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Sample records for radiative mhd simulations

  1. Understanding Accretion Disks through Three Dimensional Radiation MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei

    I study the structures and thermal properties of black hole accretion disks in the radiation pressure dominated regime. Angular momentum transfer in the disk is provided by the turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI), which is calculated self-consistently with a recently developed 3D radiation magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) code based on Athena. This code, developed by my collaborators and myself, couples both the radiation momentum and energy source terms with the ideal MHD equations by modifying the standard Godunov method to handle the stiff radiation source terms. We solve the two momentum equations of the radiation transfer equations with a variable Eddington tensor (VET), which is calculated with a time independent short characteristic module. This code is well tested and accurate in both optically thin and optically thick regimes. It is also accurate for both radiation pressure and gas pressure dominated flows. With this code, I find that when photon viscosity becomes significant, the ratio between Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress from the MRI turbulence can increase significantly with radiation pressure. The thermal instability of the radiation pressure dominated disk is then studied with vertically stratified shearing box simulations. Unlike the previous results claiming that the radiation pressure dominated disk with MRI turbulence can reach a steady state without showing any unstable behavior, I find that the radiation pressure dominated disks always either collapse or expand until we have to stop the simulations. During the thermal runaway, the heating and cooling rates from the simulations are consistent with the general criterion of thermal instability. However, details of the thermal runaway are different from the predictions of the standard alpha disk model, as many assumptions in that model are not satisfied in the simulations. We also identify the key reasons why previous simulations do not find the instability. The thermal

  2. Simulating solar MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüssler, M.

    1999-05-01

    Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse') are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.

  3. Simulating solar MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüssler, M.

    1999-05-01

    Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse') are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.Key words. Solar physics · astrophysics and astronomy (photosphere and chromosphere; stellar interiors and dynamo theory; numerical simulation studies).

  4. Coronal extension of the MURaM radiative MHD code: From quiet sun to flare simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We present a new version of the MURaM radiative MHD code, which includes a treatment of the solar corona in terms of MHD, optically thin radiative loss and field-aligned heat conduction. In order to relax the severe time-step constraints imposed by large Alfven velocities and heat conduction we use a combination of semi-relativistic MHD with reduced speed of light ("Boris correction") and a hyperbolic formulation of heat conduction. We apply the numerical setup to 4 different setups including a mixed polarity quiet sun, an open flux region, an arcade solution and an active region setup and find all cases an amount of coronal heating sufficient to maintain a corona with temperatures from 1 MK (quiet sun) to 2 MK (active region, arcade). In all our setups the Poynting flux is self-consistently created by photospheric and sub-photospheric magneto-convection in the lower part of our simulation domain. Varying the maximum allowed Alfven velocity ("reduced speed of light") leads to only minor changes in the coronal structure as long as the limited Alfven velocity remains larger than the speed of sound and about 1.5-3 times larger than the peak advection velocity. We also found that varying details of the numerical diffusivities that govern the resistive and viscous energy dissipation do not strongly affect the overall coronal heating, but the ratio of resistive and viscous energy dependence is strongly dependent on the effective numerical magnetic Prandtl number. We use our active region setup in order to simulate a flare triggered by the emergence of a twisted flux rope into a pre-existing bipolar active region. Our simulation yields a series of flares, with the strongest one reaching GOES M1 class. The simulation reproduces many observed properties of eruptions such as flare ribbons, post flare loops and a sunquake.

  5. The PLX- α project: Radiation-MHD Simulations of Imploding Plasma Liners Using USim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Kristian; Stoltz, Peter; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Hsu, Scott; PLX-α Team

    2015-11-01

    USim is a tool for modeling high energy density plasmas using multi-fluid models coupled to electromagnetics using fully-implicit iterative solvers, combined with finite volume discretizations on unstructured meshes. Prior work has demonstrated application of USim models and algorithms to simulation of supersonic plasma jets relevant to the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) and compared synthetic interferometry to that gathered from the experiment. Here, we give an overview of the models and algorithms included in USim; review results from prior modeling campaigns for the PLX; and describe plans for radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation efforts focusing on integrated plasma-liner implosion and target compression in a fusion-relevant regime using USim for the PLX- α project. Supported by ARPA-E's ALPHA program. Original PLX construction supported by OFES. USim development supported in part by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  6. Radiative Models of Sagittarius A* and M87 from Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, J.; Agol, E.; Fragile, P. C.; McKinney, J. C.

    2012-07-01

    Ongoing millimeter VLBI observations with the Event Horizon Telescope allow unprecedented study of the innermost portion of black hole accretion flows. Interpreting the observations requires relativistic, time-dependent physical modeling. We discuss the comparison of radiative transfer calculations from general relativistic MHD simulations of Sagittarius A* and M87 with current and future mm-VLBI observations. This comparison allows estimates of the viewing geometry and physical conditions of the Sgr A* accretion flow. The viewing geometry for M87 is already constrained from observations of its large-scale jet, but, unlike Sgr A*, there is no consensus for its millimeter emission geometry or electron population. Despite this uncertainty, as long as the emission region is compact, robust predictions for the size of its jet launching region can be made. For both sources, the black hole shadow may be detected with future observations including ALMA and/or the LMT, which would constitute the first direct evidence for a black hole event horizon.

  7. Radiative 3D MHD simulations of the spontaneous small-scale eruptions in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, Irina N.

    2015-08-01

    Studying non-linear turbulent dynamics of the solar atmosphere is important for understanding mechanism of the solar and stellar brightness variations. High-resolution observations of the quiet Sun reveal ubiquitous distributions of high-speed jets, which are transport mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. However, the origin of these eruption events is still unknown. Using 3D realistic MHD numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes and shows that the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers. I will discuss about properties of these eruptions, their effects on brightness and spectral variations and comparison with observations.

  8. WADM and radiation MHD simulations of compact multi-planar and cylindrical wire arrays at 1 MA currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaulov, A. A.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Williamson, K. M.; Shrestha, I.; Osborne, G. C.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Ouart, N. D.; Weller, M. E.

    2009-09-01

    The radiative performance of Z-pinches created by the imploding wire array loads is defined by the ablation and implosion dynamics of these loads. Both these processes can be effectively modeled by the Wire Ablation Dynamics Model (WADM), which extends the formalism exploited earlier for the cylindrical wire arrays to the loads of arbitrary geometries. The WADM calculates the ablation rates for each array wire and provides the important dynamic parameters, such as the specific mass and velocity of the imploding plasma, which can be used to estimate the shapes of the x-ray pre-pulse and, partially, the main x-ray burst. The applications of the WADM also extend to combined material wire array loads. The ablation and implosion dynamics of novel Prism Planar Wire Array (PPWA) and combined material (Mo/Al/Mo) Triple Planar Wire Array (TPWA) loads are discussed in detail. The combined WADM and radiation MHD simulation is applied to model the radiative performance of the precursor plasma column, created by the imploding stainless steel compact cylindrical wire array. As the radiation effects intensify with the mass accumulation at the array center, the simulation reveals the transformation of quasi-uniform precursor column into a heterogeneous plasma structure with strong density and temperature gradients. We find that radiative performance of the precursor plasma is greatly affected by the load geometry as well as by the wire material.

  9. Magnetic flux emergence in granular convection: radiative MHD simulations and observational signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:We study the emergence of magnetic flux from the near-surface layers of the solar convection zone into the photosphere. Methods: To model magnetic flux emergence, we carried out a set of numerical radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulations. Our simulations take into account the effects of compressibility, energy exchange via radiative transfer, and partial ionization in the equation of state. All these physical ingredients are essential for a proper treatment of the problem. Furthermore, the inclusion of radiative transfer allows us to directly compare the simulation results with actual observations of emerging flux. Results: We find that the interaction between the magnetic flux tube and the external flow field has an important influence on the emergent morphology of the magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), the emergence process can also modify the local granulation pattern. The emergence of magnetic flux tubes with a flux of 1019 Mx disturbs the granulation and leads to the transient appearance of a dark lane, which is coincident with upflowing material. These results are consistent with observed properties of emerging magnetic flux. Movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Predictive radiation-MHD simulations with FLASH: Magnetic field generation and turbulent amplification experiments with the Omega EP laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Daley, Christopher; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, Donald Q.; Lee, Dongwook; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus; Doyle, Hugo; Gregori, Gianluca; Meinecke, Jena; Reville, Brian; Miniati, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    The process of generation and amplification of Biermann battery magnetic fields is closely linked to the development of turbulence. In an astrophysical environment, a small seed field can be formed in asymmetric supernova remnant blast waves due to misaligned pressure and density gradients. Inhomogeneities in the density distribution can cause the flow to become turbulent and the B-field can be amplified via dynamo action. In this context, the COSMOLAB team will perform experiments using the Omega EP laser at LLE, that represent a scaled-down model of the astrophysical process in a controlled environment. The experiments involve the illumination of a slab-like target, which produces a plasma flow and a Biermann battery field. The flow then propagates through a grid that creates turbulence and amplifies the field. In this study we describe 2D and 3D radiative MHD simulations of the experimental setup, carried out using the FLASH code on Mira (BG/Q) at ALCF. The objective of these simulations is to explore the morphology and strength of the B-fields generated by ablation of target material by the laser, and their amplification due to the grid. This work was supported by DOE NNSA ASC.

  11. Impact of the Partial Ionization in the solar atmosphere using 2.5D Radiative MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    The chromosphere/transition region constitute the interface between the solar surface and the corona and modulate the flow of mass and energy into the upper atmosphere. IRIS was launched in 2013 to study the chromosphere and transition region. The complexity of the chromosphere is due to various regime changes that take place across it, like: Hydrogen goes from predominantly neutral to predominantly ionized; the plasma behavior changes from collisional to collision-less; it goes from gas-pressure dominated to magnetically driven, etc. Consequently, the interpretation of chromospheric observations in general and those from IRIS, in particular, is a challenging task. It is thus crucial to combine IRIS observations with advanced radiative-MHD numerical modeling. Because the photosphere, chromosphere and transition region are partially ionized, the interaction between ionized and neutral particles has important consequences on the magneto-thermodynamics of these regions. We implemented the effects of partial ionization using generalized Ohm's law in the Bifrost code (Gudiksen et al. 2011) which includes full MHD equations with non-grey and non-LTE radiative transfer and thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. I will describe the importance and impact of taking into account partial ionization effects in the modeled radiative-MHD atmosphere, such as chromospheric heating, photospheric magnetic field diffused into the upper-chromosphere which expands into the upper atmosphere filling the corona with mass, magnetic flux, energy and current, etc.

  12. Extended MHD Simulations of Spheromaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear extended MHD simulations of a spheromak in a cylindrical flux conserver are performed using the NIMROD code (JCP 195, 2004). An idealized series of simulations starting from a Grad-Shafranov equilibrium and small non-axisymmetric perturbations are performed to model the sustained decay phase. The resulting confinement leads to steep resistivity gradients. Strong current gradients develop, driving tearing modes that dominate the evolution of the spheromak. Absent in these simulations are the remains of n=1 fluctuations created during the formation process. A second series of simulations start from vacuum fields and model the full spheromak evolution, including the formation process where the n=1 fluctuations dominate. To understand the role of pressure driven instabilities in the evolution of the spheromak, a numerical diagnostic is developed to calculate the Mercier stability criterion from the axisymmetric fields.

  13. Cusp geometry in MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George; Crooker, Nancy; Siebert, Keith; Maynard, Nelson; Weimer, Daniel; White, Willard

    2005-01-01

    The MHD simulations described here show that the latitude of the high-altitude cusp decreases as the IMF swings from North to South, that there is a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at high-altitude associated with a dawn dusk component of the IMF, and that at the same time there is also a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at low-altitude. The simulations generate a feature that represents what has been called the cleft. It appears as a tail (when the IMF has a By component) attached to the cusp, extending either toward the dawn flank or the dusk flank depending on the dawn dusk orientation of the IMF. This one-sided cleft connects the cusp to the magnetospheric sash. We compare cusp geometry predicted by MHD simulations against published observations based on Hawkeye and DMSP data. Regarding the high-altitude predictions, the comparisons are not definitive, mainly because the observations are incomplete or mutually inconsistent. Regarding the low-altitude prediction of a strong dawn dusk asymmetry, the observations are unambiguous and are in good qualitative agreement with the prediction.

  14. Radiation-MHD Simulations of Pillars and Globules in HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, J.

    2012-07-01

    Implicit and explicit raytracing-photoionisation algorithms have been implemented in the author's radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code. The algorithms are described briefly and their efficiency and parallel scaling are investigated. The implicit algorithm is more efficient for calculations where ionisation fronts have very supersonic velocities, and the explicit algorithm is favoured in the opposite limit because of its better parallel scaling. The implicit method is used to investigate the effects of initially uniform magnetic fields on the formation and evolution of dense pillars and cometary globules at the boundaries of HII regions. It is shown that for weak and medium field strengths an initially perpendicular field is swept into alignment with the pillar during its dynamical evolution, matching magnetic field observations of the ‘Pillars of Creation’ in M16. A strong perpendicular magnetic field remains in its initial configuration and also confines the photoevaporation flow into a bar-shaped, dense, ionised ribbon which partially shields the ionisation front.

  15. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  16. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer and GeneralRelativistic MHD Simulations of Accretion and Outflows of Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, Steven V.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Wu, Kinwah; /Mullard Space Sci. Lab.

    2007-01-05

    We calculate the emission from relativistic flows in black hole systems using a fully general relativistic radiative transfer formulation, with flow structures obtained by general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. We consider thermal free-free emission and thermal synchrotron emission. Bright filament-like features protrude (visually) from the accretion disk surface, which are enhancements of synchrotron emission where the magnetic field roughly aligns with the line-of-sight in the co-moving frame. The features move back and forth as the accretion flow evolves, but their visibility and morphology are robust. We propose that variations and drifts of the features produce certain X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in black-hole X-ray binaries.

  17. 3D simulation studies of tokamak plasmas using MHD and extended-MHD models

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) tokamak simulation project aims at the simulation of tokamak plasmas using a multi-level tokamak code package. Several current applications using MHD and Extended-MHD models are presented; high-{beta} disruption studies in reversed shear plasmas using the MHD level MH3D code, {omega}{sub *i} stabilization and nonlinear island saturation of TAE mode using the hybrid particle/MHD level MH3D-K code, and unstructured mesh MH3D{sup ++} code studies. In particular, three internal mode disruption mechanisms are identified from simulation results which agree which agree well with experimental data.

  18. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  19. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaw, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W=4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. We also simulate jets with the more realistic initial conditions for injecting jets for helical mangetic field, perturbed density, velocity, and internal energy, which are supposed to be caused in the process of jet generation. Three possible explanations for the observed variability are (i) tidal disruption of a star falling into the black hole, (ii) instabilities in the relativistic accretion disk, and (iii) jet-related PRocesses. New results will be reported at the meeting.

  20. A New Godunov Algorithm for Radiation MHD in Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.-F.; Stone, J. M.; Davis, S. W.

    2012-07-01

    Here we describe the implementation and tests of a new multi-dimension Godunov algorithm for radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations based on Athena. There are several new features of this algorithm. First, this is a Godunov method with stiff source terms from radiation field. Second, we use a variable Eddington tensor to close the radiation momentum equations. Thus we do not need to assume any diffusion like approximation. This also makes the code be suitable for both optical thin and optical thick regimes. Third, we only need to solve a set of linear equations for the radiation subsystem, instead of a non-linear equation people usually encounter with flux-limited diffusion approximation. We have also developed a suite of tests, which cover a wide range of parameter space in terms of optical depth and the ratio between radiation pressure and gas pressure, to show that the algorithm is working accurately.

  1. MHD simulations of supernova driven ISM turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressel, Oliver; Ziegler, Udo

    The dynamic evolution of the (stratified) turbulent interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated utilizing a three-dimensional MHD model including various physical effects. The computational domain covers a box of 0.5x0.5x2.0 kpc at a resolution of typically 128x128x1024 grid cells. The model includes (constant kinematic) viscosity and magnetic diffusivity. The adiabatic equation of state is supplemented by a parameterized heating- and cooling-function allowing for thermal instability (TI). The update due to heating and cooling is implemented implicitly using a Patankar-type discretization. Turbulence is driven by supernova explosions which are modelled as local injections of thermal energy, smeared over three standard-deviations of a Gaussian support with FWHM of 20pc. Supernova rates are adopted for typical cited values. Within our model we make a distinction between Type I and Type II SNe. Latter are statistically clustered by the (artificial) constraint that the density at the explosion site be above average (with respect to a horizontal slab) - former are spatially uncorrelated. The dual-energy feature of the conservative NIRVANA-code is used to tackle the extreme ratio of kinetic to internal energy that arises from the violent energy input. We stress the importance of using a conservative scheme to properly transfer the injected energy to kinetic motion. The model also includes a differentially rotating background (with shearing boundary conditions in radial direction) as well as vertical stratification. The initial density and pressure profiles are in hydrostatic equilibrium with respect to the equation of state given by the radiative equilibrium. Including z-dependent heating rates this leads to a considerable deviation from usual isothermal initial models. The primary focus of this work is on the galactic dynamo and the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. As a secondary target we are also interested in general properties of the ISM that are of importance

  2. MHD simulation of the Bastille day event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Jon; Torok, Tibor; Downs, Cooper; Lionello, Roberto; Titov, Viacheslav; Caplan, Ronald M.; Mikić, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2016-03-01

    We describe a time-dependent, thermodynamic, three-dimensional MHD simulation of the July 14, 2000 coronal mass ejection (CME) and flare. The simulation starts with a background corona developed using an MDI-derived magnetic map for the boundary condition. Flux ropes using the modified Titov-Demoulin (TDm) model are used to energize the pre-event active region, which is then destabilized by photospheric flows that cancel flux near the polarity inversion line. More than 1033 ergs are impulsively released in the simulated eruption, driving a CME at 1500 km/s, close to the observed speed of 1700km/s. The post-flare emission in the simulation is morphologically similar to the observed post-flare loops. The resulting flux rope that propagates to 1 AU is similar in character to the flux rope observed at 1 AU, but the simulated ICME center passes 15° north of Earth.

  3. Shocked Magnetotail: ARTEMIS Observations and MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2015-04-01

    Interplanetary shocks can cause magnetospheric disturbances on various scales including kinetic and MHD processes. In this paper we study a shock event using ARTEMIS in situ observations and OpenGGCM MHD simulations, which shows how significant effect of interplanetary shocks could be on the magnetotail. The two ARTEMIS spacecraft were located near the tail current sheet and lobe center at (-60, 1, -5Re_GSM) when the shock arrived and recorded an abrupt tail compression leading to significant enhancements in the plasma density, temperature, magnetic field strength, and cross-tail current density, as well as to tailward flows and current sheet crossings. About 10 min later, the spacecraft entered the sheath solar wind unexpectedly. Two hypotheses are considered: either the tail was cut off by the high solar wind ram pressure (~25-30 nPa), or the compressed tail was pushed aside by the appreciable dawnward solar wind flow imposed by the shock. OpenGGMC simulation results confirmed the second hypothesis and revealed that during this 10 min interval, the lobe center moved dawnward by ~12 Re and the tail width in Y was reduced from ~40 to 26 Re, which eventually exposed ARTEMIS to the sheath solar wind. Comparisons of plasma and magnetic parameters between ARTEMIS in situ observations and simulations showed a satisfied consistence.

  4. MHD Simulation Heliospheric Magnetic Fields and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2005-01-01

    This talk will present a summary of our results on simulations of heliospheric structure and dynamics. We use a three-dimensional MHD code in spherical coordinates to produce a solar wind containing a rotating, tilted heliospheric current sheet, fast-slow stream and microstream shear layers, waves, 2-D turbulence, and pressure balanced structures that are input to the inner (superAlfvenic) boundary. The evolution of various combinations of these has led to a deeper understanding of sector structure, magnetic holes, fluctuation anisotropies, and general turbulent evolution. We show how the sectors are likely to be connected, how spiral fields can arise, and how field line diffusion can be caused by waves with transverse structure and microstream shears.

  5. Reducing radiative losses in aluminum-hydrogen MHD generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bityurin, V. A.; Galaktionov, A. V.; Kolpakov, A. V.

    2010-11-01

    Rigorous estimations are obtained for the integral thermal radiation flux from a working substance to walls of a high-temperature setup. These estimations are convenient for engineering calculations and can be used in solving problems related to radiative losses in promising aluminum-hydrogen MHD generators.

  6. Global MHD simulations of plasmaspheric plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J.; Ouellette, J.; Merkin, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    The plasmasphere represents a separate population from the rest of themagnetosphere, generally high density but cold. When the solar windturns strongly southward this plasma is convected toward the daysidemagnetopause and affects the interaction of the solar wind with themagnetosphere. We have used multi-fluid simulations using the LFMglobal MHD code to model this interaction. The plasmasphere isinitialized as a cold (~1eV) hydrogen plasma in a quiet northward IMFstate with a density distribution appropriate for K_p = 1. Thecorotation potential from the ionosphere spins up the plasmasphereinto rough corotation. After a initialization period of hours, asouthward IMF is introduced and the enhanced convection initiates asurge of plasmaspheric density to the dayside. We discuss two aspectsof this interaction, the effects on dayside reconnection and on theKelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). We find that the mass loading ofmagnetospheric flux tubes slows local reconnection rates, though notas much as predicted by Borovsky et al. [2013]. We findthat the total reconnection rate is reduced, although not as much aswould be predicted by just the sub-solar reconnection rate. The KHIis somewhat reduced by the plasmaspheric loading of density in the lowlatitude boundary layer. It has been suggested that the presence ofthe plasmasphere may lead to enhanced ULF wave power in the interiorof the magnetosphere from the KHI waves. We find only a minimal effect during northward IMF. For southward IMF, the situation is complicated by the interaction of KHI with non-steady reconnection.

  7. Identification of standing MHD modes in MHD simulations of planetary magnetospheres. Application to Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griton, Léa; Pantellini, Filippo; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    We present 3D simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury's magnetosphere using the magnetohydrodynamic code AMRVAC. A procedure for the identification of standing MHD modes has been applied to these simulations showing that large scale standing slow mode structures may exist in Mercury's magnetosheath. The identification is mostly based on relatively simple approximate analytical solutions to the old problem of determining the family of all standing linear plane MHD waves in a flowing plasma. The question of the identification of standing slow mode structures using in situ measurements such as the future BepiColombo MMO mission to Mercury will be discussed as well.

  8. Three Dimensional Simulations of Compressible Hall MHD Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    We have developed three dimensional, time dependent, compressible, non-adiabatic, driven and massively parallelized Hall magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate turbulent spectral cascades in a regime where characteristic lengthscales associated with plasma fluctuations are smaller than ion gyro radii. Such regime is ubiquitously present in solar wind and many other collisionless space plasmas. Particularly in the solar wind, the high time resolution databases identify a spectral break at the end of MHD inertial range spectrum that corresponds to a high frequency regime. In the regime, turbulent cascades cannot be explained by the usual MHD models. With the help of our 3D Hall MHD code, we find that characteristic turbulent interactions in the high frequency regime evolve typically on kinetic Alfven time scales. The turbulent fluctuation associated with kinetic Alfven interactions are compressive and anisotropic and possess equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies.

  9. Kinetic MHD simulation of large 'circ; tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott; Uzdensky, Dmitri

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a second-order accurate semi-implicit δ method for kinetic MHD simulation with Lorentz force ions and fluid electrons. The model has been used to study the resistive tearing mode instability, which involves multiple spatial scales. In small 'circ; cases, the linear growth rate and eigenmode structure are consistent with resistive MHD analysis. The Rutherford stage and saturation are demonstrated, but the simulation exhibits different saturation island widths compared with previous MHD simulations. In large 'circ; cases, nonlinear simulations show multiple islands forming, followed by the islands coalescing at later times. The competition between these two processes strongly influences the reconnection rates and eventually leads to a steady state reconnection. We will present various parameter studies and show that our hybrid results agree with fluid analysis in certain limits (e.g., relatively large resisitivities).

  10. MHD-Epic: Embedded Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Reconnection in Global 3D Extended MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daldorff, L. K. S.; Toth, G.; Borovikov, D.; Gombosi, T. I.; Lapenta, G.

    2014-12-01

    With the new modeling capability in the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) of embedding an implicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the BATS-R-US magnetohydrodynamics model (Daldorff et al. 2014, JCP, 268, 236) we are ready to locally handle the full physics of the reconnection and its implications on the full system where globally, away from the reconnection region, a magnetohydrodynamic description is satisfactory. As magnetic reconnection is one of the main drivers in magnetospheric and heliospheric plasma dynamics, the self-consistent description of the electron dynamics in the coupled MHD-EPIC model is well suited for investigating the nature of these systems. We will compare the new embedded MHD-EPIC model with pure MHD and Hall MHD simulations of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  11. Global and Kinetic MHD Simulation by the Gpic-MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroshi, Naitou; Yusuke, Yamada; Kenji, Kajiwara; Wei-li, Lee; Shinji, Tokuda; Masatoshi, Yagi

    2011-10-01

    In order to implement large-scale and high-beta tokamak simulation, a new algorithm of the electromagnetic gyrokinetic PIC (particle-in-cell) code was proposed and installed on the Gpic-MHD code [Gyrokinetic PIC code for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation]. In the new algorithm, the vorticity equation and the generalized Ohm's law along the magnetic field are derived from the basic equations of the gyrokinetic Vlasov, Poisson, and Ampere system and are used to describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the field quantities of the electrostatic potential varphi and the longitudinal component of the vector potential Az. The basic algorithm is equivalent to solving the reduced-MHD-type equations with kinetic corrections, in which MHD physics related to Alfven modes are well described. The estimation of perturbed electron pressure from particle dynamics is dominant, while the effects of other moments are negligible. Another advantage of the algorithm is that the longitudinal induced electric field, ETz = -∂Az/∂t, is explicitly estimated by the generalized Ohm's law and used in the equations of motion. Furthermore, the particle velocities along the magnetic field are used (vz-formulation) instead of generalized momentums (pz-formulation), hence there is no problem of ‘cancellation', which would otherwise appear when Az is estimated from the Ampere's law in the pz-formulation. The successful simulation of the collisionless internal kink mode by the new Gpic-MHD with realistic values of the large-scale and high-beta tokamaks revealed the usefulness of the new algorithm.

  12. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Longcope, D.W.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  13. MHD Simulations of Thermal Plasma Jets in Coaxial Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    The development of a magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) numerical tool to study high energy density thermal plasma in coaxial plasma accelerators is presented. The coaxial plasma accelerator is a device used simulate the conditions created at the confining wall of a thermonuclear fusion reactor during an edge localized mode (ELM) disruption event. This is achieved by creating magnetized thermal plasma in a coaxial volume which is then accelerated by the Lorentz force to form a high velocity plasma jet. The simulation tool developed solves the resistive MHD equation using a finite volume method (FVM) framework. The acceleration and subsequent demagnetization of the plasma as it travels down the length of the accelerator is simulated and shows good agreement with experiments. Additionally, a model to study the thermalization of the plasma at the inlet is being developed in order to give self-consistent initial conditions to the MHD solver.

  14. Hall MHD Simulations of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Y.; Combi, M. R.; Rubin, M.; Hansen, K. C.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2012-12-01

    Comets have highly eccentric orbits and a wide range of gas production rates and thus they are ideal subjects to study the interaction between the solar wind and nonmagnetized bodies. Hansen et al. (2007, Space Sci. Rev. 128, 133) used a fluid-based MHD model and a semi-kinetic hybrid particle model to study the plasma environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), the Rosetta mission target comet, at different heliocentric distances. They showed that for such a weak comet at a large heliocentric distance, the length scales of the cometosheath and the bow shock are comparable to or smaller than the ion gyroradius, which violates the underlying assumption for a valid fluid description of the plasma. As a result, the classical ideal MHD model is not able to always give physical results, while the hybrid model, which accounts for the kinetic effects of ions with both cometary and solar wind origin, is more reliable. However, hybrid models are computationally expensive and the results can be noisy. A compromise approach is Hall MHD [Toth et al., 2008], which includes the Hall term in the MHD equations and allows for the decoupling of the ion and electron fluids. We use a single ion species Hall MHD model to simulate the plasma environment of comet 67P/CG and compare the results with the two models mentioned above. We find that the Hall effect is capable of reproducing some features of the hybrid model and thus extends the applicability of MHD. In addition, this study helps to identify the conditions and regions in the cometary plasma where the Hall effect is not negligible. This work is supported by NSF Planetary Astronomy grant AST0707283 and JPL subcontract 1266313 under NASA grant NMO710889.

  15. The flare position obtained from MHD simulation and comparison with X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, Alexander; Podgorny, Igor

    It was for the first time shown that the position of the current sheet, obtained by numerical MHD simulation, coincides with the position of the thermal X-ray source. In our 3D MHD simulation we do not use any hypotheses about the flare mechanism. Several mechanisms of solar flare production are considered by different authors. Usually the initial conditions at numerical simulation are artificially set such a way that it is required for development of the proposed mechanism. In this approach, the unstable configuration of the magnetic field is set as the initial conditions, and the possibility of forming such an unstable system at the real evolution of the active region before the flare is not considered. Here the flare mechanism is obtained from the numerical MHD simulations in which all the conditions are taken from observations in the active region. It is shown that flare energy accumulation occurs in the current sheet magnetic field created by disturbances focusing in the vicinity of an X-type singular line. According to the developed solar flare electrodynamical model the thermal X-ray emission source appears in a current sheet, where plasma is heated due to magnetic field dissipation. Using 3D MHD numerical simulation the position of source of thermal X-ray emission are found for the flare occurred May 27, 2003 at 02:53. To find positions of sources of thermal X-ray radiation in the corona from MHD simulation results the graphical system is developed. The comparison with RHESSI X-ray observations show the coincidence of current sheet and observed the thermal X-ray emission source.

  16. Evidence of Active MHD Instability in EULAG-MHD Simulations of Solar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Nicolas; Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the possible development of magnetohydrodynamical instabilities in the EULAG-MHD “millennium simulation” of Passos & Charbonneau. This simulation sustains a large-scale magnetic cycle characterized by solar-like polarity reversals taking place on a regular multidecadal cadence, and in which zonally oriented bands of strong magnetic fields accumulate below the convective layers, in response to turbulent pumping from above in successive magnetic half-cycles. Key aspects of this simulation include low numerical dissipation and a strongly sub-adiabatic fluid layer underlying the convectively unstable layers corresponding to the modeled solar convection zone. These properties are conducive to the growth and development of two-dimensional instabilities that are otherwise suppressed by stronger dissipation. We find evidence for the action of a non-axisymmetric magnetoshear instability operating in the upper portions of the stably stratified fluid layers. We also investigate the possibility that the Tayler instability may be contributing to the destabilization of the large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component at high latitudes. On the basis of our analyses, we propose a global dynamo scenario whereby the magnetic cycle is driven primarily by turbulent dynamo action in the convecting layers, but MHD instabilities accelerate the dissipation of the magnetic field pumped down into the overshoot and stable layers, thus perhaps significantly influencing the magnetic cycle period. Support for this scenario is found in the distinct global dynamo behaviors observed in an otherwise identical EULAG-MHD simulations, using a different degree of sub-adiabaticity in the stable fluid layers underlying the convection zone.

  17. The Contribution of Jets to Coronal and Solar Wind Energetics: MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Torok, Tibor; Titov, Viacheslav; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Transient collimated plasma eruptions in the corona, commonly known as coronal jets, are among the most interesting manifestations of solar activity.We use the 3D MHD model with thermodynamics developed at PSI to investigate the origin, dynamics, and plasma properties of coronal jets.Our model is coupled with 3D MHD flux emergence simulations, i.e, we use boundary conditions provided by such simulations to drive a time-dependent coronal evolution. It includes parametric coronal heating, radiative losses, and thermal conduction in the energy equations.This enables us to simulate the energy transfer in coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far and to study the amount of energy and mass transported by these phenomena into the higher corona and inner heliosphere. We discuss our results and compare them with previous estimations obtained from observations.

  18. Coupling MHD Simulations of CMEs to SEP Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torok, T.; Gorby, M.; Linker, J.; Schwadron, N.

    2015-12-01

    Large Solar Energetic Particle events (SEPs) are a main space weather hazard and extremely dangerous to astronauts and electronic equipmentin space. They are typically associated with fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Recent results indicate that SEPs can be generated already inthe early phase of CME expansion low in the corona, but the underlyingphysical mechanisms are not yet well understood. State-of-the-artmagnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of CME initiation and evolution,combined with numerical models of particle acceleration and propagation,provide a powerful tool to investigate these mechanisms. In this talk, we present recent developments in the coupling of CORHEL/MAS thermodynamicMHD simulations of fast CMEs to the EPREM particle code, and we discuss the insights that can be gained from such a combined modeling approach.

  19. Quick Time-dependent Ionization Calculations Depending on MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengcai; Raymond, John C.; Murphy, Nicholas Arnold

    2014-06-01

    Time-dependent ionization is important in astrophysical environments where the thermodynamic time scale is shorter than ionization time scale. In this work, we report a FORTRAN program that performs fast non-equilibrium ionization calculations based on parallel computing. Using MHD simulation results, we trace the movements of plasma in a Lagrangian framework, and obtain evolutionary history of temperature and electron density. Then the time-dependent ionization equations are solved using the eigenvalue method. For any complex temperature and density histories, we introduce a advanced time-step strategy to improve the computational efficiency. Our tests show that this program has advantages of high numerical stability and high accuracy. In addition, it is also easy to integrate this solver with the other MHD routines.

  20. Spectral Methods in General Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, David

    2012-03-01

    In this talk I discuss the use of spectral methods in improving the accuracy of a General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) computer code. I introduce SpecCosmo, a GRMHD code developed as a Cactus arrangement at UHCL, and show simulation results using both Fourier spectral methods and finite differencing. This work demonstrates the use of spectral methods with the FFTW 3.3 Fast Fourier Transform package integrated with the Cactus Framework to perform spectral differencing using MPI.

  1. Numerical simulation of the operation of a MHD generator in transient regimes in MHD power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Bityurin, V.A.; Ivanov, P.P.; Koryagina, G.M.; Lyubimov, G.A.; Medin, S.A.; Morozov, G.N.; Prokop, A.S.

    1982-09-01

    Transient regimes of a MHD generator operating in combination with equipment in a MHD power station are analzyed with the help of a numerical model. The MHD generator, whose flow-through part consists of a nozzle, a channel, and a diffuser, is regulated by changing the flow rate and the load. Three types of MHD channels are studied: Faraday supersonic and subsonic, and diagonal supersonic. Their characteristics are presented and the efficiency of the MHD power station under nonrated regimes is determined. It is established that a MHD generator and the MHD power station as a whole admit quite efficient and deep regulation of the change in the flow rate of the working body.

  2. 3D MHD Simulations of Spheromak Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuber, James E.; Woodruff, Simon; O'Bryan, John; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; Darpa Spheromak Team

    2015-11-01

    The adiabatic compression of compact tori could lead to a compact and hence low cost fusion energy system. The critical scientific issues in spheromak compression relate both to confinement properties and to the stability of the configuration undergoing compression. We present results from the NIMROD code modified with the addition of magnetic field coils that allow us to examine the role of rotation on the stability and confinement of the spheromak (extending prior work for the FRC). We present results from a scan in initial rotation, from 0 to 100km/s. We show that strong rotational shear (10km/s over 1cm) occurs. We compare the simulation results with analytic scaling relations for adiabatic compression. Work performed under DARPA grant N66001-14-1-4044.

  3. MHD Simulations of Plasma Dynamics with Non-Axisymmetric Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Chris; Levesque, Jeffrey; Morgan, Kyle; Jarboe, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The arbitrary geometry, 3D extended MHD code PSI-TET is applied to linear and non-linear simulations of MCF plasmas with non-axisymmetric boundaries. Progress and results from simulations on two experiments will be presented: 1) Detailed validation studies of the HIT-SI experiment with self-consistent modeling of plasma dynamics in the helicity injectors. Results will be compared to experimental data and NIMROD simulations that model the effect of the helicity injectors through boundary conditions on an axisymmetric domain. 2) Linear studies of HBT-EP with different wall configurations focusing on toroidal asymmetries in the adjustable conducting wall. HBT-EP studies the effect of active/passive stabilization with an adjustable ferritic wall. Results from linear verification and benchmark studies of ideal mode growth with and without toroidal asymmetries will be presented and compared to DCON predictions. Simulations of detailed experimental geometries are enabled by use of the PSI-TET code, which employs a high order finite element method on unstructured tetrahedral grids that are generated directly from CAD models. Further development of PSI-TET will also be presented including work to support resistive wall regions within extended MHD simulations. Work supported by DoE.

  4. Relativistic MHD simulations of extragalactic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leismann, T.; Antón, L.; Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.; Martí, J. M.; Miralles, J. A.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2005-06-01

    We have performed a comprehensive parameter study of the morphology and dynamics of axisymmetric, magnetized, relativistic jets by means of numerical simulations. The simulations have been performed with an upgraded version of the GENESIS code which is based on a second-order accurate finite volume method involving an approximate Riemann solver suitable for relativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamic flows, and a method of lines. Starting from pure hydrodynamic models we consider the effect of a magnetic field of increasing strength (up to β ≡ |b|2/2p ≈ 3.3 times the equipartition value) and different topology (purely toroidal or poloidal). We computed several series of models investigating the dependence of the dynamics on the magnetic field in jets of different beam Lorentz factor and adiabatic index. We find that the inclusion of the magnetic field leads to diverse effects which contrary to Newtonian magnetohydrodynamics models do not always scale linearly with the (relative) strength of the magnetic field. The relativistic models show, however, some clear trends. Axisymmetric jets with toroidal magnetic fields produce a cavity which consists of two parts: an inner one surrounding the beam which is compressed by magnetic forces, and an adjacent outer part which is inflated due to the action of the magnetic field. The outer border of the outer part of the cavity is given by the bow-shock where its interaction with the external medium takes place. Toroidal magnetic fields well below equipartition (β = 0.05) combined with a value of the adiabatic index of 4/3 yield extremely smooth jet cavities and stable beams. Prominent nose cones form when jets are confined by toroidal fields and carry a high Poynting flux (σ≡ |b|2/ρ>0.01 and β≥ 1). In contrast, none of our models possessing a poloidal field develops such a nose cone. The size of the nose cone is correlated with the propagation speed of the Mach disc (the smaller the speed the larger is the size). If two

  5. Analysis and gyrokinetic simulation of MHD Alfven wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kevin Derek

    The study of low-frequency turbulence in magnetized plasmas is a difficult problem due to both the enormous range of scales involved and the variety of physics encompassed over this range. Much of the progress that has been made in turbulence theory is based upon a result from incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), in which energy is only transferred from large scales to small via the collision of Alfven waves propagating oppositely along the mean magnetic field. Improvements in laboratory devices and satellite measurements have demonstrated that, while theories based on this premise are useful over inertial ranges, describing turbulence at scales that approach particle gyroscales requires new theory. In this thesis, we examine the limits of incompressible MHD theory in describing collisions between pairs of Alfven waves. This interaction represents the fundamental unit of plasma turbulence. To study this interaction, we develop an analytic theory describing the nonlinear evolution of interacting Alfven waves and compare this theory to simulations performed using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. Gyrokinetics captures a much richer set of physics than that described by incompressible MHD, and is well-suited to describing Alfvenic turbulence around the ion gyroscale. We demonstrate that AstroGK is well suited to the study of physical Alfven waves by reproducing laboratory Alfven dispersion data collected using the LAPD. Additionally, we have developed an initialization alogrithm for use with AstroGK that allows exact Alfven eigenmodes to be initialized with user specified amplitudes and phases. We demonstrate that our analytic theory based upon incompressible MHD gives excellent agreement with gyrokinetic simulations for weakly turbulent collisions in the limit that k⊥rho i << 1. In this limit, agreement is observed in the time evolution of nonlinear products, and in the strength of nonlinear interaction with respect to polarization and scale. We also examine the

  6. MHD simulations of large conducting bodies moving through a planetary magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, A.; Schröer, A.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction between a large body with finite conductivity moving relatively to a planetary magnetic field and the magnetospheric plasma is studied by means of numerical simulations in the framework of resistive MHD. Applications discussed are spacecrafts (tethered satellites) in the Earth's ionosphere and the interaction of Jupiter with its satellite Io. The interaction excites MHD waves in which consequence an electrical current flow through the conductor is generated which extends into the surrounding plasma and propagates along the Alfvén characteristics. Thus, kinetic energy is converted into electrical energy which may be utilized for satellite projects or explain Jupiter's decametric radiation. The linear and nonlinear evolution of the plasma environment and the current system is investigated with special care taken of the principal phenomena occuring in the vicinity of the conducting body.

  7. MHD simulation studies of z-pinch shear flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, I.; Bauer, B. S.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Makhin, V.; Siemon, R. E.

    2003-10-01

    The development of the m=0 instability in a z-pinch in the presence of sheared plasma flows is investigated with the aid of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation code (MHRDR). The linear growth rates are compared to the results obtained by solving the ideal MHD linearized equations [1] and to the results obtained using a 3D hybrid simulation code [2]. The instability development is followed into the nonlinear regime where its growth and saturation are examined. [1] V.I. Sotnikov, I. Paraschiv, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, J.-N. Leboeuf, and J.M. Dawson, "Linear analysis of sheared flow stabilization of global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities based on the Hall fluid mode", Phys. Plasmas 9, 913 (2002). [2] V.I. Sotnikov, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, P. Hellinger, P. Travnicek, V. Fiala, J.-N. Leboeuf, "Hybrid Simulations of Current-Carrying Instabilities in Z-pinch Plasmas with Sheared Axial Flow", AIP Conference Proceedings, Volume 651, Dense Z-Pinches: 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, edited by J. Davis et al., page 396, June 2002.

  8. Relativistic MHD simulations of stellar core collapse and magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, José A.; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Gabler, Michael; Müller, Ewald; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2011-02-01

    We present results from simulations of magneto-rotational stellar core collapse along with Alfvén oscillations in magnetars. These simulations are performed with the CoCoA/CoCoNuT code, which is able to handle ideal MHD flows in dynamical spacetimes in general relativity. Our core collapse simulations highlight the importance of genuine magnetic effects, like the magneto-rotational instability, for the dynamics of the flow. For the modelling of magnetars we use the anelastic approximation to general relativistic MHD, which allows for an effective suppression of fluid modes and an accurate description of Alfvén waves. We further compute Alfvén oscillation frequencies along individual magnetic field lines with a semi-analytic approach. Our work confirms previous results based on perturbative approaches regarding the existence of two families of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), with harmonics at integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. Additional material is presented in the accompanying contribution by Gabler et al (2010b) in these proceedings.

  9. Magnetotail dynamics: MHD simulations of driven and spontaneous dynamic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Schindler, K.; Hesse, M.

    1994-05-01

    The dynamic evolution of the magnetotail during growth phase and expansion phase of a substorm is studied through threedimensional time-dependent MHD simulations. To model growth phase effects, an external electric field with an equatorward inflow is applied at the boundaries over a finite time period. This leads to the formation of a thin current sheet with greatly enhanced current density in the near tail, embedded in the wider plasma/current sheet, which becomes diminished in strength. A faster, spontaneous current sheet formation occurs when entropy conservation is released in an isobaric model, while the ideal MHD constraint persists. This may be a suitable model for the late, explosive part of the growth phase. The transition to the substorm expansive phase is modeled by an increase in anomalous resistivity, using either uniform resistivity or a current density dependent resistivity which is turned on when the current density exceeds a certain threshold. In both cases the violation of ideal MHD leads to resistive instability and the formation of a near-Earth neutral line, fast flow, and plasmoid ejection, together with the dipolarization and current reduction in the region further earthward. The spontaneous increase in total region 1 type field-aligned currents associated with the disruptions of the thin current sheets is less significant than that found in earlier simulations of the disruption of a wider current sheet, whereas the driven increase in the region 1 type current is substantial. The results demonstrate that the same dynamic process which appears spontaneous in the behavior of some quantities might be interpreted as entirely driven from the observation of others.

  10. Global MHD Simulation of Mesoscale Structures at the Magnetospheric Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, Jean

    1998-01-01

    The research carried out for this protocol was focused on the study of mesoscales structures at the magnetospheric boundary. We investigated three areas: (1) the structure of the magnetospheric boundary for steady solar wind conditions; (2) the dynamics of the dayside magnetospheric boundary and (3) the dynamics of the distant tail magnetospheric boundary. Our approach was to use high resolution three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere. We first considered simple variations of the interplanetary conditions to obtain generic cases that helped us in establishing the basic cause and effect relationships for steady solar wind conditions. Subsequently, we used actual solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters measured by an upstream spacecraft as input to the simulations and compared the simulation results with sequences of events observed by another or several other spacecraft located downstream the bow shock. In particular we compared results with observations made when spacecraft crossed the magnetospheric boundary.

  11. MHD simulations of ram pressure stripping of a disk galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Mariana; Gomez, Gilberto

    2015-08-01

    The removal of the ISM of disk galaxies through ram pressure stripping (RPS) has been extensively studied in numerous simulations. These models show that this process has a significant impact on galaxy evolution (the truncation of the ISM will lead to a decrease in the star formation and the galaxy will become redder).Nevertheless, the role of the magnetic fields (MFs) on the dynamics of the gas in this process has been hardly studied, although the influence of magnetic fields on the large scale disk structure is well established. The presence of MFs produce a less compressible gas, thus increasing the scale height of the gas in the galaxy, that is, gas can be found farther away from the galactic potential well, which may lead to an easier removal of gas. We test this idea by performing a 3D MHD simulation of a disk galaxy that experiences RPS under the wind-tunnel approximation.

  12. MHD Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae with Cosmos++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Shizuka; Salmonson, Jay

    2010-10-01

    We performed 2D, axisymmetric, MHD simulations with Cosmos++ in order to examine the growth of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in core-collapse supernovae. We have initialized a non-rotating 15 Msolar progenitor, infused with differential rotation and poloidal magnetic fields. The collapse of the iron core is simulated with the Shen EOS, and the parametric Ye and entropy evolution. The wavelength of the unstable mode in the post-collapse environment is expected to be only ~200 m. In order to achieve the fine spatial resolution requirement, we employed remapping technique after the iron core has collapsed and bounced. The MRI unstable region appears near the equator and angular momentum and entropy are transported outward. Higher resolution remap run display more vigorous overturns and stronger transport of angular momentum and entropy. Our results are in agreement with the earlier work by Akiyama et al. [1] and Obergaulinger et al. [2].

  13. The ideal tearing mode: theory and resistive MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Landi, S.; Papini, E.; Pucci, F.; Velli, M.

    2016-05-01

    Classical MHD reconnection theories, both the stationary Sweet-Parker model and the tearing instability, are known to provide rates which are too slow to explain the observations. However, a recent analysis has shown that there exists a critical threshold on current sheet's thickness, namely a/L ∼ S -1/3, beyond which the tearing modes evolve on fast macroscopic Alfvénic timescales, provided the Lunquist number S is high enough, as invariably found in solar and astrophysical plasmas. Therefore, the classical Sweet-Parker scenario, for which the diffusive region scales as a/L ∼ S -1/2 and thus can be up to ∼ 100 times thinner than the critical value, is likely to be never realized in nature, as the current sheet itself disrupts in the elongation process. We present here two-dimensional, compressible, resistive MHD simulations, with S ranging from 105 to 107, that fully confirm the linear analysis. Moreover, we show that a secondary plasmoid instability always occurs when the same critical scaling is reached on the local, smaller scale, leading to a cascading explosive process, reminiscent of the flaring activity.

  14. Final Report: "Large-Eddy Simulation of Anisotropic MHD Turbulence"

    SciTech Connect

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2008-06-23

    To acquire better understanding of turbulence in flows of liquid metals and other electrically conducting fluids in the presence of steady magnetic fields and to develop an accurate and physically adequate LES (large-eddy simulation) model for such flows. The scientific objectives formulated in the project proposal have been fully completed. Several new directions were initiated and advanced in the course of work. Particular achievements include a detailed study of transformation of turbulence caused by the imposed magnetic field, development of an LES model that accurately reproduces this transformation, and solution of several fundamental questions of the interaction between the magnetic field and fluid flows. Eight papers have been published in respected peer-reviewed journals, with two more papers currently undergoing review, and one in preparation for submission. A post-doctoral researcher and a graduate student have been trained in the areas of MHD, turbulence research, and computational methods. Close collaboration ties have been established with the MHD research centers in Germany and Belgium.

  15. Global MHD modeling of resonant ULF waves: Simulations with and without a plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Wiltberger, M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the plasmaspheric influence on the resonant mode coupling of magnetospheric ultralow frequency (ULF) waves using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We present results from two different versions of the model, both driven by the same solar wind conditions: one version that contains a plasmasphere (the LFM coupled to the Rice Convection Model, where the Gallagher plasmasphere model is also included) and another that does not (the stand-alone LFM). We find that the inclusion of a cold, dense plasmasphere has a significant impact on the nature of the simulated ULF waves. For example, the inclusion of a plasmasphere leads to a deeper (more earthward) penetration of the compressional (azimuthal) electric field fluctuations, due to a shift in the location of the wave turning points. Consequently, the locations where the compressional electric field oscillations resonantly couple their energy into local toroidal mode field line resonances also shift earthward. We also find, in both simulations, that higher-frequency compressional (azimuthal) electric field oscillations penetrate deeper than lower frequency oscillations. In addition, the compressional wave mode structure in the simulations is consistent with a radial standing wave oscillation pattern, characteristic of a resonant waveguide. The incorporation of a plasmasphere into the LFM global MHD model represents an advance in the state of the art in regard to ULF wave modeling with such simulations. We offer a brief discussion of the implications for radiation belt modeling techniques that use the electric and magnetic field outputs from global MHD simulations to drive particle dynamics.

  16. Relative timing of substorm features in MHD simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of the temporal sequence of substorm phenomena based on three dimensional MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations of magnetic reconnection and plasmoid formation is presented. The investigation utilizes a spatially localized resistivity model which leads to a significantly faster evolution than found in previous investigations. The analysis of the results concentrates on substorm features that have received considerable attention in the past. The formation of magnetic neutral lines, the occurrence of fast flows directed both earthward and tailward, and the magnetic field changes leading to the formation of the substorm current wedge, and to the depolarization of the magnetic field earthward of the reconnection region and its dependence on the spatial distribution of resistivity, are discussed. These phenomena are seen as an integral part of the nonlinear evolution of the three dimensional tearing instability.

  17. MHD Simulation of the Inverse Pinch Plasma Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Esaulov, A; Bauer, B; Lindemuth, I; Makhin, V; Presura, R; Ryutov, D

    2004-07-01

    A wall confined plasma in an inverse pinch configuration holds potential as a plasma target for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) as well as the simple geometry to study wall-confined plasma. An experiment is planned to study the inverse pinch configuration using the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). The dynamics of the discharge formation have been analyzed using analytic models and numerical methods. Strong heating occurs by thermalization of directed energy when an outward moving current sheet (the inverse pinch effect) collides with the outer wall of the experimental chamber. Two dimensional MHD simulations show Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov -like modes of instability, as expected because of the shock acceleration during plasma formation phase. The instabilities are not disruptive, but give rise to a mild level of turbulence. The conclusion from this work is that an interesting experiment relevant to wall confinement for MTF could be done using existing equipment at UNR.

  18. Comparison of inversion codes for polarized line formation in MHD simulations. I. Milne-Eddington codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrero, J. M.; Lites, B. W.; Lagg, A.; Rezaei, R.; Rempel, M.

    2014-12-01

    Milne-Eddington (M-E) inversion codes for the radiative transfer equation are the most widely used tools to infer the magnetic field from observations of the polarization signals in photospheric and chromospheric spectral lines. Unfortunately, a comprehensive comparison between the different M-E codes available to the solar physics community is still missing, and so is a physical interpretation of their inferences. In this contribution we offer a comparison between three of those codes (VFISV, ASP/HAO, and HeLIx+). These codes are used to invert synthetic Stokes profiles that were previously obtained from realistic non-grey three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (3D MHD) simulations. The results of the inversion are compared with each other and with those from the MHD simulations. In the first case, the M-E codes retrieve values for the magnetic field strength, inclination and line-of-sight velocity that agree with each other within σB ≤ 35 (Gauss), σγ ≤ 1.2°, and σv ≤ 10 m s-1, respectively. Additionally, M-E inversion codes agree with the numerical simulations, when compared at a fixed optical depth, within σB ≤ 130 (Gauss), σγ ≤ 5°, and σv ≤ 320 m s-1. Finally, we show that employing generalized response functions to determine the height at which M-E codes measure physical parameters is more meaningful than comparing at a fixed geometrical height or optical depth. In this case the differences between M-E inferences and the 3D MHD simulations decrease to σB ≤ 90 (Gauss), σγ ≤ 3°, and σv ≤ 90 m s-1.

  19. Kelvin-Helmholtz Unstable Magnetotail Flow Channels: Deceleration and Radiation of MHD Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkakin, H.; Mann, I. R.; Rankin, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of magnetotail flow channels associated with burstybulk flows (BBFs) is investigated. MHD oscillations of the channel in both kink and sausage modes areinvestigated for KHI, and both the primary and secondary KHIs are found that drive MHD waves. Theseinstabilities are likely to be important for flow channel braking where the KHI removes energy from the flow.At flow speeds above the peak growth rate, the MHD modes excited by KHI develop from surface modesinto propagating modes leading to the radiation of MHD waves from the flow channel. The coupling ofBBF-driven shear flow instabilities to MHD waves presented here represents a new paradigm to explain BBFexcitation of tail flapping. Our model can also explain, for the first time, the generation mechanism for theobservations of waves propagating toward both flanks and emitted from BBF channels in the magnetotail.

  20. Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable magnetotail flow channels: Deceleration and radiation of MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkakin, H.; Mann, I. R.; Rankin, R.

    2014-06-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of magnetotail flow channels associated with bursty bulk flows (BBFs) is investigated. MHD oscillations of the channel in both kink and sausage modes are investigated for KHI, and both the primary and secondary KHIs are found that drive MHD waves. These instabilities are likely to be important for flow channel braking where the KHI removes energy from the flow. At flow speeds above the peak growth rate, the MHD modes excited by KHI develop from surface modes into propagating modes leading to the radiation of MHD waves from the flow channel. The coupling of BBF-driven shear flow instabilities to MHD waves presented here represents a new paradigm to explain BBF excitation of tail flapping. Our model can also explain, for the first time, the generation mechanism for the observations of waves propagating toward both flanks and emitted from BBF channels in the magnetotail.

  1. MHD Simulations of the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuhong; Chatterjee, Piyali

    Using three-dimensional MHD simulations, we model the quasi-static evolution and the onset of eruption of twisted magnetic flux ropes in the solar corona. We present simulations where the eruption is triggered by either the onset of the torus instability or the helical kink instability of the line-tied coronal flux rope. The simulations show that S (or inverse S) shaped current sheets develop along topological structures identified as Quasi Separatrix Layers (QSLs), during the quasi-static phase before the eruption. Reconnections in the current sheets effectively add twisted flux to the flux rope and thus allow it to rise quasi-statically to the critical height for the onset of the torus instability. We examine the thermal features produced by the current sheet formation and the associated reconnections and found that they can explain some of the observed features in coronal prominence cavities as well as in pre-eruption active regions. We also present simulations of the development of a homologous sequence of CMEs caused by the repeated formation and partial eruption of kink unstable flux ropes as a result of continued flux emergence. It is found that such homologous CMEs tend to be cannibalistic, leading to the formation of more energetic, highly twisted ejecta.

  2. MHD Simulations of the Plasma Flow in the Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. E. R.; Keidar, M.; Sankaran, K.; olzin, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of plasma through a magnetic nozzle is simulated by solving the governing equations for the plasma flow in the presence of an static magnetic field representing the applied nozzle. This work will numerically investigate the flow and behavior of the plasma as the inlet plasma conditions and magnetic nozzle field strength are varied. The MHD simulations are useful for addressing issues such as plasma detachment and to can be used to gain insight into the physical processes present in plasma flows found in thrusters that use magnetic nozzles. In the model, the MHD equations for a plasma, with separate temperatures calculated for the electrons and ions, are integrated over a finite cell volume with flux through each face computed for each of the conserved variables (mass, momentum, magnetic flux, energy) [1]. Stokes theorem is used to convert the area integrals over the faces of each cell into line integrals around the boundaries of each face. The state of the plasma is described using models of the ionization level, ratio of specific heats, thermal conductivity, and plasma resistivity. Anisotropies in current conduction due to Hall effect are included, and the system is closed using a real-gas equation of state to describe the relationship between the plasma density, temperature, and pressure.A separate magnetostatic solver is used to calculate the applied magnetic field, which is assumed constant for these calculations. The total magnetic field is obtained through superposition of the solution for the applied magnetic field and the self-consistently computed induced magnetic fields that arise as the flowing plasma reacts to the presence of the applied field. A solution for the applied magnetic field is represented in Fig. 1 (from Ref. [2]), exhibiting the classic converging-diverging field pattern. Previous research was able to demonstrate effects such as back-emf at a super-Alfvenic flow, which significantly alters the shape of the

  3. High Resolution Simulations of Relativistic Hydrodynamic and MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrake, Jonathan; MacFadyen, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a program of simulations designed to investigate the basic properties of relativistic hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We employ a well-tested 5th-order accurate numerical scheme at resolutions of up to 2048^3 zones for hydrodynamic turbulence, and a minimally diffusive 2nd-order scheme at resolutions of up to 1024^3 in the case of relativistic MHD. For the hydrodynamic case, we simulate a relativistically hot gas in a cubic periodic domain continuously driven at large scales with Lorentz factor of about 3. We find that relativistic turbulent velocity fluctuations with Γ β > 1 persist from the driving scale down to scales an order of magnitude smaller, demonstrating the existence of a sustained relativistic turbulent cascade. The power spectrum of the fluid 4-velocity is broadly Kolmogorov-like, roughly obeying a power law with 5/3 index between scales 1/10 and 1/100 of the domain. Departures from 5/3 scaling are larger for the power spectrum of 3-velocity. We find that throughout the inertial interval, 25% of power is in dilatational modes, which obey strict power law scaling between 1/2 and 1/100 of the domain with an index of 1.88. Our program also explores turbulent amplification of magnetic fields in the conditions of merging neutron stars, using a realistic equation of state for dense nuclear matter (ρ ˜ 10^13 g/cm^3). We find that very robustly, seed fields are amplified to magnetar strength (≥ 4 * 10^16 Gauss) within ˜1 micro-second for fluid volumes near the size of the NS crust thickness <10 meters. We present power spectra of the kinetic and magnetic energy taken long into the fully stationary evolution of the highest resolution models, finding the magnetic energy to be in super-equipartition (4 times larger) with the kinetic energy through the inertial range. We believe that current global simulations of merging NS binaries are insufficiently resolved for studying field amplification via turbulent processes

  4. Implicit Predictor-Corrector finite difference scheme for the ideal MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, T.; Yu, H.; Lai, S.

    2012-12-01

    A innovative simulation code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is developed. We present a multiple-dimensional MHD code based on high-order implicit predictor-corrector finite difference scheme (high-order IPCFD scheme). High-order IPCFD scheme adopts high-order predictor-corrector scheme for the time integration and high-order central difference method as the spatial derivative solver. We use Elimination-of-the-Runoff-Errors (ERE) technology to avoid the numerical oscillations and numerical instability in the simulation results. In one-dimensional MHD problem, our simulation results show good agreement with the Brio & Wu MHD shock tube problem. The divergent B constraint remains fully satisfied, that is the divergent B equals to zero throughout the simulation. When solving the two-dimensional (2D) linear wave in MHD plasma, we clearly obtain the group-velocity Friedrichs diagrams of the MHD waves. Here we demonstrate 2D simulation results of rotor problem, Orszag-Tang vortex system, vortex type K-H instability, and kink type K-H instability by using our IPCFD MHD code and discuss the advantage of our simulation code.

  5. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations of Extragalactic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1997-12-01

    We present the numerical simulations of relativistic jets propagating initially oblique to the field lines of a magnetized ambient medium. Our simulations incorporate relativistic MHD in a four-dimensional spacetime and clearly show that (a) relatively weak, oblique fields (at 1/16 of the equipartition value) have only a negligible influence on the propagating jet and they are passively pushed away by the relativistically moving head; (b) oblique fields in equipartition with the ambient plasma provide more resistance and cause bending at the jet head, but the magnitude of this deflection and the associated backflow are small compared to those identified by previous studies with a 2-D slab model. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently during the simulations. The effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. Applied to relativistic extragalactic jets from blazars, the new results are encouraging since superluminal outflows exhibit bending near their sources and their environments are profoundly magnetized---but observations do not provide support for irregular kinematics such as large-scale vortical motions and pronounced reverse flows near the points of origin.

  6. Preliminary analysis of the dynamic heliosphere by MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Washimi, H.; Zank, G. P.; Tanaka, T.

    2006-09-26

    A preliminary analysis of the dynamic heliosphere to estimate the termination shock (TS) distance from the sun around the time when Voyager 1 passed the termination shock at December 16, 2004 is performed by using MHD simulations. For input to this simulation, we use the Voyager 2 solar-wind data. We first find a stationary solution of the 3-D outer heliosphere by assigning a set of LISM parameters as our outer boundary conditions and then the dynamical analysis is performed. The model TS crossing is within 6 months of the observed date. The TS is pushed outward every time a high ram-pressure solar wind pulse arrives. After the end of the high ram-pressure wind, the TS shock shrinks inward. When the last Halloween event passed through the TS at DOY 250, 2004, the TS began to shrink inward very quickly and the TS crossed V1. The highest inward speed of the TS is over 400 km/s. The high ram-pressure solar wind transmitted through the TS becomes a high thermal-pressure plasma in the heliosheath, acting to push the TS inward. This suggests that the position of the TS is determined not only by the steady-state pressure balance condition between the solar wind ram-pressure and the LISM pressure, but by the dynamical ram pressure too. The period when the high ram-pressure solar wind arrives at the TS shock seems to correspond to the period of the TS particle event (Stone et al, 2005, Decker et al., 2005). The TS crossing date will be revised in future simulations using a more appropriate set of parameters for the LISM. This will enable us to undertake a detailed comparison of the simulation results with the TS particle events.

  7. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.

    2014-02-12

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ∼ 10{sup 4}) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ∼ 3×10{sup 6}) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  8. Observations and MHD Simulations for a Shocked Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. Z.; Angelopoulos, V.; Raeder, J.; Oliveira, D.; Shi, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies disclosed that interplanetary shocks not only raise global auroral activity, but also cause significant tail disturbances, ranging from ULF wave excitation to abrupt cross-tail current sheet thinning and current density increase, generation of burst bulk flows and dipolarization fronts, and to magnetic reconnection enhancement. In addition, shocks can also cause significant deformation of the magnetotail at ~60 Re and beyond. In this paper we study a shock event using ARTEMIS in situ observations and OpenGGCM MHD simulations. The two ARTEMIS spacecraft were located near the tail current sheet and lobe center at (-60, 1, -5Re_GSM) when the shock arrived and recorded an abrupt tail compression leading to significant enhancements in the plasma density, temperature, magnetic field strength, and cross-tail current density, as well as to tailward flows. However, ~10 min later, the spacecraft entered the sheath solar wind unexpectedly. Two hypotheses are considered: either the tail was cut off by the high solar wind ram pressure (~25-30 nPa), or the compressed tail was pushed aside by the appreciable Vy solar wind flow component imposed by the shock. OpenGGMC simulation results confirmed the second hypothesis and disclosed that for this event the magnetic pressure played a dominant role at X=-60 Re for the compression. In addition to the shock normal direction and shock compression, the anisotropic (transverse) magnetic pressure also contributed to the significant reduction of the lobe Y dimension. Therefore, during this 10 min interval, the lobe center moved dawnward by ~12 Re and the tail width in Y was reduced from 40 to 26 Re, which eventually exposed ARTEMIS to the sheath solar wind. Comparisons of plasma and magnetic parameters between ARTEMIS in situ observations and simulations showed a satisfied consistence.

  9. On the propagation of blobs in the magnetotail: MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birn, J.; Nakamura, R.; Hesse, M.

    2013-09-01

    Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the magnetotail, we investigate the fate of entropy-enhanced localized magnetic flux tubes ("blobs"). Such flux tubes may be the result of a slippage process that also generates entropy-depleted flux tubes ("bubbles") or of a rapid localized energy increase, for instance, from wave absorption. We confirm the expectation that the entropy enhancement leads to a tailward motion and that the speed and distance traveled into the tail increase with the entropy enhancement, even though the blobs tend to break up into pieces. The vorticity on the outside of the blobs twists the magnetic field and generates field-aligned currents predominantly of region-2 sense (earthward on the dusk side and tailward on the dawn side), which might provide a possibility for remote identification from the ground. The breakup, however, leads to more turbulent flow patterns, associated with opposite vorticity and the generation of region-1 sense field-aligned currents of lower intensity but approximately equal integrated magnitude.

  10. 3D Radiative MHD Modeling of Quiet-Sun Magnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, Irina

    2016-05-01

    Quiet-Sun regions that cover most of the solar surface represent a background state that plays an extremely important role in the dynamics and energetics of the solar atmosphere. A clear understanding of these regions is required for accurate interpretation of solar activity events such as emergence of magnetic flux, sunspot formation, and eruptive dynamics. Modern high-resolution observations from ground and space telescopes have revealed a complicated dynamics of turbulent magnetoconvection and its effects in the solar atmosphere and corona, showing intense interactions across different temporal and spatial scales. Interpretation of the observed complex phenomena and understanding of their origins is impossible without advanced numerical models. I will present new results of realistic-type 3D radiative MHD simulations of the upper turbulent convective layer and atmosphere of the Sun. The results reveal the mechanism of formation and properties of the Sun’s “magnetic carpet” controlled by subsurface small-scale dynamo processes, and demonstrate interaction between the subsurface layers and the atmosphere via spontaneous small-scale eruptions and wave phenomena. To link the simulations to solar data the spectro-polarimetric radiative transfer code SPINOR is used to convert the simulated data into the Stokes profiles of various spectral lines, including the SDO and Hinode observables. The results provide a detailed physical understanding of the quiet-Sun dynamics, and show potential for future observations with the DKIST and other large solar telescopes.

  11. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling MHD and 3D Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM, a 3D energetic particle model) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS, an MHD code developed at Predictive Science, Inc.) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions around fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for particle acceleration low in the corona (˜ 3 - 6 solar radii). These couplings show rapid particle acceleration over a broad longitudinal extent (˜ 80 degrees) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression regions and their subsequent expansion. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. We present here the most recent simulation results including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles, the subsequent flux and dosages at 1AU, and an analysis of the compressional regions as efficient accelerators.

  12. Relativistic MHD Simulations of Poynting Flux-driven Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoyue; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic, magnetized jets are observed to propagate to very large distances in many active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations to study the propagation of Poynting flux-driven jets in AGNs. These jets are already assumed to be being launched from the vicinity (~103 gravitational radii) of supermassive black holes. Jet injections are characterized by a model described in Li et al., and we follow the propagation of these jets to ~parsec scales. We find that these current-carrying jets are always collimated and mildly relativistic. When α, the ratio of toroidal-to-poloidal magnetic flux injection, is large the jet is subject to nonaxisymmetric current-driven instabilities (CDI) which lead to substantial dissipation and reduced jet speed. However, even with the presence of instabilities, the jet is not disrupted and will continue to propagate to large distances. We suggest that the relatively weak impact by the instability is due to the nature of the instability being convective and the fact that the jet magnetic fields are rapidly evolving on Alfvénic time scales. We present the detailed jet properties and show that far from the jet launching region, a substantial amount of magnetic energy has been transformed into kinetic energy and thermal energy, producing a jet magnetization number σ < 1. In addition, we have also studied the effects of a gas pressure supported "disk" surrounding the injection region, and qualitatively similar global jet behaviors were observed. We stress that jet collimation, CDIs, and the subsequent energy transitions are intrinsic features of current-carrying jets.

  13. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms 2. MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Winglee, R. M.

    1993-05-01

    The effects of temporal and spatial variations in the plasma resistivity on the evolution of the magnetosphere during substorms are examined with numerical solutions of the two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The global MHD simulations self-consistently consider the interaction of the solar wind with the dayside magnetosphere as well as the evolution of the tail region. These solutions are used to study how various solar wind states generate conditions in the tail, such as pressure gradients and cross-tail currents, that have the potential of leading to a substorm. Although the MHD formalism does provide information on the large-scale evolution, the essential mechanism for substorm development may involve microscopic or particle processes not present in an MHD approach. As a result, this MHD study is carried out in association with particle simulations (Winglee and Steinolfson, this issue). Since one connection between the MHD and particle approaches is through the resistivity, the effects of various resistivity distributions on the global MHD configuration are examined. The resistivity distributions considered here are (1) a temporally constant and spatially uniform resistivity, (2) a resistivity proportional to the square of the local current density, and (3) a resistivity proportional to the square of the local magnetic field strength. The latter distribution is suggested by the above particle simulations and represents effects produced by the increased magnetization of particles and the differential motion between electrons and ions. For all three cases a plasmoid is formed and ejected tailward. However, when the resistivity depends on the field strength, considerably more energy is stored in the tail prior to plasmoid formation, and plasmoid formation is delayed relative to the results for the other two resistivity distributions. Furthermore, when the plasmoid is eventually ejected, it moves down the tail with a higher speed. The MHD results

  14. Comparison of Iridium Determined Field-Aligned Current Patterns with MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Goodrich, C. C.; Waters, C. L.; Merkine, V. G.

    2002-05-01

    The engineering magnetometers aboard the 70+ Iridium satellites arranged in six equally spaced polar orbital planes provide a unique database for determination of global field-aligned currents [Waters et al., 2001]. In this study we compare these field-aligned currents with MHD simulation results to quantitatively evaluate the MHD results in a global way. We report analysis for three events of steady interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation, stable to within 25o of the average direction. The start times of these intervals are August~11, 1999 (22:36), November~23, 1999 (07:15), and August~10, 2000 (22:11), and the events extend between eight and ten hours in duration. The IMF clock angles for the events are -124o, 125o, and 160o, respectively, and the IMF cone angles for all three intervals are within 25o of 90o. The solar wind flow speeds for the events averages 430, 453, and 386~km/s, and the mean solar wind densities are 3.7, 3.6, and 12.0 {cm}-3, respectively. The field aligned current densities in the MHD simulations are evaluated at the inner simulation boundary (2~Re) and mapped on dipole field lines to ionospheric altitudes. Preliminary results show a reasonably good agreement in the morphology of the Region-1 currents, although the field-aligned currents of the MHD simulations are displaced somewhat poleward with respect to the Iridium patterns. DMSP particle source identifications are used to compare source regions of Region 1 in the observed FAC maps with those in the MHD simulations. The Region-2 currents show expectedly larger differences since ring current drift physics necessary to drive these currents in the magnetosphere is not implemented in the MHD evaluations. The ratio between Region~1 and Region~2 is used to measure the relative deficit of Region-2 currents in the MHD simulation results.

  15. MHD-EPIC: Extended Magnetohydrodynamics with Embedded Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Ganymede's Magnetosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Jia, X.; Gombosi, T. I.; Lapenta, G.

    2014-12-01

    We have recently developed a new modeling capability to embed theimplicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the BATS-R-USmagnetohydrodynamic model. The PIC domain can cover the regions wherekinetic effects are most important, such as reconnection sites. TheBATS-R-US code, on the other hand, can efficiently handle the rest ofthe computational domain where the MHD or Hall MHD description issufficient. As one of the very first applications of the MHD-EPICalgorithm (Daldorff et al. 2014, JCP, 268, 236) we simulate theinteraction between Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma with Ganymede'smagnetosphere, where the separation of kinetic and global scalesappears less severe than for the Earth's magnetosphere. Because theexternal Jovian magnetic field remains in an anti-parallel orientationwith respect to Ganymede's intrinsic magnetic field, magneticreconnection is believed to be the major process that couples the twomagnetospheres. As the PIC model is able to describe self-consistentlythe electron behavior, our coupled MHD-EPIC model is well suited forinvestigating the nature of magnetic reconnection in thisreconnection-driven mini-magnetosphere. We will compare the MHD-EPICsimulations with pure Hall MHD simulations and compare both modelresults with Galileo plasma and magnetic field measurements to assess therelative importance of ion and electron kinetics in controlling theconfiguration and dynamics of Ganymede's magnetosphere.

  16. HYBRID AND HALL-MHD SIMULATIONS OF COLLISIONLESS RECONNECTION: EFFECTS OF PLASMA PRESSURE TENSOR

    SciTech Connect

    L. YIN; D. WINSKE; ET AL

    2001-05-01

    In this study we performed two-dimensional hybrid (particle ions, massless fluid electrons) and Hall-MHD simulations of collisionless reconnection in a thin current sheet. Both calculations include the full electron pressure tensor (instead of a localized resistivity) in the generalized Ohm's law to initiate reconnection, and in both an initial perturbation to the Harris equilibrium is applied. First, electron dynamics from the two calculations are compared, and we find overall agreement between the two calculations in both the reconnection rate and the global configuration. To address the issue of how kinetic treatment for the ions affects the reconnection dynamics, we compared the fluid-ion dynamics from the Hall-MHD calculation to the particle-ion dynamics obtained from the hybrid simulation. The comparison demonstrates that off-diagonal elements of the ion pressure tensor are important in correctly modeling the ion out-of-plane momentum transport from the X point. It is that these effects can be modeled efficiently using a particle Hall-MHD simulation method in which particle ions used in a predictor/corrector to implement the ion gyro-radius corrections. We also investigate the micro- macro-scale coupling in the magnetotail dynamics by using a new integrated approach in which particle Hall-MHD calculations are embedded inside a MHD simulation. Initial results of the simulation concerning current sheet thinning and reconnection dynamics are discussed.

  17. Viscous dissipation and thermal radiation effects on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow and heat transfer over a stretching slender cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalteh, M.; Ghorbani, S.; Khademinejad, T.

    2016-05-01

    An axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a fluid over a slender cylinder are investigated numerically. The effects of viscous dissipation, thermal radiation, and surface transverse curvature are taken into account in the simulations. For this purpose, the governing partial differential equations are transformed to ordinary differential equations by using appropriate similarity transformations. The resultant ordinary differential equations along with appropriate boundary conditions are solved by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method combined with the shooting technique. The effects of various parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles, local skin friction coefficient, and Nusselt number are analyzed.

  18. Daily Coronal MHD Simulation Using HMI Near-Real-Time Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Keiji; HMI Team

    2012-05-01

    SDO/HMI is making full-disk line-of-sight magnetogram measurements with a cadence of 45 seconds. The HMI analysis pipeline regularly generates two types of synoptic map of the solar surface magnetic field. Definitive calibrated data maps are created every Carrington Rotation, about every 27 days and a preliminary synoptic map is updated on a near-real-time basis. As an application of the near-real-time data, we have been running a daily MHD simulation of the global solar corona using the photospheric map as the boundary condition ( http://hmi.stanford.edu/MHD ). The daily MHD model assumes a polytropic gas with the specific heat ratio of 1.05, and the simulation is conducted in a 4-pi spherical grid system with latitudinal and longitudinal grid sizes of pi/64. The output available at hmi.stanford.edu/MHD includes the three-dimensional volume data, the shape of the open-field regions corresponding to the coronal holes, and the LoS-integration of the coronal density mimicking coronagraph observations. For validation, we compare the results of the low-resolution daily MHD simulation and the high-resolution PFSS calculation with SDO/AIA and SOHO/C2 and C3 image data. In the future the simulation region will be extended to 1 AU, and models of coronal heating and acceleration will be applied to allow a timely prediction of solar wind at the Earth for space weather purposes.

  19. Accuracy of MHD simulations: Effects of simulation initialization in GUMICS-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakka, Antti; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Dimmock, Andrew; Osmane, Adnane; Palmroth, Minna; Honkonen, Ilja

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a study aimed at revealing how different global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation initialization methods affect the dynamics in different parts of the Earth's magnetosphere-ionosphere system. While such magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling codes have been used for more than two decades, their testing still requires significant work to identify the optimal numerical representation of the physical processes. We used the Grand Unified Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Simulation (GUMICS-4), the only European global MHD simulation being developed by the Finnish Meteorological Institute. GUMICS-4 was put to a test that included two stages: 1) a 10 day Omni data interval was simulated and the results were validated by comparing both the bow shock and the magnetopause spatial positions predicted by the simulation to actual measurements and 2) the validated 10 day simulation run was used as a reference in a comparison of five 3 + 12 hour (3 hour synthetic initialisation + 12 hour actual simulation) simulation runs. The 12 hour input was not only identical in each simulation case but it also represented a subset of the 10 day input thus enabling quantifying the effects of different synthetic initialisations on the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. The used synthetic initialisation data sets were created using stepwise, linear and sinusoidal functions. Switching the used input from the synthetic to real Omni data was immediate. The results show that the magnetosphere forms in each case within an hour after the switch to real data. However, local dissimilarities are found in the magnetospheric dynamics after formation depending on the used initialisation method. This is evident especially in the inner parts of the lobe.

  20. Multidimensional MHD Simulations Of DSA Using AstroBEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmon, Paul; Jones, T.; Mitran, S.; Cunningham, A.; Frank, A.

    2009-05-01

    We present a modification to the AstroBEAR (Astronomical Boundary Embedded Adaptive Refinement) MHD code (Cunningham et. al. 2007) that allows it to treat time dependent Diffusive Shock Acceleration (DSA) of cosmic rays in multiple dimensions including dynamical feedback from the cosmic rays. Utilizing the power of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in tandem with efficient methods for cosmic ray diffusion and advection, this allows us for the first time to explore the evolution of modified MHD shocks in more than one spatial dimension. Among the early applications of the code will be investigations of colliding and clumpy stellar winds, type II supernova remnants and cosmic ray driven instabilities. This work is supported at the University of Minnesota by NSF, NASA and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  1. MHD simulations for investigating interaction processes between a CME and ambient solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Junmo; Magara, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and ambient solar winds is one of the important issues of space weather because it affects the trajectory of a flying CME, which determines whether the CME hits the Earth and produces geomagnetic disturbances or not. In this study, two-step 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations including a spheromak-type CME and an ambient solar wind are performed to investigate their interaction processes such as deflection and rotation of a CME. We perform the 1st-step MHD simulation using averaged surface magnetic field data to construct a steady state with an ambient solar wind. A spheromak-type CME is then injected through the solar surface, and subsequent evolution is reproduced by performing the 2nd-step MHD simulation. We discuss key parameters that characterize interaction processes between a CME and ambient solar wind.

  2. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE TYPE II SPICULES: DYNAMIC THREE-DIMENSIONAL MHD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MartInez-Sykora, Juan; Hansteen, Viggo; Moreno-Insertis, Fernando E-mail: viggo.hansteen@astro.uio.no

    2011-07-20

    Recent high temporal and spatial resolution observations of the chromosphere have forced the definition of a new type of spicule, 'type II's', that are characterized by rising rapidly, having short lives, and by fading away at the end of their lifetimes. Here, we report on features found in realistic three-dimensional simulations of the outer solar atmosphere that resemble the observed type II spicules. These features evolve naturally from the simulations as a consequence of the magnetohydrodynamical evolution of the model atmosphere. The simulations span from the upper layer of the convection zone to the lower corona and include the emergence of a horizontal magnetic flux. The state-of-art Oslo Staggered Code is used to solve the full MHD equations with non-gray and non-LTE radiative transfer and thermal conduction along the magnetic field lines. We describe in detail the physics involved in a process which we consider a possible candidate for the driver mechanism that produces type II spicules. The modeled spicule is composed of material rapidly ejected from the chromosphere that rises into the corona while being heated. Its source lies in a region with large field gradients and intense electric currents, which lead to a strong Lorentz force that squeezes the chromospheric material, resulting in a vertical pressure gradient that propels the spicule along the magnetic field, as well as Joule heating, which heats the jet material, forcing it to fade.

  3. Forced Reconnection in the Near Magnetotail: Onset and Energy Conversion in PIC and MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) together with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Q1 simulations of magnetotail dynamics, we investigate the evolution toward onset of reconnection and the subsequent energy transfer and conversion. In either case, reconnection onset is preceded by a driven phase, during which magnetic flux is added to the tail at the high-latitude boundaries, followed by a relaxation phase, during which the configuration continues to respond to the driving. The boundary deformation leads to the formation of thin embedded current sheets, which are bifurcated in the near tail, converging to a single sheet farther out in the MHD simulations. The thin current sheets in the PIC simulation are carried by electrons and are associated with a strong perpendicular electrostatic field, which may provide a connection to parallel potentials and auroral arcs and an ionospheric signal even prior to the onset of reconnection. The PIC simulation very well satisfies integral entropy conservation (intrinsic to ideal MHD) during this phase, supporting ideal ballooning stability. Eventually, the current intensification leads to the onset of reconnection, the formation and ejection of a plasmoid, and a collapse of the inner tail. The earthward flow shows the characteristics of a dipolarization front: enhancement of Bz, associated with a thin vertical electron current sheet in the PIC simulation. Both MHD and PIC simulations show a dominance of energy conversion from incoming Poynting flux to outgoing enthalpy flux, resulting in heating of the inner tail. Localized Joule dissipation plays only a minor role.

  4. MHD simulations of protostellar jets: formation and stability of shock diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustamujic, Sabina

    2016-07-01

    The early stages of a star birth are characterised by a variety of mass ejection phenomena, including outflows and collimated jets, that are strongly related with the accretion process developed in the context of the star-disc interaction. After been ejected, jets move through the ambient medium, interacting and producing shocks and complex structures that are observed at different wavelength bands. In particular, X-ray observations show evidence of strong shocks heating the plasma up to temperatures of a few million degrees. In some cases, the shocked features appear to be stationary and have been interpreted as shock diamonds. We aim at investigating the physical properties of the shocked plasma and the role of the magnetic field on the collimation performing 2.5D MHD simulations, including the effects of the thermal conduction and the radiative losses. We modelled the propagation of a jet ramming with a supersonic speed into an initially isothermal and homogeneous magnetized medium. We studied the physics that guides the formation of a stationary shock (for instance a shock diamond) and compared the results with observations, via the emission measure distribution vs. temperature and the luminosity synthesised from the simulations.

  5. The effect of line-tying on the radiative MHD stability of coronal plasmas with radial pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.

    1984-01-01

    The role of photospheric line-tying, i.e., solar coronal loop structures, was investigated in terms of the effect on radiative modes and the influence that different radial pressure profiles exert on the effects of line-tying on radiative MHD stability. Energy is assumed dissipated by heat conduction and radiation and zero- and first-order solutions are obtained for the radiative time scales. Line-tying is a magnetic tension in the zero-order MHD mode and produces stability. Heat conduction occurs along bent field lines in first-order MHD modes when plasmas cross the field lines. Irradiated cool-core loops can experience MHD instabilities in the cylinder center, while line-tying can stabilize the plasma in the surrounding hot medium. Line-tying also adds stability to magnetosonic and condensation modes.

  6. Phase transition-like behavior of magnetospheric substorms: Global MHD simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M. I.; Sharma, S. A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Goodrich, C. C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Using nonlinear dynamical techniques, we statistically investigate whether the simulated substorms from global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models have a combination of global and multiscale features, revealed in substorm dynamics by [2000] and featured the phase transition-like behavior. We simulate seven intervals of total duration of 280 hours from the data set used in the above works [, 1985]. We analyze the input-output (vBs-pseudo AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compare the results to those inferred from the original set (vBs-observed AL index). The analysis of the coupled vBs-pseudo AL index system shows the first-order phase transition map, which is consistent with the map obtained for the vBs-observed AL index system. Although the comparison between observations and global MHD simulations for individual events may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is statistically consistent between simulations and observations. The coupled vBs-pseudo AL index system also shows multiscale behavior (scale-invariant power law dependence) in SSA power spectrum. Besides, we find the critical exponent of the nonequilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflects the multiscale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponent relates input and output parameters of the magnetosphere. We also discuss the limitations of the global MHD model in reproducing the multiscale behavior when compared to the real system.

  7. Numerical Simulation of MHD Effect in Liquid Metal Blankets with Flow Channel Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Pan, H. C.

    2011-09-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic effect in liquid metal blankets with flow channel insert and pressure equalization slot for fusion liquid metal blanket is studied by numerical simulation based on two dimensional fully developed flow model. The code is verified by comparing analytical solution and numerical solution of Hunt Case II. The velocity field and MHD pressure drop varying with electric conductivity of the FCI is analyzed. The result shows that the average velocity in central area of the cross section decreases with the increase of the electric conductivity of FCI. While the average velocity in gap zone is reverse. Comparing with MHD duct flow without FCI, MHD pressure drop is reduced significantly when the FCI material is electrically insulating.

  8. Shear-induced instability and arch filament eruption - A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Song, M. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Dryer, M.

    1991-01-01

    A situation wherein a bipolar magnetic field embedded in a stratified solar atmosphere undergoes symmetrical shear motion at the footpoints is investigated via a 2D (nonplanar) MHD simulation. It was found that the vertical plasma flow velocities grow exponentially, leading to a new type of global MHD instability. The growth rate increases almost linearly until it reaches the same order of magnitude as the Alfven speed. Then a nonlinear MHD instability occurs beyond this point. It was found that the central loops are pinched by opposing Lorentz forces, and the outer closed loops stretch upward with the vertically-rising mass flow. The nonlinear dynamical shearing instability is illustrated by a numerical example that is given for three different values of the plasma beta that span several orders of magnitude.

  9. On Computations for Thermal Radiation in MHD Channel Flow with Heat and Mass Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, T.; Awais, M.; Alsaedi, A.; Safdar, Ambreen

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer on the three-dimensional boundary layer flow of viscous fluid between two infinite parallel plates. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and thermal radiation effects are present. The governing problems are first modeled and then solved by homotopy analysis method (HAM). Influence of several embedded parameters on the velocity, concentration and temperature fields are described. PMID:24497968

  10. Phase Transition-like Behavior of Magnetospheric Substorms: Global MHD Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Guzdar, P. N.; Goodrich, C. C.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2001-12-01

    Because of their relevance to massive global energy loading and unloading, lots of observations and studies have been made for magnetic substorm events. Using nonlinear dynamical techniques, we investigate whether the simulated substorms from global MHD models have the non-equilibrium phase transition-like features revealed by \\markcite{Sitnov et al. [2000]}. We simulated 6 intervals of total duration of 240 hours from the same data set used in Sitnov et al. [2000]. We analyzed the input-output (vBs--pseudo-AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compared the results to those in \\markcite{Sitnov et al. [2000, 2001]}. The analysis of the coupled vBs--pseudo-AL index system shows the first-order phase transition map, which is consistent with the map obtained for the vBs--observed-AL index system from Sitnov et al. [2000]. The explanation lies in the cusp catastrophe model proposed by Lewis [1991]. Although, the comparison between observation and individual global MHD simulations may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is consistent between simulations and observations. This is an important validation of the global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. The coupled vBs--pseudo-AL index system shows multi-scale behavior (scale-invarianet power-law dependence) in singular power spectrum. We found critical exponents of the non-equilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflect the multi-scale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power-law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponents relate input and output parameters of the magnetosphere and distinguish the second order phase transition model from the self-organized criticality model. We also discuss the limitations of the global MHD model in reproducing the multi-scale behavior when compared to the real system.

  11. Oblique MHD cosmic-ray modified shocks: Two-fluid numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Adam; Jones, T. W.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1991-01-01

    We present the first results of time dependent, two-fluid, cosmic-ray (CR) modified, MHD shock simulations. The calculations were carried out with a new numerical code for 1-D ideal MHD. By coupling this code with the CR energy transport equation we can simulate the time-dependent evolution of MHD shocks including the acceleration of the CR and their feedback on the shock structures. We report tests of the combined numerical method including comparisons with analytical steady state results published earlier by Webb, as well as internal consistency checks for more general MHD CR shock structures after they appear to have converged to dynamical steady states. We also present results from an initial time dependent simulation which extend the parameter space domain of previous analytical models. These new results support Webb's suggestion that equilibrium oblique shocks are less effective than parallel shocks in the acceleration of CR. However, for realistic models of anisotropic CR diffusion, oblique shocks may achieve dynamical equilibrium on shorter timescale than parallel shocks.

  12. Multifluid MHD Simulations of the Plasma Environment of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko at Different Heliocentric Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Jia, X.; Rubin, M.; Fougere, N.; Gombosi, T. I.; Tenishev, V.; Combi, M. R.; Bieler, A. M.; Toth, G.; Hansen, K. C.; Shou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We study the plasma environment of the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which is the target of the Rosetta mission, by performing large scale numerical simulations. Our model is based on BATS-R-US within the Space Weather Modeling Framework that solves the governing multifluid MHD equations, which describe the behavior of the cometary heavy ions, the solar wind protons, and electrons. The model includes various mass loading processes, including ionization, charge exchange, dissociative ion-electron recombination, as well as collisional interactions between different fluids. The neutral background used in our MHD simulations is provided by a kinetic Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) model. We will simulate how the cometary plasma environment changes at different heliocentric distances.

  13. Comparison of empirical magnetic field models and global MHD simulations: The near-tail currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Walker, R. J.; Raeder, J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1995-01-01

    The tail currents predicted by empirical magnetic field models and global MHD simulations are compared. It is shown that the near-Earth currents obtained from the MHD simulations are much weaker than the currents predicted by the Tsyganenko models, primarily because the ring current is not properly represented in the simulations. On the other hand, in the mid-tail and distant tail the lobe field strength predicted by the simulations is comparable to what is observed at about 50 R(sub E) distance, significantly larger than the very low lobe field values predicted by the Tsyganenko models at that distance. Ways to improve these complementary approaches to model the actual magnetospheric configuration are discussed.

  14. Comparison of empirical magnetic field models and global MHD simulations: The near-tail currents

    SciTech Connect

    Pulkkinen, T.I.; Baker, D.N.; Walker, R.J.

    1995-03-15

    The tail currents predicted by empirical magnetic field models and global MHD simulations are compared. It is shown that the near-Earth currents obtained from the MHD simulations are much weaker than the currents predicted by the Tsyganenko models, primarily because the ring current is not properly represented in the simulations. On the other hand, in the mid-tail and distant tail the lobe field strength predicted by the simulations is comparable to what is observed at about 50R{sub E} distance, significantly larger than the very low lobe field values predicted by the Tsyganenko models at that distance. Ways to improve these complementary approaches to model the actual magnetospheric configuration are discussed. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Global Hall-MHD simulations of magnetorotational instability in a plasma Couette flow experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, F.; Lefebvre, B.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Forest, C. B.

    2011-06-15

    Global MHD and Hall-MHD numerical simulations relevant to the Madison plasma Couette flow experiment (MPCX) have been performed using the extended MHD code NIMROD. The MPCX has been constructed to study the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a plasma. The two-fluid Hall effect, which is relevant to some astrophysical situations such as protostellar disks, is also expected to be important in the MPCX. Here, we first derive the local Hall dispersion relation including viscosity, extending earlier work by Balbus and Terquem [Astrophys. J. 552, 235 (2001)]. The predictions of the local analysis are then compared with nonlocal calculations of linear stability of the MRI for a parameter range relevant to the MPCX. It is found that the MHD stability limit and mode structure are altered by the Hall term, and nonlocal analysis is necessary to obtain quantitatively reliable predictions for MPCX. Two-fluid physics also significantly changes the nonlinear evolution and saturation of the axisymmetric MRI. Both the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses contribute significantly to momentum transport. In the Hall regime, when the magnetic field is parallel to the rotation axis, the Maxwell stress is larger than the Reynolds stress (similar to the MHD regime). However, when the magnetic field is antiparallel to the rotation axis in the Hall regime, the Reynolds stress is much larger than the Maxwell stress. To further study the role of non-axisymmetric modes, we have also carried out fully nonlinear MHD computations. Non-axisymmetric modes play an increasingly important role as the magnetic Reynolds number increases and grow to large amplitudes in a saturated turbulent state.

  16. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Michael A.; Crowell, John M.

    1987-01-01

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  17. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  18. Modeling anisotropic MHD turbulence in simulations of liquid metal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widlund, O.

    2001-06-01

    The dynamical properties of the MHD turbulence model proposed by Widlund etal. are examined for the case of homogeneous decaying turbulence. The model is a Reynolds stress closure, extended with a transport equation for a dimensional anisotropy variable, α, which carries information about length scale anisotropy. The analysis suggests that the model term originally proposed for the nonlinear energy transfer in the α equation should be modified. A unique set of model coefficients could be determined, which makes the model consistent with theory and experiments for interaction parameters N ranging from zero to infinity. The model coincides with the standard K-eps model when there is no magnetic field. In the linear regime of large N, it produces the K˜ t^{-1/2} energy decay predicted by linear theory. When nonlinear effects are important, the model predicts K˜ t^{-1.7} and L_∥ ˜ t^{0.65}, in agreement with the classical experiments by Alemany etal. Figs 5, Refs 11.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Molten Metal Flow Produced by Induction MHD Pump Using Rotating Twisted Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tsutomu; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Sawada, Keisuke

    Numerical simulation at the same condition as an experiment is carried out under the magnetic Stokes approximation for small shielding parameter. Results of the simulation compensate for the information of molten metal flow that we could not directly obtain in the experiment. In this paper, we study the molten metal flow at a starting condition and quasi-steady state. Besides, the energy conversion in the MHD pump is discussed. The simulation result shows that the proposed MHD pump causes the spiral induced current in a molten gallium and produces an axial flow with swirl. At quasi-steady state, it is confirmed that the centrifugal force by the excessive swirl flow produces high pressure at a duct wall and low pressure around the central axis. Since the excessive swirl flow results in large viscous dissipation, the mechanical power output of the pump uses only about 1% of the mechanical energy production in the molten gallium.

  20. MHD simulation of the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Jacobo; Pantellini, Filippo; Moncuquet, Michel

    2014-05-01

    We show MHD simulations of the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere of Mercury. We use the open source codes Pluto and MPI-AMRVAC in 3 dimensional spherical geometry. In order to appreciate the limits of the MHD approach in the context of Mercury's environment we do first compare our simulations with hybrid simulation (e.g. Trávníček et al, Icarus, 209, pp 11-22, 2010). We do also compare magnetic field profiles from the magnetometer on Messenger with profiles sampled along the corresponding spacecraft trajectory in the simulations. These comparisons show that despite the lack of kinetic effects, MHD simulation provide a more than fair description of the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury at low computational cost making it a useful tool to help decrypt data from current and future exploratory missions in the hermean magnetosphere (e.g. Bepi Colombo-MMO). The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement SHOCK (project number 284515).

  1. Test-particle Orbit Simulations in Fields from a Realistic 3D MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, R. B.; Opher, M.; Hill, M. E.

    2007-05-01

    Models designed to explore the global structure of the heliosphere have become increasing sophisticated. Incentives to increase and to further explore the predictive capabilities of such models include the entry of the Voyager spacecraft into the foreshock region of the termination shock (TS), Voyager 1 in mid-2002 and Voyager 2 in late 2004, and the crossing of the TS and passage into the heliosheath (HSH) of Voyager 1 in 2004 day 351. Using the electric and magnetic fields generated by a MHD model of a 3D, asymmetric heliosphere [Opher et al., Ap. J. L., 640, 2006], we have developed full-particle and adiabatic-orbit codes to simulate the motion of test particles in the solar wind, TS, and HSH environments. The full-particle orbits are necessary to investigate energetic ion (e.g., anomalous and galactic cosmic ray) motion at the TS and within the heliospheric current sheet that is included in the MHD model. Adiabatic orbits are used to study particle motion in the much larger volume of the HSH where the non-homogeneous model fields produce complex guiding center motions, including mirroring in local field compressions. We will present results from these orbit computations, which are intended to provide an initial, albeit simplified, look at the propagation of high-energy charged particles, in the scatter-free limit, in the best model of the TS/HSH field configurations currently available. We will also display drift paths of high-energy ions in the HSH fields using the guiding center drift equations that are applicable in the limit of diffusive propagation.

  2. Effects of the driving mechanism in MHD simulations of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, J. A.; Van Hoven, G.; Schnack, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    Results of time-dependent MHD simulations of mass ejections in the solar coronal are presented. Previous authors have shown that results from simulations using a thermal driving mechanism are consistent with the observations only if an elaborate model of the initial corona is used. The first simulation effort, using a simple model of a plasmoid as the driving mechanism and a simple model of the initial corona, produces results that are also consistent with many observational features, suggesting that the nature of the driving mechanism plays an important role in determining the subsequent evolution of mass ejections. First simulations are based on the assumption that mass ejections are driven by magnetic forces.

  3. Effects of the driving mechanism in MHD simulations of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, J. A.; van Hoven, G.; Schnack, D. D.

    Results of time-dependent MHD simulations of mass ejections in the solar coronal are presented. Previous authors have shown that results from simulations using a thermal driving mechanism are consistent with the observations only if an elaborate model of the initial corona is used. The first simulation effort, using a simple model of a plasmoid as the driving mechanism and a simple model of the initial corona, produces results that are also consistent with many observational features, suggesting that the nature of the driving mechanism plays an important role in determining the subsequent evolution of mass ejections. First simulations are based on the assumption that mass ejections are driven by magnetic forces.

  4. Numerical Simulation of 3-D Supersonic Viscous Flow in an Experimental MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Hiromasa; Tannehill, John C.; Gupta, Sumeet; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D supersonic viscous flow in an experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The experimental MHD channel is currently in operation at NASA Ames Research Center. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed using a new 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime. The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very e5uent manner. To account for upstream (elliptic) effects, the flowfield can be computed using multiple streamwise sweeps with an iterated PNS algorithm. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  5. PREDICTION OF TYPE II SOLAR RADIO BURSTS BY THREE-DIMENSIONAL MHD CORONAL MASS EJECTION AND KINETIC RADIO EMISSION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Hillan, D. S.

    2013-08-20

    Type II solar radio bursts are the primary radio emissions generated by shocks and they are linked with impending space weather events at Earth. We simulate type II bursts by combining elaborate three-dimensional MHD simulations of realistic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Sun with an analytic kinetic radiation theory developed recently. The modeling includes initialization with solar magnetic and active region fields reconstructed from magnetograms of the Sun, a flux rope of the initial CME dimensioned with STEREO spacecraft observations, and a solar wind driven with averaged empirical data. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for the CME and type II burst observed on 2011 February 15. This implies real understanding of the physical processes involved regarding the radio emission excitation by shocks and supports the near-term development of a capability to predict and track these events for space weather prediction.

  6. Constrained-transport Hall-MHD simulations using CWENO reconstruction with libMRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liwei; Germaschewski, Kai; Abbott, Stephen; Maynard, Kris; Raeder, Jimmy

    2013-10-01

    We present a new CWENO (Centrally-Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) reconstruction based extended MHD (XMHD) solver that has been built for libMRC. libMRC is a library for creating efficient parallel PDE solvers on structured grids, which is used in the MRC (Magnetic Reconnection Code), OpenGGCM (Open Global Geospace Circulation Model) and PSC (Plasma Simulation Code) codes. The use of libMRC gives us access to its core functionality of providing an automated code generation framework which takes a user provided PDE right hand side in symbolic form to generate an efficient, computer-architecture specific, parallel code. libMRC also supports block-structured adaptive mesh refinement, and implicit-time stepping through integration with the PETSc library. We demonstrate validation of the new CWENO MHD solver against existing solvers both in standard test problems as well as in 3D global magnetosphere simulations.

  7. Direct simulation of multi-phase MHD flows on an unstructured Cartesian adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Ni, Ming-Jiu

    2014-08-01

    An approach for direct simulation of the multi-phase magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flows has been developed in the present study on an unstructured Cartesian adaptive system. The approach is based on the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method for capturing the interface with the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) technique used to well resolve the interface and the boundary layer. The Lorentz force is calculated using the consistent and conservative scheme, which is specially designed on a Cartesian adaptive mesh to conserve the physical conservation laws. The continuous-surface-tension (CSF) formulation is adopted for surface tension calculation. Moreover, the interfacial flows driven by thermal Marangoni effects at multifluid interfaces are also studied with a special numerical treatment presented. The method is able to simulate bubble motion in liquid metal under magnetic field irrespective of high density ratio and electric conductivity ratio. The proposed scheme for multi-phase MHD flows is validated by experimental results as well as analytical solutions.

  8. 3D simulations of fluctuation spectra in the hall-MHD plasma.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Shukla, P K

    2009-01-30

    Turbulent spectral cascades are investigated by means of fully three-dimensional (3D) simulations of a compressible Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (H-MHD) plasma in order to understand the observed spectral break in the solar wind turbulence spectra in the regime where the characteristic length scales associated with electromagnetic fluctuations are smaller than the ion gyroradius. In this regime, the results of our 3D simulations exhibit that turbulent spectral cascades in the presence of a mean magnetic field follow an omnidirectional anisotropic inertial-range spectrum close to k(-7/3). The latter is associated with the Hall current arising from nonequal electron and ion fluid velocities in our 3D H-MHD plasma model. PMID:19257431

  9. Gas Core Reactor Numerical Simulation Using a Coupled MHD-MCNP Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghaie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis is provided in this report of using two head-on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks to achieve supercritical nuclear fission in an axially elongated cylinder filled with UF4 gas as an energy source for deep space missions. The motivation for each aspect of the design is explained and supported by theory and numerical simulations. A subsequent report will provide detail on relevant experimental work to validate the concept. Here the focus is on the theory of and simulations for the proposed gas core reactor conceptual design from the onset of shock generations to the supercritical state achieved when the shocks collide. The MHD model is coupled to a standard nuclear code (MCNP) to observe the neutron flux and fission power attributed to the supercritical state brought about by the shock collisions. Throughout the modeling, realistic parameters are used for the initial ambient gaseous state and currents to ensure a resulting supercritical state upon shock collisions.

  10. Solar Wind Turbulence from MHD to Sub-ion Scales: High-resolution Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franci, Luca; Verdini, Andrea; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-05-01

    We present results from a high-resolution and large-scale hybrid (fluid electrons and particle-in-cell protons) two-dimensional numerical simulation of decaying turbulence. Two distinct spectral regions (separated by a smooth break at proton scales) develop with clear power-law scaling, each one occupying about a decade in wavenumbers. The simulation results simultaneously exhibit several properties of the observed solar wind fluctuations: spectral indices of the magnetic, kinetic, and residual energy spectra in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) inertial range along with a flattening of the electric field spectrum, an increase in magnetic compressibility, and a strong coupling of the cascade with the density and the parallel component of the magnetic fluctuations at sub-proton scales. Our findings support the interpretation that in the solar wind, large-scale MHD fluctuations naturally evolve beyond proton scales into a turbulent regime that is governed by the generalized Ohm’s law.

  11. Substorm effects in MHD and test particle simulations of magnetotail dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1998-12-31

    Recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations demonstrate that a global tail instability, initiated by localized breakdown of MHD, can cause plasmoid formation and ejection as well as dipolarization and the current diversion of the substorm current wedge. The connection between the reconnection process and the current wedge signatures is provided by earthward flow from the reconnection site. Its braking and diversion in the inner magnetosphere causes dipolarization and the magnetic field distortions of the current wedge. The authors demonstrate the characteristic properties of this process and the current systems involved. The strong localized electric field associated with the flow burst and the dipolarization is also the cause of particle acceleration and energetic particle injections. Test particle simulations of orbits in the MHD fields yield results that are quite consistent with observed injection signatures.

  12. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2010-11-19

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of

  13. Thermodynamic MHD Simulation of the 2000 July 14 "Bastille Day" Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torok, Tibor; Downs, Cooper; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2015-04-01

    The "Bastille Day" event that occurred on 2000 July 14 is one of the most extensively studied solar eruptions. It originated in a complex active region close to disk center and produced an X5.7 flare, a fast halo CME, and an intense geomagnetic storm. Accurate numerical simulations of such events, in particular the matching of parameters relevant for space weather such as the CME velocity and magnetic orientation, require a realistic model of the large-scale magnetic field and plasma environment into which the eruption propagates and interacts, as well as a modeling of the pre-eruptive configuration and eruption initiation that are as realistic as possible. Here we present an MHD simulation of the Bastille Day event that complies with these requirements. We first produce a steady-state MHD solution of the background corona that incorporates realistic energy transport ("thermodynamic MHD"), photospheric magnetic field measurements, and the solar wind. In order to model the pre-eruptive magnetic field, we then insert a stable, elongated flux rope that resides above the highly curved polarity inversion line of the active region. Finally, we produce the eruption by imposing photospheric flows that slowly converge towards the polarity inversion line. In this presentation we describe our method, compare the simulation results with the observations, and discuss the challenges and limitations involved in modeling such complex and powerful eruptions.

  14. A three-dimensional MHD simulation analysis of the origin of the slow solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washimi, H.; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.; Nakamizo, A.; Tanaka, T.; Kojima, M.; Kubo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a 3D MHD simulation model for the study of the solar-wind acceleration mechanism and for reproducing a realistic configuration of solar wind plasma by using observed photospheric magnetic field at each Carrington rotation cycle. Using an unstructured mesh coordinate system on spherical surface with fine spacing in radial direction, we aim to reproduce a wide range of solar-wind plasma configuration from the photosphere to 1AU. We have incorporated external source terms into the momentum and energy equations in our MHD simulation. The energy source term consists of two volumetric heating functions: one is a new term, as a new development from our original model (Nakamizo et al. JGR 114, A07109, 2009), for the heating in a very narrow region around the transition region. The other one is an additional heating source which probably comes from some nonlinear wave phenomena which are effective over a radial distance of an order of the solar radius in the corona. The Spitzer-type thermal conduction term is also taken into account. The momentum source term is given in a form similar to that of the nonlinear wave heating function noted above. Using this MHD simulation system, we will study the origin of the slow solar wind from nearby regions of some isolated active regions during CR1900-CR1913 in some details.

  15. Heat transfer including radiation and slag particles evolution in MHD channel-I

    SciTech Connect

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Accurate estimates of convective and radiative heat transfer in the magnetohydrodynamic channel are provided. Calculations performed for a base load-size channel indicate that heat transfer by gas radiation almost equals that by convection for smooth walls, and amounts to 70% as much as the convective heat transfer for rough walls. Carbon dioxide, water vapor, and potassium atoms are the principal participating gases. The evolution of slag particles by homogeneous nucleation and condensation is also investigated. The particle-size spectrum so computed is later utilized to analyze the radiation enhancement by slag particles in the MHD diffuser. The impact of the slag particle spectrum on the selection of a workable and design of an efficient seed collection system is discussed.

  16. Broadband Electron Precipitation in Global MHD Simulation and its Effect on the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Lotko, W.; Brambles, O. J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    A broadband electron (BBE) precipitation model is implemented and analyzed in the MI coupling module of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry MHD simulation. Both number flux and energy flux of precipitating BBEs are regulated by MHD variables calculated near the low-altitude boundary of the LFM simulation. An empirical relation deduced from results of Keiling et al. (2003) is used to relate the AC Poynting flux to the energy flux precipitating BBEs in the simulation. We are investigating two different ways of regulating the number flux of BBE precipitation, one using an empirical relation between AC Poynting flux and number flux (Strangeway, unpublished) and another by constraining the intensity and cut-off energy of a fixed-pitch angle distribution of BBEs in terms of MHD simulation variables. The contributions to ionospheric conductance from BBE precipitation are evaluated using empirical relations derived by Robinson et al. (1987). The BBE-induced-conductance is added to the “standard” auroral contribution to conductance derived from monoenergetic and diffuse electron precipitation in the existing LFM precipitation model. The simulation is driven by ideal SW/IMF conditions with Vsw=400 km/s, Nsw=5/cc and Bz=-5 nT. The simulated time-average AC Poynting flux pattern resembles statistical patterns from Polar data (Keiling et al. 2003), and the simulated statistical pattern of BBE number flux resembles the statistical maps derived from DMSP data (Newell et al. 2009) on the nightside with a similar dawn-dusk asymmetry. The ionospheric Pedersen and Hall conductances are enhanced about 20% by the BBE precipitation. The number flux produced by BBEs is the same order of magnitude as that of monoenergetic and diffuse electrons. We thus expect BBE precipitation to have a moderate effect on the E-region ionosphere and a more significant influence on the density distribution of the F-region ionosphere.

  17. MHD-PIC interlocked simulation model in space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, T.; Kuasano, K.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a new type of simulation technique by directly interlocking a traditional Ion-Particle Hybrid simulation model (Hybrid) and an Energetic-Particle Hybrid simulation (EP-HYB) model. In the traditional Hybrid model, all ions are kinetically treated as particles. In the EP-HYB model, non-thermal energetic ions are kinetically treated, and the thermal component is calculated as a fluid. The interlocked model is applied to a two-dimensional collisionless shock problem. The domain for the Hybrid model is embedded in a part of the system, and the bounded data are exchanged to each other to keep the consistency between both models. It can handle the full ion kinetics to investigate the injection problem at the shock transition region, as well as the wave-particle interactions in even far upstream region. We have carried out the long-term simulation of the shock acceleration process using this interlocked model, and successfully reproduced the power-law distribution function, which is consistent with the diffusive acceleration theory. Since the calculation cost of the EP-HYB model is much smaller than that of the Hybrid model, we can considerably reduce the computational demand.

  18. PROPERTIES OF UMBRAL DOTS AS MEASURED FROM THE NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE DATA AND MHD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcik, A.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Abramenko, V.; Goode, P. R.; Cao, W.; Rempel, M.; Kitai, R.; Watanabe, H.

    2012-02-01

    We studied bright umbral dots (UDs) detected in a moderate size sunspot and compared their statistical properties to recent MHD models. The study is based on high-resolution data recorded by the New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory and three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations of sunspots. Observed UDs, living longer than 150 s, were detected and tracked in a 46 minute long data set, using an automatic detection code. A total of 1553 (620) UDs were detected in the photospheric (low chromospheric) data. Our main findings are (1) none of the analyzed UDs is precisely circular, (2) the diameter-intensity relationship only holds in bright umbral areas, and (3) UD velocities are inversely related to their lifetime. While nearly all photospheric UDs can be identified in the low chromospheric images, some small closely spaced UDs appear in the low chromosphere as a single cluster. Slow-moving and long-living UDs seem to exist in both the low chromosphere and photosphere, while fast-moving and short-living UDs are mainly detected in the photospheric images. Comparison to the 3D MHD simulations showed that both types of UDs display, on average, very similar statistical characteristics. However, (1) the average number of observed UDs per unit area is smaller than that of the model UDs, and (2) on average, the diameter of model UDs is slightly larger than that of observed ones.

  19. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of MHD waves observed by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, S.; Thompson, B. J.; Plunkett, S. P.; Zhao, X. P.; Dryer, M.

    2001-11-01

    We investigate the global large amplitude waves propagating across the solar disk as observed by the SOHO/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). These waves appear to be similar to those observed in Hα in the chromosphere and which are known as ``Moreton waves,'' associated with large solar flares [Moreton, 1960, 1964]. Uchida [1968] interpreted these Moreton waves as the propagation of a hydromagnetics disturbance in the corona with its wavefront intersecting the chromosphere to produce the Moreton wave as observed in movie sequences of Hα images. To search for an understanding of the physical characteristics of these newly observed EIT waves, we constructed a three-dimensional, time-dependent, numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. Measured global magnetic fields, obtained from the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) at Stanford University, are used as the initial magnetic field to investigate hydromagnetics wave propagation in a three-dimensional spherical geometry. Using magnetohydrodynamic wave theory together with simulation, we are able to identify these observed EIT waves as fast mode MHD waves dominated by the acoustic mode, called magnetosonic waves. The results to be presented include the following: (1) comparison of observed and simulated morphology projected on the disk and the distance-time curves on the solar disk; (2) three-dimensional evolution of the disturbed magnetic field lines at various viewing angles; (3) evolution of the plasma density profile at a specific location as a function of latitude; and (4) computed Friedrich's diagrams to identify the MHD wave characteristics.

  20. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of poloidal flows in tokamaks and MHD pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.

    2011-09-15

    Poloidal rotation is routinely observed in present-day tokamak experiments, in particular near the plasma edge and in the high-confinement mode of operation. According to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium theory [R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2439 (2000)], radial discontinuities form when the poloidal velocity exceeds the poloidal sound speed (or rather, more correctly, the poloidal magneto-slow speed). Two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic simulations show that the transonic discontinuities develop on a time scale of a plasma poloidal revolution to form an edge density pedestal and a localized velocity shear layer at the pedestal location. While such an MHD pedestal surrounds the entire core, the outboard side of the pedestal is driven by the transonic discontinuity while the inboard side is caused by a poloidal redistribution of the mass. The MHD simulations use a smooth momentum source to drive the poloidal flow. Soon after the flow exceeds the poloidal sound speed, the density pedestal and the velocity shear layer form and persist into a quasi steady state. These results may be relevant to the L-H transition, the early stages of the pedestal and edge transport barrier formation.

  1. Explosive Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection: A New Approach of MHD-Turbulent Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro; Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Higashimori, Katsuaki

    2013-04-01

    Turbulent flows are often observed in association with magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas, and it is often hypothesized that the turbulence can contribute to the fast magnetic reconnection through the enhancement of magnetic dissipation. In this presentation, we demonstrate that an explosive turbulent reconnection can happen by using a new turbulent MHD simulation, in which the evolution of the turbulent transport coefficients are self-consistently solved together with the standard MHD equations. In our model, the turbulent electromotive force defined by the correlation of turbulent fluctuations between v and B is added to the Ohm's law. We discuss that the level of turbulent can control the topology of reconnection, namely the transition from the Sweet-Parker reconnection to the Petscheck reconnection occurs when the level of fluctuations becomes of order of the ambient physical quantities, and show that the growth of the turbulent Petscheck reconnection becomes much faster than the conventional one.

  2. Neoclassical viscous stress tensor for non-linear MHD simulations with XTOR-2F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellet, N.; Maget, P.; Lütjens, H.; Meshcheriakov, D.; the Tore Supra Team

    2013-04-01

    The neoclassical viscous stress tensor is implemented in the non-linear MHD code XTOR-2F (Lütjens and Luciani 2010 J. Comput. Phys. 229 8130-43), allowing consistent bi-fluid simulations of MHD modes, including the metastable branch of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) (Carrera et al 1986 Phys. Fluids 29 899-902). Equilibrium flows and bootstrap current from the neoclassical theory are formally recovered in this Chew-Goldberger-Low formulation. The non-linear behaviour of the new model is verified on a test case coming from a Tore Supra non-inductive discharge. A NTM threshold that is larger than with the previous model is obtained. This is due to the fact that the velocity is now part of the bootstrap current and that it differs from the theoretical neoclassical value.

  3. Atmospheric Outflows from Hot Jupiters: 2D MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, A.; Matsakos, T.; Konigl, A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of stellar hydrogen Ly-α line absorption during transits of some hot Jupiter exoplanets suggest the presence of a dense, fast wind that is blowing from planetary atmosphere tep{2003Natur.422..143V,2007ApJ...671L..61B}. Modeling efforts include 1D hydrodynamic models tep{2009ApJ...693...23M,2004Icar..170..167Y,2007P&SS...55.1426G} and 2D isothermal magnetized wind models tep{2014arXiv1404.5817T}, among others. In this work, we model the 2D structure of the irradiated upper atmosphere of a hot Jupiter planet and its interaction with the planetary magnetic field. We calculate self consistently the heating by stellar UV radiation and the cooling of the atmosphere by Ly-α emission. We solve for the ionization structure assuming a 100% hydrogen atmosphere, accounting for the radiative ionization, recombination and advection of the gas. We show the effect of stellar tides and planetary magnetic field on the planet outflow and calculate the Ly-α transmission spectra of the resulting atmosphere.

  4. Using Two-Ribbon Flare Observations and MHD Simulations to Constrain Flare Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Welsch, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 363 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from June 2010 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes, reconnection flux rates and vertical currents with the properties from MHD simulations.

  5. Radiation in Particle Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    More, R M; Graziani, F R; Glosli, J; Surh, M

    2009-06-15

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known (section 3). The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (plane-waves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion (section 4). The third method is a hybrid MD/MC (molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions (section 5). The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc.(section 6). This approach is inspired by the Virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  6. 3D MHD simulations of planet migration in turbulent stratified disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Ana; Klahr, Hubert; Flock, Mario; Henning, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    We performed 3D MHD numerical simulations of planet migration in stratified disks using the Godunov code PLUTO (Mignone et al. 2007). The disk is invaded by turbulence generated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). We study the migration for planets with different mass to primary mass ratio. The migration of the low-mass planet (q=Mp/Ms=10-5) is dominated by random fluctuations in the torque and there is no defined direction of migration on timescales of 100 orbits. The intermediate-mass planet (q=Mp/Ms=10-4) can experience systematic outwards migration that was sustained for the times we were able to simulate.

  7. MHD simulations of coronal mass ejections - Importance of the driving mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, J. A.; van Hoven, G.; Schnack, D. D.

    1990-04-01

    The importance of the form of the driving mechanism in MHD simulations of coronal mass ejections is investigated. A model simulation problem is devised, and it is found that the use of a simple form for the initial corona, with an upward moving parcel of cold, dense plasma as the driving mechanism, can produce results that are consistent with many of the features observed by coronagraphs. The results imply that the nature of the driving mechanism may play an important role in determining the dynamical evolution of mass ejections.

  8. Initial simulation of MHD instabilites in a high speed plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Hughes, Tom; Thio, Francis

    2005-10-01

    High density, high Mach number plasma jets are under development for a variety of critical fusion applications. These applications include fueling, rotation driving, and disruption mitigation in magnetic fusion devices. They also include a range of innovative approaches to high energy density plasmas. FAR-TECH, Inc. has begun 3D MHD simulations using the LSP code [1] to examine such high speed plasma jets. An initial study to benchmark the code is currently underway. The blow-by instability will be simulated in a coaxial plasma accelerator using the 3D LSP code and compared with the 2D MACH2 code results. [1] LSP-Manual-MRC-ABQ-R-1942.pdf

  9. THE SUBMILLIMETER BUMP IN Sgr A* FROM RELATIVISTIC MHD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, Jason; Agol, Eric; Fragile, P. Chris; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2010-07-10

    Recent high resolution observations of the Galactic center black hole allow for direct comparison with accretion disk simulations. We compare two-temperature synchrotron emission models from three-dimensional, general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations to millimeter observations of Sgr A*. Fits to very long baseline interferometry and spectral index measurements disfavor the monochromatic face-on black hole shadow models from our previous work. Inclination angles {<=}20{sup 0} are ruled out to 3{sigma}. We estimate the inclination and position angles of the black hole, as well as the electron temperature of the accretion flow and the accretion rate, to be i=50{sup o+35o}{sub -15}{sup o}, {xi}=-23{sup o+97o}{sub -22}{sup o}, T{sub e} = (5.4 {+-} 3.0) x 10{sup 10} K, and M-dot =5{sup +15}{sub -2}x10{sup -9} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, respectively, with 90% confidence. The black hole shadow is unobscured in all best-fit models, and may be detected by observations on baselines between Chile and California, Arizona, or Mexico at 1.3 mm or .87 mm either through direct sampling of the visibility amplitude or using closure phase information. Millimeter flaring behavior consistent with the observations is present in all viable models and is caused by magnetic turbulence in the inner radii of the accretion flow. The variability at optically thin frequencies is strongly correlated with that in the accretion rate. The simulations provide a universal picture of the 1.3 mm emission region as a small region near the midplane in the inner radii of the accretion flow, which is roughly isothermal and has {nu}/{nu} {sub c} {approx} 1-20, where {nu} {sub c} is the critical frequency for thermal synchrotron emission.

  10. The Submillimeter Bump in Sgr A* from Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason; Agol, Eric; Fragile, P. Chris; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2010-07-01

    Recent high resolution observations of the Galactic center black hole allow for direct comparison with accretion disk simulations. We compare two-temperature synchrotron emission models from three-dimensional, general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations to millimeter observations of Sgr A*. Fits to very long baseline interferometry and spectral index measurements disfavor the monochromatic face-on black hole shadow models from our previous work. Inclination angles <=20° are ruled out to 3σ. We estimate the inclination and position angles of the black hole, as well as the electron temperature of the accretion flow and the accretion rate, to be i={50°}^{+35°}_{-15°}, ξ ={-23°}^{+97°}_{-22°}, Te = (5.4 ± 3.0) × 1010 K, and \\dot{M}=5^{+15}_{-2}× 10^{-9} M_⊙ yr^{-1}, respectively, with 90% confidence. The black hole shadow is unobscured in all best-fit models, and may be detected by observations on baselines between Chile and California, Arizona, or Mexico at 1.3 mm or .87 mm either through direct sampling of the visibility amplitude or using closure phase information. Millimeter flaring behavior consistent with the observations is present in all viable models and is caused by magnetic turbulence in the inner radii of the accretion flow. The variability at optically thin frequencies is strongly correlated with that in the accretion rate. The simulations provide a universal picture of the 1.3 mm emission region as a small region near the midplane in the inner radii of the accretion flow, which is roughly isothermal and has ν/ν c ~ 1-20, where ν c is the critical frequency for thermal synchrotron emission.

  11. Level-by-level artificial viscosity and visualization for MHD simulation with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatori, Tomoharu; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nunami, Masanori; Usui, Hideyuki; Miura, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a numerical method to determine the artificial viscosity in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method, where the artificial viscosity is adaptively changed due to the resolution level of the AMR hierarchy. Although the suitable value of the artificial viscosity depends on the governing equations and the model of target problem, it can be determined by von Neumann stability analysis. By means of the new method, "level-by-level artificial viscosity method," MHD simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) are carried out with the AMR method. The validity of the level-by-level artificial viscosity method is confirmed by the comparison of the linear growth rates of RTI between the AMR simulations and the simple simulations with uniform grid and uniform artificial viscosity whose resolution is the same as that in the highest level of the AMR simulation. Moreover, in the nonlinear phase of RTI, the secondary instability is clearly observed where the hierarchical data structure of AMR calculation is visualized as high resolution region floats up like terraced fields. In the applications of the method to general fluid simulations, the growth of small structures can be sufficiently reproduced, while the divergence of numerical solutions can be suppressed.

  12. 3D MHD simulation of polarized emission in SN 1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiter, E. M.; Velázquez, P. F.; Reynoso, E. M.; Esquivel, A.; De Colle, F.

    2015-05-01

    We use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to model the supernova remnant SN 1006. From our numerical results, we have carried out a polarization study, obtaining synthetic maps of the polarized intensity, the Stokes parameter Q, and the polar-referenced angle, which can be compared with observational results. Synthetic maps were computed considering two possible particle acceleration mechanisms: quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular. The comparison of synthetic maps of the Stokes parameter Q maps with observations proves to be a valuable tool to discern unambiguously which mechanism is taking place in the remnant of SN 1006, giving strong support to the quasi-parallel model.

  13. MHD simulations of homologous and cannibalistic coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuhong; Chatterjee, Piyali

    2014-06-01

    We present magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the development of a homologous sequence of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and demonstrate their so-called cannibalistic behavior. These CMEs originate from the repeated formations and partial eruptions of kink unstable flux ropes as a result of the continued emergence of a twisted flux rope across the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. The simulations show that a CME erupting into the open magnetic field created by a preceding CME has a higher speed, and therefore tends to be cannibalistic, catching up and merging with the preceding one into a single fast CME. All the CMEs attained speeds of about 1000 km/s as they exit the domain. The reformation of a twisted flux rope after each CME eruption during the sustained flux emergence can naturally explain the X-ray observations of repeated reformations of sigmoids and “sigmoid-under-cusp” configurations at a low-coronal source of homologous CMEs.

  14. Constrained Transport vs. Divergence Cleanser Options in Astrophysical MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Christopher C.; Fragile, P.

    2009-01-01

    In previous work, we presented results from global numerical simulations of the evolution of black hole accretion disks using the Cosmos++ GRMHD code. In those simulations we solved the magnetic induction equation using an advection-split form, which is known not to satisfy the divergence-free constraint. To minimize the build-up of divergence error, we used a hyperbolic cleanser function that simultaneously damped the error and propagated it off the grid. We have since found that this method produces qualitatively and quantitatively different behavior in high magnetic field regions than results published by other research groups, particularly in the evacuated funnels of black-hole accretion disks where Poynting-flux jets are reported to form. The main difference between our earlier work and that of our competitors is their use of constrained-transport schemes to preserve a divergence-free magnetic field. Therefore, to study these differences directly, we have implemented a constrained transport scheme into Cosmos++. Because Cosmos++ uses a zone-centered, finite-volume method, we can not use the traditional staggered-mesh constrained transport scheme of Evans & Hawley. Instead we must implement a more general scheme; we chose the Flux-CT scheme as described by Toth. Here we present comparisons of results using the divergence-cleanser and constrained transport options in Cosmos++.

  15. Phase Transition like Behavior of Magnetospheric Substorms: Global and Multiscale Features from MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M. I.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Goodrich, C. C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2002-05-01

    Studies of the magnetosphere during substorms based on the observational data of the solar wind and the geomagnetic indices have shown clear features of phase transition-like behavior [Sitnov et al., 2000]. The global MHD simulations of the events in the Bargatze et al. [1985] database are used to study the non-equilibrium phase transition-like features of substorms. We simulated 7 intervals of total duration of 280 hours from the same data set used in Sitnov et al. [2000]. From the simulations the AL index is computed from the maximum of the westward Hall current and is referred to as the pseudo-AL index. We analyzed the input-output (vBs-pseudo-AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compare the results to those in Sitnov et al. [2000, 2001]. The analysis of the coupled vBs-pseudo-AL index system shows the first-order phase transition characterizing global beahavior, similar to the case of vBs-observed-AL index [Sitnov et al., 2000]. Although, the comparison between observations and global MHD simulations for individual events may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by singular spectrum snalysis is statistically consistent between simulations and observations. The coupled vBs-pseudo-AL index system shows multi-scale behavior (scale-invariant power-law dependence) in singular power spectrum. We find critical exponents of the non-equilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflect the multi-scale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power-law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponents relate input and output parameters of the magnetosphere.

  16. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR COLLAPSE: PROTOSTELLAR CORE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Hori, Yasunori; Saigo, Kazuya; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N. E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.jp E-mail: saigo.kazuya@nao.ac.jp E-mail: okuzumi@nagoya-u.jp

    2013-01-20

    We report the first three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations of protostellar collapse with and without Ohmic dissipation. We take into account many physical processes required to study star formation processes, including a realistic equation of state. We follow the evolution from molecular cloud cores until protostellar cores are formed with sufficiently high resolutions without introducing a sink particle. The physical processes involved in the simulations and adopted numerical methods are described in detail. We can calculate only about one year after the formation of the protostellar cores with our direct three-dimensional RMHD simulations because of the extremely short timescale in the deep interior of the formed protostellar cores, but successfully describe the early phase of star formation processes. The thermal evolution and the structure of the first and second (protostellar) cores are consistent with previous one-dimensional simulations using full radiation transfer, but differ considerably from preceding multi-dimensional studies with the barotropic approximation. The protostellar cores evolve virtually spherically symmetric in the ideal MHD models because of efficient angular momentum transport by magnetic fields, but Ohmic dissipation enables the formation of the circumstellar disks in the vicinity of the protostellar cores as in previous MHD studies with the barotropic approximation. The formed disks are still small (less than 0.35 AU) because we simulate only the earliest evolution. We also confirm that two different types of outflows are naturally launched by magnetic fields from the first cores and protostellar cores in the resistive MHD models.

  17. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms. 2. MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Steinolfson, R.S. ); Winglee, R.M. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors present a global MHD simulation of the magnetotail in an effort to study magnetic storm development. They address the question of energy storage in the current sheet in the early phases of storm growth, which previous simulations have not shown. They address this problem by dealing with the variation of the resistivity throughout the magnetosphere. They argue that MHD theory should provide a suitable representation to this problem on a global scale, even if it does not handle all details adequately. For their simulation they use three different forms for the resistivity. First is a uniform and constant resistivity. Second is a resistivity proportional to the current density, which is related to argument that resistivity is driven by wave-particle interactions which should be strongest in regions where the current is the greatest. Thirdly is a model where the resistivity varies with the magnetic field strength, which was suggested by previous results from particle simulations of the same problem. The simulation then gives approximately the same response of the magnetosphere for all three of the models. Each results in the formation and ejection of plasmoids, but the energy stored in the magnetotail, the timing of substorm onset in relation to the appearance of a southward interplanetary magnetic field, and the speed of ejection of the plasmoids formed differ with the resistivity models.

  18. Simulation of 3-D Nonequilibrium Seeded Air Flow in the NASA-Ames MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D nonequilibrium seeded air flow in the NASA-Ames experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed us ing a 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime: The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. The algorithm has been extended in the present study to account for nonequilibrium seeded air flows. The electrical conductivity of the flow is determined using the program of Park. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the seeded flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. A Mechanism for the Loading-Unloading Substorm Cycle Missing in MHD Global Magnetospheric Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Uritsky, V.; Vassiliadis, D.; Baker, D. N.

    2005-01-01

    Loading and consequent unloading of magnetic flux is an essential element of the substorm cycle in Earth's magnetotail. We are unaware of an available global MHD magnetospheric simulation model that includes a loading- unloading cycle in its behavior. Given the central role that MHD models presently play in the development of our understanding of magnetospheric dynamics, and given the present plans for the central role that these models will play in ongoing space weather prediction programs, it is clear that this failure must be corrected. A 2-dimensional numerical driven current-sheet model has been developed that incorporates an idealized current- driven instability with a resistive MHD system. Under steady loading, the model exhibits a global loading- unloading cycle. The specific mechanism for producing the loading-unloading cycle will be discussed. It will be shown that scale-free avalanching of electromagnetic energy through the model, from loading to unloading, is carried by repetitive bursts of localized reconnection. Each burst leads, somewhat later, to a field configuration that is capable of exciting a reconnection burst again. This process repeats itself in an intermittent manner while the total field energy in the system falls. At the end of an unloading interval, the total field energy is reduced to well below that necessary to initiate the next unloading event and, thus, a loading-unloading cycle results. It will be shown that, in this model, it is the topology of bursty localized reconnection that is responsible for the appearance of the loading-unloading cycle.

  20. Analysis and statistics of discontinuities as obtained from 3D simulation of MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; He, Jian-Sen; Tu, Chuan-Yi; Yang, Li-Ping; Wang, Xin; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Ling-Hua

    2016-03-01

    The turbulent solar wind abounds with MHD discontinuities, and such discontinuities are often found in close connection with turbulence intermittency, constituting a possible main contributor to the turbulence dissipation and solar wind heating. Among the discontinuities, tangential (TD) and rotational (RD) ones are two most important types. Recently, the connection between turbulence intermittency and proton thermodynamics has been being intensively investigated. Such connections are founded to be involved with MHD instablilities, but the difference of TDs an RDs in this process has not yet been covered. Herewith we define new methods for identifying TDs and RDs obtained from a three-dimensional MHD simulation with pressure anisotropy. Especially, we define the Total Variance of Increments (TVI) as a new measure of magnetic field changes. Based on the identified cases, we compare their occurrence rates and heating effects. More specifically, we find that the thermal states embedding TDs, compared with their RD counterparts, tend to be more associated with extreme plasma parameters or instabilites. Some other possible applications of TVI-like norms are also herewith discussed.

  1. Global MHD simulations of cosmic ray driven galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Yang, Hsiang-Yi Karen; Gould Zweibel, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Galactic outflows play an important role in galactic evolution. Despite their importance, a detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for the driving of these winds is lacking. In an effort to gain more insight into the nature of these flows, we perform global three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of an isolated starbursting galaxy. We focus on the dynamical role of cosmic rays injected by supernovae, and specifically on the impact of the streaming and anisotropic diffusion of cosmic rays along the magnetic fields. We find that these microphysical effects can have a significant effect on the wind launching and mass loading factors depending on the details of the plasma physics. Cosmic rays stream away from the densest regions near the galactic disk along partially ordered magnetic fields and, in the process, accelerate more tenuous gas away from the galaxy. For cosmic ray acceleration efficiencies broadly consistent with the observational constraints, cosmic rays are likely to have a notable impact on the wind launching.

  2. Double Dynamo Signatures in a Global MHD Simulation and Mean-field Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Patrice; Simard, Corinne; Cossette, Jean-François; Charbonneau, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The 11 year solar activity cycle is the most prominent periodic manifestation of the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) large-scale dynamo operating in the solar interior, yet longer and shorter (quasi-) periodicities are also present. The so-called “quasi-biennial” signal appearing in many proxies of solar activity has been gaining increasing attention since its detection in p-mode frequency shifts, which suggests a subphotospheric origin. A number of candidate mechanisms have been proposed, including beating between co-existing global dynamo modes, dual dynamos operating in spatially separated regions of the solar interior, and Rossby waves driving short-period oscillations in the large-scale solar magnetic field produced by the 11 year activity cycle. In this article, we analyze a global MHD simulation of solar convection producing regular large-scale magnetic cycles, and detect and characterize shorter periodicities developing therein. By constructing kinematic mean-field α 2Ω dynamo models incorporating the turbulent electromotive force (emf) extracted from that same simulation, we find that dual-dynamo behavior materializes in fairly wide regions of the model’s parameters space. This suggests that the origin of the similar behavior detected in the MHD simulation lies with the joint complexity of the turbulent emf and differential rotation profile, rather that with dynamical interactions such as those mediated by Rossby waves. Analysis of the simulation also reveals that the dual dynamo operating therein leaves a double-period signature in the temperature field, consistent with a dual-period helioseismic signature. Order-of-magnitude estimates for the magnitude of the expected frequency shifts are commensurate with helioseismic measurements. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the solar quasi-biennial oscillations are associated with a secondary dynamo process operating in the outer reaches of the solar convection zone.

  3. The Substorm Current Wedge: Further Insights from MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2015-01-01

    Using a recent magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetotail dynamics, we further investigate the buildup and evolution of the substorm current wedge (SCW), resulting from flow bursts generated by near-tail reconnection. Each flow burst generates an individual current wedge, which includes the reduction of cross-tail current and the diversion to region 1 (R1)-type field-aligned currents (earthward on the dawn and tailward on the duskside), connecting the tail with the ionosphere. Multiple flow bursts generate initially multiple SCW patterns, which at later times combine to a wider single SCW pattern. The standard SCWmodel is modified by the addition of several current loops, related to particular magnetic field changes: the increase of Bz in a local equatorial region (dipolarization), the decrease of |Bx| away from the equator (current disruption), and increases in |By| resulting from azimuthally deflected flows. The associated loop currents are found to be of similar magnitude, 0.1-0.3 MA. The combined effect requires the addition of region 2 (R2)-type currents closing in the near tail through dawnward currents but also connecting radially with the R1 currents. The current closure at the inner boundary, taken as a crude proxy of an idealized ionosphere, demonstrates westward currents as postulated in the original SCW picture as well as North-South currents connecting R1- and R2-type currents, which were larger than the westward currents by a factor of almost 2. However, this result should be applied with caution to the ionosphere because of our neglect of finite resistance and Hall effects.

  4. Formation of Dense Clumps/Cores in Infrared Dark Clouds and Their Magnetic Field Properties from AMR MHD Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I.

    2014-07-01

    Massive infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) are believed to be the precursors to star clusters and massive stars (e.g. Bergin & Tafalla 2007). The supersonic turbulent nature of molecular clouds in the presence of magnetic fields poses a great challenge in understanding the structure and dynamics of molecular clouds and the star formation therein (e.g. Falgarone et al. 2008, Crutcher et al. 2010, Peretto & Fuller 2010, Hernandez & Tan 2011, Harcar et al. 2013, Kainulainen & Tan 2013). We perform two high resolution ideal MHD AMR simulations with supersonically driven turbulence on the formation of massive infrared dark clouds, using our radiative-MHD AMR code ORION2 (P.S. Li, et al. 2012), to reveal the complex 3D filamentary structure and the subsequent formation of dense clumps and cores inside the dark clouds. The two models differ only in field strength, with one model having an initial field 10 times as strong as the other. The magnetic properties of the clumps from the two models are compared with the Zeeman observations summarized in Crutcher et al. (2010). Our dense clumps exhibit a power-law relation between magnetic field strength and density similar to the observations. Despite the order of magnitude difference in initial field strength, with the magnetic field enhancement and fragmentation as the result of turbulence, the magnetic properties of clumps in the weak field model are remarkably similar to those in the strong field model, except for a clear difference in the magnetic field orientation with respect to the global mean field direction. The almost random orientation of the weak field simulation is inconsistent with the observation of the field orientation on large and small scales by H.-b. Li, et al. (2009). I will briefly summarize the physical properties of the filamentary dark clouds in the simulations and report a detailed comparison of the magnetic properties of dense clumps in the simulations with the Zeeman observations. We have continued the

  5. Extended MHD Simulations of Tearing Instabilities and the Dynamo Effect in the Reversed-Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, K.; Dearborn, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2009-11-01

    Observations on MST indicate the importance of the Hall current in sawtooth crashes and the dynamo effect in a RFP. We employ our Magnetic Reconnection Code (MRC) to perform fully 3D extended MHD simulations in the RFP, including the Hall current and electron pressure gradient in a generalized Ohm's law. The MRC is an MPI-parallelized finite-volume based simulation code that integrates the extended MHD equations. It supports arbitrary curvilinear coordinate mappings, allowing it to be adapted to cylindrical and toroidal geometries. In order to overcome restrictive time-step limits, it uses implicit time integration. We have benchmarked the code for linear tearing instabilities, and performed fully nonlinear simulations. Due to the presence of the Hall current, novel vortical flows are seen in the vicinity of rational surfaces, akin to those seen in recent sawtooth studies in tokamaks, when the peak of the current density separates from the stagnation point of the flow. We calculate the dynamo field by averaging, and compare simulations with observations.

  6. Modeling of magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail using global MHD simulation with an effective resistivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, M.; Horiuchi, R.; Fujita, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. Tanaka and Fujita reproduced substorm evolution process by numerical simulation with the global MHD code [1]. In the MHD framework, the dissipation model is introduced for modeling of the kinetic effects. They found that the normalized reconnection viscosity, one of the dissipation model employed there, gave a large effect for the dipolarization, central phenomenon in the substorm development process, though that viscosity was assumed to be a constant parameter. It is well known that magnetic reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Frozen-in condition is broken due to particle kinetic effects and collisionless reconnection is triggered when current sheet is compressed as thin as ion kinetic scales under the influence of external driving flow [2, 3]. Horiuchi and his collaborators showed that reconnection electric field generated by microscopic physics evolves inside ion meandering scale so as to balance the flux inflow rate at the inflow boundary, which is controlled by macroscopic physics [2]. That is, effective resistivity generated through this process can be expressed by balance equation between micro and macro physics. In this paper, we perform substorm simulation by using the global MHD code developed by Tanaka [3] with this effective resistivity instead of the empirical resistivity model. We obtain the AE indices from simulation data, in which substorm onset can be seen clearly, and investigate the relationship between the substorm development and the effective resistivity model. [1] T. Tanaka, A, Nakamizo, A. Yoshikawa, S. Fujita, H. Shinagawa, H. Shimazu, T. Kikuchi, and K. K. Hashimoto, J. Geophys. Res. 115 (2010) A05220,doi:10.1029/2009JA014676. [2] W. Pei, R. Horiuchi, and T. Sato, Physics of Plasmas,Vol. 8 (2001), pp. 3251-3257. [3] A. Ishizawa, and R. Horiuchi, Phys. Rev. Lett., Vol. 95, 045003 (2005). [4

  7. Propagation of Pi2 pulsations through the braking region in global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ream, J. B.; Walker, R. J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Wiltberger, M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the propagation of Pi2 period pulsations from their origin in the plasma sheet through the braking region, the region where the fast flows are slowed as they approach the inner edge of the plasma sheet. Our approach is to use both the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computer codes to simulate the Earth's magnetosphere during a substorm that occurred on 14 September 2004 when Pi2 pulsations were observed. We use two different MHD models in order to test the robustness of our conclusions about Pi2. The simulations are then compared with ground-based and satellite data. We find that the propagation of the pulsations in the simulations, especially through the braking region, depends strongly on the ionospheric models used at the inner boundary of the MHD models. With respect to typical observed values, the modeled conductances are high in the UCLA model and low in the LFM model. The different conductances affect the flows, producing stronger line tying that slows the flow in the braking region more in the UCLA model than in the LFM model. Therefore, perturbations are able to propagate much more freely into the inner magnetosphere in the LFM results. However, in both models Pi2 period perturbations travel with the dipolarization front (DF) that forms at the earthward edge of the flow channel, but as the DF slows in the braking region, -8≤x≤-6 RE, the Pi2 period perturbations begin to travel ahead of it into the inner magnetosphere. This indicates that the flow channels generate compressional waves with periods that fall within the Pi2 range and that, as the flows themselves are stopped in the braking region, the compressional wave continues to propagate into the inner magnetosphere.

  8. Relativistic modeling capabilities in PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for HED plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D.; Seyler, Charles E.

    2014-12-15

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest hybrid X-pinch simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. By suitable formulation of the relativistic generalized Ohm’s law as an evolution equation, we have reduced the recovery of primitive variables, a major technical challenge in relativistic codes, to a straightforward algebraic computation. Our code recovers expected results in the non-relativistic limit, and reveals new physics in the modeling of electron beam acceleration following an X-pinch. Through the use of a relaxation scheme, relativistic PERSEUS is able to handle nine orders of magnitude in density variation, making it the first fluid code, to our knowledge, that can simulate relativistic HED plasmas.

  9. Isolated Coronal Mass Ejections and Associated Phenomena: MHD Simulations and STEREO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, Noé; Roussev, Ilia; Sokolov, Igor; Shibata, Kazunari; Schwadron, Nathan; Downs, Cooper

    2012-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), the most energetic events occurring in our solar system, are associated with a range of other phenomena such as EUV waves, dimming regions and solar energetic particles (SEPs). With the advancement of global numerical simulations and the new fleet of spacecraft observing the Sun and the heliosphere, it is possible to combine simulations with data analyses to gain new insight into the complex Sun-Earth system. In this talk, I will discuss magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of CMEs and associated phenomena. In particular, I will focus on the changes in magnetic connectivity and the opening of previously closed field lines during and after an eruption and discuss the consequences for the acceleration and transport of energetic particles. I will also present combined numerical simulations and observations by SDO and STEREO/SECCHI of CMEs and EUV waves, which have led to new insights into CME deflection, expansion and rotation.

  10. An MHD simulation study of the poloidal mode field line resonance in the Earth's dipole magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, D. Q.; Denton, . E.; Hudson, M. K.; Lysak, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The poloidal mode field line resonance in the Earth's dipole magnetic field is investigated using cold plasma ideal MHD simulations in dipole geometry. In order to excite the poloidal mode resonance, we use either an initial or a continuous velocity perturbation to drive the system. The perturbation is localized at magnetic shell L = 7 with plasma flow in the radial direction (electric field component in the azimuthal direction). It is found that with the initial perturbation alone, no polodial mode resonance can be obtained and the initially localized perturbation spreads out across all magnetic L shells. With the continuous perturbation, oscillating near the poloidal resonance frequency, a global-scale poloidal cavity mode can be obtained. For the first time, a localized guided poloidal mode resonance is obtained when a radial component of electric field is added to the initial perturbation such that the curl of the electric field is everywhere perpendicular to the background dipole magnetic field. During the localized poloidal resonance, plasma vortices parallel/antiparallel to the background dipole magnetic field B(sub 0). This circular flow, elongated radially, results in twisting of magnetic field flux tubes, which, in turn, leads to the slowdown of the circular plasma flow and reversal of the plasma vortices. The energy associated with the localized poloidal resonance is conserved as it shifts back and forth between the oscillating plasma vortices and the alternately twisted magnetic flux tubes. In the simulations the eigenfunctions associated with the localized poloidal resonance are grid-scale singular functions. This result indicates that ideal MHD is inadequate to describe the underlying problem and nonideal MHD effects are needed for mode broadening.

  11. Thermal radiation and slip effects on MHD stagnation point flow of nanofluid over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul Haq, Rizwan; Nadeem, Sohail; Hayat Khan, Zafar; Sher Akbar, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    Present model is devoted for the stagnation point flow of nanofluid with magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) and thermal radiation effects passed over a stretching sheet. Moreover, we have considered the combined effects of velocity and thermal slip. Condition of zero normal flux of nanoparticles at the wall for the stretched flow phenomena is yet to be explored in the literature. Convinced partial differential equations of the model are transformed into the system of coupled nonlinear differential equations and then solved numerically. Graphical results are plotted for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle concentration for various values of emerging parameters. Variation of stream lines, skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt and Sherwood number are displayed along with the effective parameters. Final conclusion has been drawn on the basis of both numerical and graphs results.

  12. Jupiter Magnetotail Interaction with a Variable Solar Wind: A 3D MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranquist, D. A.; Bagenal, F.; Delamere, P. A.; Ma, X.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is the largest object within the heliosphere. Voyager 2 detected its influence at Saturn's orbit, 4.3 AU away. It takes considerable time, therefore, for the solar wind to propagate such lengths down the tail. This propagation time is much greater than typical periods between changes in direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We expect these variable magnetic fields to create a jumbled structure in Jupiter's magnetotail, resulting in magnetic reconnection and other magnetic processes. We simulate the global interaction of the solar wind with Jupiter's magnetosphere using a 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code. Delamere & Bagenal (2010) argue that the interaction is largely viscous, so we simulate the jovian magnetosphere as a region where the momentum equation has an added loss term. We also use in situ data gathered by the Ulysses spacecraft near Jupiter's orbit for solar wind input. Here, we report on the simulated dynamics in Jupiter's tail region.

  13. Nonlinear MHD simulation of DC helicity injection in the Pegasus spherical tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, Adam; Sovinec, Carl

    2006-10-01

    DC helicity injection has been successfully employed in spherical tokamaks (ST's) to produce a tokamak-like plasma with either a poloidal-gap voltage known as coaxial helicity injection [HIT-II, NSTX] or a biased cathode gun configuration [CDX, PEGASUS]. In PEGASUS, the tokamak-like plasma which is subsequently ohmically driven is the product of a reversal of vacuum poloidal flux and a merger of gun-injected current filaments. A 3D nonlinear MHD computation using the NIMROD code [Sovinec et al. JCP 195, 355 (2004)] simulates the formation, merger, and relaxation of the gun-injected current filaments to the tokamak-like plasma. The reversal of poloidal flux due to the field induced by the helicity drive is reproduced and the MHD processes leading to the merger and relaxation of the current filaments are described. Over the lifetime of a helically-driven experimental shot (approximately 10ms), the extent to which the merged plasma exhibits amplication of poloidal flux and the injected current in the relaxed state, reported in PEGASUS, is explored. The results are compared with simulations of current drive in NSTX via coaxial helicity injection which exhibit an n=1 open field-line kink [Tang and Boozer, Phys. Plasmas 11, 2679 (2004)].

  14. FLASH MHD simulations of experiments that study shock-generated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2015-12-01

    We summarize recent additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in FLASH, highlighting new non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities. We then describe 3D Cartesian and 2D cylindrical FLASH MHD simulations that have helped to design and analyze experiments conducted at the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a laser illuminates a carbon rod target placed in a gas-filled chamber. A magnetic field diagnostic (called a Bdot) employing three very small induction coils is used to measure all three components of the magnetic field at a chosen point in space. The simulations have revealed that many fascinating physical processes occur in the experiments. These include megagauss magnetic fields generated by the interaction of the laser with the target via the Biermann battery mechanism, which are advected outward by the vaporized target material but decrease in strength due to expansion and resistivity; magnetic fields generated by an outward expanding shock via the Biermann battery mechanism; and a breakout shock that overtakes the first wave, the contact discontinuity between the target material and the gas, and then the initial expanding shock. Finally, we discuss the validation and predictive science we have done for this experiment with FLASH.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of thermofluidic transport phenomena in a DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Dipankar; Amiroudine, Sakir

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive non-isothermal Lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm is proposed in this article to simulate the thermofluidic transport phenomena encountered in a direct-current (DC) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump. Inside the pump, an electrically conducting fluid is transported through the microchannel by the action of an electromagnetic Lorentz force evolved out as a consequence of the interaction between applied electric and magnetic fields. The fluid flow and thermal characteristics of the MHD micropump depend on several factors such as the channel geometry, electromagnetic field strength and electrical property of the conducting fluid. An involved analysis is carried out following the LB technique to understand the significant influences of the aforementioned controlling parameters on the overall transport phenomena. In the LB framework, the hydrodynamics is simulated by a distribution function, which obeys a single scalar kinetic equation associated with an externally imposed electromagnetic force field. The thermal history is monitored by a separate temperature distribution function through another scalar kinetic equation incorporating the Joule heating effect. Agreement with analytical, experimental and other available numerical results is found to be quantitative. PMID:21053082

  16. Global MHD Simulations of Accretion Disks in Cataclysmic Variables. I. The Importance of Spiral Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wenhua; Stone, James M.; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the first global 3D MHD simulations of accretion disks in cataclysmic variable (CV) systems in order to investigate the relative importance of angular momentum transport via turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) compared with that driven by spiral shock waves. Remarkably, we find that even with vigorous MRI turbulence, spiral shocks are an important component of the overall angular momentum budget, at least when temperatures in the disk are high (so that Mach numbers are low). In order to understand the excitation, propagation, and damping of spiral density waves in our simulations more carefully, we perform a series of 2D global hydrodynamical simulations with various equation of states, both with and without mass inflow via the Lagrangian point (L1). Compared with previous similar studies, we find the following new results. (1) The linear wave dispersion relation fits the pitch angles of spiral density waves very well. (2) We demonstrate explicitly that mass accretion is driven by the deposition of negative angular momentum carried by the waves when they dissipate in shocks. (3) Using Reynolds stress scaled by gas pressure to represent the effective angular momentum transport rate {α }{eff} is not accurate when mass accretion is driven by non-axisymmetric shocks. (4) Using the mass accretion rate measured in our simulations to directly measure α defined in standard thin-disk theory, we find 0.02≲ {α }{eff}≲ 0.05 for CV disks, consistent with observed values in quiescent states of dwarf novae. In this regime, the disk may be too cool and neutral for the MRI to operate and spiral shocks are a possible accretion mechanism. However, we caution that our simulations use unrealistically low Mach numbers in this regime and, therefore, future models with more realistic thermodynamics and non-ideal MHD are warranted.

  17. One year in the Earth's magnetosphere: A global MHD simulation and spacecraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facskó, G.; Honkonen, I.; Živković, T.; Palin, L.; Kallio, E.; Ã gren, K.; Opgenoorth, H.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Milan, S.

    2016-05-01

    The response of the Earth's magnetosphere to changing solar wind conditions is studied with a 3-D Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. One full year (155 Cluster orbits) of the Earth's magnetosphere is simulated using Grand Unified Magnetosphere Ionosphere Coupling simulation (GUMICS-4) magnetohydrodynamic code. Real solar wind measurements are given to the code as input to create the longest lasting global magnetohydrodynamics simulation to date. The applicability of the results of the simulation depends critically on the input parameters used in the model. Therefore, the validity and the variance of the OMNIWeb data are first investigated thoroughly using Cluster measurement close to the bow shock. The OMNIWeb and the Cluster data were found to correlate very well before the bow shock. The solar wind magnetic field and plasma parameters are not changed significantly from the L1 Lagrange point to the foreshock; therefore, the OMNIWeb data are appropriate input to the GUMICS-4. The Cluster SC3 footprints are determined by magnetic field mapping from the simulation results and the Tsyganenko (T96) model in order to compare two methods. The determined footprints are in rather good agreement with the T96. However, it was found that the footprints agree better in the Northern Hemisphere than the Southern one during quiet conditions. If the By is not zero, the agreement of the GUMICS-4 and T96 footprint is worse in longitude in the Southern Hemisphere. Overall, the study implies that a 3-D MHD model can increase our insight of the response of the magnetosphere to solar wind conditions.

  18. Nonlinear MHD simulations of Quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Loarte, A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Snyder, P. B.; Hoelzl, M.; Zeng, L.

    2015-09-01

    In the Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) regime, the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO), thought to be a saturated kink-peeling mode (KPM) driven unstable by current and rotation, is found in experiment to provide sufficient stationary edge particle transport to avoid the periodic expulsion of particles and energy by edge localized modes (ELMs). In this paper, both linear and nonlinear MHD modelling of QH-mode plasmas from the DIII-D tokamak have been investigated to understand the mechanism leading to the appearance of the EHO in QH-mode plasmas. For the first time nonlinear MHD simulations with low-n modes both with ideal wall and resistive wall boundary conditions have been carried out with the 3D non-linear MHD code JOREK. The results show, in agreement with the original conjectures, that in the non-linear phase, kink peeling modes are the main unstable modes in QH-mode plasmas of DIII-D and that the kink-peeling modes saturate non-linearly leading to a 3D stationary state. The characteristics of the kink-peeling modes, in terms of mode structure and associated decrease of the edge plasma density associated with them, are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the EHO in DIII-D. The effect of plasma resistivity, the role of plasma parallel rotation as well as the effect of the conductivity of the vacuum vessel wall on the destabilization and saturation of kink-peeling modes have been evaluated for experimental QH-mode plasma conditions in DIII-D.

  19. MHD Modeling in Complex 3D Geometries: Towards Predictive Simulation of SIHI Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Christopher James

    The HIT-SI experiment studies Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI) for the purpose of forming and sustaining a spheromak plasma. A spheromak is formed in a nearly axisymmetric flux conserver, with a bow tie cross section, by means of two semi-toroidal injectors. The plasma-facing surfaces of the device, which are made of copper for its low resistivity, are covered in an insulating coating in order to operate in a purely inductive manner. Following formation, the spheromak flux and current are increased during a quiescent period marked by a decrease in the global mode activity. A proposed mechanism, Imposed Dynamo Current Drive (IDCD), is expected to be responsible for this phase of quiescent current drive. Due to the geometric complexity of the experiment, previous numerical modeling efforts have used a simplified geometry that excludes the injector volumes from the simulated domain. The effect of helicity injection is then modeled by boundary conditions on this reduced plasma volume. The work presented here has explored and developed more complete computational models of the HIT-SI device. This work is separated into 3 distinct but complementary areas: 1) Development of a 3D MHD equilibrium code that can incorporate the non-axisymmetric injector fields present in HIT-SI and investigation of equilibria of interest during spheromak sustainment. 2) A 2D axisymmetric MHD equilibrium code that was used to explore reduced order models for mean-field evolution using equations derived from IDCD theory including coupling to 3D equilibria. 3) A 3D time-dependent non-linear MHD code that is capable of modeling the entire plasma volume including dynamics within the injectors. Although HIT-SI was the motivation for, and experiment studied in this research, the tools and methods developed are general --- allowing their application to a broad range of magnetic confinement experiments. These tools constitute a significant advance for modeling plasma dynamics in devices with

  20. Implementation of Inductive Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling and its Effects on Global MHD Magnetospheric Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, S.; Lotko, W.; Zhang, B.; Brambles, O.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J.; Merkin, V. G.

    2010-12-01

    In global modeling, magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling physically connects a global magnetospheric (GM) model and a global ionospheric-thermospheric (GIT) model. The field-aligned current from the GM model and the conductance distributions from the GIT model are used in a Poisson equation derived from the ionospheric Ohm's law combined with current continuity to determine the electrostatic potential in the ionosphere. In current GM models, this electrostatic potential is mapped to the inner boundary of the GM simulation to determine electrostatic boundary conditions on the electric field and MHD velocity there. Inductive effects and the finite Alfven transit time between the low-altitude GM boundary and the high-altitude GIT boundary (MI gap region) are neglected in this formulation of MI coupling. Using fields and currents derived from Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry GM simulations, and conductance distributions derived from its standalone empirical conductance model in the MI coupling Poisson equation, we have computed the fast Fourier transform of the electrostatic field at the low-altitude LFM simulation boundary as described above, and the FFT of the inductive electric field at the boundary under the assumption that μ 0 Σ P vA ≤ 1, where Σ P is the ionospheric Pedersen conductance and vA is the smallest value of the Alfven speed in the MI gap region. In this regime, the complete electric field at the low-altitude simulation boundary includes the usual mapped electrostatic field with an inductive addition for which the finite Alfven transit time and the diversion of field-aligned into polarization currents in the gap region are negligible (Lotko, 2004). By comparing the boundary-averaged spectra of the electrostatic and so-determined inductive fields, we confirm that the purely electrostatic formulation of MI coupling is valid when the MHD state varies on times scales exceeding about 200 s. For faster MHD time variations, the inductive electric field is shown to

  1. MHD heat and mass transfer flow over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Yasin, Mohd Hafizi; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2016-06-01

    The steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effects is investigated. The similarity transformation is introduced to transform the governing partial differential equations into a system of ordinary differential equations before being solved numerically using a shooting method. The results are obtained for the skin friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number as well as the velocity, temperature and the concentration profiles for some values of the governing parameters, namely, suction/injection parameter S, stretching/shrinking parameter λ, magnetic parameter M, radiation parameter R, heat source/sink Q and chemical rate parameter K. For the shrinking case, there exist two solutions for a certain range of parameters, but the solution is unique for the stretching case. The stability analysis verified that the upper branch solution is linearly stable and physically reliable while the lower branch solution is not. For the reliable solution, the skin friction coefficient increases in the present of magnetic field. The heat transfer rate at the surface decreases in the present of radiation.

  2. Complexities of a 3-D plasmoid flux rope as shown by an MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, N. L.; Baker, D. N.; Wiltberger, M.

    2008-12-01

    The results of a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a pair of magnetospheric substorms on 11 August 2002 are presented. Comparisons of data with simulation results reveal a good agreement regarding the sequence of events during substorm development. We give particular emphasis to results in the simulation of a flux rope formed during the second substorm. Unlike standard 2-D depictions of reconnection and plasmoid release during the substorm sequence, the simulation shows a highly complex structure that has considerable winding of both closed and open field lines. Additionally, the simulated flux rope does not move tailward uniformly, but rather it has asymmetric motion in which the dawn flank portion moves tailward prior to the dusk portion of the flux rope. This results in a skewed flux rope structure that runs almost parallel to the tail axis instead of perpendicular to it. The simulation compares well with both prior flux rope simulations as well as satellite observations of flux ropes. We use the global simulation to map flux tube properties to the ionosphere, which allows the complexity of the mapping of the magnetic field structure from the tail to the ionosphere to be seen in a novel manner.

  3. Flow Matching Results of an MHD Energy Bypass System on a Supersonic Turbojet Engine Using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2011-01-01

    Flow matching has been successfully achieved for an MHD energy bypass system on a supersonic turbojet engine. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment helped perform a thermodynamic cycle analysis to properly match the flows from an inlet employing a MHD energy bypass system (consisting of an MHD generator and MHD accelerator) on a supersonic turbojet engine. Working with various operating conditions (such as the applied magnetic field, MHD generator length and flow conductivity), interfacing studies were conducted between the MHD generator, the turbojet engine, and the MHD accelerator. This paper briefly describes the NPSS environment used in this analysis. This paper further describes the analysis of a supersonic turbojet engine with an MHD generator/accelerator energy bypass system. Results from this study have shown that using MHD energy bypass in the flow path of a supersonic turbojet engine increases the useful Mach number operating range from 0 to 3.0 Mach (not using MHD) to a range of 0 to 7.0 Mach with specific net thrust range of 740 N-s/kg (at ambient Mach = 3.25) to 70 N-s/kg (at ambient Mach = 7). These results were achieved with an applied magnetic field of 2.5 Tesla and conductivity levels in a range from 2 mhos/m (ambient Mach = 7) to 5.5 mhos/m (ambient Mach = 3.5) for an MHD generator length of 3 m.

  4. The role of condensation and heat conduction in the formation of prominences - An MHD simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Bao, J. J.; An, C. H.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of condensation and thermal conduction on the formation of Kippenhahn-Schlueter (K-S) type prominences in quiet regions (QP) due to symmetric mass injection are investigated. To implement this investigation a self-consistent, two-dimensional, nonplanar, time-dependent MHD simulation model is developed. In the model, various values of the injection velocity, density, and magnetic field strength are used to determine the most favorable conditions for the QP formation. Based on these simulation results, it is found that the formation of a K-S type field configuration should be considered as a dynamic process which needs both condensation amd mass injection to supply enough mass to maintain such a configuration to complete the quiescent prominence formation process.

  5. Interpreting Irradiance Distributions Using High-Resolution 3D MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Courtney; Rast, Mark; Criscuoli, Serena; Uitenbroek, Han; Rempel, Matthias D.

    2016-05-01

    We present initial results of studies aimed at understanding the impact of the unresolved magnetic field distribution on solar spectral irradiance. Using high-resolution 3D MHD simulations (from MURaM code) and spectral synthesis (with the RH code), we examine the emergent spectra of two atmospheres with similar mean field strengths but differing imposed-field conditions at wavelengths spanning from visible to infrared. Comparing the contrast against the magnetic field strength for the two magnetic simulations, we find differences in the distributions of contrasts versus field strength. We repeat the analysis after convolving the images with the PSF of a typical solar telescope (1-meter) and discuss the potential implications for irradiance modeling and future steps.

  6. OpenGGCM Simulation of Ballooning and Axial MHD Mode at Substorm Onset (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, J.; Zhu, P.; Ge, Y.; Siscoe, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    It is generally accepted that magnetic reconnection is the main mechanism that dissipates power during a substorm. It is less clear, however, whether the beginning of magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail also signifies the onset of the substorm expansion phase itself, i.e., whether the "outside-in" scenario applies, or if a different process happens first closer to Earth that triggers the reconnection onset in the magnetotail, i.e., the "inside-out" scenario. Global MHD simulations have generally supported the "outside-in" scenario. However, ideal MHD instabilities that could possibly trigger tail reconnection may have been missed due to coarse numerical resolution or due to other numerical effects. Here, we present results from an OpenGGCM simulation of the March 23, 2007 substorm that clearly shows growth of the ballooning mode as suggested by our earlier analysis (Zhu et al., 2009), as well as growth of an ideal-like instability that is purely axial and was previously reported by Siscoe et al. (2009). Both instabilities occur simultaneously and are immediately followed by reconnection onset. The simulations results are in accordance with recent Geotail observations of ballooning with a wavelength of approximately 0.5 RE, and the time scales agree with that of the explosive growth phase. The exact relation between the three instabilities, i.e., ballooning, the axial mode, and tearing, is not entirely clear yet; however, having demonstrated that the OpenGGCM reproduces all of them, they can now be analyzed in more detail. Furthermore, we present the expected auroral signature of these processes, which will allow for a more detailed comparison of the simulation results with ground based imagers.

  7. Two-Species, 3D, MHD Simulation of Europa's Interaction with Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yifan; Nagy, Andrew F.; Kabin, Konstantin; Combi, Michael R.; DeZeeuw, Darren L.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of Europa with the Jovian a magnetosphere has been studied by using a two species in ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model. This model considers the upstream plasma in the Jovian magnetosphere and the molecular oxygen ions in the ionosphere of Europa, separately. We present results a from simulation studies, which take into account impact ionization, recombination, and the effect of a possible induced dipole magnetic field of Europa. The total mass loading of the magnetospheric flow and the ionization frequency used in the model are consistent with the estimates of Europa's ionosphere and atmosphere. The multi-species MHD equations are solved by using a finite volume, high-order, Godunov-type method on an adoptively refined unstructured grid, which allows a detailed modeling of the region near Europa's surface, while still resolving both the upstream region and the satellite's wake. We have paid special attention to the wake of Europa, in order to be able to make comparisons with the Galileo's E4 flyby observations, as well as other model calculations. The calculated escape flux of a O2+ down the tail was found to be about 5.6 x 10(exp 25) s(sup -1).

  8. On Europa's Magnetospheric Interaction: A MHD Simulation of the E4 Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kabin, K.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.; Nagy, A. F.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Powell, K. G.

    1999-01-01

    The global three-dimensional interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere is modeled by using a complete set of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The model accounts for exospheric mass loading, ion-neutral charge exchange, recombination, and a possible intrinsic dipole magnetic field of Europa. The single-fluid MHD equations are solved by using a modem, finite volume, higher-order, Godunov-type method on an adoptively refined unstructured grid, which allows detailed modeling of the region near Europa while still resolving both the upstream region and the satellite's wake. The magnetic field and plasma density measured during Galileo's EGA flyby of December 19, 1996, are reproduced reasonably well in the simulation. We find the agreement between the data and our model particularly convincing if we assume that the plasma velocity during the EGA flyby deviated from the nominal corotation direction by approximately 20 deg. Evidence from the Galileo energetic particle detector also supports this assumption. In this case, we can fit the data using a dipole with orientation close to that of an induced dipole arising from the interaction of a hypothetical conducting subsurface layer on Europa with the periodically changing magnetic field of Jupiter. However, the magnitude of the dipole in our model is somewhat smaller (70%) than that suggested by Khurana et al. The total mass loading and ion-neutral charge exchange rates are consistent with the estimates of Europa's atmosphere and ionosphere.

  9. MHD SIMULATIONS OF ACCRETION ONTO Sgr A*: QUIESCENT FLUCTUATIONS, OUTBURSTS, AND QUASIPERIODICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Chan Chikwan; Liu Siming; Fryer, Christopher L.; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal; Melia, Fulvio; Rockefeller, Gabriel

    2009-08-10

    High-resolution observations of Sgr A* have revealed a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from intense rapid flares to quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), making this object an ideal system to study the properties of low luminosity accreting black holes. In this paper, we use a pseudospectral algorithm to construct and evolve a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the accretion disk in Sgr A*. Assuming a hybrid thermal-nonthermal emission scheme and calibrating the parameters by observations, we show that the MHD turbulence in the environment of Sgr A* can by itself only produce factor two fluctuations in luminosity. These fluctuations cannot explain the magnitude of flares observed in this system. However, we also demonstrate that external forcing of the accretion disk, which may be generated by the 'clumpy material' raining down onto the disk from the large-scale flow, do produce outbursts qualitatively similar to those observed by XMM-Newton in X-rays and by ground-based facilities in the near infrared. Strong, but short-term QPOs emerge naturally in the simulated light curves. We attribute these to nonaxisymmetric density perturbations that emerge as the disk evolves back toward its quiescent state.

  10. Sub-Alfvenic Non-Ideal MHD Turbulence Simulations with Ambipolar Diffusion: I. Turbulence Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R I; Li, P S; McKee, C F; Fisher, R

    2008-04-10

    Most numerical investigations on the role of magnetic fields in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) are based on ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD). However, MCs are weakly ionized, so that the time scale required for the magnetic field to diffuse through the neutral component of the plasma by ambipolar diffusion (AD) can be comparable to the dynamical time scale. We have performed a series of 256{sup 3} and 512{sup 3} simulations on supersonic but sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems with AD using the Heavy-Ion Approximation developed in Li et al. (2006). Our calculations are based on the assumption that the number of ions is conserved, but we show that these results approximately apply to the case of time-dependent ionization in molecular clouds as well. Convergence studies allow us to determine the optimal value of the ionization mass fraction when using the heavy-ion approximation for low Mach number, sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems. We find that ambipolar diffusion steepens the velocity and magnetic power spectra compared to the ideal MHD case. Changes in the density PDF, total magnetic energy, and ionization fraction are determined as a function of the AD Reynolds number. The power spectra for the neutral gas properties of a strongly magnetized medium with a low AD Reynolds number are similar to those for a weakly magnetized medium; in particular, the power spectrum of the neutral velocity is close to that for Burgers turbulence.

  11. Nonlinear MHD simulation of current drive by multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection in spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, Takashi; Nagata, Masayoshi; Kagei, Yasuhiro

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of structures of magnetic field, current density, and plasma flow generated during multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection in spherical torus is investigated by 3-D nonlinear MHD simulations. During the driven phase, the flux and current amplifications occur due to the merging and magnetic reconnection between the preexisting plasma in the confinement region and the ejected plasma from the gun region involving the n = 1 helical kink distortion of the central open flux column (COFC). Interestingly, the diamagnetic poloidal flow which tends toward the gun region is then observed due to the steep pressure gradients of the COFC generated by ohmic heating through an injection current winding around the inboard field lines, resulting in the formation of the strong poloidal flow shear at the interface between the COFC and the core region. This result is consistent with the flow shear observed in the HIST. During the decay phase, the configuration approaches the axisymmetric MHD equilibrium state without flow because of the dissipation of magnetic fluctuation energy to increase the closed flux surfaces, suggesting the generation of ordered magnetic field structure. The parallel current density λ concentrated in the COFC then diffuses to the core region so as to reduce the gradient in λ, relaxing in the direction of the Taylor state.

  12. Rarefaction and compressional standing slow mode structures in Mercury's magnetosheath: 3D MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantellini, Filippo; Griton, Léa; Varela, Jacobo

    2015-07-01

    We show that slow mode compressional fronts form upstream of the day side magnetopause in MHD simulations of Mercury's magnetosphere. The strongest compressional fronts are located upstream of the magnetopause with strong magnetic shear. Compressional fronts are crossed by magnetic field lines connecting the interplanetary magnetic field and the planet's intrinsic field, their role is to bend the magnetic field in the magnetosheath towards the magnetopause. Besides these compressional fronts, already observed in space and theoretically discussed by various authors for the case of the Earth, we observe the formation of a slow mode standing rarefaction wave spatially growing over a substantial fraction of the distance between the bow shock and the magnetopause. The slow mode source region for the rarefaction waves is located in the magnetosheath, near the bow shock's nose. The generated standing rarefaction waves, however, form even at large distances from the source region along the magnetospheric flanks. They fine-tune the magnetic field line draping and plasma flow around the magnetopause. In ideal MHD the magnetospheres of Mercury, the Earth and the giant planets do closely resemble each other, we therefore expect the mentioned slow mode structures not to be specific to Mercury.

  13. Lagrangian MHD Particle-in-Cell simulations of coronal interplanetary shocks driven by observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bacchini, Fabio; Bemporad, Alessandro; Susino, Roberto; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we compare the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters along the June 11, 1999 CME-driven shock front with the results obtained from a CME-like event simulated with the FLIPMHD3D code, based on the FLIP-MHD Particle-in-Cell (PiC) method. The observational data are retrieved from the combination of white-light (WL) coronagraphic data (for the upstream values) and the application of the Rankine-Hugoniot (RH) equations (for the downstream values). The comparison shows a higher compression ratio X and Alfvénic Mach number MA at the shock nose, and a stronger magnetic field deflection d towards the flanks, in agreement with observations. Then, we compare the spatial distribution of MA with the profiles obtained from the solutions of the shock adiabatic equation relating MA, X, and the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock front normal for the special cases of parallel and perpendicular shock, and with a semi-empirical expression for a generically oblique shock. The semi-empirical curve approximates the actual values of MA very well, if the effects of a non-negligible shock thickness and plasma-to magnetic pressure ratio are taken into account throughout the computation. Moreover, the simulated shock turns out to be supercritical at the nose and sub-critical at the flanks. Finally, we develop a new 1D Lagrangian ideal MHD method based on the GrAALE code, to simulate the ion-electron temperature decoupling due to the shock transit. Two models are used, a simple solar wind model and a variable-gamma model. Both produce results in agreement with observations, the second one being capable of introducing the physics responsible for the additional electron heating due to secondary effects (collisions, Alfvén waves, etc.). Work supported by the European Commission under the SWIFF project (swiff.eu)

  14. Plasmoid dynamics in 3D resistive MHD simulations of magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samtaney, R.; Loureiro, N. F.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a well known plasma process believed to lie at the heart of a variety of phenomena such as sub-storms in the Earth's magnetosphere, solar/stellar and accretion-disk flares, sawteeth activity in fusion devices, etc. During reconnection, the global magnetic field topology changes rapidly, leading to the violent release of magnetic energy. Over the past few years, the basic understanding of this fundamental process has undergone profound changes. The validity of the most basic, and widely accepted, reconnection paradigm - the famous Sweet-Parker (SP) model, which predicts that, in MHD, reconnection is extremely slow, its rate scaling as S-1/2, where S is the Lundquist number of the system - has been called into question as it was analytically demonstrated that, for S ≫ 1, SP-like current sheets are violently unstable to the formation of a large number of secondary islands, or plasmoids. Subsequent numerical simulations in 2D have confirmed the validity of the linear theory, and shown that plasmoids quickly grow to become wider than the thickness of the original SP current sheet, thus effectively changing the underlying reconnection geometry. Ensuing numerical work has revealed that the process of plasmoid formation, coalescence and ejection from the sheet drastically modifies the steady state picture assumed by Sweet and Parker, and leads to the unexpected result that MHD reconnection is independent of S. In this talk, we review these recent developments and present results from three-dimensional simulations of high-Lundquist number reconnection in the presence of a guide field. A parametric study varying the strength of the guide field is presented. Plasmoid flux and width distribution functions are quantified and compared with corresponding two dimensional simulations.

  15. Propagation of BBFs and Dipolarization Fronts in the Global MHD simulation of February 27, 2009 Substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Y.; Raeder, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Gilson, M. L.; Runov, A.

    2010-12-01

    A global MHD simulation has been performed to investigate the THEMIS substorm on February 27, 2009. During this substorm the conjugated observations from the space and on the THEMIS ground observatories are available. The location and time of this substorm onset can be determined based on these observations. The initial auroral brightening is found at around 07:49 UT in the field of view of Fort Smith station (FSMI), with a pre-existing auroral arc located equatorward. A couple minutes later, the in situ observations recorded a sharp dipolarization front sunward passing through THEMIS spacecraft, which travels almost 10 RE in the magnetotail. In this study our global MHD model, i.e., OpenGGCM, driven by the real-time solar wind/IMF conditions, is able to reproduce the key features of these substorm signatures, including the auroral breakup at FSMI with the same onset time as the observations, and a strong earthward Bursty Bulk Flow (BBF) and dipolarization fronts that cause the substorm onset signatures. It is found in the simulation that the auroral breakup is caused by the strong flow shear and the flow vortices which form as the BBF moves earthward. Investigation of the tail BBF and its dipolarization front (DF) reveals that the bipolar change of the Bz component ahead of the DF can be produced by the interaction between two distinct plasmas from separate X lines: the anti-sunward moving southward flux tubes in the tailward flows emanating from an inner magnetic reconnection region, and the sunward traveling dipolarized tubes within the front of a strong earthward BBF that originates in a mid-tail reconnection region. The rebound and oscillations of the intruding BBF reported by the recent THEMIS observations are also seen in the simulation when the BBF encounters the high-pressure inner magnetosphere.

  16. A Real-time 3D Visualization of Global MHD Simulation for Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Matsuoka, D.; Kubo, T.; Shimazu, H.; Tanaka, T.; Fujita, S.; Watari, S.; Miyachi, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Kimura, E.; Ishikura, S.

    2006-12-01

    Recently, many satellites for communication networks and scientific observation are launched in the vicinity of the Earth (geo-space). The electromagnetic (EM) environments around the spacecraft are always influenced by the solar wind blowing from the Sun and induced electromagnetic fields. They occasionally cause various troubles or damages, such as electrification and interference, to the spacecraft. It is important to forecast the geo-space EM environment as well as the ground weather forecasting. Owing to the recent remarkable progresses of super-computer technologies, numerical simulations have become powerful research methods in the solar-terrestrial physics. For the necessity of space weather forecasting, NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) has developed a real-time global MHD simulation system of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere couplings, which has been performed on a super-computer SX-6. The real-time solar wind parameters from the ACE spacecraft at every one minute are adopted as boundary conditions for the simulation. Simulation results (2-D plots) are updated every 1 minute on a NICT website. However, 3D visualization of simulation results is indispensable to forecast space weather more accurately. In the present study, we develop a real-time 3D webcite for the global MHD simulations. The 3-D visualization results of simulation results are updated every 20 minutes in the following three formats: (1)Streamlines of magnetic field lines, (2)Isosurface of temperature in the magnetosphere and (3)Isoline of conductivity and orthogonal plane of potential in the ionosphere. For the present study, we developed a 3-D viewer application working on Internet Explorer browser (ActiveX) is implemented, which was developed on the AVS/Express. Numerical data are saved in the HDF5 format data files every 1 minute. Users can easily search, retrieve and plot past simulation results (3D visualization data and numerical data) by using

  17. Dayside Proton Aurora: Comparisons between Global MHD Simulations and Image Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Petrinec, S.; Frey, H. U.; Burch, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    The IMAGE mission provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the accuracy of current global models of the solar wind interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere. In particular, images of proton auroras from the Far Ultraviolet Instrument (FUV) onboard the IMAGE spacecraft are well suited to support investigations of the response of the Earth's magnetosphere to interplanetary disturbances. Accordingly, we have modeled two events that occurred on June 8 and July 28, 2000, using plasma and magnetic field parameters measured upstream of the bow shock as input to three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This paper begins with a discussion of images of proton auroras from the FUV SI-12 instrument in comparison with the simulation results. The comparison showed a very good agreement between intensifications in the auroral emissions measured by FUV SI-12 and the enhancement of plasma flows into the dayside ionosphere predicted by the global simulations. Subsequently, the IMAGE observations are analyzed in the context of the dayside magnetosphere's topological changes in magnetic field and plasma flows inferred from the simulation results. Finding include that the global dynamics of the auroral proton precipitation patterns observed by IMAGE are consistent with magnetic field reconnection occurring as a continuous process while the iMF changes in direction and the solar wind dynamic pressure varies. The global simulations also indicate that some of the transient patterns observed by IMAGE are consistent with sporadic reconnection processes. Global merging patterns found in the simulations agree with the antiparallel merging model. though locally component merging might broaden the merging region, especially in the region where shocked solar wind discontinuities first reach the magnetopause. Finally, the simulations predict the accretion of plasma near the bow shock in the regions threaded by newly open field lines on which plasma flows into the dayside

  18. Cavities of Weak Magnetic Field Strength in the Wake of FTEs: Results from Global Magnetospheric MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Hesse, M.; Wang, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; Ridley, A.

    2009-01-01

    We use the global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code BATS-R-US to model multipoint observations of Flux Transfer Event (FTE) signatures. Simulations with high spatial and temporal resolution predict that cavities of weak magnetic field strength protruding into the magnetosphere trail FTEs. These predictions are consistent with recently reported multi-point Cluster observations of traveling magnetopause erosion regions (TMERs).

  19. Relativistic Modeling Capabilities in PERSEUS Extended-MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as hybrid X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. We have overcome a major challenge of a relativistic fluid implementation, namely the recovery of primitive variables (density, velocity, pressure) from conserved quantities at each time step of a simulation. Our code recovers non-relativistic results along with important features of published Particle-In-Cell simulation results for a laser penetrating a super-critical hydrogen gas with Fast Ignition applications. In particular, we recover the penetration of magnetized relativistic electron jets ahead of the laser. Our code also reveals new physics in the modeling of a laser incident on a thin foil. This work is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative agreements DE-FOA-0001153 and DE-NA0001836.

  20. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD-simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of a 3D MHD simulation, the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration (including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component B sub y N is discussed. As a consequence of B sub y N not equalling 0, the plasmoid assumes a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmoid flux rope remain connected with the earth, while at later times a gradually increasing amount of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage, topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of an ad hoc plasmoid model.

  1. Modeling CME-shock-driven storms in 2012-2013: MHD test particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.; Kress, B. T.; Wiltberger, M.; Baker, D. N.; Foster, J. C.; Turner, D. L.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    The Van Allen Probes spacecraft have provided detailed observations of the energetic particles and fields environment for coronal mass ejection (CME)-shock-driven storms in 2012 to 2013 which have now been modeled with MHD test particle simulations. The Van Allen Probes orbital plane longitude moved from the dawn sector in 2012 to near midnight and prenoon for equinoctial storms of 2013, providing particularly good measurements of the inductive electric field response to magnetopause compression for the 8 October 2013 CME-shock-driven storm. An abrupt decrease in the outer boundary of outer zone electrons coincided with inward motion of the magnetopause for both 17 March and 8 October 2013 storms, as was the case for storms shortly after launch. Modeling magnetopause dropout events in 2013 with electric field diagnostics that were not available for storms immediately following launch have improved our understanding of the complex role that ULF waves play in radial transport during such events.

  2. Large scale standing slow mode structures in MHD simulations of the hermean magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantellini, Filippo; Meyrand, Romain; Varela, Jacobo

    2015-04-01

    Standing slow mode compressional fronts are seen to form upstream of the day side magnetopause in MHD simulations of Mercury's magnetosphere. These fronts are seen to form upstream of the portions of the magnetopause characterized by a near reversal of the magnetic field orientation. Their role is to bend the magnetosheath field lines towards the magnetopause. Besides these compressional fronts, already observed in space and theoretically discussed by various authors for the case of the Earth, large scale slow mode rarefaction waves are also seen to form in most parts of the magnetosheath. The rarefaction waves are essential to divert the interplanetary magnetic field lines and the solar wind plasma flow around the magnetopause.

  3. Two-dimensional Numerical Simulation on Performance of Liquid Metal MHD Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Katsunori; Maeda, Tetsuhiko; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    The performance of a liquid metal MHD generator is investigated with a two-dimensional numerical simulation. The effects of the electrode length, the position of current lead connection and the insertion of insulator on the performance are examined taking account of the current flow in the electrode. There exists an optimal electrode length for a given distribution of applied magnetic flux density. For a short electrode, the efficiency decreases because the power output becomes small. For a long electrode, on the other hand, the efficiency also decreases owing to the leakage current from the upstream and downstream edges of the electrode. An optimal current lead position was revealed. This fact is ascribed to the distributions of induced magnetic field and the current flow in the electrode. It was found that the insertion of insulator is effective for improving the performance, by which the eddy current can be reduced.

  4. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of a three-dimensional MHD simulation we discuss the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component B/sub yN/. As a consequence of b/sub yN/ /ne/ 0 the plasmid gets a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmid flux rope remain connected with the Earth, while at later times a gradually increasing amount of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of ad-hoc plasmid models. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Initial Flow Matching Results of MHD Energy Bypass on a Supersonic Turbojet Engine Using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary flow matching has been demonstrated for a MHD energy bypass system on a supersonic turbojet engine. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment was used to perform a thermodynamic cycle analysis to properly match the flows from an inlet to a MHD generator and from the exit of a supersonic turbojet to a MHD accelerator. Working with various operating conditions such as the enthalpy extraction ratio and isentropic efficiency of the MHD generator and MHD accelerator, interfacing studies were conducted between the pre-ionizers, the MHD generator, the turbojet engine, and the MHD accelerator. This paper briefly describes the NPSS environment used in this analysis and describes the NPSS analysis of a supersonic turbojet engine with a MHD generator/accelerator energy bypass system. Results from this study have shown that using MHD energy bypass in the flow path of a supersonic turbojet engine increases the useful Mach number operating range from 0 to 3.0 Mach (not using MHD) to an explored and desired range of 0 to 7.0 Mach.

  6. Temporal evolution of a Current Sheet with Initial Finite Perturbations by Three-dimensional MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Takaaki

    Temporal evolution of a current sheet with initial perturbations is studied by using the threedimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The magnetic reconnection is considered to be the main engine of the energy rele ase in solar flares. The structure of the diffusion region is, however, not stil l understood under the circumstances with enormously large magnetic Reynolds num ber as the solar corona. In particular, the relationship between the flare's macroscopic physics and the microscopic ones are unclear. It is generally believed that the MHD turbulence s hould play a role in the intermediate scale. The initial current sheet is in an approximately hydromagnetic equilibrium with anti-parallel magnetic field in the y-direction. We imposed a finite-amplitude perturbations (=50ee what happens. Special attention is paid upon the evolution of a three-dimens ional structure in the direction along the initial electric current (z-direction ). Our preliminary results are as follows: (1) In the early phase of the evolut ion, high wavenumber modes in the z-direction are excited and grow. (2) Many "X "-type neutral points (lines) are generated along the magnetic neutral line (pla ne) in the current sheet. When they evolve into the non-linear phase, three-dime nsional structures in the z-direction also evolve. The spatial scale in the z-di rection seems to be almost comparable with that in the xy-plane. (3) The energy release rate is reduced in case of 3D simulations compared with 2D ones probably because of the reduction of the inflow cross sections by the formation of pattc hy structures in the current sheet.

  7. Saturn's periodicities: New results from an MHD simulation of magnetospheric response to rotating ionospheric vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M.; Jia, X.

    2013-12-01

    In previous work we demonstrated that a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of Saturn's magnetosphere in which periodicity is imposed by rotating vortical flows in the ionosphere reproduces many reported periodically varying properties of the system. Here we shall show that previously unreported features of the MHD simulation of Saturn's magnetosphere illuminate additional measured properties of the system. By averaging over a rotation period, we identify a global electric field whose magnitude is a few tenths of a mV/m (see Figure 1). The electric field intensity decreases with radial distance in the middle magnetosphere, consistent with drift speeds v=E/B of a few km/s towards the morning side and relatively independent of radial distance. The electric field within 10 RS in the equatorial plane is oriented from post-noon to post-midnight, in excellent agreement with observations [e.g., Thomsen et al., 2012; Andriopoulou et al., 2012, 2013; Wilson et al., 2013]. By following the electric field over a full rotation phase we identify oscillatory behavior whose magnitude is consistent with the reported fluctuations of measured electric fields. Of particular interest is the nature of the fast mode perturbations that produce periodic displacement of the magnetopause and flapping of the current sheet. Figure (2) shows the total perturbation pressure (the sum of magnetic and thermal pressure) in the equatorial plane at a rotation phase for which the ionospheric flow near noon is equatorward. By following the perturbations over a full rotation period, we demonstrate properties of the fast mode wave launched by the rotating flow structures and thereby characterize the 'cam' signal originally proposed by Espinosa et al. [2003].

  8. An MHD simulation of plasmoid instability in the dayside ionosphere of an unmagnetized planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitoshi, S.; Terada, N.; Kasaba, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation of magnetic reconnection in the dayside ionosphere of an unmagnetized planet and a comparison of the size distribution of flux ropes obtained from simulation with that from observation will be reported. Flux ropes have been frequently observed in the dayside ionospheres of Venus and Mars[Russell and Elphic, 1979; Cloutier et al.,1999] and their radius has been found to be between 6 to 12 km near the subsolar location of Venus[Russell et al., 1990]. Dreher et al. [1995] suggested using an MHD simulation that reconnection caused by an IMF rotation can generate flux ropes at the Venus ionopause. However, Dreher et al. [1995] examined only the linear stage of reconnection, so the nonlinear stage that takes into consideration the vertical convection of the reconnection site along the intrinsic convection in the Venus ionosphere has yet to be investigated. In this study, using a 2-D multi-species MHD simulation, the spatiotemporal evolution of reconnection in the ionosphere of Venus is examined. The size distribution of flux ropes is also examined and the validity of the generation mechanism of flux ropes is discussed by comparing the rope size distribution with the observed one. In the ionosphere of Venus, our simulation result shows that plasmoid instability [Loureiro et al., 2007] occurs in a Sweet-Parker (SP) current sheet above the altitude where Lundquist number exceeds 106, and consequently many plasmoids are generated. In the nonlinear stage, secondary reconnections occur in the current sheets, which exist between adjacent pairs of plasmoids, and thus smaller flux ropes are created. It has been suggested that the smaller side of the size distribution increases as a result of hierarchical reconnections in the SP current sheet [Shibata et al., 2001]. The observational size distribution [Vignes et al., 2003] shows that the population of small flux ropes is larger than that of large ones and it is consistent with the simulation result. Through

  9. Complexities of a 3-D flux rope as shown by MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, N.; Baker, D. N.; Wiltberger, M.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a pair of substorms on August 11, 2002. Comparisons of data with simulation results reveal an agreement regarding the sequence of events in the magnetosphere. We then present the results in the simulation of a flux rope formed during the second substorm. Unlike standard 2-D depictions of reconnection and plasmoid release during a substorm, the simulation shows a highly complex structure that has considerable winding of both closed and open field lines. Additionally the flux rope does not move tailward uniformly, but rather has a assymetric motion where the dawn flank moves tailward prior to the dusk end of the flux rope, resulting in a a skewed flux rope that runs almost downtail instead of crosstail. These features can add considerably complexity to satellites observing a flux rope structure in-situ. A single spacecraft could observe particle populations that go through a sequence of alternating open and closed field lines and spacecraft separated by small spatial distances could observe quite different populations as well.

  10. MHD simulations of boundary layer formation along the dayside Venus ionopause due to mass loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGary, J. E.; Pontius, D. H.

    1994-02-01

    A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of mass-loaded solar wind flow around the dayside of Venus is presented. For conditions appropriate to a low-altitude ionopause the simulations show that mass loading from the pickup of oxygen ions produces a boundary layer of finite thickness along the ionopause. Within this layer the temperatures exhibit strong gradients normal to and away from the ionopause. Furthermore, there is a shear in the bulk flow velocity across the boundary layer, such that the (predominantly tangential) flow decreases in speed as the ionopause is approached and remains small along the ionopause, consistent with Pioneer Venus observations. The total mass density increases significantly as the flow approaches the ionopause, where the contribution of O(+) to the total number density is a few percent. Numerical simulations are carried out for various mass addition rates and demonstrate that the boundary layer develops when oxygen ion production exceeds approximately 2 x 105/cu m/s. For the upstream solar wind parameters and mass loading rates chosen for these simulations, the results are consistent with observations made on the dayside of Venus for average ionopause conditions near 300 km.

  11. The influence of thermal radiation on MHD flow of Maxwellian fluids above stretching sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbar, V.; Alizadeh-Pahlavan, A.; Sadeghy, K.

    2009-03-01

    Flow induced in a viscoelastic fluid by a linearly stretched sheet is investigated assuming that the fluid is Maxwellian and the sheet is subjected to a transverse magnetic field. The objective is to investigate the effects of parameters such as elasticity number, magnetic number, radiative heat transfer, Prandtl number, and Eckert number on the temperature field above the sheet. To do this, boundary layer theory will be used to simplify energy and momentum equations assuming that fluid physical/rheological properties remain constant. A suitable similarity transformation will be used to transform boundary layer equations from PDEs into ODEs. Homotopy analysis method (HAM) will be invoked to find an analytical solution for the temperature field above the sheet knowing the velocity profiles (see Alizadeh-Pahlavan et al. [Alizadeh-Pahlavan A, Aliakbar V, Vakili-Farahani F, Sadeghy K. MHD flows of UCM fluids above porous stretching sheets using two-auxiliary parameter homotopy analysis method. Commun. Nonlinear Sci Numer Simulat, in press]). The importance of manipulating the transverse velocity component, v, will be discussed on the temperature field above the sheet.

  12. The distribution of MHD turbulence in the heliosphere and the charged particle radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence plays an important role in cross scale couplings in the heliospheric system and is central to understanding the distribution and variations of charged particle radiation. The nonlinear turbulent cascade process acts as a conduit connecting large scale fluid-like plasma motions to small scale kinetic motions, and is thus most likely an integral part of heating processes from the coronal base to the outer boundaries of the heliosphere. Turbulence also establishes key parameters that determine the transport (and perhaps also, acceleration) of energetic charged particles. In the inner heliospheric realm of solar energetic particles, turbulence can account for scattering, field line complexity, and topological trapping, and can provide other indirect effects such as turbulent transport affecting CMEs and shocks. To understand the distribution and spectra of galactic cosmic rays, one must know the diffusion tensor and therefore local turbulence properties. Turbulence is transported outward in the supersonic solar wind, while the cosmic rays diffuse and drift inwards from the interstellar medium. Thus to understand how the spectrum of galactic cosmic rays is established at any point in interplanetary space, it is necessary to have knowledge of the turbulence everywhere in the heliosphere. Here we summarize recent progress in this challenging area. Headway has been made by employing a four equation transport model with one point nonlinear modeling of locally homogeneous turbulence. The model follows turbulence energy density, correlation scale, temperature and cross helicity under the influence of specified large scale fields. The turbulence is driven by large scale shear, and in the outer heliosphere, by pickup ions. A few constants must be estimated either from theory or observations -- the MHD Karman-Taylor constants, the shear strength, a turbulence geometry factor ("mixing term"), and the Alfven ratio. The latitudinal dependence of

  13. Particle acceleration and non-thermal emission in Pulsar Wind Nebulae from relativistic MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, B.; Del Zanna, L.; Amato, E.; Bucciantini, N.; Bandiera, R.

    2015-09-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae are among the most powerful particle accelerators in the Galaxy with acceleration efficiencies that reach up to 30% and maximum particle energies in the PeV range. In recent years relativistic axisymmetric MHD models have proven to be excellent tools for describing the physics of such objects, and particularly successful at explaining their high energy morphology, down to very fine details. Nevertheless, some important aspects of the physics of PWNe are still obscure: the mechanism(s) responsible for the acceleration of particles of all energies is (are) still unclear, and the origin of the lowest energy (radio emitting) particles is most mysterious. The correct interpretation of the origin of radio emitting particles is of fundamental importance, as this holds information about the amount of pair production in the pulsar magnetosphere, and hence on the role of pulsars as antimatter factories. On the other hand, the long lifetimes of these particles against synchrotron losses, allows them to travel far from their injection location, making their acceleration site difficult to constrain. As far as the highest energy (X and gamma-ray emitting) particles are concerned, their acceleration is commonly believed to occur at the pulsar wind termination shock. But since the upstream flow is thought to have non-uniform properties along the shock surface, important constraints on the acceleration mechanism(s) could come from exact knowledge of the location and flow properties where particles are being accelerated. We investigate in detail both topics by means of 2D numerical MHD simulations. Different assumptions on the origin of radio particles and more generally on the injection sites of all particles are considered, and the corresponding emission properties are computed. We discuss the physical constraints that can be inferred from comparison of the synthetic emission properties against multiwavelength observations of the PWN class prototype, the Crab

  14. Time-dependent simulation of oblique MHD cosmic-ray shocks using the two-fluid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Adam; Jones, T. W.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1995-01-01

    Using a new, second-order accurate numerical method we present dynamical simulations of oblique MHD cosmic-ray (CR)-modified plane shock evolution. Most of the calculations are done with a two-fluid model for diffusive shock acceleration, but we provide also comparisons between a typical shock computed that way against calculations carried out using the more complete, momentum-dependent, diffusion-advection equation. We also illustrate a test showing that these simulations evolve to dynamical equilibria consistent with previously published steady state analytic calculations for such shocks. In order to improve understanding of the dynamical role of magnetic fields in shocks modified by CR pressure we have explored for time asymptotic states the parameter space of upstream fast mode Mach number, M(sub f), and plasma beta. We compile the results into maps of dynamical steady state CR acceleration efficiency, epsilon(sub c). We have run simulations using constant, and nonisotropic, obliquity (and hence spatially) dependent forms of the diffusion coefficient kappa. Comparison of the results shows that while the final steady states achieved are the same in each case, the history of CR-MHD shocks can be strongly modified by variations in kappa and, therefore, in the acceleration timescale. Also, the coupling of CR and MHD in low beta, oblique shocks substantially influences the transient density spike that forms in strongly CR-modified shocks. We find that inside the density spike a MHD slow mode wave can be generated that eventually steepens into a shock. A strong layer develops within the density spike, driven by MHD stresses. We conjecture that currents in the shear layer could, in nonplanar flows, results in enhanced particle accretion through drift acceleration.

  15. MHD mixed convection flow of a power law nanofluid over a vertical stretching sheet with radiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aini Mat, Nor Azian; Arifin, Norihan Md.; Nazar, Roslinda; Ismail, Fudziah; Bachok, Norfifah

    2013-09-01

    A similarity solution of the steady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convection boundary layer flow due to a stretching vertical heated sheet in a power law nanofluid with thermal radiation effect is theoretically studied. The governing system of partial differential equations is first transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the shooting method. The influence of pertinent parameters such as the nanoparticle volume fraction parameter, the magnetic parameter, the buoyancy or mixed convection parameter and the radiation parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics is discussed. Comparisons with published results are also presented.

  16. Fractional boundary layer flow and radiation heat transfer of MHD viscoelastic fluid over an unsteady stretching surface

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bingyu; Zheng, Liancun Chen, Shengting

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents an investigation for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) viscoelastic fluid boundary layer flow and radiation heat transfer over an unsteady stretching sheet in presence of heat source. Time dependent fractional derivative is first introduced in formulating the boundary layer equations. Numerical solutions are obtained by using the finite difference scheme and L1-algorithm approximation. Results indicate that the proposed model describes a basic delaying times framework for viscoelastic flow and radiation heat transfer. The effects of involved parameters on velocity and temperature fields are shown graphically and analyzed in detail.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent MHD Flows Using an Iterative PNS Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Hiromasa; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2003-01-01

    A new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm has been developed to efficiently compute magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime. In this regime, the electrical conductivity is low and the induced magnetic field is negligible compared to the applied magnetic field. The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equation which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. To account for upstream (elliptic) effects, the flowfields are computed using multiple streamwise sweeps with an iterated PNS algorithm. Turbulence has been included by modifying the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model to account for MHD effects. The new algorithm has been used to compute both laminar and turbulent, supersonic, MHD flows over flat plates and supersonic viscous flows in a rectangular MHD accelerator. The present results are in excellent agreement with previous complete Navier-Stokes calculations.

  18. Global MHD Simulations of Space Plasma Environments: Heliosphere, Comets, Magnetospheres of Plants and Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kabin, K.; Hansen, K. C.; Gombosi, T. I.; Combi, M. R.; Linde, T. J.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Groth, C. P. T.; Powell, K. G.; Nagy, A. F.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides an approximate description of a great variety of processes in space physics. Accurate numerical solutions of the MHD equations are still a challenge, but in the past decade a number of robust methods have appeared. Once these techniques made the direct solution of MHD equations feasible, a number of global three-dimensional models were designed and applied to many space physics objects. The range of these objects is truly astonishing, including active galactic nuclei, the heliosphere, the solar corona, and the solar wind interaction with planets, satellites, and comets. Outside the realm of space physics, MHD theory has been applied to such diverse problems as laboratory plasmas and electromagnetic casting of liquid metals. In this paper we present a broad spectrum of models of different phenomena in space science developed in the recent years at the University of Michigan. Although the physical systems addressed by these models are different, they all use the MHD equations as a unifying basis.

  19. MHD simulations of Earth's bow shock: Interplanetary magnetic field orientation effects on shape and position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, J. F.; Cairns, Iver H.; Lyon, J. G.; Boshuizen, Christopher R.

    2004-04-01

    The location and geometry of Earth's bow shock vary considerably with the solar wind conditions. More specifically, Earth's bow shock is formed by the steepening of fast mode waves, whose speed vms depends upon the angle θbn between the local shock normal n and the magnetic field vector BIMF, as well as the Alfvén and sound speeds (vA and cS). Since vms is a minimum for θbn = 0° and low Alfvén Mach number MA, and maximum for θbn = 90° and high MA, this implies that as θIMF (the angle between BIMF and vsw) varies, the magnitude of vms should vary also across the shock, leading to changes in shape. This paper presents 3-D MHD simulation data which illustrate the changes in shock location and geometry in response to changes in θIMF and MA, for 1.4 ≤ MA ≤ 9.7 and 0° ≤ θIMF ≤ 90°. Specifically, for oblique IMF the shock's geometry is shown to become skewed in planes containing BIMF (e.g., the x - z plane). This is also emphasized in the terminator plane data, where the shock is best represented by ellipses, with centers translated along the z axis. For the θIMF = 90° simulations the shock is symmetric about the x axis in both the x - y and x - z planes. Simulations for field-aligned flow (θIMF = 0°) show a dimpling of the nose of the shock as MA → 1. The simulations also illustrate the general movement of the shock in response to changes in MA; high MA shocks are found closer to Earth than low MA shocks. 's [1991] magnetopause model is used in the simulations, and we discuss the limitations of this, as well as the expected results using a self-consistent model.

  20. Fast Wave Trains Associated with Solar Eruptions: Insights from 3D Thermodynamic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, C.; Liu, W.; Torok, T.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.; Ofman, L.

    2015-12-01

    EUV imaging observations during the SDO/AIA era have provided new insights into a variety of wave phenomena occurring in the low solar corona. One example is the observation of quasi-periodic, fast-propagating wave trains that are associated with solar eruptions, including flares and CMEs. While there has been considerable progress in understanding such waves from both an observational and theoretical perspective, it remains a challenge to pin down their physical origin. In this work, we detail our results from a case-study 3D thermodynamic MHD simulation of a coronal mass ejection where quasi-periodic wave trains are generated during the simulated eruption. We find a direct correlation between the onset of non-steady reconnection in the flare current sheet and the generation of quasi-periodic wave train signatures when patchy, collimated downflows interact with the flare arcade. Via forward modeling of SDO/AIA observables, we explore how the appearance of the wave trains is affected by line-of-sight integration and the multi-thermal nature of the coronal medium. We also examine how the wave trains themselves are channeled by natural waveguides formed in 3D by the non-uniform background magnetic field. While the physical association of the reconnection dynamics to the generation of quasi-periodic wave trains appears to be a compelling result, unanswered questions posed from recent observations as well as future prospects will be discussed.

  1. Attempts to Simulate Anisotropies of Solar Wind Fluctuations Using MHD with a Turning Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    We examine a "two-component" model of the solar wind to see if any of the observed anisotropies of the fields can be explained in light of the need for various quantities, such as the magnetic minimum variance direction, to turn along with the Parker spiral. Previous results used a 3-D MHD spectral code to show that neither Q2D nor slab-wave components will turn their wave vectors in a turning Parker-like field, and that nonlinear interactions between the components are required to reproduce observations. In these new simulations we use higher resolution in both decaying and driven cases, and with and without a turning background field, to see what, if any, conditions lead to variance anisotropies similar to observations. We focus especially on the middle spectral range, and not the energy-containing scales, of the simulation for comparison with the solar wind. Preliminary results have shown that it is very difficult to produce the required variances with a turbulent cascade.

  2. 3D Multifluid MHD simulation for Uranus and Neptune: the seasonal variations of their magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Paty, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between Uranus' intrinsic magnetic field and the solar wind is quite different from the magnetospheric interactions of other planets. Uranus' large obliquity, coupled with the fact that its dipole moment is off-centered and highly tilted relative to the rotation axis, leads to unique and seasonally dependent interaction geometries with the solar wind. We present results from adapting a multifluid MHD simulation to examine these seasonally dependent geometries in terms of the global magnetospheric structure, magnetopause and bow shock location, and magnetotail configuration. The Voyager 2 spacecraft encountered Uranus near solstice, and was able to observe the magnetic field structure and plasma characteristics of a twisted magnetotail [Behannon et al., 1987]. We use such magnetometer and plasma observations as a basis for benchmarking our simulations for the solstice scenario. Auroral observations made by the Hubble Space Telescope during equinox [Lamy et al.,2012] give some indication of the magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind. We also demonstrate the structural difference of the magnetosphere between solstice and equinox seasons. The magnetosphere at equinox is quite distinct due to the orientation and rotation of the magnetic axis relative to the solar wind direction.

  3. MHD simulations of magnetized laser-plasma interaction for laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiar, Benjamin; Ciardi, Andrea; Vinci, Tommaso; Revet, Guilhem; Fuchs, Julien; Higginson, Drew

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven plasmas coupled with externally applied strong, steady-state, magnetic fields have applications that range from ICF to astrophysical studies of jet collimation, accretion shock dynamics in young stars and streaming instabilities in space plasmas. We have recently included the modelling of laser energy deposition in our three-dimensional, resistive two-temperature MHD code GORGON. The model assumes linear inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption and the laser propagation is done in the geometrical optics approximation. We present full scale numerical simulations of actual experiments performed on the ELFIE installation at LULI, including plasma generated from single and multiple laser plasmas embedded in a magnetic field of strength up to 20 T, and experiments and astrophysical simulations that have shown the viability of poloidal magnetic fields to directly result in the collimation of outflows and the formation of jets in astrophysical accreting systems, such as in young stellar objects. The authors acknowledge the support from the Ile-de-France DIM ACAV, from the LABEX Plas@par and from the ANR grant SILAMPA.

  4. The Biermann Battery In Cosmological Mhd Simulations Of Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hao; O' Shea, Brian W; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Norman, Michael L; Collins, David C

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of the first self-consistent three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamical simulations of Population III star formation including the Biermann battery effect. We find that the Population III stellar cores formed including this effect are both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those from hydrodynamics-only (non-MHD) cosmological simulations. We observe peak magnetic fields of {approx_equal} 10{sup -9} G in the center of our star-forming halo at z {approx_equal} 17.55 at a baryon density of n{sub B} {approx} 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. The magnetic fields created by the Biermann battery effect are predominantly formed early in the evolution of the primordial halo at low density and large spatial scales, and then grow through compression and by shear flows. The fields seen in this calculation are never large enough to be dynamically important (with {beta} {ge} 10{sup 15} at all times before the termination of our calculation), and should be considered the minimum possible fields in existence during Population III star formation. The lack of magnetic support lends credibility to assumptions made in previous calculations regarding the lack of importance of magnetic fields in Population III star formation. In addition, these magnetic fields may be seed fields for the stellar dynamo or the magnetorotational instability at higher densities and smaller spatial scales.

  5. Formation and Eruption of an Active Region Sigmoid: NLFFF Modeling and MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Wu, S.; Feng, X.; Hu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    We present a magnetic analysis of the formation and eruption of an active region sigmoid in AR 11283 from 2011 September 4 to 6, which is jointly based on observations, static nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation and dynamic MHD simulation. A time sequence of NLFFF model's outputs are used to reproduce the evolution of the magnetic field of the region over three days leading to a X-class flare near the end of 2011 September 6. In the first day, a new bipolar emerges into the negative polarity of a pre-existing mature bipolar, forming a magnetic topology with a coronal null on the magnetic separatrix surface between the two flux system, while the field is still near potential at the end of the day. After then photospheric shearing and twisting build up non-potentiality in the embedded core region, with a flux rope (FR) formed there above the polarity inversion line by tether-cutting reconnection between the strongly sheared field lines. Within this duration, the core field has gained a magnetic free energy of ˜ 1032 erg. In this core a sigmoid is observed distinctly at 22:00 UT on September 6, closely before its eruption at 22:12 UT. Comparison of the SDO/AIA observations with coronal magnetic field suggests that the sigmoid is formed by emission due to enhanced current sheet along the BPSS (bald-patch separatrix surface, in which the field lines graze the line-tied photosphere at the neutral line) that separates the FR from the ambient flux. Quantitative inspection of the pre-eruption field on 22:00 UT suggests a mechanism for the eruption: tether cutting at the null triggers a torus instability of the FR--overlying field system. This pre-eruption NLFFF is then input into a time-dependent MHD model to simulate the fast magnetic evolution during eruption, which successfully reproduces the observations. The highly asymmetric magnetic environment along with the lateral location of the null leads to a strongly inclined non-radial direction of the eruption

  6. Simulation and analytic analysis of radiation driven islands at the density limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, D. P.; Liu, C.; Gates, D. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; White, R.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of radiative cooling on the onset and evolution of magnetic islands is investigated with nonlinear resistive MHD simulations and reduced theoretical analysis. The configuration is a cylindrical tokamak with a m/n = 2/1 island and includes three dimensional resistivity and anisotropic heat conduction in the simulations. The radiative cooling is implemented as a temperature perturbation inside the island, which modifies the island structure and drives the island more unstable. Analytic reduction of the saturated island size and structure supports the simulation results. The results offer intuitive understanding of experimental observations of radiation driven magnetic islands, which may explain density limit disruptions.

  7. The role of the electron convection term for the parallel electric field and electron acceleration in MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, K.; Terada, N.; Katoh, Y.; Misawa, H.

    2011-08-15

    There has been a great concern about the origin of the parallel electric field in the frame of fluid equations in the auroral acceleration region. This paper proposes a new method to simulate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations that include the electron convection term and shows its efficiency with simulation results in one dimension. We apply a third-order semi-discrete central scheme to investigate the characteristics of the electron convection term including its nonlinearity. At a steady state discontinuity, the sum of the ion and electron convection terms balances with the ion pressure gradient. We find that the electron convection term works like the gradient of the negative pressure and reduces the ion sound speed or amplifies the sound mode when parallel current flows. The electron convection term enables us to describe a situation in which a parallel electric field and parallel electron acceleration coexist, which is impossible for ideal or resistive MHD.

  8. Analysis of Voyager Observed High-Energy Electron Fluxes in the Heliosheath Using MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washimi, Haruichi; Webber, W. R.; Zank, Gary P.; Hu, Qiang; Florinski, Vladimir; Adams, James; Kubo, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft (V1 and V2) observed electrons of 6-14 MeV in the heliosheath which showed several incidences of flux variation relative to a background of gradually increasing flux with distance from the Sun. The increasing flux of background electrons is thought to result from inward radial diffusion. We compare the temporal electron flux variation with dynamical phenomena in the heliosheath that are obtained from our MHD simulations. Because our simulation is based on V2 observed plasma data before V2 crossed the termination shock, this analysis is effective up to late 2008, i.e., about a year after the V2-crossing, during which disturbances, driven prior to the crossing time, survived in the heliosheath. Several electron flux variations correspond to times directly associated with interplanetary shock events. One noteworthy example corresponds to various times associated with the March 2006 interplanetary shock, these being the collision with the termination shock, the passage past the V1 spacecraft, and the collision with the region near the heliopause, as identified by W.R. Webber et al. for proton/helium of 7-200 MeV. Our simulations indicate that all other electron flux variations, except one, correspond well to the times when a shock-driven magneto-sonic pulse and its reflection in the heliosheath either passed across V1/V2, or collided with the termination shock or with the plasma sheet near the heliopause. This result suggests that variation in the electron flux should be due to either direct or indirect effects of magnetosonic pulses in the heliosheath driven by interplanetary shocks

  9. First MHD simulation of collapse and fragmentation of magnetized molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki

    2004-02-01

    This is the first paper about fragmentation and mass outflow in molecular clouds by using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) nested-grid simulations. The binary star formation process is studied, paying particular attention to the fragmentation of a rotating magnetized molecular cloud. We assume an isothermal rotating and magnetized cylindrical cloud in hydrostatic balance. Non-axisymmetric as well as axisymmetric perturbations are added to the initial state and the subsequent evolutions are studied. The evolution is characterized by three parameters: the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric perturbations, the rotation speed and the magnetic field strength. As a result, it is found that non-axisymmetry hardly evolves in the early phase, but begins to grow after the gas contracts and forms a thin disc. Disc formation is strongly promoted by the rotation speed and the magnetic field strength. There are two types of fragmentation: that from a ring and that from a bar. Thin adiabatic cores fragment if their thickness is less than 1/4 of the radius. For the fragments to survive, they should be formed in a heavily elongated barred core or a flat round disc. In the models showing fragmentation, outflows from respective fragments are found as well as those driven by the rotating bar or the disc.

  10. Solar wind-magnetosphere energy coupling function fitting: Results from a global MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Han, J. P.; Li, H.; Peng, Z.; Richardson, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    Quantitatively estimating the energy input from the solar wind into the magnetosphere on a global scale is still an observational challenge. We perform three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to derive the energy coupling function. Based on 240 numerical test runs, the energy coupling function is given by Ein=3.78×107nsw0.24Vsw1.47BT0.86[sin2.70(θ/2)+0.25]. We study the correlations between the energy coupling function and a wide variety of magnetospheric activity, such as the indices of Dst, Kp, ap, AE, AU, AL, the polar cap index, and the hemispheric auroral power. The results indicate that this energy coupling function gives better correlations than the ɛ function. This result is also applied to a storm event under northward interplanetary magnetic field conditions. About 13% of the solar wind kinetic energy is transferred into the magnetosphere and about 35% of the input energy is dissipated in the ionosphere, consistent with previous studies.

  11. MHD turbulence model for global simulations of the solar wind and SEP acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Roussev, Ilia I.

    2008-08-25

    The aim of the present work is to unify the various transport equations for turbulent waves that are used in different areas of space physics. We mostly focus on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, in particular the Alfvenic turbulence.

  12. Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

    2008-10-13

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on nonlinear MHD and extended MHD

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Nonlinear MHD simulations have proven their value in interpreting experimental results over the years. As magnetic fusion experiments reach higher performance regimes, more sophisticated experimental diagnostics coupled with ever expanding computer capabilities have increased both the need for and the feasibility of nonlinear global simulations using models more realistic than regular ideal and resistive MHD. Such extended-MHD nonlinear simulations have already begun to produce useful results. These studies are expected to lead to ever more comprehensive simulation models in the future and to play a vital role in fully understanding fusion plasmas. Topics include the following: (1) current state of nonlinear MHD and extended-MHD simulations; (2) comparisons to experimental data; (3) discussions between experimentalists and theorists; (4) /equations for extended-MHD models, kinetic-based closures; and (5) paths toward more comprehensive simulation models, etc. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Global Structure of Idealized Stream Interaction Regions Using 3D MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahud, D. M.; Hughes, W. J.; Merkin, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    The global structure of the heliosphere during solar cycles (SC) 23 and 24 differed significantly in many ways, for example in terms of global magnetic field strength, velocity structure and the observed properties of Stream Interaction Region (SIR) and associated shocks. The differences considered in this study focus primarily on the effects of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of SIRs. During the minimum of SC 24, equatorial coronal holes were prevalent as sources of low-latitude high-speed solar wind. In contrast, the canonical depiction of SC 23's minimum wind configuration is of a band of slow wind undulating about the heliographic equator. Using the heliospheric adaptation of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model (LFM-helio), we have run simulations for two idealized global solar wind conditions. The first simulation approximates the classical tilted dipole, with fast solar wind at high latitudes and a band of slow wind tilted with respect to the heliographic equator, and the second consists of global slow solar wind with equatorial circular sources of high-speed streams. The evolution of the SIRs from 0.1 AU to 2.0 AU is characterized using the amplitude and location of the maximum compressions of the plasma and the magnetic field as well as the largest deflection of solar wind flow. The relation between plasma and magnetic field compressions differs between the two cases considered. The SIRs produced by the equatorial coronal holes have similar maximum densities to those of the tilted dipole case, but the magnetic field magnitude is larger and the plasma is hotter. This suggests that evolution depends on the 3D structure of the SIR and its effects on the competitive roles of the growth of the structure, driven by compression from dynamic pressure, and and relaxation from the plasma flow and magnetic field deflections occurring in the region. Magnetic field threading SIRs and tracing plasma parcels are examined.

  15. Investigating Charon's Impact on Pluto's Interaction with the Solar Wind through Multifluid MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, J. M.; Paty, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Charon's mass, orbital parameters, and distinct surface composition relative to Pluto suggest that it plays a significant role in Pluto's dynamic interaction with the solar wind. Its high mass ( ~ 10% of total system mass ) and close orbit ( < 20 Pluto Radii ) are thought to result in regionally enhanced atmospheric escape from Pluto as well as ionospheric deformation. Additionally, there are multiple mechanisms through which Charon could possess a tenuous atmosphere—and therefore ionosphere. Firstly, spectral observations of short-lived hydrated ammonia on Charon's surface could be caused by semi-regular cryovolcanism, which would also source a water group atmosphere (Cook et al., 2007). Secondly, recent work indicates that Charon could have a nightside parasitic atmosphere that is captured from material escaping from Pluto (Tucker et al., 2014). Either possibility would result in Charon presenting a sizable obstacle to the incoming solar wind. This work studies Charon's effects on the Pluto-solar wind interaction using a 3-dimensional multifluid MHD model which has been modified to include a second body within the system. This second body (Charon) represents not only an additional gravitational perturbation to the system, but can also provide a local and distinct plasma source, a sink for plasma sourced from Pluto or the solar wind, and cause an obstruction and perturbation to the solar wind. Specifically, we investigate the possibility of enhanced ionospheric loss from Pluto due to Charon's gravitational attraction, as well as the overall dynamics of a two-body system interacting with the solar wind in which each body has an ionosphere and periodically passes through the bow shock of the other body. The former objective is made possible by tracking the flux of plasma sourced from Pluto. The latter objective is accomplished by performing simulations in which Charon is upstream of Pluto as well as simulations in which Charon is placed downstream, within Pluto

  16. 3D MHD simulations of the HIT-SI spheromak experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, V. A.

    2004-11-01

    The HIT-SI spheromak, which is driven by steady inductive helicity injection (SIHI), consists of the toroidally symmetric spheromak confinement region and two non-symmetric helicity injectors. Each injector resembles a 180^o segment of an RFP in which the flux and current are oscillated. The two injectors are mounted on opposite ends of the spheromak and are situated 90^o apart spatially and operated 90^o out of phase temporally, giving constant helicity injection. The 3D MHD code NIMROD is used to simulate HIT-SI operation, but the code's toroidally symmetric boundary requires a creative treatment of the injectors. Initially, the injectors are neglected completely and a hollow current profile equilibrium is allowed to decay in the spheromak region for several Lundquist numbers (S). For S around 600 or larger, relaxation will flatten the current profile during decay, briefly increasing the total plasma current, whereas at lower S resistive dissipation dominates [1]. Sustained HIT-SI operation is simulated with non-axisymmetric boundary conditions. In driven simulations at low S, no axisymmetric fields are generated as a result of relaxation of the predominantly n=1 injector fields until the injectors are quickly shut off and the fields are forced to reconnect. At S=500, an n=0 component arises due to relaxation during sustainment. As S is increased further, the ratio of n=0 (equilibrium) fields to n=1 (injector) fields increases, and a scaling is determined. The HIT-SI device is designed to have no currents penetrating the walls, and this is ensured by a 0.3mm insulating ceramic layer on the interior of the copper flux conserver. This is modeled in the simulation with a highly resistive 1mm layer at the edge of the grid. Significantly faster plasma decay times are seen with the thin layer than for comparable simulations with no layer. The result can be explained in terms of helicity balance argument like that used by Jarboe and Alper [2] to explain RFP loop

  17. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability during northward IMF conditions: Global 3-Dimensional MHD simulations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Lyon, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (KHI) has long been suggested to operate on the magnetospheric boundary, where the magnetosheath plasma streams past the magnetosphere. The instability is thought to be responsible for inducing various wave populations in the magnetosphere and for mass, momentum and energy transport across the magnetospheric boundary. Waves attributed to the KHI have been observed at the Earth's magnetosphere flanks as well as at Saturn and Mercury during spacecraft crossings, and remotely at boundaries of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Recent high-resolution global 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the magnetosphere confirm the existence of pronounced perturbations of the magnetospheric boundary, which are thought to be due to KHI. Such global simulations had been challenging in the past because of the need to encompass the entire magnetosphere, while sufficiently resolving the boundary layer. Here we present results of such a high-resolution simulation of the magnetosphere, using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) model, under steady northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions. We find the magnetospheric boundary to be globally unstable, including the high-latitude boundary layer (meridional plane), where magnetic tension is apparently not sufficient to stabilize the growth of oscillations. Roughly beyond the terminator, global modes, coupled into the surface modes, become apparent, so that the entire body of the magnetosphere is engaged in an oscillatory motion. The wave vector of the surface oscillations has a component perpendicular to the background flow and tangential to the shear layer (in the equatorial plane, k_z component of the wave vector), which is consistent with the generation of field-aligned currents that flow on closed field lines between the inner portion of the boundary layer and the ionosphere. We calculate the distribution of wave power in the equatorial plane and find it consistent with the existence of a

  18. The Delta x B = 0 Constraint Versus Minimization of Numerical Errors in MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The MHD equations are a system of non-strictly hyperbolic conservation laws. The non-convexity of the inviscid flux vector resulted in corresponding Jacobian matrices with undesirable properties. It has previously been shown by Powell et al. (1995) that an 'almost' equivalent MHD system in non-conservative form can be derived. This non-conservative system has a better conditioned eigensystem. Aside from Powell et al., the MHD equations can be derived from basic principles in either conservative or non-conservative form. The Delta x B = 0 constraint of the MHD equations is only an initial condition constraint, it is very different from the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in which the divergence condition is needed to close the system (i.e., to have the same number of equations and the same number of unknown). In the MHD formulations, if Delta x B = 0 initially, all one needs is to construct appropriate numerical schemes that preserve this constraint at later time evolutions. In other words, one does not need the Delta x B condition to close the MHD system. We formulate our new scheme together with the Cargo & Gallice (1997) form of the MHD approximate Riemann solver in curvilinear grids for both versions of the MHD equations. A novel feature of our new method is that the well-conditioned eigen-decomposition of the non-conservative MHD equations is used to solve the conservative equations. This new feature of the method provides well-conditioned eigenvectors for the conservative formulation, so that correct wave speeds for discontinuities are assured. The justification for using the non-conservative eigen-decomposition to solve the conservative equations is that our scheme has a better control of the numerical error associated with the divergence of the magnetic condition. Consequently, computing both forms of the equations with the same eigen-decomposition is almost equivalent. It will be shown that this approach, using the non-conservative eigensystem when

  19. The formation and evolution of a plasmoid flux rope using a global MHD simulation of an actual substorm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Nathan; Baker, Daniel N.; Wiltberger, Michael

    We present the results of a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a pair of substorms on August 11, 2002. Comparisons of data with simulation results reveal an agreement regarding the timing and sequence of events in the magnetosphere. We then present the results in the simulation of a plasmoid flux rope formed during the second substorm. Unlike standard 2-D depictions of reconnection and plasmoid release during a substorm, the simulation shows a highly complex structure that has considerable winding of both closed and open field lines. Additionally, the flux rope does not move tailward uniformly, but rather has a asymmetric motion in which the dawn flank portion moves tailward prior to the dusk end of the flux rope, resulting in a a skewed flux rope that runs almost downtail instead of crosstail. The flux rope structure begins on closed field lines, then progresses through open field lines and finally onto IMF field lines. Using the global simulation we can connect the large scale magnetotail reconfiguration with features on the auroral boundary of the model. The results shown here are in agreement with existing MHD tail simulations as well as flux rope observations from satellite data.

  20. Trapping solids at the inner edge of the dead zone: 3-D global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyurkevich, N.; Flock, M.; Turner, N. J.; Klahr, H.; Henning, Th.

    2010-06-01

    Context. The poorly-ionized interior of the protoplanetary disk or “dead zone” is the location where dust coagulation processes may be most efficient. However even here, planetesimal formation may be limited by the loss of solid material through radial drift, and by collisional fragmentation of the particles. Both depend on the turbulent properties of the gas. Aims: Our aim here is to investigate the possibility that solid particles are trapped at local pressure maxima in the dynamically evolving disk. We perform the first 3-D global non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations of a section of the disk treating the turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI). Methods: We use the ZeusMP code with a fixed Ohmic resistivity distribution. The domain contains an inner MRI-active region near the young star and an outer midplane dead zone, with the transition between the two modeled by a sharp increase in the magnetic diffusivity. Results: The azimuthal magnetic fields generated in the active zone oscillate over time, changing sign about every 150 years. We thus observe the radial structure of the “butterfly pattern” seen previously in local shearing-box simulations. The mean magnetic field diffuses from the active zone into the dead zone, where the Reynolds stress nevertheless dominates, giving a residual α between 10-4 and 10-3. The greater total accretion stress in the active zone leads to a net reduction in the surface density, so that after 800 years an approximate steady state is reached in which a local radial maximum in the midplane pressure lies near the transition radius. We also observe the formation of density ridges within the active zone. Conclusions: The dead zone in our models possesses a mean magnetic field, significant Reynolds stresses and a steady local pressure maximum at the inner edge, where the outward migration of planetary embryos and the efficient trapping of solid material are possible.

  1. Relativistic MHD simulations of core-collapse GRB jets: 3D instabilities and magnetic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Omer; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Relativistic jets are associated with extreme astrophysical phenomena, like the core collapse of massive stars in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the accretion on to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. It is generally accepted that these jets are powered electromagnetically, by the magnetized rotation of a central compact object (black hole or neutron star). However, how the jets produce the observed emission and survive the propagation for many orders of magnitude in distance without being disrupted by current-driven instabilities is the subject of active debate. We carry out time-dependent 3D relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of relativistic, Poynting-flux-dominated jets. The jets are launched self-consistently by the rotation of a strongly magnetized central object. This determines the natural degree of azimuthal magnetic field winding, a crucial factor that controls jet stability. We find that the jets are susceptible to two types of instability: (i) a global, external kink mode that grows on long time-scales. It bodily twists the jet, reducing its propagation velocity. We show analytically that in flat density profiles, like the ones associated with galactic cores, the external mode grows and may stall the jet. In the steep profiles of stellar envelopes the external kink weakens as the jet propagates outward. (ii) a local, internal kink mode that grows over short time-scales and causes small-angle magnetic reconnection and conversion of about half of the jet electromagnetic energy flux into heat. We suggest that internal kink instability is the main dissipation mechanism responsible for powering GRB prompt emission.

  2. Self-organisation in protoplanetary discs. Global, non-stratified Hall-MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, William; Lesur, Geoffroy; Ferreira, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Context. Recent observations have revealed organised structures in protoplanetary discs, such as axisymmetric rings or horseshoe concentrations, evocative of large-scale vortices. These structures are often interpreted as the result of planet-disc interactions. However, these discs are also known to be unstable to the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) which is believed to be one of the dominant angular momentum transport mechanism in these objects. It is therefore natural to ask whether the MRI itself could produce these structures without invoking planets. Aims: The nonlinear evolution of the MRI is strongly affected by the low ionisation fraction in protoplanetary discs. The Hall effect in particular, which is dominant in dense and weakly ionised parts of these objects, has been shown to spontaneously drive self-organising flows in local, shearing box simulations. Here, we investigate the behaviour of global MRI-unstable disc models dominated by the Hall effect and characterise their dynamics. Methods: We validated our implementation of the Hall effect into the PLUTO code with predictions from a spectral method in cylindrical geometry. We then performed 3D unstratified Hall-MHD simulations of Keplerian discs for a broad range of Hall, Ohmic, and ambipolar Elsasser numbers. Results: We confirm the transition from a turbulent to an organised state as the intensity of the Hall effect is increased. We observe the formation of zonal flows, their number depending on the available magnetic flux and on the intensity of the Hall effect. For intermediate Hall intensity, the flow self-organises into long-lived magnetised vortices. Neither the addition of a toroidal field nor Ohmic or ambipolar diffusion change this picture drastically in the range of parameters we have explored. Conclusions: Self-organisation by the Hall effect is a robust phenomenon in global non-stratified simulations. It is able to quench turbulent transport and spontaneously produce axisymmetric

  3. Nonequilibrium radiative hypersonic flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, J. S.; Surzhikov, S. T.

    2012-08-01

    Nearly all the required scientific disciplines for computational hypersonic flow simulation have been developed on the framework of gas kinetic theory. However when high-temperature physical phenomena occur beneath the molecular and atomic scales, the knowledge of quantum physics and quantum chemical-physics becomes essential. Therefore the most challenging topics in computational simulation probably can be identified as the chemical-physical models for a high-temperature gaseous medium. The thermal radiation is also associated with quantum transitions of molecular and electronic states. The radiative energy exchange is characterized by the mechanisms of emission, absorption, and scattering. In developing a simulation capability for nonequilibrium radiation, an efficient numerical procedure is equally important both for solving the radiative transfer equation and for generating the required optical data via the ab-initio approach. In computational simulation, the initial values and boundary conditions are paramount for physical fidelity. Precise information at the material interface of ablating environment requires more than just a balance of the fluxes across the interface but must also consider the boundary deformation. The foundation of this theoretic development shall be built on the eigenvalue structure of the governing equations which can be described by Reynolds' transport theorem. Recent innovations for possible aerospace vehicle performance enhancement via an electromagnetic effect appear to be very attractive. The effectiveness of this mechanism is dependent strongly on the degree of ionization of the flow medium, the consecutive interactions of fluid dynamics and electrodynamics, as well as an externally applied magnetic field. Some verified research results in this area will be highlighted. An assessment of all these most recent advancements in nonequilibrium modeling of chemical kinetics, chemical-physics kinetics, ablation, radiative exchange

  4. MODELING STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS THROUGH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF 3D-MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Mueller, Wolf-Christian

    2013-09-01

    Statistical properties of the Sun's photospheric turbulent magnetic field, especially those of the active regions (ARs), have been studied using the line-of-sight data from magnetograms taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and several other instruments. This includes structure functions and their exponents, flatness curves, and correlation functions. In these works, the dependence of structure function exponents ({zeta}{sub p}) of the order of the structure functions (p) was modeled using a non-intermittent K41 model. It is now well known that the ARs are highly turbulent and are associated with strong intermittent events. In this paper, we compare some of the observations from Abramenko et al. with the log-Poisson model used for modeling intermittent MHD turbulent flows. Next, we analyze the structure function data obtained from the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of homogeneous, incompressible 3D-MHD turbulence in three cases: sustained by forcing, freely decaying, and a flow initially driven and later allowed to decay (case 3). The respective DNS replicate the properties seen in the plots of {zeta}{sub p} against p of ARs. We also reproduce the trends and changes observed in intermittency in flatness and correlation functions of ARs. It is suggested from this analysis that an AR in the onset phase of a flare can be treated as a forced 3D-MHD turbulent system in its simplest form and that the flaring stage is representative of decaying 3D-MHD turbulence. It is also inferred that significant changes in intermittency from the initial onset phase of a flare to its final peak flaring phase are related to the time taken by the system to reach the initial onset phase.

  5. Three-Dimensional MHD Simulation of the Magnetosheath Plasma and Magnetic Field in the Presence of Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H. C.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wing, S.

    2001-12-01

    An accurate knowledge of the magnetosheath is essential for studies of the bow shock, magnetopause, and solar input into the magnetosphere. Gasdynamic models may not give sufficient accuracy whereas the cost/time constraints preclude running the 3-D MHD global simulations for numerous solar wind conditions. A 3-D magnetosheath MHD model is needed and presented as a viable alternative. The inner boundary of the model is the magnetopause, which has been previously determined from the pressure balance and exhibits a small indentation near the cusp regions. The initial position of the bow shock is taken from a gasdynamic model and subsequently adjusted when the magnetic field is included. The results of the gasdynamic and MHD models are compared with the following input parameters: the heat capacity ration γ = 2, the solar wind sonic Mach number, M∞ = 7, 9.81 (solar wind velocity v = 400 ; km ; s-1), temperature T = 105, 1.96 x 105 K, n = 10 ; cm-3, Bx = 10 \\cos θ \\cos φ ; nT, By = 10 \\cos θ sin φ ; nT, and Bz = 10 sin θ ; nT. There is a pronounced dawn-dusk asymmetry for both Mack numbers, and the presence of a strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field results in an equatorial belt of depressed depletion layer densities and plasma pressures between the cusp. The missing pressure is supplied by an equatorial band of enhanced magnetic field strengths. Near the subsolar point MHD densities fall to values 60% and 45 % of those in the gasdynamic models for M∞ = 9.81 and 7, resepctively. However, the standoff distance of bow shock increases significantly with stronger southward field component for low Mack numbers. By contrast, a standing shock wave attached to the the cusp becomes particularly noticeable for a strong dawn-dusk IMF orientation and high Mach numbers (M∞ = 9.81).

  6. Unsteady Flow of Radiating and Chemically Reacting MHD Micropolar Fluid in Slip-Flow Regime with Heat Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Dahab, S. M.; Mohamed, R. A.

    2013-11-01

    An analytical study of the problem of unsteady free convection with thermal radiation and heat generation on MHD micropolar fluid flow through a porous medium bounded by a semi-infinite vertical plate in a slip-flow regime has been presented. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to describe the radiation heat flux in the energy equation. The homogeneous chemical reaction of first order is accounted for in the mass diffusion equation. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicular on the porous surface absorbing micropolar fluid with a suction velocity varying with time. A perturbation technique is applied to obtain the expressions for the velocity, microrotation, temperature, and concentration distributions. Expressions for the skin-friction, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number are also obtained. The results are discussed graphically for different values of the parameters entered into the equations of the problem.

  7. 2D Radiation MHD K-shell Modeling of Single Wire Array Stainless Steel Experiments on the Z Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Chong, Y. K.; Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, K. G.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Many physical effects can produce unstable plasma behavior that affect K-shell emission from arrays. Such effects include: asymmetry in the initial density profile, asymmetry in power flow, thermal conduction at the boundaries, and non-uniform wire ablation. Here we consider how asymmetry in the radiation field also contributes to the generation of multidimensional plasma behavior that affects K-shell power and yield. To model this radiation asymmetry, we have incorporated into the MACH2 r-z MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE population kinetics based on radiation transport using multi-dimensional ray tracing. Such methodology is necessary for modeling the enhanced radiative cooling that occurs at the anode and cathode ends of the pinch during the run-in phase of the implosion. This enhanced radiative cooling is due to reduced optical depth at these locations producing an asymmetric flow of radiative energy that leads to substantial disruption of large initial diameter (>5 cm) pinches and drives 1D into 2D fluid (i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor like) flows. The impact of this 2D behavior on K-shell power and yield is investigated by comparing 1D and 2D model results with data obtained from a series of single wire array stainless steel experiments performed on the Z generator.

  8. Non-equilibrium Helium Ionization in an MHD Simulation of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11-18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed.

  9. Large Scale Earth's Bow Shock with Northern IMF as Simulated by PIC Code in Parallel with MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraka, Suleiman

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a 3D kinetic model (particle-in-cell, PIC) for the description of the large scale Earth's bow shock. The proposed version is stable and does not require huge or extensive computer resources. Because PIC simulations work with scaled plasma and field parameters, we also propose to validate our code by comparing its results with the available MHD simulations under same scaled solar wind (SW) and (IMF) conditions. We report new results from the two models. In both codes the Earth's bow shock position is found to be ≈14.8 R E along the Sun-Earth line, and ≈29 R E on the dusk side. Those findings are consistent with past in situ observations. Both simulations reproduce the theoretical jump conditions at the shock. However, the PIC code density and temperature distributions are inflated and slightly shifted sunward when compared to the MHD results. Kinetic electron motions and reflected ions upstream may cause this sunward shift. Species distributions in the foreshock region are depicted within the transition of the shock (measured ≈2 c/ ω pi for Θ Bn = 90° and M MS = 4.7) and in the downstream. The size of the foot jump in the magnetic field at the shock is measured to be (1.7 c/ ω pi ). In the foreshocked region, the thermal velocity is found equal to 213 km s-1 at 15 R E and is equal to 63 km s -1 at 12 R E (magnetosheath region). Despite the large cell size of the current version of the PIC code, it is powerful to retain macrostructure of planets magnetospheres in very short time, thus it can be used for pedagogical test purposes. It is also likely complementary with MHD to deepen our understanding of the large scale magnetosphere.

  10. Numerical simulation for the unsteady MHD flow and heat transfer of couple stress fluid over a rotating disk.

    PubMed

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Aziz, Shahnila; Khan, Nadeem Alam

    2014-01-01

    The present work is devoted to study the numerical simulation for unsteady MHD flow and heat transfer of a couple stress fluid over a rotating disk. A similarity transformation is employed to reduce the time dependent system of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) to ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The Runge-Kutta method and shooting technique are employed for finding the numerical solution of the governing system. The influences of governing parameters viz. unsteadiness parameter, couple stress and various physical parameters on velocity, temperature and pressure profiles are analyzed graphically and discussed in detail. PMID:24835274

  11. Numerical Simulation for the Unsteady MHD Flow and Heat Transfer of Couple Stress Fluid over a Rotating Disk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The present work is devoted to study the numerical simulation for unsteady MHD flow and heat transfer of a couple stress fluid over a rotating disk. A similarity transformation is employed to reduce the time dependent system of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) to ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The Runge-Kutta method and shooting technique are employed for finding the numerical solution of the governing system. The influences of governing parameters viz. unsteadiness parameter, couple stress and various physical parameters on velocity, temperature and pressure profiles are analyzed graphically and discussed in detail. PMID:24835274

  12. Identification and characterisation of small-scale heating events in the solar atmosphere from 3D MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Nuno; Haberreiter, Margit; Hansteen, Viggo; Schmutz, Werner

    2015-04-01

    We study the properties of the small-scale heating events in the solar atmosphere in the nano flare and micro flare energy scale using 3D MHD simulations. We put forward a method to identify and track the heating events in time to study their life times, frequency distributions and spectral signatures. These results aim to better understand the observations from future space missions such as the EUI and SPICE instruments onboard Solar Orbiter and improve our knowledge of the role of small-scale heating events in the heating of the corona.

  13. Simulation of ULF wave-modulated radiation belt electron precipitation during the 17 March 2013 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, T.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B.; Paral, J.; Halford, A.; Millan, R.; Usanova, M.

    2015-05-01

    Balloon-borne instruments detecting radiation belt precipitation frequently observe oscillations in the millihertz frequency range. Balloons measuring electron precipitation near the poles in the 100 keV to 2.5 MeV energy range, including the MAXIS, MINIS, and most recently the Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation belt Electron Losses balloon experiments, have observed this modulation at ULF wave frequencies. Although ULF waves in the magnetosphere are seldom directly linked to increases in electron precipitation since their oscillation periods are much larger than the gyroperiod and the bounce period of radiation belt electrons, test particle simulations show that this interaction is possible. Three-dimensional simulations of radiation belt electrons were performed to investigate the effect of ULF waves on precipitation. The simulations track the behavior of energetic electrons near the loss cone, using guiding center techniques, coupled with an MHD simulation of the magnetosphere, using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry code, during a coronal mass ejection (CME)-shock event on 17 March 2013. Results indicate that ULF modulation of precipitation occurs even without the presence of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, which are not resolved in the MHD simulation. The arrival of a strong CME-shock, such as the one simulated, disrupts the electric and magnetic fields in the magnetosphere and causes significant changes in both components of momentum, pitch angle, and L shell of radiation belt electrons, which may cause them to precipitate into the loss cone.

  14. MHD simulations of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn: Application to the Cassini mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Kenneth Calvin

    2001-08-01

    We have developed global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn motivated by the need to better understand the global structure and dynamics of the magnetospheres, their interaction with the solar wind and the plasma sources internal to them. The models are also used both as planning tools for the Cassini mission to Saturn and to give a global perspective to the measurements. Our model of Jupiter's magnetosphere is the first to include the Io mass loading region and to solve for the plasma flow in the inner magnetosphere. With the model we study the bow shock and magnetopause crossings made by Cassini and Galileo. In addition, we examine the field- aligned currents in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere with a height integrated ionospheric model coupled to the magnetosphere at the inner boundary. We find that the model describes the state of the magnetosphere at the time of Cassini quite well. The models of Saturn's magnetosphere that we present represent the first and only global models of the Kronian magnetosphere to date. With the models we study the effects of different source terms and different solar wind conditions on the configuration of the magnetosphere. Although simpler models are useful for understanding the relative roles of the icy satellite and Titan plasma sources and the configuration for different solar wind conditions, these models cannot fully account for the plasma in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn. The higher source rate gives good agreement with the mass densities measured by Voyager. For this case, we study the general structure of the magnetosphere as well as some applications of the model to the Cassini mission. We have examined the plasma environment at the satellites of Saturn, provided information about the plasma ram direction and extracted data from the model along the Cassini tour. We have carried out two simulations of the two-body, coupled Saturn-Titan system with Titan in super-fast magnetosonic

  15. Tail current surge: New insights from a global MHD simulation and comparison with satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Shin-Ichi; Raeder, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The present study examines the tailward propagation of substorm-associated variations of the tail current intensity. In the substorm event of 24 November 1996, the Interball and IMP 8 satellites were located in the midnight sector at X = -26 and -36 RE, respectively, and observed an increase and a decrease of the lobe magnetic field strength corresponding to the storage and release of the lobe magnetic energy. Both spacecraft observed BZ to decrease initially and then increase in the course of the decrease in ∣BX∣, a feature that was reported previously as a manifestation of the tailward expansion of the current disruption region. The delay of the signatures between the two satellites confirms that the associated current system moved tailward. Motivated by this fortuitous coordination of the satellite observation, the present study revisits a global MHD simulation previously conducted specifically for this substorm event [, 2001]. The most noticeable feature of the modeled tail dynamics is the repeated occurrence of tail current surges, that is, temporal intensifications of the tail current that propagate tailward. The first tail current surge is accompanied by the stretching of the tail magnetic field, which starts in the inner magnetosphere and extends tailward. The associated tailward flow redistributes the plasma pressure in such a way that the tail current is reduced in its intensity in the near-Earth region, while the pressure gradient increases at the propagation front, which intensifies the local current. The last major tail current surge is caused by the near-Earth reconnection. Inside a plasmoid, the pressure gradient current is intensified on the tailward side of the O-line, and it propagates tailward as the plasmoid grows and is released. For each tail current surge, irrespective of its cause, the intensification of the tail current is followed by the reduction, and its tailward propagation creates the aforementioned phase relationship between BX

  16. Interpretation of the Time-Intensity Profile of the 15 March 2013 Solar Energetic Particle Event with Global MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunkett, S. P.; Wu, C.; Liou, K.; Vourlidas, A.; Dryer, Ph. D., M.; Wu, S.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The coronal mass ejection (CME) event on March 15, 2013 is one of the few solar events in cycle 24 that produced a large solar energetic particle (SEP) event and severe geomagnetic activity. SEP observations from the ACE spacecraft show a complex time-intensity profile that is not easily understood with current SEP theories. In this study, we employ a global three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation to help interpret the observations. The simulation is based on the H3DMHD code and incorporates extrapolations of photospheric magnetic field as the inner boundary condition at 2.5 solar radii (Rs). A Gaussian-shaped velocity pulse is imposed at the inner boundary as a proxy of the CME. It is found that the time-intensity profile of the high-energy (> 10MeV) SEPs can be explained by the evolution of the CME-driven shock and its interaction with the heliospheric current sheet and the non-uniform solar wind. Specifically, we demonstrate that the shock Mach number at the well-connected shock location is correlated (r ≥ 0.8) with the concurrent proton SEP fluxes with energies greater than 10 and 30 MeV. This study demonstrates that global MHD simulation, despite the limitation implied by its physics-based ideal fluid continuum assumption, can be a useful tool for SEP data analysis.

  17. X-Ray Spectra from MHD Simulations of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Noble, Scott C.; Krolik, Julian H.

    2011-01-01

    We present new global calculations of X-ray spectra from fully relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic (MHO) simulations of black hole (BH) accretion disks. With a self consistent radiative transfer code including Compton scattering and returning radiation, we can reproduce the predominant spectral features seen in decades of X-ray observations of stellar-mass BHs: a broad thermal peak around 1 keV, power-law continuum up to >100 keV, and a relativistically broadened iron fluorescent line. By varying the mass accretion rate, different spectral states naturally emerge: thermal-dominant, steep power-law, and low/hard. In addition to the spectral features, we briefly discuss applications to X-ray timing and polarization.

  18. Numerical simulation of flare energy build-up and release via Joule dissipation. [solar MHD model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Bao, J. J.; Wang, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    A new numerical MHD model is developed to study the evolution of an active region due to photospheric converging motion, which leads to magnetic-energy buildup in the form of electric current. Because this new MHD model has incorporated finite conductivity, the energy conversion occurs from magnetic mode to thermal mode through Joule dissipation. In order to test the causality relationship between the occurrence of flare and photospheric motion, a multiple-pole configuration with neutral point is used. Using these results it is found that in addition to the converging motion, the initial magnetic-field configuration and the redistribution of the magnetic flux at photospheric level enhance the possibility for the development of a flare.

  19. A Three-Dimensional MHD Simulation of the Solar Wind for a Tilted-Dipole Magnetic Field on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2007-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional MHD model, we simulate the global steady-state structure of the solar corona and solar wind for a dipole magnetic field on the Sun inclined by 30 degrees to the solar rotation axis. This represents the solar conditions typical for a declining phase of solar cycle. The computations can extend from the coronal base out to 100-AU and at large heliospheric distances includes the effects of interstellar neutral hydrogen and their interaction with solar wind protons. The simulations can model the formation of corotating interaction regions and the heliospheric current sheet. The simulations are also capable of describing very strong rarefaction regions that include embedded sub-Alfvenic regions that form on the trailing edge of a fast flows.

  20. Zero-beta MHD simulations of a solar eruption driven by a solar wind in the corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwanhee; Magara, Tetsuya; Kang, Jihye

    2016-05-01

    Solar winds always exist in the corona, continuously carrying out magnetized plasmas from the solar surface toward the interplanetary space. We assume that a solar wind also plays an important role in producing a solar eruption. To confirm this hypothesis, we construct a solar eruption model in which a solar wind upflow is imposed at the top boundary of three-dimensional zero-beta magnetogydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The initial magnetic field is given by nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) reconstruction that is applied to the surface field provided by a flux emergence simulation. The simulation demonstrates that a solar eruption occurs due to the imbalance between magnetic pressure gradient force and magnetic tension force caused by a solar wind that gradually transports the envelope flux outward. This result provides important insights into the role of solar winds in producing solar eruptions.

  1. Time Dependent MHD Nano-Second Grade Fluid Flow Induced by Permeable Vertical Sheet with Mixed Convection and Thermal Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ramzan, Muhammad; Bilal, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of present paper is to study the series solution of time dependent MHD second grade incompressible nanofluid towards a stretching sheet. The effects of mixed convection and thermal radiation are also taken into account. Because of nanofluid model, effects Brownian motion and thermophoresis are encountered. The resulting nonlinear momentum, heat and concentration equations are simplified using appropriate transformations. Series solutions have been obtained for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle fraction profiles using Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM). Convergence of the acquired solution is discussed critically. Behavior of velocity, temperature and concentration profiles on the prominent parameters is depicted and argued graphically. It is observed that temperature and concentration profiles show similar behavior for thermophoresis parameter Νt but opposite tendency is noted in case of Brownian motion parameter Νb. It is further analyzed that suction parameter S and Hartman number Μ depict decreasing behavior on velocity profile. PMID:25962063

  2. Time Dependent MHD Nano-Second Grade Fluid Flow Induced by Permeable Vertical Sheet with Mixed Convection and Thermal Radiation.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, Muhammad; Bilal, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of present paper is to study the series solution of time dependent MHD second grade incompressible nanofluid towards a stretching sheet. The effects of mixed convection and thermal radiation are also taken into account. Because of nanofluid model, effects Brownian motion and thermophoresis are encountered. The resulting nonlinear momentum, heat and concentration equations are simplified using appropriate transformations. Series solutions have been obtained for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle fraction profiles using Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM). Convergence of the acquired solution is discussed critically. Behavior of velocity, temperature and concentration profiles on the prominent parameters is depicted and argued graphically. It is observed that temperature and concentration profiles show similar behavior for thermophoresis parameter Νt but opposite tendency is noted in case of Brownian motion parameter Νb. It is further analyzed that suction parameter S and Hartman number Μ depict decreasing behavior on velocity profile. PMID:25962063

  3. MHD-based modeling of radiation and polarization signatures of blazar emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Observations have shown that sometimes strong multiwavelength flares are accompanied by drastic polarization variations, indicating active participation of magnetic fields during flares. We have developed a 3D numerical tool set of magnetohydrodynamics, Fokker-Planck particle evolution, and polarization-dependent radiation transfer codes. This allows us to study the snap-shot spectra, multiwavelength light curves, and time-dependent optical polarization signatures self-consistently. We have made a simultaneous fit of a multiwavelength flare with 180 degree polarization angle swing of the blazar 3C279 reported by Abdo et al. 2010. Our work has shown that this event requires an increase in the nonthermal particles, a decrease in the magnetic field strength, and a change in the magnetic field structure. We conclude that this event is likely due to a shock-initiated magnetic reconnection in an emission environment with relatively strong magnetic energy. We have performed magnetrohydrodynamic simulations to support this statement. Our simulations have found that the blazar emission region may be strongly magnetized. In this situation, polarization angle swings are likely to be correlated with strong gamma-ray flares.

  4. Four-fluid MHD Simulations of the Plasma and Neutral Gas Environment of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko Near Perihelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T.; Jia, X.; Rubin, M.; Fougere, N.; Tenishev, V.; Combi, M.; Bieler, A.; Hansen, K.; Shou, Y.; Altwegg, K.

    2015-10-01

    We develop a 3-D four fluid model to study the plasma environment of comet Churyumov- Gerasimenko (CG), which is the target of the Rosetta mission. Our model is based on BATS-R-US within the SWMF (Space Weather Modeling Framework) that solves the governing multifluid MHD equations and and the Euler equations for the neutral gas fluid. These equations describe the behavior and interactions of the cometary heavy ions, the solar wind protons, the electrons, and the neutrals. This model incorporates mass loading processes, including photo and electron impact ionization, furthermore taken into account are charge exchange, dissociative ion-electron recombination, as well as collisional interactions between different fluids. We simulate the near nucleus plasma and neutral gas environment with a realistic shape model of CG near perihelion and compare our simulation results with Rosetta observations.

  5. Hybrid MHD/particle simulation study of sub-cyclotron Alfvén Eigenmodes in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestz, Jeff; Belova, Elena; Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2015-11-01

    Low toroidal mode number, high frequency compressional (CAE) and global (GAE) Alfvén Eigenmodes are often driven unstable by super-Alfvénic beam ions in NSTX. These modes have been identified as part of an energy channeling mechanism that may explain observed anomalous electron temperature profile flattening in beam-heated NSTX discharges. 3D hybrid simulations using the HYM code are conducted to study the excitation and stability properties of such CAE and GAE modes in NSTX and NSTX-like plasmas. HYM allows for the self-consistent simulation of these modes with a delta-f particle treatment of the energetic beam ions coupled to a single fluid resistive MHD model of the thermal plasma. Particular attention is paid to the sensitivity of CAE/GAE excitation on parametric changes in the equilibrium beam ion distribution function, among other factors.

  6. Experimental Study and Simulation of W7-AS Transient MHD Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Pokol, G.; Papp, G.; Por, G.; Zoletnik, S.; Weller, A.

    2008-03-19

    Transient MHD modes present in pure ECRH W7-AS plasmas have been shown to be in correlation with transient transport events (ELM-like modes). Here the spatial structure of the individual transients is analyzed using short-time Fourier transform and continuous analytical wavelet transform based techniques. Processing of Mirnov coil data partly confirms the properties derived from earlier, simpler analyses. Theoretical explanation of the properties of these modes (spatial structure and rapid damping) is attempted by models based involving drift-Alfven turbulence or shear Alfven waves.

  7. Three-dimensional MHD simulation of two coronal mass ejections' propagation and interaction using a successive magnetized plasma blobs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, F.; Feng, X. S.; Wang, Yuming; Wu, S. T.; Song, W. B.; Guo, J. P.; Zhou, Y. F.

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D), time-dependent, numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is used to investigate the evolution and interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the nonhomogeneous ambient solar wind. The background solar wind is constructed on the basis of the self-consistent source surface with observed line of sight of magnetic field and density from the source surface of 2.5 Rs to Earth's orbit (215 Rs) and beyond. The two successive CMEs occurring on 28 March 2001 and forming a multiple magnetic cloud in interplanetary space are chosen as a test case, in which they are simulated by means of a two high-density, high-velocity, and high-temperature magnetized plasma blobs model, and are successively ejected into the nonhomogeneous background solar wind medium along different initial launch directions. The dynamical propagation and interaction of the two CMEs between 2.5 and 220 Rs are investigated. Our simulation results show that, although the two CMEs are separated by 10 h, the second CME is able to overtake the first one and cause compound interactions and an obvious acceleration of the shock. At the L1 point near Earth the two resultant magnetic clouds in our simulation are consistent with the observations by ACE. In this validation study we find that this 3-D MHD model, with the self-consistent source surface as the initial boundary condition and the magnetized plasma blob as the CME model, is able to reproduce and explain some of the general characters of the multiple magnetic clouds observed by satellite.

  8. Toward understanding the Sun-to-Earth evolution of the 2012 July 12-16 Coronal Mass Ejection Using Three-dimensional MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, F.; Feng, X.; Shen, C.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic process of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the heliosphere is the key information for us to evaluate the CMEs' geo-effectiveness and to improve the accurate prediction of CME induced Shock Arrival Time (SAT) at Earth's environment. We present a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the evolution of the CME in a realistic ambient solar wind for the July 12-16, 2012 event by using the 3D COIN-TVD MHD code. The influence of the background solar wind speed to the SAT is analyzed. The influence of the initial position and polarity of the plasma blob to IMF Bz is also studied. In the validation study of this CME event (July 12-16, 2012), we find that this 3D COIN-TVD MHD model, with the magnetized plasma blob as CME model, provide a relatively satisfactory comparison with the ACE spacecraft observations at the L1 point.

  9. Interaction of dipolarization fronts within multiple bursty bulk flows in global MHD simulations of a substorm on 27 February 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Y. S.; Raeder, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Gilson, M. L.; Runov, A.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a global MHD simulation of a well-studied substorm on 27 February 2009 (Runov et al., 2009) to understand the generation and large-scale evolution of dipolarization fronts within bursty bulk flows (BBFs). Conjugate, well-positioned Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms (THEMIS) observations from space and ground observatories provide significant constraints to the simulation model. The main substorm onset auroral brightening, at 0749 UT, was in the field of view of Fort Smith (FSMI), just poleward of a preexisting auroral arc. Two minutes later, the space probes recorded a sharp dipolarization front moving sunward, passing by THEMIS and traversing ˜10 RE along the magnetotail. Our global MHD model, OpenGGCM, driven by real-time solar wind/interplanetary magnetic field conditions, is able to reproduce the key features of these signatures. We show that the auroral breakup is caused by the strong flow shear and the flow vortices formed by the BBF flows. Rebound oscillations of the intruding BBF (consistent with recent observations by Panov et al. (2010a)) and filamentation of the front into 1 RE size undulations are superimposed on the flow pattern. Further investigation of the interaction of the BBF and the dipolarization fronts (DFs) reveals that an observed bipolar Bz signature ahead of the DF is due to the interaction between two distinct plasmas emanating from multiple X lines: antisunward-moving flux tubes from a reconnection region at ˜13 RE and sunward-moving dipolarization region within a BBF from a midtail reconnection region at ˜23 RE.

  10. Type II solar radio bursts predicted by 3-D MHD CME and kinetic radio emission simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2014-01-01

    Impending space weather events at Earth are often signaled by type II solar radio bursts. These bursts are generated upstream of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that move away from the Sun. We combine elaborate three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic predictions of realistic CMEs near the Sun with a recent analytic kinetic radiation theory in order to simulate two type II bursts. Magnetograms of the Sun are used to reconstruct initial solar magnetic and active region fields for the modeling. STEREO spacecraft data are used to dimension the flux rope of the initial CME, launched into an empirical data-driven corona and solar wind. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for the two type II bursts observed by the Wind spacecraft on 15 February 2011 and 7 March 2012. Propagation of the simulated CME-driven shocks through coronal plasmas containing preexisting density and magnetic field structures that stem from the coronal setup and CME initiation closely reproduce the isolated islands of type II emission observed. These islands form because of a competition between the growth of the radio source due to spherical expansion and a fragmentation of the radio source due to increasingly radial fields in the nose region of the shock and interactions with streamers in the flank regions of the shock. Our study provides strong support for this theory for type II bursts and implies that the physical processes involved are understood. It also supports a near-term capability to predict and track these events for space weather predictions.