Science.gov

Sample records for radiative capture mechanisms

  1. Radiative capture mechanisms in the {sup 89}Y({rvec p},{gamma}) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W.E.; Dietrich, F.S.; Sale, K.E.; Kammeraad, J.E.; Luke, S.J.; Weller, H.R.; Chasteler, R.M.; Godwin, M.A.; Kramer, L.; Schmid, G.J.

    1993-07-28

    We have measured the spectra of gamma rays from approximately 14 MeV to the endpoint in the {sup 89}Y({rvec p},{gamma}) reaction with 19.6 MeV polarized protons from the TUNL tandem accelerator. Gamma spectra were measured with a pair of 25.4 cm {times} 25.4 cm anticoincidence shielded NaI detectors at angles of 30, 55, 90, 125, and 150{degrees} with respect to the incident beam. The {gamma}-ray spectra show significant analyzing powers and forward peaking of the angular distributions. These features allow for the discrimination between compound processes which do not exhibit interference between different channels, and direct processes. The observed interference effects indicate that multistep-direct processes are important at {gamma}-ray energies lower than those for which direct-semidirect capture is the dominant mechanism.

  2. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  3. Magnetic capture docking mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Nathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Hai D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism uses a magnetic field to dock a satellite to a host vehicle. A docking component of the mechanism residing on the host vehicle has a magnet that is used to induce a coupled magnetic field with a docking component of the mechanism residing on the satellite. An alignment guide axially aligns the docking component of the satellite with the docking component of the host device dependent on the coupled magnetic field. Rotational alignment guides are used to rotationally align the docking component of the satellite with the docking component of the host device. A ball-lock mechanism is used to mechanically secure the docking component of the host vehicle and the docking component of the satellite.

  4. From radiation-induced chromosome damage to cell death: modelling basic mechanisms and applications to boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Clerici, A M; Ferrari, C; Protti, N; Altieri, S

    2011-02-01

    Cell death is a crucial endpoint in radiation-induced biological damage: on one side, cell death is a reference endpoint to characterise the action of radiation in biological targets; on the other side, any cancer therapy aims to kill tumour cells. Starting from Lea's target theory, many models have been proposed to interpret radiation-induced cell killing; after briefly discussing some of these models, in this paper, a mechanistic approach based on an experimentally observed link between chromosome aberrations and cell death was presented. More specifically, a model and a Monte Carlo code originally developed for chromosome aberrations were extended to simulate radiation-induced cell death applying an experimentally observed one-to-one relationship between the average number of 'lethal aberrations' (dicentrics, rings and deletions) per cell and -ln S, S being the fraction of surviving cells. Although such observation was related to X rays, in the present work, the approach was also applied to protons and alpha particles. A good agreement between simulation outcomes and literature data provided a model validation for different radiation types. The same approach was then successfully applied to simulate the survival of cells enriched with boron and irradiated with thermal neutrons at the Triga Mark II reactor in Pavia, to mimic a typical treatment for boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:21159746

  5. Radiative pion capture by C12.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, W. C.; Gotow, K.; Macdonald, B.; Trower, W. P.; Anderson, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    The energy spectrum of neutrons from radiative pion capture by carbon is investigated. Radiative pion capture is identified by coincidence of a stop signal and a signal from one of six lead-glass gamma detectors when negative pions traverse a beam telescope and are stopped in a carbon target. The energy of the neutrons is measured using the time interval between a stop signal coincident with a gamma-counter signal and a signal from a liquid-oscillator neutron counter. Asymmetry in the neutron-photon angular correlation increases with neutron energy and is accounted for by direct neutron emission.

  6. Towards a fast calculator for the radiation characteristics of radiative recombination and radiative electron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, G.; Ding, H.; Herdrich, M. O.; Surzhykov, A.

    2015-04-01

    The radiative capture of free electrons (radiative recombination) and bound electrons (radiative electron capture) are among the most important charge changing processes for fast, highly-charged ions. While total cross sections can be obtained by an approximate formula with reasonable accuracy, the estimation of angular distributions and polarization properties of the emitted radiation requires a fully relativistic treatment that is numerical expensive. Therefore we recently started the development of a fast calculator for these radiation characteristics. The program is based on a grid of rigorously calculated data points for free- electron capture into bare ions, between which interpolation is performed to obtain radiation characteristics for specific collision systems. Also capture into few-electron systems is taken into account in an approximate way. We present first results from this development.

  7. Apparatus and method for detecting full-capture radiation events

    DOEpatents

    Odell, Daniel M. C.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling the output signal of a radiation detector and distinguishing full-capture radiation events from Compton scattering events. The output signal of a radiation detector is continuously sampled. The samples are converted to digital values and input to a discriminator where samples that are representative of events are identified. The discriminator transfers only event samples, that is, samples representing full-capture events and Compton events, to a signal processor where the samples are saved in a three-dimensional count matrix with time (from the time of onset of the pulse) on the first axis, sample pulse current amplitude on the second axis, and number of samples on the third axis. The stored data are analyzed to separate the Compton events from full-capture events, and the energy of the full-capture events is determined without having determined the energies of any of the individual radiation detector events.

  8. Role of giant resonances in heavy-ion radiative capture

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The main features and physics of the radiative capture of heavy ions are reviewed. Data are discussed from three reactions: /sup 12/C(/sup 12/C,..gamma..)/sup 24/Mg, /sup 14/C(/sup 12/C,..gamma..)/sup 26/Mg, /sup 12/C(/sup 16/O,..gamma..)/sup 28/Si. Excitation functions are given and discussed. 17 references.

  9. Microspine Gripping Mechanism for Asteroid Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Ezekiel G.; Berg, Andrew B.; Willig, Andrew; Parness, Aaron; Frey, Tim; Howell, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper details the development and early testing of a compliant suspension for a microspine gripper device for asteroid capture or micro-gravity percussive drilling. The microspine gripper architecture is reviewed, and a proposed microspine suspension design is presented and discussed. Prototyping methods are discussed, as well as testing methods and results. A path forward is identified from the results of the testing completed thus far. Key findings include: the microspine concept has been established as a valid architecture and the compliant suspension exhibits the desired stiffness characteristics for good gripping behavior. These developments will aid in developing the capability to grasp irregularly shaped boulders in micro-gravity.

  10. Radiative neutron captures by neutron-rich nuclei and the r-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.

    1998-09-01

    The radiative neutron capture by neutron-rich nuclei is estimated with an improved description of the electric giant dipole resonance. In addition, 3 major effects affecting the capture rates by exotic neutron-rich nuclei are studied. These concern the existence of a low-energy E1 pygmy resonance, the overestimate of the statistical predictions for resonance-deficient nuclei and the direct capture mechanism. The total (n,γ) reaction rates including these 3 effects are evaluated for 3100 neutron-rich nuclei and used in parametric r-process calculations to analyze their impact on the r-abundance distribution.

  11. Impact of the phonon coupling on the radiative neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Avdeenkov, A. V.; Goriely, S.; Kamerdzhiev, S. P.

    2010-07-15

    Inclusion of the coupling of quasiparticle degrees of freedom with phonon degrees is a natural extention of the standard QRPA approach. The paper presents the quantitative impact of this phonon coupling on the dipole strength and radiative neutron capture for the stable {sup 124}Sn and very exotic {sup 150}Sn isotopes, as an illustration, using the self-consistent version of the Extended Theory of Finite Fermi Systems. It was found that the phonon contribution to the pygmy-dipole resonance and radiative neutron capture cross section is increased with the (N - Z) difference growth. The results show that the self-consistent nuclear structure calculations are important for unstable nuclei, where phenomenological approaches do not work.

  12. Neutron radiative capture methods for surface elemental analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trombka, J.I.; Senftle, F.; Schmadebeck, R.

    1970-01-01

    Both an accelerator and a 252Cf neutron source have been used to induce characteristic gamma radiation from extended soil samples. To demonstrate the method, measurements of the neutron-induced radiative capture and activation gamma rays have been made with both Ge(Li) and NaI(Tl) detectors, Because of the possible application to space flight geochemical analysis, it is believed that NaI(Tl) detectors must be used. Analytical procedures have been developed to obtain both qualitative and semiquantitative results from an interpretation of the measured NaI(Tl) pulse-height spectrum. Experiment results and the analytic procedure are presented. ?? 1970.

  13. Methods for modeling contact dynamics of capture mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Philip J.; Tobbe, Patrick A.; Glaese, John

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, an analytical approach for studying the contact dynamics of space-based vehicles during docking/berthing maneuvers is presented. Methods for modeling physical contact between docking/berthing mechanisms, examples of how these models have been used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of automated capture mechanisms, and experimental verification of predicted results are shown.

  14. Production of 6He and 9Be by radiative capture and four-body recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Diego, R.; Garrido, E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Jensen, A. S.

    2014-06-01

    In this work we estimate the production rates for the three-body radiative capture processes α + n + n → 6He + γ and α + α + n → 9Be + γ, as well as the four-body recombination reactions α + α + n + n → 6He + α, α + n + n + n → 6He + n, α + α + n + n → 9Be + n and α + α + α + n → BeBe + α. These processes compete as a source of 6He and 9Be. The hyperspherical adiabatic expansion method is used. With this method no assumption is made about the capture mechanism. Both sequential and direct capture are included. The production rates for the radiative and the four-body recombination processes are found to be comparable for a mass density of about 107g/cm3 ( ˜ 1030 neutrons/cm3) and temperatures of a few GK.

  15. Testing parity with atomic radiative capture of μ(-).

    PubMed

    McKeen, David; Pospelov, Maxim

    2012-06-29

    The next generation of "intensity frontier" facilities will bring a significant increase in the intensity of subrelativistic beams of μ(-). We show that the use of these beams in combination with thin targets of Z~30 elements opens up the possibility of testing parity-violating interactions of muons with nuclei via direct radiative capture of muons into atomic 2S orbitals. Since atomic capture preserves longitudinal muon polarization, the measurements of the gamma ray angular asymmetry in the single photon 2S(1/2)-1S(1/2) transition will offer a direct test of parity. We calculate the probability of atomic radiative capture taking into account the finite size of the nucleus to show that this process can dominate over the usual muonic atom cascade and that the as-yet unobserved single photon 2S(1/2)-1S(1/2) transition in muonic atoms can be detected in this way using current muon facilities. PMID:23004975

  16. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial γ-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the γ rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of γ-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thickness until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.

  17. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-11-01

    A procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial γ -ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the γ rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of γ -ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thickness until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation, thus, provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.

  18. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial γ-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the γ rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of γ-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thicknessmore » until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.« less

  19. Radiative Negative Pion Proton Capture and the Low Energy Theorem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kailin

    Four-point angular distributions of the differential cross section for the radiative capture reaction pi^-ptogamma n have been measured at pion laboratory energies of 9.8, 14.6 and 19.8 MeV. An undegraded pion beam was used, along with a bubble-free liquid hydrogen target of 1 cm thickness. The use of a high resolution NaI(Tl) spectrometer allowed us to resolve the in-flight capture gamma rays from those due to stopped pion capture at all pion beam energies and gamma-ray angles investigated. The lineshape response of the gamma-ray detector to ~130 MeV gamma rays was continuously measured over a broad energy range during the data collection with a second independent trigger. This allowed an accurate extraction of the in-flight capture yields and provided a precise measurement of the detector efficiency. From the measured angular distributions of cross section the electric dipole amplitude for capture of s-wave pions, E_{0+}, has been determined at each energy in a model-independent analysis. These data have been extrapolated to threshold by assuming an energy dependence given by the Born diagrams calculated with pseudovector coupling. The extrapolated E _{0+} value at threshold has been determined to be -34.7+/- 1.1 (10^ {-3}/m_pi) which is 9.4 +/- 3.2 percent larger in magnitude than the low energy theorem, which determines the threshold E_{0+} amplitude based upon the requirements of PCAC and electromagnetic gauge invariance.

  20. S-Factor of radiative р 13C capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2012-06-01

    The possibility of description of experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor of radiative р 13C capture within the framework of the potential cluster model with forbidden states is analyzed at energies in the range 0.03-0.8 MeV. It is demonstrated that the behavior of the astrophysical S-factor can be explained based on the Е1-transition to the bound 3 P 1 state of the 14N nucleus in the р 13С channel from the 3 S 1 wave of р 13С scattering at resonant energy of 0.55 MeV (l.s.).

  1. Molecular mechanisms of kinetochore capture by spindle microtubules.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kozo; Mukae, Naomi; Dewar, Hilary; van Breugel, Mark; James, Euan K; Prescott, Alan R; Antony, Claude; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2005-04-21

    For high-fidelity chromosome segregation, kinetochores must be properly captured by spindle microtubules, but the mechanisms underlying initial kinetochore capture have remained elusive. Here we visualized individual kinetochore-microtubule interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by regulating the activity of a centromere. Kinetochores are captured by the side of microtubules extending from spindle poles, and are subsequently transported poleward along them. The microtubule extension from spindle poles requires microtubule plus-end-tracking proteins and the Ran GDP/GTP exchange factor. Distinct kinetochore components are used for kinetochore capture by microtubules and for ensuring subsequent sister kinetochore bi-orientation on the spindle. Kar3, a kinesin-14 family member, is one of the regulators that promote transport of captured kinetochores along microtubules. During such transport, kinetochores ensure that they do not slide off their associated microtubules by facilitating the conversion of microtubule dynamics from shrinkage to growth at the plus ends. This conversion is promoted by the transport of Stu2 from the captured kinetochores to the plus ends of microtubules. PMID:15846338

  2. Pygmy resonances and radiative nucleon captures for stellar nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoneva, N.; Goriely, S.; Lenske, H.; Schwengner, R.

    2015-04-01

    The impact of low-energy multipole excitations and pygmy resonances on radiative neutron and proton-capture cross sections in nuclei close to the β -stability line is investigated. For this purpose, a microscopic theoretical approach based on self-consistent density functional theory and quasiparticle-random-phase-approximation formalism extended with multiphonon degrees of freedom is implemented in a statistical reaction model. The advantage of the method is the microscopic nuclear structure input for unified description of low-energy multiphonon excitations and pygmy and giant resonances. This is found to be important for the understanding of the fine structure and dynamics of the nuclear response function at low energies, which strongly influences nuclear reaction rates of astrophysical relevance. Calculations of the radiative capture cross sections of the reactions 85Kr (n ,γ )86Kr , 87Sr (n ,γ )88Sr , and 89Y (p ,γ )90Zr are discussed in comparison with experimental data. For the reactions 89Zr (n ,γ )90Zr and 91Mo (n ,γ )92Mo theoretical predictions of the reaction cross sections are made.

  3. Direct measurements of radiative capture reactions with DRAGON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Gregory

    2015-10-01

    Direct measurements of radiative proton and alpha capture reactions are crucial for understanding nucleosynthesis in a variety of astrophysical environments, including classical novae, supernovae, X-Ray bursts, and quiescent stellar burning. Often the most important reactions have very low cross sections or involve unstable targets, making laboratory measurements extremely challenging. The detector of recoils and gammas of nuclear reactions (DRAGON) at TRIUMF is a recoil mass separator designed to measure radiative capture reactions in inverse kinematics, with beam suppression factors as high as 1016. When combined with the intense radioactive beams available at the ISAC-I facility, DRAGON's capabilities are unique and world-leading. In this talk, I will give a brief technical overview of DRAGON before presenting results from recent experiments. Some highlights include the first-ever direct measurement of 38K(p , γ) 39Ca, a crucial reaction for determining the endpoint of nova nucleosynthesis, and measurements of 76Se(α , γ) 80Kr. The latter measurements determine the rate of the reverse reaction, 80Kr(γ , α) 76Se, an important waiting point in the synthesis of the p-nuclei. I will also discuss future (and ongoing) developments at DRAGON, including the commissioning of a new chamber for high-precision elastic scattering measurements and plans to determine the 330 keV resonance strength in 18F(p , γ) 19Ne via measurements of 15O(α , γ) 19Ne and 15O + α elastic scattering.

  4. Contingent capture and inhibition of return: a comparison of mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Prinzmetal, William; Taylor, Jordan A; Myers, Loretta Barry; Nguyen-Espino, Jacqueline

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the cause(s) of two effects associated with involuntary attention in the spatial cueing task: contingent capture and inhibition of return (IOR). Previously, we found that there were two mechanisms of involuntary attention in this task: (1) a (serial) search mechanism that predicts a larger cueing effect in reaction time with more display locations and (2) a decision (threshold) mechanism that predicts a smaller cueing effect with more display locations (Prinzmetal et al. 2010). In the present study, contingent capture and IOR had completely different patterns of results when we manipulated the number of display locations and the presence of distractors. Contingent capture was best described by a search model, whereas the inhibition of return was best described by a decision model. Furthermore, we fit a linear ballistic accumulator model to the results and IOR was accounted for by a change of threshold, whereas the results from contingent capture experiments could not be fit with a change of threshold and were better fit by a search model. PMID:21814835

  5. Proceedings of the fourth workshop on radiative capture 1990, October 19--21, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.A. ); Gossett, C. . Nuclear Physics Lab.); Feldman, J. . Saskatchewan Accelerator Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    The Fourth Workshop on Radiative Capture was held at the Berkeley Conference Center, Berkeley, CA, on October 19--21, 1990. This two-day workshop, which had seventeen presentations, addressed current theoretical and experimental issues in the field of nucleon capture and other nuclear radiative processes. The scientific program was divided into three sessions: (1) radiative capture at low energies; (2) few-nucleon systems and capture at intermediate energies; and (3) nucleon capture and other radiative processes. This proceedings of the conference contains the abstracts of the presented talks and the transparencies used by the speakers. Summary papers of the talks are also included when they were supplied by the speaker.

  6. Radiative capture of fast neutrons by /sup 165/Ho and /sup 238/U

    SciTech Connect

    McDainels, D K; Varghese, P; Drake, D M; Arthur, E; Lindholm, A; Bergqvist, I; Krumlinde, J

    1982-04-01

    Radiative capture of fast neutrons by the deformed nuclei /sup 165/Ho and /sup 238/U was measured over the 7- to 15-MeV incident neutron energy range. The ..gamma..-ray detector was a large NaI(T1) anti-Compton spectrometer, and time-of-flight techniques were used to suppress background. The total radiative capture cross section exhibits an energy dependence that clearly indicates the importance of the direct-semidirect reaction mechanism. Theoretical calculations compare favorably with experimental observations. However, the shapes of the observed ..gamma..-ray spectra differ from those calculated, indicating problems in estimating the distribution of single-particle strength for these deformed nuclei.

  7. Radiative n 14N capture at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2013-06-01

    In the potential cluster model with forbidden states and classification of orbital cluster states according to Young's schemes, the possibility is considered of describing the experimental data for the total cross sections of radiative n 14N capture at energies from 25.0 meV (25•10-3 eV) to 1.0 MeV. It is shown that on the whole it is possible to successfully explain the behavior of these cross sections outside the resonant energy region on the basis of the E1 transition from the 2S1/2 scattering wave with zero phase to the bound 2Р1/2 state of the 15N nucleus in the n14N channel.

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): A radiation oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1994-03-30

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) offers considerable promise in the search for the ideal cancer therapy, a therapy which selectively and maximally damages malignant cells while sparing normal tissue. This bimodal treatment modality selectivity concentrates a boron compound in malignant cells, and then [open quotes]activates[close quotes] this compound with slow neutrons resulting in a highly lethal event within the cancer cell. This article reviews this treatment modality from a radiation oncology, biology, and physics perspective. The remainder of the articles in this special issue provide a survey of the current [open quotes]state-of-the-art[close quotes] in this rapidly expanding field, including information with regard to boron compounds and their localization. 118 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Radiative double electron capture in collisions of fully-stripped fluorine ions with thin carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkafrawy, Tamer Mohammad Samy

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC) is a one-step process in ion-atom collisions occurring when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of the projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. The emitted photon has approximately double the energy of the photon emitted due to radiative electron capture (REC), which occurs when a target electron is captured to a projectile bound state with simultaneous emission of a photon. REC and RDEC can be treated as time-reversed photoionization (PI) and double photoionization (DPI), respectively, if loosely-bound target electrons are captured. This concept can be formulated with the principle of detailed balance, in which the processes of our interest can be described in terms of their time-reversed ones. Fully-stripped ions were used as projectiles in the performed RDEC experiments, providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields. This allows the target electrons to be transferred without interaction with any of the projectile electrons, enabling accurate investigation of the electron-electron interaction in the vicinity of electromagnetic field. In this dissertation, RDEC was investigated during the collision of fully-stripped fluorine ions with a thin carbon foil and the results are compared with the recent experimental and theoretical studies. In the current work, x rays associated with projectile charge-changing by single and double electron capture and no charge change by F9+ ions were observed and compared with recent work for O8+ ions and with theory. Both the F 9+ and O8+ ions had energies in the ˜MeV/u range. REC, in turn, was investigated as a means to compare with the theoretical predictions of the RDEC/REC cross section ratio. The most significant background processes including various mechanisms of x-ray emission that may interfere with the energy region of interest are addressed in detail. This enables isolation of the contributions of REC and RDEC from the

  10. Mechanism of Germacradien-4-ol Synthase-Controlled Water Capture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The sesquiterpene synthase germacradiene-4-ol synthase (GdolS) from Streptomyces citricolor is one of only a few known high-fidelity terpene synthases that convert farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) into a single hydroxylated product. Crystals of unliganded GdolS-E248A diffracted to 1.50 Å and revealed a typical class 1 sesquiterpene synthase fold with the active site in an open conformation. The metal binding motifs were identified as D80DQFD and N218DVRSFAQE. Some bound water molecules were evident in the X-ray crystal structure, but none were obviously positioned to quench a putative final carbocation intermediate. Incubations in H218O generated labeled product, confirming that the alcohol functionality arises from nucleophilic capture of the final carbocation by water originating from solution. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues from both within the metal binding motifs and without identified by sequence alignment with aristolochene synthase from Aspergillus terreus generated mostly functional germacradien-4-ol synthases. Only GdolS-N218Q generated radically different products (∼50% germacrene A), but no direct evidence of the mechanism of incorporation of water into the active site was obtained. Fluorinated FDP analogues 2F-FDP and 15,15,15-F3-FDP were potent noncompetitive inhibitors of GdolS. 12,13-DiF-FDP generated 12,13-(E)-β-farnesene upon being incubated with GdolS, suggesting stepwise formation of the germacryl cation during the catalytic cycle. Incubation of GdolS with [1-2H2]FDP and (R)-[1-2H]FDP demonstrated that following germacryl cation formation a [1,3]-hydride shift generates the final carbocation prior to nucleophilic capture. The stereochemistry of this shift is not defined, and the deuteron in the final product was scrambled. Because no clear candidate residue for binding of a nucleophilic water molecule in the active site and no significant perturbation of product distribution from the replacement of active site residues were

  11. Mechanism of Germacradien-4-ol Synthase-Controlled Water Capture.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Daniel J; Chen, Mengbin; González, Verónica; Leoni, Stefano; Miller, David J; Christianson, David W; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2016-04-12

    The sesquiterpene synthase germacradiene-4-ol synthase (GdolS) from Streptomyces citricolor is one of only a few known high-fidelity terpene synthases that convert farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) into a single hydroxylated product. Crystals of unliganded GdolS-E248A diffracted to 1.50 Å and revealed a typical class 1 sesquiterpene synthase fold with the active site in an open conformation. The metal binding motifs were identified as D(80)DQFD and N(218)DVRSFAQE. Some bound water molecules were evident in the X-ray crystal structure, but none were obviously positioned to quench a putative final carbocation intermediate. Incubations in H2(18)O generated labeled product, confirming that the alcohol functionality arises from nucleophilic capture of the final carbocation by water originating from solution. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues from both within the metal binding motifs and without identified by sequence alignment with aristolochene synthase from Aspergillus terreus generated mostly functional germacradien-4-ol synthases. Only GdolS-N218Q generated radically different products (∼50% germacrene A), but no direct evidence of the mechanism of incorporation of water into the active site was obtained. Fluorinated FDP analogues 2F-FDP and 15,15,15-F3-FDP were potent noncompetitive inhibitors of GdolS. 12,13-DiF-FDP generated 12,13-(E)-β-farnesene upon being incubated with GdolS, suggesting stepwise formation of the germacryl cation during the catalytic cycle. Incubation of GdolS with [1-(2)H2]FDP and (R)-[1-(2)H]FDP demonstrated that following germacryl cation formation a [1,3]-hydride shift generates the final carbocation prior to nucleophilic capture. The stereochemistry of this shift is not defined, and the deuteron in the final product was scrambled. Because no clear candidate residue for binding of a nucleophilic water molecule in the active site and no significant perturbation of product distribution from the replacement of active site residues

  12. Flexible, Mechanically Durable Aerogel Composites for Oil Capture and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Karatum, Osman; Steiner, Stephen A; Griffin, Justin S; Shi, Wenbo; Plata, Desiree L

    2016-01-13

    More than 30 years separate the two largest oil spills in North American history (the Ixtoc I and Macondo well blowouts), yet the responses to both disasters were nearly identical in spite of advanced material innovation during the same time period. Novel, mechanically durable sorbents could enable (a) sorbent use in the open ocean, (b) automated deployment to minimize workforce exposure to toxic chemicals, and (c) mechanical recovery of spilled oils. Here, we explore the use of two mechanically durable, low-density (0.1-0.2 g cm(-3)), highly porous (85-99% porosity), hydrophobic (water contact angles >120°), flexible aerogel composite blankets as sorbent materials for automated oil capture and recovery: Cabot Thermal Wrap (TW) and Aspen Aerogels Spaceloft (SL). Uptake of crude oils (Iraq and Sweet Bryan Mound oils) was 8.0 ± 0.1 and 6.5 ± 0.3 g g(-1) for SL and 14.0 ± 0.1 and 12.2 ± 0.1 g g(-1) for TW, respectively, nearly twice as high as similar polyurethane- and polypropylene-based devices. Compound-specific uptake experiments and discrimination against water uptake suggested an adsorption-influenced sorption mechanism. Consistent with that mechanism, chemical extraction oil recoveries were 95 ± 2 (SL) and 90 ± 2% (TW), but this is an undesirable extraction route in decentralized oil cleanup efforts. In contrast, mechanical extraction routes are favorable, and a modest compression force (38 N) yielded 44.7 ± 0.5% initially to 42.0 ± 0.4% over 10 reuse cycles for SL and initially 55.0 ± 0.1% for TW, degrading to 30.0 ± 0.2% by the end of 10 cycles. The mechanical integrity of SL deteriorated substantially (800 ± 200 to 80 ± 30 kPa), whereas TW was more robust (380 ± 80 to 700 ± 100 kPa) over 10 uptake-and-compression extraction cycles. PMID:26701744

  13. Radiative capture of nucleons at astrophysical energies with single-particle states

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.T.; Bertulani, C.A.; Guimaraes, V.

    2010-11-15

    Radiative capture of nucleons at energies of astrophysical interest is one of the most important processes for nucleosynthesis. The nucleon capture can occur either by a compound nucleus reaction or by a direct process. The compound reaction cross sections are usually very small, especially for light nuclei. The direct capture proceeds either via the formation of a single-particle resonance or a non-resonant capture process. In this work we calculate radiative capture cross sections and astrophysical S-factors for nuclei in the mass region A<20 using single-particle states. We carefully discuss the parameter fitting procedure adopted in the simplified two-body treatment of the capture process. Then we produce a detailed list of cases for which the model works well. Useful quantities, such as spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients, are obtained and compared to published data.

  14. Radiative neutron capture cross sections on 176Lu at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, O.; Jandel, M.; Méot, V.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    The cross section of the neutron capture reaction 176Lu(n ,γ ) has been measured for a wide incident neutron energy range with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be (1912 ±132 ) b for one of the Lu natural isotopes, 176Lu. The resonance part was measured and compared to the Mughabghab's atlas using the R -matrix code, sammy. At higher neutron energies the measured cross sections are compared to ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, and BRC evaluated nuclear data. The Maxwellian averaged cross sections in a stellar plasma for thermal energies between 5 keV and 100 keV were extracted using these data.

  15. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Schooneveld, E M; Pietropaolo, A; Andreani, C; Perelli Cippo, E; Rhodes, N J; Senesi, R; Tardocchi, M; Gorini, G

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources. PMID:27502571

  16. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rhodes, N. J.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources.

  17. Dark radiative inverse seesaw mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahriche, Amine; Boucenna, Sofiane M.; Nasri, Salah

    2016-04-01

    We present a minimal model that simultaneously accounts for neutrino masses and the origin of dark matter (DM) and where the electroweak phase transition is strong enough to allow for electroweak baryogenesis. The Standard Model is enlarged with a Majorana fermion, three generations of chiral fermion pairs, and a single complex scalar that plays a central role in DM production and phenomenology, neutrino masses, and the strength of the phase transition. All the new fields are singlets under the SM gauge group. Neutrino masses are generated via a new variant of the radiative inverse seesaw mechanism, where the required small mass term is generated via loops involving DM and no large hierarchy is assumed among the mass scales. The model offers all the advantage of low-scale neutrino mass models as well as a viable dark matter candidate that is testable with direct detection experiments.

  18. Gamma-Ray Strength Function Method:. Away from Photoneutron Emission to Radiative Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Goriely, S.; Daoutidis, I.; Toyokawa, H.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Iwamoto, N.; Lui, Y. W.; Arteaga, D. P.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A. J.

    2013-03-01

    Radiative neutron capture cross sections are of direct relevance for the synthesis of heavy elements referred to as the s-process and the r-process in nuclear astrophysics and constitute basic data in the field of nuclear engineering. The surrogate reaction technique is in active use to indirectly determine radiative neutron capture cross sections for unstable nuclei. We have devised an indirect method alternative to the surrogate reaction technique on the basis of the γ-ray strength function (γSF), a nuclear statistical quantity that interconnects photoneutron emission and radiative neutron capture in the Hauser-Feshbach model calculation. We outline the γSF method and show applications of the method to tin, palladium, and zirconium isotopes. In the application of the γSF method, it is important to use γSF's that incorporate extra strengths of PDR and/or M1 resonance emerging around neutron threshold.

  19. Photonuclear and radiative capture reaction rates for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Mary; Frauendorf, S.; Kaempfer, B.; Scwengner, R.; Wiescher, M.

    2011-10-01

    The vast majority of nuclei heavier than iron are synthesisized via the capture of neutrons. There are however 35 naturally occurring nuclei, including isotopes of Mo and La, located on the neutron-deficient size of the valley of stability. It has been proposed that these nuclei, referred to as p-nuclei, are produced via sequential photo-dissociation reactions in the oxygen-neon shell burning regions of a pre-supernova star. As such, cross sections for p-nuclei production are particularly sensitive to the gamma-ray strength function, which, though dominated by the giant dipole resonance, may contain extra strength contributions near to the neutron threshold. Recently new (γ, γ') cross section measurements have been performed at the ELBE facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf for the nuclei ^92-100Mo, ^88Sr, ^90Zr and ^139La probing the photo-absorption cross section over an energy range 4.5 - 6 MeV, up to the neutron separation threshold. The use of these measurements as a test of existing gamma-ray strength function models, and the consequent impact on p-nuclei production rates, will be discussed.

  20. Radiative Electron Capture in the First-Forbidden Unique Decay of 81Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Mianowski, S.; Werner-Malento, E.; Korgul, A.; Pomorski, M.; Pachucki, K.; Pfutzner, M.; Szweryn, B.; Zylicz, J.; Hornshoj, P.; Nilsson, T.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr

    2010-01-01

    The photon spectrum accompanying the orbital K-electron capture in the first-forbidden unique decay of 81Kr was measured.The total radiation intensity for photon energies larger than 50 keVwas found to be 1.42(22) 10 4 per K capture. Both the shape of the spectrum and its intensity relative to the ordinary, nonradiative capture rate are compared to theoretical predictions. The best agreement is found for the recently developed model that employs the length gauge for the electromagnetic field.

  1. Model calculations of radiative capture of nucleons in MeV region

    SciTech Connect

    Betak, E.

    2006-03-13

    We address calculations of the neutron and the proton radiative capture at incident energies up to 20 MeV on medium and heavy nuclei. The main formalism used is the pre-equilibrium (exciton) model of {gamma} emission. A link to the Consistent Direct-Semidirect model is noticed as well. The resulting pre-equilibrium (plus equilibrium) calculations of the radiative capture excitation functions are compared to experimental data and also some cross section trends important for possible production of therapeutic radioisotopes are extracted.

  2. A new theoretical approach to thermonuclear radiative-capture reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, Yasuro; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Akahori, Takahiko

    2012-11-12

    We propose a new computational method for astrophysical reaction rate of radiative capture process, which does not require any solution of scattering problem. It is tested for twobody radiative caputure reaction {sup 16}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 20}Ne and a comparison is made with an ordinary method solving two-body scattering problem. The method is shown to work well in practice and thus will be useful for problems in which an explicit construction of scattering solution is difficult such as the triple-alpha capture process.

  3. Capture and analysis of radiation dose reports for radiology.

    PubMed

    Midgley, S M

    2014-12-01

    Radiographic imaging systems can produce records of exposure and dose parameters for each patient. A variety of file formats are in use including plain text, bit map images showing pictures of written text and radiation dose structured reports as text or extended markup language files. Whilst some of this information is available with image data on the hospital picture archive and communication system, access is restricted to individual patient records, thereby making it difficult to locate multiple records for the same scan protocol. This study considers the exposure records and dose reports from four modalities. Exposure records for mammography and general radiography are utilized for repeat analysis. Dose reports for fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) are utilized to study the distribution of patient doses for each protocol. Results for dosimetric quantities measured by General Radiography, Fluoroscopy and CT equipment are summarised and presented in the Appendix. Projection imaging uses the dose (in air) area product and derived quantities including the dose to the reference point as a measure of the air kerma reaching the skin, ignoring movement of the beam for fluoroscopy. CT uses the dose indices CTDIvol and dose length product as a measure of the dose per axial slice, and to the scanned volume. Suitable conversion factors are identified and used to estimate the effective dose to an average size patient (for CT and fluoroscopy) and the entrance skin dose for fluoroscopy. PMID:25315104

  4. Total radiative capture rates for three- and four-nucleon pionic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Werntz, C.; Valk, H.S.

    1988-02-01

    A corrected closure approximation is used to calculate the reduced rates for radiative capture of negative pions from 1s and 2p orbitals in /sup 3/H, /sup 3/He, and /sup 4/He. For /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He the calculated rates are in good agreement with experimental data. In the case of /sup 3/H, the calculated value for 1s capture is combined with the measured radiative capture branching ratio to obtain a value of GAMMA/sub tot//sup 1//sup s/ = 2.2 +- 0.4 eV for the total width of the 1s level in the /sup 3/H pionic atom. This value when compared to the measured total width of the 1s level in pionic /sup 3/He implies a small but definite contribution of singlet spin nucleon pairs to absorption of s-wave pions.

  5. Radiative double electron capture (RDEC) by bare fluorine ions on a nitrogen target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumara, Nuwan; La Mantia, David; Kayani, Asghar; Simon, Anna; Tanis, John

    2016-05-01

    Unlike radiative electron capture (REC), in which a single photon is emitted due to capture of a single electron from the target to the projectile, radiative double electron capture (RDEC) involves two electrons accompanied by the emission of a single photon. Hence, RDEC can be considered as the inverse of double photoionization and used to study the role of electron correlation in causing the process. We report recent results obtained for 40 MeV F9+ ions incident on a nitrogen target, in which counts were observed in the calculated RDEC region (2.8-4.4 keV) for the system. Based on these observations an approximate value for the total RDEC cross section was estimated. Compared with the data obtained for 38 MeV O8+ ions incident on a carbon foil target, the present value is considerably smaller than the value found for carbon, but in better agreement with recent theory. Supported in part by NSF.

  6. Mechanical stability study of capture cavity II at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Problematic resonant conditions at both 18 Hz and 180 Hz were encountered and identified early during the commissioning of Capture Cavity II (CC2) at Fermilab. CC2 consists of an external vacuum vessel and a superconducting high gradient (close to 25 MV/m) 9-cell 1.3 GHz niobium cavity, transported from DESY for use in the A0 Photoinjector at Fermilab. An ANSYS modal finite element analysis (FEA) was performed in order to isolate the source of the resonance and directed the effort towards stabilization. Using a fast piezoelectric tuner to excite (or shake) the cavity at different frequencies (from 5 Hz to 250 Hz) at a low-range sweep for analysis purposes. Both warm (300 K) and cold (1.8 K) accelerometer measurements at the cavity were taken as the resonant ''fix'' was applied. FEA results, cultural and technical noise investigation, and stabilization techniques are discussed.

  7. Nonequilibrium Diffusion and Capture Mechanism Ensures Tip Localization of Regulating Proteins on Dynamic Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reithmann, Emanuel; Reese, Louis; Frey, Erwin

    2016-08-01

    Diffusive motion of regulatory enzymes on biopolymers with eventual capture at a reaction site is a common feature in cell biology. Using a lattice gas model we study the impact of diffusion and capture for a microtubule polymerase and a depolymerase. Our results show that the capture mechanism localizes the proteins and creates large-scale spatial correlations. We develop an analytic approximation that globally accounts for relevant correlations and yields results that are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Our results show that diffusion and capture operates most efficiently at cellular enzyme concentrations which points to in vivo relevance.

  8. Design Rules and Analysis of a Capture Mechanism for Rendezvous between a Space Tether and Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Kirk F.; Canfield, Stephen L.; Norris, Marshall A.

    2006-01-01

    Momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether systems have been proposed to serve as an "upper stage in space". A MXER tether station would boost spacecraft from low Earth orbit to a high-energy orbit quickly, like a high-thrust rocket. Then, it would slowly rebuild its orbital momentum through electrodynamic thrust, minimizing the use of propellant. One of the primary challenges in developing a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost tether system as identified by the 2003 MXER Technology Assessment Group is in the development of a mechanism that will enable the processes of capture, carry and release of a payload by the rotating tether as required by the MXER tether approach. This paper will present a concept that will achieve the desired goals of the capture system. This solution is presented as a multi-DOF (degree-of-freedom) capture mechanism with nearly passive operation that features matching of the capture space and expected window of capture error, efficient use of mass and nearly passive actuation during the capture process. This paper will describe the proposed capture mechanism concept and provide an evaluation of the concept through a dynamic model and experimental tests performed on a prototype article of the mechanism in a dynamically similar environment. This paper will also develop a set of rules to guide the design of such a capture mechanism based on analytical and experimental analyses. The primary contributions of this paper will be a description of the proposed capture mechanism concept, a collection of rules to guide its design, and empirical and model information that can be used to evaluate the capability of the concept

  9. Friction, mechanical and ageing properties of surface modified materials for space debris capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, S.; Perero, S.; Gautier di Confiengo, G.; Chiesa, A.; Messidoro, A.; Ferraris, M.

    2016-03-01

    Space debris removal is a challenging problem for a clean and safe space environment. The present paper focuses on a novel concept of capture mechanism in the framework of technologies, strategies and concepts known as "tentacles with belts" method. Within this framework two different strategies (based on inorganic or organic materials) have been developed in order to improve the capture efficiency of the belts. The mechanical, tribological and ageing characterization of modified belt fabrics for space application is reported and discussed.

  10. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Diaz, A.Z.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, {alpha})7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,{gamma})2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning.

  11. The mechanism of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobzev, A. P.

    2010-05-01

    The mechanism of generation of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation is discussed in this article. The developers of the theory of the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect, I.E. Tamm and I.M. Frank, attributed this effect to their discovery of a new mechanism of radiation when a charged particle moves uniformly and rectilinearly in the medium. As such a mechanism presupposes the violation of the laws of conservation of energy and momentum, they proposed the abolition of these laws to account for the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation mechanism. This idea has received a considerably wide acceptance in the creation of other theories, for example, transition radiation theory. In this paper, the radiation mechanism for the charge constant motion is demonstrated to be incorrect, because it contradicts not only the laws of conservation of energy and momentum, but also the very definitions of uniform and rectilinear motion (Newton's First Law). A consistent explanation of the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation microscopic mechanism that does not contradict the basic laws is proposed. It is shown that the radiation arises from the interaction of the moving charge with bound charges that are spaced fairly far away from its trajectory. The Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation mechanism bears a slowing down character, but it differs fundamentally from bremsstrahlung, primarily because the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation onset results from a two-stage process. First, the moving particle polarizes the medium; then, the already polarized atoms radiate coherently, provided that the particle velocity exceeds the phase speed of light in the medium. If the particle velocity is less than the phase speed of light in the medium, the polarized atoms return energy to the outgoing particle. In this case, radiation is not observed. Special attention is given to the relatively constant particle velocity as the condition of the coherent composition of waves. However, its motion cannot be designated as a uniform and rectilinear one in the

  12. Radioactivity induced by neutrons: Enrico Fermi and a thermodynamic approach to radiative capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio, Alberto

    2006-07-01

    When Fermi learned that slow neutrons are much more effective than fast ones in inducing radioactivity, he explained this phenomenon by mentioning the well-known scattering cross section between neutrons and protons. At this early stage, he did not refer to the capture cross section by target nuclei. At the same time a thermodynamic approach to neutron-proton capture was being discussed by physicists: neutron capture was interpretated as the reverse of deuteron photodissociation and detailed balance among neutrons, protons, deuterons, and radiation was invoked. This thermodynamic approach might underlie Fermi's early explanation of the great efficiency of slow neutrons. Fermi repeatedly used a thermodynamic approach that had been used in describing some of the physical properties of conductors by Richardson and had been influential in Fermi's youth.

  13. Review of measurement techniques for the neutron radiative-capture process

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The experimental techniques applied in measurements of the neutron capture process are reviewed. The emphasis is on measurement techniques used in neutron capture cross section measurements. The activation technique applied mainly in earlier work has still its use in some cases, specifically for measurements of technologically important cross sections (/sup 238/U and /sup 232/Th) with high accuracy. Three major prompt neutron radioactive capture detection techniques have evolved: the total gamma radiation energy detection technique (mainly with large liquid scintillation detectors), the gamma-energy proportional detectors (with proportional counters or Moxon-Rae detectors), and the pulse-height weighting technique. These measurement techniques are generally applicable, however, shortcomings limit the achievable accuracy to a approx. = 5 to 15% uncertainty level.

  14. Metal Ion Capture Mechanism of a Copper Metallochaperone.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Li, Pengfei; Tran, Trang T; Bayse, Craig A; Merz, Kenneth M

    2016-01-26

    A novel cation-π interaction between the bound Cu(+) metal ion and Trp44 in the periplasmic Cu(+)/Ag(+) metallochaperone Escherichia coli CusF protects Cu(+) from the oxidative influence of the periplasm. In a popular model of metal ion transfer, a conformational change in the metal binding loop disrupts the cation-π interaction and moves Trp44 aside to provide access to the occluded metal ion binding site in an "open" conformation. In this study, our molecular dynamics simulations support this putative mechanism of metal ion transfer. We find that the apoprotein undergoes a transition back and forth from the crystallographically observed "closed" state to the hypothesized open conformation over multiple microseconds. In agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance data, our simulations show that similar transitions are prohibited in Cu(+)·CusF, suggesting that the conformational transitions are gated by a metal ion-mediated second-shell hydrogen bond between metal binding residue His36 and Asp37 of the metal binding loop region. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations indicate that metal ion binding strengthens this interaction significantly, much like what is found in the case of other metalloproteins. The study builds toward a common evolutionary role of metal ion-mediated second-shell hydrogen bonds in metalloprotein structure and function. PMID:26690586

  15. A search for the radiative neutrinoless double-electron capture of 58Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, B.; Degering, D.; Frotscher, A.; Michel, T.; Zuber, K.

    2016-06-01

    A search for the radiative neutrinoless double-electron capture with single γ-ray emission has been performed in 58Ni. Gamma radiation from a 7286 {{g}} nickel sample in natural isotope composition was measured for 58.3 {{d}} with an ultra-low background HPGe detector in the Felsenkeller underground laboratory in Dresden, Germany. A new lower half-life limit of 2.1× {10}21 yr (90% CL) was obtained for this decay mode. This half-life limit is two orders of magnitude higher than the existing limit for 58Ni and among the best half-life limits for neutrinoless double-electron capture decays.

  16. A New Decay Path in the {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O Radiative Capture Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Courtin, S.; Lebhertz, D.; Haas, F.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Salsac, M.-D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Marley, P.; Lister, C. J.

    2009-03-04

    The {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture reaction has been studied at energies close to the Coulomb barrier at Triumf (Vancouver) using the Dragon spectrometer and its associated BGO array. It has been observed that the {gamma} decay flux proceeds mainly via states around 10-11 MeV and via the direct feeding of the {sup 28}Si 3{sub 1}{sup -}(6879 keV) and 4{sub 2}{sup +}(6888 keV) deformed states. A discussion is presented about this selective feeding as well as perspectives for the use of novel detection systems for the study of light heavy-ion radiative capture reactions.

  17. Angular distribution of characteristic photons after radiative electron capture at strong central fields

    SciTech Connect

    Drukarev, E. G.; Ma, X.; Mikhailov, A. I.; Mikhailov, I. A.; Mokler, P. H.

    2006-08-15

    We investigate the difference in the angular distribution of Ly-{alpha}{sub 1} and K{alpha}{sub 1} photons from hydrogenlike and heliumlike ions of uranium after radiative electron capture to the L shell. The strong anisotropy in the former case is changed to a very small one in the latter case. Our calculations support the observation. The effect takes place even in the limiting case of noninteracting electrons, being caused by the Pauli principle.

  18. Measurement of radiative capture resonance energies with an extended gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheon, D. A.; Ruiz, C.; Fallis, J.; D'Auria, J. M.; Davids, B.; Hager, U.; Martin, L.; Ottewell, D. F.; Reeve, S.; Rojas, A.

    2012-10-01

    The DRAGON facility for the study of radiative capture reactions has an extended gas target, surrounded by an array of BGO detectors. The distribution of detected gamma rays amongst the segmented array permits an estimate of the reaction position and consequently of the resonance energy. We report a study of the technique, using the 24Mg(p, γ)25Al reaction. Energy determination to better than 0.5% has been demonstrated.

  19. Radiative 10Be(n, γ)11Be capture at thermal and astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The modified potential cluster model with the forbidden states and the classification of states according to the Young tableaux, which are irreducible representations of permutation symmetric group SU(4), was used in this paper. Within the framework of this model the possibility of describing the experimental data available for the total reaction cross sections and the reaction rate of neutron radiative capture on 10Be at thermal and astrophysical energies has been shown.

  20. Radiation Degradation Mechanisms in Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johston, A. H.; Miyahira, T. F.

    2004-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms are investigated for laser diodes fabricated with different materials and wavelengths between 660 and 1550 nm. A new approach is developed that evaluates degradation below the laser threshold to determine the radiation-induced recombination density. This allows mechanisms at high injection, such as Auger recombination, to be separated from low-injection damage. New results show that AlGaInP lasers in the visible region are nearly an order of magnitude more resistant to radiation than devices fabricated with AlGaAs or AlGaAsP at longer wavelengths.

  1. Improved Mechanism for Capturing Muscle Power for Circulatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Trumble, Dennis R.; Melvin, David B.; Byrne, Mark T.; Magovern, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is now understood that trained skeletal muscle can generate enough steady-state power to provide significant circulatory support, there are currently no means by which to tap this endogenous energy source to aid the failing heart. To that end, an implantable muscle energy converter (MEC) has been constructed and its function has been improved to optimize durability, anatomic fit, and mechanical efficiency. Bench tests show that MEC transmission losses average less than 10% of total work input and that about 85% of this muscle power is successfully transferred to the working fluid of the pump. Results from canine implant trials confirm excellent biocompatibility and demonstrate that contractile work of the latissimus dorsi muscle—measured to 290 mJ/stroke in one dog—can be transmitted within the body at levels consistent with cardiac assist requirements. These findings suggest that muscle-powered cardiac assist devices are feasible and that efforts to further develop this technology are warranted. PMID:16143010

  2. Investigation of 186Re via radiative thermal-neutron capture on 185Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matters, D. A.; Lerch, A. G.; Hurst, A. M.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Carroll, J. J.; Detwiler, B.; Révay, Zs.; McClory, J. W.; McHale, S. R.; Firestone, R. B.; Sleaford, B. W.; Krtička, M.; Belgya, T.

    2016-05-01

    Partial γ -ray production cross sections and the total radiative thermal-neutron capture cross section for the 185Re(n ,γ ) 186Re reaction were measured using the Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis facility at the Budapest Research Reactor with an enriched 185Re target. The 186Re cross sections were standardized using well-known 35Cl(n ,γ )36Cl cross sections from irradiation of a stoichiometric natReCl3 target. The resulting cross sections for transitions feeding the 186Re ground state from low-lying levels below a cutoff energy of Ec=746 keV were combined with a modeled probability of ground-state feeding from levels above Ec to arrive at a total cross section of σ0=111 (6 ) b for radiative thermal-neutron capture on 185Re. A comparison of modeled discrete-level populations with measured transition intensities led to proposed revisions for seven tentative spin-parity assignments in the adopted level scheme for 186Re. Additionally, 102 primary γ rays were measured, including 50 previously unknown. A neutron-separation energy of Sn=6179.59 (5 ) keV was determined from a global least-squares fit of the measured γ -ray energies to the known 186Re decay scheme. The total capture cross section and separation energy results are comparable to earlier measurements of these values.

  3. Indirect measurement of radiative capture cross sections relevant in astrophysical scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Ushasi Datta

    2007-07-01

    Radiative capture cross sections play a significant role in many cosmic phenomena, e.g. galactic evolution, star formation and planet formation etc. In explosive stellar burning scenarios, a large number of unstable nuclei play a crucial role, and reliable reaction cross sections are necessary for astrophysical model calculations, which will help in turn to understand the phenomena. A number of indirect methods are being explored by experimental nuclear physicists to avoid radioactive targets and other difficulties of direct measurements of radiative capture cross sections. The Coulomb dissociation of radioactive ion beams at intermediate energy is one of the most powerful indirect methods for measuring capture cross sections, and is being explored at various laboratories in the world. Here, a brief current status report is presented. This indirect method has a number of advantages compared to direct measurements, but there are also a number of limitations to this method with the presently available experimental facilities. A discussion on these aspects is given, together with an outlook on future experimental prospects.

  4. Review of the fundamentals of the neutron-capture reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty years of research into the nature of the radiative capture reaction mechanisms is briefly summarized. A variety of such mechanisms is exploited to explain neutron capture over nine decades of neutron energy.

  5. Impact of low-energy multipole excitations and pygmy resonances on radiative nucleon captures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoneva, N.; Lenske, H.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear structure theory is considered in the framework of the development of a microscopic model for nucleon-capture astrophysical implementations. In particular, microscopically obtained strength functions from a theoretical method incorporating density functional theory and quasiparticle-phonon model are used as an input in a statistical reaction model. The approach is applied in systematic investigations of the impact of low-energy multipole excitations and pygmy resonances on dipole photoabsorption and radiative neutronand proton-capture cross sections of key s- and r-process nuclei which is discussed in comparison with the experiment. For the cases of the short-lived isotopes 89Zr and 91Mo theoretical predictions are made.

  6. Radiative HELIUM-3 Capture by CARBON-12 to Excited States in OXYGEN-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abduljalil, Amir M.

    The radiative ^3He capture reaction on ^{12}C was measured over the energy region E_{ rm 3_{He}} = 12-25 MeV. The gamma-ray was measured by two 25.4 cm long and 25.4 cm in diameter NaI(Tl) spectrometers surrounded by anticoincidence plastic shields. Excitation functions at theta_{rm lab} = 60^circ and 105 ^circ have been measured for captures populating the ground and various excited states of ^{15}O. Angular distribution have been measured at E_{rm 3 _{He}} = 18.9 MeV. The existence of giant resonances built on the excited states of ^{15}O was investigated. Calculations from a phenomenological direct-semidirect cluster model were performed to bound and unbound final states in ^{15}O to determine the magnitude and the energy dependence of the cross section as well as the angular distributions. The calculations showed a reasonable agreement with the excitation function.

  7. Cumulative Radiative Forcing Implications of Deployment Strategies for Carbon Capture and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathre, R. C.; Masanet, E.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is increasingly discussed as a potential means of mitigating the climate disruption associated with fossil fuel use. Some technologies for capturing, transporting, and sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) are already mature, while others technologies under development may lead to more cost- and energy-efficient CCS systems. Various elements of CCS systems are currently in operation at relatively small scale, but will need to be scaled up very substantially in order to make a significant contribution to climate change mitigation. Because the rate of fossil fuel CO2 emission is continuing to increase and the emitted CO2 will remain in the atmosphere for long time periods, the speed at which CCS is deployed will strongly affect the cumulative CO2 emission and the climate impacts. To better understand these issues, in this analysis we integrate scenario forecasting of energy supply systems, life cycle emission modeling, and time-dependent calculations of cumulative radiative forcing. We develop a series of CCS deployment scenarios that describe plausible future trajectories for CCS implementation in the US electric power plant fleet. The scenarios incorporate dimensions such as speed of deployment build-out, year of initiating deployment, efficiency of capture technology, and installation in new power plants vs. retrofitting existing plants. We conduct life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions analyses of each scenario to estimate annual emission profiles of CO2, CH4, and N2O over a 90-year time horizon, from 2010 to 2100. We then model the atmospheric dynamics of the emitted GHGs including atmospheric decay and instantaneous radiative forcing patterns over time. Finally, we determine the cumulative radiative forcing of each scenario, which we use as a proxy for surface temperature change and resulting disruption to physical, ecological and social systems. The results show strong climate mitigation benefits of early, aggressive

  8. Radiative p 15N Capture in the Region of Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-06-01

    Within the framework of the modified potential cluster model with classification of orbital states according to the Young schemes, the possibility of describing experimental data for the astrophysical S-factor of p 15N radiative capture at energies from 50 to 1500 keV is considered. It is shown that on the basis of M1 and E1 transitions from various p 15N scattering states to the ground state of the 16O nucleus in the p 15N channel it is entirely possible to successfully explain the overall behavior of the S-factor in the considered energy region in the presence of two resonances.

  9. Preliminary system design of a Three Arm Capture Mechanism (TACM) flight demonstration article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Otto; Stasi, Bill

    1993-04-01

    The overall objective of the Three Arm Capture Mechanism (TACM) is to serve as a demonstration of capability for capture of objects in space. These objects could be satellites, expended boosters, pieces of debris, etc.; anything of significant size. With this capability we can significantly diminish the danger of major collisions of debris with valuable space assets and with each other, which would otherwise produce many smaller, high velocity pieces of debris which also become concerns. The captured objects would be jettisoned into the atmosphere, relocated in 'parking' orbits, or recovered for disposition or refurbishment. The dollar value of satellites launched into space continues to grow along with the cost of insurance; having a capture capability takes a positive step towards diminishing this added cost. The effort covered is a planning step towards a flight demonstration of the satellite capture capability. Based on the requirement to capture a communication class satellite, its associated booster, or both, a preliminary system definition of a retrieval kit is defined. The objective of the flight demonstration is to demonstrate the techniques proposed to perform the mission and to obtain data on technical issues requiring an in situ space environment. The former especially includes issues such as automated image recognition techniques and control strategies that enable an unmanned vehicle to rendezvous and capture a satellite, contact dynamics between the two bodies, and the flight segment level of automation required to support the mission. A development plan for the operational retrieval capability includes analysis work, computer and ground test simulations, and finally a flight demonstration. A concept to perform a selected mission capturing a precessing communications satellite is described. Further development efforts using analytical tools and laboratory facilities are required prior to reaching the point at which a full commitment to the flight

  10. Preliminary system design of a Three Arm Capture Mechanism (TACM) flight demonstration article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Otto; Stasi, Bill

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective of the Three Arm Capture Mechanism (TACM) is to serve as a demonstration of capability for capture of objects in space. These objects could be satellites, expended boosters, pieces of debris, etc.; anything of significant size. With this capability we can significantly diminish the danger of major collisions of debris with valuable space assets and with each other, which would otherwise produce many smaller, high velocity pieces of debris which also become concerns. The captured objects would be jettisoned into the atmosphere, relocated in 'parking' orbits, or recovered for disposition or refurbishment. The dollar value of satellites launched into space continues to grow along with the cost of insurance; having a capture capability takes a positive step towards diminishing this added cost. The effort covered is a planning step towards a flight demonstration of the satellite capture capability. Based on the requirement to capture a communication class satellite, its associated booster, or both, a preliminary system definition of a retrieval kit is defined. The objective of the flight demonstration is to demonstrate the techniques proposed to perform the mission and to obtain data on technical issues requiring an in situ space environment. The former especially includes issues such as automated image recognition techniques and control strategies that enable an unmanned vehicle to rendezvous and capture a satellite, contact dynamics between the two bodies, and the flight segment level of automation required to support the mission. A development plan for the operational retrieval capability includes analysis work, computer and ground test simulations, and finally a flight demonstration. A concept to perform a selected mission capturing a precessing communications satellite is described. Further development efforts using analytical tools and laboratory facilities are required prior to reaching the point at which a full commitment to the flight

  11. Boron neutron capture therapy and radiation synovectomy research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Nwanguma, C.I.; Wazer, D.E.; Saris, S.; Madoc-Jones, H. ); Sledge, C.B.; Shortkroff, S. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, current research in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and radiation synovectomy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor is reviewed. In the last few years, major emphasis has been placed on the development of BNCT primarily for treatment of brain tumors. This has required a concerted effort in epithermal beam design and construction as well as the development of analytical capabilities for {sup 10}B analysis and patient treatment planning. Prompt gamma analysis and high-resolution track-etch autoradiography have been developed to meet the needs, respectively, for accurate bulk analysis and for quantitative imaging of {sup 10}B in tissue at subcellular resolutions. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning codes have been developed to ensure optimized and individualized patient treatments. In addition, the development of radiation synovectomy as an alternative therapy to surgical intervention is joints that are affected by rheumatoid arthritis is described.

  12. Astrophysical S factors for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2011-03-15

    Within the potential cluster model where orbital states are classified according to Young diagrams and isospin, astrophysical S factors are considered for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei at energies of up to 1 and 10 keV, respectively. It is shown that the approach used, which takes into account only the E1 transition for the p{sup 3}H capture process, makes it possible to describe well the most recent experimental data at c.m. energies in the range from 50 keV to 5MeV. In the case of proton capture by {sup 7}Li nuclei, an M1 processwas taken into account in addition to the E1 transition, and a general behavior and the magnitude of the experimental S factor could be correctly reproduced owing to this at astrophysical energies, including the region around the resonance at 0.441 MeV (in the laboratory frame).

  13. Decay strength distributions in {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}) radiative capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, D. G.; Fulton, B. R.; Marley, P.; Fox, S. P.; Glover, R.; Wadsworth, R.; Watson, D. L.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Beck, C.; Papka, P.; Rousseau, M.; Sanchez i Zafra, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Ottewell, D.; Pavan, M. M.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2007-10-15

    The heavy-ion radiative capture reaction, {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}), has been investigated at energies both on- and off-resonance, with a particular focus on known resonances at E{sub c.m.}=6.0, 6.8, 7.5, and 8.0 MeV. Gamma rays detected in a BGO scintillator array were recorded in coincidence with {sup 24}Mg residues at the focal plane of the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF. In this manner, the relative strength of all decay pathways through excited states up to the particle threshold could be examined for the first time. Isovector M1 transitions are found to be a important component of the radiative capture from the E{sub c.m.}=6.0 and 6.8 MeV resonances. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations suggests that these resonances may have either J=0 or 2, with a preference for J=2. The higher energy resonances at E{sub c.m.}=7.5 and 8.0 MeV have a rather different decay pattern. The former is a clear candidate for a J=4 resonance, whereas the latter has a dominant J=4 character superposed on a J=2 resonant component underneath. The relationship between these resonances and the well-known quasimolecular resonances as well as resonances in breakup and electrofission of {sup 24}Mg into two {sup 12}C nuclei are discussed.

  14. Integrated capture, transport, and magneto-mechanical resonant sensing of superparamagnetic microbeads using magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, E; Montana, D; Beach, G S D

    2012-11-01

    An integrated platform for the capture, transport, and detection of individual superparamagnetic microbeads is described for lab-on-a-chip biomedical applications. Magnetic domain walls in magnetic tracks have previously been shown to be capable of capturing and transporting individual beads through a fluid at high speeds. Here it is shown that the strong magnetostatic interaction between a bead and a domain wall leads to a distinct magneto-mechanical resonance that reflects the susceptibility and hydrodynamic size of the trapped bead. Numerical and analytical modeling is used to quantitatively explain this resonance, and the magneto-mechanical resonant response under sinusoidal drive is experimentally characterized both optically and electrically. The observed bead resonance presents a new mechanism for microbead sensing and metrology. The dual functionality of domain walls as both bead carriers and sensors is a promising platform for the development of lab-on-a-bead technologies. PMID:22955796

  15. Mechanisms of interaction of radiation with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Geacintov, N.E.; Pope, M.

    1992-08-31

    This project is concerned with studies of biological activity-structure relationships in which the mechanisms of interaction of ionizing radiation and benzopyrene (PB) compounds with DNA are being investigated and compared. Emphasis is focused on effects of DNA conformation on its mechanisms of interaction with ionizing radiation, on the influence of structure and stereochemistry of BP metabolites on mechanisms of DNA damage, and on influence of DNA conformation on interactions between BP metabolites and DNA molecules, and the structures of the complexes and adducts which are formed. One basic theme of this project is the use of photoexcited states of BP and nucleic acids as probes of these interactions. In part I of this report, recent progress on elucidating the structures of selected BP-oligonucleotide model adducts by high resolution NMR and gel electrophoresis techniques is summarized. It is shown that the stereochemical properties of benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide-DNA adducts play a crucial role in determining their interactions with certain exonucleases. These results provide useful models for deriving a better understanding of differences biological activities of BP compounds and the relationships between mutagenicities and the structure properties of BP-DNA adducts. In Part II of this report, a new time-resolved method based on picosecond laser pulse techniques for elucidating the electronic levels involved in electron photoemission and electron transfer in BP and nucleic acid solids is described.

  16. Four-body calculation of 12C(α, γ)16O radiative capture reaction at stellar energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, H.; Firoozabadi, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of the four-alphamodel, the 12C(α, γ)16Oradiative capture process is investigated by using the four-body Faddeev-Yakubovsky equations as well as the two- and three-body electromagnetic currents. The present calculation is an application of our current conservation realistic potentials method for the 12C(α, γ)16Oradiative capture process. This work clears the way formore refinedmodels of radiative capture based on two- and three-body realistic potentials and current conservation. The calculation is carried out by considering the 4He + 12C (1 + 3) and the 8Be + 8Be (2 + 2) subamplitudes, respectively. Radiative capture 12C(α, γ)16Oreaction is one of the most important reactions in nuclear astrophysics. For this reaction, the electric dipole transitions between states with the same isospin are forbidden in the first order. Because the state 1+ and 0+ ground state nuclei 16O have zero isospin, thus the electric dipole radiations are not at the first order between two levels and electric dipole radiation will be the second order and electric dipole radiation is the same order as the electric quadrupole radiation. Therefore, we must consider the effects of both radiations. In comparison with other theoretical methods and available experimental data, good agreement is achieved for the E 1 and E 2 contribution to the cross section and the astrophysical S factor for this process.

  17. Radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis by a linear combination technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.; Bhargava, R.C.; Senftle, F.E.; Brinkerhoff, J.M.

    1972-01-01

    The linear combination technique, when applied to a gamma-ray spectrum, gives a single number indicative of the extent to which the spectral lines of a sought element are present in a complex spectrum. Spectra are taken of the sought element and of various other substances whose spectra interfere with that of the sought element. A weighting function is then computed for application to spectra of unknown materials. The technique was used to determine calcium by radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis in the presence of interfering elements, notably titanium, and the results were compared with those for two popular methods of peak area integration. Although linearity of response was similar for the methods, the linear combination technique was much better at rejecting interferences. For analyses involving mixtures of unknown composition the technique consequently offers improved sensitivity. ?? 1972.

  18. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, J.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    2016-04-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of B (E 1 ) distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to 11Li (9Li+n +n ) and 6He (4He+n +n ) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  19. Description of the proton and neutron radiative capture reactions in the Gamow shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Michel, N.; Płoszajczak, M.; Jaganathen, Y.; Id Betan, R. M.

    2015-03-01

    We formulate the Gamow shell model (GSM) in coupled-channel (CC) representation for the description of proton/neutron radiative capture reactions and present the first application of this new formalism for the calculation of cross sections in mirror reactions 7Be(p ,γ ) 8B and 7Li(n,γ ) 8Li . The GSM-CC formalism is applied to a translationally invariant Hamiltonian with an effective finite-range two-body interaction. Reactions channels are built by GSM wave functions for the ground state 3 /2- and the first excited state 1 /2- of 7Be /7Li and the proton/neutron wave function expanded in different partial waves.

  20. Measuring Neutron-Proton Radiative Capture Cross-section at Low Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, To Chin; Kovash, Michael; Matthews, June; Yang, Hongwei; Yang, Yunjie

    2015-10-01

    The experiment aims to fill in a gap in our data for the cross-section of neutron-proton radiative capture (p(n,d γ)) at energies below 500 keV. Current measurements in this energy range are scarce and inconsistent with theoretical predictions and with each other. A well-determined cross-section of the capture reaction in the low energy range is useful in nuclear physics due to its fundamental nature. The measurement is also of interest in cosmology. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), the process by which light elements are formed in early universe, is very sensitive to the p(n,d γ) cross-section in the low energy range. The measurement enables us to put tighter constraints on the theoretical predictions of BBN. We have conducted preliminary measurements in the van de Graaff accelerator facility at the University of Kentucky. Our array of detectors consists of three plastic scintillators to serve as proton targets and deuteron detectors, and five BGO scintillators to detect γ-rays. The combination results in an over-determination of reaction kinematics that discriminates against scattering processes and other backgrounds. We have obtained some early results which show promise for the precise measurement of the p(n,d γ) cross-section.

  1. A new analytical formula for neutron capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Hosein; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2012-01-01

    Background Photoneutrons are produced in radiation therapy with high energy photons. Also, capture gamma rays are the byproduct of neutrons interactions with wall material of radiotherapy rooms. Aim In the current study an analytical formula was proposed for capture gamma dose calculations in double bend mazes in radiation therapy rooms. Materials and methods A total of 40 different layouts with double-bend mazes and a 18 MeV photon beam of Varian 2100 Clinac were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) code. Neutron capture gamma ray dose equivalent was calculated by the MC method along the maze and at the maze entrance door of all the simulated rooms. Then, all MC resulted data were fitted to an empirical formula for capture gamma dose calculations. Wu–McGinley analytical formula for capture gamma dose equivalent at the maze entrance door in single-bend mazes was also used for comparison purposes. Results For capture gamma dose equivalents at the maze entrance door, the difference of 2–11% was seen between MC and the derived equation, while the difference of 36–87% was found between MC and the Wu–McGinley methods. Conclusion Our results showed that the derived formula results were consistent with the MC results for all of 40 different geometries. However, as a new formula, further evaluations are required to validate its use in practical situations. Finally, its application is recommend for capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes to improve shielding calculations. PMID:24377027

  2. Determination of radiative neutron capture cross sections for unstable nuclei by the {gamma}-ray strength function method

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, H.; Goriely, S.

    2012-11-12

    An indirect method referred to as the {gamma}-ray strength function method has been devised to determine radiative neutron capture cross sections for unstable nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability. This method is based on the {gamma}-ray strength function which interconnects radiative neutron capture and photoneutron emission within the statistical model. The method was applied to several unstable nuclei such as {sup 93,95}Zr, {sup 107}Pd, and 121,123Sn. This method offers a versatile application extended to unstable nuclei far from the stability when combined with Coulomb dissociation experiments at RIKEN-RIBF and GSI.

  3. Mechanisms of low temperature capture and regeneration of CO2 using diamino protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Simons, Tristan J; Verheyen, Thomas; Izgorodina, Ekaterina I; Vijayaraghavan, R; Young, Scott; Pearson, Andrew K; Pas, Steven J; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2016-01-14

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) chemical absorption and regeneration was investigated in two diamino carboxylate protic ionic liquids (PILs), dimethylethylenediamine formate (DMEDAH formate) and dimethylpropylenediamine acetate (DMPDAH acetate), using novel calorimetric techniques. The PILs under study have previously been shown to possess a CO2 absorption capacity similar to the industrial standard, 30% aqueous MEA, while requiring much lower temperatures to release the captured CO2. We show that this is in part due to the fact that the PILs exhibit enthalpies of CO2 desorption as low as 40 kJ mol(-1), significantly lower than the 85 kJ mol(-1) required for 30% aqueous MEA. Computational and spectroscopic analyses were used to probe the mechanism of CO2 capture, which was found to proceed via the formation of carbamate moieties on the primary amine of both DMEDAH and DMPDAH. Evidence was also found that weakly acidic counter-ions such as formate and acetate provide, unexpectedly, an additional proton acceptor site in the traditional carbamate mechanism, revealing opportunities to increase CO2 uptake capacity in the future through careful design of the anion and cation used in the PIL capture agent. PMID:26660453

  4. Capturing mechanical properties of biological cells using coarse-grained modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenbin; Chang, Monique; Alexeev, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Understanding cell mechanics is important for a variety of biomedical applications. Our goal is to develop a coarse-grained computational model that can properly capture the micromechanics of biological cells. The coarse-grained cell model includes an elastic shell enclosing a cross-linked polymer network and a viscous fluid representing, respectively, cell membrane, cytoskeleton, and cytoplasm. We use this model to investigate the mechanical response of cells to external forces and compare the results with the experimental AFM measurements. We systematically vary the properties and structure of the internal polymer network and the outer membrane to assess their influence on the cell mechanical responses. This model not only reveals interesting insights into the cell mechanics, but also provides a promising tool for investigation of motile and multicellular systems. Acknowledge financial support from NSF under Award No. 0932510.

  5. Synergistic capture mechanisms for alkali and sulfur species from combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.W.; Shadman, F.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Mwabe, P.O.

    1994-02-01

    Experimental work was carried out on a 17 kW, 600 cm long, gas laboratory combustor, to investigate the post flame reactive capture of alkali species by kaolinite. Emphasis was on alkali/sorbent interactions occurring in flue gas at temperatures above the alkali dewpoint and on the formation of water insoluble reaction products. Time-temperature studies were carried out by injecting kaolinite at different axial points along the combustor. The effect of chlorine and sulfur on alkali capture was investigated by doping the flame with SO{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} gases to simulate coal flame environments. Particle time and temperature history was kept as close as possible to that which would ordinarily be found in a practical boiler. Experiments designed to extract apparent initial reaction rates were carried using a narrow range, 1-2 {mu}m modal size sorbent, while, a coarse, multi size sorbent was used to investigate the governing transport mechanisms. The capture reaction has been proposed to be between alkali hydroxide and activated kaolinite, and remains so in the presence of sulfur and chlorine. The presence of sulfur reduces sodium capture by under 10% at 1300{degree}C. Larger reductions at lower temperatures are attributed to the elevated dewpoint of sodium ({approximately}850{degree}C) with subsequent reduction in sorbent residence time in the alkali gas phase domain. Chlorine reduces sodium capture by 30% across the temperature range covered by the present experiments. This result has been linked to thermodynamic equilibria between sodium hydroxide, sodium chloride and water.

  6. Macroscopic geometric heterogeneity effects in radiation dose distribution analysis for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.; Nigg, D.W.; Wheeler, F.J.; Bauer, W.F. )

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This paper describes such a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for the tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for this model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous-tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10%--20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  7. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  8. Premaxillary movements in cyprinodontiform fishes: an unusual protrusion mechanism facilitates "picking" prey capture.

    PubMed

    Ferry-Graham, Lara A; Gibb, Alice C; Hernandez, L Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Premaxillary protrusion is hypothesized to confer a number of feeding advantages to teleost fishes; however, most proposed advantages relate to enhanced stealth or suction production during prey capture. Cyprinodontiformes exhibit an unusual form of premaxillary protrusion where the descending process of the premaxilla does not rotate anteriorly to occlude the sides of the open mouth during prey capture. Instead, the premaxilla is protruded such that it gives the impression of a beak during prey capture. We quantified premaxillary kinematics during feeding in four cyprinodontiform taxa and compared them with three percomorph taxa to identify any performance consequences of this protrusion mechanism. Individual prey capture events were recorded using digital high-speed video at 250-500 frames per second (n >or= 4 individuals, >or= 4 strikes per individual). Species differed in the timing of movement and the maximum displacement of the premaxilla during the gape cycle and in the contribution of the premaxilla to jaw closing. Cyprinodontiform taxa produced less premaxillary protrusion than the percomorph taxa, and were consistently slower in the time to maximum gape. Further, it appears cyprinodontiforms can alter the contribution of the premaxilla to mouth closure on an event-specific basis. We were able to demonstrate that, within at least one species, this variability is associated with the location of the prey (bottom vs. water column). Cyprinodontiform upper jaw movements likely reflect increased dexterity associated with a foraging ecology where prey items are "picked" from a variety of locations: the bottom, water column, or surface. We postulate that dexterity requires slow, precisely controlled jaw movements; thus, may be traded off for some aspects of suction-feeding performance, such as protrusion distance and speed. PMID:18619823

  9. Real-Time Imaging of Ground Cover: Relationships with Radiation Capture, Canopy Photosynthesis, and Daily Growth Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, S. P.; Ritchie, G.; Frantz, J. M.; Pinnock, D.; Bugbee, B.

    2003-01-01

    Cumulative absorbed radiation is highly correlated with crop biomass and yield. In this chapter we describe the use of a digital camera and commercial imaging software for estimating daily radiation capture, canopy photosynthesis, and relative growth rate. Digital images were used to determine percentage of ground cover of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) communities grown at five temperatures. Plants were grown in a steady-state, 10-chamber CO2 gas exchange system, which was used to measure canopy photosynthesis and daily carbon gain. Daily measurements of percentage of ground cover were highly correlated with daily measurements of both absorbed radiation (r(sup 2) = 0.99) and daily carbon gain (r(sup 2) = 0.99). Differences among temperature treatments indicated that these relationships were influenced by leaf angle, leaf area index, and chlorophyll content. An analysis of the daily images also provided good estimates of relative growth rates, which were verified by gas exchange measurements of daily carbon gain. In a separate study we found that images taken at hourly intervals were effective for monitoring real-time growth. Our data suggests that hourly images can be used for early detection of plant stress. Applications, limitations, and potential errors are discussed. We have long known that crop yield is determined by the efficiency of four component processes: (i) radiation capture, (ii) quantum yield, (iii) carbon use efficiency, and (iv) carbon partitioning efficiency (Charles-Edwards, 1982; Penning de Vries & van Laar, 1982; Thornley, 1976). More than one-half century ago, Watson (1947, 1952) showed that variation in radiation capture accounted for almost all of the variation in yield between sites in temperate regions, because the three other components are relatively constant when the crop is not severely stressed. More recently, Monteith (1977) reviewed the literature on the close correlation between radiation capture and yield. Bugbee and Monje (1992

  10. Acute Cerebrovascular Radiation Syndrome: Radiation Neurotoxicity , mechanisms of CNS radiation injury, advanced countermeasures for Radiation Protection of Central Nervous System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    . Antiradiation Vaccine and Antiradiation IgG preparations - prospective effective antidote/countermeasure for ϒ-irradiation, heavy ions irradiation, neutron irradiation. Recommendations for treatment and immune-prophylaxis of CNS injury, induced by radiation, were proposed. Specific immune therapy and specific immune prophylaxis reduce symptoms of ACvRS. This manuscript summarizes the results of experiments and considering possibility for blocking toxicological mechanisms of action of Radiation and Radiation Neurotoxins and prevention or diminishing clinical signs of injury of CNS. Experimental data suggest that Antiradiation vaccine and Antiradiation IgG with specific antibodies to Radiation Neurotoxins, Cytotoxins protect CNS against high doses of radiation.

  11. Unpacking the mechanisms captured by a correlative species distribution model to improve predictions of climate refugia.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Natalie J; Kearney, Michael R; Taylor, Chris A; Wintle, Brendan A

    2016-07-01

    Climate refugia are regions that animals can retreat to, persist in and potentially then expand from under changing environmental conditions. Most forecasts of climate change refugia for species are based on correlative species distribution models (SDMs) using long-term climate averages, projected to future climate scenarios. Limitations of such methods include the need to extrapolate into novel environments and uncertainty regarding the extent to which proximate variables included in the model capture processes driving distribution limits (and thus can be assumed to provide reliable predictions under new conditions). These limitations are well documented; however, their impact on the quality of climate refugia predictions is difficult to quantify. Here, we develop a detailed bioenergetics model for the koala. It indicates that range limits are driven by heat-induced water stress, with the timing of rainfall and heat waves limiting the koala in the warmer parts of its range. We compare refugia predictions from the bioenergetics model with predictions from a suite of competing correlative SDMs under a range of future climate scenarios. SDMs were fitted using combinations of long-term climate and weather extremes variables, to test how well each set of predictions captures the knowledge embedded in the bioenergetics model. Correlative models produced broadly similar predictions to the bioenergetics model across much of the species' current range - with SDMs that included weather extremes showing highest congruence. However, predictions in some regions diverged significantly when projecting to future climates due to the breakdown in correlation between climate variables. We provide unique insight into the mechanisms driving koala distribution and illustrate the importance of subtle relationships between the timing of weather events, particularly rain relative to hot-spells, in driving species-climate relationships and distributions. By unpacking the mechanisms

  12. Ab initio Calculation of the np→dγ Radiative Capture Process.

    PubMed

    Beane, Silas R; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J; Tiburzi, Brian C

    2015-09-25

    Lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture process np→dγ, and the photo-disintegration processes γ^{(*)}d→np. In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of m_{π}~450 and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine the amplitudes for these low-energy inelastic processes. At m_{π}~806 MeV, using only lattice QCD inputs, a cross section σ^{806 MeV}~17 mb is found at an incident neutron speed of v=2,200 m/s. Extrapolating the short-distance contribution to the physical pion mass and combining the result with phenomenological scattering information and one-body couplings, a cross section of σ^{lqcd}(np→dγ)=334.9(+5.2-5.4) mb is obtained at the same incident neutron speed, consistent with the experimental value of σ^{expt}(np→dγ)=334.2(0.5) mb. PMID:26451545

  13. Using the FMA for radiative capture cross-section measurements of interest to astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    We assessed the capability of the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) to study radiative capture reactions of astrophysical interest using inverse kinematics. Results from measurements on the {sup 1}H({sup 13}C,{sup 14}N){gamma} reaction show that the FMA is an ideal high-efficiency tool for these experiments, where the recoil ion is detected and identified at the FMA focal plane. Intermediate slits acting on energy/charge and mass/charge were introduced into the FMA, which reduced the scattered primary beam fraction at the focal plane to <10{sup -11}. A small gas ionization chamber was placed behind the position-sensitive focal-plane detector, followed by a Si detector. Measurements of mass/charge, energy loss, and residual energy of the transmitted ions were made, giving at least another two orders of magnitude separation of recoils from scattered beam. A new ionization detector operating in the same gas volume as the focal plane detector will provide even better separation by eliminating the need for two of the three windows used in the test measurement. At energies of {approximately} 0.5 MeV/nucleon, the recoil ions populate primarily a single charge state, resulting in a detection efficiency of > 50%. This will be particularly valuable for use with radioactive beams.

  14. The impact of UVB radiation on the glycoprotein glue of orb-weaving spider capture thread.

    PubMed

    Stellwagen, Sarah D; Opell, Brent D; Clouse, Mary E

    2015-09-01

    Many spider orb-webs are exposed to sunlight and the potentially damaging effects of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. We examined the effect of UVB on the viscoelastic glycoprotein core of glue droplets deposited on the prey capture threads of these webs, hypothesizing that webs built by species that occupy sunny habitats are less susceptible to UVB damage than are webs built by species that prefer shaded forest habitats or by nocturnal species. Threads were tested shortly after being collected in the early morning and after being exposed to UVB energy equivalent to a day of summer sun and three times this amount. Droplets kept in a dark chamber allowed us to evaluate post-production changes. Droplet volume was unaffected by treatments, indicating that UVB did not damage the hygroscopic compounds in the aqueous layer that covers droplets. UVB exposure did not affect energies of droplet extension for species from exposed and partially to mostly shaded habitats (Argiope aurantia, Leucauge venusta and Verrucosa arenata). However, UVB exposure reduced the energy of droplet extension in Micrathena gracilis from shaded forests and Neoscona crucifera, which forages at night. Only in L. venusta did the energy of droplet extension increase after the dark treatment, suggesting endogenous molecular alignment. This study adds UVB irradiation to the list of factors (humidity, temperature and strain rate) known to affect the performance of spider glycoprotein glue, factors that must be more fully understood if adhesives that mimic spider glycoprotein glue are to be produced. PMID:26333924

  15. Ab initio calculation of the $$np \\to d ³$$ radiative capture process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2015-09-24

    In this study, lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture processmore » $$np \\to d\\gamma$$, and the photo-disintegration processes $$\\gamma^{(\\ast)} d \\to np$$. In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of $$m_\\pi \\sim 450$$ and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine these low-energy inelastic processes. Extrapolating to the physical pion mass, a cross section of $$\\sigma^{lqcd}(np\\to d\\gamma)=332.4({\\tiny \\begin{array}{l}+5.4 \\\\ - 4.7\\end{array}})\\ mb$$ is obtained at an incident neutron speed of $$v=2,200\\ m/s$$, consistent with the experimental value of $$\\sigma^{expt}(np \\to d\\gamma) = 334.2(0.5)\\ mb$$.« less

  16. Radiative neutron capture on a proton at big-bang nucleosynthesis energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, S.; Cyburt, R. H.; Hong, S. W.; Hyun, C. H.

    2006-08-15

    The total cross section for radiative neutron capture on a proton, np{yields}d{gamma}, is evaluated at big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) energies. The electromagnetic transition amplitudes are calculated up to next-to-leading-order within the framework of pionless effective field theory with dibaryon fields. We also calculate the d{gamma}{yields}np cross section and the photon analyzing power for the d{gamma}(vector sign){yields}np process from the amplitudes. The values of low-energy constants that appear in the amplitudes are estimated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis using the relevant low-energy experimental data. Our result agrees well with those of other theoretical calculations except for the np{yields}d{gamma} cross section at some energies estimated by an R-matrix analysis. We also study the uncertainties in our estimation of the np{yields}d{gamma} cross section at relevant BBN energies and find that the estimated cross section is reliable to within {approx}1% error.

  17. Ab initio calculation of the $np \\to d ³$ radiative capture process

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2015-09-24

    In this study, lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture process $np \\to d\\gamma$, and the photo-disintegration processes $\\gamma^{(\\ast)} d \\to np$. In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of $m_\\pi \\sim 450$ and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine these low-energy inelastic processes. Extrapolating to the physical pion mass, a cross section of $\\sigma^{lqcd}(np\\to d\\gamma)=332.4({\\tiny \\begin{array}{l}+5.4 \\\\ - 4.7\\end{array}})\\ mb$ is obtained at an incident neutron speed of $v=2,200\\ m/s$, consistent with the experimental value of $\\sigma^{expt}(np \\to d\\gamma) = 334.2(0.5)\\ mb$.

  18. Design status of KOBRA for rare isotope production and direct measurements of radiative capture cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshoo, K.; Chae, H.; Park, J.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, Y. K.; Souliotis, G. A.; Hashimoto, T.; Akers, C.; Berg, G. P. A.; Choi, S.; Jeong, S. C.; Kato, S.; Kim, Y. K.; Kubono, S.; Lee, K. B.; Moon, C.-B.

    2016-06-01

    KOBRA (KOrea Broad acceptance Recoil spectrometer and Apparatus) facility being designed at Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea will be utilized to produce rare isotope beams by employing multi-nucleon transfer reactions at about 20 MeV/nucleon for studies of nuclear structure. KOBRA will also provide high suppression of beam induced background for direct measurements of radiative-capture cross sections in the astrophysical energy range. The present design status of the KOBRA facility is reported along with a brief introduction to the facility. We have studied the feasibility of production of 44Ti based on the present design of KOBRA as an example, and calculated the intensity of 44Ti secondary beam, to be about 105 particles per second, for 1 pnA 46Ti primary beam with a carbon target for a beam energy of 25 MeV/nucleon. A Monte Carlo simulation with a ray-tracing code has been performed to show that recoil products 66Se are well separated from a 65As beam by KOBRA for the 65As (p, γ)66Se reaction at a beam energy of 1 MeV/nucleon.

  19. Developing Capture Mechanisms and High-Fidelity Dynamic Models for the MXER Tether System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    A team consisting of collaborators from Tennessee Technological University (TTU), Marshall Space Flight Center, BD Systems, and the University of Delaware (herein called the TTU team) conducted specific research and development activities in MXER tether systems during the base period of May 15, 2004 through September 30, 2006 under contract number NNM04AB13C. The team addressed two primary topics related to the MXER tether system: 1) Development of validated high-fidelity dynamic models of an elastic rotating tether and 2) development of feasible mechanisms to enable reliable rendezvous and capture. This contractor report will describe in detail the activities that were performed during the base period of this cycle-2 MXER tether activity and will summarize the results of this funded activity. The primary deliverables of this project were the quad trap, a robust capture mechanism proposed, developed, tested, and demonstrated with a high degree of feasibility and the detailed development of a validated high-fidelity elastic tether dynamic model provided through multiple formulations.

  20. Naturally Split Inteins Assemble through a “Capture and Collapse” Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Split inteins are a class of naturally occurring proteins that carry out protein splicing in trans. The chemical mechanism of protein trans-splicing is well-understood and has been exploited to develop several powerful protein engineering technologies. Split intein chemistry is preceded by efficient molecular recognition between two protomers that become intertwined in their bound state. It is currently unclear how this unique topology is achieved upon fragment association. Using biophysical techniques in conjunction with protein engineering methods, including segmental isotopic labeling, we show that one split intein fragment is partly folded, while the other is completely disordered. These polypeptides capture each other through their disordered regions and form an ordered intermediate with native-like structure at their interface. This intermediate then collapses into the canonical intein fold. This mechanism provides insight into the evolutionary constraints on split intein assembly and should enhance the development of split intein-based technologies. PMID:24236406

  1. Mechanism of Electrophilic Fluorination with Pd(IV): Fluoride Capture and Subsequent Oxidative Fluoride Transfer(.)

    PubMed

    Brandt, Jochen R; Lee, Eunsung; Boursalian, Gregory B; Ritter, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Electrophilic fluorinating reagents derived from fluoride are desirable for the synthesis of (18)F-labeled molecules for positron emission tomography (PET). Here, we study the mechanism by which a Pd(IV)-complex captures fluoride and subsequently transfers it to nucleophiles. The intermediate Pd(IV)-F is formed with high rates even at the nano- to micromolar fluoride concentrations typical for radiosyntheses with (18)F due to fast formation of an outer-sphere complex between fluoride and Pd(IV). The subsequent fluorine transfer from the Pd(IV)-F complex is proposed to proceed through an unusual SET/fluoride transfer/SET mechanism. The findings detailed in this manuscript provide a theoretical foundation suitable for addressing a more general approach for electrophilic fluorination with high specific activity (18)F PET imaging. PMID:24376910

  2. Mechanisms of Melanoma Promotion by Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rünger, Thomas M

    2016-09-01

    The mutagenic properties of ultraviolet radiation drive the initiation of melanoma. Induction of matrix metalloproteinases in melanoma cells by longwave UVA radiation, possibly via a Warburg-like effect, promotes melanoma invasiveness. This is one of several mechanisms by which ultraviolet radiation also promotes further growth of previously established melanomas. PMID:27542295

  3. Examining the mechanisms of overgeneral autobiographical memory: capture and rumination, and impaired executive control.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Jennifer A; Griffith, James W; Mineka, Susan

    2011-02-01

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is an important cognitive phenomenon in depression, but questions remain regarding the underlying mechanisms. The CaR-FA-X model (Williams et al., 2007) proposes three mechanisms that may contribute to OGM, but little work has examined the possible additive and/or interactive effects among them. We examined two mechanisms of CaR-FA-X: capture and rumination, and impaired executive control. We analysed data from undergraduates (N=109) scoring high or low on rumination who were presented with cues of high and low self-relevance on the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT). Executive control was operationalised as performance on both the Stroop Colour-Word Task and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT). Hierarchical generalised linear modelling was used to predict whether participants would generate a specific memory on a trial of the AMT. Higher COWAT scores, lower rumination, and greater cue self-relevance predicted a higher probability of a specific memory. There was also a rumination×cue self-relevance interaction: Higher (vs lower) rumination was associated with a lower probability of a specific memory primarily for low self-relevant cues. We found no evidence of interactions between these mechanisms. Findings are interpreted with respect to current autobiographical memory models. Future directions for OGM mechanism research are discussed. PMID:21294036

  4. Structure effects in the 15N(n ,γ )16N radiative capture reaction from the Coulomb dissociation of 16N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, Shubhchintak, Chatterjee, R.

    2015-10-01

    Background: The 15N(n ,γ )16N reaction plays an important role in red giant stars and also in inhomogeneous big bang nucleosynthesis. However, there are controversies regarding spectroscopic factors of the four low-lying states of 16N, which have direct bearing on the total direct capture cross section and also on the reaction rate. Direct measurements of the capture cross section at low energies are scarce and available only at three energies below 500 keV. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to calculate the 15N(n ,γ )16N radiative capture cross section and its subsequent reaction rate by an indirect method and in that process investigate the effects of spectroscopic factors of different levels of 16N to the cross section. Method: A fully quantum mechanical Coulomb breakup theory under the aegis of post-form distorted wave Born approximation is used to calculate the Coulomb breakup of 16N on Pb at 100 MeV/u . This is then related to the photodisintegration cross section of 16N(γ ,n )15N and subsequently invoking the principle of detailed balance, the 15N(n ,γ )16N capture cross section is calculated. Results: The nonresonant capture cross section is calculated with spectroscopic factors from the shell model and those extracted (including uncertainties) from two recent experiments. The data seem to favor a more single particle nature for the low-lying states of 16N. The total neutron capture rate is also calculated by summing up nonresonant and resonant (significant only at temperatures greater than 1 GK) contributions and comparison is made with other charged particle capture rates. In the typical temperature range of 0.1 -1.2 GK, almost all the contributions to the reaction rate come from capture cross sections below 0.25 MeV. Conclusion: We have attempted to resolve the discrepancy in the spectroscopic factors of low-lying 16N levels and conclude that it would certainly be useful to perform a Coulomb dissociation experiment to find the low energy capture

  5. Mechanisms and feasibility of prey capture in ambush-feeding zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Andersen, Anders; Langlois, Vincent J; Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-07-28

    Many marine zooplankters, particularly among copepods, are "ambush feeders" that passively wait for their prey and capture them by fast surprise attacks. This strategy must be very demanding in terms of muscle power and sensing capabilities, but the detailed mechanisms of the attacks are unknown. Using high-speed video we describe how copepods perform spectacular attacks by precision maneuvering during a rapid jump. We show that the flow created by the attacking copepod is so small that the prey is not pushed away, and that the attacks are feasible because of their high velocity (approximately 100 mm x s(-1)) and short duration (few ms), which leaves the prey no time for escape. Simulations and analytical estimates show that the viscous boundary layer that develops around the attacking copepod is thin at the time of prey capture and that the flow around the prey is small and remains potential flow. Although ambush feeding is highly successful as a feeding strategy in the plankton, we argue that power requirements for acceleration and the hydrodynamic constraints restrict the strategy to larger (> 0.25 mm), muscular forms with well-developed prey perception capabilities. The smallest of the examined species is close to this size limit and, in contrast to the larger species, uses its largest possible jump velocity for such attacks. The special requirements to ambush feeders with such attacks may explain why this strategy has evolved to perfection only a few times among planktonic suspension feeders (few copepod families and chaetognaths). PMID:19622725

  6. The mechanism of vapor phase hydration of calcium oxide: implications for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Kudłacz, Krzysztof; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos

    2014-10-21

    Lime-based sorbents are used for fuel- and flue-gas capture, thereby representing an economic and effective way to reduce CO2 emissions. Their use involves cyclic carbonation/calcination which results in a significant conversion reduction with increasing number of cycles. To reactivate spent CaO, vapor phase hydration is typically performed. However, little is known about the ultimate mechanism of such a hydration process. Here, we show that the vapor phase hydration of CaO formed after calcination of calcite (CaCO3) single crystals is a pseudomorphic, topotactic process, which progresses via an intermediate disordered phase prior to the final formation of oriented Ca(OH)2 nanocrystals. The strong structural control during this solid-state phase transition implies that the microstructural features of the CaO parent phase predetermine the final structural and physicochemical (reactivity and attrition) features of the product hydroxide. The higher molar volume of the product can create an impervious shell around unreacted CaO, thereby limiting the efficiency of the reactivation process. However, in the case of compact, sintered CaO structures, volume expansion cannot be accommodated in the reduced pore volume, and stress generation leads to pervasive cracking. This favors complete hydration but also detrimental attrition. Implications of these results in carbon capture and storage (CCS) are discussed. PMID:25233236

  7. Implication of the Proton-Deuteron Radiative Capture for Big Bang Nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, L E; Mangano, G; Kievsky, A; Viviani, M

    2016-03-11

    The astrophysical S factor for the radiative capture d(p,γ)^{3}He in the energy range of interest for big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is calculated using an ab initio approach. The nuclear Hamiltonian retains both two- and three-nucleon interactions-the Argonne v_{18} and the Urbana IX, respectively. Both one- and many-body contributions to the nuclear current operator are included. The former retain for the first time, besides the 1/m leading order contribution (m is the nucleon mass), also the next-to-leading order term, proportional to 1/m^{3}. The many-body currents are constructed in order to satisfy the current conservation relation with the adopted Hamiltonian model. The hyperspherical harmonics technique is applied to solve the A=3 bound and scattering states. Particular attention is paid in this second case in order to obtain, in the energy range of BBN, an uncertainty on the astrophysical S factor of the order or below ∼1%. Then, in this energy range, the S factor is found to be ∼10% larger than the currently adopted values. Part of this increase (1%-3%) is due to the 1/m^{3} one-body operator, while the remaining is due to the new more accurate scattering wave functions. We have studied the implication of this new determination for the d(p,γ)^{3}He S factor on the deuterium primordial abundance. We find that the predicted theoretical value for ^{2}H/H is in excellent agreement with its experimental determination, using the most recent determination of the baryon density of the Planck experiment, and with a standard number of relativistic degrees of freedom N_{eff}=3.046 during primordial nucleosynthesis. This calls for a more accurate measurement of the astrophysical S factor in order to confirm the present predictions. PMID:27015474

  8. Implication of the Proton-Deuteron Radiative Capture for Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcucci, L. E.; Mangano, G.; Kievsky, A.; Viviani, M.

    2016-03-01

    The astrophysical S factor for the radiative capture d (p ,γ ) 3He in the energy range of interest for big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is calculated using an ab initio approach. The nuclear Hamiltonian retains both two- and three-nucleon interactions—the Argonne v18 and the Urbana IX, respectively. Both one- and many-body contributions to the nuclear current operator are included. The former retain for the first time, besides the 1 /m leading order contribution (m is the nucleon mass), also the next-to-leading order term, proportional to 1 /m3. The many-body currents are constructed in order to satisfy the current conservation relation with the adopted Hamiltonian model. The hyperspherical harmonics technique is applied to solve the A =3 bound and scattering states. Particular attention is paid in this second case in order to obtain, in the energy range of BBN, an uncertainty on the astrophysical S factor of the order or below ˜1 %. Then, in this energy range, the S factor is found to be ˜10 % larger than the currently adopted values. Part of this increase (1%-3%) is due to the 1 /m3 one-body operator, while the remaining is due to the new more accurate scattering wave functions. We have studied the implication of this new determination for the d (p ,γ )3He S factor on the deuterium primordial abundance. We find that the predicted theoretical value for 2H/H is in excellent agreement with its experimental determination, using the most recent determination of the baryon density of the Planck experiment, and with a standard number of relativistic degrees of freedom Neff=3.046 during primordial nucleosynthesis. This calls for a more accurate measurement of the astrophysical S factor in order to confirm the present predictions.

  9. On the radiation mechanism of a uniformly moving charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobzev, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    The radiation mechanism of a uniformly moving charge is discussed in detail with attention to the description of the Vavilov-Cherenkov and transition radiation effects. A well-grounded proof is given that this mechanism is incorrect because it is in conflict with the energy and momentum conservation laws and Newton's first law. A lucid explanation of the mechanism for the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation and the transition radiation is suggested by considering the atomic structure of solids, which does not require violation of fundamental laws. It is shown that the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation and the transition radiation are emitted by the atoms of the medium that are polarized by the moving particle, rather than by the particle itself moving through a medium. It is obvious that in this case neither the anomalous nor the normal Doppler effect is possible in the process of the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation emission. It is shown that the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation and the transition radiation cannot be emitted at frequencies higher than the inner shell frequency of the atom of the medium. Mistakes caused by using the radiation mechanism of a uniformly moving charge for describing the interaction of a moving charge with a solid are discussed.

  10. Radiative Neutron Capture on 9Be, 14C, 14N, 15N and 16O at Thermal and Astrophysical Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, Sergey; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, Albert; Afanasyeva, Nadezhda

    2013-10-01

    The total cross-sections of the radiative neutron capture processes on 9Be, 14C, 14N, 15N and 16O are described in the framework of the modified potential cluster model with the classification of orbital states according to Young tableaux. The continued interest in the study of these reactions is due, on the one hand, to the important role played by this process in the analysis of many fundamental properties of nuclei and nuclear reactions, and, on the other hand, to the wide use of the capture cross-section data in the various applications of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, and, also, to the importance of the analysis of primordial nucleosynthesis in the Universe. This article is devoted to the description of results for the processes of the radiative neutron capture on certain light atomic nuclei at thermal and astrophysical energies. The considered capture reactions are not part of stellar thermonuclear cycles, but involve in the reaction chains of inhomogeneous Big Bang models.

  11. New decay branches of the radiative capture reaction {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Lebhertz, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Salsac, M.-D.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Rousseau, M.; Marley, P. L.; Glover, R. G.; Kent, P. E.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Pearson, J. E.

    2009-01-28

    Resonances in the {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture process at energies around the Coulomb barrier have been probed using the very selective 0 deg. Dragon spectrometer at Triumf and its associated BGO {gamma}-array. For the first time the full level scheme involved in this process has been measured and shows previously unobserved {gamma}-decay to doorway states around 11 MeV in {sup 28}Si.

  12. Mesure du taux de la capture radiative du muon par l'hydrogene liquide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkmans, Guy

    À basse énergie, l'interaction faible entre leptons et quarks est décrite par une interaction de la forme courant × courant de type V - A. La présence de l'interaction forte induit des couplages additionnels qui doivent être déterminés expérimentalement. De ceux-ci, le couplage pseudoscalaire induit, gp , est mesuré avec la plus grande incertitude et fait l'objet de la présente recherche. L'hypothèse du Courant Axial Partiellement Conservé (CAPC) et l'usage de la relation de Goldberger-Treiman relie gp au couplage axial ga . Cette relation a été vérifiée traditionnellement par la Capture Ordinaire du Muon (COM) à une valeur fixe du moment de transfert q. La Capture Radiative du Muon (CRM), m- p-->nnmg , est un meilleur outil pour l'étude de gp à cause de sa dépendance variable en q2 qui offre une plus grande sensibilité dans la partie à haute énergie du spectre des photons. Toutefois, le petit rapport d'embranchement (~10-8) de la CRM par rapport à la désintégration du muon a retardé cette mesure jusqu'à ce jour. La théorie et les difficultés expérimentales associées à la détection des photons de CRM sont présentées au deuxième chapitre. On décrit ensuite, au troisième chapitre, les composantes du système de détection. Ce détecteur est un spectromètre à paires de grand angle solide (~3p) et qui permet l'observation des photons par l'analyse des électrons et des positrons de photo-conversion. Ainsi, le bruit de fond important des neutrons de la COM ne constitue pas un problème pour cette mesure. Nous décrivons, au quatrième chapitre, toutes les étapes de l'analyse, nécessaires pour la réduction des multiples bruits de fond. Le cinquième chapitre présente le calcul des efficacités ainsi que l'estimation des erreurs systématiques. Le sixième chapitre démontre comment l'on extrait le rapport d'embranchement pour la CRM ainsi que la valeur ae gp . On insiste sur la dépendance de gp en fonction de la valeur de

  13. Mechanism Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Ambient Air by Hydration Energy Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Lackner, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydration of neutral and ionic species on solid interfaces plays an important role in a wide range of natural and engineered processes within energy systems as well as biological and environmental systems. Various chemical reactions are significantly enhanced, both in the rate and the extent of the reaction, because of water molecules present or absent at the interface. A novel technology for carbon dioxide capture, driven by the free energy difference between more or less hydrated states of an anionic exchange resin is studied for a new approach to absorb CO2 from ambient air. For these materials the affinity to CO2 is dramatically lowered as the availability of water is increased. This makes it possible to absorb CO2 from air in a dry environment and release it at two orders of magnitude larger partial pressures in a wet environment. While the absorption process and the thermodynamic properties of air capture via ion exchange resins have been demonstrated, the underlying physical mechanisms remain to be understood. In order to rationally design better sorbent materials, the present work elucidates through molecular dynamics and quantum mechanical modeling the energy changes in the carbonate, bicarbonate and hydroxide ions that are induced by hydration, and how these changes affect sorbent properties. A methodology is developed to determine the free energy change during carbonate ion hydrolysis changes with different numbers of water molecules present. This makes it possible to calculate the equilibrium in the reaction CO3--•nH2O ↔ HCO3- • m1H2O + OH- • m2H2O + (n - 1 - m1 - m2)H2O Molecular dynamics models are used to calculate free energies of hydration for the CO32- ion, the HCO3- ion, and the OH- ion as function of the amount of water that is present. A quantum mechanical model is employed to study the equilibrium of the reaction Na2CO3 + H2O ↔ NaHCO3 + NaOHin a vacuum and at room temperature. The computational analysis of the free energy of

  14. Investigation of photoneutron and capture gamma-ray production in Pb and W under irradiation from 16N decay radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebwaro, Jeremiah Monari; Zhao, Yaolin; He, Chaohui

    2015-09-01

    Lead and tungsten are potential alternative materials for shielding reactor ex-core components with high 16N activity when available space limits application of concrete. Since the two materials are vulnerable to photonuclear reactions, the nature and intensity of the secondary radiation resulting from (γ,n) and (n,γ) reactions when 16N decay radiation interact with these materials need to be well known for effective shielding design. In this study the MCNP code was used to calculate the photoneutron and capture gamma-ray spectra in the two materials when irradiated by 16N decay radiation. It was observed that some of the photoneutrons generated in the two materials lie in the low-energy range which is considered optimum for (n,γ) reactions. Lead is more transparent to the photoneutrons when compared to tungsten. The calculations also revealed that the bremsstrahlung generated by the beta spectrum was not sufficient to trigger any additional photoneutrons. Both energetic and less energetic capture gamma-rays are observed when photoneutrons interact with nuclei of the two materials. Depending on the strength of the 16N source term, the secondary radiation could affect the effectiveness of the shield and need to be considered during design.

  15. Novel Mechanism of Hemin Capture by Hbp2, the Hemoglobin-binding Hemophore from Listeria monocytogenes*

    PubMed Central

    Malmirchegini, G. Reza; Sjodt, Megan; Shnitkind, Sergey; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rosinski, Justin; Newton, Salete M.; Klebba, Phillip E.; Clubb, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient that is required for the growth of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In cell cultures, this microbe secretes hemin/hemoglobin-binding protein 2 (Hbp2; Lmo2185) protein, which has been proposed to function as a hemophore that scavenges heme from the environment. Based on its primary sequence, Hbp2 contains three NEAr transporter (NEAT) domains of unknown function. Here we show that each of these domains mediates high affinity binding to ferric heme (hemin) and that its N- and C-terminal domains interact with hemoglobin (Hb). The results of hemin transfer experiments are consistent with Hbp2 functioning as an Hb-binding hemophore that delivers hemin to other Hbp2 proteins that are attached to the cell wall. Surprisingly, our work reveals that the central NEAT domain in Hbp2 binds hemin even though its primary sequence lacks a highly conserved YXXXY motif that is used by all other previously characterized NEAT domains to coordinate iron in the hemin molecule. To elucidate the mechanism of hemin binding by Hbp2, we determined crystal structures of its central NEAT domain (Hbp2N2; residues 183–303) in its free and hemin-bound states. The structures reveal an unprecedented mechanism of hemin binding in which Hbp2N2 undergoes a major conformational rearrangement that facilitates metal coordination by a non-canonical tyrosine residue. These studies highlight previously unrecognized plasticity in the hemin binding mechanism of NEAT domains and provide insight into how L. monocytogenes captures heme iron. PMID:25315777

  16. How Well Does a Funneled Energy Landscape Capture the Folding Mechanism of Spectrin Domains?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Three structurally similar domains from α-spectrin have been shown to fold very differently. Firstly, there is a contrast in the folding mechanism, as probed by Φ-value analysis, between the R15 domain and the R16 and R17 domains. Secondly, there are very different contributions from internal friction to folding: the folding rate of the R15 domain was found to be inversely proportional to solvent viscosity, showing no apparent frictional contribution from the protein, but in the other two domains a large internal friction component was evident. Non-native misdocking of helices has been suggested to be responsible for this phenomenon. Here, I study the folding of these three proteins with minimalist coarse-grained models based on a funneled energy landscape. Remarkably, I find that, despite the absence of non-native interactions, the differences in folding mechanism of the domains are well captured by the model, and the agreement of the Φ-values with experiment is fairly good. On the other hand, within the context of this model, there are no significant differences in diffusion coefficient along the chosen folding coordinate, and the model cannot explain the large differences in folding rates between the proteins found experimentally. These results are nonetheless consistent with the expectations from the energy landscape perspective of protein folding: namely, that the folding mechanism is primarily determined by the native-like interactions present in the Gō-like model, with missing non-native interactions being required to explain the differences in “internal friction” seen in experiment. PMID:23947368

  17. Radiation-induced autophagy: mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Madhuri; Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Das, Asmita; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S; Sharma, Kulbhushan

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionary conserved, indispensable, lysosome-mediated degradation process, which helps in maintaining homeostasis during various cellular traumas. During stress, a context-dependent role of autophagy has been observed which drives the cell towards survival or death depending upon the type, time, and extent of the damage. The process of autophagy is stimulated during various cellular insults, e.g. oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, imbalances in calcium homeostasis, and altered mitochondrial potential. Ionizing radiation causes ROS-dependent as well as ROS-independent damage in cells that involve macromolecular (mainly DNA) damage, as well as ER stress induction, both capable of inducing autophagy. This review summarizes the current understanding on the roles of oxidative stress, ER stress, DNA damage, altered mitochondrial potential, and calcium imbalance in radiation-induced autophagy as well as the merits and limitations of targeting autophagy as an approach for radioprotection and radiosensitization. PMID:26764568

  18. Mechanisms for radiation damadge in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    A comprehensive report is provided of the author`s research since 1986 on radiolysis of DNA as well as current state of knowledge in this area. In particular study areas such as the influence of hydration on the absolute yield of primary ionic free radicals in irradiated DNA at 77K, Ab Initio molecular orbital calculations of DNA base pairs and their radical ions, and radiation-induced DNA damage as a function of hydration are discussed.

  19. Radiation nephritis. Clinical manifestations and pathophysiologic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Krochak, R.J.; Baker, D.G.

    1986-05-01

    Radiation nephritis is both volume and dose related. Clinical experience would indicate that a minimum of one third of the renal volume needs to be excluded from nephrotoxic doses which appears to have a threshold of 2,000 cGy. The site of damage leading to renal failure appears to be the microvasculature ultimately expressed as glomerulosclerosis. How much direct damage to the tubular system contributes to this process is unclear, but undoubtedly the resultant systemic physiologic effects potentiate the expression of damage in the irradiated kidney. The acute syndrome, with all the potential manifestations of renal failure, rarely presents sooner than six months and appears to have no clear prodrome, although it would seem reasonable that a subclinical syndrome consisting of abnormalities detectable by urinalysis may occur. Treatment of radiation-induced nephritis or hypertension is no different from treatment for nephritis from any other cause and should be aggressive with lifelong follow-up. Carcinogenesis is a rare late expression of radiation-induced kidney damage. 25 references.

  20. Spectroscopic comparison of effects of electron radiation on mechanical properties of two polyimides

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.R. Jr.; Long, S.A.T.

    1987-04-01

    The differences in the radiation durabilities of two polyimide materials, Du Pont Kapton and General Electric Ultem, are compared. An explanation of the basic mechanisms which occur during exposure to electron radiation from analyses of infrared (IR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic data for each material is provided. The molecular model for Kapton was, in part, established from earlier modeling for Ultem (pp. 1293-1298 of IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, December 1984). Techniques for understanding the durability of one complex polymer based on the understanding of a different and equally complex polymer are demonstrated. The spectroscopic data showed that the primary radiation-generated change in the tensile properties of Ultem (a large reduction in tensile elongation) was due to crosslinking, which followed the capture by phenyl radicals of hydrogen atoms removed from gem-dimethyl groups. In contrast, the tensile properties of Kapton remained unchanged because radical-radical recombination, a self-mending process, took place.

  1. Spectroscopic comparison of effects of electron radiation on mechanical properties of two polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.

    1987-01-01

    The differences in the radiation durabilities of two polyimide materials, Du Pont Kapton and General Electric Ultem, are compared. An explanation of the basic mechanisms which occur during exposure to electron radiation from analyses of infrared (IR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic data for each material is provided. The molecular model for Kapton was, in part, established from earlier modeling for Ultem (pp. 1293-1298 of IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, December 1984). Techniques for understanding the durability of one complex polymer based on the understanding of a different and equally complex polymer are demonstrated. The spectroscopic data showed that the primary radiation-generated change in the tensile properties of Ultem (a large reduction in tensile elongation) was due to crosslinking, which followed the capture by phenyl radicals of hydrogen atoms removed from gem-dimethyl groups. In contrast, the tensile properties of Kapton remained unchanged because radical-radical recombination, a self-mending process, took place.

  2. Understanding the mechanism of CO2 capture by 1,3 di-substituted imidazolium acetate based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Mao, James X; Steckel, Janice A; Yan, Fangyong; Dhumal, Nilesh; Kim, Hyung; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2016-01-21

    Efficient CO2 capture by ionic liquids needs a thorough understanding of underlying mechanisms of the CO2 interaction with ionic liquids, especially when it involves chemisorption. In this work we have systematically investigated the mechanism of CO2 capture by 1,3 di-substituted imidazolium acetate ionic liquids using density functional theory. Solvent effects are analyzed using QM/MM and QM/QM approaches with the help of molecular dynamics simulations and ONIOM methods. The investigation of different stepwise mechanisms shows that CO2 could be involved in the first step of the reaction mechanism, also a new two-step mechanism is proposed. The final stabilization step is analyzed and pointed out to be responsible for important experimentally-observed features of the reaction. PMID:26687108

  3. Algorithm for ventricular capture verification based on the mechanical evoked response.

    PubMed

    Yaacoby, E; Akselrod, S; Eldar, M; Glikson, M

    2005-07-01

    Automatic pacemaker capture verification is important for maintaining safety and low energy consumption in pacemaker patients. A new algorithm was developed, based on impedance measurement between pacing electrode poles, which reflects the distribution of the conducting medium between the poles and changes with effective contraction. Data acquired during pacemaker implant in 17 subjects were analysed, with intracardiac impedance recorded while pacing was performed in the ventricle at varying energies, resulting in multiple-captured and non-captured beats. The impedance signals of all captured/non-captured beats were analysed using three different algorithms, based on the morphology of the impedance signal. The algorithm decision for each beat was compared with an actual capture or non-capture, as determined from the simultaneous recording of surface ECG. Two of the three algorithms (Z1 and Zn) were based on impedance values, and one (Z'n) was based on the first derivative of the impedance. Z1 was based on a single sample, whereas Z'n and Z'n were based on several samples in each beat. The total accuracy for each was Z1: 43%, Zn: 87%, Z'n: 92%. It was concluded that impedance-based capture verification is feasible, that a multiple rather than single sample approach for signal classification is both feasible and superior, and that first derivative analysis with multiple samples (Z'n) provides the best results. PMID:16255434

  4. Astrophysical S factors of radiative {sup 3}He{sup 4}He, {sup 3}H{sup 4}He, and {sup 2}H{sup 4}He capture

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2010-09-15

    The possibility of describing the astrophysical S factors for radiative {sup 3}He{sup 4}He capture at energies of up to 15 keV and radiative {sup 3}H{sup 4}He and {sup 2}H{sup 4}He capture at energies of up 5 keV is considered on the basis of the potential cluster model involving forbidden states.

  5. Mechanisms of interaction of radiation with matter

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This progress report is a summary and update of the research performed under DOE grant FG-02086-ER60405 from September 1, 1989 to August 31, 1990. Part I deals with mechanisms of photoemission from organic particulates, theoretical studied of the photoemission of electrons into atmospheres containing scavenger molecules, and theoretical studies of the possible existence of excitonic ions. Part II deals with the mechanisms of electrolytic reactions which occur at solid anthracene/aqueous electrolyte interfaces. Part III describes our most recent results on the physico-chemical interactions of mutagenic and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) derivatives with nucleic acids. 3 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Astrophysical S-Factor of Radiative p 14C Capture at Low Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of describing the available experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor for the reaction of p14C capture to the ground state of 15N at astrophysical energies within the framework of the modified potential cluster model is considered.

  7. Astrophysical S-Factor of Radiative T 14C Capture at Low Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of describing the available experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor for the reaction of p14C capture to the ground state of 15N at astrophysical energies within the framework of the modified potential cluster model is considered.

  8. Observation of Nonclassical Radiation Pressure Forces on a Mechanical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jeremy; Lecocq, Florent; Simmonds, Raymond; Aumentado, Jose; Teufel, John

    Squeezed states of light are known to be useful for enhancing mechanical displacement sensing since they can be tailored to reduce the ``photon counting noise'' that limits the measurement's noise floor. On the other hand, recent experiments in cavity optomechanics have reached measurement regimes where an interrogating light field exerts radiation pressure noise on a mechanical oscillator. One outstanding challenge has been to explore the intersection between such experiments. I will present data obtained using a superconducting cavity optomechanical system wherein a mechanical oscillator is driven by nonclassical radiation pressure imparted by squeezed microwave fields. JBC acknowledges the NRC for financial support.

  9. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

    1996-10-01

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

  10. Radiation toxins: molecular mechanisms of action and radiomimetic properties .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav

    Introduction: Acute Radiation Disease (ARD) or Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) were defined as a toxic poisonous with development of the acute pathological processes in irradi-ated animals: systemic inflammatory response syndrome(SIRS), toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMOD), toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). However, the nature of radiation toxins, their mechanisms of formation, molecular structure, and mechanism of actions remain uncertain. Moderate and high doses of radiation induce apoptotic necrosis of radiosensitive cells with formation of Radiation Toxins and in-flammation development. Mild doses of radiation induce apoptosis or controlled programmed death of radiosensitive cells without Radiation Toxins formation and development of inflam-mation processes. Only radiation induced apoptotic necrosis initiates formation of Radiation Toxins(RT). Radiation Toxins are playing an important role as the trigger mechanisms for in-flammation development and cell lysis. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome after radiation involves an influence of various endogenous agents and mediators of inflammation such as bradykinin, histamine, serotonin and phospholipases activation, prostaglandins biosyn-thesis. Although, formation of non-specific toxins such as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is an important pathological process at mild or high doses of radiation. Reactive Oxygen Species play an important role in molecules damage and development of peroxidation of lipids and pro-teins which are the structural parts of cell and mitochondrial membranes. ROS and bio-radicals induce damage of DNA and RNA and peroxidation of their molecules. But high doses of radia-tion, severe and extremely severe physiological stress, result in cells death by apoptotic necrosis and could be defined as the neuroimmune acute disease. Excitotoxicity is an important patho-logical mechanism which damages the central nervous system. We postulate that

  11. Boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma-correlation between radiation dose and radiation injury and clinical outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Kageji, Teruyoshi . E-mail: kageji@clin.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Nagahiro, Shinji; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Toi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To clarify the correlation between the radiation dose and clinical outcome of sodium borocaptate-based intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy in patients with malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: The first protocol (P1998, n = 8) prescribed a maximal gross tumor volume (GTV) dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a dose-escalated protocol was introduced (P2001, n 11), which prescribed a maximal vascular volume dose of 15 Gy or, alternatively, a clinical target volume (CTV) dose of 18 Gy. Results: The GTV and CTV doses in P2001 were 1.1-1.3 times greater than those in P1998. The maximal vascular volume dose of those with acute radiation injury was 15.8 Gy. The mean GTV and CTV dose in long-term survivors with glioblastoma was 26.4 and 16.5 Gy, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between the GTV dose and median survival time was found. In the 11 glioblastoma patients in P2001, the median survival time was 19.5 months and 1- and 2-year survival rate was 60.6% and 37.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose escalation contributed to the improvement in clinical outcome. To avoid radiation injury, the maximal vascular volume dose should be <12 Gy. For long-term survival in patients with glioblastoma after boron neutron capture therapy, the optimal mean dose of the GTV and CTV was 26 and 16 Gy, respectively.

  12. Isomeric ratio measurements for the radiative neutron capture 176Lu(n,γ) at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis-Petit, D.; Roig, O.; Méot, V.; Jandel, M.; Vieira, D. J.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    The isomeric ratio for the neutron capture reaction 176Lu(n,γ) on the Jπ= 5/2-, 761.7 keV, T1/2=32.8 ns level of 177mLu, has been determined in the neutron energy range 8.5 eV-100 keV for the first time using the DANCE array at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  13. Refinements in the Method of Total Body Nitrogen Determination Based on Measurement of Gamma Radiation Following Thermal Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamen, Yakov

    1992-01-01

    While measurements of Total Body Nitrogen (TBN) based on observation of capture radiation from ^{14}N(n,gamma)^ {15}N have been made for over a decade, the basis on which they were analyzed did not properly account for the effects of body size on the results obtained. This research investigates that dependence and thus removes a significant systematic error which otherwise limits the accuracy attainable to an undesirable level. These studies were carried out using two Monte Carlo codes, MCNP and EGS4, to calculate neutron transport in the body and gamma transport in the detector respectively. The results of each of the calculations were verified by comparison with measurement and proved satisfactory. The detector responses to neutron capture at various portions of the body were determined. These were combined with calculations of the spatial distribution of neutron capture in the body and, by integration, the response to a body of given size was determined. Comparisons of simulation and measurements for several phantoms of different sizes and shapes showed excellent agreement. Simulation studies were made for a very wide range of phantoms and the results used to permit the correction of analyzed data for body size and shape. At the same time, studies were made to guide a modified design of the TBN facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Improvements made in source shielding, material choices, collimator and premoderator sizes and detector shielding have led to improvements in the systematic error previously attainable.

  14. In-drop capillary spooling of spider capture thread inspires hybrid fibers with mixed solid–liquid mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elettro, Hervé; Neukirch, Sébastien; Vollrath, Fritz; Antkowiak, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    An essential element in the web-trap architecture, the capture silk spun by ecribellate orb spiders consists of glue droplets sitting astride a silk filament. Mechanically this thread presents a mixed solid–liquid behavior unknown to date. Under extension, capture silk behaves as a particularly stretchy solid, owing to its molecular nanosprings, but it totally switches behavior in compression to now become liquid-like: It shrinks with no apparent limit while exerting a constant tension. Here, we unravel the physics underpinning the unique behavior of this ”liquid wire” and demonstrate that its mechanical response originates in the shape-switching of the silk filament induced by buckling within the droplets. Learning from this natural example of geometry and mechanics, we manufactured programmable liquid wires that present previously unidentified pathways for the design of new hybrid solid–liquid materials.

  15. In-drop capillary spooling of spider capture thread inspires hybrid fibers with mixed solid-liquid mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Elettro, Hervé; Neukirch, Sébastien; Vollrath, Fritz; Antkowiak, Arnaud

    2016-05-31

    An essential element in the web-trap architecture, the capture silk spun by ecribellate orb spiders consists of glue droplets sitting astride a silk filament. Mechanically this thread presents a mixed solid-liquid behavior unknown to date. Under extension, capture silk behaves as a particularly stretchy solid, owing to its molecular nanosprings, but it totally switches behavior in compression to now become liquid-like: It shrinks with no apparent limit while exerting a constant tension. Here, we unravel the physics underpinning the unique behavior of this "liquid wire" and demonstrate that its mechanical response originates in the shape-switching of the silk filament induced by buckling within the droplets. Learning from this natural example of geometry and mechanics, we manufactured programmable liquid wires that present previously unidentified pathways for the design of new hybrid solid-liquid materials. PMID:27185930

  16. In-drop capillary spooling of spider capture thread inspires hybrid fibers with mixed solid–liquid mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Elettro, Hervé; Neukirch, Sébastien; Vollrath, Fritz; Antkowiak, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    An essential element in the web-trap architecture, the capture silk spun by ecribellate orb spiders consists of glue droplets sitting astride a silk filament. Mechanically this thread presents a mixed solid–liquid behavior unknown to date. Under extension, capture silk behaves as a particularly stretchy solid, owing to its molecular nanosprings, but it totally switches behavior in compression to now become liquid-like: It shrinks with no apparent limit while exerting a constant tension. Here, we unravel the physics underpinning the unique behavior of this ”liquid wire” and demonstrate that its mechanical response originates in the shape-switching of the silk filament induced by buckling within the droplets. Learning from this natural example of geometry and mechanics, we manufactured programmable liquid wires that present previously unidentified pathways for the design of new hybrid solid–liquid materials. PMID:27185930

  17. Radiation-induced mechanical property changes in filled rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Weisgraber, T. H.; Gee, R. H.; Small, W.; Alviso, C. T.; Chinn, S. C.; Maxwell, R. S.

    2011-06-15

    In a recent paper we exposed a filled elastomer to controlled radiation dosages and explored changes in its cross-link density and molecular weight distribution between network junctions [A. Maiti et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 031802 (2011)]. Here we report mechanical response measurements when the material is exposed to radiation while being under finite nonzero strain. We observe interesting hysteretic behavior and material softening representative of the Mullins effect, and materials hardening due to radiation. The net magnitude of the elastic modulus depends upon the radiation dosage, strain level, and strain-cycling history of the material. Using the framework of Tobolsky's two-stage independent network theory we develop a model that can quantitatively interpret the observed elastic modulus and its radiation and strain dependence.

  18. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P < 0.05) and root respiration (24%, P < 0.05). These data indicate that plant communities adapt to CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  19. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation - an alternative detection mechanism.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  20. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: An alternative detection mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.

    2009-08-15

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  1. The enhancement mechanism of thin plasma layer on antenna radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chunsheng Jiang, Binhao; Li, Xueai

    2015-03-09

    A model of plasma-antenna is carried out to study the radiation enhancement mechanism of antenna covered by thin plasma layer. The results show when the radiation intensity achieves maximum, a region of equal electric field is formed due to the reflection of electric field at the interface of plasma and air. The plasma layer acted as an extension of the antenna. Furthermore, the shape of plasma layer is changed to verify the effect of plasma boundary on antenna radiation. The study shows the effect of thin plasma layer on electromagnetic field and provides a type of plasma antenna.

  2. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: An alternative detection mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  3. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: an alternative detection mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gopalsami, N; Chien, H T; Heifetz, A; Koehl, E R; Raptis, A C

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam. PMID:19725673

  4. Radiation injury of boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Kageji, T; Nagahiro, S; Mizobuchi, Y; Toi, H; Nakagawa, Y; Kumada, H

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the radiation injury in acute or delayed stage after boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma. Eighteen patients with malignant glioma underwent mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beam and sodium borocaptate between 1998 and 2004. The radiation dose (i.e. physical dose of boron n-alpha reaction) in the protocol used between 1998 and 2000 (Protocol A, n = 8) prescribed a maximum tumor volume dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a new dose-escalated protocol was introduced (Protocol B, n = 4); it prescribes a minimum tumor volume dose of 18 Gy or, alternatively, a minimum target volume dose of 15 Gy. Since 2002, the radiation dose was reduced to 80-90% dose of Protocol B because of acute radiation injury. A new Protocol was applied to 6 glioblastoma patients (Protocol C, n = 6). The average values of the maximum vascular dose of brain surface in Protocol A, B and C were 11.4+/-4.2 Gy, 15.7+/-1.2 and 13.9+/-3.6 Gy, respectively. Acute radiation injury such as a generalized convulsion within 1 week after BNCT was recognized in three patients of Protocol B. Delayed radiation injury such as a neurological deterioration appeared 3-6 months after BNCT, and it was recognized in 1 patient in Protocol A, 5 patients in Protocol B. According to acute radiation injury, the maximum vascular dose was 15.8+/-1.3 Gy in positive and was 12.6+/-4.3 Gy in negative. There was no significant difference between them. According to the delayed radiation injury, the maximum vascular dose was 13.8+/-3.8 Gy in positive and was 13.6+/-4.9 Gy in negative. There was no significant difference between them. The dose escalation is limited because most patients in Protocol B suffered from acute radiation injury. We conclude that the maximum vascular dose does not exceed over 12 Gy to avoid the delayed radiation injury, especially, it should be limited under 10 Gy in the case that tumor

  5. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  6. Mechanisms of cardiac radiation injury and potential preventive approaches.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Jan; Kura, Branislav; Ravingerová, Táňa; Tribulova, Narcisa; Okruhlicova, Ludmila; Barancik, Miroslav

    2015-09-01

    In addition to cytostatic treatment and surgery, the most common cancer treatment is gamma radiation. Despite sophisticated radiological techniques however, in addition to irradiation of the tumor, irradiation of the surrounding healthy tissue also takes place, which results in various side-effects, depending on the absorbed dose of radiation. Radiation either damages the cell DNA directly, or indirectly via the formation of oxygen radicals that in addition to the DNA damage, react with all cell organelles and interfere with their molecular mechanisms. The main features of radiation injury besides DNA damage is inflammation and increased expression of pro-inflammatory genes and cytokines. Endothelial damage and dysfunction of capillaries and small blood vessels plays a particularly important role in radiation injury. This review is focused on summarizing the currently available data concerning the mechanisms of radiation injury, as well as the effectiveness of various antioxidants, anti-inflammatory cytokines, and cytoprotective substances that may be utilized in preventing, mitigating, or treating the toxic effects of ionizing radiation on the heart. PMID:26030720

  7. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection.

  8. Radiative proton capture cross sections in the mass range 40-54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dipti; Dutta, Saumi; Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    Proton capture cross sections in the energy range of astrophysical interest for mass region 40-54 have been calculated in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism with the reaction code talys1.6. The density-dependent M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon interaction folded with target radial matter densities from the relativistic mean field approach is used to obtain the semimicroscopic optical potential. A definite normalization of potential well depths has been used over the entire mass region. The (p ,γ ) rates of some reactions, important in the astrophysical scenario, are calculated using the potential in the relevant mass region.

  9. Scattering length measurements from radiative pion capture and neutron-deuteron breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.F.; Tornow, W. |; Carman, T.S.

    1997-07-01

    The neutron-neutron and neutron-proton {sup 1}S{sub 0} scattering lengths a{sub nn} and a{sub np}, respectively, were determined simultaneously from the neutron-deuteron breakup reaction. Their comparison with the recommended values obtained from two body reactions gives a measure of the importance of three-nucleon force effects in the three-nucleon continuum. In order to check on the result obtained for a{sub nn} from the two-body {pi}{sup {minus}}-d capture reaction, a new measurement was performed at LANL. Preliminary results of the three experiments are given.

  10. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Symptoms, risk factors and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    Ionising radiation therapy is a common treatment modality for different types of cancer and its use is expected to increase with advances in screening and early detection of cancer. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is important factor working against better utility of this important therapeutic modality. Cancer survivors can suffer a wide variety of acute and chronic symptoms following radiotherapy, which significantly reduces their quality of life as well as adding an extra burden to the cost of health care. The accurate diagnosis and treatment of intestinal radiation injury often represents a clinical challenge to practicing physicians in both gastroenterology and oncology. Despite the growing recognition of the problem and some advances in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation injury, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal radiation injury or any possible susceptibility factors that could aggravate its severity. The aims of this review are to examine the various clinical manifestations of post-radiation gastrointestinal symptoms, to discuss possible patient and treatment factors implicated in normal gastrointestinal tissue radiosensitivity and to outline different mechanisms of intestinal tissue injury. PMID:23345941

  11. Radiation-Induced Bystander Response: Mechanism and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation (IR) to the genetic material in the cell gives rise to damage to DNA in a dose-dependent manner. There are two types of DNA damage; by a high dose (causing acute or deterministic effects) and by a low dose (related to chronic or stochastic effects), both of which induce different health effects. Among radiation effects, acute cutaneous radiation syndrome results from cell killing as a consequence of high-dose exposure. Recent advances: Recent advances in radiation biology and oncology have demonstrated that bystander effects, which are emerged in cells that have never been exposed, but neighboring irradiated cells, are also involved in radiation effects. Bystander effects are now recognized as an indispensable component of tissue response related to deleterious effects of IR. Critical issues: Evidence has indicated that nonapoptotic premature senescence is commonly observed in various tissues and organs. Senesced cells were found to secrete various proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, most of which are equivalent to those identified as bystander factors. Secreted factors could trigger cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell migration, inflammatory response, etc., which provide a tissue microenvironment assisting tissue repair and remodeling. Future directions: Understandings of the mechanisms and physiological relevance of radiation-induced bystander effects are quite essential for the beneficial control of wound healing and care. Further studies should extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of bystander effects and mode of cell death in response to IR. PMID:24761341

  12. Small animal radiation research platform: imaging, mechanics, control and calibration.

    PubMed

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Gray, Owen; Iordachita, Iulian; Kennedy, Chris; Ford, Eric; Wong, John; Taylor, Russell H; Kazanzides, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In cancer research, well characterized small animal models of human cancer, such as transgenic mice, have greatly accelerated the pace of development of cancer treatments. The goal of the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is to make those same models available for the development and evaluation of novel radiation therapies. In combination with advanced imaging methods, small animal research allows detailed study of biological processes, disease progression, and response to therapy, with the potential to provide a natural bridge to the clinical environment. The SARRP will realistically model human radiation treatment methods in standard animal models. In this paper, we describe the mechanical and control structure of the system. This system requires accurate calibration of the x-ray beam for both imaging and radiation treatment, which is presented in detail in the paper. PMID:18044657

  13. Sound radiation mechanism in a turbulent gas flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kidin, N.I.; Librovich, V.B.

    1984-01-01

    To describe sound radiation in an ''explosion within a flame'', a model based on gas dynamics equations averaged over volume with a thermal source of chemical nature has been proposed, relating the power of the monopole sound source to the change in heat liberation rate in the combustion reactions within the volume. This mechanism apparently plays a significant role in flame turbulization and sound radiation by a turbulent flame. Equations for the temperature perturbations, a linear differential equation for temperature perturbations of the third order are obtained, after the solution of which the density, mass flow, and geometric factor perturbations are also obtained. Such a mechanism of transition from frontal combustion to reactions within the volume accompanied by intense sound radiation may play a significant role in describing the noise produced by turbulent flames.

  14. Astrophysical S-factor of the radiative proton capture on 14C at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, Sergey; Burtebaev, Nasurlla; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, Albert; Alimov, Dilshod

    2014-07-01

    The phase shift analysis for position location of the 2S1/2 resonance at 1.5 MeV was carried out on the basis of the known experimental measurements of the excitation functions of the p14C elastic scattering at four angles from 90° to 165° and more than 100 energy values in the range from 600-800 keV to 2200-2400 keV. Also, the possibility to describe the available experimental data on the astrophysical S-factor for the proton capture reaction on 14C to the ground state (GS) of 15N at astrophysical energies was considered in the frame of modified potential cluster model (MPCM).

  15. Precision calculation of radiative n-p capture for big-bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupak, Gautam

    2000-04-01

    An effective field theory calculation of the n parrow d+γ cross section accurate to 1% for center of mass energy E up to 1 MeV is presented. At these energies, which are relevant for big-bang nucleosynthesis, isovector magnetic transitions M1 and isovector electric transitions E1 give the dominant contributions. The M1 amplitude is calculated up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) and the contribution from the associated four-nucleon-one-photon operator is determined from the cold neutron capture rate. The E1 amplitude is calculated up to NNNNLO. The four-nucleon-one-photon operator contribution to E1 is determined from the related deuteron photodisintegration reaction γ darrow np.

  16. Sample Canister Capture Mechanism for Mars Sample Return: Functional and environmental test of the elegant breadboard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carta, R.; Filippetto, D.; Lavagna, M.; Mailland, F.; Falkner, P.; Larranaga, J.

    2015-12-01

    The paper provides recent updates about the ESA study: Sample Canister Capture Mechanism Design and Breadboard developed under the Mars Robotic Exploration Preparation (MREP) program. The study is part of a set of feasibility studies aimed at identifying, analysing and developing technology concepts enabling the future international Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. The MSR is a challenging mission with the purpose of sending a Lander to Mars, acquire samples from its surface/subsurface and bring them back to Earth for further, more in depth, analyses. In particular, the technology object of the Study is relevant to the Capture Mechanism that, mounted on the Orbiter, is in charge of capturing and securing the Sample Canister, or Orbiting Sample, accommodating the Martian soil samples, previously delivered in Martian orbit by the Mars Ascent Vehicle. An elegant breadboard of such a device was implemented and qualified under an ESA contract primed by OHB-CGS S.p.A. and supported by Politecnico di Milano, Department of Aerospace Science and Technology: in particular, functional tests were conducted at PoliMi-DAST and thermal and mechanical test campaigns occurred at Serms s.r.l. facility. The effectiveness of the breadboard design was demonstrated and the obtained results, together with the design challenges, issues and adopted solutions are critically presented in the paper. The breadboard was also tested on a parabolic flight to raise its Technology Readiness Level to 6; the microgravity experiment design, adopted solutions and results are presented as well in the paper.

  17. Astrophysical S factor for the radiative-capture reaction p{sup 6}Li {yields} {sup 7}Be{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N. Zazulin, D. M.; Kerimkulov, Zh. K.; Amar, A. S. A.

    2011-07-15

    A new measurement of differential cross sections for elastic p{sup 6}Li scattering in the energy range 0.35-1.2 MeV was performed. A partial-wave analysis of the data obtained in this way was carried out, and potentials simulating the p{sup 6}Li interaction were constructed. Various experiments devoted to studying elastic p{sup 6}Li scattering over the broad energy range of 0.5-50 MeV were analyzed on the basis of the optical model. By using the potentials obtained from the partial-wave analysis, the possibility of describing the astrophysical S factor for radiative proton capture on {sup 6}Li at low energies was considered within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states.

  18. Self-consistent calculations of the strength function and radiative neutron capture cross section for stable and unstable tin isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Avdeenkov, A.; Goriely, S.; Kamerdzhiev, S.; Krewald, S.

    2011-06-15

    The E1 strength function for 15 stable and unstable Sn even-even isotopes from A=100 to A=176 are calculated using a self-consistent microscopic theory which, in addition to the standard (quasiparticle) random-phase approximation [(Q)RPA] approach, takes into account phonon coupling and the single-particle continuum (by means of the discretization procedure) with a cutoff of 100 MeV. Our analysis shows two distinct regions for which the integral characteristics of both the giant and pygmy resonances behave rather differently. For neutron-rich nuclei, starting from {sup 132}Sn, we obtain a giant E1 resonance which significantly deviates from the widely used systematics extrapolated from experimental data in the {beta}-stability valley. We show that the inclusion of phonon coupling is necessary for a proper description of the low-energy pygmy resonances and the corresponding transition densities for A<132 nuclei, while in the A>132 region the influence of phonon coupling is significantly smaller. The radiative neutron capture cross sections leading to the stable {sup 124}Sn and unstable {sup 132}Sn and {sup 150}Sn nuclei are calculated with both the (Q)RPA and the beyond-(Q)RPA strength functions and shown to be sensitive to both the predicted low-lying strength and the phonon-coupling contribution. The comparison with the widely used phenomenological generalized Lorentzian approach shows considerable differences both for the strength function and the radiative neutron capture cross section. In particular, for the neutron-rich {sup 150}Sn, the reaction cross section is found to be increased by a factor greater than 20. We conclude that the present approach may provide a complete and coherent description of the {gamma}-ray-strength function for astrophysics applications. In particular, such calculations are highly recommended for a reliable estimate of the electromagnetic properties of exotic nuclei.

  19. Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome : Radiation Neurotoxins, Mechanisms of Toxicity, Neuroimmune Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (CvARS) is an extremely severe in-jury of Central Nervous System (CNS) and Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). CvARS can be induced by the high doses of neutron, heavy ions, or gamma radiation. The Syndrome clinical picture depends on a type, timing, and the doses of radiation. Four grades of the CvARS were defined: mild, moderate, severe, and extremely severe. Also, four stages of CvARS were developed: prodromal, latent, manifest, outcome -death. Duration of stages depends on the types, doses, and time of radiation. The CvARS clinical symptoms are: respiratory distress, hypotension, cerebral edema, severe disorder of cerebral blood microcirculation, and acute motor weakness. The radiation toxins, Cerebro-Vascular Radiation Neurotoxins (SvARSn), determine development of the acute radiation syndrome. Mechanism of action of the toxins: Though pathogenesis of radiation injury of CNS remains unknown, our concept describes the Cv ARS as a result of Neurotoxicity and Excitotoxicity, cell death through apoptotic necrosis. Neurotoxicity occurs after the high doses radiation exposure, formation of radiation neuro-toxins, possible bioradicals, or group of specific enzymes. Intracerebral hemorrhage can be a consequence of the damage of endothelial cells caused by radiation and the radiation tox-ins. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB)and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCFB)is possibly the most significant effect of microcirculation disorder and metabolic insufficiency. NMDA-receptors excitotoxic injury mediated by cerebral ischemia and cerebral hypoxia. Dam-age of the pyramidal cells in layers 3 and 5 and Purkinje cell layer the cerebral cortex , damage of pyramidal cells in the hippocampus occur as a result of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral bleeding. Methods: Radiation Toxins of CV ARS are defined as glycoproteins with the molec-ular weight of RT toxins ranges from 200-250 kDa and with high enzymatic activity

  20. Polarisation capture of the wave front of depolarised speckle radiation by a holographic laser mode

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovoi, V V

    2001-04-30

    The polarisation properties of a reference-free hologram inside which the diffraction of the recording depolarised radiation from the speckle inhomogeneities is insignificant, are studied. It is shown that such a hologram, used as the output mirror of a ring laser, has selective properties for the specklon waves comprising the lasing mode. The behaviour of the fundamental mode of a holographic laser with an inhomogeneous birefringent medium inside the cavity is analysed. Conditions for attaining amplitude-phase relations between mode specklons, which are required for vector phase conjugation of depolarised speckle signal, are determined. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  1. Correlation of clinical outcome to the estimated radiation dose from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    A phase I/II trial delivering a single fraction of BNCT using p-Boronophenylalanine-Fructose and epithermal neutrons at the the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was initiated in September 1994. The primary endpiont of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a given BNCT dose. The clinical outcome of the disease was a secondary endpoint of the study. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the correlation of the clinical outcome of patients to the estimated radiation dose from BNCT.

  2. Radiation effects and tolerance mechanism in β-eucryptite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Badri; Reimanis, Ivar E.; Huang, Hanchen; Ciobanu, Cristian V.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies on Li-silicates have shown that these materials are resistant to radiation damage even in extreme physical and chemical environments, and are thus promising solid-state breeder materials in fusion reactors. Here, we focus on β-eucryptite as a member of Li-Al silicate class of ceramics with potential for nuclear applications, and study the atomic-scale processes induced by radiation. Using molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field, we have found that upon radiation dosage of 0.21 displacements-per-atom or less, the structure largely retains its long-range order while exhibiting (a) disordering of the Li atoms, (b) distortion of the Si and Al tetrahedra defined as the change in their oxygen-coordination number, and (c) tilting of the Si and Al tetrahedra with respect to one another. We find that Si tetrahedra that distort to SiO3 during exposure to radiation recover significantly upon thermal relaxation, and provide the mechanism for this recovery. This mechanism consists in the tilting of AlO5 polyhedra formed upon exposure so as to satisfy the oxygen-coordination of distorted Si tetrahedra. Doubling the dosage results in a significant increase of the concentration of Si-Al antisite defects, which renders the tolerance mechanism inefficient and leads to amorphization.

  3. Radiation effects and tolerance mechanism in {beta}-eucryptite

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Badri; Reimanis, Ivar E.; Huang, Hanchen; Ciobanu, Cristian V.

    2013-01-21

    Previous studies on Li-silicates have shown that these materials are resistant to radiation damage even in extreme physical and chemical environments, and are thus promising solid-state breeder materials in fusion reactors. Here, we focus on {beta}-eucryptite as a member of Li-Al silicate class of ceramics with potential for nuclear applications, and study the atomic-scale processes induced by radiation. Using molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field, we have found that upon radiation dosage of 0.21 displacements-per-atom or less, the structure largely retains its long-range order while exhibiting (a) disordering of the Li atoms, (b) distortion of the Si and Al tetrahedra defined as the change in their oxygen-coordination number, and (c) tilting of the Si and Al tetrahedra with respect to one another. We find that Si tetrahedra that distort to SiO{sub 3} during exposure to radiation recover significantly upon thermal relaxation, and provide the mechanism for this recovery. This mechanism consists in the tilting of AlO{sub 5} polyhedra formed upon exposure so as to satisfy the oxygen-coordination of distorted Si tetrahedra. Doubling the dosage results in a significant increase of the concentration of Si-Al antisite defects, which renders the tolerance mechanism inefficient and leads to amorphization.

  4. Radiation toxins: molecular mechanisms of action and radiomimetic properties .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav

    Introduction: Acute Radiation Disease (ARD) or Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) were defined as a toxic poisonous with development of the acute pathological processes in irradi-ated animals: systemic inflammatory response syndrome(SIRS), toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMOD), toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). However, the nature of radiation toxins, their mechanisms of formation, molecular structure, and mechanism of actions remain uncertain. Moderate and high doses of radiation induce apoptotic necrosis of radiosensitive cells with formation of Radiation Toxins and in-flammation development. Mild doses of radiation induce apoptosis or controlled programmed death of radiosensitive cells without Radiation Toxins formation and development of inflam-mation processes. Only radiation induced apoptotic necrosis initiates formation of Radiation Toxins(RT). Radiation Toxins are playing an important role as the trigger mechanisms for in-flammation development and cell lysis. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome after radiation involves an influence of various endogenous agents and mediators of inflammation such as bradykinin, histamine, serotonin and phospholipases activation, prostaglandins biosyn-thesis. Although, formation of non-specific toxins such as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is an important pathological process at mild or high doses of radiation. Reactive Oxygen Species play an important role in molecules damage and development of peroxidation of lipids and pro-teins which are the structural parts of cell and mitochondrial membranes. ROS and bio-radicals induce damage of DNA and RNA and peroxidation of their molecules. But high doses of radia-tion, severe and extremely severe physiological stress, result in cells death by apoptotic necrosis and could be defined as the neuroimmune acute disease. Excitotoxicity is an important patho-logical mechanism which damages the central nervous system. We postulate that

  5. Measurement of Radiative Proton Capture on F18 and Implications for Oxygen-Neon Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, C.; Laird, A. M.; Fulton, B. R.; Ruiz, C.; Bardayan, D. W.; Buchmann, L.; Christian, G.; Davids, B.; Erikson, L.; Fallis, J.; Hager, U.; Hutcheon, D.; Martin, L.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nelson, K.; Spyrou, A.; Stanford, C.; Ottewell, D.; Rojas, A.

    2013-06-01

    The rate of the F18(p,γ)Ne19 reaction affects the final abundance of the γ-ray observable radioisotope F18, produced in novae. However, no successful measurement of this reaction exists and the rate used is calculated from incomplete information on the contributing resonances. Of the two resonances thought to play a significant role, one has a radiative width estimated from the assumed analogue state in the mirror nucleus, F19. The second does not have an analogue state assignment at all, resulting in an arbitrary radiative width being assumed. Here, we report the first successful direct measurement of the F18(p,γ)Ne19 reaction. The strength of the 665 keV resonance (Ex=7.076MeV) is found to be over an order of magnitude weaker than currently assumed in nova models. Reaction rate calculations show that this resonance therefore plays no significant role in the destruction of F18 at any astrophysical energy.

  6. Measurement of radiative proton capture on 18F and implications for oxygen-neon novae.

    PubMed

    Akers, C; Laird, A M; Fulton, B R; Ruiz, C; Bardayan, D W; Buchmann, L; Christian, G; Davids, B; Erikson, L; Fallis, J; Hager, U; Hutcheon, D; Martin, L; Murphy, A St J; Nelson, K; Spyrou, A; Stanford, C; Ottewell, D; Rojas, A

    2013-06-28

    The rate of the 18F(p,γ)19Ne reaction affects the final abundance of the γ-ray observable radioisotope 18F, produced in novae. However, no successful measurement of this reaction exists and the rate used is calculated from incomplete information on the contributing resonances. Of the two resonances thought to play a significant role, one has a radiative width estimated from the assumed analogue state in the mirror nucleus, 19F. The second does not have an analogue state assignment at all, resulting in an arbitrary radiative width being assumed. Here, we report the first successful direct measurement of the 18F(p,γ)^19Ne reaction. The strength of the 665 keV resonance (Ex=7.076  MeV) is found to be over an order of magnitude weaker than currently assumed in nova models. Reaction rate calculations show that this resonance therefore plays no significant role in the destruction of ^{18}F at any astrophysical energy. PMID:23848867

  7. A New Top-Down Decadal Constraint on Black Carbon Emissions over Asia - Capturing The Influence of Widespread and Regularly Occurring Fires and Urbanization: Greater Atmospheric Loading and Variability, Larger Impacts on Radiative Forcing at the Surface and in the Atmosphere, and Possible Feedback Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    A global top-down study of Black Carbon (BC) Emissions has found that sources are considerably higher than present day emissions datasets, with most of this underestimation stemming from the rapidly developing areas of East and Southeast Asia. An additional source in these regions is the frequent and sometimes annual influence of extreme biomass burning events, which emit additional BC and other aerosols into the atmosphere. An additional top-down study has shown that the emissions of BC from these biomass burning events in Southeast Asia contribute an additional 30% increase in the annual average BC emissions, and an additional 110% increase during the highest fire year. One important reason for this underestimation is that many of these source regions do not appear as fires, due to missing MODIS overpasses, intense cloud cover, and low fire temperatures at the wet surface. These new temporally and spatially varying emissions of BC are run in a state-of-the art combined model of aerosol physics, chemistry, and general circulation, including urban scale chemical processing and core/shell aerosol mixture impacts on radiation. The results reveal that this new dataset matches in space, time, and magnitude, an array of observations (remotely sensed, ground, and column) far better than other emission datasets: IPCC SRES, AEROCOM, BOND, and GFED. The modeled mean atmospheric extinction and loading are both much higher and more variable than previous modelling efforts, leading to a larger negative surface radiative forcing. At the same time, atmospheric absorption is enhanced and more variable, leading to intense atmospheric heating, with the average impact from 1.0-1.5 W/m2. This has impacts on the vertical stability in the source areas, and leads to changes in the dynamics such as a shifting of the ITCZ, reducing light precipitation and increasing strong convection. To support this, a bit of measurement-based evidence presented for each of these phenomena.

  8. Effect of radiation on topopah spring tuff mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Blair, S.C.

    1996-11-01

    The effect of radiation on the mechanical properties of Topopah Spring tuff was investigated by performing uniaxial compressive tests on irradiated and control samples of the tuff from the potential repository horizon at Yucca Mountain. Test results are presented, including stress-strain curves and peak strength and Young`s modulus values. These results show that for homogeneous uncracked samples of Topopah Spring tuff, exposure to gamma radiation had no discernible effect on the unconfined partially healed subvertical caracks indicate that exposure may reduce the strength and Young`s modulus significantly. This is attributed to weakening of the cementing materials in the cracks and fractures of the samples that were irradiated. These results are preliminary, and additional studies are warranted to evaluate whether radiation weakens cementing materials in welded tuff.

  9. Radiation hardness and mechanical durability of Kuraray optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, K.; Hata, K.; Kim, S.; Mishina, M.; Sano, M.; Seiya, Y.; Takikawa, K.; Tanaka, M.; Yasuoka, K.

    1998-02-01

    The radiation hardness of Kuraray 3HF scintillating and clear optical fibers has been investigated using 60Co γ-rays in the dose range 0.4-500 krad. Significant initial degradation in the attenuation length was observed both for 3HF and clear fibers at a dose as small as 10 krad. The radiation hardness of both the scintillating and clear fibers is identical if it is expressed in terms of the ratio of the attenuation lengths after to before irradiation. The radiation damage of 3HF fibers was observed to recover substantially with a time scale of a few months. The attenuation length and mechanical durability against bending were measured for clear fibers by changing S parameter which characterizes the softness of the fibers.

  10. An apparent mechanism dependence of radiated seismic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PéRez-Campos, Xyoli; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2001-06-01

    We develop an extension to the method of Boatwright and Choy [1986] for determining the radiated seismic energy Es that accounts for factors that bias the estimate. We apply our technique to 204 events worldwide during the period 1992-1999 and find that the apparent stress is on average largest for strike-slip events (0.70 MPa), while for reverse and normal events it is significantly smaller (0.15 and 0.25 MPa, respectively). These results support the mechanism dependence of Es reported by Choy and Boatwright [1995], although we find that once likely sources of bias are accounted for, the mechanism dependence is not as strong as found previously. The source of the mechanism dependence is unclear, but one possibility is that it reflects a mechanism-dependent difference in the stress drop. This hypothesis is suggested by the scaling of slip with width in large strike-slip earthquakes and makes two predictions, which could be used to test it. The first is that the discrepancy should disappear for the very largest dip-slip earthquakes as the length of the fault greatly exceeds the downdip extent. The second is that the discrepancy ought to disappear for smaller earthquakes. The first can not yet be tested due to a lack of recent, very large dip-slip earthquakes. The second is supported by the lack of mechanism dependence to Es for smaller earthquakes. An alternative hypothesis is that the apparent mechanism dependence could result if faults are opaque during rupture, blocking seismic radiation across them [Brune, 1996]. This could cause radiated seismic energy to be trapped preferentially in the crust near the source volume for dipping faults. There remains, however, a large discrepancy between estimates of Es obtained from teleseismic versus regional data. This discrepancy indicates a problem with teleseismic and/or regional estimates of the seismic energy and must be resolved before a definite conclusion can be drawn.

  11. Adsorption mechanism of graphene-like ZnO monolayer towards CO₂ molecules: enhanced CO₂ capture.

    PubMed

    Rao, G S; Hussain, T; Islam, M S; Sagynbaeva, M; Gupta, D; Panigrahi, P; Ahuja, R

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to efficiently capture CO2 on two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures for effective cleaning of our atmosphere and purification of exhausts coming from fuel engines. Here, we have performed extensive first principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the interaction of CO2 on a recently synthesized ZnO monolayer (ZnO-ML) in its pure, defected and functionalized form. A series of rigorous calculations yielded the most preferential binding configurations of the CO2 gas molecule on a ZnO-ML. It is observed that the substitution of one oxygen atom with boron, carbon and nitrogen on the ZnO monolayer resulted into enhanced CO2 adsorption. Our calculations show an enriched adsorption of CO2 on the ZnO-ML when substituting with foreign atoms like B, C and N. The improved adsorption energy of CO2 on ZnO suggests the ZnO-ML could be a promising candidate for future CO2 capture. PMID:26599020

  12. A Structure-Based Mechanism for Vesicle Capture by the Multisubunit Tethering Complex Dsl1

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y.; Yip, C; Tripathi, A; Huie, D; Jeffrey, P; Walz, T; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Vesicle trafficking requires membrane fusion, mediated by SNARE proteins, and upstream events that probably include tethering, an initial long-range attachment between a vesicle and its target organelle. Among the factors proposed to mediate tethering are a set of multisubunit tethering complexes (MTCs). The Dsl1 complex, with only three subunits, is the simplest known MTC and is essential for the retrograde traffic of COPI-coated vesicles from the Golgi to the ER. To elucidate structural principles underlying MTC function, we have determined the structure of the Dsl1 complex, revealing a tower containing at its base the binding sites for two ER SNAREs and at its tip a flexible lasso for capturing vesicles. The Dsl1 complex binds to individual SNAREs via their N-terminal regulatory domains and also to assembled SNARE complexes; moreover, it is capable of accelerating SNARE complex assembly. Our results suggest that even the simplest MTC may be capable of orchestrating vesicle capture, uncoating, and fusion.

  13. Radiation response mechanisms of the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Narumi, Issay; Satoh, Katsuya; Funayama, Tomoo; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kitayama, Shigeru; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Effect of microgravity on recovery of bacterial cells from radiation damage was examined in IML-2, S/MM-4 and S/MM-9 experiments using the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The cells were irradiated with gamma rays before the space flight and incubated on board the Space Shuttle. The survival of the wild type cells incubated in space increased compared with the ground controls, suggesting that the recovery of this bacterium from radiation damage was enhanced under the space environment. No difference was observed between the survivals of radiosensitive mutant rec30 cells incubated in space and on the ground. The amount of DNA-repair related RecA protein induced under microgravity was similar to those of ground controls, however, induction of PprA protein, product of a unique radiation-inducible gene (designated pprA) responsible for loss of radiation resistance in repair-deficient mutant, KH311, was enhanced under microgravity compared with ground controls. Recent investigation in vitro showed that PprA preferentially bound to double-stranded DNA carrying strand breaks, inhibited Escherichia coli exonuclease III activity, and stimulated the DNA end-joining reaction catalyzed by DNA ligases. These results suggest that D. radiodurans has a radiation-induced non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair mechanism in which PprA plays a critical role. PMID:15858357

  14. Basic mechanisms of radiation effects in the natural space radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Schwank, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    Four general topics are covered in respect to the natural space radiation environment: (1) particles trapped by the earth`s magnetic field, (2) cosmic rays, (3) radiation environment inside a spacecraft, (4) laboratory radiation sources. The interaction of radiation with materials is described by ionization effects and displacement effects. Total-dose effects on MOS devices is discussed with respect to: measurement techniques, electron-hole yield, hole transport, oxide traps, interface traps, border traps, device properties, case studies and special concerns for commercial devices. Other device types considered for total-dose effects are SOI devices and nitrided oxide devices. Lastly, single event phenomena are discussed with respect to charge collection mechanisms and hard errors. (GHH)

  15. SUB-THz RADIATION MECHANISMS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2010-02-01

    Observations in the sub-THz range of large solar flares have revealed a mysterious spectral component increasing with frequency and hence distinct from the microwave component commonly accepted to be produced by gyrosynchrotron (GS) emission from accelerated electrons. Evidently, having a distinct sub-THz component requires either a distinct emission mechanism (compared to the GS one), or different properties of electrons and location, or both. We find, however, that the list of possible emission mechanisms is incomplete. This Letter proposes a more complete list of emission mechanisms, capable of producing a sub-THz component, both well known and new in this context, and calculates a representative set of their spectra produced by (1) free-free emission, (2) GS emission, (3) synchrotron emission from relativistic positrons/electrons, (4) diffusive radiation, and (5) Cherenkov emission. We discuss the possible role of the mechanisms in forming the sub-THz emission and emphasize their diagnostics potential for flares.

  16. Mechanism of 'GSI oscillations' in electron capture by highly charged hydrogen-like atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Krainov, V. P.

    2012-07-15

    We suggest a qualitative explanation of oscillations in electron capture decays of hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions observed recently in an ion experimental storage ring (ESR) of Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) mbH, Darmstadt, Germany. This explanation is based on the electron multiphoton Rabi oscillations between two Zeeman states of the hyperfine ground level with the total angular momentum F = 1/2. The Zeeman splitting is produced by a constant magnetic field in the ESR. Transitions between these states are produced by the second, sufficiently strong alternating magnetic field that approximates realistic fields in the GSI ESR. The Zeeman splitting amounts to only about 10{sup -5} eV. This allows explaining the observed quantum beats with the period 7 s.

  17. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  18. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  19. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  20. An unprecedented nucleic acid capture mechanism for excision of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinson, Emily H.; Prakasha Gowda, A.S.; Spratt, Thomas E.; Gold, Barry; Eichmanbrand, Brandt F.

    2010-11-18

    DNA glycosylases that remove alkylated and deaminated purine nucleobases are essential DNA repair enzymes that protect the genome, and at the same time confound cancer alkylation therapy, by excising cytotoxic N3-methyladenine bases formed by DNA-targeting anticancer compounds. The basis for glycosylase specificity towards N3- and N7-alkylpurines is believed to result from intrinsic instability of the modified bases and not from direct enzyme functional group chemistry. Here we present crystal structures of the recently discovered Bacillus cereus AlkD glycosylase in complex with DNAs containing alkylated, mismatched and abasic nucleotides. Unlike other glycosylases, AlkD captures the extrahelical lesion in a solvent-exposed orientation, providing an illustration for how hydrolysis of N3- and N7-alkylated bases may be facilitated by increased lifetime out of the DNA helix. The structures and supporting biochemical analysis of base flipping and catalysis reveal how the HEAT repeats of AlkD distort the DNA backbone to detect non-Watson-Crick base pairs without duplex intercalation.

  1. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  2. A new mechanism for radiation damage processes in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinko, V. I.; Turkin, A. A.; Vainshtein, D. I.; den Hartog, H. W.

    1999-12-01

    We present a theory of radiation damage formation in alkali halides based on a new mechanism of dislocation climb, which involves the production of VF centers (self-trapped hole neighboring a cation vacancy) as a result of the absorption of H centers of dislocation lines. We consider the evolution of all experimentally observed extended defects: metal colloids, gas bubbles, and vacancy voids. Voids are shown to arise and grow large due to the reaction between F and VF centers at the surface of halogen bubbles. Voids can ignite a back reaction between the radiolytic products resulting in decomposition of the irradiated material.

  3. Mechanism for rapid passive-dynamic prey capture in a pitcher plant

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Ulrike; Paulin, Marion; Robert, Daniel; Sutton, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Plants use rapid movements to disperse seed, spores, or pollen and catch animal prey. Most rapid-release mechanisms only work once and, if repeatable, regaining the prerelease state is a slow and costly process. We present an encompassing mechanism for a rapid, repeatable, passive-dynamic motion used by a carnivorous pitcher plant to catch prey. Nepenthes gracilis uses the impact of rain drops to catapult insects from the underside of the canopy-like pitcher lid into the fluid-filled trap below. High-speed video and laser vibrometry revealed that the lid acts as a torsional spring system, driven by rain drops. During the initial downstroke, the tip of the lid reached peak velocities similar to fast animal motions and an order of magnitude faster than the snap traps of Venus flytraps and catapulting tentacles of the sundew Drosera glanduligera. In contrast to these active movements, the N. gracilis lid oscillation requires neither mechanical preloading nor metabolic energy, and its repeatability is only limited by the intensity and duration of rainfall. The underside of the lid is coated with friction-reducing wax crystals, making insects more vulnerable to perturbations. We show that the trapping success of N. gracilis relies on the combination of material stiffness adapted for momentum transfer and the antiadhesive properties of the wax crystal surface. The impact-driven oscillation of the N. gracilis lid represents a new kind of rapid plant movement with adaptive function. Our findings establish the existence of a continuum between active and passive trapping mechanisms in carnivorous plants. PMID:26438874

  4. Mechanism for rapid passive-dynamic prey capture in a pitcher plant.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Ulrike; Paulin, Marion; Robert, Daniel; Sutton, Gregory P

    2015-10-27

    Plants use rapid movements to disperse seed, spores, or pollen and catch animal prey. Most rapid-release mechanisms only work once and, if repeatable, regaining the prerelease state is a slow and costly process. We present an encompassing mechanism for a rapid, repeatable, passive-dynamic motion used by a carnivorous pitcher plant to catch prey. Nepenthes gracilis uses the impact of rain drops to catapult insects from the underside of the canopy-like pitcher lid into the fluid-filled trap below. High-speed video and laser vibrometry revealed that the lid acts as a torsional spring system, driven by rain drops. During the initial downstroke, the tip of the lid reached peak velocities similar to fast animal motions and an order of magnitude faster than the snap traps of Venus flytraps and catapulting tentacles of the sundew Drosera glanduligera. In contrast to these active movements, the N. gracilis lid oscillation requires neither mechanical preloading nor metabolic energy, and its repeatability is only limited by the intensity and duration of rainfall. The underside of the lid is coated with friction-reducing wax crystals, making insects more vulnerable to perturbations. We show that the trapping success of N. gracilis relies on the combination of material stiffness adapted for momentum transfer and the antiadhesive properties of the wax crystal surface. The impact-driven oscillation of the N. gracilis lid represents a new kind of rapid plant movement with adaptive function. Our findings establish the existence of a continuum between active and passive trapping mechanisms in carnivorous plants. PMID:26438874

  5. Nondestructive Methods to Characterize Rock Mechanical Properties at Low-Temperature: Applications for Asteroid Capture Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Kara A.

    Recent government initiatives and commercial activities have targeted asteroids for in situ material characterization, manipulation, and possible resource extraction. Most of these activities and missions have proposed significant robotic components, given the risks and costs associated with manned missions. To successfully execute these robotic activities, detailed mechanical characteristics of the target space bodies must be known prior to contact, in order to appropriately plan and direct the autonomous robotic protocols. Unfortunately, current estimates of asteroid mechanical properties are based on limited direct information, and significant uncertainty remains specifically concerning internal structures, strengths, and elastic properties of asteroids. One proposed method to elucidate this information is through in situ, nondestructive testing of asteroid material immediately after contact, but prior to any manipulation or resource extraction activities. While numerous nondestructive rock characterization techniques have been widely deployed for terrestrial applications, these methods must be adapted to account for unique properties of asteroid material and environmental conditions of space. For example, asteroid surface temperatures may range from -100°C to 30°C due to diurnal cycling, and these low temperatures are especially noteworthy due to their deleterious influence on non-destructive testing. As a result, this thesis investigates the effect of low temperature on the mechanical characteristics and nondestructive technique responses of rock material. Initially, a novel method to produce low temperature rock samples was developed. Dry ice and methanol cooling baths of specific formulations were used to decrease rock to temperatures ranging from -60°C to 0°C. At these temperatures, shale, chalk, and limestone rock samples were exposed to several nondestructive and conventional mechanical tests, including Schmidt hammer, ultrasonic pulse velocity, point

  6. Molecular Mechanisms and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Nian-Hua; Li, Jian Jian; Sun, Lun-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) is a severe side effect of radiotherapy in lung cancer patients that presents as a progressive pulmonary injury combined with chronic inflammation and exaggerated organ repair. RILF is a major barrier to improving the cure rate and well-being of lung cancer patients because it limits the radiation dose that is required to effectively kill tumor cells and diminishes normal lung function. Although the exact mechanism is unclear, accumulating evidence suggests that various cells, cytokines and regulatory molecules are involved in the tissue reorganization and immune response modulation that occur in RILF. In this review, we will summarize the general symptoms, diagnostics, and current understanding of the cells and molecular factors that are linked to the signaling networks implicated in RILF. Potential approaches for the treatment of RILF will also be discussed. Elucidating the key molecular mediators that initiate and control the extent of RILF in response to therapeutic radiation may reveal additional targets for RILF treatment to significantly improve the efficacy of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Nian-Hua; Li, Jian Jian; Sun, Lun-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) is a severe side effect of radiotherapy in lung cancer patients that presents as a progressive pulmonary injury combined with chronic inflammation and exaggerated organ repair. RILF is a major barrier to improving the cure rate and well-being of lung cancer patients because it limits the radiation dose that is required to effectively kill tumor cells and diminishes normal lung function. Although the exact mechanism is unclear, accumulating evidence suggests that various cells, cytokines and regulatory molecules are involved in the tissue reorganization and immune response modulation that occur in RILF. In this review, we will summarize the general symptoms, diagnostics, and current understanding of the cells and molecular factors that are linked to the signaling networks implicated in RILF. Potential approaches for the treatment of RILF will also be discussed. Elucidating the key molecular mediators that initiate and control the extent of RILF in response to therapeutic radiation may reveal additional targets for RILF treatment to significantly improve the efficacy of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients. PMID:23909719

  8. New amines for CO{sub 2} capture. II. oxidative degradation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lepaumier, H.; Picq, D.; Carrette, P.L.

    2009-10-15

    This study examines oxidative degradation of 12 ethanolamines and ethylenediamines. They were chosen to establish structure-property relationships: the role of replacement of the alcohol function by one second amine function, amine nature, steric hindrance, and cyclic structure were studied. Degradation of aqueous amine solutions was evaluated at 140{sup o}C under air pressure (2 MPa) in stainless steel reactors for 15 days. At the end of the run, most degradation products were identified by gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS); amounts of remaining amine and its degradation products were determined with the quantitative GC method. Main degradation mechanisms are proposed, and some relationships between structure and chemical stability are given.

  9. Engineering the Cyanobacterial Carbon Concentrating Mechanism for Enhanced CO2 Capture and Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Sandh, Gustaf; Cai, Fei; Shih, Patrick; Kinney, James; Axen, Seth; Salmeen, Annette; Zarzycki, Jan; Sutter, Markus; Kerfeld, Cheryl

    2011-06-02

    In cyanobacteria CO2 fixation is localized in a special proteinaceous organelle, the carboxysome. The CO2 fixation enzymes are encapsulated by a selectively permeable protein shell. By structurally and functionally characterizing subunits of the carboxysome shell and the encapsulated proteins, we hope to understand what regulates the shape, assembly and permeability of the shell, as well as the targeting mechanism and organization of the encapsulated proteins. This knowledge will be used to enhance CO2 fixation in both cyanobacteria and plants through synthetic biology. The same strategy can also serve as a template for the production of modular synthetic bacterial organelles. Our research is conducted using a variety of techniques such as genomic sequencing and analysis, transcriptional regulation, DNA synthesis, synthetic biology, protein crystallization, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), protein-protein interaction assays and phenotypic characterization using various types of cellular imaging, e.g. fluorescence microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Soft X-ray Tomography (SXT).

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy applied to advanced breast cancers: Engineering simulation and feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztejnberg Goncalves-Carralves, Manuel Leonardo

    This dissertation describes a novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) application for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 positive (HER2+) breast cancers. The original contribution of the dissertation is the development of the engineering simulation and the feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol for this novel combination of BNCT and HER2+ breast cancer treatment. This new concept of BNCT, representing a radiation binary targeted treatment, consists of the combination of two approaches never used in a synergism before. This combination may offer realistic hope for relapsed and/or metastasized breast cancers. This treatment assumes that the boronated anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) are administrated to the patient and accumulate preferentially in the tumor. Then the tumor is destroyed when is exposed to neutron irradiation. Since the use of anti-HER2 MABs yields good and promising results, the proposed concept is expected to amplify the known effect and be considered as a possible additional treatment approach to the most severe breast cancers for patients with metastasized cancer for which the current protocol is not successful and for patients refusing to have the standard treatment protocol. This dissertation makes an original contribution with an integral numerical approach and proves feasible the combination of the aforementioned therapy and disease. With these goals, the dissertation describes the theoretical analysis of the proposed concept providing an integral engineering simulation study of the treatment protocol. An extensive analysis of the potential limitations, capabilities and optimization factors are well studied using simplified models, models based on real CT patients' images, cellular models, and Monte Carlo (MCNP5/X) transport codes. One of the outcomes of the integral dosimetry assessment originally developed for the proposed treatment of advanced breast cancers is the implementation of BNCT

  11. Sorption Mechanisms for Mercury Capture in Warm Post-Gasification Gas Clean-Up Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jost Wendt; Sung Jun Lee; Paul Blowers

    2008-09-30

    The research was directed towards a sorbent injection/particle removal process where a sorbent may be injected upstream of the warm gas cleanup system to scavenge Hg and other trace metals, and removed (with the metals) within the warm gas cleanup process. The specific objectives of this project were to understand and quantify, through fundamentally based models, mechanisms of interaction between mercury vapor compounds and novel paper waste derived (kaolinite + calcium based) sorbents (currently marketed under the trade name MinPlus). The portion of the research described first is the experimental portion, in which sorbent effectiveness to scavenge metallic mercury (Hg{sup 0}) at high temperatures (>600 C) is determined as a function of temperature, sorbent loading, gas composition, and other important parameters. Levels of Hg{sup 0} investigated were in an industrially relevant range ({approx} 25 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) although contaminants were contained in synthetic gases and not in actual flue gases. A later section of this report contains the results of the complementary computational results.

  12. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low

  13. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation: Molecular mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui-Hsu Yang, Tracy; Craise, Laurie M.; Mei, Man-Tong; Tobias, Cornelius A.

    Experimental data on molecular mechanisms are essential for understanding the bioeffects of radiation and for developing biophysical models, which can help in determining the shape of dose-response curves at very low doses, e.g., doses less than 1 cGy. Although it has been shown that ionizing radiation can cause neoplastic cell transformation directly, that high-LET heavy ions in general can be more effective than photons in transforming cells, and that the radiogenic cell transformation is a multi-step processes, we know very little about the molecular nature of lesions important for cell transformation, the relationship between lethal and transformational damages, and the evolution of initial damages into final chromosomal aberrations which alter the growth control of cells. Using cultured mouse embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) as a model system, we have collected quantitative data on dose-response curves for heavy ions with various charges and energies. An analysis of these quantitative data suggested that two DNA breaks formed within 80 Å may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 Å may be lethal. Through studies with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, we have found that DNA double strand breaks, including both blunt- and cohesive-ended breaks, can cause cell transformation in vitro. These results indicate that DNA double strand breaks can be important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship is similar for HGPRT gene mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, suggesting common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects. The high RBE of high-LET radiation for cell killing and neoplastic cell transformation is most likely related to its effectiveness in producing DNA double strand breaks in mammalian cells. At

  14. High-energy Coulomb breakup of proton-dripline nuclei as a tool to study radiative-capture reactions of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sümmerer, K.

    2007-11-01

    High-energy Coulomb dissociation (CD) can be used to investigate the time-reversed process, radiative capture, for unstable nuclei where the direct capture reaction is difficult or impossible to perform. At GSI, we have run a series of CD measurements involving the proton-halo nucleus 8B which plays a major role in solar-neutrino physics. We could show that for this case CD and direct proton capture yield the same result. Theoretical guidance is necessary, however, to make sure that contributions of different electro-magnetic multipolarities and nuclear dissociation processes are well under control. Recently, we have complemented the LAND/ALADIN experimental apparatus at GSI with new Si microstrip detectors and proton-drift-chambers to continue similar studies with radioactive beams from the fragment separator FRS at GSI. The first case of astrophysical interest to be studied will be the CD of 27P. Another case will be the 2-proton breakup of 17Ne to investigate radiative two-proton capture on 15O, a process which could modify the reaction flow of the rp-process.

  15. Capturing the Energy Absorbing Mechanisms of Composite Structures under Crash Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Bonnie

    As fiber reinforced composite material systems become increasingly utilized in primary aircraft and automotive structures, the need to understand their contribution to the crashworthiness of the structure is of great interest to meet safety certification requirements. The energy absorbing behavior of a composite structure, however, is not easily predicted due to the great complexity of the failure mechanisms that occur within the material. Challenges arise both in the experimental characterization and in the numerical modeling of the material/structure combination. At present, there is no standardized test method to characterize the energy absorbing capability of composite materials to aide crashworthy structural design. In addition, although many commercial finite element analysis codes exist and offer a means to simulate composite failure initiation and propagation, these models are still under development and refinement. As more metallic structures are replaced by composite structures, the need for both experimental guidelines to characterize the energy absorbing capability of a composite structure, as well as guidelines for using numerical tools to simulate composite materials in crash conditions has become a critical matter. This body of research addresses both the experimental characterization of the energy absorption mechanisms occurring in composite materials during crushing, as well as the numerical simulation of composite materials undergoing crushing. In the experimental investigation, the specific energy absorption (SEA) of a composite material system is measured using a variety of test element geometries, such as corrugated plates and tubes. Results from several crush experiments reveal that SEA is not a constant material property for laminated composites, and varies significantly with the geometry of the test specimen used. The variation of SEA measured for a single material system requires that crush test data must be generated for a range of

  16. Radiation induced effects on mechanical properties of nanoporous gold foams

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, M. E-mail: efu@pku.edu.cn; Fu, E. G. E-mail: efu@pku.edu.cn; Wang, Y. Q.; Martinez, E.; Caro, A.; Mook, W. M.; Sheehan, C.; Baldwin, J. K.

    2014-06-09

    It has recently been shown that due to a high surface-to-volume ratio, nanoporous materials display radiation tolerance. The abundance of surfaces, which are perfect sinks for defects, and the relation between ligament size, defect diffusion, and time combine to define a window of radiation resistance [Fu et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 191607 (2012)]. Outside this window, the dominant defect created by irradiation in Au nanofoams are stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). Molecular dynamics computer simulations of nanopillars, taken as the elemental constituent of foams, predict that SFTs act as dislocation sources inducing softening, in contrast to the usual behavior in bulk materials, where defects are obstacles to dislocation motion, producing hardening. In this work we test that prediction and answer the question whether irradiation actually hardens or softens a nanofam. Ne ion irradiations of gold nanofoams were performed at room temperature for a total dose up to 4 dpa, and their mechanical behavior was measured by nanoindentation. We find that hardness increases after irradiation, a result that we analyze in terms of the role of SFTs on the deformation mode of foams.

  17. Radiation induced effects on mechanical properties of nanoporous gold foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, M.; Mook, W. M.; Fu, E. G.; Wang, Y. Q.; Sheehan, C.; Martinez, E.; Baldwin, J. K.; Caro, A.

    2014-06-01

    It has recently been shown that due to a high surface-to-volume ratio, nanoporous materials display radiation tolerance. The abundance of surfaces, which are perfect sinks for defects, and the relation between ligament size, defect diffusion, and time combine to define a window of radiation resistance [Fu et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 191607 (2012)]. Outside this window, the dominant defect created by irradiation in Au nanofoams are stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). Molecular dynamics computer simulations of nanopillars, taken as the elemental constituent of foams, predict that SFTs act as dislocation sources inducing softening, in contrast to the usual behavior in bulk materials, where defects are obstacles to dislocation motion, producing hardening. In this work we test that prediction and answer the question whether irradiation actually hardens or softens a nanofam. Ne ion irradiations of gold nanofoams were performed at room temperature for a total dose up to 4 dpa, and their mechanical behavior was measured by nanoindentation. We find that hardness increases after irradiation, a result that we analyze in terms of the role of SFTs on the deformation mode of foams.

  18. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Selected Mechanical Properties of Silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Emily Jane

    Impressive mechanical properties have served to peak interest in silk as an engineering material. In addition, the ease with which silk can be altered through processing has led to its use in various biomaterial applications. As the uses of silk branch into new territory, it is imperative (and inevitable) to discover the boundary conditions beyond which silk no longer performs as expected. These boundary conditions include factors as familiar as temperature and humidity, but may also include other less familiar contributions, such as exposure to different types of radiation. The inherent variations in mechanical properties of silk, as well as its sensitivity to moisture, suggest that in an engineering context silk is best suited for use in composite materials; that way, silk can be shielded from ambient moisture fluctuations, and the surrounding matrix allows efficient load transfer from weaker fibers to stronger ones. One such application is to use silk as a reinforcing fiber in epoxy composites. When used in this way, there are several instances in which exposure to microwave radiation is likely (for example, as a means of speeding epoxy cure rates), the effects of which remain mostly unstudied. It will be the purpose of this dissertation to determine whether selected mechanical properties of B. mori cocoon silk are affected by exposure to microwave radiation, under specified temperature and humidity conditions. Results of our analyses are directly applicable wherever exposure of silk to microwave radiation is possible, including in fiber reinforced epoxy composites (the entire composite may be microwaved to speed epoxy cure time), or when silk is used as a component in the material used to construct the radome of an aircraft (RADAR units use frequencies in the microwave range of the electromagnetic spectrum), or when microwave energy is used to sterilize biomaterials (such as cell scaffolds) made of silk. In general, we find that microwave exposure does not

  19. Memory reconsolidation allows the consolidation of a concomitant weak learning through a synaptic tagging and capture mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cassini, Lindsey F; Sierra, Rodrigo O; Haubrich, Josué; Crestani, Ana P; Santana, Fabiana; de Oliveira Alvares, Lucas; Quillfeldt, Jorge A

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by the synaptic tagging and capture (STC) hypothesis, it was recently shown that a weak learning, only able to produce short-term memory (STM), can succeed in establishing long-term memory (LTM) with a concomitant, stronger experience. This is consistent with the capture, by the first-tagged event, of the so-called plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) provided by the second one. Here, we describe how a concomitant session of reactivation/reconsolidation of a stronger, contextual fear conditioning (CFC) memory, allowed LTM to result from a weak spatial object recognition (wSOR) training. Consistent with an STC process, the effect was observed only during a critical time window and was dependent on the CFC reconsolidation-related protein synthesis. Retrieval by itself (without reconsolidation) did not have the same promoting effect. We also found that the inactivation of the NMDA receptor by AP5 prevented wSOR training to receive this support of CFC reconsolidation (supposedly through the production of PRPs), which may be the equivalent of blocking the setting of a learning tag in the dorsal CA1 region for that task. Furthermore, either a Water Maze reconsolidation, or a CFC extinction session, allowed the formation of wSOR-LTM. These results suggest for the first time that a reconsolidation session can promote the consolidation of a concomitant weak learning through a probable STC mechanism. These findings allow new insights concerning the influence of reconsolidation in the acquisition of memories of otherwise unrelated events during daily life situations. PMID:23733489

  20. Stable loss of global DNA methylation in the radiation-target tissue-A possible mechanism contributing to radiation carcinogenesis?

    SciTech Connect

    Koturbash, Igor; Pogribny, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga . E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca

    2005-11-18

    Radiation-induced lymphomagenesis and leukemogenesis are complex processes involving both genetic and epigenetic changes. Although genetic alterations during radiation-induced lymphoma- and leukemogenesis are fairly well studied, the role of epigenetic changes has been largely overlooked. Rodent models are valuable tools for identifying molecular mechanisms of lymphoma and leukemogenesis. A widely used mouse model of radiation-induced thymic lymphoma is characterized by a lengthy 'pre-lymphoma' period. Delineating molecular changes occurring during the pre-lymphoma period is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of radiation-induced leukemia/lymphoma development. In the present study, we investigated the role of radiation-induced DNA methylation changes in the radiation carcinogenesis target organ-thymus, and non-target organ-muscle. This study is the first report on the radiation-induced epigenetic changes in radiation-target murine thymus during the pre-lymphoma period. We have demonstrated that acute and fractionated whole-body irradiation significantly altered DNA methylation pattern in murine thymus leading to a massive loss of global DNA methylation. We have also observed that irradiation led to increased levels of DNA strand breaks 6 h following the initial exposure. The majority of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks were repaired 1 month after exposure. DNA methylation changes, though, were persistent and significant radiation-induced DNA hypomethylation was observed in thymus 1 month after exposure. In sharp contrast to thymus, no significant persistent changes were noted in the non-target muscle tissue. The presence of stable DNA hypomethylation in the radiation-target tissue, even though DNA damage resulting from initial genotoxic radiation insult was repaired, suggests of the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in the development of radiation-related pathologies. The possible role of radiation-induced DNA hypomethylation in radiation-induced genome

  1. Failure of fluid-saturated granular materials: a unified approach to capture diffuse and localized instability mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalache, Constance; Buscarnera, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    Granular materials are susceptible to a wide variety of failure and deformation mechanisms, especially because of their interaction with the pore fluids and the surrounding environment. An adequate modeling of their mechanical response is therefore essential for understanding a number of geological processes, such as the onset of rapid landslides, hillslope denudation and sediment transport, or even the mechanics of fault gauges. Depending on the type of material, the groundwater conditions and the surrounding kinematic constraints, both diffuse and localized mechanisms are possible, and these may occur under either drained or undrained conditions. In the geomechanics literature, failure modes are usually explained and modeled with the tools of continuum mechanics, such as the mathematical theory of plasticity. Due to the complexity of granular material behavior, however, most classical models for frictional strength are unable to capture the variety of instability mechanisms observed for such class of geomaterials (e.g., liquefaction, shear banding, etc.). Sophisticated strain-hardening plasticity models are therefore required for numerical modeling purposes, thus making the evaluation of critical failure conditions less straightforward than in perfect plasticity theories. Here we propose a mathematical strategy that can be adapted to any elastoplastic model and allows the onset of failure in elastoplastic geomaterials to be expressed in a more general manner. More specifically, our theory expresses the failure conditions as a function of local kinematics and solid-fluid interactions. The stability criterion used in this study is based on the so-called stability modulus, a scalar index of failure that was formulated by linking the physical concept controllability to the mathematical notion of plastic admissibility upon an incremental loading path [Buscarnera et al, 2011]. In this contribution, different loading constraints are considered, accounting for the

  2. A comparison of radiative capture with decay gamma-ray method in bore hole logging for economic minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.

    1972-01-01

    The recent availability of borehole logging sondes employing a source of neutrons and a Ge(Li) detector opens up the possibility of analyzing either decay or capture gamma rays. The most efficient method for a given element can be predicted by calculating the decay-to-capture count ratio for the most prominent peaks in the respective spectra. From a practical point of view such a calculation must be slanted toward short irradiation and count times at each station in a borehole. A simplified method of computation is shown, and the decay-to-capture count ratio has been calculated and tabulated for the optimum value in the decay mode irrespective of the irradiation time, and also for a ten minute irradiation time. Based on analysis of a single peak in each spectrum, the results indicate the preferred technique and the best decay or capture peak to observe for those elements of economic interest. ?? 1972.

  3. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Sook; Kim, Wonwoo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eunjin; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Lawrence Chinsoo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS. PMID:26756026

  4. The effect of ionizing radiation on the blood-brain-barrier (BBB): Considerations for the application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III; Spickard, J.H.; Griebenow, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    All methods of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in use or envisioned for treatment of brain tumors have an element of ionizing radiation (incident and induced). This paper reviews data on the effects of ionizing radiation on the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and the blood-tumor-barrier (BTB) and the potential impact of the effects on the delivery techniques of BNCT. The objectives are: review the available technique for BNCT of brain tumors; review the literature on experimental and human studies regarding the effects of ionizing radiation on the BBB; discuss the impact of these effects on the fractionization question for BNCT; and draw conclusions from that information. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Cryan, Scott; Zipay, John; Strube, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR&D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a threedimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe the current

  6. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Strube, Matthew; Zipay, John J.; Cryan, Scott

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR and D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR and D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR and D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a threedimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR and D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe

  7. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Strube, Matthew; Zipay, John J.; Cryan, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR&D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion spacecraft. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a three-dimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build-time instead of at design-time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal non-recurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe the current

  8. Experimental search for the radiative capture reaction d + d → 4He + γ from the ddμ muonic molecule state J = 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, V. V.; Bogdanova, L. N.; Bom, V. R.; Demin, D. L.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Filchenkov, V. V.; Grafov, N. N.; Grishechkin, S. K.; Gritsaj, K. I.; Konin, A. D.; Mikhailyukov, K. L.; Rudenko, A. I.; Vinogradov, Yu. I.; Volnykh, V. P.; Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Yukhimchuk, S. A.

    2011-07-01

    A search for the muon-catalyzed fusion reaction d + d → 4He + γ in the ddμ muonic molecule was performed using the experimental installation TRITON with BGO detectors for γ-quanta. A high-pressure target filled with deuterium was exposed to the negative muon beam of the JINR Phasotron to detect γ-quanta with the energy 23.8 MeV. An experimental estimation for the yield of radiative deuteron capture from the ddμ state J = 1 was obtained at the level of η γ ≤ 8 × 10-7 per fusion.

  9. Experimental search for the radiative capture reaction d + d {yields} {sup 4}He + {gamma} from the dd{mu} muonic molecule state J = 1

    SciTech Connect

    Baluev, V. V.; Bogdanova, L. N.; Bom, V. R.; Demin, D. L.; Eijk, C. W. E. van; Filchenkov, V. V.; Grafov, N. N.; Grishechkin, S. K.; Gritsaj, K. I.; Konin, A. D.; Mikhailyukov, K. L.; Rudenko, A. I.; Vinogradov, Yu. I.; Volnykh, V. P.; Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Yukhimchuk, S. A.

    2011-07-15

    A search for the muon-catalyzed fusion reaction d + d {yields} {sup 4}He + {gamma} in the dd{mu} muonic molecule was performed using the experimental installation TRITON with BGO detectors for {gamma}-quanta. A high-pressure target filled with deuterium was exposed to the negative muon beam of the JINR Phasotron to detect {gamma}-quanta with the energy 23.8 MeV. An experimental estimation for the yield of radiative deuteron capture from the dd{mu} state J = 1 was obtained at the level of {eta}{sub {gamma}} {<=} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} per fusion.

  10. Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity in Transformed and Non-Transformed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Panganiban, Ronald-Allan M.; Snow, Andrew L.; Day, Regina M.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation damage to biological systems is determined by the type of radiation, the total dosage of exposure, the dose rate, and the region of the body exposed. Three modes of cell death—necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagy—as well as accelerated senescence have been demonstrated to occur in vitro and in vivo in response to radiation in cancer cells as well as in normal cells. The basis for cellular selection for each mode depends on various factors including the specific cell type involved, the dose of radiation absorbed by the cell, and whether it is proliferating and/or transformed. Here we review the signaling mechanisms activated by radiation for the induction of toxicity in transformed and normal cells. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of radiation toxicity is critical for the development of radiation countermeasures as well as for the improvement of clinical radiation in cancer treatment. PMID:23912235

  11. Nonradiative coherent carrier captures and defect reaction at deep-level defects via phonon-kick mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Wakita, Masaki; Suzuki, Kei; Shinozuka, Yuzo

    2014-02-21

    We simulated the time evolution of electron-lattice coupling mode, and a series of nonradiative carrier captures by a deep-level defect in a semiconductor. For lattice relaxation energy of the order of the band gap, a series of coherent (athermal) electron and hole captures by a defect is possible for high carrier densities, which results in an inflation in the induced lattice vibration, which in turn enhances a defect reaction.

  12. The Hybrid Sterling Engine: boosting photovoltaic efficiency and deriving mechanical work from fluid expansion and heat capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beets, Nathan; Wake Forest CenterNanotechnology; Molecular Materials Team; Fraunhofer Institute Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Two major problems with many third generation photovoltaics is their complex structure and greater expense for increased efficiency. Spectral splitting devices have been used by many with varying degrees of success to collect more and more of the spectrum, but simple, efficient, and cost-effective setups that employ spectral splitting remain elusive. This study explores this problem, presenting a solar engine that employs stokes shifting via laser dyes to convert incident light to the wavelength bandgap of the solar cell and collects the resultant infrared radiation unused by the photovoltaic cell as heat in ethylene glycol or glycerin. When used in conjunction with micro turbines, fluid expansion creates mechanical work, and the temperature difference between the cell and the environment is made available for use. The effect of focusing is also observed as a means to boost efficiency via concentration. Experimental results from spectral scans, vibrational voltage analysis of the PV itself and temperature measurements from a thermocouple are all compared to theoretical results using a program in Mathematica written to model refraction and lensing in the devices used, a quantum efficiency test of the cells, the absorption and emission curves of the dues used to determine the spectrum shift, and the various equations for fill factor, efficiency, and current in different setups. An efficiency increase well over 50% from the control devices is observed, and a new solar engine proposed.

  13. Protective mechanisms and acclimation to solar ultraviolet-B radiation in Oenothera stricta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robberecht, R.; Caldwell, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    Plant adaptations ameliorating or repairing the damaging effects of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on plant tissue were investigated. The degree of phenotype plasticity in UV protective mechanisms and acclimation in relation to the natural solar UV-B radiation flux and in an enhanced UV-B irradiance environment was also examined. Mechanisms by which plants avoid radiation, adaptations altering the path of radiation incident on the leaf, and repair processes were considered. Attenuation of UV-B by tissues, UV-B irradiation into the leaf, and the effects of UV-B on photosynthesis were investigated.

  14. Simulating coupled thermal-mechanical interactions in morphing radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertagne, Christopher L.; Sheth, Rubik B.; Hartl, Darren J.; Whitcomb, John D.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal control is an important aspect of every spacecraft. The thermal control system (TCS) must maintain the temperature of all other systems within acceptable limits in spite of changes in environmental conditions or heat loads. Most thermal control systems used in crewed vehicles use a two-fluid-loop architecture in order to achieve the flexibility demanded by the mission. The two-loop architecture provides sufficient performance, but it does so at the cost of additional mass. A recently-proposed radiator concept known as a morphing radiator employs shape memory alloys in order to achieve the performance necessary to use a single-loop TCS architecture. However, modeling the behavior of morphing radiators is challenging due to the presence of a unique and complex thermomechanical coupling. In this work, a partitioned analysis procedure is implemented with existing finite element solvers in order to explore the behavior of a possible shape memory alloy-based morphing radiator in a mission-like thermal environment. The results help confirm the theory of operation and demonstrate the ability of this method to support the design and development of future morphing radiators.

  15. Physical and chemical mechanisms in molecular radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, W.A.; Varma, M.N.

    1991-01-01

    Through its Radiological and Chemical Physics Program, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been a primary source of funding for research in radiation physics and radiochemistry, supporting a wide range of explorations of the link between physical, chemical and biological events. This book is a series of articles by authors working within this field, most of whom have been central to the DOE-sponsored research. The opening papers focus on radiological physics; the second section covers radiation chemistry in a discussion that extends from the initial energy transfer to the production of intermediate chemical species and DNA damage. The third section explores the link between the physical and chemical events and the production of biological effects. Finally the book closes with a series of papers on molecular radiation biology.

  16. Mechanism of the radiation chemical conversions of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Ershov, B-G; Isakova, O.V.; Matyushkina, E.P.; Samuilova, S.D.

    1986-09-01

    Radical products of the radiolysis of cellulose were investigated by the ESR method. The destruction of the polymer was studied, an analysis was made for carbonyl and carboxyl groups, and the composition of the gases was determined. A scheme of radiation chemical conversions of cellulose was proposed, and the ratios in the formation of the main end products were determined. It was shown that the action of radiation is accompanied by breaking of a glucoside bond and decomposition of the glucose unit of the polymer.

  17. The Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, M; Fardid, R; Hadadi, Gh; Fardid, M

    2014-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect is the phenomenon which non-irradiated cells exhibit effects along with their different levels as a result of signals received from nearby irradiated cells. Responses of non-irradiated cells may include changes in process of translation, gene expression, cell proliferation, apoptosis and cells death. These changes are confirmed by results of some In-Vivo studies. Most well-known important factors affecting radiation-induced bystander effect include free radicals, immune system factors, expression changes of some genes involved in inflammation pathway and epigenetic factors. PMID:25599062

  18. Evolutionary mechanism of the defects in the fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses induced by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengfei; He, Quanlong; Lu, Min; Li, Weinan; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In the laser driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experimental target chamber, like the 3ω (351 nm) laser irradiation, the irradiation of gamma ray and X-rays, will also cause the formation and increase of various defects in the investigated series of fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses that have potential use in novel high performance color separation optics. The induced defects contribute to the increase of absorption in the UV region, which will make the UV performance of these laser glasses deteriorated. Some of the induced defects can be bleached to some extent through the subsequent thermal treatment process, resulting from the release and capture of the electrons in conduction band. Through the gamma radiation and post-heat treatment experiments, a general model of the evolutionary mechanism of the defects in these fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses was proposed.

  19. Evolutionary mechanism of the defects in the fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses induced by gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; He, Quanlong; Lu, Min; Li, Weinan; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In the laser driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experimental target chamber, like the 3ω (351 nm) laser irradiation, the irradiation of gamma ray and X-rays, will also cause the formation and increase of various defects in the investigated series of fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses that have potential use in novel high performance color separation optics. The induced defects contribute to the increase of absorption in the UV region, which will make the UV performance of these laser glasses deteriorated. Some of the induced defects can be bleached to some extent through the subsequent thermal treatment process, resulting from the release and capture of the electrons in conduction band. Through the gamma radiation and post-heat treatment experiments, a general model of the evolutionary mechanism of the defects in these fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses was proposed. PMID:26732043

  20. Evolutionary mechanism of the defects in the fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses induced by gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; He, Quanlong; Lu, Min; Li, Weinan; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In the laser driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experimental target chamber, like the 3ω (351 nm) laser irradiation, the irradiation of gamma ray and X-rays, will also cause the formation and increase of various defects in the investigated series of fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses that have potential use in novel high performance color separation optics. The induced defects contribute to the increase of absorption in the UV region, which will make the UV performance of these laser glasses deteriorated. Some of the induced defects can be bleached to some extent through the subsequent thermal treatment process, resulting from the release and capture of the electrons in conduction band. Through the gamma radiation and post-heat treatment experiments, a general model of the evolutionary mechanism of the defects in these fluoride-containing phosphate based glasses was proposed. PMID:26732043

  1. Radiation dose measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for neutron and photon reactions in a human head phantom for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Don-Soo

    Dose measurements and radiation transport calculations were investigated for the interactions within the human brain of fast neutrons, slow neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons associated with accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT). To estimate the overall dose to the human brain, it is necessary to distinguish the doses from the different radiation sources. Using organic scintillators, human head phantom and detector assemblies were designed, constructed, and tested to determine the most appropriate dose estimation system to discriminate dose due to the different radiation sources that will ultimately be incorporated into a human head phantom to be used for dose measurements in ABNCT. Monoenergetic and continuous energy neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in a metallic lithium target near the reaction threshold using the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. A human head phantom was built to measure and to distinguish the doses which result from proton recoils induced by fast neutrons, alpha particles and recoil lithium nuclei from the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction, and photons generated in the 7Li accelerator target as well as those generated inside the head phantom through various nuclear reactions at the same time during neutron irradiation procedures. The phantom consists of two main parts to estimate dose to tumor and dose to healthy tissue as well: a 3.22 cm3 boron loaded plastic scintillator which simulates a boron containing tumor inside the brain and a 2664 cm3 cylindrical liquid scintillator which represents the surrounding healthy tissue in the head. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX(TM) was used for the simulation of radiation transport due to neutrons and photons and extended to investigate the effects of neutrons and other radiation on the brain at various depths.

  2. Neoplastic cell transformation by high-LET radiation - Molecular mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Mei, Man-Tong

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative data were collected on dose-response curves of cultured mouse-embryo cells (C3H10T1/2) irradiated with heavy ions of various charges and energies. Results suggests that two breaks formed on DNA within 80 A may cause cell transformation and that two DNA breaks formed within 20 A may be lethal. From results of experiments with restriction enzymes which produce DNA damages at specific sites, it was found that DNA double strand breaks are important primary lesions for radiogenic cell transformation and that blunt-ended double-strand breaks can form lethal as well as transformational damages due to misrepair or incomplete repair in the cell. The RBE-LET relationship for high-LET radiation is similar to that for HGPRT locus mutation, chromosomal deletion, and cell transformation, indicating that common lesions may be involved in these radiation effects.

  3. Astrophysical S-factor for the radiative-capture reaction p{sup 13}C {yields} {sup 14}N{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2012-02-15

    The possibility of describing experimental data on the astrophysical S factor for radiative proton capture on a {sup 13}C nucleus at energies in the range 0.03-0.8 MeV is considered within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states. It is shown that the energy dependence of this astrophysical S factor can be reasonably explained on the basis of the E1 transition to the {sup 3}P{sub 1}-wave bound state of the {sup 14}N nucleus in the p{sup 13}C channel from the {sup 3}S{sub 1} wave of p{sup 13}C scattering in the resonance energy region around 0.55 MeV in the laboratory frame.

  4. Radiative neutron capture by {sup 2}H, {sup 7}Li, {sup 14}C, and {sup 14}N nuclei at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2013-07-15

    The possibility of describing experimental data on the total cross sections for the n{sup 2}H, n{sup 7}Li, n{sup 14}C, and n{sup 14}N radiative-capture processes within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states and their classification according to Young's tableaux is considered. It is shown that this model and the methods used here to construct potentials make it possible to describe correctly the behavior of the experimental cross sections at energies between 5 to 10 meV (5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}-10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV) and 1 to 15MeV.

  5. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, R. D.; Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on mechanical properties and on the molecular and structural properties of graphite fiber reinforced composites are assessed so that durability in space applications can be predicted. A listing of composite systems irradiated along with the maximum radiation dose applied and type of mechanical tests performed is shown. These samples were exposed to 1/2 MeV electrons.

  6. Radiative thermal neutron-capture cross sections for the 180W(n ,γ ) reaction and determination of the neutron-separation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, A. M.; Firestone, R. B.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Sleaford, B. W.; Basunia, M. S.; Belgya, T.; Escher, J. E.; Krtička, M.; Révay, Zs.; Summers, N. C.

    2015-09-01

    Prompt thermal neutron-capture partial γ -ray production cross sections were measured for the first time for the 180W(n ,γ ) reaction using a cold guided-neutron beam at the Budapest Research Reactor. Absolute 181Wγ -ray cross sections were internally standardized using well-known comparator γ -ray cross sections belonging to the other tungsten isotopes present in the 11.35% enriched 180W sample. Transitions were assigned to levels in 181W based largely upon information available in the literature. The total radiative thermal neutron-capture cross section σ0 was determined from the sum of direct prompt γ -ray cross sections populating the ground state and a modeled contribution accounting for ground-state feeding from the quasicontinuum. In this work, we find σ0=21.67 (77 ) b. A new measurement of the cross section for the 5 /2- metastable isomer at 365.6 keV, σ5 /2-(181Wm,14.6 μ s ) =19.96 (55 ) b, is also determined. Additionally, primary γ rays, observed for the first time in the 180W(n ,γ ) reaction, provide the most precise determination for the 181W neutron-separation energy, Sn=6669.02 (16 ) keV.

  7. Radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis: Mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis and implications for future research

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoutsou, Pelagia G.; Koukourakis, Michael I. . E-mail: targ@her.forthnet.gr

    2006-12-01

    Radiation pneumonitis and subsequent radiation pulmonary fibrosis are the two main dose-limiting factors when irradiating the thorax that can have severe implications for patients' quality of life. In this article, the current concepts about the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis are presented. The clinical course of fibrosis, a postulated acute inflammatory stage, and a late fibrotic and irreversible stage are discussed. The interplay of cells and the wide variety of molecules orchestrating the immunologic response to radiation, their interactions with specific receptors, and the cascade of events they trigger are elucidated. Finally, the implications of this knowledge with respect to the therapeutic interventions are critically presented.

  8. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy-graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    In an effort to elucidate the changes in molecular structural and mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber composites upon exposure to ionizing radiation in a simulated space environment, spectroscopic and surface properties of tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diamino diphenyl methane (TGDDM) red with diamino diphenyl sulfone (DDS) and T-300 graphite fiber were investigated following exposure to ionizing radiation. Cobalt-60 gamma radiation and 1/2 MeV electrons were used as radiation sources. The system was studied using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, infrared absorption spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

  9. The mechanical properties of radiation-vulcanized NR/BR blending system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoshuang, Yan; Zhengtao, Guo; Li, Li; Ying, Zhai; Peng, Zhou

    2002-03-01

    The effect of radiation dose on the mechanical properties of NR/BR blending system is reported in this paper. A comparison was made between sulphur vulcanization and radiation vulcanization for an optimal nature rubber (NR)/ butyl rubber (BR) blending ratio (60/40) at dose range from 10 to 150 kGy. The result shows that the mechanical properties, especially, tensile strength, elongation at break, and tear strength have been improved significantly by radiation-vulcanization. This finding was also proved by thermal aging experiment on a selected NR/BR blend at 70°C for up to 168 h.

  10. Mechanism for radiative recombination in ZnCdO alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buyanova, I. A.; Bergman, J. P.; Pozina, G.; Chen, W. M.; Rawal, S.; Norton, D. P.; Pearton, S. J.; Osinsky, A.; Dong, J. W.

    2007-06-25

    Temperature dependent cw- and time-resolved photoluminescence combined with absorption measurements are employed to evaluate the origin of radiative recombination in ZnCdO alloys grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The near-band-edge emission is attributed to recombination of excitons localized within band tail states likely caused by nonuniformity in Cd distribution. Energy transfer between the tail states is argued to occur via tunneling of localized excitons. The transfer is shown to be facilitated by increasing Cd content due to a reduction of the exciton binding energy and, therefore, an increase of the exciton Bohr radius in the alloys with a high Cd content.

  11. A NEW MECHANISM FOR MASS ACCRETION UNDER RADIATION PRESSURE IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2010-05-01

    During the formation of a massive star, strong radiation pressure from the central star acts on the dust sublimation front and tends to halt the accretion flow. To overcome this strong radiation pressure, it has been considered that a strong ram pressure produced by a high-mass accretion rate of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} or more is needed. We reinvestigated the necessary condition to overcome the radiation pressure and found a new mechanism for overcoming it. Accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps the mass accretion by its weight. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation. We call this mechanism the 'OMOSHI effect', where OMOSHI is an acronym for 'One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weIght'. Additionally, in Japanese, OMOSHI is a noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. We investigate the generation of the OMOSHI effect using local one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The radiation pressure and the gravitational force are connected through the gas pressure, and to sum up, the radiation pressure is balanced or overcome by the gravitational force. We also discuss the global structure and temporal variation of the accretion flow.

  12. A New Mechanism for Mass Accretion Under Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2010-05-01

    During the formation of a massive star, strong radiation pressure from the central star acts on the dust sublimation front and tends to halt the accretion flow. To overcome this strong radiation pressure, it has been considered that a strong ram pressure produced by a high-mass accretion rate of 10-3 M sun yr-1 or more is needed. We reinvestigated the necessary condition to overcome the radiation pressure and found a new mechanism for overcoming it. Accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps the mass accretion by its weight. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation. We call this mechanism the "OMOSHI effect," where OMOSHI is an acronym for "One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weIght." Additionally, in Japanese, OMOSHI is a noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. We investigate the generation of the OMOSHI effect using local one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The radiation pressure and the gravitational force are connected through the gas pressure, and to sum up, the radiation pressure is balanced or overcome by the gravitational force. We also discuss the global structure and temporal variation of the accretion flow.

  13. System for effecting underwater coupling of optical fiber cables characterized by a novel V-probe cable capture mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Christopher F.; Barron, Thomas D.; Nugent, David M.

    1995-03-01

    A submarine trails one fiber optic cable and an undersea vehicle is controlled by this first cable. A missile/torpedo trails a second cable that is to be coupled to the first cable. The second cable has a segment suspended vertically underwater between a buoyant pod and a sea anchor type buoy. The undersea vehicle, or Autonomous Undersea Vehicle, (AUV) hunts for the pod by conventional homing means. A forked cable pickup device in the nose of the AUV captures the suspended cable segment directing it into a slot so a male socket in the underside of the pod mates with a female socket in the slot.

  14. Mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity and implications for future clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Jenrow, Kenneth A.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    To summarize current knowledge regarding mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue injury and medical countermeasures available to reduce its severity. Advances in radiation delivery using megavoltage and intensity-modulated radiation therapy have permitted delivery of higher doses of radiation to well-defined tumor target tissues. Injury to critical normal tissues and organs, however, poses substantial risks in the curative treatment of cancers, especially when radiation is administered in combination with chemotherapy. The principal pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of tissue stem cells and progenitor cells and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Emerging concepts of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity suggest that the recovery and repopulation of stromal stem cells remain chronically impaired by long-lived free radicals, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines resulting in progressive damage after radiation exposure. Better understanding the mechanisms mediating interactions among excessive generation of reactive oxygen species, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated macrophages, and role of bone marrow-derived progenitor and stem cells may provide novel insight on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury of tissues. Further understanding the molecular signaling pathways of cytokines and chemokines would reveal novel targets for protecting or mitigating radiation injury of tissues and organs. PMID:25324981

  15. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  16. Are Epigenetic Mechanisms Involved in Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects?

    PubMed Central

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The “non-targeted effects” of ionizing radiation including bystander effects and genomic instability are unique in that no classic mutagenic event occurs in the cell showing the effect. In the case of bystander effects, cells which were not in the field affected by the radiation show high levels of mutations, chromosome aberrations, and membrane signaling changes leading to what is termed “horizontal transmission” of mutations and information which may be damaging while in the case of genomic instability, generations of cells derived from an irradiated progenitor appear normal but then lethal and non-lethal mutations appear in distant progeny. This is known as “vertical transmission.” In both situations high yields of non-clonal mutations leading to distant occurrence of mutation events both in space and time. This precludes a mutator phenotype or other conventional explanation and appears to indicate a generalized form of stress-induced mutagenesis which is well documented in bacteria. This review will discuss the phenomenology of what we term “non-targeted effects,” and will consider to what extent they challenge conventional ideas in genetics and epigenetics. PMID:22629281

  17. Quantum-mechanical treatment of an electron undergoing synchrotron radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of an electron moving perpendicular to an intense magnetic field is approached from the framework of quantum mechanics. A numerical solution to the related rate equations describing the probabilities of occupation of the electron's energy states is put forth along with the expected errors involved. The quantum-mechanical approach is found to predict a significant amount of energy broadening with time for an initially monoenergetic electron beam entering a region of an intense magnetic field as long as the product of initial energy and magnetic field is of order 50 MG BeV or larger.

  18. System for effecting underwater coupling of optical fiber cables characterized by a novel lateral arm cable capture mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Christopher F.

    1995-03-01

    A submarine trails one fiber optic cable and an undersea vehicle is controlled by this first cable. A missile/torpedo trails a second cable that is to be coupled to the first cable. The second cable has a segment suspended vertically underwater between a buoyant pod and a sea anchor type buoy. The undersea vehicle, or autonomous undersea vehicle, (AUV) hunts for the pod by conventional homing components, and cable capturing arms on the vehicle direct the cable's movement relative to the vehicle into a pod mating position that achieves optical coupling of the two cables. In one embodiment two arms are pivotably mounted to the vehicle's sides so one arm captures the suspended cable segment directing it into a slot so a male socket in the underside of the pod mates with a female socket in the slot. Another embodiment accomplishes the same result with a device in which the arms are formed as the off-shoots of a forked cable pickup device in the nose of the AUV.

  19. Adsorption mechanism of graphene-like ZnO monolayer towards CO2 molecules: enhanced CO2 capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, G. S.; Hussain, T.; Islam, M. S.; Sagynbaeva, M.; Gupta, D.; Panigrahi, P.; Ahuja, R.

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to efficiently capture CO2 on two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures for effective cleaning of our atmosphere and purification of exhausts coming from fuel engines. Here, we have performed extensive first principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the interaction of CO2 on a recently synthesized ZnO monolayer (ZnO-ML) in its pure, defected and functionalized form. A series of rigorous calculations yielded the most preferential binding configurations of the CO2 gas molecule on a ZnO-ML. It is observed that the substitution of one oxygen atom with boron, carbon and nitrogen on the ZnO monolayer resulted into enhanced CO2 adsorption. Our calculations show an enriched adsorption of CO2 on the ZnO-ML when substituting with foreign atoms like B, C and N. The improved adsorption energy of CO2 on ZnO suggests the ZnO-ML could be a promising candidate for future CO2 capture.

  20. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  1. L-Boronophenylalanine-Mediated Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Glioma Progressing After External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Beule, Annette; Collan, Juhani; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Seren, Tom; Paetau, Anders; Saarilahti, Kauko; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety of boronophenylalanine-mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of malignant gliomas that progress after surgery and conventional external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Adult patients who had histologically confirmed malignant glioma that had progressed after surgery and external beam radiotherapy were eligible for this Phase I study, provided that >6 months had elapsed from the last date of radiation therapy. The first 10 patients received a fixed dose, 290 mg/kg, of L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (L-BPA-F) as a 2-hour infusion before neutron irradiation, and the remaining patients were treated with escalating doses of L-BPA-F, either 350 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg, or 450 mg/kg, using 3 patients on each dose level. Adverse effects were assessed using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 2.0. Results: Twenty-two patients entered the study. Twenty subjects had glioblastoma, and 2 patients had anaplastic astrocytoma, and the median cumulative dose of prior external beam radiotherapy was 59.4 Gy. The maximally tolerated L-BPA-F dose was reached at the 450 mg/kg level, where 4 of 6 patients treated had a grade 3 adverse event. Patients who were given >290 mg/kg of L-BPA-F received a higher estimated average planning target volume dose than those who received 290 mg/kg (median, 36 vs. 31 Gy [W, i.e., a weighted dose]; p = 0.018). The median survival time following BNCT was 7 months. Conclusions: BNCT administered with an L-BPA-F dose of up to 400 mg/kg as a 2-hour infusion is feasible in the treatment of malignant gliomas that recur after conventional radiation therapy.

  2. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-01-01

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

  3. OMOSHI Effect: A New Mechanism for Mass Accretion under the Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2009-08-01

    In a massive-star formation process, a high-mass accretion rate is considered to be needed to overcome the strong radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. We examined the accretion structure near the dust sublimation front and found a new mechanism to overcome this radiation pressure. The weight of the accumulated mass in a stagnant flow near the dust sublimation front helps with the mass accretion. We call this mechanism the ``OMOSHI effect,'' where OMOSHI is an acronym for ``One Mechanism for Overcoming Stellar High radiation pressure by weight.'' OMOSHI is also a Japanese noun meaning a weight that is put on something to prevent it from moving. This mechanism relaxes the condition for the massive star formation.

  4. In vivo evidence for an endothelium-dependent mechanism in radiation-induced normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Emilie; François, Agnès; Toullec, Aurore; Guipaud, Olivier; Buard, Valérie; Tarlet, Georges; Mintet, Elodie; Jaillet, Cyprien; Iruela-Arispe, Maria Luisa; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism involved in side effects of radiation therapy, and especially the role of the endothelium remains unclear. Previous results showed that plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) contributes to radiation-induced intestinal injury and suggested that this role could be driven by an endothelium-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether endothelial-specific PAI-1 deletion could affect radiation-induced intestinal injury. We created a mouse model with a specific deletion of PAI-1 in the endothelium (PAI-1KOendo) by a Cre-LoxP system. In a model of radiation enteropathy, survival and intestinal radiation injury were followed as well as intestinal gene transcriptional profile and inflammatory cells intestinal infiltration. Irradiated PAI-1KOendo mice exhibited increased survival, reduced acute enteritis severity and attenuated late fibrosis compared with irradiated PAI-1flx/flx mice. Double E-cadherin/TUNEL labeling confirmed a reduced epithelial cell apoptosis in irradiated PAI-1KOendo. High-throughput gene expression combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed a putative involvement of macrophages. We observed a decrease in CD68+cells in irradiated intestinal tissues from PAI-1KOendo mice as well as modifications associated with M1/M2 polarization. This work shows that PAI-1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury by an endothelium-dependent mechanism and demonstrates in vivo that the endothelium is directly involved in the progression of radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:26510580

  5. Radiation Induced Non-targeted Response: Mechanism and Potential Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Tom K.; Zhou, Hongning; Chai, Yunfei; Ponnaiya, Brian; Ivanov, Vladimir N.

    2012-01-01

    Generations of students in radiation biology have been taught that heritable biological effects require direct damage to DNA. Radiation-induced non-targeted/bystander effects represent a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation in that extranuclear and extracellular effects may also contribute to the biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Although radiation induced bystander effects have been well documented in a variety of biological systems, including 3D human tissue samples and whole organisms, the mechanism is not known. There is recent evidence that the NF-κB-dependent gene expression of interleukin 8, interleukin 6, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 33 in directly irradiated cells produced the cytokines and prostaglandin E2 with autocrine/paracrine functions, which further activated signaling pathways and induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression in bystander cells. The observations that heritable DNA alterations can be propagated to cells many generations after radiation exposure and that bystander cells exhibit genomic instability in ways similar to directly hit cells indicate that the low dose radiation response is a complex interplay of various modulating factors. The potential implication of the non-targeted response in radiation induced secondary cancer is discussed. A better understanding of the mechanism of the non-targeted effects will be invaluable to assess its clinical relevance and ways in which the bystander phenomenon can be manipulated to increase therapeutic gain in radiotherapy. PMID:21143185

  6. Study on electromagnetic radiation and mechanical characteristics of coal during an SHPB test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengwu, Li; Qifei, Wang; Pingyang, Lyu

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic loads provided by a Split Hopkinson pressure bar are applied in the impact failure experiment on coal with an impact velocity of 4.174–17.652 m s‑1. The mechanical property characteristics of coal and an electromagnetic radiation signal can be detected and measured during the experiment. The variation of coal stress, strain, incident energy, dissipated energy and other mechanical parameters are analyzed by the unidimensional stress wave theory. It suggests that with an increase of the impact velocity, the mechanical parameters and electromagnetic radiation increased significantly and the dissipated energy of the coal sample has a high discrete growing trend during the failure process of coal impact. Combined with the received energy of the electromagnetic radiation signal, the relationship between these mechanical parameters and electromagnetic radiation during the failure process of coal burst could be analyzed by the grey correlation model. The results show that the descending order of the gray correlation degree between the mechanical characteristics and electromagnetic radiation energy are impact velocity, maximum stress, the average stress, incident energy, the average strain, maximum strain, the average strain rate and dissipation energy. Due to the correlation degree, the impact velocity and incident energy are relatively large, and the main factor affecting the electromagnetic radiation energy of coal is the energy magnitude. While the relationship between extreme stress and the radiation energy change trend is closed, the stress state of coal has a greater impact on electromagnetic radiation than the strain and destruction which can deepen the research of the coal-rock dynamic disaster electromagnetic monitoring technique.

  7. Near infrared radiation damage mechanism in the lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Per G.; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Galichanin, Konstantin; Kronschläger, Martin; Schulmeister, Karl; Yu, Zhaohua

    2015-03-01

    The current data strongly indicates that there is no photochemical effect of in vivo exposure to 1090 nm near IRR radiation within the pupil. Four groups of 20 Sprague-Dawley rats were unilaterally exposed in vivo to 96 W·cm-2 centered inside the pupil for 10, 18, 33 and 60 min, respectively depending on group belonging. This resulted in radiant exposure doses of 57, 103, 198 and 344 kJ·cm-2. Temperature evolution at the limbus during the exposure and difference of intensity of forward light scattering between the exposed and the contralateral not exposed eye was measured at 1 week after exposure. The temperature at the limbus was found to increase exponentially towards an asymptote with an asymptote temperature of around 7 °C and a time constant (1/k) of around 15 s. No increase of light scattering was found despite that the cumulated radiant exposure dose was [80;250] times the threshold for photochemically induced cataract suggested by previous empirical data. It is concluded that at 1090 nm near IRR there is no photochemical effect.

  8. Correlation of Radiation Dosage With Mechanical Properties of Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to examine the relationship between irradiation level (proton dose), microstructure, and stress levels in chemical vapor deposited diamond and polysilicon film using crosssectioned specimens. However, the emphasis was placed on the diamond specimen because diamond holds much promise for use in advanced technologies. The use of protons allows not only the study of the charged particle that may cause the most microstructural damage in Earth-orbit microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices, but also allows the study of relatively deeply buried damage inside the diamond material. Using protons allows these studies without having to resort to megaelectronvolt implant energies that may create extensive damage due to the high energy that is needed for the implantation process. Since 1 MEMS devices operating in space will not have an opportunity to reverse radiation damage via annealing, only nonannealed specimens were investigated. The following three high spatial resolution techniques were used to examine these relationships: (I) Scanning electron microscopy, (2) micro-Raman spectroscopy, and (3) micro x-ray diffraction.

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy: A guide to the understanding of the pathogenesis of late radiation damage to the rat spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.M.; Whitehouse, E.M.; Hopewell, J.W. ); Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P. )

    1994-03-30

    Before the commencement of new boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) clinical trials in Europe and North America, detailed information on normal tissue tolerance is required. In this study, the pathologic effects of BNCT on the central nervous system (CNS) have been investigated using a rat spinal cord model. The neutron capture agent used was [sup 10]B-enriched sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH), at a dosage of 100 mg/kg body weight. Rats were irradiated on the thermal beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. The large spine of vertebra T[sub 2] was used as the lower marker of the irradiation field. Rats were irradiated with thermal neutrons alone to a maximum physical absorbed dose of 11.4 Gy, or with thermal neutrons in combination with BSH, to maximum absorbed physical doses of 5.7 Gy to the CNS parenchyma and 33.7 Gy to the blood in the vasculature of the spinal cord. An additional group of rats was irradiated with 250 kVp X-rays to a single dose of 35 Gy. Spinal cord pathology was examined between 5 and 12 months after irradiation. The physical dose of radiation delivered to the CNS parenchyma, using thermal neutron irradiation in the presence of BSH, was a factor of two to three lower than that delivered to the vascular endothelium, and could not account for the level of damage observed in the parenchyma. The histopathological observations of the present study support the hypothesis that the blood vessels, and the endothelial cells in particular, are the critical target population responsible for the lesions seen in the spinal cord after BNCT type irradiation and by inference, after more conventional irradiation modalities such as photons or fast neutrons. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. A mechanical model for giant radiating dike swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Alexander; Yarushina, Viktoriya; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2016-04-01

    The Large Igneous Provinces (LIP) is believed to form as results of plume-lithosphere interaction. A recognizable diagnostic feature of the LIP is a swarm of dikes (100 - 1000 km -long) radiating from a single or several focal regions. The models for formation of these dike swarms are mainly based on Venusian analogues (associated with coronae structures) since on Earth these paleo-structures are presumably less likely to preserve due to erosion and later tectonics. The existing explanation for the geometry of dikes (in horizontal plane) is based on assumption that in a far-field shear stress the dikes are normal to the least principal stress. A small overpressure related to the lithospheric magma reservoir is also assumed. However, this type of models implies several limitations: 1) the dike emplacement is considered as a purely elastic process, 2) all dikes are assumed to intrude simultaneously (no interaction with neighboring dikes). On the other hand, recent geophysical observations suggest that the dikes that apparently belong to the same magmatic event can intersect and can be affected by each other and local crustal heterogeneity. In this study, we attribute the geometry of dikes to irreversible plastic deformation including the path-dependence. We use finite-element elastoplastic simulations to predict the fracture pattern related to the plume-lithosphere interaction. The rheology is governed by a non-associated Mohr-Coulomb plastic flow law. The accuracy of the numerical results is benchmarked versus 2D plane strain analytical solutions for combined shear and internal pressure loads. We apply our model to the case of the High Arctic LIP. Here, the location of the dike intrusions is based on the interpretation of magnetic anomalies supported by geological and seismic data in the Barents Sea together with timing constraints using U-Pb isotopic ages. The developed model provides a framework for future high-resolution structural and geochronological studies to