Science.gov

Sample records for radiative heat flux

  1. Spectral estimates of net radiation and soil heat flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daughtry, C.S.T.; Kustas, W.P.; Moran, M.S.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Jackson, R. D.; Brown, P.W.; Nichols, W.D.; Gay, L.W.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional methods of measuring surface energy balance are point measurements and represent only a small area. Remote sensing offers a potential means of measuring outgoing fluxes over large areas at the spatial resolution of the sensor. The objective of this study was to estimate net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G) using remotely sensed multispectral data acquired from an aircraft over large agricultural fields. Ground-based instruments measured Rn and G at nine locations along the flight lines. Incoming fluxes were also measured by ground-based instruments. Outgoing fluxes were estimated using remotely sensed data. Remote Rn, estimated as the algebraic sum of incoming and outgoing fluxes, slightly underestimated Rn measured by the ground-based net radiometers. The mean absolute errors for remote Rn minus measured Rn were less than 7%. Remote G, estimated as a function of a spectral vegetation index and remote Rn, slightly overestimated measured G; however, the mean absolute error for remote G was 13%. Some of the differences between measured and remote values of Rn and G are associated with differences in instrument designs and measurement techniques. The root mean square error for available energy (Rn - G) was 12%. Thus, methods using both ground-based and remotely sensed data can provide reliable estimates of the available energy which can be partitioned into sensible and latent heat under nonadvective conditions. ?? 1990.

  2. An Investigation of the Compatibility of Radiation and Convection Heat Flux Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1996-01-01

    A method for determining time-resolved absorbed surface heat flux and surface temperature in radiation and convection environments is described. The method is useful for verification of aerodynamic, heat transfer and durability models. A practical heat flux gage fabrication procedure and a simple one-dimensional inverse heat conduction model and calculation procedure are incorporated in this method. The model provides an estimate of the temperature and heat flux gradient in the direction of heat transfer through the gage. This paper discusses several successful time-resolved tests of this method in hostile convective heating and cooling environments.

  3. Comparison of measured and modeled radiation, heat and water vapor fluxes: FIFE pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.; Verma, Shashi B.; Starks, Patrick; Norman, John M.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using radio frequency receivers to collect data from automated weather stations to model fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and radiation using routine weather data collected by automated weather stations was tested and the estimated fluxes were compared with fluxes measured over wheat. The model Cupid was used to model the fluxes. Two or more automated weather stations, interrogated by radio frequency and other means, were utilized to examine some of the climatic variability of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE) site, to measure and model reflected and emitted radiation streams from various locations at the site and to compare modeled latent and sensible heat fluxes with measured values. Some bidirectional reflected and emitted radiation data were collected from 23 locations throughout the FIFE site. Analysis of these data along with analysis of the measured sensible and latent heat fluxes is just beginning.

  4. Radiative Heating and the Buoyant Rise of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Solar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Fisher, G. H.

    1996-06-01

    We study the effect of radiative heating on the evolution of thin magnetic flux tubes in the solar interior and on the eruption of magnetic flux loops to the surface. Magnetic flux tubes experience radiative heating because (1) the mean temperature gradient in the lower convection zone and the overshoot region deviates substantially from that of radiative equilibrium, and hence there is a non-zero divergence of radiative heat flux; and (2) the magnetic pressure of the flux tube causes a small change of the thermodynamic properties within the tube relative to the surrounding field-free fluid, resulting in an additional divergence of radiative heat flux. Our calculations show that the former constitutes the dominant source of radiative heating experienced by the flux tube. In the overshoot region, the radiative heating is found to cause a quasi-static rising of the toroidal flux tubes with an upward drift velocity ˜ 10-3|?| cm s-1, where ? ? ?e - ?ad < 0 describes the subadiabaticity in the overshoot layer. The upward drift velocity does not depend sensitively on the field strength of the flux tubes. Thus in order to store toroidal flux tubes in the overshoot region for a period comparable to the length of the solar cycle, the magnitude of the subadiabaticity ?(< 0) in the overshoot region must be as large as ˜ 3 × 10-4. We discuss the possibilities for increasing the magnitude of ? and for reducing the rate of radiative heating of the flux tubes in the overshoot region. Using numerical simulations we study the formation of ‘?’-shaped emerging loops from toroidal flux tubes in the overshoot region as a result of radiative heating. The initial toroidal tube is assumed to be non-uniform in its thermodynamic properties along the tube and lies at varying depths beneath the base of the convection zone. The tube is initially in a state of neutral buoyancy with the internal density of the tube plasma equal to the local external density. We find from our numerical simulations that such a toroidal tube rises quasi-statically due to radiative heating. The top portion of the nonuniform tube first enters the convection zone and may be brought to an unstable configuration which eventually leads to the eruption of an anchored flux loop to the surface. Assuming reasonable initial parameters, our numerical calculations yield fairly short rise times (2 4 months) for the development of the emerging flux loops. This suggests that radiative heating is an effective way of causing the eruption of magnetic flux loops, leading to the formation of active regions at the surface.

  5. A new method for simultaneous measurement of convective and radiative heat flux in car underhood applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, M.; Garnier, B.; Harambat, F.; Peerhossaini, H.

    2010-02-01

    A new experimental technique is presented that allows simultaneous measurement of convective and radiative heat flux in the underhood. The goal is to devise an easily implemented and accurate experimental method for application in the vehicle underhood compartment. The new method is based on a technique for heat-flux measurement developed by the authors (Heat flow (flux) sensors for measurement of convection, conduction and radiation heat flow 27036-2, © Rhopoint Components Ltd, Hurst Green, Oxted, RH8 9AX, UK) that uses several thermocouples in the thickness of a thermal resistive layer (foil heat-flux sensor). The method proposed here uses a pair of these thermocouples with different radiative properties. Measurements validating this novel technique are carried out on a flat plate with a prescribed constant temperature in both natural- and forced-convection flow regimes. The test flat plate is instrumented by this new technique, and also with a different technique that is intrusive but very accurate, used as reference here (Bardon J P and Jarny Y 1994 Procédé et dispositif de mesure transitoire de température et flux surfacique Brevet n°94.011996, 22 February). Discrepancies between the measurements by the two techniques are less than 10% for both convective and radiative heat flux. Error identification and sensitivity analysis of the new method are also presented.

  6. Comparison of measured and modeled radiation, heat and water vapor fluxes: FIFE pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Verma, Shashi B.; Hubbard, Kenneth G.; Starks, Patrick; Hays, Cynthia; Norman, John M.; Waltershea, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    The primary objectives of the 1985 study were to test the feasibility of using radio frequency receivers to collect data from automated weather stations and to evaluate the use of the data collected by the automated weather stations for modeling the fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and radiation over wheat. The model Cupid was used to calculate these fluxes which were compared with fluxes of these entities measured using micrometeorological techniques. The primary objectives of the 1986 study were to measure and model reflected and emitted radiation streams at a few locations within the First International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) site and to compare modeled and measured latent heat and sensible heat fluxes from the prairie vegetation.

  7. Boundary Heat Fluxes for Spectral Radiation from a Uniform Temperature Rectangular Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The effect of spectral behavior is analytically shown for radiation in a 2D rectangular geometry. The solution provides exact boundary heat flux values that can be used for comparison with values obtained from general computer programs. The spectral solution presented can be easily evaluated by numerical integration for complex variations of the spectral absorption coefficient with wavelength.

  8. Temperature and Radiative Heat Flux Measurements in Microgravity Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide detailed measurements and modeling analyses of local soot concentration, temperature and radiation heat flux distributions in laminar and turbulent jet diffusion flames under normal (1-g) and reduced gravity (0-g) conditions. Results published to date by these co-PI's and their co-workers include: 1. thermophoretic sampling and size and morphological analyses of soot aggregates in laminar flames under normal and reduced gravity conditions; 2. full-field absorption imaging for soot volume fraction maps in laminar and turbulent flames under normal and reduced gravity conditions; 3. an accurate solver module for detailed radiation heat transfer in nongray nonhomogeneous media; 4. a complete model to include flame structure, soot formation and an energy equation to couple with radiation solver.

  9. Apparatus for measuring high-flux heat transfer in radiatively heated compact exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus is described which can deliver uniform heat flux densities of up to 80 W/sq cm over an area 7.8 cm x 15.2 cm for use in measuring the heat transfer and pressure drop in thin (6 mm or less), compact heat exchangers. Helium gas at flow rates of 0 to 40 kg/h and pressures to 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) is the working fluid. The instrumentation used in the apparatus and the methods for analyzing the data is described. The apparatus will be used initially to test the performance of prototype cooling jackets for the engine struts of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP).

  10. The Sensitivity of Latent Heat Flux to Changes in the Radiative Forcing: A Framework for Comparing Models and Observations

    E-print Network

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    A climate model must include an accurate surface physics scheme in order to examine the interactions between the land and atmosphere. Given an increase in the surface radiative forcing, the sensitivity of latent heat flux ...

  11. Sensitivity of shortwave radiative flux density, forcing, and heating rates to the aerosol vertical profile

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Hong; Schmid, Beat; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bergstrom, Robert

    2010-03-31

    The effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the solar radiation profiles, for idealized and measured profiles of optical properties (extinction and single-scattering albedo (SSA)) during the May 2003 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Observation Period (AIOP), has been investigated using the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model Shortwave (RRTM_SW) code. Calculated profiles of down-welling and up-welling solar fluxes during the AIOP have been compared with the data measured by up- and down-looking solar broadband radiometers aboard a profiling research aircraft. The measured profiles of aerosol extinction, SSA, and water vapor obtained from the same aircraft that carried the radiometers served as the inputs for the model calculations. It is noteworthy that for this study, the uplooking radiometers were mounted on a stabilized platform that kept the radiometers parallel with respect to the earth’s horizontal plane. The results indicate that the shape of the aerosol extinction profiles has very little impact on direct radiative forcings at the top of atmosphere and surface in a cloud-free sky. However, as long as the aerosol is not purely scattering, the shape of the extinction profiles is important for forcing profiles. Identical extinction profiles with different absorption profiles drastically influence the forcing and heating rate profiles. Using aircraft data from 19 AIOP profiles over the Southern Great Plains (SGP), we are able to achieve broadband down-welling solar flux closure within 0.8% (bias difference) or 1.8% (rms difference), well within the expected measurement uncertainty of 1 to 3%. The poorer agreement in up-welling flux (bias -3.7%, rms 10%) is attributed to the use of inaccurate surface albedo data. The sensitivity tests reveal the important role accurate, vertically resolved aerosol extinction data plays in tightening flux closure. This study also suggests that in the presence of a strongly absorbing substance, aircraft flux measurements from a stabilized platform have the potential to determine heating rate profiles. These measurement-based heating rate profiles provide useful data for heating rate closure studies and indirect estimates of single scattering albedo assumed in radiative transfer calculations.

  12. The effect of cumulus cloud field anisotropy on solar radiative fluxes and atmospheric heating rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkelman, Laura M.

    The effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain average surface fluxes and atmospheric heating profiles was studied. Causes of anisotropy were investigated using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Cloud formation under a variety of environmental conditions was simulated and the degree of anisotropy in the output fields was calculated. Wind shear was found to be the single greatest factor in the development of both vertically tilted and horizontally stretched cloud structures. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of the LES cloud scenes. Progressively greater degrees of tilt and stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes were produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. For nearly all solar geometries, domain-averaged fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles calculated using the Independent Pixel Approximation differed substantially from the corresponding three-dimensional Monte Carlo results.

  13. Validation experiments to determine radiation partitioning of heat flux to an object in a fully turbulent fire.

    SciTech Connect

    Ricks, Allen; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Jernigan, Dann A.

    2006-06-01

    It is necessary to improve understanding and develop validation data of the heat flux incident to an object located within the fire plume for the validation of SIERRA/ FUEGO/SYRINX fire and SIERRA/CALORE. One key aspect of the validation data sets is the determination of the relative contribution of the radiative and convective heat fluxes. To meet this objective, a cylindrical calorimeter with sufficient instrumentation to measure total and radiative heat flux had been designed and fabricated. This calorimeter will be tested both in the controlled radiative environment of the Penlight facility and in a fire environment in the FLAME/Radiant Heat (FRH) facility. Validation experiments are specifically designed for direct comparison with the computational predictions. Making meaningful comparisons between the computational and experimental results requires careful characterization and control of the experimental features or parameters used as inputs into the computational model. Validation experiments must be designed to capture the essential physical phenomena, including all relevant initial and boundary conditions. A significant question of interest to modeling heat flux incident to an object in or near a fire is the contribution of the radiation and convection modes of heat transfer. The series of experiments documented in this test plan is designed to provide data on the radiation partitioning, defined as the fraction of the total heat flux that is due to radiation.

  14. Use of radiation control coatings to reduce ceiling heat flux in hot climates

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Nachimuthu, R. )

    1994-04-01

    Radiation control coatings are materials with minimum solar reflectance of 0.75 and minimum ambient temperature emittances of 0.75. Radiation control coatings are produced from exterior-grade, white paint by adding a substance to increase the solar reflectance. Twenty formulations of radiation control coatings, containing a variety of additives, were studied. Solar reflectances as high as 0.83 were measured for radiation control coatings containing TiO[sub 2] or glass microspheres. A small test unit was used to measure roof temperatures and ceiling fluxes. The test unit was used to measure roof temperatures as a function of roof angle for reflective and non-reflective coatings. The roof with a reflective coating had temperatures 25 to 30[degrees]C less than the roof with a non-reflective coating. The ceiling heat fluxes with the reflective coating were, therefore, much lower than those with a non-reflective coating. The building simulator [open quotes]BLAST[close quotes] was used to assess the annual benefit of using radiation control coatings on the roofs of buildings.

  15. A comparison of small and larger mesoscale latent heat and radiative fluxes: December 6 case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, I.; Starr, David; Heymsfield, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the small amounts of water vapor, the potential for rapid changes, and the very cold temperatures in the upper troposphere, moisture measuring instruments face several problems related to calibration and response. Calculations of eddy moisture fluxes are, therefore, subject to significant uncertainty. The purpose of this study is to examine the importance of latent heat (moisture) fluxes due to small and larger mesoscale circulations in comparison to radiative fluxes within cirrus. Scale separation is made at about 1 km because of significant changes in the structures within cirrus. Only observations at warmer than -40 C are used in this study. The EG&G hygrometer that is used for measuring dewpoint temperature (Td) is believed to be fairly accurate down to -40 C. On the other hand, Lyman-Alpha (L-alpha) hygrometer measurements of moisture may include large drift errors. In order to compensate for these drift errors, the L-alpha hygrometer is often calibrated against the EG&G hygrometer. However, large errors ensue for Td measurements at temperatures less than -40 C. The cryogenic hygrometer frost point measurements may be used to calibrate L-alpha measurements at temperatures less than -40 C. In this study, however, measurements obtained by EG&G hygrometer and L-alpha measurements are used for the flux calculations.

  16. Radiative and turbulent surface heat fluxes over sea ice in the western Weddell Sea in early summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihma, Timo; Johansson, Milla M.; Launiainen, Jouko

    2009-04-01

    The radiative and turbulent heat fluxes between the snow-covered sea ice and the atmosphere were analyzed on the basis of observations during the Ice Station Polarstern (ISPOL) in the western Weddell Sea from 28 November 2004 to 2 January 2005. The net heat flux to the snowpack was 3 ± 2 W m-2 (mean ± standard deviation; defined positive toward snow), consisting of the net shortwave radiation (52 ± 8 W m-2), net longwave radiation (-29 ± 4 W m-2), latent heat flux (-14 ± 5 W m-2), and sensible heat flux (-6 ± 5 W m-2). The snowpack receives heat at daytime while releases heat every night. Snow thinning was due to approximately equal contributions of the increase of snow density, melt, and evaporation. The surface albedo only decreased from 0.9 to 0.8. During a case of cold air advection, the sensible heat flux was even below -50 W m-2. At night, the snow surface temperature was strongly controlled by the incoming longwave radiation. The diurnal cycle in the downward solar radiation drove diurnal cycles in 14 other variables. Comparisons against observations from the Arctic sea ice in summer indicated that at ISPOL the air was colder, surface albedo was higher, and a larger portion of the absorbed solar radiation was returned to the atmosphere via turbulent heat fluxes. The limited melt allowed larger diurnal cycles. Due to regional differences in atmospheric circulation and ice conditions, the ISPOL results cannot be fully generalized for the entire Antarctic sea ice zone.

  17. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  18. Radiative Heating and the Buoyant Rise of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Solar Interior

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    of the National Optical Astronomy Observa- tories operated by the Association of Universities for Research of radiative heating. The initial toroidal tube is assumed to be non-uniform in its thermodynamic properties. Moreno-Insertis, Schussler, & Ferris-Mas (1992) and Ferris-Mas & Schussler (1994) have argued

  19. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MaCarthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  20. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MacArthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  1. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MacArthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  2. Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  3. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  4. Radiative Flux Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Chuck

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  5. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  6. Measurements of net radiation, ground heat flux and surface temperature in an urban canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Gouveia, F J; Leach, M J; Shinn, J H

    2003-11-06

    The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect data to increase our knowledge of dispersion in urban areas. Air motions in and around urban areas are very complicated due to the influence of urban structures on both mechanical and thermal forcing. During JU2003, meteorological instruments were deployed at various locations throughout the urban area to characterize the processes that influence dispersion. Some of the instruments were deployed to characterize urban phenomena, such as boundary layer development. In addition, particular sites were chosen for more concentrated measurements to investigate physical processes in more detail. One such site was an urban street canyon on Park Avenue between Broadway and Robinson Avenues in downtown Oklahoma City. The urban canyon study was designed to examine the processes that control dispersion within, into and out of the urban canyon. Several towers were deployed in the Park Avenue block, with multiple levels on each tower for observing the wind using sonic anemometers. Infrared thermometers, net radiometers and ground heat flux plates were deployed on two of the towers midway in the canyon to study the thermodynamic effects and to estimate the surface energy balance. We present results from the surface energy balance observations.

  7. Spatialization of instantaneous and daily average net radiation and soil heat flux in the territory of Itaparica, Northeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Helio L.; Silva, Bernardo B.; Teixeira, Antônio H. C.; Accioly, Luciano J. O.

    2012-09-01

    This work has as aim to quantify the energy changes between atmosphere and surface by modeling both net radiation and soil heat flux related to land use and cover. The methodology took into account modeling and mapping of physical and biophysical parameters using MODIS images and SEBAL algorithm in an area of native vegetation and irrigated crops. The results showed that there are variations in the values of the estimated parameters for different land cover types and mainly in caatinga cover. The dense caatinga presents mean values of soil heat flux (Go) of 124.9 Wm-2 while sparse caatinga with incidence of erosion, present average value of 132.6 Wm-2. For irrigated plots cultivated with banana, coconut, and papaya the mean Go values were 103.8, 98.6, 113.9 Wm-2, respectively. With regard to the instantaneous net radiation (Rn), dense caatinga presented mean value of 626.1 Wm-2, while sparse caatinga a mean value of 575.2 Wm-2. Irrigated areas cultivated with banana, coconut, and papaya presented Rn of 658.1, 647.4 and 617.9 W m-2 respectively. Applying daily mean net radiation (RnDAve) it was found that dense caatinga had a mean value of 417.1 W m-2, while sparse caatinga had a mean value of 379.9 W m-2. For the irrigated crops of banana, coconut and papaya the RnDAve values were 430.9, 431.3 and 411.6 W m-2, respectively. Sinusoidal model can be applied to determine the maximum and RnDAve considering the diverse classes of LULC; however, there is a need to compare the results with field data for validation of this model.

  8. High heat flux single phase heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Izenson, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained to date in a program to develop a high heat flux, single-phase heat exchanger for spacecraft thermal management. The intended application is a net generation interface heat exchanger to couple the crew module water thermal bus to the two-phase ammonia main thermal bus in the Space Station Freedom. The large size of the interface heat exchanger is dictated by the relatively poor water-side heat transfer characteristics. The objective of this program is to develop a single-phase heat transfer approach which can achieve heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients comparable to those of the evaporation ammonia side. A new heat exchanger concept has been developed to meet these objecties. The main feature of this heat exchanger is that it can achieve very high heat fluxes with a pressure drop one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of previous microchannel or jet impingement high heat flux heat exchangers. This paper describes proof-of-concept experiments performed in air and water and presents analytical model of the heat exchanger.

  9. Heat flux microsensor measurements and calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, James P.; Hager, Jon M.; Onishi, Shinzo; Diller, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    A new thin-film heat flux gage has been fabricated specifically for severe high temperature operation using platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium for the thermocouple elements. Radiation calibrations of this gage were performed at the AEDC facility over the available heat flux range (approx. 1.0 - 1,000 W/cu cm). The gage output was linear with heat flux with a slight increase in sensitivity with increasing surface temperature. Survivability of gages was demonstrated in quench tests from 500 C into liquid nitrogen. Successful operation of gages to surface temperatures of 750 C has been achieved. No additional cooling of the gages is required because the gages are always at the same temperature as the substrate material. A video of oxyacetylene flame tests with real-time heat flux and temperature output is available.

  10. Radial heat flux transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit moves heat radially from small diameter shell to larger diameter shell, or vice versa, with negligible temperature drop, making device useful wherever heating or cooling of concentrically arranged materials, substances, and structures is desired.

  11. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mace, Gerald

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  12. On the use of radiative surface temperature to estimate sensible heat flux over sparse shrubs in Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chehbouni, A.; Nichols, W. D.; Qi, J.; Njoku, E. G.; Kerr, Y. H.; Cabot, F.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate partitioning of available energy into sensible and latent heat flux is crucial to the understanding of surface atmosphere interactions. This issue is more complicated in arid and semi arid regions where the relative contribution to surface fluxes from the soil and vegetation may vary significantly throughout the day and throughout the season. A three component model to estimate sensible heat flux over heterogeneous surfaces is presented. The surface was represented with two adjacent compartments. The first compartment is made up of two components, shrubs and shaded soil, the second of open 'illuminated' soil. Data collected at two different sites in Nevada (U.S.) during the Summers of 1991 and 1992 were used to evaluate model performance. The results show that the present model is sufficiently general to yield satisfactory results for both sites.

  13. Impact of aerosol direct radiative forcing on the radiative budget, surface heat fluxes, and atmospheric dynamics during the heat wave of summer 2003 over western Europe: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PéRé, J. C.; Mallet, M.; Pont, V.; Bessagnet, B.

    2011-12-01

    In this work, an off-line coupling between the chemistry-transport model CHIMERE (associated with an aerosol optical module) and the meteorological model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) is used to study (1) the direct radiative forcing of pollution aerosols during the heat wave of summer 2003 over western Europe and (2) the possible feedbacks of this direct radiative forcing on the surface-atmosphere system. Simulations performed for the period 7-15 August 2003 reveal a significant decrease of daily mean solar radiation reaching the surface (?FBOA = -(10-30) W/m2) because of back scattering at the top of the atmosphere (?FTOA = -(1-12) W/m2) and also absorption of solar radiation by polluted particles (?Fatm = + (5-23) W/m2). During daytime, the aerosol surface dimming induces a mean reduction of both sensible (16 W/m2) and latent (21 W/m2) heat fluxes emitted by the terrestrial surface, resulting in a radiative cooling of the air near the surface (up to 2.9 K/d at noon). Simultaneously, the absorption of solar energy by aerosols causes an atmospheric radiative heating within the planetary boundary layer reaching 1.20 K/d at noon. As a consequence, the direct radiative effect of aerosols is shown to reduce both the planetary boundary layer height (up to 30%) and the horizontal wind speed (up to 6%); that may have contributed to favor the particulate pollution during the heat wave of summer 2003.

  14. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  15. Coupled estimation of surface heat fluxes and vegetation dynamics from remotely sensed land surface temperature and fraction of photosynthetically active radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, S. M.; Entekhabi, D.; Margulis, S.; Castelli, F.; Kergoat, L.

    2014-11-01

    Remotely sensed Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) are assimilated, respectively, into the Surface Energy Balance (SEB) equation and a Vegetation Dynamics Model (VDM) in order to estimate surface fluxes and vegetation dynamics. The problem is posed in terms of three unknown and dimensionless parameters: (1) neutral bulk heat transfer coefficient, which scales the sum of turbulent heat fluxes, (2) soil and canopy evaporative fractions that characterize partitioning among the turbulent heat fluxes over soil and vegetation, and (3) specific leaf area, which captures seasonal phenology and vegetation dynamics. The model is applied over the Gourma site in Mali, the northern region of the West African Monsoon (WAM) domain. The application of the model over the Gourma site shows that spaceborne LST observations can be used to constrain the SEB equation and obtain its key two unknown parameters (i.e., neutral bulk heat transfer coefficient and evaporative fraction). We demonstrate that the spatial patterns of estimated neutral bulk heat transfer coefficient and evaporative fraction resemble, respectively, those of independently observed vegetation index and soil moisture. The framework also yields estimates of surface energy balance components. The daily sensible, latent, and ground heat flux estimates at the Agoufou site that is located in the south of the Gourma region have, respectively, a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 53.6, 34.4, and 45.1 Wm-2. The daily sensible heat flux estimates at the Bamba site, which is located in the north of the Gourma domain, have a RMSE of 42.6 Wm-2. The results also show that remotely sensed FPAR observations can constrain the VDM and retrieve its main unknown parameter (specific leaf area) over large-scale domains without costly in situ measurements. The results indicate that the estimated specific leaf area values vary reasonably with the expected influential environmental variables such as precipitation, air temperature, and solar radiation. Assimilating FPAR observations into the VDM can also provide an estimate of Leaf Area Index (LAI) dynamics. The estimated LAI values are comparable in magnitude, spatial pattern and temporal evolution with satellite retrievals.

  16. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-06-01

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall. All of the other model elements (conduction through wall board, sheathing, and siding; convection from siding and wallboard to ambients; and radiation across the wall cavity) are required to accurately predict the heat transfer through a wall. Addition of a foil liner on one inner surface of the wall cavity reduces the total heat transferred by almost 50%.

  17. Automated Heat-Flux-Calibration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    Computer control speeds operation of equipment and processing of measurements. New heat-flux-calibration facility developed at Lewis Research Center. Used for fast-transient heat-transfer testing, durability testing, and calibration of heat-flux gauges. Calibrations performed at constant or transient heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 6 MW/m2 and at temperatures ranging from 80 K to melting temperatures of most materials. Facility developed because there is need to build and calibrate very-small heat-flux gauges for Space Shuttle main engine (SSME).Includes lamp head attached to side of service module, an argon-gas-recirculation module, reflector, heat exchanger, and high-speed positioning system. This type of automated heat-flux calibration facility installed in industrial plants for onsite calibration of heat-flux gauges measuring fluxes of heat in advanced gas-turbine and rocket engines.

  18. Deployable Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    A 1.2- by 1.8-m variable conductance heat pipe radiator was designed, built, and tested. The radiator has deployment capability and can passively control Freon-21 fluid loop temperatures under varying loads and environments. It consists of six grooved variable conductance heat pipes attached to a 0.032-in. aluminum panel. Heat is supplied to the radiator via a fluid header or a single-fluid flexible heat pipe header. The heat pipe header is an artery design that has a flexible section capable of bending up to 90 degrees. Radiator loads as high as 850 watts were successfully tested. Over a load variation of 200 watts, the outlet temperature of the Freon-21 fluid varied by 7 F. An alternate control system was also investigated which used a variable conductance heat pipe header attached to the heat pipe radiator panel.

  19. Latent heat sink in soil heat flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  20. Building wall heat flux calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Tunstall, J.N.; Childs, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations of the heat transfer through the standard stud wall structure of a residential building are described. The wall cavity contains no insulation. Four of the five test cases represent progressively more complicated approximations to the heat transfer through and within a hollow wall structure. The fifth adds the model components necessary to severely inhibit the radiative energy transport across the empty cavity. Flow within the wall cavity is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy conservation equation for an ideal gas using the Implicit Compressible Eulerian (ICE) algorithm. The fluid flow calculation is coupled to the radiation-conduction model for the solid portions of the system. Conduction through sill plates is about 4% of the total heat transferred through a composite wall.

  1. Effects of dynamic heat fluxes on model climate sensitivity Meridional sensible and latent heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutowski, W. J., Jr.; Wang, W.-C.; Stone, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    The high- and low-latitude radiative-dynamic (HLRD) climatic model of Wang et al. (1984) was used to study the effect of meridional heat (MH) fluxes on climate changes caused by increases of CO2 abundance and solar constant variations. However, the empirical MH parameterization of the HLRD model was replaced by physically based parameterization, which gives separate meridional sensible and latent heat fluxes and provides a complete representation of the dependence of the flux on the mean temperature field. Both parameterization methods yielded about the same changes in global mean surface temperature and ice line, and both produced only small changes in meridional temperature gradient, although the latter were even smaller with the physically based parameterizations. At any latitude, the hemispheric mean surface temperature, rather than MH fluxes, dominates the surface temperature changes.

  2. Geometrical correction factors for heat flux meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Papell, S. S.

    1974-01-01

    General formulas are derived for determining gage averaging errors of strip-type heat flux meters used in the measurement of one-dimensional heat flux distributions. The local averaging error e(x) is defined as the difference between the measured value of the heat flux and the local value which occurs at the center of the gage. In terms of e(x), a correction procedure is presented which allows a better estimate for the true value of the local heat flux. For many practical problems, it is possible to use relatively large gages to obtain acceptable heat flux measurements.

  3. Dimensional Analysis of Thermoelectric Modules Under Constant Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryosuke O.; Fujisaka, Takeyuki; Ito, Keita O.; Meng, Xiangning; Sui, Hong-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generation is examined in the case of radiative heating. A constant heat flux is assumed in addition to consideration of the Seebeck effect, Peltier effect, and Joule heating with temperature-dependent material properties. Numerical evaluations are conducted using a combination of the finite-volume method and an original simultaneous solver for the heat transfer, thermoelectric, and electric transportation phenomena. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new solver could work well in the numerical calculations. The calculations predict that the Seebeck effect becomes larger for longer thermoelectric elements because of the larger temperature difference. The heat transfer to the cold surface is critical to determine the junction temperatures under a constant heat flux from the hot surface. The negative contribution from Peltier cooling and heating can be minimized when the current is smaller for longer elements. Therefore, a thicker TE module can generate more electric power even under a constant heat flux.

  4. Effects of dynamical heat fluxes on model climate sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Molnar, G.; Mitchell, T. P.; Stone, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A coupled high and low latitude radiative-dynamical model of the annual mean northern hemisphere has been constructed in order to study the interactions of the vertical and meridional heat fluxes and their feedback effect on model climate sensitivity. The model's climate sensitivity to solar constant changes and CO2 increases is investigated, and the effect of feedback in the dynamical fluxes on model climate sensitivity is examined. Nonlinear interactions between heat fluxes and other feedbacks such as radiation-temperature, ice albedo, and humidity are also discussed.

  5. Dual Active Surface Heat Flux Gage Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  6. Miniature convection cooled plug-type heat flux gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1994-02-01

    Tests and analysis of a new miniature plug-type heat flux gauge configuration are described. This gauge can simultaneously measure heat flux on two opposed active surfaces when heat flux levels are equal to or greater than about 0.2 MW/m(sup 2). The performance of this dual active surface gauge was investigated over a wide transient and steady heat flux and temperature range. The tests were performed by radiatively heating the front surface with an argon arc lamp while the back surface was convection cooled with air. Accuracy is about +20 percent. The gauge is responsive to fast heat flux transients and is designed to withstand the high temperature (1300 K), high pressure (15 MPa), erosive and corrosive environments in modern engines. This gauge can be used to measure heat flux on the surfaces of internally cooled apparatus such as turbine blades and combustors used in jet propulsion systems and on the surfaces of hypersonic vehicles. Heat flux measurement accuracy is not compromised when design considerations call for various size gauges to be fabricated into alloys of various shapes and properties. Significant gauge temperature reductions (120 K), which can lead to potential gauge durability improvement, were obtained when the gauges were air-cooled by forced convection.

  7. Miniature Convection Cooled Plug-type Heat Flux Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1994-01-01

    Tests and analysis of a new miniature plug-type heat flux gauge configuration are described. This gauge can simultaneously measure heat flux on two opposed active surfaces when heat flux levels are equal to or greater than about 0.2 MW/m(sup 2). The performance of this dual active surface gauge was investigated over a wide transient and steady heat flux and temperature range. The tests were performed by radiatively heating the front surface with an argon arc lamp while the back surface was convection cooled with air. Accuracy is about +20 percent. The gauge is responsive to fast heat flux transients and is designed to withstand the high temperature (1300 K), high pressure (15 MPa), erosive and corrosive environments in modern engines. This gauge can be used to measure heat flux on the surfaces of internally cooled apparatus such as turbine blades and combustors used in jet propulsion systems and on the surfaces of hypersonic vehicles. Heat flux measurement accuracy is not compromised when design considerations call for various size gauges to be fabricated into alloys of various shapes and properties. Significant gauge temperature reductions (120 K), which can lead to potential gauge durability improvement, were obtained when the gauges were air-cooled by forced convection.

  8. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

    2008-08-04

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  9. Divertor heat flux mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Maingi, R.; Gates, D.A.; Menard, J.E.; Bush, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono , Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m(-2) to 0.5-2 MW m(-2) in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of the outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  10. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  11. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  12. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  13. Surface heat flux data from energy balance Bowen ratio systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Coulter, R.L.

    1995-06-01

    The 350 {times} 400 km domain of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program`s Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in the southern Great Plains is equipped with 10 energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) stations at grassland sites; they measure the net radiation, ground heat flux, and temperature/humidity differences between 1.0 and 2.0 m heights. The latter differences provide estimates of the geometric Bowen ratio ({beta}), which are used to estimate sensible and latent heat fluxes. This paper addresses the problem that occurs when the value of {beta} is near {minus}1 and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the EBBR stations in collecting energy flux data at the CART site.

  14. Radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Blad, Blaine L.; Zara, Pedro; Vining, Roel; Hays, Cynthia J.; Mesarch, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) has been stated as 'the development of techniques that may be applied to satellite observations of the radiation reflected and emitted from the Earth to yield quantitative information concerning land surface climatological conditions'. The major field study, FIFE (the First ISLSCP Field Experiment), was conducted in 1987-89 to accomplish this objective. Four intensive field campaigns (IFC's) were carried out in 1987 and one in 1989. Factors contributing to observed reflected radiation from the FIFE site must be understood before the radiation observed by satellites can be used to quantify surface processes. Our last report (Walter-Shea et al., 1992b) focused on slope effects on incoming and outgoing shortwave radiation and net radiation from data collected in 1989. We report here on the final analysis of the slope data as well as results from thermal radiation studies conducted during the FIFE experiment. The specific areas reported are the following: (1) analysis of slope effects on measured reflectance values and estimates of surface albedo; (2) using remotely-measured surface temperatures as a means of estimating sensible heat flux from the Konza Prairie; (3) extracting canopy temperatures from remotely-measured composite surface temperatures; (4) modeling the measured composite temperature of partially vegetated surfaces; and (5) estimating gap distribution in partially vegetated surfaces from reflectance measurements.

  15. Direct computation of the sensible heat flux.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1980-01-01

    An algorithm to determine the sensible heat flux from simple field measurements (wind speed, air and ground temperatures) has been developed. It provides a direct solution, in parametric form, which can be displayed graphically or tabularly. -from Author

  16. Spatially averaged heat flux and convergence measurements at the ARM regional flux experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Porch, W.; Barnes, F.; Buchwald, M.; Clements, W.; Cooper, D.; Hoard, D. ); Doran, C.; Hubbe, J.; Shaw, W. ); Coulter, R.; Martin, T. ); Kunkel, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Cloud formation and its relation to climate change is the greatest weakness in current numerical climate models. Surface heat flux in some cases causes clouds to form and in other to dissipate and the differences between these cases are subtle enough to make parameterization difficult in a numerical model. One of the goals of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program is to make long term measurements at representative sites to improve radiation and cloud formation parameterization. This paper compares spatially averaged optical measurements of heat flux and convergence with a goal of determining how point measurements of heat fluxes scale up to the larger scale used for climate modeling. It was found that the various optical techniques used in this paper compared well with each other and with independent measurements. These results add confidence that spatially averaging optical techniques can be applied to transform point measurements to the larger scales needed for mesoscale and climate modeling. 10 refs., 6 figs. (MHB)

  17. Light-intensity modulator withstands high heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, H. G.; Strass, H. K.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanism modulates and controls the intensity of luminous radiation in light beams associated with high-intensity heat flux. This modulator incorporates two fluid-cooled, externally grooved, contracting metal cylinders which when rotated about their longitudinal axes present a circular aperture of varying size depending on the degree of rotation.

  18. Critical heat flux test apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Welsh, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA); Doman, Marvin J. (McKeesport, PA); Wilson, Edward C. (West Mifflin, PA)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

  19. Radiation flux tables for ICRCCM using the GLA GCM radiation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN

    1986-01-01

    Tabulated values of longwave and shortwave radiation fluxes and also cooling and heating rates in the atmosphere for standard atmospheric profiles are presented. The radiation codes used in the Goddard general circulation model were employed for the computations. These results were obtained for an international intercomparison projected called Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM).

  20. The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux

    E-print Network

    Todreas, Neil E.

    1965-01-01

    A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

  1. Numerical Analysis of a Radiant Heat Flux Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Shanjuan; Horn, Thomas J.; Dhir, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    A radiant heat flux gage calibration system exists in the Flight Loads Laboratory at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. This calibration system must be well understood if the heat flux gages calibrated in it are to provide useful data during radiant heating ground tests or flight tests of high speed aerospace vehicles. A part of the calibration system characterization process is to develop a numerical model of the flat plate heater element and heat flux gage, which will help identify errors due to convection, heater element erosion, and other factors. A 2-dimensional mathematical model of the gage-plate system has been developed to simulate the combined problem involving convection, radiation and mass loss by chemical reaction. A fourth order finite difference scheme is used to solve the steady state governing equations and determine the temperature distribution in the gage and plate, incident heat flux on the gage face, and flat plate erosion. Initial gage heat flux predictions from the model are found to be within 17% of experimental results.

  2. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  3. Heat flux sensors for infrared thermography in convective heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  4. Thermal coupling of a heat flux sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, E.

    1982-01-01

    The conditions of thermal coupling were investigated in relationship to the development of sensors for local thermal flux measurements of component surfaces. The dependence of the transfer function on heat conductivity coefficient of the measured object and the influence of the contact resistance at the sensor boundaries are discussed in terms of known results and investigations.

  5. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mather, James

    2008-01-15

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  6. Multidecade Global Flux Datasets from the Objectively Analyzed Air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) Project: Latent and Sensible Heat Fluxes,

    E-print Network

    Yu, Lisan

    : Latent and Sensible Heat Fluxes, Ocean Evaporation, and Related Surface Meteorological Variables Lisan Yu.1 Latent and sensible heat fluxes 4.2 Ocean evaporation 4.3 Basic variables 5. Comparison with COADS consists of a 49- year analysis of latent and sensible heat fluxes, ocean evaporation, and flux

  7. Heat flux dynamics in dissipative cascaded systems

    E-print Network

    Salvatore Lorenzo; Alessandro Farace; Francesco Ciccarello; G. Massimo Palma; Vittorio Giovannetti

    2015-03-24

    We study the dynamics of heat flux in the thermalization process of a pair of identical quantum system that interact dissipatively with a reservoir in a {\\it cascaded} fashion. Despite the open dynamics of the bipartite system S is globally Lindbladian, one of the subsystems "sees" the reservoir in a state modified by the interaction with the other subsystem and hence it undergoes a non-Markovian dynamics. As a consequence, the heat flow exhibits a non-exponential time behaviour which can greatly deviate from the case where each party is independently coupled to the reservoir. We investigate both thermal and correlated initial states of $S$ and show that the presence of correlations at the beginning can considerably affect the heat flux rate. We carry out our study in two paradigmatic cases -- a pair of harmonic oscillators with a reservoir of bosonic modes and two qubits with a reservoir of fermionic modes -- and compare the corresponding behaviours. In the case of qubits and for initial thermal states, we find that the trace distance discord is at any time interpretable as the correlated contribution to the total heat flux.

  8. Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration

    E-print Network

    Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

    2007-11-18

    We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

  9. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  10. The photospheric Poynting flux and coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Brian T.

    2015-04-01

    Some models of coronal heating suppose that convective motions at the photosphere shuffle the footpoints of coronal magnetic fields and thereby inject sufficient magnetic energy upward to account for observed coronal and chromospheric energy losses in active regions. Using high-resolution observations of plage magnetic fields made with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite, we investigate this idea by estimating the upward transport of magnetic energy-the vertical Poynting flux, Sz-across the photosphere in a plage region. To do so, we combine the following: (i) estimates of photospheric horizontal velocities, vh, determined by local correlation tracking applied to a sequence of line-of-sight magnetic field maps from the Narrowband Filter Imager, with (ii) a vector magnetic field measurement from the SpectroPolarimeter. Plage fields are ideal observational targets for estimating energy injection by convection, because they are (i) strong enough to be measured with relatively small uncertainties, (ii) not so strong that convection is heavily suppressed (as within umbrae), and (iii) unipolar, so Sz in plage is not influenced by mixed-polarity processes (e.g., flux emergence) unrelated to heating in stable, active-region fields. In this plage region, we found that the average Sz varied in space, but was positive (upward) and sufficient to explain coronal heating, with values near (5 ± 1) × 107 erg cm-2 s-1. We find the energy input per unit magnetic flux to be on the order of 105 erg s-1 Mx-1. A comparison of intensity in a Ca II image co-registered with one plage magnetogram shows stronger spatial correlations with both total field strength and unsigned vertical field, |Bz|, than either Sz or horizontal flux density, Bh. The observed Ca II brightness enhancement, however, probably contains a strong contribution from a near-photosphere hot-wall effect, which is unrelated to heating in the solar atmosphere.

  11. Comparison of the Radiative Two-Flux and Diffusion Approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    Approximate solutions are sometimes used to determine the heat transfer and temperatures in a semitransparent material in which conduction and thermal radiation are acting. A comparison of the Milne-Eddington two-flux approximation and the diffusion approximation for combined conduction and radiation heat transfer in a ceramic material was preformed to determine the accuracy of the diffusion solution. A plane gray semitransparent layer without a substrate and a non-gray semitransparent plane layer on an opaque substrate were considered. For the plane gray layer the material is semitransparent for all wavelengths and the scattering and absorption coefficients do not vary with wavelength. For the non-gray plane layer the material is semitransparent with constant absorption and scattering coefficients up to a specified wavelength. At higher wavelengths the non-gray plane layer is assumed to be opaque. The layers are heated on one side and cooled on the other by diffuse radiation and convection. The scattering and absorption coefficients were varied. The error in the diffusion approximation compared to the Milne-Eddington two flux approximation was obtained as a function of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The percent difference in interface temperatures and heat flux through the layer obtained using the Milne-Eddington two-flux and diffusion approximations are presented as a function of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The largest errors occur for high scattering and low absorption except for the back surface temperature of the plane gray layer where the error is also larger at low scattering and low absorption. It is shown that the accuracy of the diffusion approximation can be improved for some scattering and absorption conditions if a reflectance obtained from a Kubelka-Munk type two flux theory is used instead of a reflection obtained from the Fresnel equation. The Kubelka-Munk reflectance accounts for surface reflection and radiation scattered back by internal scattering sites while the Fresnel reflection only accounts for surface reflections.

  12. Radiative Heating Of The ExoMars Entry Demonstrator Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, J.; Omaly, P.; Lino da Silva, M.; Surzhikov, s.

    2011-05-01

    Previous Mars entry missions have not accounted for the radiative heating of the vehicle during entry, as it has been assumed small. This is indeed the case in the ultra-violet (UV) and visible wavelength ranges in which atomic and diatomic species radiate in high speed Earth return entries due to electronic transitions. The Martian atmosphere is mainly composed of carbon dioxide which radiates strongly in the infra-red at more moderate temperatures due to vibrational transitions. Simulations of the radiative fluxes to the vehicle inclusive of the infra-red (IR) CO2 radiation have been performed at three centres using independent radiation databases. The agreement between the models is good. The findings show that the radiative fluxes are very important on the afterbody, and that the radiative heat pulse occurs significantly later in the trajectory than the convective heat pulse.

  13. Global Intercomparison of 12 Land Surface Heat Flux Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, C.; Prigent, C.; Mueller, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.; McCabe, M. F.; Wood, E. F.; Rossow, W. B.; Balsamo, G.; Betts, A. K.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; Fisher, J. B.; Jung, M.; Kanamitsu, M.; Reichle, R. H.; Reichstein, M.; Rodell, M.; Sheffield, J.; Tu, K.; Wang, K.

    2011-01-01

    A global intercomparison of 12 monthly mean land surface heat flux products for the period 1993-1995 is presented. The intercomparison includes some of the first emerging global satellite-based products (developed at Paris Observatory, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, University of California Berkeley, University of Maryland, and Princeton University) and examples of fluxes produced by reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, NCEP-DOE) and off-line land surface models (GSWP-2, GLDAS CLM/ Mosaic/Noah). An intercomparison of the global latent heat flux (Q(sub le)) annual means shows a spread of approx 20 W/sq m (all-product global average of approx 45 W/sq m). A similar spread is observed for the sensible (Q(sub h)) and net radiative (R(sub n)) fluxes. In general, the products correlate well with each other, helped by the large seasonal variability and common forcing data for some of the products. Expected spatial distributions related to the major climatic regimes and geographical features are reproduced by all products. Nevertheless, large Q(sub le)and Q(sub h) absolute differences are also observed. The fluxes were spatially averaged for 10 vegetation classes. The larger Q(sub le) differences were observed for the rain forest but, when normalized by mean fluxes, the differences were comparable to other classes. In general, the correlations between Q(sub le) and R(sub n) were higher for the satellite-based products compared with the reanalyses and off-line models. The fluxes were also averaged for 10 selected basins. The seasonality was generally well captured by all products, but large differences in the flux partitioning were observed for some products and basins.

  14. Comparison of high heat flux cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Micheal J.; Chang, Won S.; Pais, Martin R.; Chow, Louis C.

    1993-02-01

    The advent of LSI/VLSI systems has made possible the development of advanced electronic systems operating in the multi-GHz regime. such high speed systems will be of multichip construction to increase miniaturization, packing, and heat dissipation density. Similar advances in high laser-power optics have resulted in significant increases in heat flux density. The stringent temperature uniformity specifications on these systems demand innovative means of applying state-of-the-art technology in enhancing heat removal. Promising cooling techniques that will meet the future thermal control requirements for these electronic and optics packages are presented. These concepts involve the use of microchannel, droplet impingement, jet impingement, and flow boiling in straight or curved channels.

  15. Heat flux in a granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, J. J.; Ruiz-Montero, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    A peculiarity of the hydrodynamic Navier-Stokes equations for a granular gas is the modification of the Fourier law, with the presence of an additional contribution to the heat flux that is proportional to the density gradient. Consequently, the constitutive relation involves, in the case of a one-component granular gas, two transport coefficients: the usual (thermal) heat conductivity and a diffusive heat conductivity. A very simple physical interpretation of this effect, in terms of the mean free path and the mean free time is provided. It leads to the modified Fourier law with an expression for the diffusive Fourier coefficient that differs in a factor of the order of unity from the expression obtained by means of the inelastic Boltzmann equation. Also, some aspects of the Chapman-Enskog computation of the new transport coefficients as well as of the comparison between simulation results and theory are discussed.

  16. The Photospheric Poynting Flux and Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Brian

    2014-06-01

    Some models of coronal heating suppose that random (cf., coherent) convective motions at the photosphere shuffle the footpoints of coronal magnetic fields and thereby inject sufficient magnetic energy upward to account for observed coronal and chromospheric energy losses in active regions. Using high-resolution observations of plage magnetic fields made with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite, we observationally test this idea by estimating the upward transport of magnetic energy --- the vertical Poynting flux, S_z --- across the photosphere in a plage region. To do so, we combine: (i) estimates of photospheric horizontal velocities, v_h, determined by local correlation tracking applied to a sequence of line-of-sight magnetic field maps from the Narrowband Filter Imager, with (ii) a vector magnetic field measurement from the SpectroPolarimeter. Plage fields are ideal observational targets for estimating energy injection by convection, because they are: (i) strong enough to be measured with relatively small uncertainties; (ii) not so strong that convection is heavily suppressed (as within umbrae); and (iii) unipolar, so S_z in plage is not influenced by mixed-polarity processes (e.g., flux emergence) that cannot explain steady heating in stable, active-region fields. In this and a previously analyzed plage region, we found that the average S_z varied between the regions, but was positive (upward) and sufficient to explain coronal heating, with values near 2 x 10^7 erg/ cm^2/ s. We find the energy input per unit magnetic flux to be on the order of a few times 10^4 erg/ s/ Mx. A comparison of intensity in a Ca II image co-registered with one plage magnetogram shows stronger spatial correlation with unsigned vertical field, |B_z|, than either S_z or horizontal flux density, |B_h|.

  17. The Photosheric Poynting Flux and Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, B. T.

    2014-12-01

    Some models of coronal heating suppose that convective motions at thephotosphere shuffle the footpoints of coronal magnetic fields andthereby inject sufficient magnetic energy upward to account forobserved coronal and chromospheric energy losses in active regions.Using high-resolution observations of plage magnetic fields made withthe Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite, weinvestigate this idea by estimating the upward transport of magneticenergy --- the vertical Poynting flux, S_z --- across the photospherein a plage region. To do so, we combine: (i) estimates ofphotospheric horizontal velocities, v_h, determined by localcorrelation tracking applied to a sequence of line-of-sight magneticfield maps from the Narrowband Filter Imager, with (ii) a vectormagnetic field measurement from the SpectroPolarimeter. Plage fieldsare ideal observational targets for estimating energy injection byconvection, because they are: (i) strong enough to be measured withrelatively small uncertainties; (ii) not so strong that convection isheavily suppressed (as within umbrae); and (iii) unipolar, so S_z inplage is not influenced by mixed-polarity processes (e.g., fluxemergence) unrelated to heating in stable, active-region fields. Inthis plage region, we found that the average S_z varied in space, butwas positive (upward) and sufficient to explain coronal heating, withvalues near (5 +/- 1) x 107 erg / cm2 / s. We find the energy inputper unit magnetic flux to be on the order of 105 erg / s / Mx. Acomparison of intensity in a Ca II image co-registered with one plagemagnetogram shows stronger spatial correlations with both total fieldstrength and unsigned vertical field, |B_z|, than either S_z orhorizontal flux density, B_h. The observed Ca II brightnessenhancement, however, probably contains a strong contribution from anear-photosphere hot-wall effect, which is unrelated to heating in thesolar atmosphere.

  18. Time and Space Resolved Heat Flux Measurements During Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work was to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleating bubbles on a constant heat flux surface using a microheater array with 100x 100 square microns resolution, then numerically determine the wall to liquid heat flux. This data was then correlated with high speed (greater than l000Hz) visual recordings of The bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that microlayer evaporation and contact line heat transfer are not major heat transfer mechanisms for bubble growth. The dominant heat transfer mechanism appears to be transient conduction into the liquid as the liquid rewets the wall during the bubble departure process.

  19. ACCURACY OF SOIL HEAT FLUX MEASUREMENTS MADE WITH FLUX PLATES OF CONTRASTING PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flux plate measurements of soil heat flux (G) may include significant errors unless the plates are carefully installed and known errors accounted for. The objective of this research was to quantify potential errors in G when using soil heat flux plates of contrasting designs. Five flux plates with...

  20. Experimental Measurements of Temperature and Heat Flux in a High Temperature Black Body Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1998-01-01

    During hypersonic flight, high temperatures and high heat fluxes are generated. The Flight Loads Laboratory (FLL) at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) is equipped to calibrate high heat fluxes up to 1100 kW/sq m. There are numerous uncertainties associated with these heat flux calibrations, as the process is transient, there are expected to be interactions between transient conduction, natural and forced convection, radiation, and possibly an insignificant degree of oxidation of the graphite cavity. Better understanding, of these mechanisms during the calibration process, will provide more reliable heat transfer data during either ground testing or flight testing of hypersonic vehicles.

  1. Heat flux measurements on ceramics with thin film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Anderson, Robert C.; Liebert, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods were devised to measure heat flux through a thick ceramic using thin film thermocouples. The thermocouples were deposited on the front and back face of a flat ceramic substrate. The heat flux was applied to the front surface of the ceramic using an arc lamp Heat Flux Calibration Facility. Silicon nitride and mullite ceramics were used; two thicknesses of each material was tested, with ceramic temperatures to 1500 C. Heat flux ranged from 0.05-2.5 MW/m2(sup 2). One method for heat flux determination used an approximation technique to calculate instantaneous values of heat flux vs time; the other method used an extrapolation technique to determine the steady state heat flux from a record of transient data. Neither method measures heat flux in real time but the techniques may easily be adapted for quasi-real time measurement. In cases where a significant portion of the transient heat flux data is available, the calculated transient heat flux is seen to approach the extrapolated steady state heat flux value as expected.

  2. Re-Evaluation of the Earth's Surface Energy Balance Using a New Method of Heat Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S. Y.; Deng, Y.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    The recently proposed and tested model of surface heat fluxes, based on the theory of maximum entropy production (MEP), was used for re-evaluating the global mean annual energy balance over the Earth's surface. Compared to the commonly used bulk transfer models, the MEP model predicted heat fluxes are constrained by surface radiation fluxes satisfying energy balance and independent of temperature/moisture gradient, wind speed and roughness lengths. The MEP model holds for the entire range of soil moisture from dryness to saturation over land surfaces. It provides the first global maps of water heat fluxes at ocean surfaces as well as at snow/ice covered polar regions. The MEP model is less sensitive to the uncertainties of model input (surface radiation fluxes, temperature and/or humidity) parameters and free of location specific tuning (empirical) parameters. Ten years of earth surface radiation fluxes, surface temperature data products from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System supplemented (when needed) by the surface specific humidity data from Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications were used to reproduce global annual surface energy budgets. The MEP modeled global annual sensible heat fluxes are in close agreement with both previous studies and ocean content climatology (OHC) data from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, while those of latent heat fluxes are significantly lower than previous estimates. The net surface-atmosphere heat exchange according to the MEP model is consistent with the OHC data.

  3. Critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David Douglas

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon was investigated for water flow in tubes with particular emphasis on the development of methods for predicting CHF in the subcooled flow boiling regime. The Purdue University Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (PU-BTPFL) CHF database for water flow in a uniformly heated tube was compiled from the world literature dating back to 1949 and represents the largest CHF database ever assembled with 32,544 data points from over 100 sources. The superiority of this database was proven via a detailed examination of previous databases. The PU-BTPFL CHF database is an invaluable tool for the development of CHF correlations and mechanistic models that are superior to existing ones developed with smaller, less comprehensive CHF databases. In response to the many inaccurate and inordinately complex correlations, two nondimensional, subcooled CHF correlations were formulated, containing only five adjustable constants and whose unique functional forms were determined without using a statistical analysis but rather using the parametric trends observed in less than 10% of the subcooled CHF data. The correlation based on inlet conditions (diameter, heated length, mass velocity, pressure, inlet quality) was by far the most accurate of all known subcooled CHF correlations, having mean absolute and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 10.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The outlet (local) conditions correlation was the most accurate correlation based on local CHF conditions (diameter, mass velocity, pressure, outlet quality) and may be used with a nonuniform axial heat flux. Both correlations proved more accurate than a recent CHF look-up table commonly employed in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic computer codes. An interfacial lift-off, subcooled CHF model was developed from a consideration of the instability of the vapor-liquid interface and the fraction of heat required for liquid-vapor conversion as opposed to that for bulk liquid heating. Severe vapor effusion in an upstream wetting front lifts the vapor-liquid interface off the surface, triggering CHF. Since the model is entirely based on physical observations, it has the potential to accurately predict CHF for other fluids and flow geometries which are beyond the conditions for which it was validated.

  4. Solution of Radiation and Convection Heat-Transfer Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Computer program P5399B developed to accommodate variety of fin-type heat conduction applications involving radiative or convective boundary conditions with additionally imposed local heat flux. Program also accommodates significant variety of one-dimensional heat-transfer problems not corresponding specifically to fin-type applications. Program easily accommodates all but few specialized one-dimensional heat-transfer analyses as well as many twodimensional analyses.

  5. NIST Measurement Services: Heat-Flux Sensor Calibration

    E-print Network

    -flux sensors (test number 35101C in SP250, NIST Calibration Services Users Guide). Inquiries concerningNIST Measurement Services: Heat-Flux Sensor Calibration NIST Special Publication 250-65 Benjamin K Special Publication 250-65 NIST MEASUREMENT SERVICES: Heat-Flux Sensor Calibration Benjamin K. Tsai

  6. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors: Design and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors: Design and Methodology: (1) Heat flux is one of a number of parameters, together with pressure, temperature, flow, etc. of interest to engine designers and fluid dynamists, (2) The measurement of heat flux is of interest in directly determining the cooling requirements of hot section blades and vanes, and (3)In addition, if the surface and gas temperatures are known, the measurement of heat flux provides a value for the convective heat transfer coefficient that can be compared with the value provided by CFD codes.

  7. Multiplate Radiation Shields: Investigating Radiational Heating Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Scott James

    1995-01-01

    Multiplate radiation shield errors are examined using the following techniques: (1) analytic heat transfer analysis, (2) optical ray tracing, (3) numerical fluid flow modeling, (4) laboratory testing, (5) wind tunnel testing, and (6) field testing. Guidelines for reducing radiational heating errors are given that are based on knowledge of the temperature sensor to be used, with the shield being chosen to match the sensor design. Small, reflective sensors that are exposed directly to the air stream (not inside a filter as is the case for many temperature and relative humidity probes) should be housed in a shield that provides ample mechanical and rain protection while impeding the air flow as little as possible; protection from radiation sources is of secondary importance. If a sensor does not meet the above criteria (i.e., is large or absorbing), then a standard Gill shield performs reasonably well. A new class of shields, called part-time aspirated multiplate radiation shields, are introduced. This type of shield consists of a multiplate design usually operated in a passive manner but equipped with a fan-forced aspiration capability to be used when necessary (e.g., low wind speed). The fans used here are 12 V DC that can be operated with a small dedicated solar panel. This feature allows the fan to operate when global solar radiation is high, which is when the largest radiational heating errors usually occur. A prototype shield was constructed and field tested and an example is given in which radiational heating errors were reduced from 2 ^circC to 1.2 ^circC. The fan was run continuously to investigate night-time low wind speed errors and the prototype shield reduced errors from 1.6 ^ circC to 0.3 ^circC. Part-time aspirated shields are an inexpensive alternative to fully aspirated shields and represent a good compromise between cost, power consumption, reliability (because they should be no worse than a standard multiplate shield if the fan fails), and accuracy. In addition, it is possible to modify existing passive shields to incorporate part-time aspiration, thus making them even more cost-effective. Finally, a new shield is described that incorporates a large diameter top plate that is designed to shade the lower portion of the shield. This shield increases flow through it by 60%, compared to the Gill design and it is likely to reduce radiational heating errors, although it has not been tested.

  8. Electron heat flux constraints in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S.P.; Skoug, R.M.; Daughton, W.

    1999-06-01

    Enhanced fluctuations from electromagnetic heat flux instabilities may, through wave-particle scattering, constrain the electron heat flux which flows parallel to the background magnetic field in the solar wind. A corollary of this hypothesis is that instability thresholds should correspond to observable bounds on the heat flux. Here plasma and magnetic field data from February and March 1995 of the Ulysses mission is analyzed in terms of the core/halo electron model to yield scaling relations of dimensionless electron parameters and empirical upper bounds on the dimensionless heat flux as functions of the core {beta}. Use of these scaling relations in linear Vlasov theory for the whistler and Alfv{acute e}n heat flux instabilities in homogeneous plasmas yields threshold conditions on the dimensionless heat flux which are also functions of the electron core {beta}. The empirical bounds and the theoretical thresholds are similar and are therefore consistent with the hypothesis. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    SciTech Connect

    Liebert, C.H.

    1990-11-01

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  10. A simple model for the interaction between vertical eddy heat fluxes and static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutowski, W. J., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical model for studying the interaction of vertical eddy heat fluxes and vertical temperature structure in midlatitude regions is described. The temperature profile for the model was derived from calculations of the equilibrium among heating rates in simplified representations of large-scale vertical eddy heat flux, moist convection and radiation. An eddy flux profile is calculated based on the quasi-geostrophic, liner baroclinic instability of a single wave. Model equilibrium states for summer and winter conditions are compared with observations, and the results are discussed in detail.

  11. Heat pipe radiators for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the data heat pipe radiator systems tested in both vacuum and ambient environments was continued. The systems included (1) a feasibility VCHP header heat-pipe panel, (2) the same panel reworked to eliminate the VCHP feature and referred to as the feasibility fluid header panel, and (3) an optimized flight-weight fluid header panel termed the 'prototype.' A description of freeze-thaw thermal vacuum tests conducted on the feasibility VCHP was included. In addition, the results of ambient tests made on the feasibility fluid header are presented, including a comparison with analytical results. A thermal model of a fluid header heat pipe radiator was constructed and a computer program written. The program was used to make a comparison of the VCHP and fluid-header concepts for both single and multiple panel applications. The computer program was also employed for a parametric study, including optimum feeder heat pipe spacing, of the prototype fluid header.

  12. High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, C.P.

    1993-07-01

    Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

  13. Remote Heat Flux Using a Self Calibration Multiwavelength Pyrometer and a Transparent Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    A self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer was used to conduct remote heat flux measurements using a transparent sapphire disk by determining the sapphire disk's front and back surface temperatures. Front surface temperature (Tfs) was obtained from detection of surface emitted radiation at long wavelengths (k = 6 gm). Back surface temperature (Tbs) was obtained from short wavelength (1 to 5 gm) radiation transmitted through the sapphire disk. The thermal conductivity of the sapphire disk and the heat transfer coefficients h, and h2 of its surfaces are determined experimentally. An analysis of the heat flux measurement is presented.

  14. Remote Heat Flux Measurement Using a Self Calibration Multiwavelength Pyrometer and a Transparent Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    A self calibrating multiwavelength pyrometer was used to conduct remote heat flux measurements using a transparent sapphire disk by determining the sapphire disk's front and back surface temperatures. Front surface temperature (Tfs) was obtained from detection of surface emitted radiation at long wavelengths (lambda > 6 micrometers). Back surface temperature (Tbs) was obtained from short wavelength (1 to 5 micrometers) radiation transmitted through the sapphire disk. The thermal conductivity k of the sapphire disk and the heat transfer coefficients h(sub 1) and h(sub 2) of its surfaces are determined experimentally. An analysis of the heat flux measurement is presented.

  15. Inverse heat flux in double layer thermal metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, M.; Shashurin, A.; Delaire, S.; Fang, X.; Beilis, I. I.

    2015-12-01

    An approach to controlling heat flux based on electron emission in the double layer assembly of two materials with different work functions has been developed. It is shown that this two-electrode assembly promotes the inverse heat flux exhibiting a thermal metamaterial property in a wide range of temperatures. The proposed thermal metamaterial can be used as an active element of a thermal diode, ensuring heat flux in one direction regardless of temperature difference.

  16. Wedge Heat-Flux Indicators for Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2003-01-01

    Wedge indicators have been proposed for measuring thermal radiation that impinges on specimens illuminated by flash lamps for thermographic inspection. Heat fluxes measured by use of these indicators would be used, along with known thermal, radiative, and geometric properties of the specimens, to estimate peak flash temperatures on the specimen surfaces. These indicators would be inexpensive alternatives to high-speed infrared pyrometers, which would otherwise be needed for measuring peak flash surface temperatures. The wedge is made from any suitable homogenous material such as plastic. The choice of material is governed by the equation given. One side of the wedge is covered by a temperature sensitive compound that decomposes irreversibly when its temperature exceeds a rated temperature (T-rated). The uncoated side would be positioned alongside or in place of the specimen and exposed to the flash, then the wedge thickness at the boundary between the white and blackened portions measured.

  17. An Investigation of the Radiative Heat Transfer through Nonwoven Fibrous Materials

    E-print Network

    Tafreshi, Hooman Vahedi

    An Investigation of the Radiative Heat Transfer through Nonwoven Fibrous Materials Imad Qashou1 of the Fluent CFD code is used to investigate the response of a fibrous material to the radiative heat transfer. The unsteady state heat transfer equation is solved for the temperature and heat flux in and around the fibers

  18. Designing, testing, and analyzing coupled, flux transformer heat 

    E-print Network

    Renzi, Kimberly Irene

    1998-01-01

    The proposed research involves designing, testing, and ics. analyzing a coupled, flux transformer heat pipe system following the patent of Oktay and Peterson (1997). Experiments were conducted utilizing four copper heat pipes, lined with copper mesh...

  19. Homotopy Analysis Method for Variable Thermal Conductivity Heat Flux Gage with Edge Contact Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Abdul; Khani, Farzad; Darvishi, Mohammad Taghi

    2010-10-01

    The homotopy analysis method (HAM) has been used to develop an analytical solution for the thermal performance of a circular-thin-foil heat flux gage with temperature dependent thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance between the edge of the foil and the heat sink. Temperature distributions in the foil are presented illustrating the effect of incident heat flux, radiation emission from the foil, variable thermal conductivity, and contact resistance between the foil and the heat sink. The HAM results agree up to four places of decimal with the numerical solutions generated using the symbolic algebra package Maple. This close comparison vouches for the high accuracy and stability of the analytic solution.

  20. Numerical and experimental analyses of the radiant heat flux produced by quartz heating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Ash, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    A method is developed for predicting the radiant heat flux distribution produced by tungsten filament, tubular fused-quartz envelope heating systems with reflectors. The method is an application of Monte Carlo simulation, which takes the form of a random walk or ray tracing scheme. The method is applied to four systems of increasing complexity, including a single lamp without a reflector, a single lamp with a Hat reflector, a single lamp with a parabolic reflector, and up to six lamps in a six-lamp contoured-reflector heating unit. The application of the Monte Carlo method to the simulation of the thermal radiation generated by these systems is discussed. The procedures for numerical implementation are also presented. Experiments were conducted to study these quartz heating systems and to acquire measurements of the corresponding empirical heat flux distributions for correlation with analysis. The experiments were conducted such that several complicating factors could be isolated and studied sequentially. Comparisons of the experimental results with analysis are presented and discussed. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated results was obtained in all cases. This study shows that this method can be used to analyze very complicated quartz heating systems and can account for factors such as spectral properties, specular reflection from curved surfaces, source enhancement due to reflectors and/or adjacent sources, and interaction with a participating medium in a straightforward manner.

  1. Transient critical heat flux and blowdown heat-transfer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, J.C.

    1980-05-01

    Objective of this study is to give a best-estimate prediction of transient critical heat flux (CHF) during reactor transients and hypothetical accidents. To accomplish this task, a predictional method has been developed. Basically it involves the thermal-hydraulic calculation of the heated core with boundary conditions supplied from experimental measurements. CHF predictions were based on the instantaneous ''local-conditions'' hypothesis, and eight correlations (consisting of round-tube, rod-bundle, and transient correlations) were tested against most recent blowdown heat-transfer test data obtained in major US facilities. The prediction results are summarized in a table in which both CISE and Biasi correlations are found to be capable of predicting the early CHF of approx. 1 s. The Griffith-Zuber correlation is credited for its prediction of the delay CHF that occurs in a more tranquil state with slowly decaying mass velocity. In many instances, the early CHF can be well correlated by the x = 1.0 criterion; this is certainly indicative of an annular-flow dryout-type crisis. The delay CHF occurred at near or above 80% void fraction, and the success of the modified Zuber pool-boiling correlation suggests that this CHF is caused by flooding and pool-boiling type hydrodynamic crisis.

  2. Radiation and combined heat transfer in channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tamonis, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents numerical methods of calculation of radiative and combined heat transfer in channel flows of radiating as well as nonradiating media. Results obtained in calculations for flow conditions of combustion products from organic fuel products are given and methods used in determining the spectral optical properties of molecular gases are analyzed. The book presents applications of heat transfer in solving problems. Topic covered are as follows: optical properties of molecular gases; transfer equations for combined heat transfer; experimental technique; convective heat transfer in heated gas flows; radiative heat transfer in gaseous media; combined heat transfer; and radiative and combined heat transfer in applied problems.

  3. Radiative heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, K. S.; Ramadhyani, S.; Ramamurthy, H.; Viskanta, R.

    1990-04-01

    One and two-dimensional mathematical models have been developed to predict the steady state thermal performance and combustion characteristics of a natural gas-fired straight-through radiant tube. The effects of burner geometry, equivalence ratio, and preheat temperature and fuel firing rate on fuel burn-up have been investigated. The one-dimensional models for straight-through and single-ended recuperative radiant tubes have been validated using available experimental data. Thermal system models have been developed for the continuous and batch indirectly fired (radiant tube) furnaces to identify opportunities for fuel savings and enhanced productivity. Extensive parametric investigations were performed to examine the effects of load and refractory emissivities, load throughput rate and thickness on the thermal performance of the furnaces. Batch and continuous direct-fired furnace thermal system models were developed to analyze the effect of various design and operation parameters on the furnace thermal performance. An attempt was made to validate the batch furnace model by using experimental data from a small experimental furnace. Due to the size of the furnace, the two-dimensional heat conduction effects near the corners and edges of the furnace walls were significant. Since the effects were neglected in the system model, which is intended to simulate a large industrial furnace, the validation was unsuccessful. The parametric study consisted of examining the effect of the load and refractory emissivities and other operating and load parameters on the thermal performance of the batch and continuous furnaces.

  4. Computation of radiative heat transport across a nanoscale vacuum gap

    SciTech Connect

    Budaev, Bair V. Bogy, David B.

    2014-02-10

    Radiation heat transport across a vacuum gap between two half-spaces is studied. By consistently applying only the fundamental laws of physics, we obtain an algebraic equation that connects the temperatures of the half-spaces and the heat flux between them. The heat transport coefficient generated by this equation for such structures matches available experimental data for nanoscale and larger gaps without appealing to any additional specific mechanisms of energy transfer.

  5. A. Gershunov R. Roca Coupling of latent heat flux and the greenhouse effect by large-scale

    E-print Network

    Roca, Rémy

    A. Gershunov Æ R. Roca Coupling of latent heat flux and the greenhouse effect by large Abstract Coupled variability of the greenhouse effect (GH) and latent heat flux (LHF) over the tropical greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. The radiative properties of water vapor are central to the response

  6. Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications

    DOEpatents

    Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

    2013-06-11

    Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

  7. Maximum power flux of auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph

    1991-08-01

    Distant observations of intense auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) are discussed in light of the increased maximum AKR power flux registered by the 3D radio-mapping instrument on ISEE 3. Only AKR events that contain the highest frequency signals are selected, and during spacecraft rotation the spacecraft antenna gain is employed to increase the dynamic range of the instrument. The technique is found to result in the screening of false signals created by instrument overloading as well as the detection of genuine second-harmonic AKR signals while the spacecraft was 17 R(E) from earth. A very strong power flux of fundamental AKR is also reported, exceeding 3 x 10 to the -13th W/sq m/Hz at 360 kHz. The most intense source-region values detected by Isis I and Viking measurements are compared to the strong signal, and the signal is concluded to be the combined signal of a number of sources.

  8. Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

  9. Effect of magnetic geometry on ELM heat flux profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Petrie, T. W.; Watkins, J. G.

    2001-03-01

    In this paper, we explore how precisely the magnetic up/down symmetry must be controlled to insure sharing of edge localized mode (ELM) heat flux between upper and lower divertors in a double-null tokamak. We show for DIII-D, using infrared thermography, that the spatial distribution of Type-I ELM energy is less strongly affected by variations in magnetic geometry than the time-averaged peak heat flux in attached discharges. The degree of control necessary to share ELM heat flux deposition equally between divertors was less stringent than the control needed to balance the time-averaged heat flux. ELM energy is transported more than four times further into the scrape-off layer (SOL) than the time-averaged heat flux.

  10. Effect of Magnetic Geometry on ELM Heat Flux Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C.J.; Leonard, A.W.; Petrie, T.W.; Watkins, J.G.

    2000-05-15

    In this paper we explore how precisely the magnetic up/down symmetry must be controlled to insure sharing of edge localized mode (ELM) heat flux between upper and lower diverters in a double-null tokamak. We show for DIII-D, using infrared thermography, that the spatial distribution of Type-I ELM energy is less strongly affected by variations in magnetic geometry than is the time-averaged peak heat flux in attached discharges. The degree of control necessary to share ELM heat flux deposition equally between diverters was less stringent than the control needed to balance the time averaged heat flux. ELM energy is transported more than four times further into the scrape-off layer than the time-averaged heat flux.

  11. Geometrical effects on axial & azimuthal variations of heat flux to coolant in asymmetrically heated channels

    E-print Network

    Wang, Chunyun, 1968-

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes analyses of the effects of heat conduction in a copper block on the heat flux to a coolant flowing axially in the block. Heat is assumed to be added through one side of the block corresponding to ...

  12. Features of Afterbody Radiative Heating for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Brandis, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Radiative heating is identified as a major contributor to afterbody heating for Earth entry capsules at velocities above 10 km/s. Because of rate-limited electron-ion recombination processes, a large fraction of the electronically-excited N and O atoms produced in the high temperature/pressure forebody remain as they expand into the afterbody region, which results in significant afterbody radiation. Large radiative heating sensitivities to electron-impact ionization rates and escape factors are identified. Ablation products from a forebody ablator are shown to increase the afterbody radiation by as much as 40%. The tangent-slab radiation transport approach is shown to over-predict the radiative flux by as much as 40% in the afterbody, therefore making the more computationally expensive ray-tracing approach necessary for accurate radiative flux predictions. For the Stardust entry, the afterbody radiation is predicted to be nearly twice as large as the convective heating during the peak heating phase of the trajectory. Comparisons between simulations and the Stardust Echelle observation measurements, which are shown to be dominated by afterbody emission, indicate agreement within 20% for various N and O lines. Similarly, calorimeter measurements from the Fire II experiment are identified as a source of validation data for afterbody radiation. For the afterbody calorimeter measurement closest to the forebody, which experiences the largest afterbody radiative heating component, the convective heating alone is shown to under-predict the measurement, even for the fullycatalytic assumption. Agreement with the measurements is improved with the addition of afterbody radiation. These comparisons with Stardust and Fire II measurements provide validation that the significant afterbody radiation values proposed in this work are legitimate.

  13. The Influence of Ablation on Radiative Heating for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Using the coupled ablation and radiation capability recently included in the LAURA flowfield solver, this paper investigates the influence of ablation on the shock-layer radiative heating for Earth entry. The extension of the HARA radiation model, which provides the radiation predictions in LAURA, to treat a gas consisting of the elements C, H, O, and N is discussed. It is shown that the absorption coefficient of air is increased with the introduction of the C and H elements. A simplified shock layer model is studied to show the impact of temperature, as well as the abundance of C and H, on the net absorption or emission from an ablation contaminated boundary layer. It is found that the ablation species reduce the radiative flux in the vacuum ultraviolet, through increased absorption, for all temperatures. However, in the infrared region of the spectrum, the ablation species increase the radiative flux, through strong emission, for temperatures above 3,000 K. Thus, depending on the temperature and abundance of ablation species, the contaminated boundary layer may either provide a net increase or decrease in the radiative flux reaching the wall. To assess the validity of the coupled ablation and radiation LAURA analysis, a previously analyzed Mars-return case (15.24 km/s), which contains significant ablation and radiation coupling, is studied. Exceptional agreement with previous viscous shock-layer results is obtained. A 40% decrease in the radiative flux is predicted for ablation rates equal to 20% of the free-stream mass flux. The Apollo 4 peak-heating case (10.24 km/s) is also studied. For ablation rates up to 3.4% of the free-stream mass flux, the radiative heating is reduced by up to 19%, while the convective heating is reduced by up to 87%. Good agreement with the Apollo 4 radiometer data is obtained by considering absorption in the radiometer cavity. For both the Mars return and the Apollo 4 cases, coupled radiation alone is found to reduce the radiative heating by 30 60% and the convective heating by less than 5%.

  14. Radiation and combined heat transfer in channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tamonis, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a concise, practical treatment of numerical methods of calculation for radiative and combined (convection and conduction) heat transfer -- encompassing channel flows of radiating and nonradiating media. The volume offers results from calculations for various flow conditions, and analyzes methods used in determining the spectral optical properties of molecular gases. Topics considered include optical properties of molecular gases, transfer equations for combined heat transfer, experimental techniques, convective heat transfer in heat gas flows, radiative heat transfer in gaseous media, combined heat transfer, and radiative and combined heat transfer in applied problems.

  15. MERLOT: a model for flow and heat transfer through porous media for high heat flux applications

    E-print Network

    Raffray, A. René

    MERLOT: a model for flow and heat transfer through porous media for high heat flux applications A tend to provide modest heat transfer performance due to their inherently low heat capacity and heat transfer coefficient. Innovative techniques have been proposed previously using porous metal heat transfer

  16. The effect of ocean heat flux on seasonal ice growth in Young Sound (Northeast Greenland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, Sergei; Dmitrenko, Igor; Babb, David; Rysgaard, Søren; Barber, David

    2015-07-01

    The seasonal ice cover plays an important role in the climate system limiting the exchange of heat and momentum across the air-water interface. Among other factors, sea ice is sensitive to the ocean heat flux. In this study, we use in situ oceanographic, sea ice, and meteorological data collected during winter 2013/2014 in Young Sound (YS) fjord in Northeast Greenland to estimate the ocean heat flux to the landfast ice cover. During the preceding ice-free summer, incident solar radiation caused sea surface temperatures of up to 5-6°C. Subsequently, this heat was transferred down to the intermediate depths, but returned to the surface and retarded ice growth throughout winter. Two different approaches were used to estimate the ocean heat fluxes; (i) a residual method based on a 1-D thermodynamic ice growth model and (ii) a bulk parameterization using friction velocities and available heat content of water beneath the ice. The average heat flux in the inner YS varied from 13 W m-2 in October-December to less than 2 W m-2 in January-May. An average heat flux of 9 W m-2 was calculated for the outer YS. Moreover, we show that the upward heat flux in the outer fjord is strongly modulated by surface outflow, which produced two maxima in heat flux (up to 18-24 W m-2) during 26 December to 27 January and from 11 February to 14 March. By May 2014, the upward ocean heat flux reduced the landfast ice thickness by 18% and 24% in the inner and outer YS, respectively.

  17. An iterative procedure for estimating areally averaged heat flux using planetary boundary layer mixed layer height and locally measured heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R. L.; Gao, W.; Lesht, B. M.

    2000-04-04

    Measurements at the central facility of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) are intended to verify, improve, and develop parameterizations in radiative flux models that are subsequently used in General Circulation Models (GCMs). The reliability of this approach depends upon the representativeness of the local measurements at the central facility for the site as a whole or on how these measurements can be interpreted so as to accurately represent increasingly large scales. The variation of surface energy budget terms over the SGP CART site is extremely large. Surface layer measurements of the sensible heat flux (H) often vary by a factor of 2 or more at the CART site (Coulter et al. 1996). The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) effectively integrates the local inputs across large scales; because the mixed layer height (h) is principally driven by H, it can, in principal, be used for estimates of surface heat flux over scales on the order of tens of kilometers. By combining measurements of h from radiosondes or radar wind profiles with a one-dimensional model of mixed layer height, they are investigating the ability of diagnosing large-scale heat fluxes. The authors have developed a procedure using the model described by Boers et al. (1984) to investigate the effect of changes in surface sensible heat flux on the mixed layer height. The objective of the study is to invert the sense of the model.

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Surface Heat Flux During Quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K.; Prasanna Kumar, T. S.

    2010-02-01

    In this article, a method to model the heat flux during quenching has been developed to bring out the effect of initial soaking temperature. Quench probes with a diameter of 20 mm and a length of 50 mm were prepared from 304 L stainless steel. These probes were quenched from different initial soaking temperatures ranging from 400 °C to 950 °C in water. Time-temperature data were recorded during the quenching. The heat flux and temperature at the quenched surface were estimated based on the inverse heat-conduction method. The computation results showed that the peak in the heat flux increased with an increase in the initial soaking temperature of the probes. The heat flux was dependent on the initial soaking temperature. A model for the surface heat flux was proposed as a function of dimensionless parameters. The model could be used to compute the heat flux at different surface temperatures and was specified as a boundary condition to simulate the quenching for the particular material-quenchant combination. The model was verified by running a direct quenching simulation with heat fluxes computed at different surface temperatures using the proposed model as a boundary condition in ANSYS, a commercial finite element program.

  19. ERRORS IN SOIL HEAT FLUX MEASUREMENT: EFFECTS OF FLUX PLATE DESIGN AND VARYING SOIL THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flux plate method is the most commonly employed method for measuring soil heat flux (G) in surface energy balance studies. Nonetheless, significant errors in G measured with flux plates can occur unless proper installation techniques are used and necessary corrections made. The objective of th...

  20. Heat flux determination for nucleate boiling in subsurface tunnel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Poniewski, Mieczyslaw E.; Koziol, Monika

    2012-08-01

    The paper focuses on theoretical analysis of boiling heat transfer on surfaces with tunnel structures formed by fins with microfins and covered with perforated foil. The investigations were conducted for water, ethanol and R-123. The theoretical heat flux, based on modified Chien and Webb model, when compared to the experiments, showed satisfying agreement in low and medium ranges for water and ethanol, and in all heat flux ranges for R-123.

  1. Deep-Sea Research II 49 (2002) 59115917 Surface heat fluxes and subsurface heat content at a site over

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    of major heating of the water column (May­July) in 1996. 2.2. Surface heat fluxes Exchange of heatDeep-Sea Research II 49 (2002) 5911­5917 Surface heat fluxes and subsurface heat content at a site heat fluxes for the period May­July 1996. Changes in heat content of the water column also were

  2. Active galaxies and radiative heating.

    PubMed

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Ciotti, Luca

    2005-03-15

    There is abundant evidence that heating processes in the central regions of elliptical galaxies have both prevented large-scale cooling flows and assisted in the expulsion of metal rich gas. We now know that each such spheroidal system harbours in its core a massive black hole weighing ca. 0.13% of the mass in stars and also know that energy was emitted by each of these black holes with an efficiency exceeding 10% of its rest mass. Since, if only 0.5% of that radiant energy were intercepted by the ambient gas, its thermal state would be drastically altered, it is worth examining in detail the interaction between the out-flowing radiation and the equilibrium or inflowing gas. On the basis of detailed hydrodynamic computations we find that relaxation oscillations are to be expected with the radiative feedback quite capable of regulating both the growth of the central black hole and also the density and thermal state of the gas in the galaxy. Mechanical input of energy by jets may assist or dominate over these radiative effects. We propose specific observational tests to identify systems which have experienced strong bursts of radiative heating from their central black holes. PMID:15681285

  3. Supercritical convection, critical heat flux, and coking characteristics of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Gross, R. S.; Boyd, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of propane at subcritical and supercritical pressure were experimentally evaluated using electrically heated Monel K-500 tubes. A design correlation for supercritical heat transfer coefficient was established using the approach previously applied to supercritical oxygen. Flow oscillations were observed and the onset of these oscillations at supercritical pressures was correlated with wall-to-bulk temperature ratio and velocity. The critical heat flux measured at subcritical pressure was correlated with the product of velocity and subcooling. Long duration tests at fixed heat flux conditions were conducted to evaluate coking on the coolant side tube wall and coking rates comparable to RP-1 were observed.

  4. High flux heat transfer in a target environment

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    High flux heat transfer in a target environment T. Davenne High Power Targets Group Rutherford Valid for: Consider turbulent heat transfer in a 1.5mm diameter pipe ­ Dittus Boelter correlation Achenbach correlation for heat transfer in a packed bed of spheres Max power density for a sphere

  5. Maximizing the heat flux in steady unicellular porous media convection

    E-print Network

    Lebovitz, Norman

    Maximizing the heat flux in steady unicellular porous media convection Lindsey T. Corson University of Strathclyde 1 Introduction Convection in a horizontal porous layer heated from below is relevant to a variety is to determine the maximum heat transport attainable in steady 2D unicel- 1 #12;lular porous media convection

  6. Nonequilibrium Stagnation-Line Radiative Heating for Fire II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Hollis, Brian R.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the shock-layer radiative heating to the Fire II vehicle using a new air radiation model and a viscous shock-layer flowfield model. This new air radiation model contains the most up-to-date properties for modeling the atomic-line, atomic photoionization, molecular band, and non-Boltzmann processes. The applied viscous shock-layer flowfield analysis contains the same thermophysical properties and nonequilibrium models as the LAURA Navier-Stokes code. Radiation-flowfield coupling, or radiation cooling, is accounted for in detail in this study. It is shown to reduce the radiative heating by about 30% for the peak radiative heating points, while reducing the convective heating only slightly. A detailed review of past Fire II radiative heating studies is presented. It is observed that the scatter in the radiation predicted by these past studies is mostly a result of the different flowfield chemistry models and the treatment of the electronic state populations. The present predictions provide, on average throughout the trajectory, a better comparison with Fire II flight data than any previous study. The magnitude of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) contribution to the radiative flux is estimated from the calorimeter measurements. This is achieved using the radiometer measurements and the predicted convective heating. The VUV radiation predicted by the present model agrees well with the VUV contribution inferred from the Fire II calorimeter measurement, although only when radiation-flowfield coupling is accounted for. This agreement provides evidence that the present model accurately models the VUV radiation, which is shown to contribute significantly to the Fire II radiative heating.

  7. Heat pipe radiator. [for spacecraft waste heat rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swerdling, B.; Alario, J.

    1973-01-01

    A 15,000 watt spacecraft waste heat rejection system utilizing heat pipe radiator panels was investigated. Of the several concepts initially identified, a series system was selected for more in-depth analysis. As a demonstration of system feasibility, a nominal 500 watt radiator panel was designed, built and tested. The panel, which is a module of the 15,000 watt system, consists of a variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP) header, and six isothermalizer heat pipes attached to a radiating fin. The thermal load to the VCHP is supplied by a Freon-21 liquid loop via an integral heat exchanger. Descriptions of the results of the system studies and details of the radiator design are included along with the test results for both the heat pipe components and the assembled radiator panel. These results support the feasibility of using heat pipes in a spacecraft waste heat rejection system.

  8. Effect of the radiative background flux in convection

    E-print Network

    A. Brandenburg; K. L. Chan; A. Nordlund; R. F. Stein

    2005-08-18

    Numerical simulations of turbulent stratified convection are used to study models with approximately the same convective flux, but different radiative fluxes. As the radiative flux is decreased, for constant convective flux: the entropy jump at the top of the convection zone becomes steeper, the temperature fluctuations increase and the velocity fluctuations decrease in magnitude, and the distance that low entropy fluid from the surface can penetrate increases. Velocity and temperature fluctuations follow mixing length scaling laws.

  9. Limitations of Using Uniform Heat Flux Assumptions in Sizing Vertical Borehole Heat Exchanger Fields

    E-print Network

    Limitations of Using Uniform Heat Flux Assumptions in Sizing Vertical Borehole Heat Exchanger heat exchangers and the surrounding ground are essential for design, optimization and energy analysis of ground heat exchangers (GHE) used with ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems. These models can account

  10. Effect of haze absorption and scattering on radiative-convective-conductive heat flux divergence in Martian CO2 atmosphere and ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallmann, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents some guidelines of an improved numerical modeling effort developed to investigate the effect of an absorbing and scattering particulate phase on the temperature field of the Mars atmosphere and soil in its diurnal cycle and in response to a time-dependent convective heat transfer. Some guidelines are also formulated for the re-evaluation of Mariner 9 infrared radiometer or spectrometer inverted temperature measurements of the dust-laden atmosphere.

  11. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  12. A season of heat, water vapor, total hydrocarbon, and ozone fluxes at a subarctic fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Kathleen E.; Fitzjarrald, David R.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Daube, Bruce C.; Munger, J. William; Bakwin, Peter S.; Crill, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    High-latitude environments are thought to play several critical roles in the global balance of radiatively active trace gases. Adequate documentation of the source and sink strengths for trace gases requires long time series of detailed measurements, including heat and moisture budgets. A fen near Schefferville, Quebec, was instrumented during the summer of 1990 for the measurement of the surface energy, radiation, and moisture balances as well as for eddy correlation estimates of ozone and methane flux. Despite the limited fetch at this site, analysis of the tower flux 'footprint' indicates that at least 80% of the flux observed originates from sources within the fen. Sensible heat fluxes averaged 25% of the daytime net radiation at the site, while the latent heat flux, determined from the energy balance, was 63%; the Bowen ratio varied from 0.2 to 0.8 from day to day, without a seasonal trend to the variation. The competing effects of rooted macrophyte development (with concomitant effects on roughness and transpiration) and the normal shift in synoptic pattern around day 200 to warm, dry conditions results in a lack of net seasonal effect on the energy partitioning. Over the period from days 170 to 230, the evaporation (167 mm) was double the rainfall, while the decline in water level was 107 mm, leaving a net runoff of 0.44 mm/d. The total hydrocarbon flux was 75-120 mg m(exp -2)/d, following a diurnal pattern similar to heat or moisture flux, while the daytime ozone flux was about -1.11 x 10(exp 11) molecules cm(exp -2)/s. A period near the end of the experiment, during week 30, produced the strongest total hydrocarbon flux, associated with warmer deep (1 m) soil temperatures, lower fen water levels, and the late summer shift in wind direction at that time. An early summer 'flush' of total hydrocarbon was not observed.

  13. Calculation of turbulent shear stress, heat flux, mass flux, and mixing length from mean flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. L.; Crouse, R. F.; Borek, G. T.

    1992-05-01

    A numerical technique to calculate the turbulent mass flux, shear stress, heat flux, and mixing length directly from measurable mean flow quantities is presented. The development of this technique was motivated by the desire to make aero-optical calculations based directly on experimentally obtained mean flow data. The technique is based upon the direct integration of the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible turbulent flow. The results of the integrations are the shear stress, heat flux, mass flux and mixing length distributions (i.e., all data that are necessary for application of the Aero-Optical Quality Code (AOQ).

  14. Using remotely sensed planetary boundary layer variables as estimates of areally averaged heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R.L.; Martin, T.J.; Holdridge, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    Homogeneity across the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is an issue of importance to all facets of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program. The degree to which measurements at the central facility can be used to verify, improve, or develop relationships in radiative flux models that are subsequently used in Global Circulation Models (GCMs), for example, is tied directly to the representativeness of the local measurements at the central facility for the site as a whole. The relative variation of surface energy budget terms over a 350- km X 400km domain such as the SGP CART site can be extremely large. The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) develops as a result of energy inputs from widely varying surfaces. The lower atmosphere effectively integrates the local inputs; measurements of PBL structure can potentially be used for estimates of surface heat flux over scales on the order of tens of kilometers. This project is focusing on two PBL quantities that are intimately tied to the surface heat flux: (1) the height of the mixed layer, z, that grows during daytime due to sensible heat flux input from the surface; and (2) the convective velocity scale, normally a scaling parameter defined by the product of the sensible heat flux and z, but in this case defined by coherent structures that connect the surface layer and the capping inversion that defines z.

  15. Determination of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux enhancement in nanofluids

    E-print Network

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids are engineered colloids composed of nano-size particles dispersed in common fluids such as water or refrigerants. Using an electrically controlled wire heater, pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of Alumina ...

  16. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    E-print Network

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well ...

  17. Model of critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    E-print Network

    Fiori, Mario P.

    1968-01-01

    The physical phenomenon occurring before and at the critical heat flux (CHF) for subcooled flow boiling has been investigated. The first phase of this study established the basic nature of the flow structure at CHF. A ...

  18. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-28

    A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  19. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  20. Method to calculate soil heat flux that accounts for sunlit and shaded soil beneath row crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil heat flux (G) is a component of the soil-plant-atmosphere energy balance, and can have significant impact on evapotranspiration (ET), especially for incomplete canopies. Most ET models calculate G as a fraction of net radiation (Rn), which is usually suitable for full canopy cover and spatial s...

  1. Effect of Index of Refraction on Radiation Characteristics in a Heated Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the index of refraction on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux in semitransparent materials, such as some ceramics, is investigated analytically. In the case considered here, a plane layer of a ceramic material is subjected to external radiative heating incident on each of its surfaces; the material emits, absorbs, and isotropically scatters radiation. It is shown that, for radiative equilibrium in a gray layer with diffuse interfaces, the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux for any index of refraction can be obtained in a simple manner from the results for an index of refraction of unity.

  2. Characterization of local heat fluxes around ICRF antennas on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Campergue, A.-L.; Jacquet, P.; Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Sirinelli, A.; Milanesio, D.; Colas, L.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    When using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating, enhanced power deposition on Plasma-Facing Components (PFCs) close to the antennas can occur. Experiments have recently been carried out on JET with the new ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) to characterize the heat fluxes on the protection of the JET ICRF antennas, using Infra-Red (IR) thermography measurement. The measured heat flux patterns along the poloidal limiters surrounding powered antennas were compared to predictions from a simple RF sheath rectification model. The RF electric field, parallel to the static magnetic field in front of the antenna, was evaluated using the TOPICA code, integrating a 3D flattened model of the JET A2 antennas. The poloidal density variation in front of the limiters was obtained from the mapping of the Li-beam or edge reflectometry measurements using the flux surface geometry provided by EFIT equilibrium reconstruction. In many cases, this simple model can well explain the position of the maximum heat flux on the different protection limiters and the heat-flux magnitude, confirming that the parallel RF electric field and the electron plasma density in front of the antenna are the main driving parameters for ICRF-induced local heat fluxes.

  3. Explosive Boiling at Very Low Heat Fluxes: A Microgravity Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents experimental observations of explosive boiling from a large (relative to bubble sizes) flat heating surface at very low heat fluxes in microgravity. The explosive boiling is characterized as either a rapid growth of vapor mass over the entire heating surface due to the flashing of superheated liquid or a violent boiling spread following the appearance of single bubbles on the heating surface. Pool boiling data with saturated Freon 113 was obtained in the microgravity environment of the space shuttle. The unique features of the experimental results are the sustainability of high liquid superheat for long periods and the occurrence of explosive boiling at low heat fluxes (0.2 to 1.2 kW/sq m). For a heat flux of 1.0 kW/sq m a wall superheat of 17.9 degrees C was attained in ten minutes of heating. This was followed by an explosive boiling accompanied with a pressure spike and a violent bulk liquid motion. However, at this heat flux the vapor blanketing the heating surface could not be sustained. Stable nucleate boiling continued following the explosive boiling.

  4. Systematic investigation of the effects of hydrophilic porosity on boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux

    E-print Network

    Tetreault-Friend, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the conditions of critical heat flux (CHF) is of considerable importance for safety and economic reasons in heat transfer units, such as in nuclear power plants. It is greatly advantageous to increase this thermal ...

  5. Nano-engineering the boiling surface for optimal heat transfer rate and critical heat flux

    E-print Network

    Phillips, Bren Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The effects on pool boiling characteristics such as critical heat flux and the heat transfer coefficient of different surface characteristics such as surface wettability, roughness, morphology, and porosity are not well ...

  6. SPECTRAL data-based estimation of soil heat flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, R.K.; Irmak, A.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth; Verma, S.B.; Suyker, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous existing spectral-based soil heat flux (G) models have shown wide variation in performance for maize and soybean cropping systems in Nebraska, indicating the need for localized calibration and model development. The objectives of this article are to develop a semi-empirical model to estimate G from a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and net radiation (R n) for maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) fields in the Great Plains, and present the suitability of the developed model to estimate G under similar and different soil and management conditions. Soil heat fluxes measured in both irrigated and rainfed fields in eastern and south-central Nebraska were used for model development and validation. An exponential model that uses NDVI and Rn was found to be the best to estimate G based on r2 values. The effect of geographic location, crop, and water management practices were used to develop semi-empirical models under four case studies. Each case study has the same exponential model structure but a different set of coefficients and exponents to represent the crop, soil, and management practices. Results showed that the semi-empirical models can be used effectively for G estimation for nearby fields with similar soil properties for independent years, regardless of differences in crop type, crop rotation, and irrigation practices, provided that the crop residue from the previous year is more than 4000 kg ha-1. The coefficients calibrated from particular fields can be used at nearby fields in order to capture temporal variation in G. However, there is a need for further investigation of the models to account for the interaction effects of crop rotation and irrigation. Validation at an independent site having different soil and crop management practices showed the limitation of the semi-empirical model in estimating G under different soil and environment conditions. ?? 2011 American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers ISSN 2151-0032.

  7. Surface Energy Heat Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, David L.; Vukovich, Fred M.; Pontikes, Elizabeth G.

    1997-01-01

    Realistic estimates of surface energy heat fluxes are needed for the study of water and energy interactions between the land and atmosphere. The primary objective of this work is to study the estimation of surface heat energy fluxes using remote sensing derived parameters under different spatial and temporal conditions. Surface energy fluxes and remote sensing derived data from two sources were analyzed. First, we used surface heat flux, remote sensing, and ancillary data from the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP), mapped at a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid. Second, we used NOAA AVHRR (1 km), weather station, and ancillary data to derive estimates of surface latent and sensible heat energy fluxes over a 100 sq kilometers area for three test sites: 1) First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) grassland site, Konza Prairie, Kansas; 2) Howland, Maine Forest Ecosystem Dynamics Site; and 3) Walnut Gulch, scrubland site, surrounding Tombstone, Arizona. Satellite derived estimates of land surface temperature, surface albedo, and spectral vegetation index are used in selected models to provide estimates of surface heat fluxes. Analysis of results from the 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid for North America indicated there were similar, overall correlations between sensible and latent heat energy fluxes versus remotely sensed vegetation index and ground temperature during dry and wet year conditions. However, there were significant differences in correlations between years when stratified by land cover class. Analysis of 100 km x 100 km data (1 km resolution) indicated partitioning the areas in to primary versus secondary cover, with the secondary cover comprising less than 5% of the area, significantly improved surface heat energy flux estimates.

  8. Design of a Calibration System for Heat Flux Meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpino, F.; Dell'Isola, M.; Ficco, G.; Iacomini, L.; Fernicola, V.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate heat flux measurements are needed to gain a better knowledge of the thermal performance of buildings and to evaluate the heat exchange among various parts of a building envelope. Heat flux meters (HFMs) are commonly used both in laboratory applications and in situ for measuring one-dimensional heat fluxes and, thus, estimating the thermal transmittance of material samples and existing buildings components. Building applications often requires heat flux measurements below 100 W · m-2. However, a standard reference system generating such a low heat flux is available only in a few national metrology institutes (NMIs). In this work, a numerical study aimed at designing an HFM calibration apparatus operating in the heat flux range from 5 W·m-2 to 100 W · m-2 is presented. Predictions about the metrological performance of such a calibration system were estimated by numerical modeling exploiting a commercial FEM code (COMSOL®). On the basis of the modeling results, an engineered design of such an apparatus was developed and discussed in detail. The system was designed for two different purposes: (i) for measuring the thermal conductivity of insulators and (ii) for calibrating an HFM with an absolute method (i.e., by measuring the applied power from the heater and its active cross section) or by a relative method (i.e., by measuring the temperature drop across a reference material of known thickness and thermal conductivity). The numerical investigations show that in order to minimize the uncertainty of the generated heat flux, a fine temperature control on the thermal guard is needed. The predicted standard uncertainty is within 2% at 10W·m-2 and within 0.5% at 100 W · m-2.

  9. Radiative component in thermal calculation of tubular heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Stehlik, P.

    1995-01-01

    A model for evaluating radiative heat fluxes in tubular heat exchangers is proposed. In this model it is assumed that individual tubes of the bundle are surrounded by a gaseous layer. The actual geometry was approximated by an equivalent cylindrical gaseous medium to simplify the problem. A mathematical procedure was developed based on this and other assumptions to evaluate the gas-radiation coefficient. The procedure can be incorporated in any arbitrary program for thermal and hydraulic calculation of a tubular heat exchanger. The applicability of this method for determination of the radiative heat transfer coefficient (h{sub R}) is demonstrated on the exchanger-type primary reformer, and the variation of h{sub R} under different geometric and operating conditions is studied using the procedure developed.

  10. Research in Airborne Remote Sensing: Heat Flux in Giant

    E-print Network

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    rich cold water Thermal Color Infrared #12;Questions · Is there a kelp heat signature in MASTER imagery from 2010 to 2011 in the thermal imagery? · Can a flux of heat be observed in and out of the kelp Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer · ASTER ­ Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer

  11. Progress Report Development of a High Heat Flux

    E-print Network

    Yuen, Walter W.

    carbon matrix and two-phase boiling heat transfer in the porous region. The carbon foam shell is brazedProgress Report Development of a High Heat Flux Supercooler Using Carbon Foam By Walter Yuen is brazed to a carbon foam tip. The carbon foam tip is a part of a carbon foam cylindrical shell which

  12. Heat Conduction with Flux Condition on a Free Patch

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttler, Kenneth L. Shillor, Meir

    2004-08-15

    A new free boundary or free patch problem for the heat equation is presented. In the problem a nonlinear heat flux condition is prescribed on a free portion of the boundary, the patch, the position of which depends on the solution. The existence of a weak solution is established using the theory of set-valued pseudo monotone operators.

  13. Inverse Heat Conduction Using Measured Back Surface Temperature and Heat Flux

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yuwen

    . (1) h = convection heat transfer coefficient, W=m2 K k = thermal conductivity, W=m K L = thicknessInverse Heat Conduction Using Measured Back Surface Temperature and Heat Flux Jianhua Zhou, Yuwen are not directly measurable, but they can be estimated by solving an inverse heat conduction problem based

  14. Thermal response of a flat heat pipe sandwich structure to a localized heat flux

    E-print Network

    Wadley, Haydn

    Thermal response of a flat heat pipe sandwich structure to a localized heat flux G. Carbajal a , C The temperature distribution across a flat heat pipe sandwich structure, subjected to an intense localized thermal to the evaporator side of the flat heat pipe, while the condenser side was cooled via natural convective

  15. MAPPING HIGH-RESOLUTION LAND SURFACE RADIATIVE FLUXES FROM MODIS

    E-print Network

    Liang, Shunlin

    pollution (Wang K. et al. 2009), and land cover and land use changes (Wang et al. 2007b). The SRB is alsoChapter 6 MAPPING HIGH-RESOLUTION LAND SURFACE RADIATIVE FLUXES FROM MODIS: ALGORITHMS-Chee Tsay, Robert Wolf, Crystal Schaaf, Alan Strahler 6.1 Introduction Land surface radiative fluxes

  16. ENTROPY PRODUCTION AND RADIATION ENTROPY FLUX OF THE EARTH SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    ENTROPY PRODUCTION AND RADIATION ENTROPY FLUX OF THE EARTH SYSTEM Wu, W. and Liu, Y/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Entropy production of the Earth system and the radiation entropy flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are critical

  17. Heat flux and precipitation estimates from oceanographic observations.

    PubMed

    Ostapoff, F; Tarbeyev, Y; Worthem, S

    1973-06-01

    Surface meteorological observations and salinity and temperature profiles were made in the intertropical convergence zone during July 1972. Over an 18-hour period, estimates of the heat budget in the top layer of the ocean and estimates of the total heat flux made by using aerodynamic parameterization equations balance within 10 percent. The salinity budget provides a precipitation estimate. Due to the stable stratification established by the salinity dilution in the wave-mixed layer by rain, the total heat flux to the atmosphere is being extracted from this shallow layer. As a result, large sea surface temperature drops occur regionally and may be capable of inhibiting atmospheric convection. PMID:17735928

  18. High heat flux measurements and experimental calibrations/characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, Carl T.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in techniques employed in the measurement of very high heat-transfer rates in reentry-type facilities at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is described. These advances include thermal analyses applied to transducer concepts used to make these measurements; improved heat-flux sensor fabrication methods, equipment, and procedures for determining the experimental time response of individual sensors; performance of absolute heat-flux calibrations at levels above 2,000 Btu/cu ft-sec (2.27 kW/cu cm); and innovative methods of performing in-situ run-to-run characterizations of heat-flux probes installed in the test facility. Graphical illustrations of the results of extensive thermal analyses of the null-point calorimeter and coaxial surface thermocouple concepts with application to measurements in aerothermal test environments are presented. Results of time response experiments and absolute calibrations of null-point calorimeters and coaxial thermocouples performed in the laboratory at intermediate to high heat-flux levels are shown. Typical AEDC high-enthalpy arc heater heat-flux data recently obtained with a Calspan-fabricated null-point probe model are included.

  19. QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT FLUX FROM A REACTING THERMITE SPRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Nixon; Michelle Pantoya

    2009-07-01

    Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors can not survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite spray conditions are reported. Results indicate that this newly developed energetic material heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability.

  20. A diagnostic for quantifying heat flux from a thermite spray

    SciTech Connect

    E. P. Nixon; M. L. Pantoya; D. J. Prentice; E. D. Steffler; M. A. Daniels; S. P. D'Arche

    2010-02-01

    Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors cannot survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite sprays are reported. Results indicate that this newly designed heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability suitable for characterizing energetic material combustion.

  1. Evaluation of satellite-derived latent heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, J.; Meywerk, J.; Ewald, S.; Schluessel, P.

    1997-11-01

    A method of determining ocean-atmosphere latent heat flux using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is presented and evaluated. While sea surface temperatures are retrieved from AVHRR data with an accuracy of 0.5-1.0 K, the near-surface wind speed and the surface air humidity are retrieved from measurements of the SSM/I with accuracies of 1.4 m s{sup -1} and 1.1 g kg{sup -1}, respectively. The latent heat flux is then computed with a stability-dependent bulk parameterization model. The derived fluxes are compared to globally distributed instantaneous shipboard and buoy measurements and to monthly averages of 2{degrees} x 2{degrees} longitude and latitude bins. The standard error for instantaneous flux estimates is approximately 30 W m{sup -2}, and that for monthly averages decreases to 15 W m{sup -2}. Additionally, a 1-yr time series of latent heat flux at the weathership M in the North Atlantic and two shorter time series during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) and the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) in the tropical Pacific are compared to satellite measurements. The SSM/1-derived parameters, as well as the latent heat flux, are represented very well on the weathership M. During TOGA COARE and CEPEX, the near-surface humidity is sometimes systematically overestimated in the warm pool region, which results in an underestimation of the latent heat flux. Nevertheless, the representation of the latent heat flux is always in the range of the in situ measurements. 50 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

  3. Critical heat flux in a boiling aqueous dispersion of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokin, B. S.; Belenkiy, M. Ya.; Almjashev, V. I.; Khabensky, V. B.; Almjasheva, O. V.; Gusarov, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    The effect of nanoparticles in an aqueous dispersion (nanofluid) on the critical heat flux (CHF) removed by boiling liquid from a heat-exchange surface has been studied. It is shown that a nanoparticles layer formed on the heated surface in the course of boiling possesses a hierarchical structure. Hydrophilic properties of this layer and its high permeability facilitating the supply of liquid to vapor bubbles lead to an increase in the CHF density.

  4. Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Heat flux sensors available for installation in the hot section airfoils of advanced aircraft gas turbine engines were developed. Two heat flux sensors were designed, fabricated, calibrated, and tested. Measurement techniques are compared in an atmospheric pressure combustor rig test. Sensors, embedded thermocouple and the Gordon gauge, were fabricated that met the geometric and fabricability requirements and could withstand the hot section environmental conditions. Calibration data indicate that these sensors yielded repeatable results and have the potential to meet the accuracy goal of measuring local heat flux to within 5%. Thermal cycle tests and thermal soak tests indicated that the sensors are capable of surviving extended periods of exposure to the environment conditions in the turbine. Problems in calibration of the sensors caused by severe non-one dimensional heat flow were encountered. Modifications to the calibration techniques are needed to minimize this problem and proof testing of the sensors in an engine is needed to verify the designs.

  5. Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Goldston

    2009-08-20

    The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

  6. Hamiltonian magnetic reconnection with parallel electron heat flux dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, D.; Tassi, E.

    2015-10-01

    > We analyse, both analytically and numerically, a two-dimensional six-field fluid model for collisionless magnetic reconnection, accounting for temperature and heat flux fluctuations along the direction of the magnetic guide field. We show that the model possesses a Hamiltonian structure with a non-canonical Poisson bracket. This bracket is characterized by the presence of six infinite families of Casimirs, associated with Lagrangian invariants. This reveals that the model can be reformulated as a system of advection equations, thus generalizing previous results obtained for Hamiltonian isothermal fluid models for reconnection. Numerical simulations indicate that the presence of heat flux and temperature fluctuations yields slightly larger growth rates and similar saturated island amplitudes, with respect to the isothermal models. For values of the sonic Larmor radius much smaller than the electron skin depth, heat flux fluctuations tend to be suppressed and temperature fluctuations follow density fluctuations. Increasing the sonic Larmor radius results in an increasing fraction of magnetic energy converted into heat flux, at the expense of temperature fluctuations. In particular, heat flux fluctuations tend to become relevant along the magnetic island separatrices. The qualitative structures associated with the electron field variables are also reinterpreted in terms of the rotation of the Lagrangian invariants of the system.

  7. Experimental verification of heat flux bending in multilayered thermal metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuri, Krishna P.; Canbazoglu, Fatih M.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate heat flux bending in a multilayered composite considering an effective thermal medium approximation. We show that when the orientation of the composite is physically rotated with respect to the applied temperature gradient , that the resultant thermal conductivity tensor can be modified to be anisotropic, with non-zero off- diagonal elements. The resultant anisotropy was found to be dependent on the angle of rotation as well as the ratio of the thermal conductivities of the constituent materials. We experimentally demonstrate the bending of the heat flux in three such multilayered composites made by alternately stacking 2mm layers of copper ~ 391 W/mK and alloy steel ~ 42 W/mK respectively with three different rotation angles. We show that the resultant heat flux vectors in the composites are oriented at an angle with the applied temperature gradient , due to anisotropy in the thermal conductivity. Our experiments and analysis indicate that heat flux does not have to be collinear with the applied temperature gradient, e.g. the temperature gradient in a particular direction can drive heat flux in an orthogonal direction. Our studies have implications in thermal energy management with possible utility in portable electronics, nano-combustible systems, solar energy utilization etc.

  8. Diesel cylinder gas-side heat flux to a ceramic surface. Final report, 18 May 1981-30 June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, G.L.; Huang, J.C.

    1986-06-01

    Results of four research projects, each dealing with instantaneous heat flux to the cylinder head of reciprocating engine, are given. The projects are: heat flux measurements in a diesel engine with variations in injection pressure, nozzle tips, and swirl; development of instrumentation for radiation measurements in a diesel cylinder; heat-flux measurements to various surfaces on the head of diesel engines including a normaly cooled metal surface, an insulated metal surface and a zirconia surface; and initial attempts to simultaneously measure the fluid motion and heat flux in a motored engine boundary layer. The variation of injection-pressure nozzle tips and swirl in a direct-injection diesel showed strong coupling between combustion and heat flux. An instrument for radiation measurement that uses a wall jet to reduce convection is described. Compression of the jet by the combustion heat release prevents zeroing of the convection. The major portion of the research was devoted to heat-flux measurements to the surface of an instrumentation plug in the head of a single TACOM-LABECO diesel. Comparisons made between data for insulated and uninsulated surfaces show that the hot metal surface gave reduced time-averaged heat transfer, but gave a higher peak heat flux than a normally cooled surface. Data for zirconia plate surface gave reduced time-averaged heat transfer, but gave a higher peak heat flux than a normally cooled surface. Data for zirconia-plate surface showed a reduction in peak flux that was larger than predicted from the rise in surface temperature alone.

  9. Multi Function Heat Pulse Probes (MFHPP) to Estimate Ground Heat Flux and Reduce Surface Energy Budget Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocca, Francesco; Sharma, Varun; Lunati, Ivan; Parlange, Marc B.

    2013-04-01

    Ground heat flux plays a crucial role in surface energy budget: an incorrect estimation of energy storage and heat fluxes in soils occur when probes such as heat flux plates are adopted, and these mistakes can account for up to 90% of the residual variance (Higgins, GRL, 2012). A promising alternative to heat flux plates is represented by Multi Function Heat Pulse Probes (MFHPP). They have proven to be accurate in thermal properties and heat fluxes estimation (e.g. Cobos, VZJ, 2003) and can be used to monitor and quantify subsurface evaporation in field experiments (Xiao et al., VZJ, 2011). We perform a laboratory experiment with controlled temperature in a small Plexiglas column (20cm diameter and 40cm height). The column is packed with homogeneously saturated sandy soil and equipped with three MFHPPs in the upper 4cm and thermocouples and dielectric soil moisture probes deeper. This configuration allows for accurate and simultaneous ground heat flux, soil moisture and subsurface evaporation measurements. Total evaporation is monitored using a precision scale, while an infrared gun and a long wave radiometer measure the soil skin temperature and the outgoing long-short wave radiation, respectively. A fan and a heat lamp placed above the column allow to mimick on a smaller and more controlled scale the field conditions induced by the diurnal cycle. At a reference height above the column relative humidity, wind speed and air temperature are collected. Results are interpreted by means of numerical simulations performed with an ad-hoc-developed numerical model that simulates coupled heat and moisture transfer in soils and is used to match and interpolate the temperature and soil moisture values got at finite depths within the column. Ground heat fluxes are then estimated by integrating over almost continuous, numerically simulated temperature profiles, which avoids errors due to use of discrete data (Lunati et al., WRR, 2012) and leads to a more reliable estimate of this crucial term. The surface energy balance is calculated and the residual decomposition approach described by Higgins, GRL, 2012 will be applied to estimate the contribution of the ground heat. Results of the matching between subsurface-surface evaporation are presented, and the applicability of the MFHPP to energy balance closure problems is discussed.

  10. Radiative heat transfer in rocket thrust chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammad, K. J.; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical models based on the discrete exchange factor (DEF) and the zonal methods for radiative analysis of rocket engines containing a radiatively participating medium have been developed. These models implement a new technique for calculating the direct exchange factors to account for possible blockage by the nozzle throat. Given the gas and surface temperature distributions, engine geometry, and radiative properties, the models compute the wall radiative heat fluxes at different axial positions. The results of sample calculations for a typical rocket engine (engine 700 at NASA), which uses RP-1 (a kerosene-type propellant), are presented for a wide range of surface and gas properties. It is found that the heat transfer by radiation can reach up to 50 percent of that due to convection. The maximum radiative heat flux is at the inner side of the engine, where the gas temperature is the highest. While the results of both models are in excellent agreement, the computation time of the DEF method is found to be much smaller.

  11. Radiative heat transfer in rocket thrust chambers and nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammad, K. J.; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1989-06-01

    Numerical models based on the discrete exchange factor (DEF) and the zonal methods for radiative analysis of rocket engines containing a radiatively participating medium have been developed. These models implement a new technique for calculating the direct exchange factors to account for possible blockage by the nozzle throat. Given the gas and surface temperature distributions, engine geometry, and radiative properties, the models compute the wall radiative heat fluxes at different axial positions. The results of sample calculations for a typical rocket engine (engine 700 at NASA), which uses RP-1 (a kerosene-type propellant), are presented for a wide range of surface and gas properties. It is found that the heat transfer by radiation can reach up to 50 percent of that due to convection. The maximum radiative heat flux is at the inner side of the engine, where the gas temperature is the highest. While the results of both models are in excellent agreement, the computation time of the DEF method is found to be much smaller.

  12. Heat flux measurement from vertical temperature profile and thermal infrared imagery in low-flux fumarolic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Damien; Finizola, Anthony; Beauducel, François; Brothelande, Elodie; Allemand, Pascal; Delacourt, Christophe; Delcher, Eric; Peltier, Aline

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal systems are associated to most of the dormant volcanoes. Heat is transported by steam from the hot magma body in the connected porosity and the fissures of the rock to the surface. If the flux is low enough (<500 W/m²), the steam mainly condensates in the soil close to surface, and a significant proportion of the heat is transported to the surface by conduction, producing a gradient of temperature and a thermal anomaly detectable at the surface. Detecting and monitoring these fluxes is crucial for hazard management, since it reflects the state of the magma body in depth. In order to quantify this flux two methods are considered. First, a vertical profile of temperature is measured by a series of thermocouples, and the conducted flux is estimated thanks to the Fourier law. Secondly, a more recent method uses the thermal infrared imagery to monitor the surface temperature anomaly (STA) between the studied zone and an equivalent zone not affected by the geothermal flux. The heat flux from the soil to the atmosphere is computed as the sum of (1) the radiative flux, (2) the sensible flux and (3) the residual steam flux. These two methods are complementary and have an equivalent uncertainty of approximately 20%, which would allow to track the major changes in the hydrothermal system. However, the surface and sub-surface temperatures are strongly influenced by the climate. For instance, it has been widely demonstrated that the surface temperature dramatically decreases after a rainfall. In order to estimate the reliability of the measurements, a numerical model simulating the evolution of the subsurface temperature in low flux fumarolic zone has been built. In depth, the heat can be transported either by conduction, or by the rising steam, or by condensed water. In surface, both the radiative flux and the sensible flux (convection of the atmosphere) are taken into account. This model allows to estimate the changes of temperature due to a variation of solar illumination, wind, or rainfalls. It has been successfully tested during 5 months with a permanent station built on the Ty fault on La Soufrière volcano (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles). Results show that the diurnal cycle has a significant influence on the temperature up to ca. 30 cm depth, hindering the use of the thermal gradient in this zone, while the STA has a negligible variation. Rain has a more dramatic influence: the surface temperature and the STA are significantly affected, even for small rains. The model shows that the drop of temperature and the affected thickness are mainly controlled by the amount of rain, while the relaxation time is primarily a function of the heat flux. These results have strong implications in the interpretation and the reliability of the temperature surveys, and could be used to correct them from the climate fluctuations.

  13. Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies

    E-print Network

    Svend-Age Biehs

    2011-03-16

    The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

  14. Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.

    1993-12-28

    A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

  15. Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

  16. Simulation for heat flux mitigation by gas puffing in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Seung Bo; Kotov, Vladislav; Hong, Suk-Ho; Detlev, Reiter; Kim, Jin Yong; Na, Yong Su; Lee, Hae June

    2013-10-01

    Control of heat flux is very important to achieve high performance long pulse operation in tokamaks. There are so many efforts to reduce the heat flux like change of divertor structure, snowflake divertor, and RMP, etc. Detachment by gas puffing is used for long time to reduce the heat flux. In this paper edge plasma scenarios of KSTAR are analyzed numerically by well-known B2-Eirene code package(SOLPS4.3). High performance discharges with heating power ~ 8 MW and core flux ~ 1021 s-1 is used. Gas puffed on the outer mid-plane(OMP), both divertors is likely to stay attached. So, gas puffed on the outer target, one is near the private flux region(PFR) and the other is near the scrape-off-layer(SOL). When gas puffed near the SOL is still attached, and it is worse than gas puff from OMP because it is too close to cryo-pump. The case near the PFR shows high recycling region easily compared with OMP case. When one forth gas puffed on the PFR, results are similar with OMP case. But it is still not good for detachment operation. Detachment operation window is too small for the gas puffing on the PFR. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MEST)(No. 2012-0000579).

  17. Combining Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) with photosynthesis model to simulate water and CO2 fluxes over wheat canopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy, water and CO2 flux at the soil-atmosphere interface is a key interest among ecosystem researchers. The Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) Model describes radiation energy balance, heat transfer and water movement within the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum, but has no provisions for carbon as...

  18. Infrared Camera Diagnostic for Heat Flux Measurements on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mastrovito; R. Maingi; H.W. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore

    2003-03-25

    An infrared imaging system has been installed on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to measure the surface temperatures on the lower divertor and center stack. The imaging system is based on an Indigo Alpha 160 x 128 microbolometer camera with 12 bits/pixel operating in the 7-13 {micro}m range with a 30 Hz frame rate and a dynamic temperature range of 0-700 degrees C. From these data and knowledge of graphite thermal properties, the heat flux is derived with a classic one-dimensional conduction model. Preliminary results of heat flux scaling are reported.

  19. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-12-19

    Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

  20. Scaling of high heat flux flow boiling flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Castrogiovanni, A.; Sforza, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    The scaling of high heat flux boiling flow systems is examined using a computational technique newly developed by the present authors. The current work is an extension of previously reported two-dimensional scaling technique to include flow development along the axis of a cooling channel. The new approach involves the solution of the energy equation for a pipe flow subjected to a step change in wall heat flux assuming a fully developed turbulent velocity profile at the point of initial heating. A boiling-induced turbulent eddy diffusivity term is used with an adaptive genetic algorithm closure scheme to predict both the transition to, and development of, the partial nucleate boiling regime based on a postulated minimization of the local wall temperature. Examination of the constitutive equations in non-dimensional form in conjunction with the use of previously established fluid-property scaling tools, leads to the development of a scaling procedure. Reasonable similarity between a high heat flux boiling flow system utilizing water, and a lower heat flux boiling flow system using R-12 is demonstrated. A numerical experiment is carried out to illustrate the scaling technique.

  1. Eroding ribbon thermocouples: impulse response and transient heat flux analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttsworth, David R.; Stevens, Robert; Stone, C. Richard

    2005-07-01

    We have investigated a particular type of fast-response surface thermocouple to determine if it is appropriate to use a one-dimensional transient heat conduction model to derive the transient surface heat flux from the measurements of surface temperature. With these sensors, low thermal inertia thermocouple junctions are formed near the surface by abrasive wear. Using laser excitation, we obtained the impulse response of these commercially available devices. The response of particular sensors can vary if new junctions are created by abrasive wear. Furthermore, the response of these sensors was found to deviate substantially from the one-dimensional model and varied from sensor to sensor. The impulse response was simulated with greater fidelity using a two-dimensional finite element model, but three-dimensional effects also appear to be significant. The impact of these variations on the derived heat flux is assessed for the case of measurements in an internal combustion engine. When the measured impulse response is used to derive the surface heat flux, the apparent reversal of heat flux during the expansion stroke does not occur.

  2. Heat flux instrumentation for Hyflite thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diller, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    Using Thermal Protection Tile core samples supplied by NASA, the surface characteristics of the FRCI, TUFI, and RCG coatings were evaluated. Based on these results, appropriate methods of surface preparation were determined and tested for the required sputtering processes. Sample sensors were fabricated on the RCG coating and adhesion was acceptable. Based on these encouraging results, complete Heat Flux Microsensors were fabricated on the RCG coating. The issue of lead attachment was addressed with the annnealing and welding methods developed at NASA Lewis. Parallel gap welding appears to be the best method of lead attachment with prior heat treatment of the sputtered pads. Sample Heat Flux Microsensors were submitted for testing in the NASA Ames arc jet facility. Details of the project are contained in two attached reports. One additional item of interest is contained in the attached AIAA paper, which gives details of the transient response of a Heat Flux Microsensors in a shock tube facility at Virginia Tech. The response of the heat flux sensor was measured to be faster than 10 micro-s.

  3. Anatomy of a Radiation Belt Flux Dropout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennell, J. F.; Friedel, R. H.; Green, J. C.; Guild, T. B.; Mazur, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    During the period 30 June to 4 July 2011 an extended flux dropout of energetic electrons was observed by multiple GOES, HEO and GPS satellites. The GOES >2 MeV electron flux dropped by more than two orders of magnitude to background levels and remained at the reduced levels for about four days. The HEO observations indicate the >6.5, >3 MeV, >1.5 MeV, >0.23 flux reductions were observed down to L~4.8, 4.9, 5.1 and 5.6 respectively. The >320 keV proton fluxes were also observe to drop out down to L~ 5.5. At the time of the flux dropout the interplanetary conditions were relatively steady with low solar wind speed and ion density of ~10/cc. However Bz was <0 and Dst turned negative on 1 July at 02 UT reaching -49 nT by 08 UT. The recovery and duration of the flux dropouts were energy dependent with the hundreds of keV electron fluxes recovering within a day near geosynchronous while the >MeV electrons and >320 keV protons recovered slowly. Only the <500 keV electrons reached flux levels exceeding or approaching their pre dropout levels at HEO and then only in the L=4.5-5.2 range. These < 0.5 MeV flux enhancements were temporary, lasting about a day. The HEO observations show that the recovery of the relativistic electron fluxes proceeded slowly from low to higher L. The >8.5 MeV electrons and >320 keV proton fluxes observed by the HEO satellites had still not recovered to L~6.5 after 6-7 days. We will fold all the available data together from GOES, multiple HEO and GPS satellites plus low altitude observations to provide a comprehensive view of this dropout event.

  4. Heat-Flux Sensor For Hot Engine Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Walter S.; Barrows, Richard F.; Smith, Floyd A.; Koch, John

    1989-01-01

    Heat-flux sensor includes buried wire thermocouple and thin-film surface thermocouple, made of platinum and platinum with 13 percent rhodium. Sensor intended for use in ceramic-insulated, low-heat-rejection diesel engine at temperatures of about 1,000 K. Thermocouple junction resists environment in cylinder of advanced high-temperature diesel engine created by depositing overlapping films of Pt and 0.87 Pt/0.13 Rh on iron plug. Plug also contains internal thermocouple.

  5. Heat Rejection from a Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Radiator Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Gibson, M. A.; Hervol, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    A titanium-water heat pipe radiator having an innovative proprietary evaporator configuration was evaluated in a large vacuum chamber equipped with liquid nitrogen cooled cold walls. The radiator was manufactured by Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT), Lancaster, PA, and delivered as part of a Small Business Innovative Research effort. The radiator panel consisted of five titanium-water heat pipes operating as thermosyphons, sandwiched between two polymer matrix composite face sheets. The five variable conductance heat pipes were purposely charged with a small amount of non-condensable gas to control heat flow through the condenser. Heat rejection was evaluated over a wide range of inlet water temperature and flow conditions, and heat rejection was calculated in real-time utilizing a data acquisition system programmed with the Stefan-Boltzmann equation. Thermography through an infra-red transparent window identified heat flow across the panel. Under nominal operation, a maximum heat rejection value of over 2200 Watts was identified. The thermal vacuum evaluation of heat rejection provided critical information on understanding the radiator s performance, and in steady state and transient scenarios provided useful information for validating current thermal models in support of the Fission Power Systems Project.

  6. Dependence of divertor heat flux widths on heating power, flux expansion, and plasma current in the NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Maingi, Rajesh; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Ahn, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    We report the dependence of the lower divertor surface heat flux profiles, measured from infrared thermography and mapped magnetically to the mid-plane on loss power into the scrape-off layer (P{sub LOSS}), plasma current (I{sub p}), and magnetic flux expansion (f{sub exp}), as well as initial results with lithium wall conditioning in NSTX. Here we extend previous studies [R. Maingi et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 363-365 (2007) 196-200] to higher triangularity similar to 0.7 and higher I{sub p} {le} 1.2 MA. First we note that the mid-plane heat flux width mapped to the mid-plane, {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} is largely independent of P{sub LOSS} for P{sub LOSS} {ge} 4 MW. {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} is also found to be relatively independent of f{sub exp}; peak heat flux is strongly reduced as f{sub exp} is increased, as expected. Finally, {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} is shown to strongly contract with increasing I{sub p} such that {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} {alpha} I{sub p}{sup -1.6} with a peak divertor heat flux of q{sub div,peak} similar to 15 MW/m{sup 2} when I{sub p} = 1.2 MA and P{sub LOSS} similar to 6 MW. These relationships are then used to predict the divertor heat flux for the planned NSTX-Upgrade, with heating power between 10 and 15 MW, B{sub t} = 1.01 and I{sub p}= 2.0 MA for 5 s.

  7. Thin film heat flux sensors for accurate transient and unidirectional heat transfer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azerou, B.; Garnier, B.; Lahmar, J.

    2012-11-01

    Heat flux measurement is needed in many heat transfer studies. For the best unbiased heat flux sensors (HFS), the heat flux is obtained using temperature measurements at different locations and also an inverse heat conduction method (function specification...) in order to calculate the heat flux. Systematic errors can come from the uncertainty in the wire thermocouples locations and from errors in the knowledge of distances between two consecutive wire thermocouples. The main idea in this work is to use thin film thermoresistances deposited on a flexible thin polymer substrate instead of wire thermocouples welded on metallic sample. The interest of using thin film thermoresistances instead of wire thermocouples is a lower disturbance due to the smaller thickness of the thin film sensors (typically less than 1?m) and a much better knowledge of the distances between the different thin film thermoresistances which are precisely defined in the mask used for the metallic thin film pattern fabrication. In this paper, we present the fabrication of the new heat flux sensor with thin film thermoresistances, the study of the effect of the self heating (due to Joule effect in thermoresistances) and the performances of this new HFS with the comparison with classical HFS using wire thermocouples. For this study, a symmetric experimental setup is used with metallic samples equipped with an etched foil heater and both classical and new HFS. For several heating conditions, it appears that a better accuracy is always obtained with the new HFS using thin film thermoresistances.

  8. Heat flux measurements for use in physiological and clothing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermann, R.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    Scientists use passive heat flow meters to measure body heat exchanges with the environment. In recent years, several such sensors have been developed and concerns about their proper calibration have been addressed. However, calibration methods have differed in the geometry of the heated device as well as in the heat transfer mechanism. Therefore, a comparison of calibration methods is needed in order to understand the obtained differences in calibration lines. We chose three commercially available heat flux sensors and placed them on four different heated devices: a hot plate, double hot plate, nude cylinder and a cylinder covered with a spacer material. We found differences between the calibration line of the manufacturer and our own measurements, especially when forced convection was involved as the main heat transfer mechanism. The results showed clearly that the calibration method should be chosen according to the intended purpose of use. In addition, we recommend use a thin, light heat flux sensor with good thermal conduction in human subject studies.

  9. Heat flux measurements for use in physiological and clothing research.

    PubMed

    Niedermann, R; Psikuta, A; Rossi, R M

    2014-08-01

    Scientists use passive heat flow meters to measure body heat exchanges with the environment. In recent years, several such sensors have been developed and concerns about their proper calibration have been addressed. However, calibration methods have differed in the geometry of the heated device as well as in the heat transfer mechanism. Therefore, a comparison of calibration methods is needed in order to understand the obtained differences in calibration lines. We chose three commercially available heat flux sensors and placed them on four different heated devices: a hot plate, double hot plate, nude cylinder and a cylinder covered with a spacer material. We found differences between the calibration line of the manufacturer and our own measurements, especially when forced convection was involved as the main heat transfer mechanism. The results showed clearly that the calibration method should be chosen according to the intended purpose of use. In addition, we recommend use a thin, light heat flux sensor with good thermal conduction in human subject studies. PMID:23824222

  10. Spatial resolution of subsurface anthropogenic heat fluxes in cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Susanne; Bayer, Peter; Menberg, Kathrin; Blum, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    Urban heat islands in the subsurface contain large quantities of energy in the form of elevated groundwater temperatures caused by anthropogenic heat fluxes (AHFS) into the subsurface. Hence, the objective of this study is to exemplarily quantify these AHFS and the generated thermal powers in two German cities, Karlsruhe and Cologne. A two-dimensional (2D) statistical analytical model of the vertical subsurface anthropogenic heat fluxes across the unsaturated zone was developed. The model consists of a so-called Local Monte Carlo approach that introduces a spatial representation of the following sources of AHFS: (1) elevated ground surface temperatures, (2) basements, (3) sewage systems, (4) sewage leakage, (5) subway tunnels, and (6) district heating networks. The results show that district heating networks induce the largest local AHFS with values larger than 60 W/m2 and one order of magnitude higher than the other evaluated heat sources. Only sewage pipes and basements reaching into the groundwater cause equally high heat fluxes, with maximal values of 40.37 W/m2 and 13.60 W/m2, respectively. While dominating locally, the district heating network is rather insignificant for the citywide energy budget in both urban subsurfaces. Heat from buildings (1.51 ± 1.36 PJ/a in Karlsruhe; 0.31 ± 0.14 PJ/a in Cologne) and elevated GST (0.34 ± 0.10 PJ/a in Karlsruhe; 0.42 ± 0.13 PJ/a in Cologne) are dominant contributors to the anthropogenic thermal power of the urban aquifer. In Karlsruhe, buildings are the source of 70% of the annual heat transported into the groundwater, which is mainly caused by basements reaching into the groundwater. A variance analysis confirms these findings: basement depth is the most influential factor to citywide thermal power in the studied cities with high groundwater levels. The spatial distribution of fluxes, however, is mostly influenced by the prevailing thermal gradient across the unsaturated zone. A relatively cold groundwater temperature combined with a high ground surface temperature (GST) and a high groundwater level promote elevated fluxes. Overall, 2.15 ± 1.42 PJ and 0.99 ± 0.32 PJ of thermal energy are annually transported into the shallow groundwater of Karlsruhe and Cologne due to AHFS. This is sufficient to sustainably cover 32% and 9% of the annual residential space heating demand of Karlsruhe and Cologne, respectively. Furthermore, extracting this energy could also keep groundwater temperatures from rising any further.

  11. Forced Convection Boiling and Critical Heat Flux of Ethanol in Electrically Heated Tube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Linne, Diane L.; Rousar, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Electrically heated tube tests were conducted to characterize the critical heat flux (transition from nucleate to film boiling) of subcritical ethanol flowing at conditions relevant to the design of a regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chamber. The coolant was SDA-3C alcohol (95% ethyl alcohol, 5% isopropyl alcohol by weight), and tests were conducted over the following ranges of conditions: pressure from 144 to 703 psia, flow velocities from 9.7 to 77 ft/s, coolant subcooling from 33 to 362 F, and critical heat fluxes up to 8.7 BTU/in(exp 2)/sec. For the data taken near 200 psia, critical heat flux was correlated as a function of the product of velocity and fluid subcooling to within +/- 20%. For data taken at higher pressures, an additional pressure term is needed to correlate the critical heat flux. It was also shown that at the higher test pressures and/or flow rates, exceeding the critical heat flux did not result in wall burnout. This result may significantly increase the engine heat flux design envelope for higher pressure conditions.

  12. A microscale thermophoretic turbine driven by external diffusive heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingcheng; Liu, Rui; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2014-10-01

    We propose a theoretical prototype of a micro-scale turbine externally driven by diffusive heat flux without the need for macroscopic particle flux, which is in sharp contrast to conventional turbines. The prototypes are described analytically and validated by computer simulations. Our results indicate that a micro-scale turbine composed of anisotropic blades can rotate unidirectionally in an external temperature gradient due to the anisotropic thermophoresis effect. The rotational direction and speed depend on the temperature gradient, the geometry and the thermophoretic properties of the turbine. The proposed thermophoretic turbines can be experimentally realized and implemented on micro-devices such as computer-chips to recover waste heat or to facilitate cooling.We propose a theoretical prototype of a micro-scale turbine externally driven by diffusive heat flux without the need for macroscopic particle flux, which is in sharp contrast to conventional turbines. The prototypes are described analytically and validated by computer simulations. Our results indicate that a micro-scale turbine composed of anisotropic blades can rotate unidirectionally in an external temperature gradient due to the anisotropic thermophoresis effect. The rotational direction and speed depend on the temperature gradient, the geometry and the thermophoretic properties of the turbine. The proposed thermophoretic turbines can be experimentally realized and implemented on micro-devices such as computer-chips to recover waste heat or to facilitate cooling. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03990d

  13. The Flux Tube Tectonics model for coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Eric R.

    2011-02-01

    An account is presented of the Flux Tube Tectonics model for heating the solar corona, in which a multitude of current sheets are continually forming and dissipating. In addition, a model is summarised for the time-dependent response of the corona to the sudden dissipation of one such current sheet.

  14. Estimation of net radiation flux distribution on the southern slopes of the central Himalayas using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatya, Pukar Man; Ma, Yaoming; Han, Cunbo; Wang, Binbin; Devkota, Lochan Prasad

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of the southern slopes of the Himalayas as a possible heating source driving the South Asian Summer Monsoon (SASM). The central Himalayas are characterized by a complex topography; consequently the measurements regarding land surface heat fluxes are scarce. In this study we tested the feasibility of deriving the regional net radiation flux, an essential component of the surface energy balance, from MODIS data. Three MODIS data scenes were used to derive net radiation flux, taking into account the effect of topography and a detailed extinction process within the atmosphere. This is the first time the regional net radiation flux distribution for the southern slopes of the central Himalayas has been derived from satellite data. The net shortwave radiation flux, net longwave radiation flux and net radiation flux from MODIS data agree well with field observations with mean relative errors of 6.19%, 7.72% and 6.60% respectively. We can therefore conclude that the aforementioned net radiation flux can reasonably be obtained using this method.

  15. White dwarf heating and the ultraviolet flux in dwarf novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pringle, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    The heating of the outer layers of the white dwarf which is likely to occur during a dwarf nova outburst is investigated. It is shown that the decline in IUE flux, observed during quiescent intervals in the dwarf novae VW Hydri and WX Hydri, may be due to the outer layers cooling off once the heat source is removed. The calculations here assume uniformity of the heat source over the white dwarf surface. This is unlikely to be realized from disk accretion, and discussion is made of what further calculations are required.

  16. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The superimposed thin-film pattern of all six layers is presented. The large pads are for connection with pins used to bring the signal out the back of the ceramic. In addition to the heat flux measurement, the surface temperature is measured with a platinum resistance layer (RTS). The resistance of this layer increases with increasing temperature. Therefore, these gages simultaneously measure the surface temperature and heat flux. The demonstrated applications include rocket nozzles, SCRAM jet engines, gas turbine engines, boiling heat transfer, flame experiments, basic fluid heat transfer, hypersonic flight, and shock tube testing. The laboratory involves using one of these sensors in a small combustion flame. The sensor is made on a 2.5 cm diameter piece of aluminum nitride ceramic.

  17. Downstream heat flux profile versus midplane T profile in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer (SOL) electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied that takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion in rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with rectangular geometry and constant, but highly anisotropic, thermal diffusivities. A nonlinear solution is also found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma, and geometry that includes a model for the divertor leg. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities, it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared to the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the scaling of the simplest two-point model. However, the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q?div to Tmp??mp/L? as predicted in that model. For realistic parameters, the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of 2 or more relative to the two-point model scaling that fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest opportunities and caveats for data interpretation and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

  18. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8%Y2O3 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with failing. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 2 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12%Y2O3 or ZrO2-20%Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  19. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with falling. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 1 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12 percent Y2O3 or ZrO2-2O percent Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  20. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y203 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with failing. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 2 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12 percent Y2O3 or ZrO2-20 percent Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  1. Cooling by Heat Conduction Inside Magnetic Flux Loops and the Moderate Cluster Cooling Flow Model

    E-print Network

    Noam Soker

    2003-11-02

    I study non-radiative cooling of X-ray emitting gas via heat conduction along magnetic field lines inside magnetic flux loops in cooling flow clusters of galaxies. I find that such heat conduction can reduce the fraction of energy radiated in the X-ray band by a factor of 1.5-2. This non-radiative cooling joins two other proposed non-radiative cooling processes, which can be more efficient. These are mixing of cold and hot gas, and heat conduction initiated by magnetic fields reconnection between hot and cold gas. These processes when incorporated into the moderate cooling flow model lead to a general cooling flow model with the following ingredients. (1) Cooling flow does occur, but with a mass cooling rate about 10 times lower than in old versions of the cooling flow model. Namely, heating occurs such that the effective age of the cooling flow is much below the cluster age, but the heating can't prevent cooling altogether. (2) The cooling flow region is in a non-steady state evolution. (3) Non-radiative cooling of X-ray emitting gas can bring the model to a much better agreement with observations. (4) The general behavior of the cooling flow gas, and in particular the role played by magnetic fields, make the intracluster medium in cooling flow clusters similar in some aspects to the active solar corona.

  2. Radiative heat transfer in plastic welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaki, Yasuo

    2005-06-01

    This paper deals with a novel CO2 laser plastic welding procedure developed from the point of view of heat transfer containing simultaneous radiation and conduction processes and also gives a brief review of plastic welding development to date. The principle and features are shown by both the experiments using CO2 laser as a radiation source and numerical simulation considering heat transfer phenomena in simultaneous radiation and conduction in welding process. The feasibility of the proposed procedure is confirmed by applying the overlapped same plastic films with combination of infrared radiation absorbing heating and thermal diffusion cooling processes. A solid material transparent to infrared radiation with a high thermal diffusivity is used as a heat sink in contact with the irradiated surface of overlapped thermoplastics during radiation heating. The procedure is able to achieve both high welding strength and excellent surface appearance without causing surface thermal damage as often suffered in conventional direct infrared radiation welding process. In addition, pigmentation in welding material to increase absorption of radiation is unnecessary for this method.

  3. Constraints on hydrothermal heat flux through the oceanic lithosphere from global heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    A significant discrepancy exists between the heat flow measured at the seafloor and the higher values predicted by thermal models of the cooling lithosphere. This discrepancy is generally interpreted as indicating that the upper oceanic crust is cooled significantly by hydrothermal circulation. The magnitude of this heat flow discrepancy is the primary datum used to estimate the volume of hydrothermal flow, and the variation in the discrepancy with lithospheric age is the primary constraint on how the hydrothermal flux is divided between near-ridge and off-ridge environments. The resulting estimates are important for investigation of both the thermal structure of the lithosphere and the chemistry of the oceans. We reevaluate the magnitude and age variation of the discrepancy using a global heat flow data set substantially larger than in earlier studies, and the GDHI (Global Depth and Heat Flow) model that better predicts the heat flow. We estimate that of the predicted global oceanic heat flux of 32 x 10(exp 12) W, 34% (11 x 10(exp 12) W) occurs by hydrothermal flow. Approximately 30% of the hydrothermal heat flux occurs in crust younger than 1 Ma, so the majority of this flux is off-ridge. These hydrothermal heat flux estimates are upper bounds, because heat flow measurements require sediment at the site and so are made preferentially at topographic lows, where heat flow may be depressed. Because the water temperature for the near-ridge flow exceeds that for the off-ridge flow, the near-ridge water flow will be even a smaller fraction of the total water flow. As a result, in estimating fluxes from geochemical data, use of the high water temperatures appropriate for the ridge axis may significantly overestimate the heat flux for an assumed water flux or underestimate the water flux for an assumed heat flux. Our data also permit improved estimates of the 'sealing' age, defined as the age where the observed heat flow approximately equals that predicted, suggesting that hydrothermal heat transfer has largely ceased. Although earlier studies suggested major differences in sealing ages for different ocean basins, we find that the sealing ages for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans are similar and consistent with the sealing age for the entire data set, 65 +/- 10 Ma. The previous inference of a young (approximately 20 Ma) sealing age for the Pacific appears to have biased downward several previous estimates of the global hydrothermal flux. The heat flow data also provide indirect evidence for the mechanism by which the hydrothermal heat flux becomes small, which has often been ascribed to isolation of the igneous crust from seawater due to the hydraulic conductivity of the intervening sediment. We find, however, that even the least sedimented sites show the systematic increase of the ratio of observed to predicted heat flow with age, although the more sedimented sites have a younger sealing age. Moreover, the heat flow discrepancy persists at heavily sedimented sites until approximately 50 Ma. It thus appears that approximately 100-200 m of sediment is neither necessary nor sufficient to stop hydrothermal heat transfer. We therefore conclude that the age of the crust is the primary control on the fraction of heat transported by hydrothermal flow and that sediment thickness has a lesser effect. This inference is consistent with models in which hydrothermal flow decreases with age due to reduced crustal porosity and hence permeability.

  4. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Flux Using Surface-Mounted One-Dimensional Flat Gages

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the measurement of the net heat flux normal to a surface using flat gages mounted onto the surface. Conduction heat flux is not the focus of this standard. Conduction applications related to insulation materials are covered by Test Method C 518 and Practices C 1041 and C 1046. The sensors covered by this test method all use a measurement of the temperature difference between two parallel planes normal to the surface to determine the heat that is exchanged to or from the surface in keeping with Fourier’s Law. The gages operate by the same principles for heat transfer in either direction. 1.2 This test method is quite broad in its field of application, size and construction. Different sensor types are described in detail in later sections as examples of the general method for measuring heat flux from the temperature gradient normal to a surface (1). Applications include both radiation and convection heat transfer. The gages have broad application from aerospace to biomedical en...

  5. Combined radiation-convection heat transfer in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, J. S.

    1993-03-01

    The effect of radiation on steam under the reflood steam cooling condition, as during the reflood period in a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), was calculated. A one-dimensional radiative heat flux model was included in the energy transport equation and was solved simultaneously with other conservative equations. The calculated results are shown to agree well with test data of Larsen and Lord (1969) from steam cooling experiments, where the pressure, power, flow rates, and the hydraulic diameter of the test section were chosen so as to simulate the pressurized water reactor LOCA conditions.

  6. Levitation by Heat Radiation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, Philip I.

    1987-01-01

    Report presents calculations relating to feasibility of proposed heating-and-levitating technique for use in microgravity. In material-processing system based on this technique, specimen heated to required processing temperature by thermal radiation, and pressures of radiation impinging on specimen from different directions controlled to push specimen toward desired position. Technique used in spaceborne manufacturing processes and experiments requiring levitation in vacuum to prevent contamination of any kind from reaching specimens.

  7. Radiative Heat Transfer between Neighboring Particles

    E-print Network

    Alejandro Manjavacas; F. Javier Garcia de Abajo

    2012-01-26

    The near-field interaction between two neighboring particles is known to produce enhanced radiative heat transfer. We advance in the understanding of this phenomenon by including the full electromagnetic particle response, heat exchange with the environment, and important radiative corrections both in the distance dependence of the fields and in the particle absorption coefficients. We find that crossed terms of electric and magnetic interactions dominate the transfer rate between gold and SiC particles, whereas radiative corrections reduce it by several orders of magnitude even at small separations. Radiation away from the dimer can be strongly suppressed or enhanced at low and high temperatures, respectively. These effects must be taken into account for an accurate description of radiative heat transfer in nanostructured environments.

  8. Two Improvements of an Operational Two-Layer Model for Terrestrial Surface Heat Flux Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renhua; Tian, Jing; Su, Hongbo; Sun, Xiaomin; Chen, Shaohui; Xia, Jun

    2008-01-01

    In order to make the prediction of land surface heat fluxes more robust, two improvements were made to an operational two-layer model proposed previously by Zhang. These improvements are: 1) a surface energy balance method is used to determine the theoretical boundary lines (namely ‘true wet/cool edge’ and ‘true dry/warm edge’ in the trapezoid) in the scatter plot for the surface temperature versus the fractional vegetation cover in mixed pixels; 2) a new assumption that the slope of the Tm – f curves is mainly controlled by soil water content is introduced. The variables required by the improved method include near surface vapor pressure, air temperature, surface resistance, aerodynamic resistance, fractional vegetation cover, surface temperature and net radiation. The model predictions from the improved model were assessed in this study by in situ measurements, which show that the total latent heat flux from the soil and vegetation are in close agreement with the in situ measurement with an RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) ranging from 30 w/m2?50 w/m2, which is consistent with the site scale measurement of latent heat flux. Because soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration are not measured separately from the field site, in situ measured CO2 flux is used to examine the modeled ?Eveg. Similar trends of seasonal variations of vegetation were found for the canopy transpiration retrievals and in situ CO2 flux measurements. The above differences are mainly caused by 1) the scale disparity between the field measurement and the MODIS observation; 2) the non-closure problem of the surface energy balance from the surface fluxes observations themselves. The improved method was successfully used to predict the component surface heat fluxes from the soil and vegetation and it provides a promising approach to study the canopy transpiration and the soil evaporation quantitatively during the rapid growing season of winter wheat in northern China.

  9. Coupled Convective and Radiative Heat Transfer Simulation for Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracik, Stefan; Sadeghipour, Mostapha; Pitchurov, George; Liu, Jiying; Heidarinejad, Mohammad; Srebric, Jelena; Building Science Group, Penn State Team

    2013-11-01

    A building's surroundings affect its energy use. An analysis of building energy use needs to include the effects of its urban environment, as over half of the world's population now lives in cities. To correctly model the energy flow around buildings, an energy simulation needs to account for both convective and radiative heat transfer. This study develops a new model by coupling OpenFOAM and Radiance, open source packages for simulating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and solar radiation, respectively. The model currently provides themo-fluid parameters including convective heat transfer coefficients, pressure coefficients, and solar heat fluxes that will be used as inputs for building energy simulations in a follow up study. The model uses Penn State campus buildings immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer flow as a case study to determine the thermo-fluid parameters around buildings. The results of this case study show that shadows can reduce the solar heat flux of a building's surface by eighty percent during a sunny afternoon. Convective heat transfer coefficients can vary by around fifty percent during a windy day.

  10. The eddy heat-flux in rotating turbulent convection

    E-print Network

    G. Ruediger; P. Egorov; L. L. Kitchatinov; M. Kueker

    2004-07-19

    The three components of the heat-flux vector $F =\\rho C_p are numerically computed for a stratified rotating turbulent convection using the NIRVANA code in a flat box. The latitudinal component $F_\\theta$ proves to be negative (positive) in the northern (southern) hemisphere so that the heat always flows towards the poles. As a surprise, the radial heat-flux $F_r$ peaks at the equator rather than at the poles (Taylor numbers O(10^6)). The same behavior is observed for the radial turbulence intensity $$ which for \\emph{free} turbulence is also believed to peak at the poles (see Eq. (19) below). As we can show, however, the consequences of this unexpected result (also obtained by Kaepylae, Korpi and Tuominen 2004) for the theory of differential rotation are small as mainly the $F_\\theta$ is responsible to solve the `Taylor number puzzle'. In all our simulations the azimuthal component $F_\\phi$ proves to be negative so that the rotating turbulence produces an westwards directed azimuthal heat-flux which should be observable. Fluctuations with higher temperature are expected to be anticorrelated with their own angular velocity fluctuations. We find this rotation-induced result as understandable as the $F_\\phi$ is closely related to the radial \\Lambda-effect which is known to be also negative in stratified and rapidly rotating convection zones.

  11. Study of Solidification and Heat Transfer Behavior of Mold Flux Through Mold Flux Heat Transfer Simulator Technique: Part II. Effect of Mold Oscillation on Heat Transfer Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fanjun; Liu, Yongzhen; Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Haihui

    2015-08-01

    Mold flux solidification and heat transfer experiments under both non-oscillation and oscillation modes have been conducted and compared with the help of Mold Flux Heat Transfer Simulator (MFHTS) technique. The results suggested that the steady-state responding heat flux in the mode of oscillation is smaller than that in non-oscillation operation, and a transition time is observed in the responding temperature and heat flux profiles during the oscillation experiments. The oscillation of mold would introduce the roughness of slag film surface and the enlargement of air gap at the interface of mold/flux film; thus, the interfacial thermal resistance was enhanced. In addition, the thermal conductivity of solid crystalline mold flux and mold/flux film interfacial thermal resistance at steady state were calculated in this work. The thermal conductivity of crystalline mold flux was about 1.43 to 1.76 W m-1 K-1, and the interfacial thermal resistance R int in oscillation operation was calculated as 17.3 to 22.5 × 10-4 m2 (K W-1) in the measured region. The obtained interfacial thermal resistance R int in this work is higher than that in non-oscillation operations.

  12. Determining heat fluxes from temperature measurements made in massive walls

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is described for determining heat fluxes at the surfaces of masonry walls or floors using temperature data measured at two points within the wall, usually near the surfaces. The process consists of solving the heat diffusion equation in one dimension using finite difference techniques given two measured temperatures as input. The method is fast and accurate and also allows for an in-situ measurement of wall thermal diffusivity if a third temperature is measured. The method is documented in sufficient detail so that it can be readily used by the reader. Examples are given for heat flow through walls. Annual results for two cases are presented. The method has also been used to determine heat flow into floors.

  13. Development of high heat radiation printed boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, Shigeo; Nakao, Masahiro; Kanno, Tooru; Shimizu, Akira

    1992-08-01

    An overview of the development conducted on printed boards is presented. Data of the heat-shock-resistant properties at various through hole diameters, board materials, and plating thickness were obtained on Copper Inver Copper (CIC) Multi Wire Circuit Boards (MWB) which are most sensitive thermally. The print board heat radiation characteristics were evaluated. The results of conducting tests, such as heat shock, hot oil, radiation, and out gassing tests are presented. Reliability assurance program was established to establish manufacturing process preparing procedures, standards, and control documentation.

  14. Responses of sensible heat flux to soil water variation over a forest in a subalpine mountain valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chunhua; Chai, Minwei; Zhang, Qingtao; Xiang, Jiao; Wang, Yongqiang; Qiu, Guo Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sensible heat flux is a vital component of Evapotranspiration (ET) and a critical process in the energy budget of the earth-atmosphere system. In our early study, it's found that soil water variation may be a critical factor for sensible heat flux over the forest in a subalpine mountain valley. The components of surface energy fluxes were measured for 2 years using the eddy covariance technique in Jiuzhaigou Valley, a subalpine mountainous area of Southwest China. Meanwhile, transpiration was measured by sap flow sensors. Within the observation period, the magnitude and distribution of energy fluxes and the magnitude of transpiration were mainly controlled by leaf emergence and seasonal changes in net radiation and soil water content. Large increases in transpiration were observed after leaves emerged around May, while evapotranspiration started to increase from February, which increased from nearly zero during winter to more than 5 mm d-1 in summer. Large increases in soil water content were observed despite increases in evapotranspiration during early spring. In spite of the large increases in net radiation, obvious decreases in sensible heat flux were observed with the variation of soil water content over the same period. Therefore, the most influential effect on the variability of sensible heat flux was the soil water content. These general characteristics can help us have a better understanding of the energy budget and water consumption of forest and their responses to net radiation and soil water content.

  15. THERMAL DESIGN METHODOLOGY FOR HIGH-HEAT-FLUX SINGLE-PHASE AND TWO-PHASE MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS

    E-print Network

    Qu, Weilin

    implementation of micro- channel heat sinks in high-heat-flux electronic cooling applications. KEY WORDS: micro-channel thermocouple to micro-channel bottom wall, m Hw1 Thickness of cover plate, m Hw2 Distance from unit cell bottomTHERMAL DESIGN METHODOLOGY FOR HIGH-HEAT-FLUX SINGLE-PHASE AND TWO-PHASE MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS

  16. Heat and Flux Configurations on Offshore Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucuksahin, D.; Bot, E. T. G.

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to determine the best configurations of the Heat and Flux concept for more profitable and utilizable settings in a wind farm in terms of increase in the energy yield and reduction in loadings. The computations are performed with alteration of a single parameter at a time. The reference farm for this study is EWTW, the ECN test farm in Wieringermeer, as this farm was also the reference for the validation of both the Heat and Flux concept and the software tool FarmFlow. All the studies are performed with FarmFlow developed by ECN, which computes wake deficits and turbulence intensities, resulting in the energy yield of all turbines in the farm.

  17. Collapsing Plane Symmetric Source with Heat Flux and Conformal Flatness

    E-print Network

    G. Abbas; Zahid Ahmad; Hassan Shah

    2015-04-24

    This paper deals with the study of collapsing plane symmetric source in the presence of heat flux. For this purpose, we have calculated the Einstein field equations as well as Weyl tensor components. The conditions for the conformal flatness have been determined. The interior source has been matched smoothly with the exterior geometry in single null coordinate. It has been found the pressure is balanced with the out going heat flux and the continuity of the masses in two regions has been noted. A simple new model of collapse has been proposed which satisfies flatness condition, also we have discussed the physical properties of the model. For our model, we have calculated the temperature profile by using the approximation scheme.

  18. A microscale thermophoretic turbine driven by external diffusive heat flux.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Liu, Rui; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2014-11-21

    We propose a theoretical prototype of a micro-scale turbine externally driven by diffusive heat flux without the need for macroscopic particle flux, which is in sharp contrast to conventional turbines. The prototypes are described analytically and validated by computer simulations. Our results indicate that a micro-scale turbine composed of anisotropic blades can rotate unidirectionally in an external temperature gradient due to the anisotropic thermophoresis effect. The rotational direction and speed depend on the temperature gradient, the geometry and the thermophoretic properties of the turbine. The proposed thermophoretic turbines can be experimentally realized and implemented on micro-devices such as computer-chips to recover waste heat or to facilitate cooling. PMID:25268245

  19. Method of fission heat flux determination from experimental data

    DOEpatents

    Paxton, Frank A. (Schenectady, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

  20. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-10-01

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q2, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation.

  1. Heat flux induced dryout and rewet in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroes, Gustave; Fricker, Darren; Issacci, Farrokh; Catton, Ivan

    1990-08-01

    Heat flux induced dryout of thin liquid films on an inclined copper plate was studied. Rewet of the dried out area is also considered. The four fluids used to form the thin films exhibited very different dryout and rewet characteristics. The contact angle and hysteresis effects were found to be important, but they must be considered in context with other parameters. No single variable was found to independently determine the pattern of dryout and rewet.

  2. Heat flux induced dryout and rewet in thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroes, Gustave; Fricker, Darren; Issacci, Farrokh; Catton, Ivan

    1990-01-01

    Heat flux induced dryout of thin liquid films on an inclined copper plate was studied. Rewet of the dried out area is also considered. The four fluids used to form the thin films exhibited very different dryout and rewet characteristics. The contact angle and hysteresis effects were found to be important, but they must be considered in context with other parameters. No single variable was found to independently determine the pattern of dryout and rewet.

  3. Development of advanced high-temperature heat flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Strange, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Various configurations of high temperature, heat flux sensors were studied to determine their suitability for use in experimental combustor liners of advanced aircraft gas turbine engines. It was determined that embedded thermocouple sensors, laminated sensors, and Gardon gauge sensors, were the most viable candidates. Sensors of all three types were fabricated, calibrated, and endurance tested. All three types of sensors met the fabricability survivability, and accuracy requirements established for their application.

  4. A new one-dimensional radiative equilibrium model for investigating atmospheric radiation entropy flux

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Liu, Yangang

    2010-01-01

    A new one-dimensional radiative equilibrium model is built to analytically evaluate the vertical profile of the Earth's atmospheric radiation entropy flux under the assumption that atmospheric longwave radiation emission behaves as a greybody and shortwave radiation as a diluted blackbody. Results show that both the atmospheric shortwave and net longwave radiation entropy fluxes increase with altitude, and the latter is about one order in magnitude greater than the former. The vertical profile of the atmospheric net radiation entropy flux follows approximately that of the atmospheric net longwave radiation entropy flux. Sensitivity study further reveals that a ‘darker’ atmosphere with a larger overall atmospheric longwave optical depth exhibits a smaller net radiation entropy flux at all altitudes, suggesting an intrinsic connection between the atmospheric net radiation entropy flux and the overall atmospheric longwave optical depth. These results indicate that the overall strength of the atmospheric irreversible processes at all altitudes as determined by the corresponding atmospheric net entropy flux is closely related to the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. PMID:20368255

  5. An experimental investigation of critical heat flux in subcooled internal flow 

    E-print Network

    Shatto, Donald Patrick

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the critical heat flux for subcooled refrigerant-11 and refrigerant-113 flowing upward in a vertical cylindrical tube. Critical heat flux (CHF) values are ...

  6. Effect of heat flux on differential rotation in turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2006-04-01

    We studied the effect of the turbulent heat flux on the Reynolds stresses in a rotating turbulent convection. To this end we solved a coupled system of dynamical equations which includes the equations for the Reynolds stresses, the entropy fluctuations, and the turbulent heat flux. We used a spectral tau approximation in order to close the system of dynamical equations. We found that the ratio of the contributions to the Reynolds stresses caused by the turbulent heat flux and the anisotropic eddy viscosity is of the order of approximately 10(L rho/l0)2, where l0 is the maximum scale of turbulent motions and L rho is the fluid density variation scale. This effect is crucial for the formation of the differential rotation and should be taken into account in the theories of the differential rotation of the Sun, stars, and planets. In particular, we demonstrated that this effect may cause the differential rotation which is comparable with the typical solar differential rotation. PMID:16711925

  7. Novel Surface Thermocouple Probes for Divertor Heat Flux Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadhara, S.; Labombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Pierce, N.

    1996-11-01

    An array of novel surface thermocouple probes have been installed and tested in the outer divertor of Alcator C-Mod. These sensors can, in principle, record divertor surface temperatures with fast time response (? >= 10 ? sec), allowing a direct estimate of the plasma heat flux to be inferred. The design is an adaptation of a commercially available device(``The Self-Renewing Thermocouple,'' Nanmac Corp., Framingham, MA), employing a coaxial-like geometry with a single tungsten-rhenium ribbon wire embedded inside a 6.35 mm diameter molybdenum rod. Various prototypes were tested, including probes with flush and 5^circ angles with respect to the divertor surface, and probes with and without protective surface coatings. Typical surface temperature rises are ~ 300-700 ^circC, corresponding to signals of ~ 3-9 mV. RC filters with 10 ms time constants are used to reduce noise introduced by the plasma environment. The surface temperature corresponding to typical RMS noise levels is ~ 25 ^circC. Using a one-dimensional, semi-infinite slab model, parallel heat fluxes in the range of 50-500 MW/m^2 are estimated. A comparison with heat flux estimates from Langmuir probes located adjacent to the thermocouple array will be presented. Supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-78ET51013

  8. Effect of heat flux on differential rotation in turbulent convection

    E-print Network

    N. Kleeorin; I. Rogachevskii

    2006-02-24

    We studied the effect of the turbulent heat flux on the Reynolds stresses in a rotating turbulent convection. To this end we solved a coupled system of dynamical equations which includes the equations for the Reynolds stresses, the entropy fluctuations and the turbulent heat flux. We used a spectral $\\tau$ approximation in order to close the system of dynamical equations. We found that the ratio of the contributions to the Reynolds stresses caused by the turbulent heat flux and the anisotropic eddy viscosity is of the order of $\\sim 10 (L_\\rho / l_0)^2$, where $l_{0}$ is the maximum scale of turbulent motions and $L_\\rho$ is the fluid density variation scale. This effect is crucial for the formation of the differential rotation and should be taken into account in the theories of the differential rotation of the Sun, stars and planets. In particular, we demonstrated that this effect may cause the differential rotation which is comparable with the typical solar differential rotation.

  9. Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer

    2013-11-07

    A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

  10. Local Heat Flux Measurements with Single Element Coaxial Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregg; Protz, Christopher; Bullard, Brad; Hulka, James

    2006-01-01

    To support the mission for the NASA Vision for Space Exploration, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a program in 2005 to improve the capability to predict local thermal compatibility and heat transfer in liquid propellant rocket engine combustion devices. The ultimate objective was to predict and hence reduce the local peak heat flux due to injector design, resulting in a significant improvement in overall engine reliability and durability. Such analyses are applicable to combustion devices in booster, upper stage, and in-space engines, as well as for small thrusters with few elements in the injector. In this program, single element and three-element injectors were hot-fire tested with liquid oxygen and ambient temperature gaseous hydrogen propellants at The Pennsylvania State University Cryogenic Combustor Laboratory from May to August 2005. Local heat fluxes were measured in a 1-inch internal diameter heat sink combustion chamber using Medtherm coaxial thermocouples and Gardon heat flux gauges. Injectors were tested with shear coaxial and swirl coaxial elements, including recessed, flush and scarfed oxidizer post configurations, and concentric and non-concentric fuel annuli. This paper includes general descriptions of the experimental hardware, instrumentation, and results of the hot-fire testing for three of the single element injectors - recessed-post shear coaxial with concentric fuel, flush-post swirl coaxial with concentric fuel, and scarfed-post swirl coaxial with concentric fuel. Detailed geometry and test results will be published elsewhere to provide well-defined data sets for injector development and model validatation.

  11. Cosmic matter flux may turn Hawking radiation off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Ellis, George F. R.

    2015-02-01

    An astrophysical (cosmological) black hole forming in a cosmological context will be subject to a flux of infalling matter and radiation, which will cause the outer apparent horizon (a marginal trapping surface) to be spacelike spacelike (Ellis et al., arXiv:1407.3577). As a consequence the radiation emitted close to the apparent horizon no longer arrives at infinity with a diverging redshift. Standard calculations of the emission of Hawking radiation then indicate that no blackbody radiation is emitted to infinity by the black hole in these circumstances, hence there will also then be no black hole evaporation process due to emission of such radiation as long as the matter flux is significant. The essential adiabatic condition (eikonal approximation) for black hole radiation gives a strong limit to the black holes that can emit Hawking radiation. We give the mass range for the black holes that can radiate, according to their cosmological redshift, for the special case of the cosmic blackbody radiation (CBR) influx (which exists everywhere in the universe). At a very late stage of black hole formation when the CBR influx decays away, the black hole horizon becomes first a slowly evolving horizon and then an isolated horizon; at that stage, black hole radiation will start. This study suggests that the primordial black hole evaporation scenario should be revised to take these considerations into account.

  12. Reynolds stress and heat flux in spherical shell convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Mantere, M. J.; Guerrero, G.; Brandenburg, A.; Chatterjee, P.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Turbulent fluxes of angular momentum and enthalpy or heat due to rotationally affected convection play a key role in determining differential rotation of stars. Their dependence on latitude and depth has been determined in the past from convection simulations in Cartesian or spherical simulations. Here we perform a systematic comparison between the two geometries as a function of the rotation rate. Aims: Here we want to extend the earlier studies by using spherical wedges to obtain turbulent angular momentum and heat transport as functions of the rotation rate from stratified convection. We compare results from spherical and Cartesian models in the same parameter regime in order to study whether restricted geometry introduces artefacts into the results. In particular, we want to clarify whether the sharp equatorial profile of the horizontal Reynolds stress found in earlier Cartesian models is also reproduced in spherical geometry. Methods: We employ direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection in spherical and Cartesian geometries. In order to alleviate the computational cost in the spherical runs, and to reach as high spatial resolution as possible, we model only parts of the latitude and longitude. The rotational influence, measured by the Coriolis number or inverse Rossby number, is varied from zero to roughly seven, which is the regime that is likely to be realised in the solar convection zone. Cartesian simulations are performed in overlapping parameter regimes. Results: For slow rotation we find that the radial and latitudinal turbulent angular momentum fluxes are directed inward and equatorward, respectively. In the rapid rotation regime the radial flux changes sign in accordance with earlier numerical results, but in contradiction with theory. The latitudinal flux remains mostly equatorward and develops a maximum close to the equator. In Cartesian simulations this peak can be explained by the strong "banana cells". Their effect in the spherical case does not appear to be as large. The latitudinal heat flux is mostly equatorward for slow rotation but changes sign for rapid rotation. Longitudinal heat flux is always in the retrograde direction. The rotation profiles vary from anti-solar (slow equator) for slow and intermediate rotation to solar-like (fast equator) for rapid rotation. The solar-like profiles are dominated by the Taylor-Proudman balance. Movies and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Spatial variability of shortwave radiative fluxes in the context of snowmelt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinker, Rachel T.; Ma, Yingtao; Hinkelman, Laura; Lundquist, Jessica

    2014-05-01

    Snow-covered mountain ranges are a major source of water supply for run-off and groundwater recharge. Snowmelt supplies as much as 75% of surface water in basins of the western United States. Factors that affect the rate of snow melt include incoming shortwave and longwave radiation, surface albedo, snow emissivity, snow surface temperature, sensible and latent heat fluxes, ground heat flux, and energy transferred to the snowpack from deposited snow or rain. The net radiation generally makes up about 80% of the energy balance and is dominated by the shortwave radiation. Complex terrain poses a great challenge for obtaining the needed information on radiative fluxes from satellites due to elevation issues, spatially-variable cloud cover, rapidly changing surface conditions during snow fall and snow melt, lack of high quality ground truth for evaluation of the satellite based estimates, as well as scale issues between the ground observations and the satellite footprint. In this study we utilize observations of high spatial resolution (5-km) as available from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) to derive surface shortwave radiative fluxes in complex terrain, with attention to the impact of slopes on the amount of radiation received. The methodology developed has been applied to several water years (January to July during 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2009) over the western part of the United States, and the available information was used to derive metrics on spatial and temporal variability in the shortwave fluxes. It is planned to apply the findings from this study for testing improvements in Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) estimates.

  14. Extreme surface turbulent heat fluxes during bora events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrikov, Alexander; Gulev, Sergey; Turk, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    Bora events, associated with the strong seaward wind blowing from the coastal mountains, frequently occur in the Mediterranean and Black Seas and result in off-shore natural hazards such as icing of the off-shore infrastructures, stormy conditions and associated impact on marine structures and carriers. Furthermore, bora events are associated with extreme sea-air temperature and humidity gradients and locally strong winds which result in extreme surface turbulent fluxes of heat and evaporation. We present diagnostics of several bora events in the Adriatic and Black Seas which resulted in extremely strong turbulent sea-air exchanges. Diagnostics were performed using very high resolution simulations with non-hydrostatic WRF-ARW-3.5 model whose set-up included for 3 domains (2 outer and 1 inner) with the sub-grids corresponding to 27, 9 and 1 km respectively going from the external outer to the inner domain. For all three domains model had 36 vertical levels in vertical and realizes a set of physical parameterizations whose choice has been justified by sensitivity experiments. Validation of the numerical experiments was based upon in-situ data from buoys, coastal and island meteorological stations. Simulations of bora events captured extreme air-sea fluxes amounting to more than 2000 W/m2 for the latent heat flux and corresponding to very high percentiles of probability distribution of surface fluxes. These events are insufficiently resolved (or not captured at all) by even relatively high resolution modern era reanlayses, and, thus, can hardly be diagnosed without using mesoscale resolutions. Using Modified Fisher-Tippett (MFT) distribution of surface turbulent fluxes, we estimated the fractional contribution of bora events in long-term integral air-sea fluxes for Mediterranean and Black Seas. Further we discuss the role of bora events in forming climatological air-sea exchanges over the semi-enclosed seas and in the heat contents of surface layer as well as importance of bora events in forming high sea-air CO2 fluxes.

  15. Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

  16. Monte Carlo prediction of radiative heat transfer in inhomogeneous, anisotropic, nongray media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jeff T.; Howell, John R.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo solution technique has been formulated to predict the radiative heat transfer in three-dimensional, inhomogeneous participating media which exhibit spectrally dependent emission and absorption and anisotropic scattering. Details of the technique and selected numerical sensitivities are discussed. The technique was applied to a problem involving a medium composed of a gas mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen and suspended carbon particles. A homogeneous medium was modeled to examine the effect of total pressure and carbon-particle concentration on radiative heat transfer. Variation in total pressure, over the range studied, had minimal effect on the amount of heat radiated to the enclosure walls and on the radiative-flux distribution within the medium. Increases in the carbon particle concentration produced significantly higher heat fluxes at the boundaries and altered the radiative flux distribution. The technique was then applied to an inhomogeneous medium to examine effects of specific temperature and carbon particle concentration distributions on radiative heat transfer. For the inhomogeneous conditions examined, the largest radiative flux divergence occurs near the center of the medium and the regions near some enclosure walls act as energy sinks.

  17. A study of heat flux induced dryout in capillary grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Timothy J.; Bowman, W. J.

    This paper describes the results of an experimental study of ethanol flowing in the narrow grooves of a copper plate which was subjected to heat fluxes sufficient to evaporate more liquid than could be replaced by capillary pumping. Three groove geometries were used: square, rectangle, and trapezoid. In order to validate analytical models of capillary flow in grooves exposed to high heat fluxes, the capillary limit, dryout front location, and dryout front movement in response to power draw downs were documented. The results show the rewet performance of the groove is dependent on geometry. Grooves of higher heat transfer capacity, e.g., the trapezoid, can have poor performance recovering from dryout. Comparisons of a theoretical maximum heat transfer rate with the data are good for the square and rectangle, but overestimate the value for the trapezoid. No theory sufficiently predicted the location of the dryout front for the three geometries. For both a quiescent dryout front and a boiling dryout front, the theory does not utilize an accurate description of the geometry of the liquid front which is critical for determining the capillary pressure difference.

  18. Sensitivity of Cenozoic Antarctic ice sheet variations to geothermal heat flux

    E-print Network

    Sensitivity of Cenozoic Antarctic ice sheet variations to geothermal heat flux David Pollard a sheet to geothermal heat flux is investigated, using a coupled climate­ice sheet model with various prescribed values and patterns of geothermal heat flux. The sudden growth of major ice across the Eocene

  19. Vertical heat flux and lateral mass transport in nonlinear internal waves

    E-print Network

    (2010), Vertical heat flux and lateral mass transport in nonlinear internal waves, Geophys. Res. Lett and heat flux over the shelf. [3] By definition, particle speeds (uw) in NLIWs are com- parable to the waveClick Here for Full Article Vertical heat flux and lateral mass transport in nonlinear internal

  20. Convection under a lid of finite conductivity: Heat flux scaling and application to continents

    E-print Network

    Tackley, Paul J.

    Convection under a lid of finite conductivity: Heat flux scaling and application to continents C. J. Tackley (2007), Convection under a lid of finite conductivity: Heat flux scaling and application April 2007; published 1 August 2007. [1] A scaling law for the heat flux out of a convective fluid

  1. Two-Flux Green's Function Analysis for Transient Spectral Radiation in a Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    An analysis is developed for obtaining transient temperatures in a two-layer semitransparent composite with spectrally dependent properties. Each external boundary of the composite is subjected to radiation and convection. The two-flux radiative transfer equations are solved by deriving a Green's function. This yields the local radiative heat source needed to numerically solve the transient energy equation. An advantage of the two-flux method is that isotropic scattering is included without added complexity. The layer refractive indices are larger than one. This produces internal reflections at the boundaries and the internal interface; the reflections are assumed diffuse. Spectral results using the Green's function method are verified by comparing with numerical solutions using the exact radiative transfer equations. Transient temperature distributions are given to illustrate the effect of radiative heating on one side of a composite with external convective cooling. The protection of a material from incident radiation is illustrated by adding scattering to the layer adjacent to the radiative source.

  2. Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

    2006-10-31

    A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

  3. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima. PMID:26346098

  4. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima. PMID:26346098

  5. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-09-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima.

  6. Heat Transfer in the Turbulent Incompressible Boundary Layer. 3; Arbitrary Wall Temperature and Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, W. C.; Kays, W. M.; Kline, S. J.

    1958-01-01

    Superposition techniques are used to calculate the rate of heat transfer from a flat plate to a turbulent incompressible boundary layer for several cases of variable surface temperature. The predictions of a number of these calculations are compared with experimental heat-transfer rates, and good agreement is obtained. A simple computing procedure for determining the heat-transfer rates from surfaces with arbitrary wall-temperature distributions is presented and illustrated by two examples. The inverse problem of determining the temperature distribution from an arbitrarily prescribed heat flux is also treated, both experimentally and analytically.

  7. Skyglow effects in UV and visible spectra: radiative fluxes.

    PubMed

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, H A

    2013-09-30

    Several studies have tried to understand the mechanisms and effects of radiative transfer under different night-sky conditions. However, most of these studies are limited to the various effects of visible spectra. Nevertheless, the invisible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum can pose a more profound threat to nature. One visible threat is from what is popularly termed skyglow. Such skyglow is caused by injudiciously situated or designed artificial night lighting systems which degrade desired sky viewing. Therefore, since lamp emissions are not limited to visible electromagnetic spectra, it is necessary to consider the complete spectrum of such lamps in order to understand the physical behaviour of diffuse radiation at terrain level. In this paper, the downward diffuse radiative flux is computed in a two-stream approximation and obtained ultraviolet spectral radiative fluxes are inter-related with luminous fluxes. Such a method then permits an estimate of ultraviolet radiation if the traditionally measured illuminance on a horizontal plane is available. The utility of such a comparison of two spectral bands is shown, using the different lamp types employed in street lighting. The data demonstrate that it is insufficient to specify lamp type and its visible flux production independently of each other. Also the UV emissions have to be treated by modellers and environmental scientists because some light sources can be fairly important pollutants in the near ultraviolet. Such light sources can affect both the living organisms and ambient environment. PMID:23792881

  8. 2D divertor heat flux distribution using a 3D heat conduction solver in National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gan, K F; Ahn, J-W; Park, J-W; Maingi, R; McLean, A G; Gray, T K; Gong, X; Zhang, X D

    2013-02-01

    The divertor heat flux footprint in tokamaks is often observed to be non-axisymmetric due to intrinsic error fields, applied 3D magnetic fields or during transients such as edge localized modes. Typically, only 1D radial heat flux profiles are analyzed; however, analysis of the full 2D divertor measurements provides opportunities to study the asymmetric nature of the deposited heat flux. To accomplish this an improved 3D Fourier analysis method has been successfully applied in a heat conduction solver (TACO) to determine the 2D heat flux distribution at the lower divertor surface in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) tokamak. This advance enables study of helical heat deposition onto the divertor. In order to account for heat transmission through poorly adhered surface layers on the divertor plate, a heat transmission coefficient, defined as the surface layer thermal conductivity divided by the thickness of the layer, was introduced to the solution of heat conduction equation. This coefficient is denoted as ? and a range of values were tested in the model to ensure a reliable heat flux calculation until a specific value of ? led to the constant total deposited energy in the numerical solution after the end of discharge. A comparison between 1D heat flux profiles from TACO and from a 2D heat flux calculation code, THEODOR, shows good agreement. Advantages of 2D heat flux distribution over the conventional 1D heat flux profile are also discussed, and examples of 2D data analysis in the study of striated heat deposition pattern as well as the toroidal degree of asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width are demonstrated. PMID:23464209

  9. 2D divertor heat flux distribution using a 3D heat conduction solver in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, K. F.; Ahn, J.-W.; Park, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A. G.; Gray, T. K.; Gong, X.; Zhang, X. D.

    2013-02-01

    The divertor heat flux footprint in tokamaks is often observed to be non-axisymmetric due to intrinsic error fields, applied 3D magnetic fields or during transients such as edge localized modes. Typically, only 1D radial heat flux profiles are analyzed; however, analysis of the full 2D divertor measurements provides opportunities to study the asymmetric nature of the deposited heat flux. To accomplish this an improved 3D Fourier analysis method has been successfully applied in a heat conduction solver (TACO) to determine the 2D heat flux distribution at the lower divertor surface in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) tokamak. This advance enables study of helical heat deposition onto the divertor. In order to account for heat transmission through poorly adhered surface layers on the divertor plate, a heat transmission coefficient, defined as the surface layer thermal conductivity divided by the thickness of the layer, was introduced to the solution of heat conduction equation. This coefficient is denoted as ? and a range of values were tested in the model to ensure a reliable heat flux calculation until a specific value of ? led to the constant total deposited energy in the numerical solution after the end of discharge. A comparison between 1D heat flux profiles from TACO and from a 2D heat flux calculation code, THEODOR, shows good agreement. Advantages of 2D heat flux distribution over the conventional 1D heat flux profile are also discussed, and examples of 2D data analysis in the study of striated heat deposition pattern as well as the toroidal degree of asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width are demonstrated.

  10. Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Barnes, F.J.; Coulter, R.L.; Crawford, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moreover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations? To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discusses some initial findings from those campaigns.

  11. Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C. ); Barnes, F.J. ); Coulter, R.L. ); Crawford, T.L. . Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

    1993-01-01

    In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moreover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discusses some initial findings from those campaigns.

  12. Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Barnes, F.J.; Coulter, R.L.; Crawford, T.L.

    1993-04-01

    In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations within the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moveover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations? To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discuses some initial findings from those campaigns.

  13. Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C. ); Barnes, F.J. ); Coulter, R.L. ); Crawford, T.L. . Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

    1993-01-01

    In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations within the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moveover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discuses some initial findings from those campaigns.

  14. Neural network analysis on the effect of heat fluxes on greenhouse gas emissions from anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we examined the various meteorological factors (i.e., air temperatures, solar radiation, and heat fluxes) that potentially affect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from swine waste lagoon. GHG concentrations (methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide) were monitored using a photoacous...

  15. The effect of heat fluxes on ammonia emission from swine waste lagoon based on neural network analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding factors that affect ammonia emissions from swine waste lagoons or any animal waste receptacles is a necessary first step in deploying potential remediation options. In this study, we examined the various meteorological factors (i.e., air temperatures, solar radiation, and heat fluxes)...

  16. Investigation of saturated critical heat flux in a single, uniformly heated microchannel

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtan, Leszek; Revellin, Remi; Thome, John R.

    2006-08-15

    A series of tests have been performed to determine the saturated critical heat flux (CHF) in 0.5 and 0.8mm internal diameter microchannel tubes as a function of refrigerant mass velocity, heated length, saturation temperature and inlet liquid subcooling. The tested refrigerants were R-134a and R-245fa and the heated length of microchannel was varied between 20 and 70mm. The results show a strong dependence of CHF on mass velocity, heated length and microchannel diameter but no influence of liquid subcooling (2-15{sup o}C) was observed. The experimental results have been compared to the well-known CHF single-channel correlation of Y. Katto and H. Ohno [An improved version of the generalized correlation of critical heat flux for the forced convective boiling in uniformly heated vertical tubes, Int. J. Heat and Mass Transfer 27 (9) (1984) 1641-1648] and the multichannel correlation of W. Qu and I. Mudawar [Measurement and correlation of critical heat flux in two-phase microchannel heat sinks, Int. J. Heat and Mass Transfer 47 (2004) 2045-2059]. The comparison shows that the correlation of Katto-Ohno predicts microchannel data with a mean absolute error of 32.8% with only 41.2% of the data falling within a +/-15% error band. The correlation of Qu and Mudawar shows the same trends as the CHF data but significantly overpredicts them. Based on the present experimental data, a new microscale version of the Katto-Ohno correlation for the prediction of CHF during saturated boiling in microchannels has been proposed. (author)

  17. RADIATION ENTROPY FLUX AND ENTROPY PRODUCTION OF THE EARTH SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    solar radiation entropy flux among the dif- ferent expressions arises mainly from the difference disastrous, including threats to human health, increasing risks of extreme weather events (drought, flood that would result from past and future changes in atmospheric composition. [3] Current mainstream studies

  18. Investigation of Instabilities and Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Fuels at High Heat Flux and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.; Meyer, Michael L.; Braun, Donald C.; Keller, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    A series of heated tube experiments was performed to investigate fluid instabilities that occur during heating of supercritical fluids. In these tests, JP-7 flowed vertically through small diameter tubes at supercritical pressures. Test section heated length, diameter, mass flow rate, inlet temperature, and heat flux were varied in an effort to determine the range of conditions that trigger the instabilities. Heat flux was varied up to 4 BTU/sq in./s, and test section wall temperatures reached as high as 1950 F. A statistical model was generated to explain the trends and effects of the control variables. The model included no direct linear effect of heat flux on the occurrence of the instabilities. All terms involving inlet temperature were negative, and all terms involving mass flow rate were positive. Multiple tests at conditions that produced instabilities provided inconsistent results. These inconsistencies limit the use of the model as a predictive tool. Physical variables that had been previously postulated to control the onset of the instabilities, such as film temperature, velocity, buoyancy, and wall-to-bulk temperature ratio, were evaluated here. Film temperatures at or near critical occurred during both stable and unstable tests. All tests at the highest velocity were stable, but there was no functional relationship found between the instabilities and velocity, or a combination of velocity and temperature ratio. Finally, all of the unstable tests had significant buoyancy at the inlet of the test section, but many stable tests also had significant buoyancy forces.

  19. Surface heat fluxes influence on medicane trajectories and intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tous, M.; Romero, R.; Ramis, C.

    2013-04-01

    A few tropical-like cyclones have developed over the Mediterranean Sea during the last decades according to the inventory of images provided by Meteosat satellite. These extreme small-scale warm-core storms, also called “medicanes”, operate on the thermodynamical disequilibrium between the sea and the atmosphere, and sometimes attain hurricane intensity and threaten the islands and coastal regions. Despite their small size, mesoscale model runs at moderate horizontal resolutions (7.5 km) made with MM5 are able to simulate the formation of a subsynoptic cyclone and the general trajectory of the disturbance, and for most of the cases a warm-core axi-symmetrical structure becomes evident in the simulations. The timing and precise details of the storm trajectories are shown to be more problematic when compared against the satellite images available for the events. It is hypothesized that the small size of the systems and the crucial role of moist microphysics, deep convection and boundary layer parameterizations are the main factors behind these errors. On the other hand, a sensitivity analysis examining the role of the sea surface heat fluxes is conducted: latent and sensible heat fluxes from the Mediterranean are switched off at the beginning of the simulations to explore the effects of these factors on the medicane trajectories and deepening rate. Results show different roles of the surface heat fluxes on medicane properties (intensification and track) depending on their magnitude and spatial distribution over the Mediterranean Sea. In this way, three distinct patterns have been identified using a database of twelve events.

  20. USE OF PELTIER COOLERS AS SOIL HEAT FLUX TRANSDUCERS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, H.L.; Campbell, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Peltier coolers were modified and calibrated to serve as soil heat flux transducers. The modification was to fill their interiors with epoxy. The average calibration constant on 21 units was 13. 6 plus or minus 0. 8 kW m** minus **2 V** minus **1 at 20 degree C. This sensitivity is about eight times that of the two thermopile transducers with which comparisons were made. The thermal conductivity of the Peltier cooler transducers was 0. 4 W m** minus **1 degree C** minus **1, which is comparable to that of dry soil.

  1. Using Gravity Inversion to Estimate Antarctic Geothermal Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Kusznir, Nick J.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Leat, Phil T.; Jordan, Tom A. R. M.; Purucker, Michael E.; (Sasha) Golynsky, A. V.; Rogozhina, Irina

    2014-05-01

    New modelling studies for Greenland have recently underlined the importance of GHF for long-term ice sheet behaviour (Petrunin et al. 2013). Revised determinations of top basement heat-flow for Antarctica and adjacent rifted continental margins using gravity inversion mapping of crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning (Chappell & Kusznir 2008), using BedMap2 data have provided improved estimates of geothermal heat flux (GHF) in Antarctica where it is very poorly known. Continental lithosphere thinning and post-breakup residual thicknesses of continental crust determined from gravity inversion have been used to predict the preservation of continental crustal radiogenic heat productivity and the transient lithosphere heat-flow contribution within thermally equilibrating rifted continental and oceanic lithosphere. The sensitivity of present-day Antarctic top basement heat-flow to initial continental radiogenic heat productivity, continental rift and margin breakup age has been examined. Recognition of the East Antarctic Rift System (EARS), a major Permian to Cretaceous age rift system that appears to extend from the continental margin at the Lambert Rift to the South Pole region, a distance of 2500 km (Ferraccioli et al. 2011) and is comparable in scale to the well-studied East African rift system, highlights that crustal variability in interior Antarctica is much greater than previously assumed. GHF is also important to understand proposed ice accretion at the base of the EAIS in the GSM and its links to sub-ice hydrology (Bell et al. 2011). References Bell, R.E., Ferraccioli, F., Creyts, T.T., Braaten, D., Corr, H., Das, I., Damaske, D., Frearson, N., Jordan, T., Rose, K., Studinger, M. & Wolovick, M. 2011. Widespread persistent thickening of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet by freezing from the base. Science, 331 (6024), 1592-1595. Chappell, A.R. & Kusznir, N.J. 2008. Three-dimensional gravity inversion for Moho depth at rifted continental margins incorporating a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction. Geophysical Journal International, 174 (1), 1-13. Ferraccioli, F., Finn, C.A., Jordan, T.A., Bell, R.E., Anderson, L.M. & Damaske, D. 2011. East Antarctic rifting triggers uplift of the Gamburtsev Mountains. Nature, 479, 388-392. Petrunin, A., Rogozhina, I., Vaughan, A. P. M., Kukkonen, I. T., Kaban, M., Koulakov, I., Thomas, M. (2013): Heat flux variations beneath central Greenland's ice due to anomalously thin lithosphere. - Nature Geoscience, 6, 746-750.

  2. Estimation of Momentum and Heat Fluxes Using Dissipation and Flux-Variance Methods in the Unstable Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Cheng-I.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Schieldge, John; Sigmon, John; Knoerr, Kenneth R.

    1996-08-01

    Dissipation and flux-variance methods, derived from the turbulent kinetic energy and temperature variance budget equations in conjunction with Monin-Obukov similarity theory, were used to estimate surface fluxes of momentum and sensible heat. To examine the performance of these two methods, direct eddy correlation measurements were carried out above a nonuniform grass-covered forest clearing in Durham, North Carolina. The dissipation method sensible heat flux predictions were in good agreement with eddy correlation measurements. Also, the flux-variance method reproduced the measured sensible heat flux well following an adjustment to the similarity constant. However, the momentum flux (or friction velocity) estimated by the dissipation and flux-variance methods were both inferior to those for sensible heat flux. The data from this experiment indicated that the above two methods are sensitive to the dimensionless wind shear (?m) and temperature standard deviation (??) functions. On the basis of dimensional analysis and the temperature variance budget equation a new dissipation approach for estimating sensible heat flux was derived. The similarity constant for this new approach was shown to be around 1.6 for uniform surfaces and from the data of this experiment.

  3. The Surface Heat Flux as a Function of Ground Cover for Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, Fred M.; Wayland, Robert; Toll, David

    1997-01-01

    Surface heat fluxes were examined as a function of surface properties and meteorological conditions in a 100 km x 100 km grid square at 1-km spatial resolution centered at the location of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE), the Forest Ecosystem Dynamics site in central Maine, and a semiarid rangeland site around Walnut Gulch, Arizona. This investigation treats the surface heat flux variability within a GCM grid box to provide insight into methods for treating that variability in climate models. The heat fluxes were calculated using NOAA AVHRR and available meteorological data. The average heat fluxes that were estimated using the various area ground-cover representations were compared with the ensemble average heat fluxes for the entire area, which were assumed to be the best representation of the heat fluxes for the areas. Average beat fluxes were estimated for the entire 100 km x 100 km area based on a single ground-cover representation, and the mean error for the area sensible heat flux was about 10% and for the area latent heat flux, 21%. The estimation error was reduced, and in some cases significantly reduced, when the area heat fluxes were estimated by partitioning the area according to significant ground cover. The most significant effect of the partitioning was on the latent heat flux estimates.

  4. An analysis of turbulent sensible heat fluxes within a heterogeneous black spruce boreal forest in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkenburg, Derek

    Turbulent sensible heat fluxes within the heterogeneous canopy of a black spruce boreal forest in Interior Alaska are evaluated at three different scales in order to assess their spatial variability, and to determine the feasibility of upscaling locally measured flux values to the landscape scale for modeling applications and climate studies. The first evaluation is performed locally at a single micrometeorological tower in an area of the boreal forest with a mean canopy height of 4.7 m. The data were taken across winter, spring and summer of 2012 from two sonic anemometers, one below the canopy at 3 m above ground, and one above the canopy at 12 m above ground. A multiresolution analysis is used to isolate coherent structures from the turbulent temperature time series at both instruments. When mean global statistics of coherent structures are analyzed at the two levels independently, results show an average of 8 structures per period, a mean duration of 85 s, and a mean sensible heat flux contribution of 48%. A spectral version of the Stokes parameters is applied to the turbulent horizontal wind components to show that 31% of the coherent turbulent structures detected at 12 m, and 13% at 3 m, may be complicated by canopy waves due to the prevalence of stable flows at this high latitude location. The second evaluation quantifies differences in turbulent sensible heat fluxes horizontally between two micrometeorological towers 600 m apart, one in a denser canopy (DC) and the other in a sparser canopy (SC), but under approximately similar atmospheric boundary layer conditions. Results show that SC is ˜ 3 °C cooler and more stably stratified than DC during nighttime. This suggests that changes in the height and density of the canopy impact local temperature and stability regimes. Most importantly, the sensible heat flux at DC is greater during midday periods, with that difference exceeding 30% of the measured flux and over 30 W m-2 in magnitude more than 60% of the time. The third evaluation compares locally measured sensible heat fluxes from a sonic anemometer atop a 24 m micrometeorological tower to those derived from a large aperture scintillometer (LAS) whose beam is centered near the tower at an average height of 36 m above ground, and over a path length of 1423 m. This analysis focuses on unstable daytime periods from June, July and August of 2013. The daytime is defined as 0700-2000 Alaska Standard Time, since local sensible heat flux values derived from the sonic anemometer (H EC) are robust (above 50 W m-2) during this time, and since this time also agrees with the minima in the mean diurnal pattern of Cn2 from the LAS. For daytime periods with robust sensible heat flux values, HEC and the large-scale flux from the LAS (HLAS) correlate with R2 = 0.68, while H EC captures about 82% of HLAS on average. The magnitude of HEC and HLAS are both strongly sensitive to incoming solar radiation, with HLAS having a better correlation and regression slope, suggesting that the local measurements are adjusting also to surface and/or flow conditions above the heterogeneous canopy. Evaluation of the magnitude of the ratio of HEC/HLAS for days with varying amounts of solar radiation suggests that while radiation affects the magnitude of HEC and HLAS independently, it does not affect their ratio. For daytime periods with lower fluxes (HEC between 10 and 50 W m-2), HEC captures about 69% of HLAS on average. However, local and large-scale fluxes during this low flux regime correlate poorly with incoming solar radiation (R2 = 0.42 for HLAS and R2 = 0.15 for HEC), and with one another (R2 = 0.27), suggesting that local heterogeneities are not well-integrated into the large-scale flux. Therefore, low flux periods should be considered separately for the purposes of upscaling local to landscape scale flux values in the boreal forest. For the high flux regime, a finer resolution of upscaling can be provided based on the mean diurnal pattern of HEC/HLAS and the Obukhov length (L). Namely, as the boundary layer becomes less unstable in late

  5. A study of heat flux induced dryout in capillary grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Timothy J.

    1992-12-01

    This is an experimental study of ethanol flowing in the narrow grooves of a copper plate which is subjected to heat fluxes sufficient to evaporate more liquid than can be replaced by capillary pumping. Three groove geometries are used: square, rectangle, and trapezoid. The objective is to simulate aspects of liquid flow in heat pipes with axial grooves. In order to validate analytical models of capillary flow in grooves, the capillary limit, dryout front location, and dryout front movement in response to power draw downs are documented. The results show the rewet performance of the groove is dependent on geometry. Grooves of higher heat transfer capacity can be poor for recovering from dryout, like the trapezoidal groove. Comparisons of the theoretical maximum heat transfer with the data are good for the square and rectangle, but overestimate the value for the trapezoid. No theory sufficiently predicted the location of the dryout front for the three geometries. For both a quiescent dryout front and a boiling dryout front, the theory does not utilize an accurate description of the geometry of the liquid front which is critical for determining the capillary pressure difference.

  6. Graphene-assisted near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated polar materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2014-06-23

    Graphene has attracted great attention in nanoelectronics, optics, and energy harvesting. Here, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered corrugated silica is investigated based on the exact scattering theory. It is found that graphene can improve the radiative heat flux between silica gratings by more than one order of magnitude and alleviate the performance sensitivity to lateral shift. The underlying mechanism is mainly attributed to the improved photon tunneling of modes away from phonon resonances. Besides, coating with graphene leads to nonlocal radiative transfer that breaks Derjaguin's proximity approximation and enables corrugated silica to outperform bulk silica in near-field radiation.

  7. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D; Menard, J; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, R E; Bush, C; Kaita, R

    2008-09-22

    Experiments conducted in high-performance 1.0-1.2 MA 6 MW NBI-heated H-mode plasmas with a high flux expansion radiative divertor in NSTX demonstrate that significant divertor peak heat flux reduction and access to detachment may be facilitated naturally in a highly-shaped spherical torus (ST) configuration. Improved plasma performance with high {beta}{sub p} = 15-25%, a high bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} = 45-50%, longer plasma pulses, and an H-mode regime with smaller ELMs has been achieved in the lower single null configuration with higher-end elongation 2.2-2.4 and triangularity 0.6-0.8. Divertor peak heat fluxes were reduced from 6-12 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-2 MW/m{sup 2} in ELMy H-mode discharges using high magnetic flux expansion and partial detachment of the outer strike point at several D{sub 2} injection rates, while good core confinement and pedestal characteristics were maintained. The partially detached divertor regime was characterized by a 30-60% increase in divertor plasma radiation, a peak heat flux reduction by up to 70%, measured in a 10 cm radial zone, a five-fold increase in divertor neutral pressure, and a significant volume recombination rate increase.

  8. Radiative Heating Methodology for the Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Hollis, Brian R.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The radiative heating environment for the Huygens probe near peak heating conditions for Titan entry is investigated in this paper. The task of calculating the radiation-coupled flowfield, accounting for non-Boltzmann and non-optically thin radiation, is simplified to a rapid yet accurate calculation. This is achieved by using the viscous-shock layer (VSL) technique for the stagnation-line flowfield calculation and a modified smeared rotational band (SRB) model for the radiation calculation. These two methods provide a computationally efficient alternative to a Navier-Stokes flowfield and line-by-line radiation calculation. The results of the VSL technique are shown to provide an excellent comparison with the Navier-Stokes results of previous studies. It is shown that a conventional SRB approach is inadequate for the partially optically-thick conditions present in the Huygens shock-layer around the peak heating trajectory points. A simple modification is proposed to the SRB model that improves its accuracy in these partially optically-thick conditions. This modified approach, labeled herein as SRBC, is compared throughout this study with a detailed line-by-line (LBL) calculation and is shown to compare within 5% in all cases. The SRBC method requires many orders-of-magnitude less computational time than the LBL method, which makes it ideal for coupling to the flowfield. The application of a collisional-radiative (CR) model for determining the population of the CN electronic states, which govern the radiation for Huygens entry, is discussed and applied. The non-local absorption term in the CR model is formulated in terms of an escape factor, which is then curve-fit with temperature. Although the curve-fit is an approximation, it is shown to compare well with the exact escape factor calculation, which requires a computationally intensive iteration procedure.

  9. Effect of combined nanoparticle and polymeric dispersions on critical heat flux, nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient, and coating adhesion

    E-print Network

    Edwards, Bronwyn K

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine thermal performance and adhesion effects of a combined nanoparticle and polymeric dispersion coating. The critical heat flux (CHF) values and nucleate boiling heat transfer ...

  10. Development of advanced high-temperature heat flux sensors. Phase 2: Verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    A two-phase program is conducted to develop heat flux sensors capable of making heat flux measurements throughout the hot section of gas turbine engines. In Phase 1, three types of heat flux sensors are selected; embedded thermocouple, laminated, and Gardon gauge sensors. A demonstration of the ability of these sensors to operate in an actual engine environment is reported. A segmented liner of each of two combustors being used in the Broad Specification Fuels Combustor program is instrumented with the three types of heat flux sensors then tested in a high pressure combustor rig. Radiometer probes are also used to measure the radiant heat loads to more fully characterize the combustor environment. Test results show the heat flux sensors to be in good agreement with radiometer probes and the predicted data trends. In general, heat flux sensors have strong potential for use in combustor development programs.

  11. Estimating Antarctic Geothermal Heat Flux using Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Kusznir, Nick J.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Leat, Phil T.; Jordan, Tom A. R. M.; Purucker, Michael E.; Golynsky, A. V.; Sasha Rogozhina, Irina

    2013-04-01

    Geothermal heat flux (GHF) in Antarctica is very poorly known. We have determined (Vaughan et al. 2012) top basement heat-flow for Antarctica and adjacent rifted continental margins using gravity inversion mapping of crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning (Chappell & Kusznir 2008). Continental lithosphere thinning and post-breakup residual thicknesses of continental crust determined from gravity inversion have been used to predict the preservation of continental crustal radiogenic heat productivity and the transient lithosphere heat-flow contribution within thermally equilibrating rifted continental and oceanic lithosphere. The sensitivity of present-day Antarctic top basement heat-flow to initial continental radiogenic heat productivity, continental rift and margin breakup age has been examined. Knowing GHF distribution for East Antarctica and the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM) region in particular is critical because: 1) The GSM likely acted as key nucleation point for the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS); 2) the region may contain the oldest ice of the EAIS - a prime target for future ice core drilling; 3) GHF is important to understand proposed ice accretion at the base of the EAIS in the GSM and its links to sub-ice hydrology (Bell et al. 2011). An integrated multi-dataset-based GHF model for East Antarctica is planned that will resolve the wide range of estimates previously published using single datasets. The new map and existing GHF distribution estimates available for Antarctica will be evaluated using direct ice temperature measurements obtained from deep ice cores, estimates of GHF derived from subglacial lakes, and a thermodynamic ice-sheet model of the Antarctic Ice Sheet driven by past climate reconstructions and each of analysed heat flow maps, as has recently been done for the Greenland region (Rogozhina et al. 2012). References Bell, R.E., Ferraccioli, F., Creyts, T.T., Braaten, D., Corr, H., Das, I., Damaske, D., Frearson, N., Jordan, T., Rose, K., Studinger, M. & Wolovick, M. 2011. Widespread persistent thickening of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet by freezing from the base. Science, 331 (6024), 1592-1595. Chappell, A.R. & Kusznir, N.J. 2008. Three-dimensional gravity inversion for Moho depth at rifted continental margins incorporating a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction. Geophysical Journal International, 174 (1), 1-13. Golynsky, A.V. & Golynsky, D.A. 2009. Rifts in the tectonic structure of East Antarctica (in Russian). Russian Earth Science Research in Antarctica, 2, 132-162. Rogozhina, I., Hagedoorn, J.M., Martinec, Z., Fleming, K., Soucek, O., Greve, R. & Thomas, M. 2012. Effects of uncertainties in the geothermal heat flux distribution on the Greenland Ice Sheet: An assessment of existing heat flow models. Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface, 117 (F2), F02025. Vaughan, A.P.M., Kusznir, N.J., Ferraccioli, F. & Jordan, T.A.R.M. 2012. Regional heat-flow prediction for Antarctica using gravity inversion mapping of crustal thickness and lithosphere thinning. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 14, EGU2012-8095.

  12. Nonlinear fluid simulation of particle and heat fluxes during burst of ELMs on DIII-D with BOUT++??code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, T. Y.; Xu, X. Q.

    2015-09-01

    In order to study the distribution and evolution of the transient particle and heat fluxes during edge-localized mode (ELM) bursts, a BOUT++??six-field two-fluid model based on the Braginskii equations with non-ideal physics effects is used to simulate pedestal collapse in divertor geometry. The profiles from the DIII-D H-mode discharge #144382 with fast target heat flux measurements are used as the initial conditions for the simulations. A flux-limited parallel thermal conduction is used with three values of the flux-limiting coefficient {?j} , free streaming model with {?j}=1 , sheath-limit with {?j}=0.05 , and one value in between. The studies show that a 20 times increase in {?j} leads to???6 times increase in the heat flux amplitude to both the inner and outer targets, and the widths of the fluxes are also expanded. The sheath-limit model of flux-limiting coefficient is found to be the most appropriate one, which shows ELM sizes close to the measurements. The evolution of the density profile during the burst of ELMs of DIII-D discharge #144382 is simulated, and the collapse in width and depth of {{n}\\text{e}} are reproduced at different time steps. The growing process of the profiles for the heat flux at divertor targets during the burst of ELMs measured by IRTV (infrared television) is also reproduced by this model. The widths of heat fluxes towards targets are a little narrower, and the peak amplitudes are twice the measurements possibly due to the lack of a model of divertor radiation which can effectively reduce the heat fluxes. The magnetic flutter combined with parallel thermal conduction is found to be able to increase the total heat loss by around 33% since the magnetic flutter terms provide the additional conductive heat transport in the radial direction. The heat flux profile at both the inner and outer targets is obviously broadened by magnetic flutter. The lobe structures near the X-point at LFS are both broadened and elongated due to the magnetic flutter.

  13. Skin-surface warming: heat flux and central temperature.

    PubMed

    Sessler, D I; Moayeri, A

    1990-08-01

    The authors determined the efficacy of four postoperative warming devices by measuring cutaneous and tympanic membrane temperatures, and heat loss/gain using 11 thermocouples and ten thermal flux transducers in five healthy, unanesthetized volunteers. Overall thermal comfort was evaluated at 5-10 min intervals using a 10-cm visual analog scale. The warming devices were: 1) a pair of 250-W infrared heating lamps mounted 71 cm above the abdomen; 2) the Thermal Ceiling MTC XI UL (500 W) set on "high" and mounted 56 cm above the volunteer; 3) a 54-by-145-cm circulating-water blanket set to 40 degrees C placed over the volunteer; and 4) the Bair Hugger forced air warmer with an adult-sized cover set on "low" (approximately 33 degrees C), "medium" (approximately 38 degrees C), and "high" (approximately 43 degrees C). Following a 10-min control period, each device was placed over the volunteer and activated for a 30-min period. All devices were started "cold" and warmed up during the study period. The Bair Hugger set on "medium" decreased heat loss more than each radiant warming device and as much as the circulating-water blanket. All methods reached maximum efficacy within 20 min. Set on "high," the Bair Hugger increased skin-surface temperature more than the circulating-water blanket. The Bair Hugger (all settings) and the water blanket raised skin temperature more than the radiant heaters. The circulating-water blanket was the most effective device for heating an optimally placed transducer on the chest (directly under and parallel to the radiant heat sources, and touching the water and Bair Hugger blankets).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2382847

  14. Cloud Properties and Associated Radiative Heating Rates in the Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, Jim H.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Miller, Mark; Johnson, Karen L.

    2007-03-01

    Radiative heating of the atmosphere affects cloud evolution and atmospheric dynamics. The most direct means available for determining radiative heating profiles is to measure profiles of thermodynamic and cloud properties (temperature, humidity, liquid and ice water content) and use these profiles to calculate radiative fluxes. Obtaining accurate, high resolution profiles of these properties requires active remote sensing instruments. Instruments capable of making these measurements and the techniques for interpreting these measurements for meteorological applications have only recently become available. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program operates instruments including millimeter wavelength radars and microwave radiometers to measure cloud property distributions at sites around the world including three in the tropical western Pacific region. We have analyzed several months of ARM observations from Manus and Nauru to calculate time series of vertical cloud property profiles and associated radiative fluxes and heating rates. To test the validity of these radiative profiles, we have conducted closure tests that compare calculated radiative fluxes at the surface and top of atmosphere to measurements from the ARM sites and from geostationary satellite. The cloud and radiation profiles exhibit distinct vertical structure with strong boundary layer and cirrus features at both sites. Manus, which was much more convectively active than Nauru during the study period, also exhibits a mid-level cloud feature near the melting level. The two sites exhibit very different diurnal cycles. This data set will be an important tool for describing radiative processes in the tropics and assessing the simulation of these processes in dynamical models.

  15. Introduction of J-OFURO version 2 surface heat flux data set and its analysis over the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, H.; Jubota, M.; Iwasaki, S.; Hihara, T.; Kawatsura, A.

    2007-05-01

    Japanese Ocean Flux Data Sets with Use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO) includes global ocean surface heat flux data derived from satellite data and are used in many studies related to air-sea interaction. Recently new surface heat flux data was constructed in J-OFURO as the version 2. In the version 2 many points are improved compared with the version 1. Since we used wind speed and specific humidity data derived from one DMSP/SSMI sensor in the version 1, we obtained two data at most one day. Therefore, there may be large sampling errors for the daily-mean value. In order to escape this problem, multi-satellite data (DMSP/SSMI F08- 15, Aqua/AMSR-E, TRMM/TMI, ERS/AMI and QuikScat/SeaWinds) are used in the version 2. As a result we could improve accuracy and temporal resolution from 3-days mean value in version 1 to daily-mean value in version 2. Also we used an Optimum Interpolation method to estimate specific humidity data instead of a simple mean method. We basically need sea surface temperature (SST), specific humidity and wind speed data for estimation of latent heat flux. In version 1 we used NCEP data (Reynolds and Smith, 1994) as SST data. However, the temporal resolution of the data is based on weekly and considerably low. Recently there are many kinds of global SST data because we can obtain SST data using a microwave radiometer sensor such as TRMM/MI and Aqua/AMSR-E. Therefore, we compared many SST products and determined to use Merged satellite and in situ data Global Daily (MGD) SST provided by Japan Meteorological Agency. A bulk algorithm used for estimation of turbulent heat flux is changed from Kondo (1975) to COASRE 3.0(Fairall et al., 2003). Shortwave and longwave radiation data are based on the ISCCP product and some modifications are carried out for longwave radiation. Finally surface latent and sensible flux data and shortwave and longwave radiation data are extended to1989- 2004. In this presentation we will introduce surface heat flux data in J-OFURO version 2 and comparison and validation results of latent heat flux with data such as GSSTF2, HOAPS and OAFlux etc. Moreover, we analyze variability of surface heat flux over the North Pacific.

  16. Radiative Heating on the After-Body of Martian Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, A. M.; Saunders, D. A.; Johnston, C. O.; Cruden, B. A.; White, T. R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents simulations of the radiative heat flux imparted on the after-body of vehicles entering the Martian atmosphere. The radiation is dominated by CO2 bands emitting in the mid-wave infrared spectral region. This mechanism has traditionally not been considered in the design of past Mars entry vehicles. However, with recent analysis showing that the CO2 radiation can be greater than convective heating in the wake, and with several upcoming and proposed missions to Mars potentially affected, an investigation of the impact of this radiation is warranted. The focus of this paper is to provide a better understanding of the impact to aerothermal heating predictions and to provide comparisons between NASA's two main radiation codes, NEQAIR and HARA. The tangent slab approximation is shown to be overly conservative, by as much as 58 percent, for most back- shell body point locations compared to using a full angular integration method. However, due to the complexity of the wake flow, it is also shown that tangent slab does not always represent an upper limit for radiative heating. Furthermore, analysis in this paper shows that it is not possible to provide a general knock-down factor from the tangent slab results to those obtained using the more rigorous full integration method. When the radiative heating is accounted for on the after-body, the unmargined total heat flux can be as high as 14 watts per square centimeter.

  17. The surface latent heat flux anomalies related to major earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Feng; Shen, Xuhui; Kang, Chunli; Xiong, Pan; Hong, Shunying

    2011-12-01

    SLHF (Surface Latent Heat Flux) is an atmospheric parameter, which can describe the heat released by phase changes and dependent on meteorological parameters such as surface temperature, relative humidity, wind speed etc. There is a sharp difference between the ocean surface and the land surface. Recently, many studies related to the SLHF anomalies prior to earthquakes have been developed. It has been shown that the energy exchange enhanced between coastal surface and atmosphere prior to earthquakes can increase the rate of the water-heat exchange, which will lead to an obviously increases in SLHF. In this paper, two earthquakes in 2010 (Haiti earthquake and southwest of Sumatra in Indonesia earthquake) have been analyzed using SLHF data by STD (standard deviation) threshold method. It is shows that the SLHF anomaly may occur in interpolate earthquakes or intraplate earthquakes and coastal earthquakes or island earthquakes. And the SLHF anomalies usually appear 5-6 days prior to an earthquake, then disappear quickly after the event. The process of anomaly evolution to a certain extent reflects a dynamic energy change process about earthquake preparation, that is, weak-strong-weak-disappeared.

  18. Heat transfer in post-dryout droplet flow including radiation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsson, S. I.; Chung, J. N.

    1982-06-01

    A numerical model has been developed to investigate specifically the radiation heat transfer characteristics of a thermally developing, turbulent flow of liquid droplets in their own vapor. The droplets are considered as a distributed heat sink in the vapor flow and the radiation in the vapor is calculated using the optically thick limit of radiation. The resulting governing equation is a highly nonlinear partial differential equation which is solved using an iterative implicit numerical scheme with marching in the streamwise direction. The model enables a comparison of the relative importance of convection and radiation in the droplet heat transfer. For the case of constant wall heat flux, the inclusion of radiation generally lowers the wall temperatures by 15%.

  19. The Global Character of the Flux of Downward Longwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Wild, Martin; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Kato, Seiji; Henderson, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Four different types of estimates of the surface downwelling longwave radiative flux (DLR) are reviewed. One group of estimates synthesizes global cloud, aerosol, and other information in a radiation model that is used to calculate fluxes. Because these synthesis fluxes have been assessed against observations, the global-mean values of these fluxes are deemed to be the most credible of the four different categories reviewed. The global, annual mean DLR lies between approximately 344 and 350 W/sq m with an error of approximately +/-10 W/sq m that arises mostly from the uncertainty in atmospheric state that governs the estimation of the clear-sky emission. The authors conclude that the DLR derived from global climate models are biased low by approximately 10 W/sq m and even larger differences are found with respect to reanalysis climate data. The DLR inferred from a surface energy balance closure is also substantially smaller that the range found from synthesis products suggesting that current depictions of surface energy balance also require revision. The effect of clouds on the DLR, largely facilitated by the new cloud base information from the CloudSat radar, is estimated to lie in the range from 24 to 34 W/sq m for the global cloud radiative effect (all-sky minus clear-sky DLR). This effect is strongly modulated by the underlying water vapor that gives rise to a maximum sensitivity of the DLR to cloud occurring in the colder drier regions of the planet. The bottom of atmosphere (BOA) cloud effect directly contrast the effect of clouds on the top of atmosphere (TOA) fluxes that is maximum in regions of deepest and coldest clouds in the moist tropics.

  20. The role of parallel and poloidal heat flux in setting the detachment threshold in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. N.; Allen, S. L.; Lasnier, C. J.; McLean, A. G.; Petrie, T. W.; Leonard, A. W.; Groth, M.

    2014-10-01

    Experimental results show that the threshold density for divertor detachment is reduced even as the parallel scrape-off-layer (SOL) heat flux (q| |) is more than doubled, contrary to expectation. The work is part of a systematic study to identify the physics basis for obtaining detached divertors in future high power burning plasma experiments, consistent with requirements for high confinement steady-state operation. Parallel heat flux [PSOL * (Btor /Bpol) / 2 ?R?q ; ?q is the SOL width] is independent of poloidal flux expansion and is commonly used to quantify the divertor heat flux challenge. In these experiments, the parallel heat flux was varied either by changing the heating power (thereby PSOL), plasma current (the SOL width), or toroidal field (the projection of PSOL onto Btor). The data point to poloidal-field physics effects (e.g., neutral penetration field, line length, and impurity radiation volume) playing a dominant role in setting the detachment threshold. Comparison with 2D simulation will be shown. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  1. Development of Low Conductivity and Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Coatings Using A High-Heat-Flux Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of low conductivity, robust thermal and environmental barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity and cyclic resistance at very high surface temperatures (up to 17OOOC) under large thermal gradients. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux test approach is established for evaluating advanced low conductivity, ultra-high temperature ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. The test approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity: the initial conductivity rise under a steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and the later coating conductivity reduction under a subsequent cyclic thermal gradient test due to coating cracking/delamination. The coating system is then evaluated based on the damage accumulations and failure after the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The lattice and radiation thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic coatings can also be evaluated using laser heat-flux techniques. The coating external radiation resistance is assessed based on the measured specimen temperature response under a laser heated intense radiation flux source. The coating internal radiation contribution is investigated based on the measured apparent coating conductivity increases with the coating surface test temperature under large thermal gradient test conditions. Since an increased radiation contribution is observed at these very high surface test temperatures, by varying the laser heat-flux and coating average test temperature, the complex relation between the lattice and radiation conductivity as a function of surface and interface test temperature is derived.

  2. Heat flux from magmatic hydrothermal systems related to availability of fluid recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J. V.; Chiodini, G.; Rissmann, C. F.; Bloomberg, S.; Hernández, P. A.; Mazot, A.; Viveiros, F.; Werner, C.

    2015-09-01

    Magmatic hydrothermal systems are of increasing interest as a renewable energy source. Surface heat flux indicates system resource potential, and can be inferred from soil CO2 flux measurements and fumarole gas chemistry. Here we compile and reanalyze results from previous CO2 flux surveys worldwide to compare heat flux from a variety of magma-hydrothermal areas. We infer that availability of water to recharge magmatic hydrothermal systems is correlated with heat flux. Recharge availability is in turn governed by permeability, structure, lithology, rainfall, topography, and perhaps unsurprisingly, proximity to a large supply of water such as the ocean. The relationship between recharge and heat flux interpreted by this study is consistent with recent numerical modeling that relates hydrothermal system heat output to rainfall catchment area. This result highlights the importance of recharge as a consideration when evaluating hydrothermal systems for electricity generation, and the utility of CO2 flux as a resource evaluation tool.

  3. Metamaterial-based perfect absorbers for efficiently enhancing near field radiative heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan; Xu, Xianfan

    2015-12-01

    The fascinating capability of manipulating light using metamaterials (MMs) has inspired a significant amount of studies of using MMs for energy related applications. In this work we investigate MM-based perfect absorbers for enhancing near field radiative heat transfer, which is described by the fluctuation dissipation theorem. MM structures designed at two wavelengths are analyzed, corresponding to two working temperatures. Both electric and magnetic surface polaritons are found to contribute to heat transfer, while natural materials support only electric polaritons. The near-perfect absorption is demonstrated to be related to the modification of effective optical properties, which is important for enhancing radiative heat transfer efficiently. By comparing different designs, the bandwidth of the heat flux spectrum is found to increase with the absorption bandwidth, which is originated from the spatial field distributions. This study will contribute to the understanding of surface polaritons in near field radiative heat transfer and facilitate the optimization of MMs for near field heat transfer applications.

  4. Estimation of turbulent surface heat fluxes using sequences of remotely sensed land surface temperature

    E-print Network

    Bateni, Sayed Mohyeddin

    2011-01-01

    Fluxes of heat and moisture at the land-surface play a significant role in the climate system. These fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and influence the characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (e.g. ...

  5. Subglacial topography and geothermal heat flux: potential interactions with drainage of the Greenland ice sheet

    E-print Network

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Leftwich, T.; von Frese, R.; Csatho, B. M.; Li, J.

    2007-06-05

    [1] Many of the outlet glaciers in Greenland overlie deep and narrow trenches cut into the bedrock. It is well known that pronounced topography intensifies the geothermal heat flux in deep valleys and attenuates this flux on mountains. Here we...

  6. RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI-MONTE CARLO METHODS

    E-print Network

    RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI-MONTE CARLO METHODS A. Kersch1 W. Moroko2 A. Schuster1 1Siemens of Quasi-Monte Carlo to this problem. 1.1 Radiative Heat Transfer Reactors In the manufacturing of the problems which can be solved by such a simulation is high accuracy modeling of the radiative heat transfer

  7. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  8. Heat conduction in nanoscale materials: a statistical-mechanics derivation of the local heat flux.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiantao

    2014-09-01

    We derive a coarse-grained model for heat conduction in nanoscale mechanical systems. Starting with an all-atom description, this approach yields a reduced model, in the form of conservation laws of momentum and energy. The model closure is accomplished by introducing a quasilocal thermodynamic equilibrium, followed by a linear response approximation. Of particular interest is the constitutive relation for the heat flux, which is expressed nonlocally in terms of the spatial and temporal variation of the temperature. Nanowires made of copper and silicon are presented as examples. PMID:25314400

  9. Penetrative turbulence associated with mesoscale surface heat flux variations

    E-print Network

    Alam, Jahrul M

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates penetrative turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer. Using a large eddy simulation approach, we study characteristics of the mixed layer with respect to surface heat flux variations in the range from 231.48 W/m$^2$ to 925.92 W/m$^2$, and observe that the surface heterogeneity on a spatial scale of $20$ km leads to downscale turbulent kinetic energy cascade. Coherent fluctuations of mesoscale horizontal wind is observed at 100m above the ground. Such a surface induced temporal oscillations in the horizontal wind suggest a rapid jump in mesocale wind forecasts, which is difficult to parameterize using traditional one-dimensional ensemble-mean models. Although the present work is idealized at a typical scale (20km) of surface heterogeneity, the results help develop effective subgrid scale parameterization schemes for classical weather forecasting mesoscale models.

  10. Shaping solar concentrator mirrors by radiative heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Roger; Stalcup, Thomas; Wheelwright, Brian; Warner, Stephen; Hammer, Kimberly; Frenkel, Mira

    2014-10-01

    Here we report a newly developed method for gravity sag molding of large glass solar reflectors, 1.65 m x 1.65 m square, with either line or point focus, and short focal length. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The tests reported here have been made in a custom batch furnace, with high power radiative heating to soften the glass for slumping. The mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to <1%. Optical metrology of replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel test using a linear array of coaligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector while the deviation of each beam from perfect focus is measured. Slopes measured over an array of 4000 points show an absolute accuracy of <0.3 mrad rms in sx and sy. The most accurate replicas we have made are from a 2.6 m2 point focus mold, showing slope errors in x and y of 1.0 mrad rms. The slump cycle, starting with rigid flat glass at 500C, uses a 350 kW burst of radiative heating for 200 seconds, followed by radiative and convective cooling.

  11. Comparisons of fixation of heat, radiation, and heat plus radiation damage by anisotonic sodium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Azzam, E.I.

    1982-06-01

    Heat treatment at temperatures greater than 40 degrees C synergistically enhanced damage produced by ionizing radiation. Researchers experiments indicated that radiation damage in exponentially growing Chinese hamster cells could be fixed in a dose-dependent manner by postirradiation treatment with both hypertonic and hypotonic NaCl solutions. At a 1,000-rad dose level, survival could be depressed by a factor of about 260. For various treatments at either 42 or 45 degrees C, exposure after heating to anisotonic solutions did not result in the fixation of heat damage. When cells were heated at 45 degrees C for 5 minutes and irradiated with 500 rad before or after heating or given 500 rad without heating and then exposed to 0.05 M NaCl solutions for 120 minutes, survival was reduced by factors of 875, 667, and 12, respectively. For heat treatments at lower temperatures, such as 41.5 or 42 degrees C, less damage fixation for the combined treatments was observed. The data indicated that heat and radiation damage were different and damage from the combined treatments was not the same for low- and high-treatment temperatures.

  12. Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

  13. Divertor heat flux mitigation in high-performance H-mode discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Maingi, R.; Gates, D.A.; Menard, J.; Paul, S.F.; Raman, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Bell, R. E.; Bush, C.E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments conducted in high-performance 1.0 and 1.2 MA 6 MW NBI-heated H-mode discharges with a high magnetic flux expansion radiative divertor in NSTX demonstrate that significant divertor peak heat flux reduction and access to detachment may be facilitated naturally in a highly shaped spherical torus (ST) configuration. Improved plasma performance with high beta(t) = 15-25%, a high bootstrap current fraction f(BS) = 45-50%, longer plasma pulses and an H-mode regime with smaller ELMs has been achieved in the strongly shaped lower single null configuration with elongation kappa = 2.2-2.4 and triangularity delta = 0.7-0.8. Divertor peak heat fluxes were reduced from 6-12 to 0.5-2 MW m(-2) in ELMy H-mode discharges using the inherently high magnetic flux expansion f(m) = 15-25 and the partial detachment of the outer strike point at several D-2 injection rates. A good core confinement and pedestal characteristics were maintained, while the core carbon concentration and the associated Z(eff) were reduced. The partially detached divertor regime was characterized by an increase in divertor radiated power, a reduction in ion flux to the plate and a large neutral compression ratio. Spectroscopic measurements indicated the formation of a high-density, low-temperature region adjacent to the outer strike point, where substantial increases in the volume recombination rate and C II, CIII emission rates were measured.

  14. Space-based estimate of the volcanic heat flux into the atmosphere during 2001 and 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Flynn, Luke P.

    2004-03-01

    Satellite remote sensing offers a convenient way to monitor changes in the thermal budgets of Earth's subaerially active volcanoes. By using data acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer, we have calculated the amount of heat released into the atmosphere by 45 volcanoes active during 2001 and 2002, in order to quantify the contribution active volcanism makes to Earth's energy budget. We report that the amount of heat radiated into the troposphere by these volcanoes, as detected from space, was ˜5.34 × 1016 and 5.30 × 1016 J/yr during 2001 and 2002, respectively. This energy flux is three orders of magnitude less than the amount of energy consumed by the United States of America for residential, manufacturing, and transportation purposes during 1999.

  15. Controls on sensible heat and latent energy fluxes from a short-hydroperiod Florida Everglades marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schedlbauer, Jessica L.; Oberbauer, Steven F.; Starr, Gregory; Jimenez, Kristine L.

    2011-12-01

    SummaryLittle is known of energy balance in low latitude wetlands where there is a year-round growing season and a climate best defined by wet and dry seasons. The Florida Everglades is a highly managed and extensive subtropical wetland that exerts a substantial influence on the hydrology and climate of the south Florida region. However, the effects of seasonality and active water management on energy balance in the Everglades ecosystem are poorly understood. An eddy covariance and micrometeorological tower was established in a short-hydroperiod Everglades marsh to examine the dominant environmental controls on sensible heat ( H) and latent energy ( LE) fluxes, as well as the effects of seasonality on these parameters. Seasonality differentially affected H and LE fluxes in this marsh, such that H was principally dominant in the dry season and LE was strongly dominant in the wet season. The Bowen ratio was high for much of the dry season (1.5-2.4), but relatively low (<0.7) in the wet season. Net radiation strongly influenced H and LE fluxes across nearly all seasons and years ( Radj2=0.48-0.79). However, the 2009 dry season LE data were not consistent with this relationship ( Radj2=0.08) because of low seasonal variation in LE following a prolonged end to the previous wet season. In addition to net radiation, H and LE fluxes were significantly related to soil volumetric water content (VWC), water depth, air temperature, and occasionally vapor pressure deficit. Given that VWC and water depth were determined in part by water management decisions, it is clear that human actions have the ability to influence the mode of energy dissipation from this ecosystem. Impending modifications to water management under the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan may shift the dominant turbulent flux from this ecosystem further toward LE, and this change will likely affect local hydrology and climate.

  16. Effects of Temperature Gradients and Heat Fluxes on High-Temperature Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2008-04-01

    The effects of a temperature gradient and heat flux on point defect diffusion in protective oxide scales were examined. Irreversible thermodynamics were used to expand Fick’s first law of diffusion to include a heat-flux term—a Soret effect. Oxidation kinetics were developed for the oxidation of cobalt and of nickel doped with chromium. Research is described to verify the effects of a heat flux by oxidizing pure cobalt in a temperature gradient at 900 °C, and comparing the kinetics to isothermal oxidation. No evidence of a heat flux effect was found.

  17. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Robert V. (Tijeras, NM)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

  18. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, R.V.

    1993-03-16

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infrared sensing devices.

  19. Decoupled cantilever arms for highly versatile and sensitive temperature and heat flux measurements

    E-print Network

    Burg, Brian R.

    Microfabricated cantilever beams have been used in microelectromechanical systems for a variety of sensor and actuator applications. Bimorph cantilevers accurately measure temperature change and heat flux with resolutions ...

  20. Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

    2009-09-25

    Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

  1. Convective and radiative heating of a Saturn entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Szema, K. Y.; Moss, J. N.; Subramanian, S. V.

    1984-01-01

    The extent of convective and radiative heating for a Saturn entry probe is investigated in the absence and presence of ablation mass injection. The flow in the shock layer is assumed to be axisymmetric, viscous and in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The importance of chemical nonequilibrium effects for both the radiative and convective nonblowing surface heating rates is demonstrated for prescribed entry conditions. Results indicate that the nonequilibrium chemistry can significantly influence the rate of radiative heating to the entry probes. With coupled carbon-phenolic ablation injection, the convective heating rates are reduced substantially. Turbulence has little effect on radiative heating but it increases the convective heating considerably.

  2. Critical Heat Flux In Inclined Rectangular Narrow Long Channel

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; S. W. Noh; Y. H. Kim; K. Y. Suh; F.B.Cheung; S. B. Kim

    2005-05-01

    In the TMI-2 accident, the lower part of the reactor pressure vessel had been overheated and then rather rapidly cooled down, as was later identified in a vessel investigation project. This accounted for the possibility of gap cooling feasibility. For this reason, several investigations were performed to determine the critical heat flux (CHF) from the standpoint of invessel retention. The experiments are conducted to investigate the general boiling phenomena, and the triggering mechanism for the CHF in a narrow gap using a 5 x 105 mm2 crevice type heater assembly and de-mineralized water. The test parameters include the gap size of 5 mm, and the surface orientation angles from the downward facing position (180o) to the vertical position (90o). The orientation angle affects the bubble layer and escape from the narrow gap. The CHF is less than that in a shorter channel, compared with the previous experiments having a heated length of 35 mmin the copper test section.

  3. Effect of combined heat and radiation on microbial destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. A.; Pflug, I. J.

    1977-01-01

    A series of experiments at several levels of relative humidity and radiation dose rates was carried out using spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger to evaluate the effect of heat alone, radiation alone, and a combination of heat and radiation. Combined heat and radiation treatment of microorganisms yields a destruction rate greater than the additive rates of the independent agents. The synergistic mechanism shows a proportional dependency on radiation dose rate, an Arrhenius dependence on temperature, and a dependency on relative humidity. Maximum synergism occurs under conditions where heat and radiation individually destroy microorganisms at approximately equal rates. Larger synergistic advantage is possible at low relative humidities rather than at high relative humidities.

  4. Momentum and heat fluxes in a turbulent air flow over a wet, smooth boundary 

    E-print Network

    Rice, Warren

    1958-01-01

    Experimental tests were conducted to measure the influence of radiant barriers and the effect of the radiant barrier location on attic heat transfer. All the tests were conducted in an attic simulator at a steady state. The heat flux through...

  5. Critical Heat Flux in Inclined Rectangular Narrow Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong J. Kim; Yong H. Kim; Seong J. Kim; Sang W. Noh; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-06-01

    In light of the TMI-2 accident, in which the reactor vessel lower head survived the attack by molten core material, the in-vessel retention strategy was suggested to benefit from cooling the debris through a gap between the lower head and the core material. The GAMMA 1D (Gap Apparatus Mitigating Melt Attack One Dimensional) tests were conducted to investigate the critical heat flux (CHF) in narrow gaps with varying surface orientations. The CHF in an inclined gap, especially in case of the downward-facing narrow gap, is dictated by bubble behavior because the departing bubbles are squeezed. The orientation angle affects the bubble layer and escape of the bubbles from the narrow gap. The test parameters include gap sizes of 1, 2, 5 and 10 mm and the open periphery, and the orientation angles range from the fully downward-facing (180o) to the vertical (90o) position. The 15 ×35 mm copper test section was electrically heated by the thin film resistor on the back. The heater assembly was installed to the tip of the rotating arm in the heated water pool at the atmospheric pressure. The bubble behavior was photographed utilizing a high-speed camera through the Pyrex glass spacer. It was observed that the CHF decreased as the surface inclination angle increased and as the gap size decreased in most of the cases. However, the opposing results were obtained at certain surface orientations and gap sizes. Transition angles, at which the CHF changed in a rapid slope, were also detected, which is consistent with the existing literature. A semi-empirical CHF correlation was developed for the inclined narrow rectangular channels through dimensional analysis. The correlation provides with best-estimate CHF values for realistically assessing the thermal margin to failure of the lower head during a severe accident involving relocation of the core material.

  6. Active control of divertor heat and particle fluxes in EAST towards advanced steady state operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Guo, H. Y.; Li, J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Zhang, X. D.; Hu, J. S.; Liang, Y.; Xu, G. S.; Zou, X. L.; Loarte, A.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J. E.; Luo, G. N.; Gao, X.; Hu, L. Q.; Gan, K. F.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, H. Q.; Chen, R.; Sun, Z.

    2015-08-01

    Significant progress has been made in EAST towards advanced steady state operations by active control of divertor heat and particle fluxes. Many innovative techniques have been developed to mitigate transient ELM and stationary heat fluxes on the divertor target plates. It has been found that lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) can lead to edge plasma ergodization, striation of the stationary heat flux and lower ELM transient heat and particle fluxes. With multi-pulse supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) to quantitatively regulate the divertor particle flux, the divertor power footprint pattern can be actively modified. H-modes have been extended over 30 s in EAST with the divertor peak heat flux and the target temperature being controlled well below 2 MW/m2 and 250 °C, respectively, by integrating these new methods, coupled with advanced lithium wall conditioning and internal divertor pumping, along with an edge coherent mode to provide continuous particle and power exhaust.

  7. Measuring and modeling near-surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Starks, Patrick J.; Vining, Roel C.; Hays, Cynthia J.; Mesarch, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information is presented pertaining to the measurement and estimation of reflected and emitted components of the radiation balance. Information is included about reflectance and transmittance of solar radiation from and through the leaves of some grass and forb prairie species, bidirectional reflectance from a prairie canopy is discussed and measured and estimated fluxes are described of incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Results of the study showed only very small differences in reflectances and transmittances for the adaxial and abaxial surfaces of grass species in the visible and infrared wavebands, but some differences in the infrared wavebands were noted for the forbs. Reflectance from the prairie canopy changed as a function of solar and view zenith angles in the solar principal plane with definite asymmetry about nadir. The surface temperature of prairie canopies was found to vary by as much as 5 C depending on view zenith and azimuth position and on the solar azimuth. Aerodynamic temperature calculated from measured sensible heat fluxes ranged from 0 to 3 C higher than nadir-viewed temperatures. Models were developed to estimate incoming and reflected shortwave radiation from data collected with a Barnes Modular Multiband Radiometer. Several algorithms for estimating incoming longwave radiation were evaluated and compared to actual measures of that parameter. Net radiation was calculated using the estimated components of the shortwave radiation streams, determined from the algorithms developed, and from the longwave radiation streams provided by the Brunt, modified Deacon, and the Stefan-Boltzmann models. Estimates of net radiation were compared to measured values and found to be within the measurement error of the net radiometers used in the study.

  8. The impact of spatial variability of land-surface characteristics on land-surface heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Avissar, R. )

    1994-04-01

    The impact of subgrid-scale variability of land characteristics on land-surface energy fluxes simulated in atmospheric models (e.g., GCMs) was investigated with Patchy Land-Atmosphere Interactive Dynamics (PLAID), a land-surface scheme developed by Avissar and Pielke that represents the land surface as a mosaic of patches. Eleven different distributions of the five predominant characteristics of land-surface schemes (i.e., stomatal conductance, soil-surface wetness, leaf area index, surface roughness, and albedo) were considered. The authors found that the more skewed the distribution within the range of land-surface characteristics that is related nonlinearly to the energy fluxes, the larger the difference between the energy fluxes calculated with the distribution and the corresponding mean. Among the various distributions considered, the lognormal distribution produced the largest such difference, and negatively skewed beta distributions resulted in negligible difference. In general, the latent heat flux was the most sensitive to spatial variability and the radiative flux emitted by the surface was the least sensitive. The results indicate that it is very important to consider the spatial variability of leaf area index, stomatal conductance, and, in bare land, soil-surface wetness. The spatial variability of leaf area index, stomatal conductance, and, in bare land, soil-surface wetness. The spatial variability of surface roughness is mostly important under neutral and stable atmospheric conditions. it appears that the relationship between albedo and surface energy fluxes is almost linear, and therefore, using a mean value of this characteristic is appropriate. This analysis emphasizes the need to develop land-surface schemes able to account for spatial variability in atmospheric models, as well as the necessity to provide higher statistical moments when creating datasets of land-surface characteristics. 20 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Heat flux determination at the AWJ cutting zone using IR thermography and inverse heat conduction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.S.; Kovacevic, R.; Beardsley, H.E.

    1996-12-31

    In abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting, the cutting tool is a thin stream of high velocity abrasive waterjet slurry which can be considered as a moving line heat source that increases the temperature of the narrow zone along the cut kerf wall. A suitably defined inverse heat conduction problem which uses the experimentally determined temperature histories at various points in the workpiece, is adopted to determine the heat flux at the cutting zone. Temperature distribution in the workpiece and the cutting nozzle during AWJ cutting is monitored using infrared thermography. A suitable strategy for on-line monitoring of the radial and axial wear of the AWJ nozzle based on the nozzle temperature distribution is also proposed.

  10. Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans, Jim; Harper, David C; Snead, Lance Lewis; Schaich, Charles Ross

    2014-01-01

    A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

  11. Heat transfer performance of an external receiver pipe under unilateral concentrated solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jianfeng, Lu; Jing, Ding; Jianping, Yang

    2010-11-15

    The heat transfer and absorption characteristics of an external receiver pipe under unilateral concentrated solar radiation are theoretically investigated. Since the heat loss ratio of the infrared radiation has maximum at moderate energy flux, the heat absorption efficiency will first increase and then decrease with the incident energy flux. The local absorption efficiency will increase with the flow velocity, while the wall temperature drops quickly. Because of the unilateral concentrated solar radiation and different incident angle, the heat transfer is uneven along the circumference. Near the perpendicularly incident region, the wall temperature and absorption efficiency slowly approaches to the maximum, while the absorption efficiency sharply drops near the parallelly incident region. The calculation results show that the heat transfer parameters calculated from the average incident energy flux have a good agreement with the average values of the circumference under different boundary conditions. For the whole pipe with coating of Pyromark, the absorption efficiency of the main region is above 85%, and only the absorption efficiency near the parallelly incident region is below 80%. In general, the absorption efficiency of the whole pipe increases with flow velocity rising and pipe length decreasing, and it approaches to the maximum at optimal concentrated solar flux. (author)

  12. Modulation and amplification of radiative far field heat transfer: Towards a simple radiative thermal transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Joulain, Karl; Ezzahri, Younès; Drevillon, Jérémie; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-03-30

    We show in this article that phase change materials (PCM) exhibiting a phase transition between a dielectric state and a metallic state are good candidates to perform modulation as well as amplification of radiative thermal flux. We propose a simple situation in plane parallel geometry where a so-called radiative thermal transistor could be achieved. In this configuration, we put a PCM between two blackbodies at different temperatures. We show that the transistor effect can be achieved easily when this material has its critical temperature between the two blackbody temperatures. We also see that the more the material is reflective in the metallic state, the more switching effect is realized, whereas the more PCM transition is stiff in temperature, the more thermal amplification is high. We finally take the example of VO{sub 2} that exhibits an insulator-metallic transition at 68?°C. We show that a demonstrator of a radiative transistor could easily be achieved in view of the heat flux levels predicted. Far-field thermal radiation experiments are proposed to back the results presented.

  13. Heat flux measurement from thermal infrared imagery in low-flux fumarolic zones: Example of the Ty fault (La Soufrire de Guadeloupe)

    E-print Network

    Beauducel, François

    Heat flux measurement from thermal infrared imagery in low-flux fumarolic zones: Example of the Ty flux Low flux fumarolic zone Thermal infrared Remote sensing Thermal anomaly Sensible flux Monitoring mainly condensates in the soil close to surface and produces a thermal anomaly detectable at the surface

  14. Calculation of Heat Flux Across the Hot Surface of Continuous Casting Mold Through Two-Dimensional Inverse Heat Conduction Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin; Zhou, Lejun

    2015-10-01

    A novel method for the estimation of the mold hot surface heat flux based on the measured responding temperatures from two columns of thermocouples that embedded inside the mold during continuous casting has been developed. The method includes a Two-Dimensional Inverse transient Heat Conduction Problem (2D-IHCP) model that was solved by the conjugate gradient method with Adjoint Equation. The model was validated by comparing the results with those calculated by a robust One-Dimensional Inverse transient Heat Conduction Problem (1D-IHCP). The solution of a test problem indicated that the Mean Absolute Percentage Error of the estimated heat flux calculated by the new method is about 9 to 40 pct of those calculated by the 1D-IHCP. Then, the method is applied to compute the heat flux for a mold simulator experiment. The results indicated that the heat fluxes and temperatures across mold hot surface calculated by 2D-IHCP show the same variation tendency as those calculated by 1D-IHCP. However, the heat fluxes calculated by 2D-IHCP are about 1.2 to 2 times larger than those calculated by 1D-IHCP for the locations below the liquid mold flux surface and are about 50 to 90 pct of those calculated by 1D-IHCP for the locations above the liquid mold flux surface.

  15. The Role of the Velocity Gradient in Laminar Convective Heat Transfer through a Tube with a Uniform Wall Heat Flux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Liang-Bi; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Xia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of convective heat transfer. For this purpose, the reason why thermal diffusivity should be placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux, and the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer are analysed. The background to these analyses is that, when the energy…

  16. Quantifying the heat flux regulation of metropolitan land use/land cover components by coupling remote sensing modeling with in situ measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Wenhui; Dou, Yinyin; Zhang, Chi; Chi, Wenfeng; Liu, Ailin; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Renhua; Liu, Jiyuan

    2015-01-01

    the effects of urban land use/land cover with regard to surface radiation and heat flux regulation is important to ecological planning and heat stress mitigation. To retrieve the spatial pattern of heat fluxes in the Beijing metropolitan area, China, a remote sensing-based energy balance model was calibrated with synchronously measured energy fluxes including net radiation, latent heat flux (LE), and sensible heat flux (H). Our model calibration approach avoided the uncertainties due to subjective judgments in previous empirical parameterization methods. The land surface temperature (LST), H, and Bowen ratio (?) of Beijing were found to increase along the outskirt-suburban-urban gradient, with strong spatial variation. LST and H were negatively correlated with vegetation fraction cover (VFC). For example, the modern high-rise residential areas with relatively higher VFC had lower H and ? than the traditional low-rise residential areas. Our findings that indicate thermal dissipation through vegetation transpiration might play an important role in urban heat regulation. Notably, the thermal dissipating strength of vegetation (calculated as LE/VFC) declined exponentially with increased VFC. For the purpose of heat stress regulation, we recommend upgrading the traditional low-rise residential areas to modern high-rise residential areas and focusing urban greenery projects in areas whose VFC < 0.1, where the heat regulating service by urban vegetation could be twice as effective as in other places.

  17. Numerical dynamos with outer boundary heat flux inferred from probabilistic tomography—consequences for latitudinal distribution of magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amit, Hagay; Deschamps, Frédéric; Choblet, Gaël

    2015-11-01

    Mantle control on the geodynamo is often simulated using numerical dynamos with imposed outer boundary heat flux inferred from lower mantle tomography, assuming that seismic and thermal anomalies in the lowermost mantle are highly correlated. However, non-thermal effects might perturb this idealized linear seismic-thermal mapping. Here we use a probabilistic tomography model to isolate the thermal part of the seismic anomaly in order to impose a more realistic core-mantle boundary heat flux pattern on the outer boundary of numerical dynamo simulations. We demonstrate that on time average these dynamo models have more low-latitude convective and magnetic activity than corresponding models with conventional tomographic heat flux. In addition, the low-latitude magnetic flux and kinetic energy contributions are more time-dependent in the dynamo models with a probabilistic tomography heat flux, and thus may recover the observed latitudinal distribution of geomagnetic flux on the core-mantle boundary, which we propose as a morphological criterion for Earth-like dynamo models.

  18. Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.; Kurzeja, R.; Villa-Aleman, E.; Bollinger, J.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q? from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation ? of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q? can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing ?. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q? and ? when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between ? and q? of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q? computed from a function of ? and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q? (0.84 and 0.89). This research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

  19. Liquid droplet radiators for heat rejection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1980-01-01

    A radiator for heat rejection in space is described which utilizes a stream of liquid droplets to radiate waste heat. The large surface area per mass makes the liquid droplet radiator at least an order of magnitude lighter than tube and fin radiators. Generation and collection of the droplets, as well as heat transfer to the liquid, can be achieved with modest extensions of conventional technology. Low vapor pressure liquids are available which cover a radiating temperature range 250-1000 K with negligible evaporation losses. The droplet radiator may be employed for a wide range of heat rejection applications in space. Three applications - heat rejection for a high temperature Rankine cycle, cooling of photovoltaic cells, and low temperature heat rejection for refrigeration in space illustrate the versatility of the radiator.

  20. Effects of tropospheric aerosols on radiative flux calculations at UV and visible wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A.S.; Grant, K.E.

    1994-08-01

    The surface fluxes in the wavelength range 175 to 735nm have been calculated for an atmosphere which contains a uniformly mixed aerosol layer of thickness 1km at the earth`s surface. Two different aerosol types were considered, a rural aerosol, and an urban aerosol. The visibility range for the aerosol layers was 95 to 15 km. Surface flux ratios (15km/95km) were in agreement with previously published results for the rural aerosol layer to within about 2%. The surface flux ratios vary from 7 to 14% for the rural aerosol layer and from 13 to 23% for the urban aerosol layer over the wavelength range. A tropospheric radiative forcing of about 1.3% of the total tropospheric flux was determined for the 95km to 15km visibility change in the rural aerosol layer, indicating the potential of tropospheric feedback effects on the surface flux changes. This effect was found to be negligible for the urban aerosol layer. Stratospheric layer heating rate changes due to visibility changes in either the rural or urban aerosol layer were found to be negligible.

  1. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Subpart A of... - Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER..., Subpt. A, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile...

  2. The Electron Heat flux in the Solar Wind: Collisionless or Collisional Dominated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, S.; Pantellini, F. G. E.; Matteini, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent measurements by the WIND spacecraft at 1 AU (Bale et al., ApJL 769, L22) show that, when the Knudsen number (the ratio between the electron mean free path and the electron temperature scale height) drops below about 0.3, the electron heat flux appears strongly correlate with the classical electron heat flux expected for a collisional dominated plasma, while at higher values the heat flux is limited to a fraction of its free-streaming value. Using a fully kinetic model including the effect of Coulomb collisions, the expansion of the solar wind, as well as the self consistent large scale electric field needed to preserve quasi neutrality and zero current, we indeed observe the electron heat flux in very good agreement with observations. However, closer inspection of the heat flux properties, such as its dependence on the thermodynamic quantities and its variation with the distance, shows that for Knudsen number between 0.02 and 0.3 the heat flux is still not conveniently described by the Spitzer-Härm formula. Moreover, the good agreement between our model - that does not include wave-particle interactions - and the heat flux in the solar wind in the high Knudsen regime suggests that at 1AU the heat flux intensity is not constrained by electromagnetic instabilities, wave-particle and wave-wave interactions.

  3. Regulation of the solar wind electron heat flux from 1 to 5 AU: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, E.E.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gary, S.P.; Phillips, J.L.; Balogh, A.

    1994-12-01

    In this study the authors use observations from the three-dimensional electron spectrometer and magnetometer aboard the Ulysses spacecraft to examine the solar wind electron heat flux from 1.2 to 5.4 AU in the ecliptic plane. Throughout Ulysses` transit to 5.4 AU, the electron heat flux decreases more rapidly ({approximately}R{sup {minus}3.0}) than simple collisionless expansion along the local magnetic field and is smaller than expected for a thermal gradient heat flux, q{sub {parallel}}e(r)={minus}k{sub {parallel}}{del}{sub {parallel}}T{sub e}(r). The radial gradients and magnitudes expected for a number of electron heat flux regulatory mechanisms are examined and compared to the observations. The best agreement is found for heat flux regulation by the whistler heat flux instability. The upper bound and radial scaling for the electron heat flux predicted for the whistler heat flux instability are consistent with observations.

  4. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Subpart A of... - Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER..., Subpt. A, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Subpart A of... - Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER..., Subpt. A, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile...

  6. Multi-Scale Sensible Heat Fluxes in the Suburban Environment from Large-Aperture Scintillometry and Eddy Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, H. C.; Evans, J. G.; Grimmond, C. S. B.

    2014-07-01

    Sensible heat fluxes () are determined using scintillometry and eddy covariance over a suburban area. Two large-aperture scintillometers provide spatially integrated fluxes across path lengths of 2.8 and 5.5 km over Swindon, UK. The shorter scintillometer path spans newly built residential areas and has an approximate source area of 2-4 , whilst the long path extends from the rural outskirts to the town centre and has a source area of around 5-10 . These large-scale heat fluxes are compared with local-scale eddy-covariance measurements. Clear seasonal trends are revealed by the long duration of this dataset and variability in monthly is related to the meteorological conditions. At shorter time scales the response of to solar radiation often gives rise to close agreement between the measurements, but during times of rapidly changing cloud cover spatial differences in the net radiation () coincide with greater differences between heat fluxes. For clear days lags , thus the ratio of to increases throughout the day. In summer the observed energy partitioning is related to the vegetation fraction through use of a footprint model. The results demonstrate the value of scintillometry for integrating surface heterogeneity and offer improved understanding of the influence of anthropogenic materials on surface-atmosphere interactions.

  7. Time and Space Resolved Heat Transfer Measurements Under Nucleate Bubbles with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2003-01-01

    Investigations into single bubble pool boiling phenomena are often complicated by the difficulties in obtaining time and space resolved information in the bubble region. This usually occurs because the heaters and diagnostics used to measure heat transfer data are often on the order of, or larger than, the bubble characteristic length or region of influence. This has contributed to the development of many different and sometimes contradictory models of pool boiling phenomena and dominant heat transfer mechanisms. Recent investigations by Yaddanapyddi and Kim and Demiray and Kim have obtained time and space resolved heat transfer information at the bubble/heater interface under constant temperature conditions using a novel micro-heater array (10x10 array, each heater 100 microns on a side) that is semi-transparent and doubles as a measurement sensor. By using active feedback to maintain a state of constant temperature at the heater surface, they showed that the area of influence of bubbles generated in FC-72 was much smaller than predicted by standard models and that micro-conduction/micro-convection due to re-wetting dominated heat transfer effects. This study seeks to expand on the previous work by making time and space resolved measurements under bubbles nucleating on a micro-heater array operated under constant heat flux conditions. In the planned investigation, wall temperature measurements made under a single bubble nucleation site will be synchronized with high-speed video to allow analysis of the bubble energy removal from the wall.

  8. Enceladus: An Estimate of Heat Flux and Lithospheric Thickness from Flexurally Supported Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Bernd; Wagner, R.; Hussmann, H.; Neukum, G.; Helfenstein, P.; Thomas, P.

    2008-09-01

    We have identified flexural uplift along a rift zone of the Harran Sulci, Enceladus, using Cassini stereo-derived topography. Modeling the topography on the basis of a flexed broken elastic plate yields an effective lithospheric thickness of 0.3 km and, combined with the strength envelope, a mechanical lithospheric thickness of 2.5 km with heat fluxes of 150-220 mW/m2 at the time of formation. The heat fluxes are comparable with average heat fluxes measured in Enceladus’ active south polar area and correspond to heat fluxes derived via models of unstable extension of the lithosphere in this area. Surface porosity can reduce the heat fluxes to an estimated minimum of 40-50 mW/m2. Crater-size frequency counts and a lunar-like impact chronology fix the time of formation of the rift zone at 3.5 Ga from present-day.

  9. The validation of ocean surface heat fluxes in AMIP

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P.J.; Randall, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    Recent intercomparisons of Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMS) constrained with sea-surface temperatures have shown that while there are substantial differences among various models (with each other and available observations), overall the differences between them have been decreasing. The primary goal of AMIP is to enable a systematic intercomparison and validation of state-of-the- art AGCMs by supporting in-depth diagnosis of and interpretation of the model results. Official AMIP simulations are 10 years long, using monthly mean Sea-Surface Temperatures (SSTs) and sea ice conditions which are representative of the 1979--1988 decade. Some model properties are also dictated by the design of AMIP such as the solar constant, the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration, and the approximate horizontal resolution. In this paper, some of the preliminary results of AMIP Subproject No. 5 will be summarized. The focus will be on the intercomparison and validation of ocean surface heat fluxes of the AMIP simulations available thus far.

  10. Arctic mass, freshwater and heat fluxes: methods and modelled seasonal variability.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Sheldon; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Fawcett, Stephen; Madec, Gurvan

    2015-10-13

    Considering the Arctic Ocean (including sea ice) as a defined volume, we develop equations describing the time-varying fluxes of mass, heat and freshwater (FW) into, and storage of those quantities within, that volume. The seasonal cycles of fluxes and storage of mass, heat and FW are quantified and illustrated using output from a numerical model. The meanings of 'reference values' and FW fluxes are discussed, and the potential for error through the use of arbitrary reference values is examined. PMID:26347537

  11. A 3-year dataset of sensible and latent heat fluxes from the Tibetan Plateau, derived using eddy covariance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maoshan; Babel, Wolfgang; Chen, Xuelong; Zhang, Lang; Sun, Fanglin; Wang, Binbin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong; Foken, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) has become a focus of strong scientific interest due to its role in the global water cycle and its reaction to climate change. Regional flux estimates of sensible and latent heat are important variables for linking the energy and hydrological cycles at the TP's surface. Within this framework, a 3-year dataset (2008-2010) of eddy covariance measured turbulent fluxes was compiled from four stations on the TP into a standardised workflow: corrections and quality tests were applied using an internationally comparable software package. Second, the energy balance closure ( C EB) was determined and two different closure corrections applied. The four stations (Qomolangma, Linzhi, NamCo and Nagqu) represent different locations and typical land surface types on the TP (high altitude alpine steppe with sparse vegetation, a densely vegetated alpine meadow, and bare soil/gravel, respectively). We show that the C EB differs between each surface and undergoes seasonal changes. Typical differences in the turbulent energy fluxes occur between the stations at Qomolangma, Linzhi and NamCo, while Nagqu is quite similar to NamCo. Specific investigation of the pre-monsoon, the Tibetan Plateau summer monsoon, post-monsoon and winter periods within the annual cycle reinforces these findings. The energy flux of the four sites is clearly influenced by the Tibetan Plateau monsoon. In the pre-monsoon period, sensible heat flux is the major energy source delivering heat to the atmosphere, whereas latent heat flux is greater than sensible heat flux during the monsoon season. Other factors affecting surface energy flux are topography and location. Land cover type also affects surface energy flux. The energy balance residuum indicates a typically observed overall non-closure in winter, while closure (or `turbulent over-closure') is achieved during the Tibetan Plateau summer monsoon at the Nagqu site. The latter seems to depend on ground heat flux, which is higher in the wet season, related not only to a larger radiation input but also to a thermal decoupling of dry soils. Heterogeneous landscape modelling using a MODIS product is introduced to explain energy non-closure.

  12. Third law of thermodynamics in the presence of a heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, J. )

    1995-01-01

    Following a maximum entropy formalism, we study a one-dimensional crystal under a heat flux. We obtain the phonon distribution function and evaluate the nonequilibrium temperature, the specific heat, and the entropy as functions of the internal energy and the heat flux, in both the quantum and the classical limits. Some analogies between the behavior of equilibrium systems at low absolute temperature and nonequilibrium steady states under high values of the heat flux are shown, which point to a possible generalization of the third law in nonequilibrium situations.

  13. Ultra lightweight unfurlable radiator for lunar base heat rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, S.D.; Gernert, N.J. )

    1993-01-10

    A proof-of-concept (POC) ultra lightweight lunar radiator was fabricated and tested. The POC radiator has a specific weight of 5 kg/kW one quarter the specific weight of current ambient temperature space radiators. The significant weight reduction was due to the radiator's unique design. It is a multi-cellular heat pipe radiator utilizing the lunar gravity for condensate return. The innovation of this radiator is the laminated film material used as the heat pipe envelope. By utilizing a flexible, durable, leak tight laminate structure instead of the typical ridge heat pipe envelope, significant weight reductions were achieved. In addition, the resulting radiator is extremely flexible, allowing it to be rolled or folded and compactly stored during transit to the lunar surface. Testing demonstrated that a laminated film heat pipe radiator offers improved performance and significant weight savings over conventional space radiators.

  14. Evaporation on/in Capillary Structures of High Heat Flux Two-Phase Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, Amir; Khrustalev, Dmitry

    1996-01-01

    Two-phase devices (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, loop heat pipes, and evaporators) have become recognized as key elements in thermal control systems of space platforms. Capillary and porous structures are necessary and widely used in these devices, especially in high heat flux and zero-g applications, to provide fluid transport and enhanced heat transfer during vaporization and condensation. However, some unexpected critical phenomena, such as dryout in long heat pipe evaporators and high thermal resistance of loop heat pipe evaporators with high heat fluxes, are possible and have been encountered in the use of two-phase devices in the low gravity environment. Therefore, a detailed fundamental investigation is proposed to better understand the fluid behavior in capillary-porous structures during vaporization at high heat fluxes. The present paper addresses some theoretical aspects of this investigation.

  15. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. ); Silverstein, C.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

  16. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Silverstein, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

  17. Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. A.; Merrigan, M. A.; Elder, M. G.; Sena, J. T.; Keddy, E. S.; Silverstein, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, it is found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700 F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90,000 ft lowers the peak hot-section temperatures to around 2800 F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature.

  18. Effects of broadened property fuels on radiant heat flux to gas turbine combustor liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of fuel type, inlet air pressure, inlet air temperature, and fuel/air ratio on the combustor radiation were investigated. Combustor liner radiant heat flux measurements were made in the spectral region between 0.14 and 6.5 microns at three locations in a modified commercial aviation can combustor. Two fuels, Jet A and a heavier distillate research fuel called ERBS were used. The use of ERBS fuel as opposed to Jet A under similar operating conditions resulted in increased radiation to the combustor liner and hence increased backside liner temperature. This increased radiation resulted in liner temperature increases always less than 73 C. The increased radiation is shown by way of calculations to be the result of increased soot concentrations in the combustor. The increased liner temperatures indicated can substantially affect engine maintenance costs by reducing combustor liner life up to 1/3 because of the rapid decay in liner material properties when operated beyond their design conditions.

  19. A New Facility for Measurements of Three-Dimensional, Local Subcooled Flow Boiling Heat Flux and Related Critical Heat Flux for PFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Ronald D. Sr.; Cofie, Penrose; Li Qingyuan; Ekhlassi, Ali A

    2002-01-15

    In the development of plasma-facing components for fusion reactors and high-heat-flux heat sinks (or components) for electronic applications, the components are usually subjected to a peripherally nonuniform heat flux. Even if the applied heat flux is uniform in the axial direction (which is unlikely), both intuition and recent investigations have clearly shown that both the local heat flux and the eventual critical heat flux (CHF) in this three-dimensional (3-D) case will differ significantly from similar quantities found in the voluminous body of data for uniformly heated flow channels. Although this latter case has been used in the past as an estimate for the former case, more study has become necessary to examine the 3-D temperature and heat flux distributions and related CHF. Work thus far has shown that the nonuniform peripheral heat flux condition enhances CHF in some cases.To avoid the excess costs associated with using electron or ion beams to produce the nonuniform heat flux, a new facility was developed that will allow 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements and two-dimensional, local subcooled flow boiling heat flux and related CHF measurements.The configurations under study for this work consist of (a) a nonuniformly heated cylinder-like test section with a circular coolant channel bored through the center and (b) a monoblock that is a square cross-section parallelepiped with a circular drilled flow channel along the channel centerline. The theoretical or ideal cylinder-like test section would be a circular cylinder with half (-90 to 90 deg) of its outside boundary subjected to a uniform heat flux and the remaining half insulated. For the monoblock, a uniform heat flux is applied to one of the outside surfaces, and the remaining surfaces are insulated. The outside diameter of the cylinder-like test section is 30.0 mm, and its length is 200.0 mm. The monoblock square is 30.0 mm long. The inside diameter of the flow channel for both types of test sections is 10.0 mm. Water is the coolant. The inlet water temperature can be set at any level in the range from 26.0 to 130.0 deg. C, and the exit pressure can be set at any level in the range from 0.4 to 4.0 MPa. Thermocouples were placed at 48 locations inside the solid cylinder-like or monoblock test section to obtain 3-D wall temperature variations and related local heat flux. Finally, the mass velocity can be set at any level in the range from 0.4 to 10.0 Mg/m{sup 2}.s for the 10.0-mm-diam channel.

  20. Thin film heat flux sensors fabricated on copper substrates for thermal measurements in microfluidic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasperson, Benjamin A.; Schmale, Joshua; Qu, Weilin; Pfefferkorn, Frank E.; Turner, Kevin T.

    2014-12-01

    Micro-scale heat flux sensors are fabricated on bulk copper surfaces using a combination of lithography-based microfabrication and micro end milling. The heat flux sensors are designed to enable heat transfer measurements on an individual pin in a copper micro pin fin heat sink. Direct fabrication of the sensors on copper substrates minimizes the thermal resistance between the sensor and pin. To fabricate the devices, copper wafers were polished to a flatness and roughness suitable for microfabrication and standard processes, including photolithography, polyimide deposition via spinning, and metal deposition through physical vapor deposition were tailored for use on the unique copper substrates. Micro end milling was then used to create 3D pin features and segment the devices from the copper substrate. Temperature calibrations of the sensors were performed using a tube furnace and the heat flux sensing performance was assessed through laser-based tests. This paper describes the design, fabrication and calibration of these integrated heat flux sensors.

  1. Heat flux decay length during RF power operation in the Tore Supra tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corre, Y.; Gunn, J. P.; Firdaouss, M.; Carpentier, S.; Chantant, M.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Gardarein, J.-L.; Lipa, M.; Loarer, T.; Courtois, X.; Guilhem, D.; Saint-Laurent, F.

    2014-01-01

    The upgrade of its ion cyclotron resonance (ICRH) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) heating systems makes the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak particularly well suited to address the physics and technology of high-power and steady-state plasma-surface interactions. High radio frequency (RF) heating powers have been successfully applied up to 12.2 MW coupled to the plasma, in which about 7.85 MW flows through the scrape-off layer. Thermal calculation based on thermography measurements gives the heat flux density distribution on the TS toroidal limiter located at the bottom of the machine. The target heat flux densities are divided by the incidence angle of the field lines with the surface and mapped to the magnetic flux surface to evaluate the power flowing in the scrape-off layer (SOL). The power profile shows a narrow component near the last closed flux surface and a wide component in the rest of the SOL. The narrow component is attributed to significant cross-field heat flux density around the plasma contact point, about 0.8% of the parallel heat flux density in the SOL, when incident angles are nearly tangential to the surface. The wide component is used to derive the experimental heat flux decay length (?q) and parallel heat flux in the SOL. The power widths are measured for a series of 1 MA/3.8 T discharges involving a scan of RF injected power 3.5 ? Ptot ? 12.2 MW. Independently of the heating power, we measured ?q,OMP = 14.5 ± 1.5 mm at the outer mid-plane and parallel heat flux in the SOL in the range 130\\le Q_{\\parallel}^{LCFS}\\le 490\\,MW\\,m^{-2} . TS values obtained with L-mode limiter plasmas are broader than those derived from L-mode divertor plasmas, confirming earlier results obtained with an ohmically heated plasma leaning on the inboard wall of TS.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  3. Subcooled flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux in water-based nanofluids at low pressure

    E-print Network

    Kim, Sung Joong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    A nanofluid is a colloidal suspension of nano-scale particles in water, or other base fluids. Previous pool boiling studies have shown that nanofluids can improve the critical heat flux (CHF) by as much as 200%. In this ...

  4. Modeling of radiative heat transfer in 3D complex boiler with non-gray sooting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borjini, Mohamed Naceur; Guedri, Kamel; Saïd, Rachid

    2007-06-01

    The radiative heat transfer problem is solved for 3D complex industrial boiler with five baffles containing a mixture of carbon dioxide and water vapor for non-uniform temperature fields. A numerical formulation using the FTn finite volume method coupled with the bounded high-order resolution CLAM scheme, the blocked-off-region procedure and the narrow-band based weighted-sum-of-gray-gases (WSGG) [Kim OJ, Song T-H. Data base of WSGGM-based spectral model for radiation properties of combustion products, JQSRT 2000; 64: 379 94] model is adapted. The effect of soot volumetric fraction, particle temperature and uniform particle concentration on the radiative heat flux and radiative heat source is investigated and discussed. Also the advantages, in non-gray media, of the FTnFVM compared to the classical FVM are highlighted.

  5. Liquid jet impingement cooling with diamond substrates for extremely high heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lienhard, J.H. V; Khounsary, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    The combination of impinging jets and diamond substrates may provide an effective solution to a class of extremely high heat flux problems in which very localized heat loads must be removed. Some potential applications include the cooling of high-heat-load components in synchrotron x-ray, fusion, and semiconductor laser systems. Impinging liquid jets are a very effective vehicle for removing high heat fluxes. The liquid supply arrangement is relatively simple, and low thermal resistances can be routinely achieved. A jet`s cooling ability is a strong function of the size of the cooled area relative to the jet diameter. For relatively large area targets, the critical heat fluxes can approach 20 W/mm{sup 2}. In this situation, burnout usually originates at the outer edge of the cooled region as increasing heat flux inhibits the liquid supply. Limitations from liquid supply are minimized when heating is restricted to the jet stagnation zone. The high stagnation pressure and high velocity gradients appear to suppress critical flux phenomena, and fluxes of up to 400 W/mm{sup 2} have been reached without evidence of burnout. Instead, the restrictions on heat flux are closely related to properties of the cooled target. Target properties become an issue owing to the large temperatures and large temperature gradients that accompany heat fluxes over 100 W/mm{sup 2}. These conditions necessitate a target with both high thermal conductivity to prevent excessive temperatures and good mechanical properties to prevent mechanical failures. Recent developments in synthetic diamond technology present a possible solution to some of the solid-side constraints on heat flux. Polycrystalline diamond foils can now be produced by chemical vapor deposition in reasonable quantity and at reasonable cost. Synthetic single crystal diamonds as large as 1 cm{sup 2} are also available.

  6. Spacecraft Radiator Freeze Protection Using a Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Schunk, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    An active thermal control system architecture has been modified to include a regenerative heat exchanger (regenerator) inboard of the radiator. Rather than using a radiator bypass valve a regenerative heat exchanger is placed inboard of the radiators. A regenerator cold side bypass valve is used to set the return temperature. During operation, the regenerator bypass flow is varied, mixing cold radiator return fluid and warm regenerator outlet fluid to maintain the system setpoint. At the lowest heat load for stable operation, the bypass flow is closed off, sending all of the flow through the regenerator. This lowers the radiator inlet temperature well below the system set-point while maintaining full flow through the radiators. By using a regenerator bypass flow control to maintain system setpoint, the required minimum heat load to avoid radiator freezing can be reduced by more than half compared to a radiator bypass system.

  7. Elastic thickness and heat flux estimates for the uranian satellite Ariel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, G.; Nimmo, F.; Schenk, P.

    2015-04-01

    The surface of Ariel, an icy satellite orbiting Uranus, shows extensional tectonic features suggesting an episode of endogenic heating in the satellite's past. Using topography derived from stereo-photoclinometry, we identified flexural uplift at a rift zone suggesting elastic thickness values in the range 3.8-4.4 km. We estimate the temperature at the base of the lithosphere to be in the range 99-146 K, depending on the strain rate assumed, with corresponding heat fluxes of 28-92 mW/m2. Neither tidal heating, assuming Ariel's current eccentricity, nor radiogenic heat production from the silicate core are enough to cause the inferred heat fluxes. None of three proposed ancient mean-motion resonances produce equilibrium tidal heating values in excess of 4.3 mW/m2. Thus, the origin of the inferred high heat fluxes is currently mysterious.

  8. Enhancement of critical heat flux in tubes using staged tangential flow injection: (Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Dhir, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of the enhancement in single and two phase heat transfer from tubes subjected to tangential flow injection have been continuing. Investigations using water as the test liquid have been focused on: single phase heat transfer coefficients; two phase heat transfer coefficients under subcooled boiling conditions; subcooled critical heat fluxes; and modeling of the enhancement under swirl flow conditions. With tangential injection up to four fold increase in the average heat transfer coefficient has been observed. During subcooled boiling the enhancement is relatively small. However swirl induced centripetal force increases vapor escape velocity and as a result higher critical heat fluxes can be accommodated. In the range of flow parameters studied up to 40% enhancement in critical heat flux has been observed with single stage injection. This enhancement is slightly less than that obtained with Freon-113. The mechanistic reasons for this observation are currently being investigated.

  9. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27?mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2?MPa to 1.8?MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024?MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5?mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8?MPa. PMID:24977219

  10. Estimation of surface heat flux and surface temperature during inverse heat conduction under varying spray parameters and sample initial temperature.

    PubMed

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong; Zubair, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m(2) was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa. PMID:24977219

  11. A Flux Tube Tectonics Model for Solar Coronal Heating Driven by the Magnetic Carpet.

    E-print Network

    Priest, Eric

    A Flux Tube Tectonics Model for Solar Coronal Heating Driven by the Magnetic Carpet. Eric R. Priest heating. The dissipation of energy along sharp boundaries we call, by analogy with geophysi- cal plate tectonics, the tectonics model of coronal heating. Similar to the case on Earth, the relative motions

  12. Measurement of Heat Flux at Metal-Mold Interface during Casting Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2006-01-01

    All previous studies on interfacial heat transfer coefficient have been based on indirect methods for estimating the heat flux that employed either inverse heat transfer analysis procedures or instrumentation arrangements to measure temperatures and displacements near the metal-mold interface. In this paper, the heat transfer at the metal-mold interfaces is investigated using a sensor for the direct measurement of heat flux. The heat flux sensor (HFS) was rated for 700oC and had a time response of less than 10 ms. Casting experiments were conducted using graphite molds for aluminum alloy A356. Several casting experiments were performed using a graphite coating and a boron nitride coating. The measurement errors were estimated. The temperature of the mold surface was provided by the HFS while the temperature of the casting surface was measured using a thermocouple. Results for the heat transfer coefficients were obtained based on measured heat flux and temperatures. Four stages were clearly identified for the variation in time of the heat flux. Values of the heat transfer coefficient were in good agreement with data from previous studies.

  13. An assessment of air-sea heat fluxes from ocean and coupled reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, Maria; Haines, Keith; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Chang, You-Soon; Drevillon, Marie; Ferry, Nicolas; Fujii, Yosuke; Köhl, Armin; Storto, Andrea; Toyoda, Takahiro; Wang, Xiaochun; Waters, Jennifer; Xue, Yan; Yin, Yonghong; Barnier, Bernard; Hernandez, Fabrice; Kumar, Arun; Lee, Tong; Masina, Simona; Andrew Peterson, K.

    2015-10-01

    Sixteen monthly air-sea heat flux products from global ocean/coupled reanalyses are compared over 1993-2009 as part of the Ocean Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (ORA-IP). Objectives include assessing the global heat closure, the consistency of temporal variability, comparison with other flux products, and documenting errors against in situ flux measurements at a number of OceanSITES moorings. The ensemble of 16 ORA-IP flux estimates has a global positive bias over 1993-2009 of 4.2 ± 1.1 W m-2. Residual heat gain (i.e., surface flux + assimilation increments) is reduced to a small positive imbalance (typically, +1-2 W m-2). This compensation between surface fluxes and assimilation increments is concentrated in the upper 100 m. Implied steady meridional heat transports also improve by including assimilation sources, except near the equator. The ensemble spread in surface heat fluxes is dominated by turbulent fluxes (>40 W m-2 over the western boundary currents). The mean seasonal cycle is highly consistent, with variability between products mostly <10 W m-2. The interannual variability has consistent signal-to-noise ratio (~2) throughout the equatorial Pacific, reflecting ENSO variability. Comparisons at tropical buoy sites (10°S-15°N) over 2007-2009 showed too little ocean heat gain (i.e., flux into the ocean) in ORA-IP (up to 1/3 smaller than buoy measurements) primarily due to latent heat flux errors in ORA-IP. Comparisons with the Stratus buoy (20°S, 85°W) over a longer period, 2001-2009, also show the ORA-IP ensemble has 16 W m-2 smaller net heat gain, nearly all of which is due to too much latent cooling caused by differences in surface winds imposed in ORA-IP.

  14. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  15. E × B shear pattern formation by radial propagation of heat flux waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kosuga, Y.; Diamond, P. H.; CASS and CMTFO, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 ; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Gürcan, Ö. D.

    2014-05-15

    A novel theory to describe the formation of E×B flow patterns by radially propagating heat flux waves is presented. A model for heat avalanche dynamics is extended to include a finite delay time between the instantaneous heat flux and the mean flux, based on an analogy between heat avalanche dynamics and traffic flow dynamics. The response time introduced here is an analogue of the drivers' response time in traffic dynamics. The microscopic foundation for the time delay is the time for mixing of the phase space density. The inclusion of the finite response time changes the model equation for avalanche dynamics from Burgers equation to a nonlinear telegraph equation. Based on the telegraph equation, the formation of heat flux jams is predicted. The growth rate and typical interval of jams are calculated. The connection of the jam interval to the typical step size of the E×B staircase is discussed.

  16. Hydrogen-dominated upper atmosphere of an exoplanet: Heating by stellar radiation from soft X-rays to extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionov, D. E.; Shematovich, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    A study is presented of how the upper atmosphere of a planet is heated by extreme radiation from the parent star, depending on the distribution of the radiation flux in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ranges. Calculations are performed to find the efficiency of heating by stellar X-ray to EUV radiation in a hydrogen-dominated upper atmosphere for the extrasolar gas giant HD 209458b. It is shown that heating efficiency by extreme stellar UV radiation in a hydrogen-dominated upper atmosphere does not exceed 20-25% at the main thermospheric heights given that the calculation takes into account the photoelectron impact. It is found that an increase in the X-ray flux by several orders of magnitude leads to a slight decrease in the heating efficiency.

  17. Innovative Divertor Development to Solve the Plasma Heat-Flux Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T; Ryutov, D; Makowski, M; Soukhanovskii, V; Umansky, M; Cohen, R; HIll, D; Joseph, I

    2009-02-26

    Large, localized plasma heat exhaust continues to be one of the critical problems for the development of tokamak fusion reactors. Excessive heat flux erodes and possibly melts plasma-facing materials, thereby dramatically shortening their lifetime and increasing the impurity contamination of the core plasma. A detailed assessment by the ITER team for their divertor has revealed substantial limitations on the operational space imposed by the divertor performance. For a fusion reactor, the problem becomes worse in that the divertor must accommodate 20% of the total fusion power (less any broadly radiated loss), while not allowing excess buildup of tritium in the walls nor excessive impurity production. This is an extremely challenging set of problems that must be solved for fusion to succeed as a power source; it deserves a substantial research investment. Material heat-flux constraints: Results from present-day tokamaks show that there are two major limitations of peak plasma heat exhaust. The first is the continuous flow of power to the divertor plates and nearby surfaces that, for present technology, is limited to 10-20 MW/m{sup 2}. The second is the transient peak heat-flux that can be tolerated in a short time, {tau}{sub m}, before substantial ablation and melting of the surface occurs; such common large transient events are Edge Localized Mode (ELMs) and disruptions. The material limits imposed by these events give a peak energy/{tau}{sub m}{sup 1/2} parameter of {approx} 40 MJ/m{sup 2}s{sup 1/2} [1]. Both the continuous and transient limits can be approached by input powers in the largest present-day devices, and future devices are expected to substantially exceed the limits unless a solution can be found. Since the early 90's LLNL has developed the analytic and computational foundation for analyzing divertor plasmas, and also suggested and studied a number of solid and liquid material concepts for improving divertor/wall performance, with the most recent being the Snowflake divertor concept [2] and generating Resonant Magnetic Perturbations by the SOL currents [3]. However, the specific approaches discussed here are part of a wider class of innovative divertor ideas that have come from the community in the last several years, and we certainly advocate the need to consider a range of options. Indeed, the most effective solution to the heat-flux problem may well contain features of various ideas. For example, there are the X-divertor (Kotschenreuther et al. [4]) that expands the magnetic flux surface in the vicinity of the near-X-point divertor plate, and the super X-divertor (Valanju et al. [5]) that guides the near-separatrix SOL flux tubes to a larger major radius to increase the surface area available for power deposition. These approaches have the common feature of manipulation of the edge magnetic geometry. Another approach is the use of liquid divertor surfaces that can increase the heat-flux capability by flowing the heated material to a cooling region and eventually out of the machine, and/or by being able to withstand a higher peak heat flux [6]. All of these areas are only emerging concepts that require substantially more analysis and definitive experimental tests, and given the need for a large improvement in this area, we advocate a substantial program to systematically assess the approaches. Because of space limitation here, we present some details of one of the concepts, namely the Snowflake divertor configuration. The Snowflake (SF) divertor [2] exploits a tokamak geometry in which the poloidal magnetic field varies quadratically with distance from the X-point null, {Delta}r. The name stems from the characteristic hexagonal, snowflake-like, shape of the multi-branched separatrix for this exact second-order null. In contrast, the standard X-point configuration has a poloidal field varying linearly with ?r. The different variations mean that a flux expansion is much larger in the vicinity of a null of a snowflake divertor, and one can try to exploit this fact for reducing the divertor heat load. A uniqu

  18. Methodology for estimation of time-dependent surface heat flux due to cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Tunnell, James W; Torres, Jorge H; Anvari, Bahman

    2002-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective technique to protect the epidermis during cutaneous laser therapies. Spraying a cryogen onto the skin surface creates a time-varying heat flux, effectively cooling the skin during and following the cryogen spurt. In previous studies mathematical models were developed to predict the human skin temperature profiles during the cryogen spraying time. However, no studies have accounted for the additional cooling due to residual cryogen left on the skin surface following the spurt termination. We formulate and solve an inverse heat conduction (IHC) problem to predict the time-varying surface heat flux both during and following a cryogen spurt. The IHC formulation uses measured temperature profiles from within a medium to estimate the surface heat flux. We implement a one-dimensional sequential function specification method (SFSM) to estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperatures measured within an in vitro model in response to a cryogen spurt. Solution accuracy and experimental errors are examined using simulated temperature data. Heat flux following spurt termination appears substantial; however, it is less than that during the spraying time. The estimated time-varying heat flux can subsequently be used in forward heat conduction models to estimate temperature profiles in skin during and following a cryogen spurt and predict appropriate timing for onset of the laser pulse. PMID:11874138

  19. Parametric representation of heat and moisture fluxes in cloud-topped mixed layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penc, Richard S.; Albrecht, Bruce A.

    1987-01-01

    The Betts (1973, 1978) parametrization of heat and moisture fluxes is tested using measurements made in thin, broken, and solid stratocumulus clouds by the NCAR Electra off the California coast in June 1976. The turbulence data are used to determine updraft-downdraft properties, heat and moisture fluxes, spectra, and cospectra. From the convective properties, vertical mass flux profiles are obtained and examined for consistency. A convective scaling which is appropriate for cloud-topped mixed layers is discussed. The results demonstrate the usefulness of a mass flux formulation in modeling applications for cloud conditions varying between solid and broken.

  20. Environmental and biological controls on the seasonal variations in latent heat fluxes derived from flux data for three forest sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, K.; Jarvis, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    One difficulty that arises when predicting canopy-scale energy fluxes is that the parameterization of complex (bio)physical soil vegetation atmosphere transfer schemes is often only partially conditioned by the information content of the eddy covariance data commonly used for calibration, rendering subsequent predictions and extrapolations somewhat uncertain. Here we derive a functional description for daily evaporative fluxes directly from observations at the canopy scale using a nonstationary regression framework. This method is applied to 3 year blocks of eddy covariance and micrometeorological data from three different FLUXNET forest sites: Harvard Forest, USA, University of Michigan Biological Station, USA, and Hyytiälä, Finland, covering a variety of climate and vegetation conditions. The approach yields a simple three-parameter model which is based on partitioning latent heat between equilibrium latent heat fluxes and fluxes that are under strong stomatal control and hence are related to CO2 fluxes. Despite being well defined and able to account for much of the observed variations in latent heat, predictive validation of the model emphasizes the need to account for surface and subsurface water balance in such descriptions.

  1. Extended hydrodynamic theory of the peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linehard, J. H.; Dhir, V. K.

    1973-01-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of the extreme pool boiling heat fluxes is expanded to embrace a variety of problems that have not previously been analyzed. These problems include the prediction of the peak heat flux on a variety of finite heaters, the influence of viscosity on the Taylor and Helmoltz instability mechanisms with application to film boiling and to the peak heat flux in viscous liquids, the formalization of the analogy between high-current-density electrolysis and boiling, and the description of boiling in the low-gravity limit. The predictions are verified with a large number of new data.

  2. Pyrotechnic hazards classification and evaluation program test report. Heat flux study of deflagrating pyrotechnic munitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassnacht, P. O.

    1971-01-01

    A heat flux study of deflagrating pyrotechnic munitions is presented. Three tests were authorized to investigate whether heat flux measurements may be used as effective hazards evaluation criteria to determine safe quantity distances for pyrotechnics. A passive sensor study was conducted simultaneously to investigate their usefulness in recording events and conditions. It was concluded that heat flux measurements can effectively be used to evaluate hazards criteria and that passive sensors are an inexpensive tool to record certain events in the vicinity of deflagrating pyrotechnic stacks.

  3. Analysis of the transient calibration of heat flux sensors: One dimensional case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dybbs, A.; Ling, J. X.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of transient heat flux on heat flux sensor response and calibration is analyzed. A one dimensional case was studied in order to elucidate the key parameters and trends for the problem. It has the added advantage that the solutions to the governing equations can be obtained by analytic means. The analytical results obtained to date indicate that the transient response of a heat flux sensor depends on the thermal boundary conditions, the geometry and the thermal properties of the sensor. In particular it was shown that if the thermal diffusivity of the sensor is small, then the transient behavior must be taken into account.

  4. Electron heat flux dropouts in the solar wind - Evidence for interplanetary magnetic field reconnection?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.; Bame, S. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    An examination of ISEE-3 data from 1978 reveal 25 electron heat flux dropout events ranging in duration from 20 min to over 11 hours. The heat flux dropouts are found to occur in association with high plasma densities, low plasma velocities, low ion and electron temperatures, and low magnetic field magnitudes. It is suggested that the heat flux dropout intervals may indicate that the spacecraft is sampling plasma regimes which are magnetically disconnected from the sun and instead are connected to the outer heliosphere at both ends.

  5. Spectrally enhancing near-field radiative heat transfer by exciting magnetic polariton in SiC gratings

    E-print Network

    Yang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate, for the first time, that near field radiative transport between 1D periodic grating microstructures separated by subwavelength vacuum gaps can be significantly enhanced by exciting magnetic resonance or polariton. Fluctuational electrodynamics that incorporates scattering matrix theory with rigorous coupled wave analysis is employed to exactly calculate the near field radiative heat flux between two SiC gratings. Besides the well known coupled surface phonon polaritons (SPhP), an additional spectral radiative heat flux peak, which is due to magnetic polariton, is found within the phonon absorption band of SiC. The mechanisms, behaviors and interplays between magnetic polariton, coupled SPhP, single interface SPhP, and Wood's anomaly in the near field radiative transport are elucidated in detail. The findings will open up a new way to control near field radiative heat transfer by magnetic resonance with micro or nanostructured metamaterials.

  6. Snow temperature profiles and heat fluxes measured on the Greenland crest by an automatic weather station

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, C.R.; Weidner, G A.

    1992-03-01

    In June 1989 three automatic weather station (AWS) units were installed on the Greenland crest at the GISP2 (78.58 N, 38.46 W, 3265 m) and GRIP (78.57 N, 37.62 W, 3230 m) ice coring sites and at Kenton (72.28 N, 38.80 W, 3185 m), the air sampling site. The purpose of the AWS units is to measure the local meteorological variables, including snow temperatures at various depths, in support of ice coring studies. The AWS units measure wind speed and direction, air temperature, and relative humidity at a nominal height of 3.6 meters, air pressure at the electronics enclosure, and air temperature difference between 3.6 m and 0.5 m. The AWS units at GISP2 and GRIP also measure solar radiation, and seven snow temperatures from the surface to a depth of approximately 4 m in the snow. The data are updated at 10-minute intervals and transmitted to the ARGOS data collection system on board the NOAA series of polar-orbiting satellites. The air temperature and snow temperatures are presented as a function of time for the period from June 8, 1989 to August 31, 1990 and as tautochrones at 30-day intervals. The heat flux into the snow is determined from the daily mean snow temperature between the day after and the day before using the volumetric heat capacity of the snow assuming a snow density of 300 kg m-3. The daily mean heat flux into the snow between the highest and the lowest levels of snow temperature is presented as a function of time.

  7. Institute for High Heat Flux Removal (IHHFR). Phases I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    2014-08-31

    The IHHFR focused on interdisciplinary applications as it relates to high heat flux engineering issues and problems which arise due to engineering systems being miniaturized, optimized, or requiring increased high heat flux performance. The work in the IHHFR focused on water as a coolant and includes: (1) the development, design, and construction of the high heat flux flow loop and facility; (2) test section development, design, and fabrication; and, (3) single-side heat flux experiments to produce 2-D boiling curves and 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements for single-side heated test sections. This work provides data for comparisons with previously developed and new single-side heated correlations and approaches that address the single-side heated effect on heat transfer. In addition, this work includes the addition of single-side heated circular TS and a monoblock test section with a helical wire insert. Finally, the present work includes: (1) data base expansion for the monoblock with a helical wire insert (only for the latter geometry), (2) prediction and verification using finite element, (3) monoblock model and methodology development analyses, and (4) an alternate model development for a hypervapotron and related conjugate heat transfer controlling parameters.

  8. Thermal Conductivity of Lower Mantle Minerals and Heat Flux Across the Core-Mantle Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, C.; Rainey, E.; Kavner, A.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal conductivity properties of the minerals comprising the Earth's lowermost mantle control the core-mantle boundary heat flux, and are therefore critical properties for determining the thermal state and evolution of the Earth's interior. Here we present measurements of the thermal conductivity of lower mantle oxides and silicates as a function of pressure, temperature, and iron content determined in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell using a combination of measurements and 3-D modeling. Our models and measurements demonstrate that the measured steady-state temperature and its increase with increasing laser power depend on the sample thermal conductivity as well as the experimental geometry, enabling measurements of the pressure- and temperature- dependence of lattice thermal conductivity in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. We applied this technique to iron-bearing silicate perovskites and MgO at lower mantle pressure and temperature conditions. For MgO, we determine the increase in thermal conductivity k with density ? to be ?lnk/?ln?=4.7±0.6, which is in agreement with results obtained using other experimental and computational techniques. For (Mg0.8,Fe0.2)SiO3 perovskite, we find ?lnk/?ln?=2.9±0.6. We use these values in combination with independent computational and experimental results to determine thermal conductivity of lower mantle minerals up to core-mantle boundary conditions. We combine the mineralogical thermal conductivity estimates in a composite model and include an estimate for the radiative contribution to thermal conductivity. Our new value of the thermal conductivity of the lowermost mantle is ~5-6 W/m/K and is sensitive to the details of the lower mantle assemblage, but is relatively insensitive to pressure and temperature. We combine our mantle thermal conductivity with models for the lower mantle boundary layer to generate a series of two-dimensional maps of core-mantle boundary heat flux, which emphasize the importance of lateral variations in phase and boundary layer thickness. Our values imply a total core-mantle boundary heat flow of 6-8 TW, which is sufficient to drive plumes and convection, is consistent with current geochemical estimates for mantle heat content, and permits a slow growth rate for the inner core.

  9. The contrasting roles of water and dust in controlling daily variations in radiative heating of the summertime Saharan Heat Low

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsham, J. H.; Parker, D. J.; Todd, M. C.; Banks, J. R.; Brindley, H. E.; Garcia-Carreras, L.; Roberts, A. J.; Ryder, C. L.

    2015-07-01

    The summertime Sahara Heat Low (SHL) is a key component of the West African Monsoon (WAM) system. Considerable uncertainty remains over the relative roles of water vapour and dust aerosols in controlling the radiation budget over the Sahara and therefore our ability to explain variability and trends in the SHL, and in turn, the WAM. Here, new observations from the Fennec field campaign during June 2011 and June 2012, together with satellite retrievals from GERB, are used to quantify how total column water vapour (TCWV) and dust aerosols (from aerosol optical depth, AOD) control day-to-day variations in energy balance in both observations and ECWMF reanalyses (ERA-I). The data show that the earth-atmosphere system is radiatively heated in June 2011 and 2012. It is TCWV that largely determines variations in daily mean TOA net flux and the net heating of the earth-atmosphere system. In contrast, dust provides the primary control on surface heating, but the decreased surface heating from dust is largely compensated by increased atmospheric heating, and so dust control on net TOA radiation is weak. Dust and TCWV are both important for direct atmospheric heating. ERA-I captures the control of TOA net flux by TCWV, with a positive correlation (r=0.6) between observed and modelled TOA net radiation, despite the use of a monthly dust climatology in ERA-I that cannot capture the daily variations in dustiness. Variations in surface net radiation, and so the vertical profile of radiative heating, are not captured in ERA-I, since it does not capture variations in dust. Results show that ventilation of the SHL by cool moist air leads to a radiative warming, stabilising the SHL with respect to such perturbations. It is known that models struggle to capture the advective moistening of the SHL, especially that associated with mesoscale convective systems. Our results show that the typical model errors in Saharan water vapour will lead to substantial errors in the modelled TOA energy balance (tens of W m-2), which will lead to errors in both the SHL and the WAM.

  10. On the Effect of Surface Heat-Flux Heterogeneities on the Mixed-Layer-Top Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sühring, Matthias; Maronga, Björn; Herbort, Florian; Raasch, Siegfried

    2014-06-01

    We used a set of large-eddy simulations to investigate the effect of one-dimensional stripe-like surface heat-flux heterogeneities on mixed-layer top entrainment. The profiles of sensible heat flux and the temporal evolution of the boundary-layer depth revealed decreased entrainment for small heat-flux amplitudes and increased entrainment for large heat-flux amplitudes, compared to the homogeneously-heated mixed layer. For large heat-flux amplitudes the largest entrainment was observed for patch sizes in the order of the boundary-layer depth, while for significantly smaller or larger patch sizes entrainment was similar as in the homogeneous case. In order to understand the underlying physics of this impact, a new approach was developed to infer local information on entrainment by means of the local flux divergence. We found an entrainment maximum over the centre of the stronger heated surface patch, where thermal energy is accumulated by the secondary circulation (SC) that was induced by the surface heterogeneity. Furthermore, we observed an entrainment maximum over the less heated patch as well, which we suppose is to be linked to the SC-induced horizontal flow convergence at the top of the convective boundary layer (CBL). For small heat-flux amplitudes a counteracting effect dominates that decreases entrainment, which we suppose is the horizontal advection of cold air in the lower, and warm air in the upper, CBL by the SC, stabilizing the CBL and thus weakening thermal convection. Moreover, we found that a mean wind can reduce the heterogeneity-induced impact on entrainment. If the flow is aligned perpendicular to the border between the differentially-heated patches, the SC and thus its impact on entrainment vanishes due to increased horizontal mixing, even for moderate wind speeds. However, if the flow is directed parallel to the border between the differentially-heated patches, the SC and thus its impact on entrainment persists.

  11. The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling

    E-print Network

    Sugrue, Rosemary M

    2012-01-01

    The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling were studied using a high-speed video camera in conjunction with a two-phase flow ...

  12. An airborne study of boundary layer heat and moisture fluxes for project FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of work accomplished during the first International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment is presented. The Wyoming King Air participated in Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 3 and 4 in 1987, which were committed to a combination of airborne sensible and latent heat flux measurements and soil moisture mappings, with the University of Kansas' X-band side-looking airborne radar (SLAR). A total of 9 flux missions were flown in 1987 using several different flight designs. A critical decision in the first round of aircraft flux analyses, agreed to by all the flux aircraft investigators, was to pass the aircraft data through a high-pass filter prior to the eddy-correlation flux calculations. Several conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) boundary layer (BL) profiles of heat fluxes were usually linear; (2) high-pass filtering applied to the aircraft data did not add to the disagreement between the profile; (3) undersampling at high frequencies could have accounted for as much as a 15 percent underestimate of surface fluxes; (4) disagreement between the aircraft and surface latent heat fluxes changed signs between summer and fall; (5) magnitude and sign of disagreement between aircraft and surface heat fluxes varied systematically with BL depth or height of aircraft profile; and (6) Bowen ratios from both detrended and filtered aircraft data agreed with surface values better for moist, summer cases than for dry cases.

  13. An Experimental Study of a Radially Arranged Thin Film Heat Flux Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Christoper S. K.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Bhatt, Hemanshu D.

    1997-01-01

    A new thin-film heat-flux gauge was designed and fabricated on three different substrate materials. Forty pairs of Pt-Pt/10% Rh thermocouple junctions were deposited in a circular pattern on the same plane of the substrate. Over the thermocouples, 5 and 10 micron thick thermal resistance layers were deposited to create a temperature gradient across those layers. Calibration and testing of these gauges were carried out in an arc-lamp calibration facility. The heat flux calculated from the gauge output is in good agreement with the value obtained from the pre-calibrated standard sensor. A CO2 laser was also used to test the steady-state and dynamic responses of the heat-flux gauge. During the steady-state test, the time constant for the heating period was 30 s. The frequency response of the heat-flux gauge was measured in the frequency domain using a CO2 laser and a chopper. The responses from an infrared detector and the heat-flux gauge were measured simultaneously and compared. It was found that the thin-film heat-flux gauge has a dynamic frequency response of 3 kHz.

  14. Icebase: A suborbital survey to map geothermal heat flux under an ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purucker, Michael E.; Connerney, John E. P.; Blakely, Richard J.; Bracken, Robert E.; Nowicki, Sophie; Le, Guan; Sabaka, Terence J.; Bonalsky, Todd M.; Kuang, Weijia; Ravat, Dhananjay; Ritz, Catherine; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Gaina, Carmen; McEnroe, Suzanne; Lesur, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    NASA will solicit suborbital missions as part of its Earth Venture program element in the coming year. These missions are designed as complete PI-led investigations to conduct innovative hypothesis or scientific question-driven approaches to pressing questions in Earth System science. We propose to carry out a suborbital magnetic survey of Greenland using NASA's Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle to produce the first-ever map of the geothermal heat flux under an ice sheet. Better constraints on geothermal heat flux will reduce the uncertainty in future sea level rise, in turn allowing a more informed assessment of its impact on society. The geothermal heat flux depends on conditions such as mantle heat flux, and the tectonic history and heat production of the crust, all of which vary spatially. Underneath ice sheets, the geothermal heat flux influences the basal ice. Therefore heat flux is an important boundary condition in ice sheet modeling. Using magnetic data to constrain heat flux is possible because the magnetic properties of rocks are temperature dependent until they reach the Curie temperature. The technique has applications to understanding the response of Greenland ice sheet to climate forcing because the basal heat flux provides one of the boundary conditions. The technique also helps to locate the oldest ice. The oldest ice in Greenland should be found in areas of very low heat flux, and the identification of those areas is provided by this technique. Ice cores from the areas of oldest ice help to decipher past temperatures and CO2 contents. Our latest model of the geothermal heat flux under the Greenland ice sheet (http://websrv.cs.umt.edu/isis/index.php/Greenland_Basal_Heat_Flux) is based on low- resolution satellite observations collected by the CHAMP satellite between 2000 and 2010. Those observations will be enhanced by the upcoming Swarm gradient satellite mission, but the resolution will improve by less than a factor of two, from 400 km resolution to approximately 250 km resolution. A high altitude, suborbital magnetic survey of Greenland would provide a heat flux model with resolution comparable to the crustal thickness, and would provide details of the high heat flux region associated with the Iceland mantle plume in E /SE Greenland, and the low heat flux region in NW Greenland, adjacent to the Canadian Shield. Magnetic field measurements from 20 km altitude are strongly preferred over lower altitude observations because of their ability to sample the longest wavelengths, provide uniform calibration with sufficient sensitivity, and suppress local remanent magnetic field signatures. We validate our heat flux estimates by assessing the possible contributions from remanent magnetism and variable susceptibility, and from other lithospheric processes such as structure, volcanism and impact, from unmodeled external magnetic fields, and from the assumptions utilized in the heat flux model.

  15. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot-section components has become critical, but at the same time the service conditions have put our best alloy systems to their limits. As a result, implementation of cooling holes and thermal barrier coatings are new advances in hot-section technologies now looked at for modifications to reach higher temperature applications. Current thermal barrier coatings used in today's turbine applications is known as 8%yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and there are no coatings for current thrust chambers. Current research is looking at the applicability of 8%yttria-stabilized hafnia (YSH) for turbine applications and the implementation of 8%YSZ onto thrust chambers. This study intends to determine if the use of thermal barrier coatings are applicable for high heat flux thrust chambers using industrial YSZ will be advantageous for improvements in efficiency, thrust and longer service life by allowing the thrust chambers to be used more than once.

  16. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D; Menard, J

    2008-12-31

    Experiments conducted in high-performance 1.0 MA and 1.2 MA 6 MW NBI-heated H-mode discharges with a high magnetic flux expansion radiative divertor in NSTX demonstrate that significant divertor peak heat flux reduction and access to detachment may be facilitated naturally in a highly-shaped spherical torus (ST) configuration. Improved plasma performance with high {beta}{sub t} = 15-25%, a high bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} = 45-50%, longer plasma pulses, and an H-mode regime with smaller ELMs has been achieved in the strongly-shaped lower single null configuration with elongation {kappa} = 2.2-2.4 and triangularity {delta} = 0.6-0.8. Divertor peak heat fluxes were reduced from 6-12 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-2 MW/m{sup 2} in ELMy H-mode discharges using the inherently high magnetic flux expansion f{sub m} = 16-25 and the partial detachment of the outer strike point at several D{sub 2} injection rates. A good core confinement and pedestal characteristics were maintained, while the core carbon concentration and the associated Z{sub eff} were reduced. The partially detached divertor regime was characterized by an increase in divertor radiated power, a reduction of ion flux to the plate, and a large neutral compression ratio. Spectroscopic measurements indicated a formation of a high-density, low temperature region adjacent to the outer strike point, where substantial increases in the volume recombination rate and CII, CIII emission rates was measured.

  17. Trace formulas for nonequilibrium Casimir interactions, heat radiation, and heat transfer for arbitrary objects

    E-print Network

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    We present a detailed derivation of heat radiation, heat transfer, and (Casimir) interactions for N arbitrary objects in the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics in thermal nonequilibrium. The results can be expressed ...

  18. Influence of heat generation and heat flux on peristaltic flow with interacting nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Raza, M.; Ellahi, R.

    2014-08-01

    In the current study, we have examined the peristaltic flow of three different nanoparticles with water as base fluid under the influence of slip boundary conditions through a vertical asymmetric porous channel in the presence of MHD. The selected nanoparticles are titanium dioxide ( TiO2 , copper oxide (CuO) and silicon dioxide ( SiO2 . The Brownian motion shows that the effective conductivity increases to result in a lower temperature gradient for a given heat flux. To examine these transport phenomena thoroughly, we also consider the thermal conductivity model of Brownian motion for nanofluids, this increases the effect of the particle size, particle volume fraction and temperature dependence. The mathematical formulation is presented. Exact solutions are obtained from the resulting equations. The obtained expressions for pressure gradient, temperature and velocity profile are described through graphs for the various relevant parameters. The streamlines are drawn for some physical quantities to discuss the trapping phenomenon.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Characterization of Transient Insertion of Heat Flux Gages in a Cylindrical Black Body Cavity at 1100 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, A. N.; Horn, T.

    2006-01-01

    Initial transient thermal models have been developed to simulate a heat flux gage calibration process capable of generating high heat flux levels of interest to reciprocating and gas turbine engine industries as well as the aerospace industry. These transient models are based on existing, experimentally validated, steady state models of the cylindrical blackbody calibration system. The steady state models were modified to include insertion of a heat flux gage into the hot zone of the calibration system and time varying electrical current passing through the resistance heated blackbody. Heat fluxes computed using the initial transient models were compared to experimental measurements. The calculated and measured transient heat fluxes were within 5% indicating that the major physical phenomena in the transient calibration had been captured by the models. The predicted and measured transient heat fluxes were also compared at two different gage insertion depths. These results indicated that there is an optimum insertion position which maximizes heat flux and minimizes cavity disturbance.

  20. RF-sheath heat flux estimates on Tore Supra and JET ICRF antennae. Extrapolation to ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.; Portafaix, C.; Goniche, M.; Jacquet, Ph.

    2009-11-26

    RF-sheath induced heat loads are identified from infrared thermography measurements on Tore Supra ITER-like prototype and JET A2 antennae, and are quantified by fitting thermal calculations. Using a simple scaling law assessed experimentally, the estimated heat fluxes are then extrapolated to the ITER ICRF launcher delivering 20 MW RF power for several plasma scenarios. Parallel heat fluxes up to 6.7 MW/m{sup 2} are expected very locally on ITER antenna front face. The role of edge density on operation is stressed as a trade-off between easy RF coupling and reasonable heat loads. Sources of uncertainty on the results are identified.

  1. Transient convective heat transfer in planar stagnation flows with time-varying surface heat flux and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zumbrunnen, D.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Impinging flows are used in a variety of applications where effective and localized heat transfer is mandated by short residence times or by space constraints, as in cooling materials moving along a conveyor or removing heat dissipated within microelectronic circuitry. A wide selection of heat transfer correlations is available for steady-state conditions. However, instantaneous heat transfer coefficients can differ significantly from steady-state values when temporal variations occur in the surface heat flux or surface temperature. Under these conditions, the temperatures of fluid layers near the surface are affected preferentially due to their proximity to the temporal variation. A theoretical model is formulated to assess the importance of a time-varying surface heat flux or temperature on convective heat transfer in a steady, planar stagnation flow. A governing equation for the transient heat transfer response is formulated analytically from the boundary layer equations for momentum and energy conservation in the fluid. Numerical solutions to the governing equation are determined for ramp and sinusoidal changes in the surface heat flux or temperature. Results indicate that the time response is chiefly governed by the velocity gradient in the free stream and to a lesser extent by the Prandtl number. Departures from steady-state Nusselt numbers are larger for more rapid transients and smaller or comparable in size to the magnitude of the imposed variation at the surface.

  2. Radiation Heat Transfer Between Diffuse-Gray Surfaces Using Higher Order Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents recent work on developing methods for analyzing radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using p-version finite elements. The work was motivated by a thermal analysis of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) wing structure which showed the importance of radiation heat transfer throughout the structure. The analysis also showed that refining the finite element mesh to accurately capture the temperature distribution on the internal structure led to very large meshes with unacceptably long execution times. Traditional methods for calculating surface-to-surface radiation are based on assumptions that are not appropriate for p-version finite elements. Two methods for determining internal radiation heat transfer are developed for one and two-dimensional p-version finite elements. In the first method, higher-order elements are divided into a number of sub-elements. Traditional methods are used to determine radiation heat flux along each sub-element and then mapped back to the parent element. In the second method, the radiation heat transfer equations are numerically integrated over the higher-order element. Comparisons with analytical solutions show that the integration scheme is generally more accurate than the sub-element method. Comparison to results from traditional finite elements shows that significant reduction in the number of elements in the mesh is possible using higher-order (p-version) finite elements.

  3. The role of the geothermal heat flux in driving the abyssal ocean circulation

    E-print Network

    Mashayek, A.

    The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the geothermal heat flux (GHF) from the solid Earth into the ocean plays a non-negligible role in determining both abyssal stratification and circulation strength. Based ...

  4. High temperature thermocouple and heat flux gauge using a unique thin film-hardware hot juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Holanda, R.; Hippensteele, S. A.; Andracchio, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    A special thin film-hardware material thermocouple (TC) and heat flux gauge concept for a reasonably high temperature and high flux flat plate heat transfer experiment was fabricated and tested to gauge temperatures of 911 K. This concept was developed for minimal disturbance of boundary layer temperature and flow over the plates and minimal disturbance of heat flux through the plates. Comparison of special heat flux gauge Stanton number output at steady-state conditions with benchmark literature data was good and agreement was within a calculated uncertainty of the measurement system. Also, good agreement of special TC and standard TC outputs was obtained and the results are encouraging. Oxidation of thin film thermoelements was a primary failure mode after about 5 of operation.

  5. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Subpart A of... - Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Standard Radiant Heat Energy Flux Profile...

  6. SURFACE HEAT FLUX DERIVED FROM SODAR AMPLITUDE AND FREQUENCY DATA: A COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sensible heat flux measurements were made in an agricultural setting near Champaign, Illinois by using doppler sodar, eddy correlations and profile methods during convective conditions during an experimental study called VOICE, (Vertical Observations Involving Convective Exchange...

  7. Sensitivity of a climatologically-driven sea ice model to the ocean heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, C. L.; Good, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    Ocean heat flux sensitivity was studied on a numerical model of sea ice covering the Weddell Sea region of the southern ocean. The model is driven by mean monthly climatological atmospheric variables. For each model run, the ocean heat flux is uniform in both space and time. Ocean heat fluxes below 20 W m to the minus 2 power do not provide sufficient energy to allow the ice to melt to its summertime thicknesses and concentrations by the end of the 14 month simulation, whereas ocean heat fluxes of 30 W m to the minus 2 power and above result in too much ice melt, producing the almost total disappearance of ice in the Weddell Sea by the end of the 14 months. These results are dependent on the atmospheric forcing fields.

  8. Dynamos driven by weak thermal convection and heterogeneous outer boundary heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Swarandeep; Sreenivasan, Binod; Amit, Hagay

    2016-01-01

    We use numerical dynamo models with heterogeneous core-mantle boundary (CMB) heat flux to show that lower mantle lateral thermal variability may help support a dynamo under weak thermal convection. In our reference models with homogeneous CMB heat flux, convection is either marginally supercritical or absent, always below the threshold for dynamo onset. We find that lateral CMB heat flux variations organize the flow in the core into patterns that favour the growth of an early magnetic field. Heat flux patterns symmetric about the equator produce non-reversing magnetic fields, whereas anti-symmetric patterns produce polarity reversals. Our results may explain the existence of the geodynamo prior to inner core nucleation under a tight energy budget. Furthermore, in order to sustain a strong geomagnetic field, the lower mantle thermal distribution was likely dominantly symmetric about the equator.

  9. On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--part II: derivation and special cases

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2006-09-10

    Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier's law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as non-linear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coefficient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier's law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or sufficient.

  10. The Effect of Cumulus Cloud Field Anisotropy on Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes and Atmospheric Heating Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkelman, Laura M.; Evans, K. Franklin; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Cumulus clouds can become tilted or elongated in the presence of wind shear. Nevertheless, most studies of the interaction of cumulus clouds and radiation have assumed these clouds to be isotropic. This paper describes an investigation of the effect of fair-weather cumulus cloud field anisotropy on domain-averaged solar fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles. A stochastic field generation algorithm was used to produce twenty three-dimensional liquid water content fields based on the statistical properties of cloud scenes from a large eddy simulation. Progressively greater degrees of x-z plane tilting and horizontal stretching were imposed on each of these scenes, so that an ensemble of scenes was produced for each level of distortion. The resulting scenes were used as input to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Domain-average transmission, reflection, and absorption of broadband solar radiation were computed for each scene along with the average heating rate profile. Both tilt and horizontal stretching were found to significantly affect calculated fluxes, with the amount and sign of flux differences depending strongly on sun position relative to cloud distortion geometry. The mechanisms by which anisotropy interacts with solar fluxes were investigated by comparisons to independent pixel approximation and tilted independent pixel approximation computations for the same scenes. Cumulus anisotropy was found to most strongly impact solar radiative transfer by changing the effective cloud fraction, i.e., the cloud fraction when the field is projected on a surface perpendicular to the direction of the incident solar beam.

  11. Vertical heat fluxes generated by mesoscale atmospheric flow induced by thermal inhomogeneities in the PBL

    SciTech Connect

    Dalu, G.A. IFA-CNR, Rome ); Pielke, R.A. )

    1993-03-15

    An analytical evaluation of the vertical heat fluxes associated with the mesoscale flow generated by thermal inhomogeneities in the PBL in the absence of a synoptic wind is presented. Results show that the mesoscale fluxes are of the same order as the diabatic beat fluxes. In the sea-breeze case, results show that in the lower layer of the atmosphere the heat flux is positive over the land and negative over the sea with an overall positive horizontal average. In the free atmosphere above the PBL, the mesoscale vertical heat flux is negative over the land and over the sea. The mesoscale flow contributes to the weakening of the atmospheric stability within a region that extends a Rossby radius distance from the coastline and up to an altitude larger than twice the depth of the convective PBL. The average momentum flux equals zero. Sinusoidally periodic thermal inhomogeneities induce periodic atmospheric cells of the same horizontal scale. The intensity of mesoscale cells increases for increasing values of the wavenumber, maximizes when the wavelength of the forcing is of the order of the local Rossby radius, and then decreases as the wavelength of the forcing decreases. The intensity of the vertical velocity and vertical fluxes is only a weak function of the wavenumber, at large wavenumber. The intensity of the mesoscale heat flux does not decrease substantially at high wavenumbers; however, the transport of cool air over small heated patches of land may cut off the temperature gradient in the atmosphere between the land and water early in the day, thereby reducing the duration of the mesoscale activity. Horizontal diffusion of heat in the convective boundary layer can significantly weaken horizontal temperature gradients for large wavenumbers. Periodic square-wave thermal inhomogeneities are more effective than sinusoidal waves in generating mesoscale cells. When dealing with low resolution models the mesoscale heat fluxes have to be introduced in a parametric form.

  12. Retrieving latent heat flux from MODIS Aqua and its comparison with ARM CLASIC 2007 observations, LDAS and recent reanalyses products over US Southern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, K.; Jarvis, A.; Niyogi, D.; Fall, S.; Charusambot, U.; Bhattacharya, B.

    2010-12-01

    We present a new method for retrieving the terrestrial latent heat flux by exploiting the vertical soundings of MODIS Aqua in conjugation with visible and infrared geophysical land products at 5 km x 5 km spatial resolution over the US Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the DOE ARM CLASIC 2007 field campaign. The method focuses first on specifying the evaporative fraction fields through the profile measurements of air and dew-point temperature obtained from MODIS IR soundings. The evaporative fraction is then combined with satellite based surface net available energy to obtain an estimate of the surface latent heat flux. Both net radiation and latent heat flux estimates were evaluated against in-situ flux measurements from the ARM CART and CLASIC field sites for June 2007. The validated satellite-based radiative and latent heat fluxes were then compared with the simulated fluxes from a land data assimilation system (LDAS) and reanalyses estimates such as from MERRA, NARR, and NCEP CFSR. The potential advantage and deficits from this approach will be discussed along with an update on a ongoing study involving the AIRS based retrievals using a similar method.

  13. An Integral Method to Evaluate Wall Heat Flux Suitable For Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Alireza; Mehdi, Faraz; White, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    An integral method to evaluate wall heat flux in turbulent boundary layers is presented. The method is mathematically exact and has the advantage of having no explicit streamwise gradient terms, thus making it amenable to experimental data. Using existing data sets, the method is shown to work in both zero- and adverse-pressure gradient boundary layers. The method is particularly useful for the latter case where Reynolds analogy does not hold and the wall heat flux must be measured directly.

  14. Radiative Heat Transfer During Atmosphere Entry at Parabolic Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, Kenneth K.; Wick, Bradford H.

    1961-01-01

    Stagnation point radiative heating rates for manned vehicles entering the earth's atmosphere at parabolic velocity are presented and compared with corresponding laminar convective heating rates. The calculations were made for both nonlifting and lifting entry trajectories for vehicles of varying nose radius, weight-to-area ratio, and drag. It is concluded from the results presented that radiative heating will be important for the entry conditions considered.

  15. Critical Heat Flux Phenomena at HighPressure & Low Mass Fluxes: NEUP Final Report Part I: Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, Michael; Wu, Qiao

    2015-04-30

    This report is a preliminary document presenting an overview of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomenon, the High Pressure Critical Heat Flux facility (HPCHF), preliminary CHF data acquired, and the future direction of the research. The HPCHF facility has been designed and built to study CHF at high pressure and low mass flux ranges in a rod bundle prototypical of conceptual Small Modular Reactor (SMR) designs. The rod bundle is comprised of four electrically heated rods in a 2x2 square rod bundle with a prototypic chopped-cosine axial power profile and equipped with thermocouples at various axial and circumferential positions embedded in each rod for CHF detection. Experimental test parameters for CHF detection range from pressures of ~80 – 160 bar, mass fluxes of ~400 – 1500 kg/m2s, and inlet water subcooling from ~30 – 70°C. The preliminary data base established will be further extended in the future along with comparisons to existing CHF correlations, models, etc. whose application ranges may be applicable to the conditions of SMRs.

  16. Changes in fluxes of heat, H2O, CO2 caused by a large wind farm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX) provides a platform to investigate the effect of wind turbines and large wind farms on surface fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture and carbon dioxide (CO2). In 2010 and 2011, eddy covariance flux stations were installed between two lines of turbines at the south...

  17. Application of ray tracing in radiation heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1993-01-01

    This collection of presentation figures displays the capabilities of ray tracing for radiation propagation calculations as compared to an analytical approach. The goal is to introduce the terminology and solution process used in ray tracing, and provide insight into radiation heat transfer principles and analysis tools. A thermal analysis working environment is introduced that solves demanding radiation heat transfer problems based on ray tracing. This information may serve as a reference for designing and building ones own analysis environment.

  18. Radiative heat transfer in the extreme near field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongtae; Song, Bai; Fernández-Hurtado, Víctor; Lee, Woochul; Jeong, Wonho; Cui, Longji; Thompson, Dakotah; Feist, Johannes; Reid, M T Homer; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-12-17

    Radiative transfer of energy at the nanometre length scale is of great importance to a variety of technologies including heat-assisted magnetic recording, near-field thermophotovoltaics and lithography. Although experimental advances have enabled elucidation of near-field radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as 20-30?nanometres (refs 4-6), quantitative analysis in the extreme near field (less than 10?nanometres) has been greatly limited by experimental challenges. Moreover, the results of pioneering measurements differed from theoretical predictions by orders of magnitude. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with embedded thermocouples, in conjunction with new microdevices capable of periodic temperature modulation, to measure radiative heat transfer down to gaps as small as two nanometres. For our experiments we deposited suitably chosen metal or dielectric layers on the scanning probes and microdevices, enabling direct study of extreme near-field radiation between silica-silica, silicon nitride-silicon nitride and gold-gold surfaces to reveal marked, gap-size-dependent enhancements of radiative heat transfer. Furthermore, our state-of-the-art calculations of radiative heat transfer, performed within the theoretical framework of fluctuational electrodynamics, are in excellent agreement with our experimental results, providing unambiguous evidence that confirms the validity of this theory for modelling radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as a few nanometres. This work lays the foundations required for the rational design of novel technologies that leverage nanoscale radiative heat transfer. PMID:26641312

  19. The whistler heat flux instability: Threshold conditions in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S.P.; Scime, E.E.; Phillips, J.L.; Feldman, W.C.

    1994-12-01

    Solar wind electrons are observed often to consist of two components: a core and a halo. The anisotropies and relative average speeds of these two components correspond to a heat flux that has the potential to excite several different electromagnetic instabilities; wave-particle scattering by the resulting enhanced fluctuations can limit this heat flux. This manuscript describes theoretical studies using the linear Vlasov dispersion equation for drifting bi-Maxwellian component distributions in a homogeneous plasma to examine the threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. Expressions for this threshold are obtained from two different parametric baselines: a local model that yields scalings as functions of local dimensionless plasma parameters, and a global model based on average electron properties observed during the in-ecliptic phase of the Ulysses mission. The latter model yields an expression for the heat flux at threshold of the whistler instability as a function of heliospheric radius that scales in the same way as the average heat flux observed from Ulysses and that provides an approximate upper bound for that same quantity. This theoretical scaling is combined with the observational results to yield a semiempirical closure relation for the average electron heat flux in the solar wind between 1 and 5 AU. 29 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. High geothermal heat flux measured below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew T; Mankoff, Kenneth D; Tulaczyk, Slawek M; Tyler, Scott W; Foley, Neil

    2015-07-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow, and mass balance of ice sheets, but measurements of this parameter are difficult to make in ice-covered regions. We report the first direct measurement of geothermal heat flux into the base of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), below Subglacial Lake Whillans, determined from the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of sediment under the lake. The heat flux at this site is 285 ± 80 mW/m(2), significantly higher than the continental and regional averages estimated for this site using regional geophysical and glaciological models. Independent temperature measurements in the ice indicate an upward heat flux through the WAIS of 105 ± 13 mW/m(2). The difference between these heat flux values could contribute to basal melting and/or be advected from Subglacial Lake Whillans by flowing water. The high geothermal heat flux may help to explain why ice streams and subglacial lakes are so abundant and dynamic in this region. PMID:26601210

  1. High geothermal heat flux measured below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Andrew T.; Mankoff, Kenneth D.; Tulaczyk, Slawek M.; Tyler, Scott W.; Foley, Neil

    2015-01-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow, and mass balance of ice sheets, but measurements of this parameter are difficult to make in ice-covered regions. We report the first direct measurement of geothermal heat flux into the base of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), below Subglacial Lake Whillans, determined from the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of sediment under the lake. The heat flux at this site is 285 ± 80 mW/m2, significantly higher than the continental and regional averages estimated for this site using regional geophysical and glaciological models. Independent temperature measurements in the ice indicate an upward heat flux through the WAIS of 105 ± 13 mW/m2. The difference between these heat flux values could contribute to basal melting and/or be advected from Subglacial Lake Whillans by flowing water. The high geothermal heat flux may help to explain why ice streams and subglacial lakes are so abundant and dynamic in this region. PMID:26601210

  2. Broadening of divertor heat flux profile with increasing number of ELM filaments in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Canik, J. M.; Gan, K. F.; Gray, T. K.; McLean, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) represent a challenge to future fusion devices, owing to cyclical high peak heat fluxes on divertor plasma facing surfaces. One ameliorating factor has been that the heat flux characteristic profile width has been observed to broaden with the size of the ELM, as compared with the inter-ELM heat flux profile. In contrast, the heat flux profile has been observed to narrow during ELMs under certain conditions in NSTX. Here we show that the ELM heat flux profile width increases with the number of filamentary striations observed, i.e. profile narrowing is observed with zero or very few striations. Because NSTX often lies on the long wavelength current-driven mode side of ideal MHD instabilities, few filamentary structures can be expected under many conditions. ITER is also projected to lie on the current driven low-n stability boundary, and therefore detailed projections of the unstable modes expected in ITER and the heat flux driven in ensuing filamentary structures is needed.

  3. Characterization of a heat flux sensor using short pulse laser calibration.

    PubMed

    Löhle, Stefan; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Batsale, Jean-Christophe; Enouf, Olivier; Dubard, Jimmy; Filtz, Jean-Remy

    2007-05-01

    A method to calibrate classical heat flux sensors is presented. The classical approach to measure the temperature inside a known material by using a thermocouple fails when the measurement time is very short. In this work the surface heat flux is determined by solving the inverse heat conduction problem using a noninteger identified system as a direct model for the estimation process. Using short pulse laser calibration measurements the crucial design aspects of the sensor that play a significant role when assuming one-dimensional, semi-infinite heat transfer have been accounted for. The theoretical approach as well as the calibration results are presented and comparisons to the classical approach and results from finite element modeling are shown. It is concluded that the new method ameliorate the heat flux sensor significantly and extend its application to very short measurement times. PMID:17552814

  4. Solar, interplanetary, and magnetospheric parameters for the radiation belt energetic electron flux

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Solar, interplanetary, and magnetospheric parameters for the radiation belt energetic electron flux 2005. [1] In developing models of the radiation belt energetic electron flux, it is important identify its peaks in reference to the radial regions P0 (L = 3.1­4.0, inner edge of the outer belt), P1 (4

  5. On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

    2014-01-02

    The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

  6. Flux and brightness calculations for various synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.M.; Hulbert, S.L.

    1991-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) storage rings are powerful scientific and technological tools. The first generation of storage rings in the US., e.g., SURF (Washington, D.C.), Tantalus (Wisconsin), SSRL (Stanford), and CHESS (Cornell), revolutionized VUV, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray science. The second (present) generation of storage rings, e.g. the NSLS VUV and XRAY rings and Aladdin (Wisconsin), have sustained the revolution by providing higher stored currents and up to a factor of ten smaller electron beam sizes than the first generation sources. This has made possible a large number of experiments that could not performed using first generation sources. In addition, the NSLS XRAY ring design optimizes the performance of wigglers (high field periodic magnetic insertion devices). The third generation storage rings, e.g. ALS (Berkeley) and APS (Argonne), are being designed to optimize the performance of undulators (low field periodic magnetic insertion devices). These extremely high brightness sources will further revolutionize x-ray science by providing diffraction-limited x-ray beams. The output of undulators and wigglers is distinct from that of bending magnets in magnitude, spectral shape, and in spatial and angular size. Using published equations, we have developed computer programs to calculate the flux, central intensity, and brightness output bending magnets and selected wigglers and undulators of the NSLS VUV and XRAY rings, the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Following is a summary of the equations used, the graphs and data produced, and the computer codes written. These codes, written in the C programming language, can be used to calculate the flux, central intensity, and brightness curves for bending magnets and insertion devices on any storage ring.

  7. Assessment of land surface temperature and heat fluxes over Delhi using remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Surya Deb; Kant, Yogesh; Mitra, Debashis

    2015-01-15

    Surface energy processes has an essential role in urban weather, climate and hydrosphere cycles, as well in urban heat redistribution. The research was undertaken to analyze the potential of Landsat and MODIS data in retrieving biophysical parameters in estimating land surface temperature & heat fluxes diurnally in summer and winter seasons of years 2000 and 2010 and understanding its effect on anthropogenic heat disturbance over Delhi and surrounding region. Results show that during years 2000-2010, settlement and industrial area increased from 5.66 to 11.74% and 4.92 to 11.87% respectively which in turn has direct effect on land surface temperature (LST) and heat fluxes including anthropogenic heat flux. Based on the energy balance model for land surface, a method to estimate the increase in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) has been proposed. The settlement and industrial areas has higher amounts of energy consumed and has high values of Has in all seasons. The comparison of satellite derived LST with that of field measured values show that Landsat estimated values are in close agreement within error of ±2 °C than MODIS with an error of ±3 °C. It was observed that, during 2000 and 2010, the average change in surface temperature using Landsat over settlement & industrial areas of both seasons is 1.4 °C & for MODIS data is 3.7 °C. The seasonal average change in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) estimated using Landsat & MODIS is up by around 38 W/m(2) and 62 W/m(2) respectively while higher change is observed over settlement and concrete structures. The study reveals that the dynamic range of Has values has increased in the 10 year period due to the strong anthropogenic influence over the area. The study showed that anthropogenic heat flux is an indicator of the strength of urban heat island effect, and can be used to quantify the magnitude of the urban heat island effect. PMID:24360191

  8. Improved Geothermal Heat Flux Estimates for East Antarctic Subglacial Basins from Groundwater Modeling and Geophysical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooch, B. T.; Frederick, B. C.; Richter, T.; Young, D. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Slower moving, deep interior ice sheet behavior is largely dependent on basal ice conditions. Basal heat (from shearing friction and geothermal input) and subglacial water pressure heavily influence the dynamics of these regions. Numerical ice sheet models require accurate estimations of geothermal heat flux for calculating realistic basal melt rates and thermal structure in the ice. Current ice sheet models are poorly constrained with low-resolution satellite- or seismic-derived geothermal heat flux estimates that neglect upper crustal contributions. Higher-resolution estimates that take into account these effects while still incorporating the lower-resolution methodologies are needed to improve geothermal heat flux estimates for next-generation ice sheet models. The main contributions to these estimates come from delineations between crystalline basement rock and sedimentary basins as well as subglacial topography, with both influencing the geothermal gradient. The geothermal gradient can be heavily altered by groundwater flow in the sedimentary basins due to higher hydraulic permeability advecting heat. We present a new approach to better estimate the geothermal heat flux in the subglacial basins and mountain ranges in a region of Wilkes Land, East Antarctica. Our approach utilizes existing potential field and ice-penetrating radar data from aerogeophysical surveys to better define the upper crustal structure, including basin and range geometry. Potential field data is used to define probable 3D basin structure and sediment properties, while ice-penetrating radar is used to define subglacial bed conditions. Numerical modeling of heat flow through the upper crust with added radiogenic crystalline basement rock heat contributions is coupled to groundwater flow through the surrounding sedimentary basins to better estimate the total resulting geothermal heat flux at the ice-bed interface. These geophysical processing methods in conjunction with geothermal modeling can provide significantly improved geothermal heat flux estimates which could better constrain crucial parameters needed for ice sheet models.

  9. Diffusive vertical heat flux in the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean inferred from moored instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, Camille; Guthrie, John D.; Steele, Michael; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Morison, James H.; Krishfield, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Observational studies have shown that an unprecedented warm anomaly has recently affected the temperature of the Atlantic Water (AW) layer lying at intermediate depth in the Arctic Ocean. Using observations from four profiling moorings, deployed in the interior of the Canada Basin between 2003 and 2011, the upward diffusive vertical heat flux from this layer is quantified. Vertical diffusivity is first estimated from a fine-scale parameterization method based on CTD and velocity profiles. Resulting diffusive vertical heat fluxes from the AW are in the range 0.1-0.2 W m-2 on average. Although large over the period considered, the variations of the AW temperature maximum yields small variations for the temperature gradient and thus the vertical diffusive heat flux. In most areas, variations in upward diffusive vertical heat flux from the AW have only a limited effect on temperature variations of the overlying layer. However, the presence of eddies might be an effective mechanism to enhance vertical heat transfer, although the small number of eddies sampled by the moorings suggest that this mechanism remains limited and intermittent in space and time. Finally, our results suggest that computing diffusive vertical heat flux with a constant vertical diffusivity of ˜2 × 10-6 m2 s-1 provides a reasonable estimate of the upward diffusive heat transfer from the AW layer, although this approximation breaks down in the presence of eddies.

  10. Effects of marine cloud brightening on polar regions and the meridional heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, B.; Gadian, A.; Latham, J.

    2011-12-01

    Marine cloud brightening is one of several proposed solar radiation management geoengineering schemes designed to avert some of the undesirable effects of climate change (Latham et al. 2008). Such changes include ice loss, desertification and increased sea levels. Polar sea ice fraction has been recorded by satellite data for the last 40 years. This data shows a general long term reduction in sea ice thickness and area and this reduction has been attributed to climate change. Changes in climate have been argued to be disproportionately larger in polar regions. The HadGEM1 (UK Met Office Climate Model, V6.1) is a fully coupled climate model. It is used to project changes in polar ice cover and temperatures as a result of increasing carbon dioxide and geoengineering using marine cloud brightening scenario. The meridional heat flux is the mechanism for moving energy from the tropics to the polar regions. The results show that for a comparison between a control (~ 2020 Carbon Dioxide concentrations) and a double pre-industrial Carbon Dioxide simulation, the maximum meridional heat flux is found to increase from 5.8PW to 6.1PW. With three-region seeding of marine Stratocumulus, this is reduced to 5.7PW. The annual North Polar sea ice cover, initially 11.5M sq km, is reduced by 3.6M sq km as a result of the increased Carbon Dioxide. Application of a three region seeding scenario, results in an increase in sea ice cover of 0.20M sq km above the initial (2020) values. Reference: Latham J. et al.. (2008) Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A doi:10.1098/rsta.2008.0137.

  11. A Freezable Heat Exchanger for Space Suit Radiator Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabity, James A.; Mason, Georgia R.; Copeland, Robert J.; Trevino, Luis a.

    2008-01-01

    During an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA), both the heat generated by the astronaut s metabolism and that produced by the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) must be rejected to space. The heat sources include the heat of adsorption of metabolic CO2, the heat of condensation of water, the heat removed from the body by the liquid cooling garment and the load from the electrical components. Although the sublimator hardware to reject this load weighs only 1.58 kg (3.48 lbm), an additional 3.6 kg (8 lbm) of water are loaded into the unit, most of which is sublimated and lost to space, thus becoming the single largest expendable during an eight-hour EVA. Using a radiator to reject heat from the astronaut during an EVA can reduce the amount of expendable water consumed in the sublimator. Radiators have no moving parts and are thus highly reliable. Past freezable radiators have been too heavy, but the weight can be greatly reduced by placing a small and freeze tolerant heat exchanger between the astronaut and radiator, instead of making the very large radiator freeze tolerant. Therefore, the key technological innovation to improve space suit radiator performance was the development of a lightweight and freezable heat exchanger that accommodates the variable heat load generated by the astronaut. Herein, we present the heat transfer performance of a newly designed heat exchanger that endured several freeze / thaw cycles without any apparent damage. The heat exchanger was also able to continuously turn down or turn up the heat rejection to follow the variable load.

  12. Numerical prediction of radiative heat transfer in reciprocating superadiabatic combustion in porous media.

    PubMed

    Du, Liming; Xie, Maozhao

    2011-06-01

    A numerical study of Reciprocating Superadiabatic Combustion of Premixed gases in porous media (hereafter, referred to as RSCP) is performed. In this system the transient combustion of methane-air mixture is stabilized in a porous media combustor by periodically switching flow directions. The mass, momentum, energy and species conservation equations are solved using a two-dimensional control volume method. Local thermal non-equilibrium between the gas and the solid phases is considered by solving separate energy equations for the two phases and coupling them through a convective heat transfer coefficient. The porous media is assumed to emit, absorb and isotropically scatter radiation. The influences of the dominating operating parameters, such as filtration velocity, equivalence ratio and half cycle on the temperature profile, heat release rate, radiant flux, radiant efficiency and combustion efficiency are discussed. The results show that coupling calculating of flow field, combustion reaction and volume radiation of the optically thick media is successively achieved and heat radiation plays an important role in the overall performance of the burner. The temperature profile inside the RSCP combustor has a typical trapezoidal shape and the profile of radiation flux is similar to sinusoidal shape. Compared with the conventional premixed combustion in porous medium, combustion behavior in RSCP combustor is superior, such as better thermal structure and higher radiation efficiency and combustion efficiency. PMID:25084588

  13. Kilometric radiation power flux dependence on area of discrete aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saflekos, N. A.; Burch, J. L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Sheehan, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    Kilometer wavelength radiation, measured from distant positions over the North Pole and over the Earth's equator, was compared to the area of discrete aurora imaged by several low-altitude spacecraft. Through correlative studies of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) with about two thousand auroral images, a stereoscopic view of the average auroral acceleration region was obtained. A major result is that the total AKR power increases as the area of the discrete auroral oval increases. The implications are that the regions of parallel potentials or the auroral plasma cavities, in which AKR is generated, must possess the following attributes: (1) they are shallow in altitude and their radial position depends on wavelength, (2) they thread flux tubes of small cross section, (3) the generation mechanism in them reaches a saturation limit rapidly, and (4) their distribution over the discrete auroral oval is nearly uniform. The above statistical results are true for large samples collected over a long period of time (about six months). In the short term, AKR frequently exhibits temporal variations with scales as short as three minutes (the resolution of the averaged data used). These fluctuations are explainable by rapid quenchings as well as fast starts of the electron cyclotron maser mechanism. There were times when AKR was present at substantial power levels while optical emissions were below instrument thresholds. A recent theoretical result may account for this set of observations by predicting that suprathermal electrons, of energies as low as several hundred eV, can generate second harmonic AKR. The indirect observations of second harmonic AKR require that these electrons have mirror points high above the atmosphere so as to minimize auroral light emissions. The results provide evidence supporting the electron cyclotron maser mechanism.

  14. Kilometric radiation power flux dependence on area of discrete aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saflekos, N. A.; Burch, J. L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Sheehan, R. E.

    Kilometer wavelength radiation, measured from distant positions over the North Pole and over the Earth's equator, was compared to the area of discrete aurora imaged by several low-altitude spacecraft. Through correlative studies of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) with about two thousand auroral images, a stereoscopic view of the average auroral acceleration region was obtained. A major result is that the total AKR power increases as the area of the discrete auroral oval increases. The implications are that the regions of parallel potentials or the auroral plasma cavities, in which AKR is generated, must possess the following attributes: (1) they are shallow in altitude and their radial position depends on wavelength, (2) they thread flux tubes of small cross section, (3) the generation mechanism in them reaches a saturation limit rapidly, and (4) their distribution over the discrete auroral oval is nearly uniform. The above statistical results are true for large samples collected over a long period of time (about six months). In the short term, AKR frequently exhibits temporal variations with scales as short as three minutes (the resolution of the averaged data used). These fluctuations are explainable by rapid quenchings as well as fast starts of the electron cyclotron maser mechanism. There were times when AKR was present at substantial power levels while optical emissions were below instrument thresholds. A recent theoretical result may account for this set of observations by predicting that suprathermal electrons, of energies as low as several hundred eV, can generate second harmonic AKR. The indirect observations of second harmonic AKR require that these electrons have mirror points high above the atmosphere so as to minimize auroral light emissions. The results provide evidence supporting the electron cyclotron maser mechanism.

  15. A FLUX-TUBE TECTONICS MODEL FOR SOLAR CORONAL HEATING DRIVEN BY THE MAGNETIC CARPET

    E-print Network

    Priest, Eric

    . The dissipation of energy along sharp boundaries we call, by analogy with geophysical plate tectonicsA FLUX-TUBE TECTONICS MODEL FOR SOLAR CORONAL HEATING DRIVEN BY THE MAGNETIC CARPET Eric R. Priest, the tectonics model of coronal heating. Simi- lar to the case on Earth, the relative motions of the photospheric

  16. Effects of surface heat flux-induced sea surface temperature changes on tropical cyclone intensity

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Effects of surface heat flux-induced sea surface temperature changes on tropical cyclone intensity cyclone-induced sea surface cooling is small compared to that caused by turbulent mixing and cold water entrainment into the upper ocean mixed-layer. This study shows that tropical cyclone-induced surface heat

  17. Heat Flux Manipulation with Engineered Thermal Materials Supradeep Narayana and Yuki Sato

    E-print Network

    Sato, Yuki

    Heat Flux Manipulation with Engineered Thermal Materials Supradeep Narayana and Yuki Sato is to manipulate heat flow in real life. Compared to the field of electric conduction armed with nonlinear solid that can be manipulated, controlled, and processed. The ability to manipulate the path of energy

  18. Inferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    to Antarctica Nikolai M. Shapiro*, Michael H. Ritzwoller Department of Physics, Center for Imaging the Earth to the inferred surface heat flux distributions across Antarctica, where direct measurements are rare streams. Mean heat flow in West Antarctica is expected to be nearly three times higher than in East

  19. Be/C layer appears to form `beads' in response to heat flux.

    E-print Network

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Be/C layer appears to form `beads' in response to heat flux. `Globules' of Be formed after laser heating. 21 temperature excursions above 1000 C, peak temperature 2,100 C. Subsequent scans at same laser power and speed resulted in lower temperatures (1,601 C then 1,314 C) as layer became more thermally

  20. IMPROVED ANALYSIS OF HEAT PULSE SIGNALS FOR SOIL WATER FLUX DETERMINATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water flux (J) can be estimated by measuring the velocity (V) of a pulse of heat introduced into the soil. Here we consider a method in which V is measured with a three-probe sensor. The center probe is used to heat the soil, and the outer probes measure changes in temperature downstream (Td) a...

  1. Temperature regimes and turbulent heat fluxes across a heterogeneous canopy in an Alaskan boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkenburg, Derek; Fochesatto, Gilberto J.; Cristóbal, Jordi; Prakash, Anupma; Gens, Rudiger; Alfieri, Joseph G.; Nagano, Hirohiko; Harazono, Yoshinobu; Iwata, Hiroki; Kane, Douglas L.

    2015-02-01

    We evaluate local differences in thermal regimes and turbulent heat fluxes across the heterogeneous canopy of a black spruce boreal forest on discontinuous permafrost in interior Alaska. The data were taken during an intensive observing period in the summer of 2013 from two micrometeorological towers 600 m apart in a central section of boreal forest, one in a denser canopy (DC) and the other in a sparser canopy, but under approximately similar atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow conditions. Results suggest that on average 34% of the half-hourly periods in a day are nonstationary, primarily during night and during ABL transitions. Also, thermal regimes differ between the two towers; specifically between midnight and 0500 Alaska Standard Time (AKST) it is about 3°C warmer at DC. On average, the sensible heat flux at DC was greater. For midday periods, the difference between those fluxes exceeded 30% of the measured flux and over 30 W m-2 in magnitude more than 60% of the time. These differences are due to higher mechanical mixing as a result of the increased density of roughness elements at DC. Finally, the vertical distribution of turbulent heat fluxes verifies a maximum atop the canopy crown (2.6 h) when compared with the subcanopy (0.6 h) and above canopy (5.1 h), where h is the mean canopy height. We argue that these spatial and vertical variations of sensible heat fluxes result from the complex scale aggregation of energy fluxes over a heterogeneous canopy.

  2. Long titanium heat pipes for high-temperature space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girrens, S. P.; Ernst, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Titanium heat pipes are being developed to provide light weight, reliable heat rejection devices as an alternate radiator design for the Space Reactor Power System (SP-100). The radiator design includes 360 heat pipes, each of which is 5.2 m long and dissipates 3 kW of power at 775 K. The radiator heat pipes use potassium as the working fluid, have two screen arteries for fluid return, a roughened surface distributive wicking system, and a D shaped cross section container configuration. A prototype titanium heat pipe, 5.5 m long, was fabricated and tested in space simulating conditions. Results from startup and isothermal operation tests are presented. These results are also compared to theoretical performance predictions that were used to design the heat pipe initially.

  3. Viscous hydrodynamic instability theory of the peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.

    1972-01-01

    Liquid viscosity was included in the Bellman-Pennington theory of the Taylor wave in a liquid vapor interface. Predictions of the most susceptible wavelength, and of the wave frequency, were made as a function of a liquid viscosity parameter and the Bond number. The stability of a gas jet in a viscous liquid was studied and the result is used to predict the peak heat flux on large horizontal heaters. Experimental measurements of the dominant Taylor wave and its growth rate were made during the film boiling of cyclohexanol on cylindrical heaters. The results bear out the predictions quite well. The thickness of the vapor blanket surrounding a cylindrical heater was measured and a correlation suggested. The effect of large fluxes of vapor volume on the dominant wavelength was also noted. Theoretical results of the peak heat flux are compared with the experimental data, and the effect of finite geometry of flat plate heaters on the peak heat flux is also discussed.

  4. Evaluation of first wall heat fluxes due to magnetic perturbations for a range of ITER scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyna, P.; Kripner, L.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G.; Peterka, M.; Panek, R.

    2015-08-01

    The proposed use of magnetic perturbations for edge-localized mode (ELM) control in ITER poses a number of integration issues, among them the localized heat fluxes (footprints) on the plasma-facing components (PFCs). They may provide the benefit of spreading the heat flux, thus reducing its peak value, but they may cause a localized erosion of the PFCs. We present calculations of heat fluxes for a range of ITER plasma parameters. The efficiency of our method enables us to perform calculations for a range of assumptions on the SOL width and to optimize the coil configuration to yield the largest power flux spreading. The optimal coil configuration is not sensitive on SOL parameters and is also close to the one which is considered optimal for ELM control. The proximity of footprints may cause significant power loads on the upper wall.

  5. Ionospheric Poynting Flux and Joule Heating Modeling Challenge: Latest Results and New Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, J. S.; Rastaetter, L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Knipp, D. J.; Zheng, Y.; Cosgrove, R. B.; Newell, P. T.; Weimer, D. R.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Wang, W.

    2014-12-01

    Poynting Flux and Joule Heating in the ionosphere - latest results from the challenge and updates at the CCMC. With the addition of satellite tracking and display features in the online analysis tool and at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), we are now able to obtain Poynting flux and Joule heating values from a wide variety of ionospheric models. In addition to Poynting fluxes derived from electric and magnetic field measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites for a recent modeling challenge, we can now use a Poynting Flux model derived from FAST satellite observations for comparison. Poynting Fluxes are also correlated using Ovation Prime maps of precipitation patterns during the same time periods to assess how "typical" the events in the challenge are.

  6. The meridional variation of the eddy heat fluxes by baroclinic waves and their parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    The meridional and vertical eddy fluxes of sensible heat produced by small-amplitude growing baroclinic waves are calculated using solutions to the two-level model with horizontal shear in the mean flow. The results show that the fluxes are primarily dependent on the local baroclinicity, i.e., the local value of the isentropic slopes in the mean state. Where the slope exceeds the critical value, the transports are poleward and upward; where the slope is less than the critical value, the transports are equatorward and downward. These results are used to improve an earlier parameterization of the tropospheric eddy fluxes of sensible heat based on Eady's model. Comparisons with observations show that the improved parameterization reproduces the observed magnitude and sign of the eddy fluxes and their vertical variations and seasonal changes, but the maximum in the poleward flux is too near the equator.

  7. Enhancement of single-phase heat transfer and critical heat flux from an ultra-high-flux simulated microelectronic heat source to a rectangular impinging jet of dielectric liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, D.C.; Mudawar, I. )

    1992-08-01

    Jet impingement is encountered in numerous applications demanding high heating or cooling fluxes. Examples include annealing of metal sheets and cooling of turbine blades, x-ray medical devices, laser weapons, and fusion blankets. The attractive heat transfer attributes of jet impingement have also stimulated research efforts on cooling of high-heat-flux microelectronic devices. These devices are fast approaching heat fluxes in excess of 100 W/cm[sup 2], which have to be dissipated using coolants that are both electrically and chemically compatible with electronic components. Unfortunately, fluids satisfying these requirements tend to possess poor transport properties, creating a need for significant enhancement in the heat transfer coefficient by such means as increased coolant flow rate and phase change. The cooling problem is compounded by a need to cool large arrays of heat sources in minimal volume, and to reduce the spacing between adjacent circuit boards. These requirements place severe constraints on the packaging of jet impingement cooling hardware.

  8. Potassium Rankine cycle vapor chamber (heat pipe) radiator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrels, E. E.; Killen, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    A structurally integrated vapor chamber fin (heat pipe) radiator is defined and evaluated as a potential candidate for rejecting waste heat from the potassium Rankine cycle powerplant. Several vapor chamber fin geometries, using stainless steel construction, are evaluated and an optimum is selected. A comparison is made with an operationally equivalent conduction fin radiator. Both radiators employ NaK-78 in the primary coolant loop. In addition, the Vapor Chamber Fin (VCF) radiator utilizes sodium in the vapor chambers. Preliminary designs are developed for the conduction fin and VCF concepts. Performance tests on a single vapor chamber were conducted to verify the VCF design. A comparison shows the conduction fin radiator easier to fabricate, but heavier in weight, particularly as meteoroid protection requirements become more stringent. While the analysis was performed assuming the potassium Rankine cycle powerplant, the results are equally applicable to any system radiating heat to space in the 900 to 1400 F temperature range.

  9. Solid motor aft closure insulation erosion. [heat flux correlation for rate analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stampfl, E.; Landsbaum, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    The erosion rate of aft closure insulation in a number of large solid propellant motors was empirically analyzed by correlating the average ablation rate with a number of variables that had previously been demonstrated to affect heat flux. The main correlating parameter was a heat flux based on the simplified Bartz heat transfer coefficient corrected for two-dimensional effects. A multiplying group contained terms related to port-to-throat ratio, local wall angle, grain geometry and nozzle cant angle. The resulting equation gave a good correlation and is a useful design tool.

  10. Converting the patterns of local heat flux via thermal illusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, N. Q.; Shen, X. Y.; Huang, J. P.

    2015-05-01

    Since the thermal conduction equation has form invariance under coordinate transformation, one can design thermal metamaterials with novel functions by tailoring materials' thermal conductivities. In this work, we establish a different transformation theory, and propose a layered device with anisotropic thermal conductivities. The device is able to convert heat flux from parallel patterns into non-parallel patterns and vice versa. In the mean time, the heat flux pattern outside the device keeps undisturbed as if this device is absent. We perform finite-element simulations to confirm the converting behavior. This work paves a different way to manipulate the flow of heat at will.

  11. Impacts of Soil-aquifer Heat and Water Fluxes on Simulated Global Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krakauer, N.Y.; Puma, Michael J.; Cook, B. I.

    2013-01-01

    Climate models have traditionally only represented heat and water fluxes within relatively shallow soil layers, but there is increasing interest in the possible role of heat and water exchanges with the deeper subsurface. Here, we integrate an idealized 50m deep aquifer into the land surface module of the GISS ModelE general circulation model to test the influence of aquifer-soil moisture and heat exchanges on climate variables. We evaluate the impact on the modeled climate of aquifer-soil heat and water fluxes separately, as well as in combination. The addition of the aquifer to ModelE has limited impact on annual-mean climate, with little change in global mean land temperature, precipitation, or evaporation. The seasonal amplitude of deep soil temperature is strongly damped by the soil-aquifer heat flux. This not only improves the model representation of permafrost area but propagates to the surface, resulting in an increase in the seasonal amplitude of surface air temperature of >1K in the Arctic. The soil-aquifer water and heat fluxes both slightly decrease interannual variability in soil moisture and in landsurface temperature, and decrease the soil moisture memory of the land surface on seasonal to annual timescales. The results of this experiment suggest that deepening the modeled land surface, compared to modeling only a shallower soil column with a no-flux bottom boundary condition, has limited impact on mean climate but does affect seasonality and interannual persistence.

  12. How Well are Recent Climate Variability Signals Resolved by Satellite Radiative Flux Estimates?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Lu, H.-L.

    2004-01-01

    One notable aspect of Earth s climate is that although the planet appears to be very close to radiative balance at top-of-atmosphere (TOA), the atmosphere itself and underlying surface are not. Profound exchanges of energy between the atmosphere and oceans, land and cryosphere occur over a range of time scales. Recent evidence from broadband satellite measurements suggests that even these TOA fluxes contain some detectable variations. Our ability to measure and reconstruct radiative fluxes at the surface and at the top of atmosphere is improving rapidly. Understanding the character of radiative flux estimates and relating them to variations in other energy fluxes and climate state variables is key to improving our understanding of climate. In this work we will evaluate several recently released estimates of radiative fluxes, focusing primarily on surface estimates. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project FD radiative flux profiles are available from rnid-1983 to near present and have been constructed by driving the radiative transfer physics from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) global model with ISCCP clouds and HlRS operational soundings profiles. Full and clear sky SW and LW fluxes are produced. A similar product from the NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Project using different radiative flux codes and thermodynamics from the NASA/Goddard Earth Observing System assimilation model makes a similar calculation of surface fluxes. However this data set currently extends only through 1995. Several estimates of downward LW flux at the surface inferred from microwave data are also examined. Since these products have been evaluated with Baseline Surface Radiation Network data over land we focus over ocean regions and use the DOE/NOAA/NASA Shipboard Ocean Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) surface flux measurements to characterize performance of these data sets under both clear and cloudy conditions. Some aspects of performance are stratified according to SST and vertical motion regimes. Comparisons to the TRMM/CERES SRB data in 1998 are also interpreted. These radiative fluxes are then analyzed to determine how surface (and TOA) radiative exchanges respond to interannual signals of ENS0 warm and cold events. Our analysis includes regional changes as well as integrated signals over land, ocean and various latitude bands. Changes in water vapor and cloud forcing signatures are prominent on interannual time scales. Prominent signals are also found in the SW fluxes for the Pinatubo volcanic event. These systematic changes in fluxes are related to changes in large-scale circulations and energy transport in the atmosphere and ocean. Some estimates of signal-to-noise and reliability are discussed to place our results in context.

  13. Variability of Winter Extreme Heat Flux Events in Kuroshio Extension and Gulf Stream Extension Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Chang, P.; Wu, D.; Lin, X.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed extreme surface heat flux events, defined by daily sensible (latent) heat flux greater than 80 percentile value (hereafter referred to as high-flux events) associated with boreal winter (NDJFM) cold-air outbreaks (CAOs) in the Kuroshio Extension Region (KER) of the Northwestern Pacific, using the high-resolution NCEP-CFSR (1979-2009) and NCEP-NCAR (1948-2009) reanalysis, and compared the results to those in the Gulf Stream Region (GSR) of the Northwestern Atlantic. The average accumulated number of days of the Pacific high-flux events, which typically last fewer than 3 days, is only less than 20% of the winter period but contributes significantly (>30%) to the total sensible and latent heat fluxes during the entire winter season in the KER. These high flux events are characterized by "cold storms" with a positive geopotential height anomaly (anti-cyclone) over Japan and a negative geopotential height anomaly (cyclone) further downstream, in between which there is an anomalous northerly wind that brings cold and dry air from the Eurasian continent to the KER. In contrast, non-event days are characterized by "warm storms" that have a cyclone (an anti-cyclone) to the west (east) of the KER, bringing warm and moist air from the subtropics to the KER. There are important differences between the Pacific and Atlantic CAOs. Generally, the Atlantic CAOs occur more frequently with stronger intensity and shorter duration than those in the Pacific. The "cold storms" in the KER also differ from those in the GSR in terms of their detailed structure and orientation relative to geographic location. However, in both the Pacific and Atlantic, interannual and longer term variations of sensible and latent heat flux are determined by the high flux events, suggesting that extreme winter storm events play an important role in the mid-latitude climate system. In the Pacific basin, decadal variability dominates the low-frequency variability of total and event-day sensible and latent heat fluxes. A significant decadal shift of high flux events with a lower number of extreme storm event days before the mid 1970s and a higher number of extreme storm event days after the mid 1970s is found, and a close relationship between the number of high flux events in the KER and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is also noted with a correlation coefficient as high as 0.7. In contrast, the low-frequency variability of the high flux events and the associated sensible and latent heat fluxes in the Atlantic is marked by an increasing trend over the past decades.

  14. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  15. Systematic errors in ground heat flux estimation and their correction

    E-print Network

    Gentine, Pierre

    Incoming radiation forcing at the land surface is partitioned among the components of the surface energy balance in varying proportions depending on the time scale of the forcing. Based on a land-atmosphere analytic continuum ...

  16. High Temperature Titanium-Water Heat Pipe Radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, William G.; Bonner, Richard; Hartenstine, John; Barth, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Space nuclear systems require large area radiators to reject the unconverted heat to space. System optimizations with Brayton cycles lead to radiators with radiator temperatures in the 400 to 550 K range. To date, nearly all space radiator systems have used aluminum/ammonia heat pipes but these components cannot function at the required temperatures. A Graphite Fiber Reinforced Composites (GFRC) radiator with high temperature water heat pipes is currently under development. High temperature GFRC materials have been selected, and will be tested for thermal conductivity and structural properties. Titanium/water and Titanium/Monel heat pipes have been successfully operated at temperatures up to 550 K. Titanium was selected as the baseline envelope material, due to its lower mass and previous experience with bonding titanium into honeycomb panels. Heat pipes were fabricated with a number of different wick designs, including slab and grooved wicks. Since titanium cannot be extruded, the grooves are being fabricated in sintered titanium powder. The paper reports on the radiator design, materials selection, heat pipe to fin bonding, heat pipe design, and experimental results.

  17. Heat pipe radiation cooling of advanced hypersonic propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. A.; Keddy, M.; Merrigan, M. A.; Silverstein, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Heat transfer, heat pipe, and system studies were performed to assess the newly proposed heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) concept. With an HPRC system, heat is removed from the ramburner and nozzle of a hypersonic aircraft engine by a surrounding, high-temperature, heat pipe nacelle structure, transported to nearby external surfaces, and rejected to the environment by thermal radiation. With HPRC, the Mach number range available for using hydrocarbon fuels for aircraft operation extends into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 range, up from the current limit of about Mach 4. Heat transfer studies using a newly developed HPRC computer code determine cooling system and ramburner and nozzle temperatures, heat loads, and weights for a representative combined-cycle engine cruising at Mach 5 at 80,000 ft altitude. Heat pipe heat transport calculations, using the Los Alamos code HTPIPE, reveal that adequate heat trasport capability is available using molybdenum-lithium heat pipe technology. Results show that the HPRC system radiator area is limited in size to the ramburner-nozzle region of the engine nacelle; reasonable system weights are expected; hot section temperatures are consistent with advanced structural materials development goals; and system impact on engine performance is minimal.

  18. Evaluation of surface radiative flux parameterizations for use in sea ice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Jeffrey R.; Silcox, Robert A.; Stone, Robert S.

    1996-02-01

    The surface radiation budget of the polar regions strongly influences ice growth and melt. Thermodynamic sea ice models therefore require accurate, yet computationally efficient methods of computing radiative fluxes. In this study, a variety of simple parameterizations of downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes at the Arctic surface are examined. Parameterized fluxes are compared to in situ measurements over an annual cycle. Results suggest that existing parameterizations can estimate the downwelling shortwave flux to within 2% in the mean, with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of about 4% for clear skies and 21% for cloudy conditions. Parameterized longwave fluxes are accurate to within 1% in the mean, with RMSE values of 6% for both clear and cloudy skies. On the basis of these results, two parameterization schemes are recommended to estimate radiation forcings in sea ice models for Arctic applications.

  19. Solar radiation, phytoplankton pigments and the radiant heating of the equatorial Pacific warm pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, David A.; Ohlmann, J. Carter; Washburn, Libe; Bidigare, Robert R.; Nosse, Craig T.; Fields, Erik; Zhou, Yimei

    1995-01-01

    Recent optical, physical, and biological oceanographic observations are used to assess the magnitude and variability of the penetrating flux of solar radiation through the mixed layer of the warm water pool (WWP) of the western equatorial Pacific Ocean. Typical values for the penetrative solar flux at the climatological mean mixed layer depth for the WWP (30 m) are approx. 23 W/sq m and are a large fraction of the climatological mean net air-sea heat flux (approx. 40 W/sq m). The penetrating solar flux can vary significantly on synoptic timescales. Following a sustained westerly wind burst in situ solar fluxes were reduced in response to a near tripling of mixed layer phytoplankton pigment concentrations. This results in a reduction in the penetrative flux at depth (5.6 W/sq m at 30 m) and corresponds to a biogeochemically mediated increase in the mixed layer radiant heating rate of 0.13 C per month. These observations demonstrate a significant role of biogeochemical processes on WWP thermal climate. We speculate that this biogeochemically mediated feedback process may play an important role in enhancing the rate at which the WWP climate system returns to normal conditions following a westerly wind burst event.

  20. Effect of gage size on the measurement of local heat flux. [formulas for determining gage averaging errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Papell, S. S.

    1973-01-01

    General formulas are derived for determining gage averaging errors of strip-type heat flux meters used in the measurement of one-dimensional heat flux distributions. In addition, a correction procedure is presented which allows a better estimate for the true value of the local heat flux. As an example of the technique, the formulas are applied to the cases of heat transfer to air slot jets impinging on flat and concave surfaces. It is shown that for many practical problems, the use of very small heat flux gages is often unnecessary.

  1. Evolution of radiation defect and radiation hardening in heat treated SA508 Gr3 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Kwon, Junhyun; Shin, Chansun

    2014-01-01

    The formation of radiation defects and corresponding radiation hardening in heat-treated SA508 Gr3 steel after Fe ion irradiation were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy and a nano-indentation technique. As the residual dislocation density is increased in the matrix, the formation of radiation defects is considerably weakened. Comparison between the characteristics of the radiation defect and an evaluation of radiation hardening indicates that a large dislocation loop contributes little to the radiation hardening in the heat-treated SA508 Gr3 steel.

  2. Influence of penetrating solar radiation on the heat budget of the equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marlon R.; Carr, Mary-Elena; Feldman, Gene C.; Esaias, Wayne; Mcclain, Chuck

    1990-01-01

    Recent satellite observations of ocean transparency, coupled with climatological surface heat fluxes and ocean density profiles, are used here to show that solar radiation in visible frequencies, usually assumed to be absorbed at the sea surface, in fact penetrates to a significant degree to below the upper mixed layer of the ocean which interacts actively with the atmosphere. The net effect is a reduction of the heat input into the upper layer; for a 20 m-thick mixed layer this is equivalent to an annual reduction in temperature of about 5-10 K. The results provide a natural explanation for the discrepancy between the SSTs predicted by models and those observed.

  3. Influence of Infrared Radiation on Attic Heat Transfer 

    E-print Network

    Katipamula, S.; Turner, W. D.; Murphy, W. E.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    transfer, and the effect of infrared radiation on the thermal conductivity of the insulation system and on attic heat transfer. All the tests were performed at steady state conditions by controlling the roof deck temperature. Calculations are performed...

  4. Small distance expansion for radiative heat transfer between curved objects

    E-print Network

    Golyk, Vladyslav A.

    We develop a small distance expansion for the radiative heat transfer between gently curved objects, in terms of the ratio of distance to radius of curvature. A gradient expansion allows us to go beyond the lowest-order ...

  5. Climatological monthly heat and freshwater flux estimates on a global scale from Argo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, Donata; Roemmich, Dean

    2014-10-01

    The global pattern of climatological monthly heat and freshwater fluxes at the ocean surface is estimated using Argo temperature and salinity profile data for the period 2004-2013. Temperature or salinity changes are calculated in a volume of water above an isopycnal that is below the mixed layer and not subject to mixed-layer entrainment. Horizontal advection components from geostrophic velocity and from Ekman transport, based on wind stress, are also included. The climatological monthly heat or freshwater flux at the ocean surface is estimated as the sum of advective and time tendency contributions. The air-sea flux estimates from Argo are described in global maps and basin-wide integrals, in comparison to atmospheric reanalysis data and to air-sea flux products based on observations. This ocean-based estimate of surface fluxes is consistent with property variations in the subsurface ocean and indicates greater amplitude for the climatological monthly heat flux values in the subtropics compared to other products. Similarly, the combination of Argo freshwater flux and reanalysis evaporation, suggests greater amplitude for climatological monthly precipitation in the tropics.

  6. Numerical research of dynamic characteristics in tower solar cavity receiver based on step-change radiation flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengwei; Wang, Yueshe; Hao, Yun; Wang, Qizhi

    2013-07-01

    The solar cavity receiver is an important light-energy to thermal-energy convector in the tower solar thermal power plant system. The heat flux in the inner surface of the cavity will show the characteristics of non-continuous step change especially in non-normal and transient weather conditions, which may result in a continuous dynamic variation of the characteristic parameters. Therefore, the research of dynamic characteristics of the receiver plays a very important role in the operation and the control safely in solar cavity receiver system. In this paper, based on the non-continuous step change of radiation flux, a non-linear dynamic model is put forward to obtain the effects of the non-continuous step change radiation flux and step change feed water flow on the receiver performance by sequential modular approach. The subject investigated in our study is a 1MW solar power station constructed in Yanqing County, Beijing. This study has obtained the dynamic responses of the characteristic parameters in the cavity receiver, such as drum pressure, drum water level, main steam flow and main steam enthalpy under step change radiation flux. And the influence law of step-change feed water flow to the dynamic characteristics in the receiver also has been analyzed. The results have a reference value for the safe operation and the control in solar cavity receiver system.

  7. Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux

    E-print Network

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux M the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential fea- tures of spatio

  8. Comparison of heat flux estimations from two turbulent exchange models based on thermal UAV data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Helene; Nieto, Hector; Jensen, Rasmus; Friborg, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Advantages of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) data-collection, compared to more traditional data-collections are numerous and already well-discussed (Berni et al., 2009; Laliberte et al., 2011; Turner et al., 2012). However studies investigating the quality and applications of UAV-data are crucial if advantages are to be beneficial for scientific purposes. In this study, thermal data collected over an agricultural site in Denmark have been obtained using a fixed-wing UAV and investigated for the estimation of heat fluxes. Estimation of heat fluxes requires high precision data and careful data processing. Latent, sensible and soil heat fluxes are estimates through two models of the two source energy modelling scheme driven by remotely sensed observations of land surface temperature; the original TSEB (Norman et al., 1995) and the DTD (Norman et al., 2000) which builds on the TSEB. The DTD model accounts for errors arising when deriving radiometric temperatures and can to some extent compensate for the fact that thermal cameras rarely are accurate. The DTD model requires an additional set of remotely sensed data during morning hours of the day at which heat fluxes are to be determined. This makes the DTD model ideal to use when combined with UAV data, because acquisition of data is not limited by fixed time by-passing tracks like satellite images (Guzinski et al., 2013). Based on these data, heat fluxes are computed from the two models and compared with fluxes from an eddy covariance station situated within the same designated agricultural site. This over-all procedure potentially enables an assessment of both the collected thermal UAV-data and of the two turbulent exchange models. Results reveal that both TSEB and DTD models compute heat fluxes from thermal UAV data that is within a very reasonable range and also that estimates from the DTD model is in best agreement with the eddy covariance system.

  9. Galileo Probe Measurements of Thermal and Solar Radiation Fluxes in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Collard, A. D.; Fry, P. M.; Orton, G. S.; Lemmon, M. T.; Tomasko, M. G.; Freedman, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo probe net flux radiometer (NFR) measured radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere from about 0.44 to 14 bars, using five spectral channels to separate solar and thermal components. Onboard calibration results confirm that the NFR responded to radiation approximately as expected. NFR channels also responded to a superimposed thermal perturbation, which can be approximately removed using blind channel measurements and physical constraints. Evidence for the expected NH3 cloud was seen in the spectral character of spin-induced modulations of the direct solar beam signals. These results are consistent with an overlying cloud of small NH3 ice particles (0.5-0.75 microns in radius) of optical depth 1.5-2 at 0.5 microns. Such a cloud would have so little effect on thermal fluxes that NFR thermal channels provide no additional constraints on its properties. However, evidence for heating near 0.45 bar in the NFR thermal channels would seem to require either an additional opacity source beyond this small-particle cloud, implying a heterogeneous-cloud structure to avoid conflicts with solar modulation results, or a change in temperature lapse rate just above the probe measurements. The large thermal flux levels imply water vapor mixing ratios that are only 6% of solar at 10 bars, but possibly increasing with depth, and significantly subsaturated ammonia at pressures less than 3 bars. If deep NH3 mixing ratios at the probe entry site are 3-4 times ground-based inferences, as suggested by probe radio signal attenuation, then only half as much water is needed to match NFR observations. No evidence of a water cloud was seen near the 5-bar level. The 5 microns thermal channel detected the presumed NH4SH cloud base near 1.35 bars. Effects of this cloud were also seen in the solar channel upflux measurements but not in the solar net fluxes, implying that the cloud is a conservative scatterer of sunlight. The minor thermal signature of this cloud is compatible with particle radii near 3 microns, but it cannot rule out smaller particles. Deeper than about 3 bars, solar channels indicate unexpectedly large absorption of sunlight at wavelengths longer than 0.6 microns, which might be due to unaccounted-for absorption by NH3 between 0.65 and 1.5 microns.

  10. Galileo Probe Measurements of Thermal and Solar Radiation Fluxes in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Collard, A. D.; Fry, P. M.; Orton, G. S.; Lemmon, M. T.; Tomasko, M. G.; Freedman, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo probe net flux radiometer (NFR) measured radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere from about 0.44 to 14 bars, using five spectral channels to separate solar and thermal components. Onboard calibration results confirm that the NFR responded to radiation approximately as expected. NFR channels also responded to a superimposed thermal perturbation, which can be approximately removed using blind channel measurements and physical constraints. Evidence for the expected NH3 cloud was seen in the spectral character of spin-induced modulations of the direct solar beam signals. These results are consistent with an overlying cloud of small NH3 ice particles (0.5-0.75 microns in radius) of optical depth 1.5-2 at 0.5 microns. Such a cloud would have so little effect on thermal fluxes that NFR thermal channels provide no additional constraints on its properties. However, evidence for heating near 0.45 bar in the NFR thermal channels would seem to require either an additional opacity source beyond this small-particle cloud, implying a heterogeneous cloud structure to avoid conflicts with solar modulation results, or a change in temperature lapse rate just above the probe measurements. The large thermal flux levels imply water vapor mixing ratios that are only 6% of solar at 10 bars, but possibly increasing with depth, and significantly subsaturated ammonia at pressures less than 3 bars. If deep NH3 mixing ratios at the probe entry site are 3-4 times ground-based inferences, as suggested by probe radio signal attenuation, then only half as much water is needed to match NFR observations. No evidence of a water cloud was seen near the 5-bar level. The 5-microns thermal channel detected the presumed NH4SH cloud base near 1.35 bars. Effects of this cloud were also seen in the solar channel upflux measurements but not in the solar net fluxes, implying that the cloud is a conservative scatterer of sunlight. The minor thermal signature of this cloud is compatible with particle radii near 3 gm, but it cannot rule out smaller particles. Deeper than about 3 bars, solar channels indicate unexpectedly large absorption of sunlight at wavelengths longer than 0.6 microns, which might be due to unaccounted-for absorption by NH3 between 0.65 and 1.5 microns.

  11. Radiative heat transfer in low-dimensional systems -- microscopic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Lilia; Phan, Anh; Drosdoff, David

    2013-03-01

    Radiative heat transfer between objects can increase dramatically at sub-wavelength scales. Exploring ways to modulate such transport between nano-systems is a key issue from fundamental and applied points of view. We advance the theoretical understanding of radiative heat transfer between nano-objects by introducing a microscopic model, which takes into account the individual atoms and their atomic polarizabilities. This approach is especially useful to investigate nano-objects with various geometries and give a detailed description of the heat transfer distribution. We employ this model to study the heat exchange in graphene nanoribbon/substrate systems. Our results for the distance separations, substrates, and presence of extended or localized defects enable making predictions for tailoring the radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale. Financial support from the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46297 is acknowledged.

  12. Analysis of the thermal performance of heat pipe radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, J. H.; Hartley, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model and computational methodology are presented to obtain numerical solutions for the transient behavior of a heat pipe radiator in a space environment. The modeling is focused on a typical radiator panel having a long heat pipe at the center and two extended surfaces attached to opposing sides of the heat pipe shell in the condenser section. In the set of governing equations developed for the model, each region of the heat pipe - shell, liquid, and vapor - is thermally lumped to the extent possible, while the fin is lumped only in the direction normal to its surface. Convection is considered to be the only significant heat transfer mode in the vapor, and the evaporation and condensation velocity at the liquid-vapor interface is calculated from kinetic theory. A finite-difference numerical technique is used to predict the transient behavior of the entire radiator in response to changing loads.

  13. High heat flux testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, D.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Wold, L.S.

    1994-12-31

    High heat flux testing for the United States fusion power program is the primary mission of the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) located at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico. This facility, which is owned by the United States Department of Energy, has been in operation for over 17 years and has provided much of the high heat flux data used in the design and evaluation of plasma facing components for many of the world`s magnetic fusion, tokamak experiments. In addition to domestic tokamaks such as Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, components for international experiments like TEXTOR, Tore-Supra, and JET also have been tested at the PMTF. High heat flux testing spans a wide spectrum including thermal shock tests on passively cooled materials, thermal response and thermal fatigue tests on actively cooled components, critical heat flux-burnout tests, braze reliability tests and safety related tests. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the high heat flux testing capabilities at the PMTF and describe a few of the experiments performed over the last year.

  14. Simulation of tokamak SOL and divertor region including heat flux mitigation by gas puffing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Woo; Na, Y. S.; Hong, S. H.; Ahn, J.W.; Kim, D. K.; Han, Hyunsun; Shim, Seong Bo; Lee, Hae June

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D), scrape-off layer (SOL)-divertor transport simulations are performed using the integrated plasma-neutral-impurity code KTRAN developed at Seoul National University. Firstly, the code is applied to reproduce a National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) discharge by using the prescribed transport coefficients and the boundary conditions obtained from the experiment. The plasma density, the heat flux on the divertor plate, and the D (alpha) emission rate profiles from the numerical simulation are found to follow experimental trends qualitatively. Secondly, predictive simulations are carried out for the baseline operation mode in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) to predict the heat flux on the divertor target plates. The stationary peak heat flux in the KSTAR baseline operation mode is expected to be 6.5 MW/m(2) in the case of an orthogonal divertor. To study the mitigation of the heat flux, we investigated the puffing effects of deuterium and argon gases. The puffing position is assumed to be in front of the strike point at the outer lower divertor plate. In the simulations, mitigation of the peak heat flux at the divertor target plates is found to occur when the gas puffing rate exceeds certain values, similar to 1.0 x 10(20) /s and similar to 5.0 x 10(18) /s for deuterium and argon, respectively. Multi-charged impurity transport is also investigated for both NSTX and KSTAR SOL and divertor regions.

  15. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: cluster observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M.; Matteini, L.; Santolík, O.

    2014-11-20

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ?10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor ? {sub e?} is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for ? {sub e?} ? 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  16. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure at astronomical observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxy, M. S.; Sumithranand, V. B.; Renuka, G.

    2014-06-01

    Soil heat flux is an important input component of surface energy balance. Estimates of soil heat flux were made in the year 2008 using soil temperature data at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala. Hourly values of soil heat flux from 00 to 24 LST are presented for selected days typical of the winter, pre-monsoon, SW monsoon and NE monsoon seasons. The diurnal variation is characterized by a cross-over from negative to positive values at 0700 h, occurrence of maximum around noon and return to negative values in the late evening. The energy storage term for the soil layer 0-0.05 m is calculated and the ground heat flux G ? is estimated in all seasons. Daytime surface energy balance at the surface on wet and dry seasons is investigated. The average Bowen's ratio during the wet and dry seasons were 0.541 and 0.515, respectively indicating that considerable evaporation takes place at the surface. The separate energy balance components were examined and the mean surface energy balance closure was found to be 0.742 and 0.795 for wet and dry seasons, respectively. When a new method that accounts for both soil thermal conduction and soil thermal convection was adopted to calculate the surface heat flux, the energy balance closure was found to be improved. Thus on the land surface under study, the soil vertical water movement is significant.

  17. The Impact of Trends in the Large Scale Atmospheric Circulation on Mediterranean Surface Turbulent Heat Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanski, Joy; Hameed, Sultan

    2015-01-01

    Interannual variations of latent heat fluxes (LHF) and sensible heat fluxes (SHF) over the Mediterranean for the boreal winter season (DJF) show positive trends during 1958-2011. Comparison of correlations between the heat fluxes and the intensity and location of the Azores High (AH), and the NAO and East Atlantic-West Russia (EAWR) teleconnections, along with analysis of composites of surface temperature, humidity and wind fields for different teleconnection states, demonstrates that variations of the AH are found to explain the heat flux changes more successfully than the NAO and the EAWR. Trends in sea level pressure and longitude of the Azores High during DJF show a strengthening, and an eastward shift. DJF Azores High pressure and longitude are shown to co-vary such that variability of the Azores High occurs along an axis defined by lower pressure and westward location at one extreme, and higher pressure and eastward location at the other extreme. The shift of the Azores High from predominance of the low/west state to the high/east state induces trends in Mediterranean Sea surface winds, temperature and moisture. These, combined with sea surface warming trends, produce trends in wintertime Mediterranean Sea sensible and latent heat fluxes.

  18. Effect of heat flux on Alfvén ballooning modes in isotropic Hall-MHD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, John Z. G.; Hirose, Akira; Liu, William W.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetosphere undergoes a transition from a dipole-like to taillike structure in the antisunward direction. In this region, Alfvén ballooning instability has been considered as a leading candidate to be responsible for the onset and expansion phase of observed impulsive substorms. We apply the generalized Ohm's law in isotropic Hall-MHD equations and study the effect of heat flux on the ballooning modes under substorm circumstances. The set of partial differential equations is obtained for a general ballooning dispersion relation from which all classical Alfvén waves and fundamental ballooning modes are recovered, e.g., the decoupled shear Alfvén and magnetosonic modes, the classical ballooning instability in incompressible plasmas. In the absence of the heat flux, the ballooning mode is featured by the coupling of the two modes by the superposition of the independent Hall effect and the independent plasma inhomogeneity effect. By contrast, heat flux exerts its influence on the ballooning mode by updating the coefficients of the terms in the dispersion relation. The results expose that the growth rate (?BM) has two branches. If kp is ? free, one branch shifts versus ?, while the other branch is damped substantially by the heat flux, leading to a more stable ballooning mode; if kc is ? free, one branch shifts little versus ?, but the other one has higher ?BM driven by the heat flux, leading to a more unstable ballooning mode.

  19. Interannual and Decadal Variability of Ocean Surface Latent Heat Flux as Seen from Passive Microwave Satellite Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Jackson, Darren L.; Wick, Gary A.; Roberts, Brent; Miller, Tim L.

    2007-01-01

    Ocean surface turbulent fluxes are critical links in the climate system since they mediate energy exchange between the two fluid systems (ocean and atmosphere) whose combined heat transport determines the basic character of Earth's climate. Deriving physically-based latent and sensible heat fluxes from satellite is dependent on inferences of near surface moisture and temperature from coarser layer retrievals or satellite radiances. Uncertainties in these "retrievals" propagate through bulk aerodynamic algorithms, interacting as well with error properties of surface wind speed, also provided by satellite. By systematically evaluating an array of passive microwave satellite algorithms, the SEAFLUX project is providing improved understanding of these errors and finding pathways for reducing or eliminating them. In this study we focus on evaluating the interannual variability of several passive microwave-based estimates of latent heat flux starting from monthly mean gridded data. The algorithms considered range from those based essentially on SSM/I (e.g. HOAPS) to newer approaches that consider additional moisture information from SSM/T-2 or AMSU-B and lower tropospheric temperature data from AMSU-A. On interannual scales, variability arising from ENSO events and time-lagged responses of ocean turbulent and radiative fluxes in other ocean basins (as well as the extratropical Pacific) is widely recognized, but still not well quantified. Locally, these flux anomalies are of order 10-20 W/sq m and present a relevant "target" with which to verify algorithm performance in a climate context. On decadal time scales there is some evidence from reanalyses and remotely-sensed fluxes alike that tropical ocean-averaged latent heat fluxes have increased 5-10 W/sq m since the early 1990s. However, significant uncertainty surrounds this estimate. Our work addresses the origin of these uncertainties and provides statistics on time series of tropical ocean averages, regional space / time correlation analysis, and separation of contributions by variations in wind and near surface humidity deficit. Comparison to variations in reanalysis data sets is also provided for reference.

  20. Parallel-plate submicron gap formed by micromachined low-density pillars for near-field radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kota; Miura, Atsushi; Iizuka, Hideo; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi

    2015-02-23

    Near-field radiative heat transfer has been a subject of great interest due to the applicability to thermal management and energy conversion. In this letter, a submicron gap between a pair of diced fused quartz substrates is formed by using micromachined low-density pillars to obtain both the parallelism and small parasitic heat conduction. The gap uniformity is validated by the optical interferometry at four corners of the substrates. The heat flux across the gap is measured in a steady-state and is no greater than twice of theoretically predicted radiative heat flux, which indicates that the parasitic heat conduction is suppressed to the level of the radiative heat transfer or less. The heat conduction through the pillars is modeled, and it is found to be limited by the thermal contact resistance between the pillar top and the opposing substrate surface. The methodology to form and evaluate the gap promotes the near-field radiative heat transfer to various applications such as thermal rectification, thermal modulation, and thermophotovoltaics.

  1. A Simple Framework for the Dynamic Response of Cirrus Clouds to Local Diabatic Radiative Heating

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, C T

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a simple analytical framework for the dynamic response of cirrus to a local radiative flux convergence, expressible in terms of three independent modes of cloud evolution. Horizontally narrow and tenuous clouds within a stable environment adjust to radiative heating by ascending gradually across isentropes while spreading sufficiently fast so as to keep isentropic surfaces nearly flat. More optically dense clouds experience very concentrated heating, and if they are also very broad, they develop a convecting mixed layer. Along isentropic spreading still occurs, but in the form of turbulent density currents rather than laminar flows. A third adjustment mode relates to evaporation, which erodes cloudy air as it lofts. The dominant mode is determined from two dimensionless numbers, whose predictive power is shown in comparisons with high resolution numerical cloud simulations. The power and simplicity of the approach hints that fast, sub-grid scale radiative-dynamic atmospheric interactions m...

  2. Heat pipe radiation cooling evaluation: Task 2 concept studies report

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, C.C.

    1991-10-01

    This report presents the result of Task 2, Concept Studies for Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC), which was performed for Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract 9-XT1-U9567. Studies under a prior contract defined a reference HPRC conceptual design for hypersonic aircraft engines operating at Mach 5 and an altitude of 80,000 ft. Task 2 involves the further investigation of heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) systems for additional design and operating conditions.

  3. Theory of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of oil radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariamov, N B

    1942-01-01

    In the present report the coefficients of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance are theoretically obtained for the case of laminar flow of a heated viscous liquid in a narrow rectangular channel. The results obtained are applied to the computation of oil radiators, which to a first approximation may be considered as made up of a system of such channels. In conclusion, a comparison is given of the theoretical with the experimental results obtained from tests on airplane oil radiators.

  4. Heat and mass flux measurement from thermal infrared imagery: Example of the Soufrière Volcano (Guadeloupe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, D.; Beauducel, F.; Finizola, A.; Allemand, P.; Delacourt, C.; Richon, P.; Coutant, O.; de Chabalier, J.

    2012-12-01

    The estimation of mass and heat emissions is crucial for volcano monitoring. These fluxes may be diffuse or concentrated on precise zones of the volcano : gas fumaroles, thermal anomalies, hot springs. The total flux evolution is good indicator of the volcanic activity global behavior, while local flux at focused zones may help to characterize the hydrothermal system. However, large-scale surveys using classical methods are difficult to carry on, since field conditions may prevent permanent instrument installation. Thermal infrared pictures (7.5 - 14 ?m) can be used to map temperatures of surfaces and gases. In this study, we investigated relationships between temperature anomalies and heat flux, in order to evaluate the potential of thermal imagery for volcano monitoring. Two surveys have been achieved in 2010 and 2012 on la Soufrière Volcano (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles), both by airborne and handled thermal cameras. We first calibrate the uncooled microbolometers cameras, then we correct images from atmospheric absorption according to sensor elevation and atmospheric humidity, pressure and temperature. To correct effects of surface reflexion, we estimate surface emissivity and incoming flux at surface. Finally, the absolute precision of measurements is 2 K while the relative sensitivity is about 0.2 K. In order to estimate the total heat flux, we map thermal anomalies on the volcano edifice by overlapping infrared airborne images on visible orthorectified images. Active zones are clearly identified at the top (actives and potential fumaroles) and on the slopes (former active fumaroles and hot springs). At the summit active fumaroles, we estimate the mass flux of gas by measuring the panache dilution into the atmosphere. Indeed, it is shown that temperature profile along the plume is a function of the wind velocity, distance and mass flux at the source vent. Measured fluxes of 30 m3/s for the South Crater and 5 m3/s for the Tarissan Pit are estimated, and compared to other methods results. At the Ty Fault thermal anomaly (low flux fumarolian zone), we conducted an experiment to estimate the heat flux from thermal gradient anomaly at surface. This implies the measurement of external parameters describing the atmosphere dynamics (surface roughness, wind velocity, rainfall, etc.). We validate our interpretative model of surface flux with in situ vertical temperature gradient measurements. The surface flux is integrated over all spatial areas to provide the total flux of the zone. Our measurements on La Soufrière Volcano show that the fluxes emitted in hot springs and in sub-fumarolian zones (1.5 MW for the Ty Fault zone) represents a few percents of the total budget of heat (50 MW). However, the evolution of the localization and of the power of different heat sources shows a clear evolution from 2010 to 2012, with an increase of the summit activity and a decrease of the peripheral sub-fumarolian heat flux. These observations are in good agreement with the seismic, tectonic and geochemical observations, showing a pressurization of the volcano since 1997. Finally, thermal infrared imaging enables a precise mapping of mass and heat fluxes. It has a great potential in volcano monitoring, because of its ease of use, and the large variety of measurements which can be achieved from a single image.

  5. OPTIMIZATION AND DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR HIGH FLUX MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS FOR LIQUID AND GASEOUS SINGLE-PHASE FLOW

    E-print Network

    Müller, Norbert

    are mostly chosen for their low manufacturing costs. So today, extruded heat sinks with ducted fans thermo-fluid systems raises the need for high flux heat exchangers using a liquid or gaseous workingOPTIMIZATION AND DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR HIGH FLUX MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS FOR LIQUID AND GASEOUS

  6. OPTIMIZATION AND DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR HIGH FLUX MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS FOR LIQUID AND GASEOUS SINGLE-PHASE FLOW

    E-print Network

    Frechette, Luc G.

    are mostly chosen for their low manufacturing costs. So today, extruded heat sinks with ducted fans-fluid systems raises the need for high flux heat exchangers using a liquid or gaseous working fluid, for devicesOPTIMIZATION AND DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR HIGH FLUX MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS FOR LIQUID AND GASEOUS

  7. Measurements of the local convective heat flux in turbulent Rayleigh-Bnard convection X.-D. Shang,1,2

    E-print Network

    Tong, Penger

    Measurements of the local convective heat flux in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection X.-D. Shang convective heat transport in turbulent thermal convection is carried out in small-aspect-ratio cells filled with water. The local convective heat flux is obtained from the simultaneous velocity and temperature

  8. Oxy-fuel combustion of coal and biomass, the effect on radiative and convective heat transfer and burnout

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, John P.; Patel, Rajeshriben; Riley, Gerry S.

    2010-12-15

    This paper focuses on results of co-firing coal and biomass under oxy-fuel combustion conditions on the RWEn 0.5 MWt Combustion Test Facility (CTF). Results are presented of radiative and convective heat transfer and burnout measurements. Two coals were fired: a South African coal and a Russian Coal under air and oxy-fuel firing conditions. The two coals were also co-fired with Shea Meal at a co-firing mass fraction of 20%. Shea Meal was also co-fired at a mass fraction of 40% and sawdust at 20% with the Russian Coal. An IFRF Aerodynamically Air Staged Burner (AASB) was used. The thermal input was maintained at 0.5 MWt for all conditions studied. The test matrix comprised of varying the Recycle Ratio (RR) between 65% and 75% and furnace exit O{sub 2} was maintained at 3%. Carbon-in-ash samples for burnout determination were also taken. Results show that the highest peak radiative heat flux and highest flame luminosity corresponded to the lowest recycle ratio. The effect of co-firing of biomass resulted in lower radiative heat fluxes for corresponding recycle ratios. Furthermore, the highest levels of radiative heat flux corresponded to the lowest convective heat flux. Results are compared to air firing and the air equivalent radiative and convective heat fluxes are fuel type dependent. Reasons for these differences are discussed in the main text. Burnout improves with biomass co-firing under both air and oxy-fuel firing conditions and burnout is also seen to improve under oxy-fuel firing conditions compared to air. (author)

  9. High heat flux accelerator targets cooling with liquid-metal jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, I.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.

    2005-12-01

    Accelerator targets for radioisotope production generate very high density of thermal energy in the target material, which absorbs the particles beam. The design of these targets requires efficient heat removal techniques in order to preserve the integrity of the target. Normal average heat fluxes from these targets are around 1 kW/cm2 and may reach order of magnitude higher values at hot spots. Few techniques exist to deal with such high heat fluxes. One of them is jet impingement that has been proved to be able to deal with heat fluxes as high as 40 kW/cm2 using water as coolant. However, this requires very high jet velocities of more than 100 m/s. A few theoretical and experimental studies indicate that liquid-metal coolants (e.g., gallium or gallium alloys) can improve the heat transfer efficiency in this configuration. Experimental cooling loops based on water and liquid-metal jet impingement have been designed and built at Soreq to evaluate this method. For the current liquid-metal system an eutectic alloy of gallium and indium (GaIn) is used. Initial experiments demonstrate that the GaIn cooling system can deal with heat flux of about 2 kW/cm2 over an area of 1 cm2. The jet velocity is less than 4 m/s and the required differential pressure from the pump is less than 1 bar.

  10. Critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon on a downward facing curved surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C.

    1997-06-01

    This report describes a theoretical and experimental study of the boundary layer boiling and critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing curved heating surface, including both hemispherical and toroidal surfaces. A subscale boundary layer boiling (SBLB) test facility was developed to measure the spatial variation of the critical heat flux and observe the underlying mechanisms. Transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB facility under both saturated and subcooled conditions to obtain a complete database on the critical heat flux. To complement the experimental effort, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed from the conservation laws along with sound physical arguments. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel. Based upon the CHF model, a scaling law was established for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water. The scaling law, which compares favorably with all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes, can be used to predict the local CHF limits on large commercial-size vessels. This technical information represents one of the essential elements that is needed in assessing the efficacy of external cooling of core melt by cavity flooding as a severe accident management strategy. 83 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Benchmark Wall Heat Flux Data for a GO2/GH2 Single Element Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Pal, Sibtosh; Woodward, Roger d.; Santoro, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Wall heat flux measurements in a 1.5 in. diameter circular cross-section rocket chamber for a uni-element shear coaxial injector element operating on gaseous oxygen (GOz)/gaseous hydrogen (GH,) propellants are presented. The wall heat flux measurements were made using arrays of Gardon type heat flux gauges and coaxial thermocouple instrumentation. Wall heat flux measurements were made for two cases. For the first case, GOZ/GHz oxidizer-rich (O/F=l65) and fuel-rich preburners (O/F=1.09) integrated with the main chamber were utilized to provide vitiated hot fuel and oxidizer to the study shear coaxial injector element. For the second case, the preburners were removed and ambient temperature gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen propellants were supplied to the study injector. Experiments were conducted at four chamber pressures of 750, 600, 450 and 300psia for each case. The overall mixture ratio for the preburner case was 6.6, whereas for the ambient propellant case, the mixture ratio was 6.0. Total propellant flow was nominally 0.27-0.29 Ibm/s for the 750 psia case with flowrates scaled down linearly for lower chamber pressures. The axial heat flux profile results for both the preburner and ambient propellant cases show peak heat flux levels a t axial locations between 2.0 and 3.0 in. from the injector face. The maximum heat flux level was about two times greater for the preburner case. This is attributed to the higher injector fuel-to-oxidizer momentum flux ratio that promotes mixing and higher initial propellant temperature for the preburner case which results in a shorter reaction zone. The axial heat flux profiles were also scaled with respect to the chamber pressure to the power 0.8. The results at the four chamber pressures for both cases collapsed to a single profile indicating that at least to first approximation, the basic fluid dynamic structures in the flow field are pressure independent as long as the chamber/njector/nozzle geometry and injection velocities remain the same.

  12. Characterization of Turbulent Latent and Sensible Heat Flux Exchange Between the Atmosphere and Ocean in MERRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Clayson, Carol Anne; Bosilovich, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture across the atmosphere-ocean interface are fundamental components of the Earth s energy and water balance. Characterizing both the spatiotemporal variability and the fidelity of these exchanges of heat and moisture is critical to understanding the global water and energy cycle variations, quantifying atmosphere-ocean feedbacks, and improving model predictability. This study examines the veracity of the recently completed NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) product with respect to its representation of the surface turbulent heat fluxes. A validation of MERRA turbulent heat fluxes and near-surface bulk variables at local, high-resolution space and time scales is achieved by making comparisons to a large suite of direct observations. Both in situ and satellite-observed gridded surface heat flux estimates are employed to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the surface fluxes with respect to their annual mean climatologies, their seasonal covariability of near-surface bulk parameters, and their representation of extremes. The impact of data assimilation on the near-surface parameters is assessed through evaluation of incremental analysis update tendencies produced by the assimilation procedure. It is found that MERRA turbulent surface heat fluxes are relatively accurate for typical conditions but have systematically weak vertical gradients in moisture and temperature and have a weaker covariability between the near-surface gradients and wind speed than found in observations. This results in an underestimate of the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes over the western boundary current and storm track regions. The assimilation of observations mostly acts to bring MERRA closer to observational products by increasing moisture and temperature near the surface and decreasing the near-surface wind speeds. The major patterns of spatial and temporal variability of the turbulent heat fluxes produced by MERRA compare favorably to observationally based estimates. However, MERRA is distinct in terms of amplitude. These results suggest that MERRA is likely to be a valuable resource for a number of research applications though, as with all turbulent flux estimates, systematic issues should be taken into account.

  13. Characterization of Turbulent Latent and Sensible Heat Flux Exchange Between the Atmosphere and Ocean in MERRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robert, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Clayson, Carol Anne; Bosilovich, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture across the atmosphere-ocean interface are fundamental components of the Earth's energy and water balance. Characterizing both the spatiotemporal variability and the fidelity of these exchanges of heat and moisture is critical to understanding the global water and energy cycle variations, quantifying atmosphere-ocean feedbacks, and improving model predictability. This study examines the veracity of the recently completed NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) product with respect to its representation of the surface turbulent heat fluxes. A validation of MERRA turbulent heat fluxes and near-surface bulk variables at local, high-resolution space and time scales is achieved by making comparisons to a large suite of direct observations. Both in situ and satellite-observed gridded surface heat flux estimates are employed to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the surface fluxes with respect to their annual mean climatologies, their seasonal covariability of near-surface bulk parameters, and their representation of extremes. The impact of data assimilation on the near-surface parameters is assessed through evaluation of incremental analysis update tendencies produced by the assimilation procedure. It is found that MERRA turbulent surface heat fluxes are relatively accurate for typical conditions but have systematically weak vertical gradients in moisture and temperature and have a weaker covariability between the near-surface gradients and wind speed than found in observations. This results in an underestimate of the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes over the western boundary current and storm track regions. The assimilation of observations mostly acts to bring MERRA closer to observational products by increasing moisture and temperature near the surface and decreasing the near-surface wind speeds. The major patterns of spatial and temporal variability of the turbulent heat fluxes produced by MERRA compare favorably to observationally based estimates. However, MERRA is distinct in terms of amplitude. These results suggest that MERRA is likely to be a valuable resource for a number of research applications though, as with all turbulent flux estimates, systematic issues should be taken into account

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of thin foil heating by Z-pinch radiation.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, J J; Bailey, J E; Chandler, G A; Deeney, C; Douglas, M R; Jobe, D; Lake, P; Nash, T J; Nielsen, D S; Spielman, R B; Wang, P; Woodruff, P

    2002-10-01

    Absorption spectroscopy measurements of the time-dependent heating of thin foils exposed to intense z-pinch radiation sources are presented. These measurements and their analysis provide valuable benchmarks for, and insights into, the radiative heating of matter by x-ray sources. Z-pinch radiation sources with peak powers of up to 160 TW radiatively heated thin plastic-tamped aluminum foils to temperatures approximately 60 eV. The foils were located in open slots at the boundary of z-pinch hohlraums surrounding the pinch. Time-resolved Kalpha satellite absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the evolution of the Al ionization distribution, using a geometry in which the pinch served as the backlighter. The time-dependent pinch radius and x-ray power were monitored using framing camera, x-ray diode array, and bolometer measurements. A three-dimensional view factor code, within which one-dimensional (1D) radiation-hydrodynamics calculations were performed for each surface element in the view factor grid, was used to compute the incident and reemitted radiation flux distribution throughout the hohlraum and across the foil surface. Simulated absorption spectra were then generated by postprocessing radiation-hydrodynamics results for the foil heating using a 1D collisional-radiative code. Our simulated results were found to be in good general agreement with experimental x-ray spectra, indicating that the spectral measurements are consistent with independent measurements of the pinch power. We also discuss the sensitivity of our results to the spectrum of the radiation field incident on the foil, and the role of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium atomic kinetics in affecting the spectra. PMID:12443339

  15. Electron Heat Flux in Pressure Balance Structures at Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar wind near solar minimum. Rom previous studies, PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes and be related to network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere. We investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs, applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data. At 2001 AGU Spring meeting, we reported that PBSs have structures like current sheets or plasmoids, and suggested that they are associated with network activity at the base of polar plumes. In this paper, we have analyzed high-energy electron data at Ulysses/SWOOPS to see whether bi-directional electron flow exists and confirm the conclusions more precisely. As a result, although most events show a typical flux directed away from the Sun, we have obtained evidence that some PBSs show bi-directional electron flux and others show an isotropic distribution of electron pitch angles. The evidence shows that plasmoids are flowing away from the Sun, changing their flow direction dynamically in a way not caused by Alfven waves. From this, we have concluded that PBSs are generated due to network activity at the base of polar plumes and their magnetic structures axe current sheets or plasmoids.

  16. Ground heat flux and power sources of low-enthalpy geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Peter; Blum, Philipp; Rivera, Jaime A.

    2015-04-01

    Geothermal heat pumps commonly extract energy from the shallow ground at depths as low as approximately 400 m. Vertical borehole heat exchangers are often applied, which are seasonally operated for decades. During this lifetime, thermal anomalies are induced in the ground and surface-near aquifers, which often grow over the years and which alleviate the overall performance of the geothermal system. As basis for prediction and control of the evolving energy imbalance in the ground, focus is typically set on the ground temperatures. This is reflected in regulative temperature thresholds, and in temperature trends, which serve as indicators for renewability and sustainability. In our work, we examine the fundamental heat flux and power sources, as well as their temporal and spatial variability during geothermal heat pump operation. The underlying rationale is that for control of ground temperature evolution, knowledge of the primary heat sources is fundamental. This insight is also important to judge the validity of simplified modelling frameworks. For instance, we reveal that vertical heat flux from the surface dominates the basal heat flux towards a borehole. Both fluxes need to be accounted for as proper vertical boundary conditions in the model. Additionally, the role of horizontal groundwater advection is inspected. Moreover, by adopting the ground energy deficit and long-term replenishment as criteria for system sustainability, an uncommon perspective is adopted that is based on the primary parameter rather than induced local temperatures. In our synthetic study and dimensionless analysis, we demonstrate that time of ground energy recovery after system shutdown may be longer than what is expected from local temperature trends. In contrast, unrealistically long recovery periods and extreme thermal anomalies are predicted without account for vertical ground heat fluxes and only when the energy content of the geothermal reservoir is considered.

  17. Dry Block Calibrator Using Heat Flux Sensors and an Adiabatic Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, M.; Marin, S.; Schalles, M.; Krapf, G.; Fröhlich, T.

    2015-08-01

    The main problems of conventional dry block calibrators are axial temperature gradients and calibration results which are strongly influenced by the geometry and the thermal properties of the thermometers under test. To overcome these disadvantages, a new dry block calibrator with improved homogeneity of the inner temperature field was developed for temperatures in the range from room temperature up to . The inner part of the dry block calibrator is a cylindrical normalization block which is divided into three parts in the axial direction. Between these parts, heat flux sensors are placed to measure the heat flux in the axial direction inside the normalization block. Each part is attached to a separate tube-shaped heating zone of which the heating power can be controlled in a way that the axial heat flux measured by means of the heat flux sensors is zero. Additionally, an internal reference thermometer is used to control the absolute value of the temperature inside the normalization block. To minimize the radial heat flux, an adiabatic shield is constructed which is composed of a secondary heating zone that encloses the whole assembly. For rapid changes of the set point from high to low temperatures, the design contains an additional ventilation system to cool the normalization block. The present paper shows the operating principle as well as the results of the design process, in which numerical simulations based on the finite element method were used to evaluate and optimize the design of the dry block calibrator. The final optimized design can be used to build a prototype of the dry block calibrator.

  18. The Development of Novel, High-Flux, Heat Transfer Cells for Thermal Control in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1996-01-01

    In order to meet the future needs of thermal management and control in space applications such as the Space Lab, new heat-transfer technology capable of much larger heat fluxes must be developed. To this end, we describe complementary numerical and experimental investigations into the fundamental fluid mechanics and heat-transfer processes involved in a radically new, self contained, heat transfer cell for microgravity applications. In contrast to conventional heat pipes, the heat transfer in this cell is based on a forced droplet evaporation process using a fine spray. The spray is produced by a novel fluidic technology recently developed at Georgia Tech. This technology is based on a vibration induced droplet atomization process. In this technique, a liquid droplet is placed on a flexible membrane and is vibrated normal to itself. When the proper drop size is attained, the droplet resonates with the surface motion of the membrane and almost immediately bursts into a shower of very fine secondary droplets. The small droplets travel to the opposite end of the cell where they impact a heated surface and are evaporated. The vapor returns to the cold end of the cell and condenses to form the large droplets that are fragmented to form the spray. Preliminary estimates show that a heat transfer cell based on this technology would have a heat-flux capacity that is an order of magnitude higher than those of current heat pipes designs used in microgravity applications.

  19. Enhanced radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates

    E-print Network

    R. Guérout; J. Lussange; F. S. S. Rosa; J. -P. Hugonin; D. A. R. Dalvit; J. -J. Greffet; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

    2012-03-07

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates in the framework of the scattering theory. We predict an enhancement of the heat transfer as we increase the depth of the corrugations while keeping the distance of closest approach fixed. We interpret this effect in terms of the evolution of plasmonic and guided modes as a function of the grating's geometry.

  20. Energy exchanges in a Central Business District - Interpretation of Eddy Covariance and radiation flux measurements (London UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotthaus, S.; Grimmond, S.

    2013-12-01

    Global urbanisation brings increasingly dense and complex urban structures. To manage cities sustainably and smartly, currently and into the future under changing climates, urban climate research needs to advance in areas such as Central Business Districts (CBD) where human interactions with the environment are particularly concentrated. Measurement and modelling approaches may be pushed to their limits in dense urban settings, but if urban climate research is to contribute to the challenges of real cities those limits have to be addressed. The climate of cities is strongly governed by surface-atmosphere exchanges of energy, moisture and momentum. Observations of the relevant fluxes provide important information for improvement and evaluation of modelling approaches. Due to the CBD's heterogeneity, a very careful analysis of observations is required to understand the relevant processes. Current approaches used to interpret observations and set them in a wider context may need to be adapted for use in these more complex areas. Here, we present long-term observations of the radiation balance components and turbulent fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat and momentum in the city centre of London. This is one of the first measurement studies in a CBD covering multiple years with analysis at temporal scales from days to seasons. Data gathered at two sites in close vicinity, but with different measurement heights, are analysed to investigate the influence of source area characteristics on long-term radiation and turbulent fluxes. Challenges of source area modelling and the critical aspect of siting in such a complex environment are considered. Outgoing long- and short-wave radiation are impacted by the anisotropic nature of the urban surface and the high reflectance materials increasingly being used as building materials. Results highlight the need to consider the source area of radiometers in terms of diffuse and direct irradiance. Sensible heat fluxes (QH) are positive all year round, even at night. QH systematically exceeds input from net all-wave radiation (Q*), probably sustained by a both storage and anthropogenic heat fluxes (QF). Model estimates suggest QF can exceed the Q* nearly all year round. The positive QH inhibits stable conditions, but the stability classification is determined predominantly by the pattern of friction velocity over the rough urban surface. Turbulent latent heat flux variations are controlled (beyond the available energy) by rainfall due to the small vegetation cover. The Bowen ratio is mostly larger than one. Analysis of the eddy covariance footprint surface controls for the different land cover types by flow patterns for measurements at the two heights suggests the spatial variations of the sensible heat flux observed are partly related to changes in surface roughness, even at the local scale. Where the source areas are most homogeneous, flow conditions are vertically consistent - even if initial morphometric parameters suggested the measurements may be below the blending height. Turbulence statistics and momentum flux patterns prove useful for the interpretation of turbulent heat exchanges observed.

  1. Radiative Heat Transfer in Finite Cylindrical Enclosures with Nonhomogeneous Participating Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Pei-Feng; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a numerical solution for radiative heat transfer in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous participating media are presented. The geometry of interest is a finite axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure. The integral formulation for radiative transport is solved by the YIX method. A three-dimensional solution scheme is applied to two-dimensional axisymmetric geometry to simplify kernel calculations and to avoid difficulties associated with treating boundary conditions. As part of the effort to improve modeling capabilities for turbulent jet diffusion flames, predicted distributions for flame temperature and soot volume fraction are used to calculate radiative heat transfer from soot particles in such flames. It is shown that the nonhomogeneity of radiative property has very significant effects. The peak value of the divergence of radiative heat flux could be underestimated by 2 factor of 7 if a mean homogeneous radiative property is used. Since recent studies have shown that scattering by soot agglomerates is significant in flames, the effect of magnitude of scattering is also investigated and found to be nonnegligible.

  2. Radiative convection with a xed heat ux S. Auma^ tre

    E-print Network

    Aumaître, Sébastien

    Radiative convection with a #12;xed heat ux S. Auma^#16;tre #3; D#19;epartement de Mod#19 On account to its role in atmospheric motions, the e#11;ect of radiative transfer on convective instability (July 1, 2001) We have determined the marginal stability curve of convective instability in the usual

  3. Stagnation Point Radiative Heating Relations for Venus Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Michael E.; Palmer, Grant E.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Improved analytic expressions for calculating the stagnation point radiative heating during entry into the atmosphere of Venus have been developed. These analytic expressions can be incorporated into entry trajectory simulation codes. Together with analytical expressions for convective heating at the stagnation point, the time-integrated total heat load at the stagnation point is used in determining the thickness of protective material required, and hence the mass of the fore body heatshield of uniform thickness.

  4. Durability of thermal barrier coatings in a high heat flux environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J.; Nesbitt, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal shock is a significant factor in the limited service life of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure, fuel turbopump (HPFTP) turbine blades. Addition of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to the blades could serve to dampen the thermal shock, thereby increasing the life of the blades. However, testing and use of TBCs to date is performed primarily under moderate heat flux conditions which are typical of aircraft turbines. Only limited testing was conducted that addresses high heat flux and severe thermal shock conditions. Therefore, it is not clear if TBCs can survive severe thermal shocks or provide adequate thermal shock protection to the HPFTP turbine blades. The purpose is to experimentally evaluate the potential durability and protective capability of a variety of advanced TBCs in a cyclic thermal shock environment. A secondary goal is to identify significant parameters affecting TBC life during high heat flux testing. Parameters investigated include top coat thickness, bond coat thickness, substrate type, and substrate geometry.

  5. Modeling and analysis of low heat flux natural convection sodium boiling in LMFBRs

    SciTech Connect

    Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Cazzoli, E.G.

    1982-09-01

    Flow excursion induced dryout at low heat flux natural convection boiling, typical of liquid metal fast breeder reactor, is addressed. Steady state calculations indicate that low quality boiling is possible up to the point of Ledinegg instability leading to flow excursion and subsequent dryout in agreement with experimental data. A flow regime-dependent dryout heat flux relationship based upon saturated boiling criterion is also presented. Transient analysis indicates that premature flow excursion can not be ruled out and sodium boiling is highly transient dependent. Analysis of a high heat flux forced convection, loss-of-flow transient shows a significantly faster flow excursion leading to dryout in excellent agreement with parallel calculations using the two-dimensional THORAX code. 31 refs., 25 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Axial evolution of radial heat flux profiles transmitted by atmospheric pressure nitrogen and argon arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meher, K. C.; Tiwari, N.; Ghorui, S.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Das, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    Axial evolutions of radial heat flux profiles in argon and nitrogen plasma jets from an atmospheric pressure dc non-transferred arc plasma torch are determined using a double calorimetric technique. Results are presented for power levels suitable for the processing of high temperature ceramic oxides, where the heat flux data reported in the literature is rare. Variations of the profile widths and profile maxima are presented as a function of axial distance as well as power. Relatively uniform profile width over prolonged axial distance for nitrogen plasma compared to argon is an important observation which has the potential to offer a much longer dwell time of the injected particles inside the plasma, avoiding the problem of unmelts, especially for ceramics. A comparative study of the heat flux profiles for argon and nitrogen plasma is presented. The obtained results are compared with the data reported in literature.

  7. Estimate of heat flux at the ice-water interface in Lake Baikal from experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslamov, I. A.; Kozlov, V. V.; Misandrontsev, I. B.; Kucher, K. M.; Granin, N. G.

    2014-08-01

    An original system for measuring temperature in the ice cover and subglacial water and an increase in the ice thickness provides data necessary for calculation of the heat flux at the ice-water interface. Successive freezing of 1-mm temperature sensors during the ice growth allows us to measure temperature gradients in the vicinities of the ice-water interface for the first time. An analytical equation derived from the Stefan condition allows calculations of the heat flux at the phase boundary on the basis of the experimental data, which agree with independent estimates that have been made on the basis of the subglacial temperature gradients and are within the 4-39 W/m2 range. The flow at the ice-water interface is comparable with the heat flux inside the ice depth and significantly affects the dynamics of the ice cover thickness.

  8. Heat radiation through steam in direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect

    Condiff, D.W.; Cho, D.H.; Chan, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    In current discussions of the direct heating of containment atmospheres (DCH) during a hypothetical severe accident in certain PWR's, involving meltdown and discharge via steam blowdown of substantial core materials (corium) from primary into secondary containment, there is concern about the potential for containment loading resulting from the release of large amounts of thermal energy from the airborne corium debris or aerosol directly to the containment atmosphere in sufficient quantities to cause overpressurization. The purpose of this study is to provide some preliminary indications based upon existing correlations, data, models, about transmission of high temperature radiant heat through steam at distances and conditions of significance to DCH.

  9. Measuring important parameters for air-sea heat exchange Christoph S. Garbeab, Uwe Schimpfab and Bernd Jhneab

    E-print Network

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    heat flux jh is composed of latent heat flux jl, sensible heat flux js and long-wave radiative heat flux jr, that is jh = jl + js + jr (1) Current techniques of measuring the net heat flux jh at the sea

  10. The first geothermal heat flux measurement below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.; Mankoff, K. D.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Foley, N.; Hossainzadeh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The geothermal heat flux is a critical thermal boundary condition that influences the melting, flow and mass balance of outlet glaciers and ice sheets. We measured directly the geothermal heat flux below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), under Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW), as part of the Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD) project. The one-dimensional, conductive heat flux is the product of thermal gradient and thermal conductivity. We developed and fielded a tool to determine the thermal gradient in lake sediments, after penetrating ~800 m of ice using a hot water drilling system. We used the needle-probe method to measure the thermal conductivity of sediments recovered from the bottom of the lake with a gravity-driven multi-corer. The thermal gradient was determined during two separate deployments of the geothermal tool, which penetrated ~1.1 m into the till below SLW, yielding essentially identical results: 0.21±0.07 °C/m. Fifteen sediment thermal conductivity measurements yield an average value of 1.36±0.12 W/m-K. The heat flux determined from these measurements is 285±85 W/m2. This value is somewhat higher than that estimated from the WAIS-Divide ice core site, 230 mW/m2, ~800 km away, and much higher than regional estimates based on magnetics and a global seismic model, generally ?100 mW/m2. Elevated heat flux in this area could result from thermal perturbations associated with rifting, crustal thinning, or volcanic activity. Heat flux of this magnitude is likely to cause basal melt rate of a few cm/year. If this value is representative of conditions below this part of the WAIS, it might help to explain the occurrence of active subglacial lakes and fast-moving ice streams and the ice dynamics of WAIS more broadly.

  11. Using heat to characterize streambed water flux variability in four stream reaches.

    PubMed

    Essaid, Hedeff I; Zamora, Celia M; McCarthy, Kathleen A; Vogel, Jason R; Wilson, John T

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of streambed water flux are needed for the interpretation of streambed chemistry and reactions. Continuous temperature and head monitoring in stream reaches within four agricultural watersheds (Leary Weber Ditch, IN; Maple Creek, NE; DR2 Drain, WA; and Merced River, CA) allowed heat to be used as a tracer to study the temporal and spatial variability of fluxes through the streambed. Synoptic methods (seepage meter and differential discharge measurements) were compared with estimates obtained by using heat as a tracer. Water flux was estimated by modeling one-dimensional vertical flow of water and heat using the model VS2DH. Flux was influenced by physical heterogeneity of the stream channel and temporal variability in stream and ground-water levels. During most of the study period (April-December 2004), flux was upward through the streambeds. At the IN, NE, and CA sites, high-stage events resulted in rapid reversal of flow direction inducing short-term surface-water flow into the streambed. During late summer at the IN site, regional ground-water levels dropped, leading to surface-water loss to ground water that resulted in drying of the ditch. Synoptic measurements of flux generally supported the model flux estimates. Water flow through the streambed was roughly an order of magnitude larger in the humid basins (IN and NE) than in the arid basins (WA and CA). Downward flux, in response to sudden high streamflows, and seasonal variability in flux was most pronounced in the humid basins and in high conductivity zones in the streambed. PMID:18453424

  12. Elastic thickness and heat flux estimates for the Uranian satellite Ariel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, G.; Nimmo, F.; Schenk, P.

    2013-12-01

    The exterior of Ariel, an icy satellite orbiting Uranus, shows tectonic features suggesting an episode of endogenic heating in the satellite's past [1]. Using topography derived from stereo images, we identified flexural uplift at two different rift zones. The elastic thickness is estimated using the wavelength of the deformation [2], yielding elastic thickness values of 2-4 km for the first region and 5-8 km for the second region. Using creep parameters for ice [3] and the approach of [4], we estimate the temperature at the base of the lithosphere to be in the range 110 to 140 K, depending on the strain rate assumed. The corresponding heat fluxes are 40-120 mW/m^2 and 20-50 mW/m^2, respectively. Neither tidal heating assuming Ariel's current eccentricity nor radiogenic heat production from the silicate core are enough to cause the inferred heat flux. Unstable resonant configurations of the Uranian satellites may have occurred in the past [5], including a 2:1 mean-motion resonance between Ariel and Umbriel. This resonance would have generated a higher eccentricity, possibly explaining the endogenic heat source. However, the maximum equilibrium heating rate in Ariel due to this resonance [1] is 2.9 GW (0.6 mW/m2), inadequate to cause the inferred heat flux. The origin of the inferred high heat fluxes is thus currently mysterious. [1] Peale 1999 [2] Turcotte and Schubert 2002 [3] Goldsby and Kohlstedt 2001 [4] Nimmo et al. 2002 [5] Dermott et al. 1988

  13. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Dominant Heat Fluxes in Arctic Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T.; Neilson, B. T.; Overbeck, L. D.; Rasmussen, M. T.; Kane, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    River temperature, critical for understanding aquatic biological, physical, and chemical processes, is a function of various heat transfer mechanisms that occur between water and its surrounding environment. The influences of these heat fluxes vary over both time and space, creating thermal heterogeneity critical in establishing hot spots and hot moments for solutes. To better understand how climate change may affect this heterogeneity in arctic river temperatures, we developed an arctic specific process based river temperature model that accounts for spatial and temporal variability in lateral inflows as well as atmospheric and bed conduction fluxes. Preliminary calibration results show that dominant heat fluxes vary with time and location within the model domain, but is primarily driven by the highly variable flow regimes common in the arctic. Based on 2 years of observations and a calibrated model for the Kuparuk River, Alaska, we more specifically found surface heat fluxes dominate the spatial temperature responses for lower flows within the lower order portion of the system while lateral inflows dictate the variability in the temporal response. In the higher order portion of the basin, we have found that lateral inflows are important for understanding volumes of water spatially throughout the study reach; however, surface fluxes dominate temperature responses over time.

  14. Surface heat flux derived from sodar amplitude and frequency data: a comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R.L.; Wesely, M.L.; Underwood, K.H.; Martin, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of the atmospheric boundary layer is known to undergo large diurnal variations that are critically important in processes such as the diffusion and dispersion of pollutants, development of convection and rainfall, and the air-surface exchange of momentum, moisture, and trace substances. Estimates of the flux of energy from the earth's surface to the atmosphere clearly are important for the operation of models attempting to predict the daily development of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Measurements of surface heat flux in simple terrain can be made relatively easily using eddy-correlation techniques to measure the correlation of vertical velocity w and temperature T at a point within the surface layer. However, in complicated terrain or for estimates above the surface layer, a volume or area average is a potentially more useful estimate since the uncertainties introduced by inhomogeneities and statistical variability are reduced. The surface heat flux has been estimated previously from the temperature structure parameter C/sub T//sup 2/ and from estimates of the variance of vertical velocity sigma/sub w/. This paper compares these techniques with eddy correlation point estimates made under convective conditions in the VOICE (Vertical Observations Involving Convective Exchange) experiment near Champaign, Illinois, USA, in cooperation with the Dry Deposition Intercomparison Experiment (DDIE), which supplied complete measurements of surface layer parameters including winds, temperatures, humidities, sensible heat flux H/sub c/, and latent sensible heat flux L/sub w/E. 6 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  15. Selective radiative heating of nanostructures using hyperbolic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Ding; Minnich, Austin J

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbolic metamaterials (HMM) are of great interest due to their ability to break the diffraction limit for imaging and enhance near-field radiative heat transfer. Here we demonstrate that an annular, transparent HMM enables selective heating of a sub-wavelength plasmonic nanowire by controlling the angular mode number of a plasmonic resonance. A nanowire emitter, surrounded by an HMM, appears dark to incoming radiation from an adjacent nanowire emitter unless the second emitter is surrounded by an identical lens such that the wavelength and angular mode of the plasmonic resonance match. Our result can find applications in radiative thermal management.

  16. Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor Development for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Zhu, Dongming; Laster, Kimala L.; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has an on-going effort for developing high temperature thin film sensors for advanced turbine engine components. Stable, high temperature thin film ceramic thermocouples have been demonstrated in the lab, and novel methods of fabricating sensors have been developed. To fabricate thin film heat flux sensors for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems, the rough and porous nature of the CMC system posed a significant challenge for patterning the fine features required. The status of the effort to develop thin film heat flux sensors specifically for use on silicon carbide (SiC) CMC systems with these new technologies is described.

  17. Two-Dimensional Thermal Boundary Layer Corrections for Convective Heat Flux Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Haddad, George

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) study of two-dimensional thermal boundary layer correction factors for convective heat flux gauges mounted in flat plate subjected to a surface temperature discontinuity with variable properties taken into account. A two-equation k - omega turbulence model is considered. Results are obtained for a wide range of Mach numbers (1 to 5), gauge radius ratio, and wall temperature discontinuity. Comparisons are made for correction factors with constant properties and variable properties. It is shown that the variable-property effects on the heat flux correction factors become significant

  18. Carpet thermal cloak realization based on the refraction law of heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Run; Xie, Bin; Hu, Jinyan; Chen, Qi; Luo, Xiaobing

    2015-09-01

    Conventional studies on the design of a (carpet) thermal cloak are based on the coordinate transformation techniques, which are complicated and hard to realize with natural materials. Here we show another feasible approach to design the carpet thermal cloak through the rotated alternatively stacking materials based on the refraction law of heat flux in analogy to that of light. To make the consequent bending of heat flux parallel to the profile of the cloaking region, three design rules to realize the carpet cloaking effect by such configurations are provided and validated. The boundary condition tolerances of the carpet thermal cloak are examined as well.

  19. Heat flux expressions that satisfy the conservation laws in atomistic system involving multibody potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yao; Song, Jeong-Hoon

    2015-08-01

    Heat flux expressions are derived for multibody potential systems by extending the original Hardy's methodology and modifying Admal & Tadmor's formulas. The continuum thermomechanical quantities obtained from these two approaches are easy to compute from molecular dynamics (MD) results, and have been tested for a constant heat flux model in two distinctive systems: crystalline iron and polyethylene (PE) polymer. The convergence criteria and affecting parameters, i.e. spatial and temporal window size, and specific forms of localization function are found to be different between the two systems. The conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are discussed and validated within this atomistic-continuum bridging.

  20. Separate effects of surface roughness, wettability and porosity on boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux and optimization of boiling surfaces

    E-print Network

    O'Hanley, Harrison Fagan

    2012-01-01

    The separate effects of surface wettability, porosity, and roughness on critical heat flux (CHF) and heat transfer coefficient (HTC) were examined using carefully-engineered surfaces. All test surfaces were prepared on ...