therapy in CML. PMID:22408137

  13. Chimeric bifunctional oligonucleotides as a novel tool to invade telomerase assembly

    PubMed Central

    Azhibek, Dulat; Zvereva, Maria; Zatsepin, Timofei; Rubtsova, Maria; Dontsova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase is a key participant in the telomere length maintaining system in eukaryotic cells. Telomerase RNA and protein reverse transcriptase subunits are essential for the appearance of active telomerase in vitro. Telomerase is active in many cancer types and is a potential target for anticancer drug development. Here we report a new approach for impairing telomerase function at the stage of human telomerase assembly. The approach is based on the application of chimeric bifunctional oligonucleotides that contain two oligonucleotide parts complementary to the functional domains of telomerase RNA connected with non-nucleotide linkers in different orientations (5′-3′, 5′-5′ or 3′-3′). Such chimeras inhibited telomerase in vitro in the nM range, but were effective in vivo in sub-nM concentrations, predominantly due to their effect on telomerase assembly and dimerization. PMID:25081209

  14. Mutually Exclusive Binding of Telomerase RNA and DNA by Ku Alters Telomerase Recruitment Model

    PubMed Central

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S.; Goodrich, Karen J.; Taabazuing, Cornelius; Ouenzar, Faissal; Chartrand, Pascal; Cech, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Ku heterodimer contributes to telomere maintenance as a component of telomeric chromatin and as an accessory subunit of telomerase. How Ku binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and to telomerase RNA (TLC1) promotes its telomeric functions is incompletely understood. We demonstrate that deletions designed to constrict the DNA-binding ring of Ku80 disrupt non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), telomeric gene silencing and telomere length maintenance, suggesting that these functions require Ku's DNA end-binding activity. Contrary to the current model, a mutant Ku with low affinity for dsDNA also loses affinity for TLC1 both in vitro and in vivo. Competition experiments reveal that wild-type Ku binds dsDNA and TLC1 mutually exclusively. Cells expressing the mutant Ku are deficient in nuclear accumulation of TLC1, as expected from the RNA-binding defect. These findings force reconsideration of the mechanisms by which Ku assists in recruiting telomerase to natural telomeres and broken chromosome ends. PMID:22365814

  15. Coordinated DNA dynamics during the human telomerase catalytic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Joseph W.; Stone, Michael D.

    2014-06-01

    The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) utilizes a template within the integral RNA subunit (hTR) to direct extension of telomeres. Telomerase exhibits repeat addition processivity (RAP) and must therefore translocate the nascent DNA product into a new RNA:DNA hybrid register to prime each round of telomere repeat synthesis. Here, we use single-molecule FRET and nuclease protection assays to monitor telomere DNA structure and dynamics during the telomerase catalytic cycle. DNA translocation during RAP proceeds through a previously uncharacterized kinetic substep during which the 3‧-end of the DNA substrate base pairs downstream within the hTR template. The rate constant for DNA primer realignment reveals this step is not rate limiting for RAP, suggesting a second slow conformational change repositions the RNA:DNA hybrid into the telomerase active site and drives the extrusion of the 5‧-end of the DNA primer out of the enzyme complex.

  16. Structural Basis of Template Boundary Definition in Tetrahymena Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Linnea I.; Akiyama, Ben M.; Ooms, Alexandra; Lu, Cheng; Rubin, Seth M.; Stone, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is required to maintain repetitive G-rich telomeric DNA sequences at chromosome ends. To do so, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) subunit reiteratively uses a small region of the integral telomerase RNA (TER) as a template. An essential feature of telomerase catalysis is the strict definition of the template boundary to determine the precise TER nucleotides to be reverse transcribed by TERT. We report the 3 Å crystal structure of the Tetrahymena TERT RNA binding domain (tTRBD) bound to the template boundary element (TBE) of TER. tTRBD is wedged into the base of the TBE RNA stem-loop and each of the flanking RNA strands wraps around opposite sides of the protein domain. The structure illustrates how the tTRBD establishes the template boundary by positioning the TBE the correct distance from the TERT active site to prohibit copying of non-template nucleotides. PMID:26436828

  17. Telomerase activity and telomere length in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, G T; Lee, H S; Chen, C H; Chiou, L L; Lin, Y W; Lee, C Z; Chen, D S; Sheu, J C

    1998-11-01

    Telomerase activity is activated and telomere length altered in various types of cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 39 HCC tissues and the corresponding non-tumour livers were analysed and correlated with clinical parameters. Telomere length was determined by terminal restriction fragment assay, and telomerase activity was assayed by telomeric repeat amplification protocol. Telomerase activity was positive in 24 of the 39 tumour tissues (1.15-285.13 total product generated (TPG) units) and in six of the 39 non-tumour liver tissues (1.05-1.73 TPG units). In the 28 cases analysed for telomere length, telomere length was shortened in 11 cases, lengthened in six cases, and unaltered in 11 cases compared with non-tumour tissues. Neither telomere length nor telomerase activity was correlated to any clinical parameters. PMID:10023320

  18. DNA copy number aberrations and disruption of the p16Ink4a/Rb pathway in radiation-induced and spontaneous rat mammary carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Daisuke; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Takabatake, Takashi; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Nishimura, Yukiko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2010-08-01

    Chromosomal amplifications and deletions are thought to be important events in spontaneous and radiation-induced carcinogenesis. To clarify how ionizing radiation induces mammary carcinogenesis, we characterized genomic copy number aberrations for gamma-ray-induced rat mammary carcinomas using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. We examined 14 carcinomas induced by gamma radiation (2 Gy) and found 26 aberrations, including trisomies of chromosomes 4 and 10 for three and one carcinomas, respectively, an amplification of the chromosomal region 1q12 in two carcinomas, and deletions of the chromosomal regions 3q35q36, 5q32 and 7q11 in two, two and four carcinomas, respectively. These aberrations were not observed in seven spontaneous mammary carcinomas. The expression of p16Ink4a and p19Arf, which are located in the chromosomal region 5q32, was always up-regulated except for a carcinoma with a homozygous deletion of region 5q32. The up-regulation was not accounted for by gene mutations or promoter hypomethylation. However, the amounts of Rb and its mRNA were down-regulated in these carcinomas, indicating a disruption of the p16Ink4a/Rb pathway. This is the first report of array CGH analysis for radiation-induced mammary tumors, which reveals that they show distinct DNA copy number aberration patterns that are different from those of spontaneous tumors and those reported previously for chemically induced tumors. PMID:20681787

  19. Characterization of telomeres and telomerase expression in Xiphophorus.

    PubMed

    Downs, Kevin P; Shen, Yingjia; Pasquali, Amanda; Beldorth, Ion; Savage, Markita; Gallier, Katelyn; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Booth, Rachell E; Walter, Ronald B

    2012-01-01

    Research investigating telomere lengths and telomerase expression in vertebrates has progressively become important due to the association of these two biological endpoints with cellular aging and cancer in humans. Studies that rely upon the traditional use of laboratory mice have been faced with limitations largely due to inbred mice possessing large telomeres and ubiquitous expression of telomerase. Recently, a number of small fish species have been shown to provide potentially informative models for examining the role of telomeres and telomerase within intact vertebrate animals. Xiphophorus fishes represent a new world live-bearing genus that has not previously been assessed for telomere length or telomerase expression. To add to the knowledge base of telomere and telomerase biology in vertebrates we assessed telomere length and telomerase expression among several species of Xiphophorus. The telomere lengths in several organs (gill, brain, eyes, testis, ovary and liver) in three species (Xiphophorus hellerii, Xiphophorus maculatus, Xiphophorus couchianus) and also in F(1) interspecies hybrids were approximately 2-6 kb. This size was consistent within the same organs of the same species, as well as between species and F(1) hybrids. Despite possessing relatively short telomere lengths compared to humans, the consistency of size among Xiphophorus species and organs may allow experimental detection of telomere shortening. The relative expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of TERT was measured in seven organs (ovary, testis, liver, gill, brain, heart, skin) from X. maculatus, X. hellerii and in control and ultraviolet light (UVB) exposed skin samples from X. maculatus, X. hellerii, and F(1) interspecies hybrids. TERT gene expression was significantly higher in ovary and testis, while all other organs showed low relative TERT expression. Detectable increases in TERT expression were found

  20. Detection of telomerase on upconversion nanoparticle modified cellulose paper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Li, Wen; Wang, Jiasi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-07-25

    Herein we report a convenient and sensitive method for the detection of telomerase activity based on upconversion nanoparticle (UCNP) modified cellulose paper. Compared with many solution-phase systems, this paper chip is more stable and easily stores the test results. What's more, the low background fluorescence of the UCNPs increases the sensitivity of this method, and the low telomerase levels in different cell lines can clearly be discriminated by the naked eye. PMID:26095724

  1. Establishment and transformation of telomerase-immortalized human small airway epithelial cells by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a number of causally linked genes including the novel tumor suppressor Betaig-h3 that were differentially expressed in radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells. To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line, we show here that ectopic expression of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) in primary human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells resulted in the generation of several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal. Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings. The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice. These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression. Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV/nucleon of 56Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium. These findings indicate that hTERT-immortalized cells, being diploid and chromosomal stable, should be a useful model in assessing mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis.

  2. Telomerase as a Cancer Target. Development of New Molecules.

    PubMed

    Gomez, D L Mengual; Armando, R G; Cerrudo, C S; Ghiringhelli, P D; Gomez, D E

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are the terminal part of the chromosome containing a long repetitive and noncodifying sequence that has as function protecting the chromosomes. In normal cells, telomeres lost part of such repetitive sequence in each mitosis, until telomeres reach a critical point, triggering at that time senescence and cell death. However, in most of tumor cells in each cell division a part of the telomere is lost, however the appearance of an enzyme called telomerase synthetize the segment that just has been lost, therefore conferring to tumor cells the immortality hallmark. Telomerase is significantly overexpressed in 80-95% of all malignant tumors, being present at low levels in few normal cells, mostly stem cells. Due to these characteristics, telomerase has become an attractive target for new and more effective anticancer agents. The capability of inhibiting telomerase in tumor cells should lead to telomere shortening, senescence and apoptosis. In this work, we analyze the different strategies for telomerase inhibition, either in development, preclinical or clinical stages taking into account their strong points and their caveats. We covered strategies such as nucleosides analogs, oligonucleotides, small molecule inhibitors, G-quadruplex stabilizers, immunotherapy, gene therapy, molecules that affect the telomere/ telomerase associated proteins, agents from microbial sources, among others, providing a balanced evaluation of the status of the inhibitors of this powerful target together with an analysis of the challenges ahead. PMID:26873194

  3. Telomerase as a Cancer Target. Development of New Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, D.L. Mengual; Armando, R.G.; Cerrudo, C.S.; Ghiringhelli, P.D.; Gomez, D.E.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are the terminal part of the chromosome containing a long repetitive and non-codifying sequence that has as function protecting the chromosomes. In normal cells, telomeres lost part of such repetitive sequence in each mitosis, until telomeres reach a critical point, triggering at that time senescence and cell death. However, in most of tumor cells in each cell division a part of the telomere is lost, however the appearance of an enzyme called telomerase synthetize the segment that just has been lost, therefore conferring to tumor cells the immortality hallmark. Telomerase is significantly overexpressed in 80–95% of all malignant tumors, being present at low levels in few normal cells, mostly stem cells. Due to these characteristics, telomerase has become an attractive target for new and more effective anticancer agents. The capability of inhibiting telomerase in tumor cells should lead to telomere shortening, senescence and apoptosis. In this work, we analyze the different strategies for telomerase inhibition, either in development, preclinical or clinical stages taking into account their strong points and their caveats. We covered strategies such as nucleosides analogs, oligonucleotides, small molecule inhibitors, G-quadruplex stabilizers, immunotherapy, gene therapy, molecules that affect the telomere/telomerase associated proteins, agents from microbial sources, among others, providing a balanced evaluation of the status of the inhibitors of this powerful target together with an analysis of the challenges ahead. PMID:26873194

  4. Inhibition of telomerase recruitment and cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Mai; Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan; Sullivan, Kelly D; Espinosa, Joaquín M; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-11-15

    Continued proliferation of human cells requires maintenance of telomere length, usually accomplished by telomerase. Telomerase is recruited to chromosome ends by interaction with a patch of amino acids (the TEL patch, for TPP1 glutamate (E) and leucine (L)-rich patch) on the surface of telomere protein TPP1. In previous studies, interruption of this interaction by mutation prevented telomere extension in HeLa cells, but the cell culture continued to grow. We now show that the telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532 acts together with TEL patch mutations to inhibit the growth of HeLa cell lines and that apoptosis is a prominent mechanism of death of these cells. Survivor cells take over the population beginning around 40 days in culture. These cells no longer express the TEL patch mutant TPP1, apparently because of silencing of the expression cassette, a survival mechanism that would not be available to cancer cells. These results provide hope that inhibiting the binding of telomerase to the TEL patch of TPP1, perhaps together with a modest inhibition of the telomerase enzyme, could comprise an effective anticancer therapy for the ∼90% of human tumors that are telomerase-positive. PMID:24097987

  5. Inhibition of Telomerase Recruitment and Cancer Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Mai; Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan; Sullivan, Kelly D.; Espinosa, Joaquín M.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Continued proliferation of human cells requires maintenance of telomere length, usually accomplished by telomerase. Telomerase is recruited to chromosome ends by interaction with a patch of amino acids (the TEL patch, for TPP1 glutamate (E) and leucine (L)-rich patch) on the surface of telomere protein TPP1. In previous studies, interruption of this interaction by mutation prevented telomere extension in HeLa cells, but the cell culture continued to grow. We now show that the telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532 acts together with TEL patch mutations to inhibit the growth of HeLa cell lines and that apoptosis is a prominent mechanism of death of these cells. Survivor cells take over the population beginning around 40 days in culture. These cells no longer express the TEL patch mutant TPP1, apparently because of silencing of the expression cassette, a survival mechanism that would not be available to cancer cells. These results provide hope that inhibiting the binding of telomerase to the TEL patch of TPP1, perhaps together with a modest inhibition of the telomerase enzyme, could comprise an effective anticancer therapy for the ∼90% of human tumors that are telomerase-positive. PMID:24097987

  6. Telomere Transcripts Target Telomerase in Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kreilmeier, Theresa; Mejri, Doris; Hauck, Marlene; Kleiter, Miriam; Holzmann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding transcripts from telomeres, called telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), were identified as blocking telomerase activity (TA), a telomere maintenance mechanism (TMM), in tumors. We expressed recombinant TERRA transcripts in tumor cell lines with TA and with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to study effects on TMM and cell growth. Adeno- and lentivirus constructs (AV and LV) were established for transient and stable expression of approximately 130 units of telomere hexanucleotide repeats under control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human RNase P RNA H1 (hH1) promoters with and without polyadenylation, respectively. Six human tumor cell lines either using telomerase or ALT were infected and analyzed for TA levels. Pre-infection cells using telomerase had 1%-3% of the TERRA expression levels of ALT cells. AV and LV expression of recombinant TERRA in telomerase positive cells showed a 1.3-2.6 fold increase in TERRA levels, and a decrease in TA of 25%-58%. Dominant-negative or small hairpin RNA (shRNA) viral expression against human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) results in senescence, not induced by TERRA expression. Population doubling time, cell viability and TL (telomere length) were not impacted by ectopic TERRA expression. Clonal growth was reduced by TERRA expression in TA but not ALT cell lines. ALT cells were not affected by treatments applied. Established cell models and tools may be used to better understand the role of TERRA in the cell, especially for targeting telomerase. PMID:27537914

  7. Aneuploidy as a mechanism of adaptation to telomerase insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Millet, Caroline; Makovets, Svetlana

    2016-08-01

    Cells' survival is determined by their ability to adapt to constantly changing environment. Adaptation responses involve global changes in transcription, translation, and posttranslational modifications of proteins. In recent years, karyotype changes in adapting populations of single cell organisms have been reported in a number of studies. More recently, we have described aneuploidy as an adaptation mechanism used by populations of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive telomerase insufficiency induced by elevated growth temperature. Genetic evidence suggests that telomerase insufficiency is caused by decreased levels of the telomerase catalytic subunit Est2. Here, we present experiments arguing that the underlying cause of this phenomenon may be within the telomerase RNA TLC1: changes in the expression of TLC1 as well as mutations in the TLC1 template region affect telomere length equilibrium and the temperature threshold for the induction of telomerase insufficiency. We discuss what lies at the root of telomerase insufficiency, how cell populations overcome it through aneuploidy and whether reversible aneuploidy could be an adaptation mechanism for a variety of environmental stresses. PMID:26758992

  8. Role of Telomerase in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Zurek, Mark; Altschmied, Joachim; Kohlgrüber, Stefanie; Ale-Agha, Niloofar; Haendeler, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Aging is one major risk factor for the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and the development of atherosclerosis. One important enzyme known to be involved in aging processes is Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT). After the discovery of the enzyme in humans, TERT had initially only been attributed to germ line cells, stem cells and cancer cells. However, over the last few years it has become clear that TERT is also active in cells of the cardiovascular system including cardiac myocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Interference with the activity of this enzyme greatly contributes to cardiovascular diseases. This review will summarize the findings on the role of TERT in cardiovascular cells. Moreover, recent findings concerning TERT in different mouse models with respect to cardiovascular diseases will be described. Finally, the extranuclear functions of TERT will be covered within this review. PMID:27322328

  9. Role of Telomerase in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Zurek, Mark; Altschmied, Joachim; Kohlgrüber, Stefanie; Ale-Agha, Niloofar; Haendeler, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Aging is one major risk factor for the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and the development of atherosclerosis. One important enzyme known to be involved in aging processes is Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT). After the discovery of the enzyme in humans, TERT had initially only been attributed to germ line cells, stem cells and cancer cells. However, over the last few years it has become clear that TERT is also active in cells of the cardiovascular system including cardiac myocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Interference with the activity of this enzyme greatly contributes to cardiovascular diseases. This review will summarize the findings on the role of TERT in cardiovascular cells. Moreover, recent findings concerning TERT in different mouse models with respect to cardiovascular diseases will be described. Finally, the extranuclear functions of TERT will be covered within this review. PMID:27322328

  10. Role for Telomerase in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Shariq; Quarck, Rozenn; Marcos, Elisabeth; Parpaleix, Aurelien; Gary-Bobo, Guillaume; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Boczkowski, Jorge; Delcroix, Marion; Blasco, Maria A.; Lipskaia, Larissa; Amsellem, Valérie; Adnot, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background Cells exhibiting dysregulated growth may express telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the dual function of which consists of maintaining telomere length, in association with the RNA template molecule TERC, and controlling cell growth. Here, we investigated lung TERT in human and experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) and its role in controlling pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PA-SMC) proliferation. Methods and Results Marked TERT expression or activity was found in lungs from patients with idiopathic PH and from mice with PH induced by hypoxia or serotonin-transporter overexpression (SM22-5HTT+ mice), chiefly within PA-SMCs. In cultured mouse PA-SMCs, TERT was expressed on growth stimulation by serum. The TERT inhibitor imetelstat and the TERT activator TA65 abrogated and stimulated PA-SMC growth, respectively. PA-SMCs from PH mice showed a heightened proliferative phenotype associated with increased TERT expression, which was suppressed by imetelstat treatment. TERC−/− mice at generation 2 and TERT−/− mice at generations 2, 3, and 4 developed less severe PH than did wild-type mice exposed to chronic hypoxia, with less distal pulmonary artery muscularization and fewer Ki67-stained proliferating PA-SMCs. Telomere length differed between TERC−/− and TERT−/− mice, whereas PH severity was similar in the 2 strains and across generations. Chronic imetelstat treatment reduced hypoxia-induced PH in wild-type mice or partially reversed established PH in SM22-5HTT+ mice while simultaneously decreasing TERT expression. Opposite effects occurred in mice treated with TA65. Conclusions Telomerase exerts telomere-independent effects on PA-SMC growth in PH and may constitute a treatment target for PH. PMID:25550449