Science.gov

Sample records for radiatively important gases

  1. EVALUATION OF SIGNIFICANT ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES OF RADIATIVELY IMPORTANT TRACE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an initial evaluation of significant anthropogenic sources of radiatively important trace gases. missions of greenhouse gases from human activities--including fossil fuel combustion, industrial/agricultural activities, and transportation--contribute to the increasin...

  2. NATIONAL- AND STATE-LEVEL EMISSIONS ESTIMATES OF RADIATIVELY IMPORTANT TRACE GASES (RITGS) FROM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the development of national- and state- level emissions estimates of radiatively important trace gases (RlTGs). Emissions estimates are presented for the principal anthropogenic sources of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and o...

  3. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  4. Greenhouse gases dissolved in soil solution - often ignored, but important?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Daniel; Brueggemann, Nicolas; Puetz, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    Flux measurements of climate-relevant trace gases from soils are frequently undertaken in contemporary ecosystem studies and substantially contribute to our understanding of greenhouse gas balances of the biosphere. While the great majority of such investigations builds on closed chamber and eddy covariance measurements, where upward gas fluxes to the atmosphere are measured, fewest concurrently consider greenhouse gas dissolution in the seepage and leaching of dissolved gases via the vadose zone to the groundwater. Here we present annual leaching losses of dissolved N2O and CO2 from arable, grassland, and forest lysimeter soils from three sites differing in altitude and climate. We aim to assess their importance in comparison to direct N2O emission, soil respiration, and further leaching parameters of the C- and N cycle. The lysimeters are part of the Germany-wide lysimeter network initiative TERENO-SoilCan, which investigates feedbacks of climate change to the pedosphere on a long-term scale. Soil water samples were collected weekly from different depths of the profiles by means of suction cups. A laboratory pre-experiment proved that no degassing occurred under those sampling conditions. We applied the headspace equilibration technique to determine dissolved gas concentrations by gas chromatography. The seepage water of all lysimeters was consistently supersaturated with N2O and CO2 compared to water equilibrated ambient air. In terms of N2O, leaching losses increased in the ascending order forest, grassland, and arable soils, respectively. In case of the latter soils, we observed a strong variability of N2O, with dissolved concentrations up to 23 ?g N L-1. However, since seepage discharge of the arable lysimeters was comparatively small and mostly limited to the hydrological winter season, leached N2O appeared to be less important than direct N2O emissions. In terms of dissolved CO2,our measurements revealed considerable leaching losses from the mountainous forest and grassland soils, based on concentrations up to 24 mg C L-1 and high seepage discharge. Such losses turned out to be similarly important like soil respiration, particularly during winter when temperature-dependent soil respiration declined. In conclusion, the results of the first year of our measurements provide evidence that dissolved greenhouse gases should be considered in studies which aim to assess full greenhouse gas balances, particularly in ecosystems where hydrological conditions favour microbial activity and high leaching losses.

  5. Handbook of infrared radiation from combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Reardon, J. E.; Thomson, J. A. L.; Goulard, R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The treatment of radiant emission and absorption by combustion gases are discussed. Typical applications include: (1) rocket combustion chambers and exhausts, (2) turbojet engines and exhausts, and (3) industrial furnaces. Some mention is made of radiant heat transfer problems in planetary atmospheres, in stellar atmospheres, and in reentry plasmas. Particular consideration is given to the temperature range from 500K to 3000K and the pressure range from 0.001 atmosphere to 30 atmospheres. Strong emphasis is given to the combustion products of hydrocarbon fuels with oxygen, specifically to carbon dioxide, water vapor, and carbon monoxide. In addition, species such as HF, HC1, CN, OH, and NO are treated.

  6. Collisional-Radiative Kinetics in Monatomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hai; Karagozian, Ann

    2012-11-01

    A detailed model of electronic excited states is essential in capturing all the nonequilibrium processes of a partially ionized plasma by means of collisional and radiative interactions. This collisional-radiative (CR) model allows us to consider deviations from equilibrium distribution of the internal states, and is now more commonly used in the study of plasma discharges. Prior studies by Kapper and Cambier and Panesi et al. suggest that this level of detail is needed for an accurate prediction of the flow field, and it is particularly relevant to plasma-combustion interactions. The required number of excited states needed to be included in the CR model is often prohibitively large due to the nonequilibrium condition of the plasma. The consequence is a large system of ODE's which needs to be solved at each time step. A reduced mechanism for the CR model can be attained by grouping the upper states of the atomic state distribution (ASDF) into a pseudo-level in which the population is characterized either by a uniform distribution or a Boltzmann distribution. This talk presents both detailed and reduced models for an ionizing shock in Argon. Supported by the US Air Force/ERC, Inc. under subcontract RS111738.

  7. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value. PMID:26827362

  8. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  9. Radiative Importance of Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol particles are input into the troposphere by biomass burning, among other sources. These aerosol palls cover large expanses of the earth's surface. Aerosols may directly scatter solar radiation back to space, thus increasing the earth's albedo and act to cool the earth's surface and atmosphere. Aerosols also contribute to the earth's energy balance indirectly. Hygroscopic aerosol act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus affects cloud properties. In 1977, Twomey theorized that additional available CCN would create smaller but more numerous cloud droplets in a cloud with a given amount of liquid water. This in turn would increase the cloud albedo which would scatter additional radiation back to space and create a similar cooling pattern as the direct aerosol effect. Estimates of the magnitude of the aerosol indirect effect on a global scale range from 0.0 to -4.8 W/sq m. Thus the indirect effect can be of comparable magnitude and opposite in sign to the estimates of global greenhouse gas forcing Aerosol-cloud interaction is not a one-way process. Just as aerosols have an influence on clouds through the cloud microphysics, clouds have an influence on aerosols. Cloud droplets are solutions of liquid water and CCN, now dissolved. When the cloud droplet evaporates it leaves behind an aerosol particle. This new particle does not have to have the same properties as the original CCN. In fact, studies show that aerosol particles that result from cloud processing are larger in size than the original CCN. Optical properties of aerosol particles are dependent on the size of the particles. Larger particles have a smaller backscattering fraction, and thus less incoming solar radiation will be backscattered to space if the aerosol particles are larger. Therefore, we see that aerosols and clouds modify each other to influence the radiative balance of the earth. Understanding and quantifying the spatial and seasonal patterns of the aerosol indirect forcing may have even greater consequences. Presently we know that through the use of fossil fuel and land-use changes we have increased the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In parallel, we have seen a modest increase of global temperature in the last century. These two observations have been linked as cause and effect by climate models, but this connection is still experimentally not verified. The spatial and seasonal distribution of aerosol forcing is different from that of greenhouse gases, thus generating a different spatial fingerprint of climate change. This fingerprint was suggested as a method to identify the response of the climate system to anthropogenic forcing of greenhouse gases and aerosol. The aerosol fingerprint may be the only way to firmly establish the presence (or absence) of human impact on climate. Aerosol-cloud interaction through the indirect effect will be an important component of establishing this fingerprint.

  10. Radiative precursors driven by converging blast waves in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Swadling, G. F.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hall, G. N.; Khoory, E.; Pickworth, L.; Bland, S. N.; Grouchy, P. de; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Bennett, M.; Niasse, N. P. L.; Williams, R. J. R.; Blesener, K.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A.; Hoyt, C.; Potter, W.; and others

    2014-03-15

    A detailed study of the radiative precursor that develops ahead of converging blast waves in gas-filled cylindrical liner z-pinch experiments is presented. The experiment is capable of magnetically driving 20 km s{sup −1} blast waves through gases of densities of the order 10{sup −5} g cm{sup −3} (see Burdiak et al. [High Energy Density Phys. 9(1), 52–62 (2013)] for a thorough description). Data were collected for Ne, Ar, and Xe gas-fills. The geometry of the setup allows a determination of the plasma parameters both in the precursor and across the shock, along a nominally uniform line of sight that is perpendicular to the propagation of the shock waves. Radiation from the shock was able to excite NeI, ArII, and XeII/XeIII precursor spectral features. It is shown that the combination of interferometry and optical spectroscopy data is inconsistent with upstream plasmas being in LTE. Specifically, electron density gradients do not correspond to any apparent temperature change in the emission spectra. Experimental data are compared to 1D radiation hydrodynamics HELIOS-CR simulations and to PrismSPECT atomic physics calculations to assist in a physical interpretation of the observations. We show that upstream plasma is likely in the process of being radiatively heated and that the emission from a small percentage of ionised atoms within a cool background plasma dominates the emission spectra. Experiments were carried out on the MAGPIE and COBRA pulsed-power facilities at Imperial College London and Cornell University, respectively.

  11. Radiative precursors driven by converging blast waves in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Swadling, G. F.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hall, G. N.; Khoory, E.; Pickworth, L.; Bland, S. N.; de Grouchy, P.; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.; Bennett, M.; Niasse, N. P. L.; Williams, R. J. R.; Blesener, K.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A.; Hoyt, C.; Potter, W.; Rosenberg, E.; Schrafel, P.; Kusse, B.

    2014-03-01

    A detailed study of the radiative precursor that develops ahead of converging blast waves in gas-filled cylindrical liner z-pinch experiments is presented. The experiment is capable of magnetically driving 20 km s-1 blast waves through gases of densities of the order 10-5 g cm-3 (see Burdiak et al. [High Energy Density Phys. 9(1), 52-62 (2013)] for a thorough description). Data were collected for Ne, Ar, and Xe gas-fills. The geometry of the setup allows a determination of the plasma parameters both in the precursor and across the shock, along a nominally uniform line of sight that is perpendicular to the propagation of the shock waves. Radiation from the shock was able to excite NeI, ArII, and XeII/XeIII precursor spectral features. It is shown that the combination of interferometry and optical spectroscopy data is inconsistent with upstream plasmas being in LTE. Specifically, electron density gradients do not correspond to any apparent temperature change in the emission spectra. Experimental data are compared to 1D radiation hydrodynamics HELIOS-CR simulations and to PrismSPECT atomic physics calculations to assist in a physical interpretation of the observations. We show that upstream plasma is likely in the process of being radiatively heated and that the emission from a small percentage of ionised atoms within a cool background plasma dominates the emission spectra. Experiments were carried out on the MAGPIE and COBRA pulsed-power facilities at Imperial College London and Cornell University, respectively.

  12. A Hypothesis on Biological Protection from Space Radiation Through the Use of Therapeutic Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation proposes a hypothesis to use therapeutic gases in space to enhance the biological protection for astronauts from space radiation. The fundamental role in how radiation causes biological damage appears to be radiolysis, the dissociation of water by radiation. A chain of events appears to cause molecular and biological transformations that ultimately manifest into medical diseases. The hypothesis of this work is that applying medical gases may increase resistance to radiation, by possessing the chemical properties that effectively improve the radical scavenging and enhance bond repair and to induce biological processes which enhance and support natural resistance and repair mechanisms.

  13. A Hypothesis on Biological Protection from Space Radiation Through the Use of New Therapeutic Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Wink, David

    2011-01-01

    Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is the biological damage it induces. As damage is associated with increased oxidative stress, it is important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as both chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and biological signaling molecules for management of the body s response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it is concluded that this approach may have great therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson s and Alzheimer s disease, cataracts, and aging.

  14. A Hypothesis on Biological Protection from Space Radiation Through the Use of New Therapeutic Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Ansari,Rafat R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Wink, David

    2011-01-01

    Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is the biological damage it induces. As damage is associated with increased oxidative stress, it is important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as both chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and biological signaling molecules for management of the body s response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it is concluded that this approach may have great therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including, cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, parkinson s and alzheimer s disease, cataracts, and aging

  15. Radiative Forcing by Long-Lived Greenhouse Gases: Calculations with the AER Radiative Transfer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, William; Iacono, Michael J.; Delamere, Jennifer S.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shephard, Mark W.; Clough, Shepard A.; Collins, William D.

    2008-04-01

    A primary component of the observed, recent climate change is the radiative forcing from increased concentrations of long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs). Effective simulation of anthropogenic climate change by general circulation models (GCMs) is strongly dependent on the accurate representation of radiative processes associated with water vapor, ozone and LLGHGs. In the context of the increasing application of the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) radiation models within the GCM community, their capability to calculate longwave and shortwave radiative forcing for clear sky scenarios previously examined by the radiative transfer model intercomparison project (RTMIP) is presented. Forcing calculations with the AER line-by-line (LBL) models are very consistent with the RTMIP line-by-line results in the longwave and shortwave. The AER broadband models, in all but one case, calculate longwave forcings within a range of -0.20 to 0.23 W m{sup -2} of LBL calculations and shortwave forcings within a range of -0.16 to 0.38 W m{sup -2} of LBL results. These models also perform well at the surface, which RTMIP identified as a level at which GCM radiation models have particular difficulty reproducing LBL fluxes. Heating profile perturbations calculated by the broadband models generally reproduce high-resolution calculations within a few hundredths K d{sup -1} in the troposphere and within 0.15 K d{sup -1} in the peak stratospheric heating near 1 hPa. In most cases, the AER broadband models provide radiative forcing results that are in closer agreement with high 20 resolution calculations than the GCM radiation codes examined by RTMIP, which supports the application of the AER models to climate change research.

  16. Radiative interactions in molecular gases under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Jha, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to investigate radiative heat interactions in diatomic and polyatomic gases under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Essential governing equations are presented for both gray and nongray gases. Information is provided on absorption models, relaxation times, and transfer equations. Radiative flux equations are developed which are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The problem is solved for fully developed laminar incompressible flows between two parallel plates under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For specific applications, three diatomic and three polyatomic gases are considered. The results are obtained numerically by employing the method of variation of parameters. The results are compared under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions at different temperature and pressure conditions. Both gray and nongray studies are conducted extensively for all molecular gases considered. The particular gases selected for this investigation are CO, NO, OH, CO2, H2O, and CH4. The temperature and pressure range considered are 300-2000 K and 0.1-10 atmosphere, respectively. In general, results demonstrate that the gray gas approximation overestimates the effect of radiative interaction for all conditions. The conditions of NLTE, however, result in underestimation of radiative interactions. The method developed for this study can be extended to solve complex problems of radiative heat transfer involving nonequilibrium phenomena.

  17. Thermal interaction of high-power laser radiation with gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloukhin, R. I.; Martynenko, O. G.; Galich, N. E.

    1980-12-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the thermal interaction of laser radiation with a medium at rest and with a medium in co- and counter-current flow over the path traversed by radiation. The operation of a gas lens for focusing high-power laser radiation is investigated for the case when radiation-induced heat generation makes an additional contribution to the temperature nonuniformity. Conditions required for the self-focusing of stationary Gaussian and circular beams, the intensity of which decreases toward the beam center, are examined. The dynamics of thermal and optical processes in the case of 'banana' self-focusing is considered.

  18. Principals Of Radiation Toxicology: Important Aspects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    “All things are poison, and nothing is without poison; only the dose permits something not to be poisonous.” Paracelsus Key Words: Radiation Toxins (RT), Radiation Toxicants (RTc), Radiation Poisons (RP), Radiation Exposure (RE), Radiation Toxicology is the science about radiation poisons. [D.Popov et al. 2012,J.Zhou et al. 2007,] Radiation Toxins is a specific proteins with high enzymatic activity produced by living irradiated mammals. [D.Popov et al. 2012,] Radiation Toxicants is a substances that produce radiomimetics effects, adverse biological effects which specific for radiation. [D.Popov et al. 2012,] Radiation Toxic agent is specific proteins that can produce pathological biological effects specific for physical form of radiation.[D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev 2007] Different Toxic Substances isolated from cells or from blood or lymph circulation. [Kudriashov I. et al. 1970, D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev et al. 2007,] Radiation Toxins may affects many organs or specific organ, tissue, specific group of cells. [Kudriashov I. et al. 1970, D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev et al. 2007] For example: Radiation Toxins could induce collective toxic clinical states to include: systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS),toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMODS),and finally, toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). [T. Azizova et al. 2005, Konchalovsky et al., 2005, D. Popov et al 2012] However, Radiation Toxins could induce specific injury of organs or tissue and induce Acute Radiation Syndromes such as Acute Radiation Cerebrovascular Syndrome, Acute Radiation Cardiovascular Syndrome, Acute Radiation Hematopoietic Syndrome, Acute Radiation GastroIntestinal Syndrome. [ D.Popov et al. 1990, 2012, V. Maliev et al. 2007] Radiation Toxins correlates with Radiation Exposure and the dose-response relationship is a fundamental and essential concept in classic Toxicology and Radiation Toxicology.[ D.Popov et al. 1990, 2012] Moderate and high doses of radiation induces necrosis of radiosensitive cells with the subsequent formation of radiation toxins and their induced acute inflammatory processes. Radiation necrosis is the most substantial and most severe form of radiation induced injury, and when widespread, has grave therapeutic implications. [D. Popov et al. 1990, 2012,Claudio A. et al. 2002, Robertson J. et al. 2002, ] Relatively small doses of Radiation Toxins induce apoptosis and high doses of Radiation Toxins induce necrosis. [Rastogi P. et al. 2009, D. Popov et al. 1990, 2012,] Threshold of Toxic Effects occurs and can be defined. [D. Popov et al. 2012, ] Radiation Toxins affects Somatic cells and Germ Cells. Radiation Toxins can induce teratogenic processes. Specific Toxicity of Radiation Toxins can affects developing fetus. Material and Methods, Results: http://www.intechopen.com/books/current-topics-in-ionizing-radiation-research/radiation-toxins-molecular-mechanisms-of-toxicity-and-radiomimetic-properties- Conclusion: Radiation is a physical agent - induce activation of some secretory proteins with high enzymatic activity. This proteins called as Radiation Toxins can produce specific for radiation biological and toxic effects after administration to radiation naive mammals. [V. Maliev et al. 2007, D. Popov et al. 1990, 2012] Radiation Toxins are teratogenic and oncogenic. Radiation Toxins effects depend on Administered Dose and Radiation effects depend on Exposure Dose and Absorbed Dose. The levels of Radiation Toxins correlates with Radiation Exposure.

  19. A hypothesis on biological protection from space radiation through the use of new therapeutic gases as medical counter measures.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Michael P; Ansari, Rafat R; Nakao, Atsunori; Wink, David

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is biological damage that is associated with increased oxidative stress. It is therefore important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and as biological signaling molecules for management of the body's response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it can be concluded that this approach may have therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, cataracts, and aging. We envision applying these therapies through inhalation of gas mixtures or ingestion of water with dissolved gases. PMID:22475015

  20. A hypothesis on biological protection from space radiation through the use of new therapeutic gases as medical counter measures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is biological damage that is associated with increased oxidative stress. It is therefore important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and as biological signaling molecules for management of the body's response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it can be concluded that this approach may have therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, cataracts, and aging. We envision applying these therapies through inhalation of gas mixtures or ingestion of water with dissolved gases. PMID:22475015

  1. Radiation detection with noble gases: Modeling and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, T. H. V. T.

    1999-06-01

    In most x-ray detection devices the radiation energy Ex is basically obtained in terms of the number n of sub-ionization electrons produced per absorbed photon in the detector filling, which is often a noble gas. Using Monte Carlo simulation, the absorption of x-rays and the development of the primary electron cloud in xenon have been investigated, and distributions of n for mono-energetic x-rays were obtained in the range Ex<40 keV. This study provided a detailed understanding of the response of xenon detectors to x-rays, analyzing and clarifying experimentally observed discontinuity effects. The behavior of full-energy as well as fluorescence-escape peaks is discussed.

  2. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for positron emission tomography (PET): inert gases 19Ne and 77Kr.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, K J

    1983-03-01

    Detailed estimates of radiation absorbed dose based on solubility data and the distribution of body water and fat are presented for 19Ne and 77Kr, useful PET rCBF imaging agents. The steady-state inhalation of 75 mCi of 19Ne and the bolus inhalation of 18 mCi of 77Kr should result in comparable imaging statistics for typical protocols and lung radiation absorbed doses less than approx. 0.5 rad. A model for both steady-state and bolus inhalation techniques for soluble gases used for these radiation absorbed dose calculations is also presented. PMID:6601093

  3. Chemical physics of frozen gases: Sublimation, morphology, and radiation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, David A.

    2001-03-01

    A study of photon and ion irradiation of solid O2, CO 2, and H2O ices of importance in outer Solar System environments is presented. Sputtering of O2, CO2, and H2O under 25-225 keV proton bombardment was found to depend on the incident angle, energy of the ions, and sample temperature, but not on irradiation fluence or surface roughness. Sputtering by 10.2 eV photons was found to depend on temperature, and on fluence for smooth-surfaced samples. The production and retention of new chemical species within the ices was studied using reflectance spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and thermal desorption. Reflectance measurements on pure O2 yielded ultraviolet absorption bands that are similar to those reported for Ganymede for oxygen at 26 K; whereas those for O2-water mixtures are slightly shifted. Hundred-fold band intensity reduction with warming to 100 K suggests that the 20% of the O2 remaining is dissolved in the ice, not aggregated. We find that oxygen is not long retained in water ice at Ganymede's recorded surface temperatures and suspect that solid oxygen exists on cold patches of the Ganymede's heterogeneous surface. We also irradiated solid oxygen with 25-275 keV protons and found a dependence of the sputtering yield on irradiation fluence, impact energy and angle of incidence. The formation of ozone in the solid was observed using optical spectroscopy and thermal desorption. Results for the dependence of yield Y on stopping power Se suggest that previous apparent discrepancies between keV and MeV data result because Y(Se) is double-valued. Mass spectrometry of species ejected from cubic ice by 80-200 keV proton irradiation showed that H, O and OH radicals dominate the sputtered flux. The yield of oxygen produced and trapped in the ice per 100 eV of energy deposited by 200 keV protons is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than used in recent models of Ganymede. Small amounts of trapped H2O 2 desorb readily above 160 K. Photo-stimulated desorption (PSD) from condensed H2O, O 2 and CO2 show remarkable fluence dependences when the ices are grown on an optically smooth surface, but not when they are grown on rough surfaces. Mass spectrometry during thermal desorption reveals fragmentation and molecular photosynthesis. For CO2, we observe enhanced desorption when the photolyzed ice is warmed to temperatures below which thermal evaporation is important, due to thermally activated, exothermic reactions involving radicals. Ozone is photosynthesized in solid O2 and CO2, but is undetected in H2O. In addition, optical microscopy shows spontaneous cracking during growth of amorphous ice. Cracking occurs at a critical thickness that depends on temperature. Cracking structure and the morphology of subsequent deposits also depend on the temperature of condensation.

  4. Greenhouse gases, radiative forcing, global warming potential and waste management--an introduction.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter; Gentil, Emmanuel

    2009-11-01

    Management of post-consumer solid waste contributes to emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) representing about 3% of global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Most GHG reporting initiatives around the world utilize two metrics proposed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC): radiative forcing (RF) and global warming potential (GWP). This paper provides a general introduction of the factors that define a GHG and explains the scientific background for estimating RF and GWP, thereby exposing the lay reader to a brief overview of the methods for calculating the effects of GHGs on climate change. An objective of this paper is to increase awareness that the GWP of GHGs has been re-adjusted as the concentration and relative proportion of these GHGs has changed with time (e.g., the GWP of methane has changed from 21 to 25 CO(2)-eq). Improved understanding of the indirect effects of GHGs has also led to a modification in the methodology for calculating GWP. Following a presentation of theory behind GHG, RF and GWP concepts, the paper briefly describes the most important GHG sources and sinks in the context of the waste management industry. The paper serves as a primer for more detailed research publications presented in this special issue of Waste Management & Research providing a technology-based assessment of quantitative GHG emissions from different waste management technologies. PMID:19748948

  5. Airborne Measurements of Important Ozone-depleting and Climate-forcing Trace Gases from 1991 to HIPPO and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, J. W.; Nance, J. D.; Moore, F. L.; Hintsa, E. J.; Dutton, G. S.; Hall, B. D.; Mondeel, D. J.; Montzka, S. A.; Hurst, D. F.; Oltmans, S. J.; Gao, R.; Fahey, D. W.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Through collaborations with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory Global Monitoring Division (NOAA/ESRL/GMD) has measured a number of trace gases from manned and unmanned aircraft up to 21 km, and balloon platforms up to 32 km since 1991 at locations spanning the globe. Over 40 trace gases, including nitrous oxide (N2O), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), methyl halides, numerous other halocarbons, sulfur gases (COS, SF6, CS2), and selected hydrocarbons, have been measured at Earth's surface and at altitude. This presentation will highlight our recent observations of halocarbons and other trace gases during the NSF and NOAA sponsored HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns (2009-2011) that included flyovers of NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change), AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment), and NOAA stations. Other observations from the recent NASA and NOAA sponsored Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) GloPac and ATTREX campaigns (2010 - present) will also be highlighted, along with comparisons to proximate NDACC and satellite observations (ACE-FTS, Aura MLS and TES instruments). Our goal is to assemble a complete data set of geolocated airborne observations of halocarbons and other important trace gases measured by NOAA/ESRL airborne gas chromatographs for the purpose of facilitating model development and studies of atmospheric chemistry and transport processes in the troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  6. Comment on "Radiative forcings for 28 potential Archean greenhouse gases" by Byrne and Goldblatt (2014)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kochanov, R. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Rothman, L. S.; Sharpe, S. W.; Johnson, T. J.; Sams, R. L.

    2015-08-25

    In the recent article by Byrne and Goldblatt, "Radiative forcing for 28 potential Archean greenhouse gases", Clim. Past. 10, 1779–1801 (2014), the authors employ the HITRAN2012 spectroscopic database to evaluate the radiative forcing of 28 Archean gases. As part of the evaluation of the status of the spectroscopy of these gases in the selected spectral region (50–1800 cm-1), the cross sections generated from the HITRAN line-by-line parameters were compared with those of the PNNL database of experimental cross sections recorded at moderate resolution. The authors claimed that for NO2, HNO3, H2CO, H2O2, HCOOH, C2H4, CH3OH and CH3Br there exist largemore » or sometimes severe disagreements between the databases. In this work we show that for only three of these eight gases a modest discrepancy does exist between the two databases and we explain the origin of the differences. For the other five gases, the disagreements are not nearly at the scale suggested by the authors, while we explain some of the differences that do exist. In summary, the agreement between the HITRAN and PNNL databases is very good, although not perfect. Typically differences do not exceed 10 %, provided that HITRAN data exist for the bands/wavelengths of interest. It appears that a molecule-dependent combination of errors has affected the conclusions of the authors. In at least one case it appears that they did not take the correct file from PNNL (N2O4 (dimer)+ NO2 was used in place of the monomer). Finally, cross sections of HO2 from HITRAN (which do not have a PNNL counterpart) were not calculated correctly in BG, while in the case of HF misleading discussion was presented there based on the confusion by foreign or noise features in the experimental PNNL spectra.« less

  7. A Hypothesis on Biological Protection from Space Radiation Through the Use of New Therapeutic Gases as Medical Counter Measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Wink, David

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. The concern regarding exposure to cosmic radiation is the biological damage it induces. As damage is associated with increased oxidative stress, it is important and would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent oxidative stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as both chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and biological signaling molecules for management of the body s response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it is concluded that this approach may have great therapeutic potential for radiation exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have similar potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson s and Alzheimer s disease, cataracts, and aging.

  8. Important Atomic, Molecular and Radiative Processes in Low Pressure Discharge Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Graeme G.

    2007-08-01

    Low pressure discharges are used in a number of light sources, of which the most important application for general lighting is the fluorescent lamp (FL). In conventional FL, electrical energy is converted to UV radiation through excitation of mercury atoms; the UV is then converted to visible radiation using a phosphor. Other atomic radiators, such as sodium and rare gases, are used for applications but are unsuitable for general lighting. In recent years, there has been strong interest in finding alternative atomic and molecular radiators and research is continuing. The efficiency of producing light in a low pressure discharge depends on the balance between ionization processes, which sustain the plasma, and the excitation of atoms or molecules into radiating states through electron impact excitation and collisions between atoms in excited states. Since radiation emitted at one point in the discharge may be absorbed and re-emitted several times before it finally reaches the wall, radiation transport also plays a significant role in determining the fraction of electrical energy which is converted to radiation. Numerical models can help guide the development of more efficient light sources, but there is currently a lack of data for a number of important fundamental processes. This paper will describe the important physical processes in low pressure discharge light sources, and discuss the requirements for new and improved atomic and molecular data.

  9. Study of multi-dimensional radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jiwen; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method (MCM) is applied to analyze radiative heat transfer in nongray gases. The nongray model employed is based on the statistical arrow band model with an exponential-tailed inverse intensity distribution. Consideration of spectral correlation results in some distinguishing features of the Monte Carlo formulations. Validation of the Monte Carlo formulations has been conducted by comparing results of this method with other solutions. Extension of a one-dimensional problem to a multi-dimensional problem requires some special treatments in the Monte Carlo analysis. Use of different assumptions results in different sets of Monte Carlo formulations. The nongray narrow band formulations provide the most accurate results.

  10. Comment on "Radiative forcings for 28 potential Archean greenhouse gases" by Byrne and Goldblatt (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, R. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Rothman, L. S.; Sharpe, S. W.; Johnson, T. J.; Sams, R. L.

    2015-08-25

    In the recent article by Byrne and Goldblatt, "Radiative forcing for 28 potential Archean greenhouse gases", Clim. Past. 10, 1779–1801 (2014), the authors employ the HITRAN2012 spectroscopic database to evaluate the radiative forcing of 28 Archean gases. As part of the evaluation of the status of the spectroscopy of these gases in the selected spectral region (50–1800 cm-1), the cross sections generated from the HITRAN line-by-line parameters were compared with those of the PNNL database of experimental cross sections recorded at moderate resolution. The authors claimed that for NO2, HNO3, H2CO, H2O2, HCOOH, C2H4, CH3OH and CH3Br there exist large or sometimes severe disagreements between the databases. In this work we show that for only three of these eight gases a modest discrepancy does exist between the two databases and we explain the origin of the differences. For the other five gases, the disagreements are not nearly at the scale suggested by the authors, while we explain some of the differences that do exist. In summary, the agreement between the HITRAN and PNNL databases is very good, although not perfect. Typically differences do not exceed 10 %, provided that HITRAN data exist for the bands/wavelengths of interest. It appears that a molecule-dependent combination of errors has affected the conclusions of the authors. In at least one case it appears that they did not take the correct file from PNNL (N2O4 (dimer)+ NO2 was used in place of the monomer). Finally, cross sections of HO2 from HITRAN (which do not have a PNNL counterpart) were not calculated correctly in BG, while in the case of HF misleading discussion was presented there based on the confusion by foreign or noise features in the experimental PNNL spectra.

  11. A new UK Greenhouse Gas measurement network providing ultra high-frequency measurements of key radiatively active trace gases taken from a network of tall towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Manning, A. J.; Simmonds, P. G.; Derwent, R. G.; Moncrieff, J. B.; Sturges, W. T.

    2012-04-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric concentrations of gases is important in assessing the impact of international policies related to the atmospheric environment. The effects of control measures on greenhouse gases introduced under the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols are now being observed. Continued monitoring is required to assess the overall success of the Protocols. For over 15 years the UK Government have funded high-frequency measurements of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting gases at Mace Head, a global background measurement station on the west coast of Ireland. These continuous, high-frequency, high-precision measurements are used to estimate regional (country-scale) emissions of greenhouse gases across the UK using an inversion methodology (NAME-Inversion) that links the Met Office atmospheric dispersion model (Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment - NAME) with the Mace Head observations. This unique inversion method acts to independently verify bottom up emission estimates of radiatively active and ozone-depleting trace gases. In 2011 the UK government (DECC) funded the establishment and integration of three new tall tower measurements stations in the UK, to provide enhanced resolution emission maps and decrease uncertainty of regional emission estimates produced using the NAME-Inversion. One station included in this new UK network was already established in Scotland and was used in collaboration with Edinburgh University. The two other new stations are in England and were set-up early in 2012, they contain brand new instrumentation for measurements of greenhouse gases. All three additional stations provide ultra high-frequency (1 sec) data of CO2 and CH4 using the Picarro© Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer and high frequency (20 min) measurements of N2O and SF6 from custom built sample modules with GC-ECD. We will present the new tall tower UK measurement network in detail. Using high-frequency measurements at new operational sites, including Mace Head, we will present the latest inversion results from the new network highlighting the enhanced resolution in regional emission maps for the UK. These results are presented to the UK government periodically and provide independent verification of the emission estimates of radiatively active trace gases. These results also inform policy makers on the accuracy of inventory emissions estimates of radiatively active and ozone-depleting trace gases.

  12. A comparison between weighted sum of gray gases and statistical narrow-band radiation models for combustion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Soufiani, A. . Lab. d'Energetique Moleculaire et Macroscopique); Djavdan, E. )

    1994-05-01

    The weighted sum of gray gases (WSGG) and the statistical narrow-band (SNB) models are implemented for radiative transfer calculations in realistic combustion gas mixtures and their results are compared. The WSGG model parameters are generated from SNB emissivity calculations in the [300, 2500 K] temperature range for a partial pressure ratio p[sub w]/p[sub c] = 2. In addition, the same methods are used for the resolution of the transfer equation associated with both models. Comparisons are made for the cases of planar geometry and an axisymmetrical methane--oxygen furnace. When the gas mixture is practically isothermal and surrounded by cold walls, small errors are introduced by the use of the WSGG model. On the other hand, in the case of significant temperature gradients, the inaccurate representation of gas absorptivities by the WSGG model leads to important errors.

  13. Interconversion of biologically important carboxylic acids by radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1978-01-01

    The interconversion of a group of biologically important polycarboxylic acids (acetic, fumaric, malic, malonic, succinic, citric, isocitric, tricarballylic) under gamma-ray or ultraviolet radiation was investigated. The formation of high molecular weight compounds was observed in all cases. Succinic acid was formed in almost all radiolysis experiments. Citric, malonic, and succinic acids appeared to be relatively insensitive to radiation. Interconversion of the polycarboxylic acids studied may have occurred under the effect of radiation in the prebiotic earth.

  14. Spatial variations in immediate greenhouse gases and aerosol emissions and resulting radiative forcing from wildfires in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shengli; Liu, Heping; Dahal, Devendra; Jin, Suming; Li, Shuang; Liu, Shuguang

    2016-02-01

    Boreal fires can cool the climate; however, this conclusion came from individual fires and may not represent the whole story. We hypothesize that the climatic impact of boreal fires depends on local landscape heterogeneity such as burn severity, prefire vegetation type, and soil properties. To test this hypothesis, spatially explicit emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols and their resulting radiative forcing are required as an important and necessary component towards a full assessment. In this study, we integrated remote sensing (Landsat and MODIS) and models (carbon consumption model, emission factors model, and radiative forcing model) to calculate the carbon consumption, GHGs and aerosol emissions, and their radiative forcing of 2001-2010 fires at 30 m resolution in the Yukon River Basin of Alaska. Total carbon consumption showed significant spatial variation, with a mean of 2,615 g C m-2 and a standard deviation of 2,589 g C m-2. The carbon consumption led to different amounts of GHGs and aerosol emissions, ranging from 593.26 Tg (CO2) to 0.16 Tg (N2O). When converted to equivalent CO2 based on global warming potential metric, the maximum 20 years equivalent CO2 was black carbon (713.77 Tg), and the lowest 20 years equivalent CO2 was organic carbon (-583.13 Tg). The resulting radiative forcing also showed significant spatial variation: CO2, CH4, and N2O can cause a 20-year mean radiative forcing of 7.41 W m-2 with a standard deviation of 2.87 W m-2. This emission forcing heterogeneity indicates that different boreal fires have different climatic impacts. When considering the spatial variation of other forcings, such as surface shortwave forcing, we may conclude that some boreal fires, especially boreal deciduous fires, can warm the climate.

  15. Spatial variations in immediate greenhouse gases and aerosol emissions and resulting radiative forcing from wildfires in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shengli; Liu, Heping; Dahal, Devendra; Jin, Suming; Li, Shuang; Liu, Shuguang

    2015-01-01

    Boreal fires can cool the climate; however, this conclusion came from individual fires and may not represent the whole story. We hypothesize that the climatic impact of boreal fires depends on local landscape heterogeneity such as burn severity, prefire vegetation type, and soil properties. To test this hypothesis, spatially explicit emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols and their resulting radiative forcing are required as an important and necessary component towards a full assessment. In this study, we integrated remote sensing (Landsat and MODIS) and models (carbon consumption model, emission factors model, and radiative forcing model) to calculate the carbon consumption, GHGs and aerosol emissions, and their radiative forcing of 2001-2010 fires at 30 m resolution in the Yukon River Basin of Alaska. Total carbon consumption showed significant spatial variation, with a mean of 2,615 g C m-2 and a standard deviation of 2,589 g C m-2. The carbon consumption led to different amounts of GHGs and aerosol emissions, ranging from 593.26 Tg (CO2) to 0.16 Tg (N2O). When converted to equivalent CO2 based on global warming potential metric, the maximum 20 years equivalent CO2 was black carbon (713.77 Tg), and the lowest 20 years equivalent CO2 was organic carbon (-583.13 Tg). The resulting radiative forcing also showed significant spatial variation: CO2, CH4, and N2O can cause a 20-year mean radiative forcing of 7.41 W m-2 with a standard deviation of 2.87 W m-2. This emission forcing heterogeneity indicates that different boreal fires have different climatic impacts. When considering the spatial variation of other forcings, such as surface shortwave forcing, we may conclude that some boreal fires, especially boreal deciduous fires, can warm the climate.

  16. Importance of establishing radiation protection culture in Radiology Department

    PubMed Central

    Ploussi, Agapi; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of ionization radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the rapid advances in computed tomography as well as the high radiation doses delivered by interventional procedures have raised serious safety and health concerns for both patients and medical staff and have necessitated the establishment of a radiation protection culture (RPC) in every Radiology Department. RPC is a newly introduced concept. The term culture describes the combination of attitudes, beliefs, practices and rules among the professionals, staff and patients regarding to radiation protection. Most of the time, the challenge is to improve rather than to build a RPC. The establishment of a RPC requires continuing education of the staff and professional, effective communication among stakeholders of all levels and implementation of quality assurance programs. The RPC creation is being driven from the highest level. Leadership, professionals and associate societies are recognized to play a vital role in the embedding and promotion of RPC in a Medical Unit. The establishment of a RPC enables the reduction of the radiation dose, enhances radiation risk awareness, minimizes unsafe practices, and improves the quality of a radiation protection program. The purpose of this review paper is to describe the role and highlight the importance of establishing a strong RPC in Radiology Departments with an emphasis on promoting RPC in the Interventional Radiology environment. PMID:26981223

  17. Importance of establishing radiation protection culture in Radiology Department.

    PubMed

    Ploussi, Agapi; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P

    2016-02-28

    The increased use of ionization radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the rapid advances in computed tomography as well as the high radiation doses delivered by interventional procedures have raised serious safety and health concerns for both patients and medical staff and have necessitated the establishment of a radiation protection culture (RPC) in every Radiology Department. RPC is a newly introduced concept. The term culture describes the combination of attitudes, beliefs, practices and rules among the professionals, staff and patients regarding to radiation protection. Most of the time, the challenge is to improve rather than to build a RPC. The establishment of a RPC requires continuing education of the staff and professional, effective communication among stakeholders of all levels and implementation of quality assurance programs. The RPC creation is being driven from the highest level. Leadership, professionals and associate societies are recognized to play a vital role in the embedding and promotion of RPC in a Medical Unit. The establishment of a RPC enables the reduction of the radiation dose, enhances radiation risk awareness, minimizes unsafe practices, and improves the quality of a radiation protection program. The purpose of this review paper is to describe the role and highlight the importance of establishing a strong RPC in Radiology Departments with an emphasis on promoting RPC in the Interventional Radiology environment. PMID:26981223

  18. Modeling radiative transfer in real gases: An assessment of existing methods in 2D enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Goutiere, V.; Charette, A.; Liu, F.

    1999-07-01

    In order to model efficiently the radiative transfer in a real participating gas, various methods have been developed during the last few decades. Each method has its own formulation and leads to different accuracies and computation times. Most of the studies reported in the literature concern specific real gas models, and very few are devoted to an extended comparison of these models. The present study is a 2D assessment of some of the most up-to-date real gas methods: the cumulative-k method (CK), the statistical narrow-band model (SNB), two hybrid SNB-CK methods, the spectral line based weighted sum of gray gases method (SLW) and the exponential wide band model (EWB). Four cases are considered: one homogeneous and isothermal case with a single participating gas (H{sub 2}O), and one homogeneous and non-isothermal case with a mixture of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Although the SNB and SNB-CK methods are the most accurate methods, the SLW method seems actually the best deal between accuracy and computation time.

  19. Importance of Bladder Radioactivity for Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gltekin, Salih Sinan; ?ahmaran, Turan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Most of the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine are excreted via the urinary system. This study evaluated the importance of a reduction in bladder radioactivity for radiation safety. Methods: The study group of 135 patients underwent several organ scintigraphies [40/135; thyroid scintigraphy (TS), 30/135; whole body bone scintigraphy (WBS), 35/135; myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) and 30/135; renal scintigraphy (RS)] by a technologist within 1 month. In full and empty conditions, static bladder images and external dose rate measurements at 0.25, 0.50, 1, 1.5 and 2 m distances were obtained and decline ratios were calculated from these two data sets. Results: External radiation dose rates were highest in patients undergoing MPS. External dose rates at 0.25 m distance for TS, TKS, MPS and BS were measured to be 56, 106, 191 and 72 ?Sv h-1 for full bladder and 29, 55, 103 and 37 ?Sv h-1 for empty bladder, respectively. For TS, WBS, MPS and RS, respectively, average decline ratios were calculated to be 52%, 55%, 53% and 54% in the scintigraphic assessment and 49%, 51%, 49%, 50% and 50% in the assessment with Geiger counter. Conclusion: Decline in bladder radioactivity is important in terms of radiation safety. Patients should be encouraged for micturition after each scintigraphic test. Spending time together with radioactive patients at distances less than 1 m should be kept to a minimum where possible. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24416625

  20. Development Of An Electronic Nose For Environmental Monitoring: Detection Of Specific Environmentally Important Gases At Their Odor Detection Threshold Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentoni, Licinia; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Del Rosso, Renato; Centola, Paolo; Della Torre, Matteo; Dematt, Fabrizio

    2011-09-01

    The use of a sensor array is demonstrated to be an effective approach to evaluate hazardous odor (or gas) emissions from industrial sites1. Therefore the possibility to use electronic noses for the prolonged survey of odor emissions from industrial sites is of particular interest for environmental monitoring purposes2. At the Olfactometric Laboratory of the Politecnico di Milano, in collaboration with Sacmi Group, Imola, an innovative electronic nose for the continuous monitoring of environmental odors is being developed. The aim of this work is to show the laboratory tests conducted to evaluate the capability of the electronic nose to recognize some specific environmentally important gases at their odor detection threshold concentration. The laboratory studies up to now focused on ammonia and butyric acid, those being compounds that can typically be found in the emissions from waste treatment plants, that may cause health effects when they exceed a given concentration level. The laboratory tests proved the sensors to be sensitive towards the considered compounds and the system to be capable of discriminating between odorous or non-odorous air, with a detection limit comparable with the detection limit of human nose.

  1. Future Climate Impacts of Direct Radiative Forcing Anthropogenic Aerosols, Tropospheric Ozone, and Long-lived Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Liao, Hong; Seinfeld, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Long-lived greenhouse gases (GHGs) are the most important driver of climate change over the next century. Aerosols and tropospheric ozone (O3) are expected to induce significant perturbations to the GHG-forced climate. To distinguish the equilibrium climate responses to changes in direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols, tropospheric ozone, and GHG between present day and year 2100, four 80-year equilibrium climates are simulated using a unified tropospheric chemistry-aerosol model within the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) 110. Concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, primary organic (POA) carbon, secondary organic (SOA) carbon, black carbon (BC) aerosols, and tropospheric ozone for present day and year 2100 are obtained a priori by coupled chemistry-aerosol GCM simulations, with emissions of aerosols, ozone, and precursors based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenario (SRES) A2. Changing anthropogenic aerosols, tropospheric ozone, and GHG from present day to year 2100 is predicted to perturb the global annual mean radiative forcing by +0.18 (considering aerosol direct effects only), +0.65, and +6.54 W m(sup -2) at the tropopause, and to induce an equilibrium global annual mean surface temperature change of +0.14, +0.32, and +5.31 K, respectively, with the largest temperature response occurring at northern high latitudes. Anthropogenic aerosols, through their direct effect, are predicted to alter the Hadley circulation owing to an increasing interhemispheric temperature gradient, leading to changes in tropical precipitation. When changes in both aerosols and tropospheric ozone are considered, the predicted patterns of change in global circulation and the hydrological cycle are similar to those induced by aerosols alone. GHG-induced climate changes, such as amplified warming over high latitudes, weakened Hadley circulation, and increasing precipitation over the Tropics and high latitudes, are consistent with predictions of a number of previous GCM studies. Finally, direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols is predicted to induce strong regional cooling over East and South Asia. Wintertime rainfall over southeastern China and the Indian subcontinent is predicted to decrease because of the increased atmospheric stability and decreased surface evaporation, while the geographic distribution of precipitation is also predicted to be altered as a result of aerosol-induced changes in wind flow.

  2. Radiative Forcing by Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases: Estimates from Climate Models in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W. D.; Ramaswamy, V.; Schwarzkopf, M. D.; Sun, Y.; Portmann, R. W.; Fu, Q.; Casanova, S. E. B.; Dufresne, J.-L.; Fillmore, D. W.; Forster, P. M. D.; Galin, V. Y.; Gohar, L. K.; Ingram, W. J.; Kratz, D. P.; Lefebvre, M.-P.; Li, J.; Marquet, P.; Oinas, V.; Tsushima, Y.; Uchiyama, T.; Zhong, W. Y.

    2006-01-01

    The radiative effects from increased concentrations of well-mixed greenhouse gases (WMGHGs) represent the most significant and best understood anthropogenic forcing of the climate system. The most comprehensive tools for simulating past and future climates influenced by WMGHGs are fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). Because of the importance of WMGHGs as forcing agents it is essential that AOGCMs compute the radiative forcing by these gases as accurately as possible. We present the results of a radiative transfer model intercomparison between the forcings computed by the radiative parameterizations of AOGCMs and by benchmark line-by-line (LBL) codes. The comparison is focused on forcing by CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11, CFC-12, and the increased H2O expected in warmer climates. The models included in the intercomparison include several LBL codes and most of the global models submitted to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). In general, the LBL models are in excellent agreement with each other. However, in many cases, there are substantial discrepancies among the AOGCMs and between the AOGCMs and LBL codes. In some cases this is because the AOGCMs neglect particular absorbers, in particular the near-infrared effects of CH4 and N2O, while in others it is due to the methods for modeling the radiative processes. The biases in the AOGCM forcings are generally largest at the surface level. We quantify these differences and discuss the implications for interpreting variations in forcing and response across the multimodel ensemble of AOGCM simulations assembled for the IPCC AR4.

  3. Second Harmonic Generation of Self-Mode-Locked СО2-Laser Radiation in GaSe and GaSeS Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genin, D. E.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Sitnikov, A. G.; Panchenko, A. N.; Sarkisov, S. Yu.; Chernyshov, A. I.

    2014-03-01

    A TEA CO2 laser generating at the wavelength λ = 10.6 μm in the modes of free lasing and self-mode-locking was used to obtain and compare second harmonic generation (SHG) in GaSe and GaSe0.7S0.3 crystals. With the self-mode-locked laser, a 5-times higher energy efficiency of SHG was obtained. The efficiency of SHG in the GaSe0.7S0.3 crystal and its second-order nonlinear susceptibility were estimated and compared with their values for undoped GaSe.

  4. Gases of the middle atmosphere and short-term solar radiation variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. YU.; Kouznetsov, G. I.

    1989-01-01

    Now there is no good agreement between theoretical and experimental data of ozone (O3) response to 27 13-day solar ultraviolet irradiance variations (SUVIV). But a few days duration SUVIV (accompanied, for example, by solar flare (SF)) has not be studied yet. The amplitudinal, diurnal, seasonal, latitudinal and phase parameters were investigated of ozone and other trace gases of atmosphere to such short term SUVIV.

  5. Influences of different gases on the terahertz radiation based on the application of two-color laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, S.; Ganjovi, A.; Shojaei, F.; Saeed, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, using a two-dimensional Particle In Cell-Monte Carlo Collision simulation method, a comparative study is performed on the influences of different types of atomic and molecular gases at various background gas pressures on the generation of broadband and intense Terahertz (THz) radiation via the application of two-color laser pulses. These two modes are focused into Argon (Ar), Xenon (Xe), Nitrogen (N2), Oxygen (O2), and air as the background gaseous media and the plasma channel is created. It is observed that the THz radiation emission dramatically changes due to the propagation effects. A wider THz pulse is emitted from the formed plasma channel at the higher gas pressures. The significant effects of the propagation features of the emitted THz pulse on its energy at the longer lengths of the plasma channel are observed.

  6. Coaxial radiative and convective heat transfer in gray and nongray gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattick, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    Coupled radiative and convective heat transfer is investigated for an absorbing gas flowing in a finite length channel and heated by blackbody radiation directed along the flow axis. The problem is formulated in one dimension and numerical solutions are obtained for the temperature profile of the gas and for the radiation escaping the channel entrance, assuming both gray and nongray absorption spectra. Due to radiation trapping, the flowing gas is found to have substantially smaller radiation losses for a given peak gas temperature than a solid surface that is radiatively heated to this temperature. A greenhouse effect is also evident whereby radiation losses are minimized for a gas having stronger absorption at long wavelengths.

  7. Importance of ultraviolet radiation in photoinhibition of microalgal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Jokiel, P.L.; York, R.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Algae vary greatly in their long term ability to adapt to levels of natural solar ultraviolet radiation encountered near the surface of the sea. Photosynthetically active radiation (where PAR is defined as quantum flux between 400 and 700 nm) produced little or no growth inhibition even at full surface intensity. In some species the capacity to tolerate intense PAR did not carry into the range of UV-A (315-400 nm) or of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) or both. Photo-inhibition became increasingly severe above 20% of surface intensity among the species sensitive to UV radiation. PAR flux in excess of that required for maximum growth was not inhibitory, but rather the higher levels of associated UV radiation reduced growth rate. These results support a previous suggestion that other molecules besides chlorophyll sensitize or shield algae in the UV portion of the solar spectrum.

  8. Importance of ultraviolet radiation in photoinhibition of microalgal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Jokiel, P.L.; York, R.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Algae vary greatly in their long term ability to adapt to levels of natural solar ultraviolet radiation encountered near the surface of the sea. Photosynthetically active radiation (where PAR is defined as quantum flux between 400 and 700 nm) produced little or no growth inhibition even at full surface intensity. Photoinhibition became increasingly severe above 20% of surface intensity among the species sensitive to UV radiation. PAR flux in excess of that required for maximum growth was not inhibitory, but rather the higher levels of associated UV radiation reduced growth rate. These results support a previous suggestion that other molecules besides chlorophyll sensitize or shield algae in the UV portion of the solar spectrum.

  9. The importance and unique aspects of radiation protection in medicine.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Ola; Czarwinski, Renate; Mettler, Fred

    2010-10-01

    Radiation protection in medicine has unique aspects and is an essential element of medical practice. Medical uses of radiation occur throughout the world, from large cities to rural clinics. It has been estimated that the number of medical procedures using radiation grew from about 1.7 billion in 1980 to almost 4 billion in 2007. In spite of these large numbers, there are many parts of the world without adequate equipment, where the ability to perform additional medical procedures would likely result in a net benefit. Medicine accounts for more than 99.9% of the per caput effective dose from man-made sources. The goal in medical exposure is not to give the lowest dose, but to provide the correct dose to enable the practitioner to make the diagnosis or cure a tumour. Too little or too much dose is problematic and the risk of any given procedure ranges from negligible to potentially fatal. Radiation protection in medicine must deal with the issues of not having dose limits, purposely exposing sensitive subgroups, and purposely using doses that could cause deterministic effects. Radiation accidents involving medical uses have accounted for more acute radiation deaths than from any other source including Chernobyl. Many physicians have little or no training in radiation protection, and many have no qualified medical physics support. In many countries, medical radiation devices and uses are only minimally regulated and the rapidly evolving technology is a challenge. Medicine also accounts for the largest number of occupationally exposed workers and collective dose. PMID:20638808

  10. Sensitivity of radiative forcing, ocean heat uptake, and climate feedback to changes in anthropogenic greenhouse gases and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paynter, D.; Frölicher, T. L.

    2015-10-01

    We use both prescribed sea surface temperature and fully coupled versions of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory coupled climate model (CM3) to analyze the sensitivity of radiative forcing, ocean heat uptake, and climate feedback to changes in anthropogenic greenhouse gases and aerosols considered separately over the 1870 to 2005 period. The global anthropogenic aerosol climate feedback parameter (- α) of -1.13 ± 0.33 Wm-2 K-1 is indistinguishable from the greenhouse gas - α of -1.28 ± 0.23 Wm-2 K-1. However, this greenhouse gas climate feedback parameter is about 50% larger than that obtained for CM3 from a widely used linear extrapolation method of regressing Earth's top of atmosphere imbalance against surface air temperature change in idealized CO2 radiative forcing experiments. This implies that the global mean surface temperature change due to forcing over the 1870-2005 period is 50% smaller than that predicted using the climate feedback parameter obtained from idealized experiments. This difference results from time dependence in α, which makes the radiative forcing obtained by the fixed sea surface temperature method incompatible with that obtained by the linear extrapolation method fitted over the first 150 years after CO2 is quadrupled. On a regional scale, α varies greatly between the greenhouse gas and aerosol case. This suggests that the relationship between transient and equilibrium climate sensitivities obtained from idealized CO2 simulations, using techniques such as regional feedback analysis and heat uptake efficacy, may not hold for other forcing scenarios.

  11. Energy transfer by radiation in non-grey atomic gases in isothermal and non-isothermal slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poon, P. T. Y.

    1975-01-01

    A multiband model for the absorption coefficient of atomic hydrogen-helium plasmas is constructed which includes continuum and line contributions. Emission from 28 stronger lines of 106 that have been screened is considered, of which 21 are from hydrogen and 7 belong to helium, with reabsorption due to line-line, line-continuum overlap accurately accounted for. The model is utilized in the computation of intensities and fluxes from shock-heated slabs of 85% H2-15% He mixtures for slab thicknesses from 1 to 30 cm, temperature from 10,000 to 20,000 K, and for different densities. In conjunction with the multiband model, simple numerical schemes have been devised which provide a quick and comprehensive way of computing radiative energy transfer in nonisothermal and nongrey gases.

  12. Shifting of infrared radiation using rotational raman resonances in diatomic molecular gases

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A device for shifting the frequency of infrared radiation from a CO.sub.2 laser by stimulated Raman scattering in either H.sub.2 or D.sub.2. The device of the preferred embodiment comprises an H.sub.2 Raman laser having dichroic mirrors which are reflective for 16 .mu.m radiation and transmittive for 10 .mu.m, disposed at opposite ends of an interaction cell. The interaction cell contains a diatomic molecular gas, e.g., H.sub.2, D.sub.2, T.sub.2, HD, HT, DT and a capillary waveguide disposed within the cell. A liquid nitrogen jacket is provided around the capillary waveguide for the purpose of cooling. In another embodiment the input CO.sub.2 radiation is circularly polarized using a Fresnel rhomb .lambda./4 plate and applied to an interaction cell of much longer length for single pass operation.

  13. Search for Positronium Lyman ?-Radiation from Positrons Stopped in Inert Gases*

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Marvin

    1970-01-01

    An attempt to detect the positronium Lyman ?-radiation at 2430 is reported. Positrons from an intense 64Cu source (20 Ci) were stopped in high purity A, Ne, and He at pressures ranging from 0.01 to 3.0 atm. Light from the stopping region was collected by a large solid-angle light pipe and directed to a photomultiplier. Spectra were obtained by inserting a series of optical interference filters in front of the photomultiplier. Identical spectra were obtained with an intense electron emitter replacing the 64Cu source. These results indicate that any Lyman ?-radiation present at the photomultiplier is masked by a large background continuum associated with gas excitation processes. The data were employed to set an upper limit of 1 in 2000 on those positrons stopping in the gas which result in Lyman ?-radiation. PMID:16591834

  14. Directionality of terahertz radiation emitted from an array of femtosecond filaments in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, N.; Andreeva, V.; Kosareva, O.; Shkurinov, A.; Makarov, V. A.; Berg, L.; Chin, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    An array of filaments in air is numerically shown to be an efficient tool to direct the energy of terahertz (THz) radiation into a narrow and controllable cone. By increasing the number of filaments in an N N array, the THz energy growth per unit angle of the cone exceeds the classical gain in N2. The backwardly directed radiation from the filament array appears when the transverse size of the array reaches the filament length. The optimum spacing between the filaments in the array is the THz wavelength, which ensures constructive interference and independent development of filaments.

  15. Acceleration of radiative transfer model calculations for the retrieval of trace gases under cloudy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, Dmitry S.; Loyola, Diego G.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Doicu, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    In the independent pixel approximation (IPA), radiative transfer computations involving cloudy scenes require two separate calls to the radiative transfer model (RTM), one call for a clear sky scenario, the other for an atmosphere containing clouds. In this paper, clouds are considered as an optically homogeneous layer. We present two novel methods for RTM performance enhancement with particular application to trace gas retrievals under cloudy conditions. Both methods are based on reusing results from clear-sky RTM calculations to speed up corresponding calculations for the cloud-filled scenario.

  16. Effect of pollutant gases on ozone production by simulated solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, E. L.; Bittker, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments using simulated solar radiation in a chamber, with a controlled atmospheric pressure near 1 atmosphere, were conducted to evaluate O3 production. The effects of CO and H2O were analyzed to determine if the CO and H2O addition could reduce NO destruction of O3. The results show that NO is destroyed while destroying O3.

  17. Implantation of high concentration noble gases in cubic zirconia and silicon carbide: A contrasted radiation tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veli?a, Gihan; Debelle, Aurlien; Thom, Lionel; Mylonas, Stamatis; Vincent, Laetitia; Boulle, Alexandre; Jagielski, Jacek; Pantelica, Dan

    2014-08-01

    The modifications of the microstructure of yttria-stabilized cubic zirconia and silicon carbide single crystals implanted with high concentrations of noble gas ions and subsequently annealed at high temperature were characterized using RBS/C, XRD and TEM. It is found that the annealing behavior is strongly dependent on both the material and the implanted noble gases. Ar-implanted yttria-stabilized zirconia shows no significant microstructural modification upon annealing at 800 C, e.g. dislocations are still present and the size of the Ar bubbles does not evolve. This is in strong contrast with previous observations on helium-implanted zirconia, where the formation of bubbles and elongated fractures were observed. In the case of SiC, thermal annealing at 1000 C shows an enhanced damage recovery when He is implanted as compared to Ar implantation and the recrystallization of the matrix is accompanied with the release of noble gas atoms. This difference can be ascribed to different atomic radii, and thus mobility of implanted species.

  18. Changes in partial pressures of respiratory gases during submerged voluntary breath hold across odontocetes: is body mass important?

    PubMed

    Noren, S R; Williams, T M; Ramirez, K; Boehm, J; Glenn, M; Cornell, L

    2012-02-01

    Odontocetes have an exceptional range in body mass spanning 10(3) kg across species. Because, size influences oxygen utilization and carbon dioxide production rates in mammals, this lineage likely displays an extraordinary variation in oxygen store management compared to other marine mammal groups. To examine this, we measured changes in the partial pressures of respiratory gases ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]), pH, and lactate in the blood during voluntary, quiescent, submerged breath holds in Pacific white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens), bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), and a killer whale (Orcinus orca) representing a mass range of 96-3,850 kg. These measurements provided an empirical determination of the effect of body size on the variability in blood biochemistry during breath hold and experimentally determined aerobic dive limits (ADL) within one taxonomic group (odontocetes). For the species in this study, maximum voluntary breath-hold duration was positively correlated with body mass, ranging from 3.5 min in white-sided dolphins to 13.3 min for the killer whale. Variation in breath-hold duration was associated with differences in the rate of change for [Formula: see text] throughout breath hold; [Formula: see text] decreased twice as fast for the two smaller species (-0.6 mmHg O(2) min(-1)) compared to the largest species (-0.3 mmHg O(2) min(-1)). In contrast, the rate of increase in [Formula: see text] during breath hold was similar across species. These results demonstrate that large body size in odontocetes facilitates increased aerobic breath-hold capacity as mediated by decreased mass-specific metabolic rates (rates of change in [Formula: see text] served as a proxy for oxygen utilization). Indeed the experimentally determined 5 min ADL for bottlenose dolphins was surpassed by the 13.3 min maximum breath hold of the killer whale, which did not end in a rise in lactate. Rather, breath hold ended voluntarily as respiratory gases and pH fell within a narrow range for both large and small species, likely providing cues for ventilation. PMID:21935721

  19. Greenhouse Gases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and the Environment Greenhouse Gases Effect on the Climate Where Greenhouse Gases Come From Outlook for Future ... effects. More about how greenhouse gases affect the climate » Also on Energy Explained Energy and the Environment ...

  20. Radiative Interaction Between Driver and Driven Gases in an Arc-Driven Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul

    2001-01-01

    An electric-arc driven shock tube was operated with hydrogen as the driven gas and either hydrogen or helium as the driver gas. Electron density was measured behind the primary shock wave spectroscopically from the width of the Beta line of hydrogen. The measured electron density values were many times greater than the values calculated by the Rankine - Hugoniot relations. By accounting for the radiative transfer from the driver gas to the driven gas, the measured electron density values were numerically recreated.

  1. Experimental study of pulsed power driven radiative shockwaves in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, J.; Lebedev, S.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bland, S.; Swadling, G.; Burdiak, G.; Hall, G.; Patankar, S.; de Grouchy, P.; Suttle, L.; Bennett, M.; Pickworth, L.; Khoory, E.; Smith, R.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J.

    2013-10-01

    The use of plastic disks coated with a thin film of Aluminium has been investigated as a control mechanism for the shockwave formed from a radial foil z-pinch in the presence of an ambient medium. Experiments were carried out on the MAGPIE (1.4 MA, 250 ns rise time) facility at Imperial College London. The configuration produces a strong radiative shockwave driven with constant velocity (>25 km/s) for long time (>400 ns) and spatial scales (cm). Experimental results demonstrate scaling of shock compression opposite to that found in 1D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Evidence of a thermal instability in the post-shock cooling region is linked to a decrease in compression for higher atomic masses due to increased radiative cooling. Increases in post-shock temperature and ionization have been measured with decreased radial distance from a strongly cooling hydrodynamic jet. Regions of observed thermal instability for Xenon and Krypton agree with those expected from evaluation of theoretical cooling functions. Institute of Shock Physics, Imperial College London.

  2. A Hypothesis on Biological Protection from Space Radiation Through the Use of New Therapeutic Gases as Medical Counter Measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Wink, David

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to astronauts could be a significant obstacle for long duration manned space exploration because of current uncertainties regarding the extent of biological effects. Furthermore, concepts for protective shielding also pose a technically challenging issue due to the nature of cosmic radiation and current mass and power constraints with modern exploration technology. As biological damage from exposure is associated with increased oxidative stress, it would be enabling to mitigate and/or prevent stress prior to the development of clinical symptoms and disease. This paper hypothesizes a "systems biology" approach in which a combination of chemical and biological mitigation techniques are used conjunctively. It proposes using new, therapeutic, medical gases as both chemical radioprotectors for radical scavenging and biological promoters for management of the body s response to exposure. From reviewing radiochemistry of water, biological effects of CO, H2, NO, and H2S gas, and mechanisms of radiation biology, it is concluded that this approach may have great therapeutic potential for exposure. Furthermore, it also appears to have potential for curtailing the pathogenesis of other diseases in which oxidative stress has been implicated including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic inflammatory disease, hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, Parkinson s and Alzheimer s disease, cataracts, and aging.

  3. Radiative lifetimes and cooling functions for astrophysically important molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Hulme, Kelsey; Naim, Omree K.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.

    2016-02-01

    Extensive line lists generated as part of the ExoMol project are used to compute lifetimes for individual rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic excited states, and temperature-dependent cooling functions by summing over all dipole-allowed transitions for the states concerned. Results are presented for SiO, CaH, AlO, ScH, H2O and methane. The results for CH4 are particularly unusual with four excited states with no dipole-allowed decay route and several others, where these decays lead to exceptionally long lifetimes. These lifetime data should be useful in models of masers and estimates of critical densities, and can provide a link with laboratory measurements. Cooling functions are important in stellar and planet formation.

  4. Atmospheric radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harshvardhan, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric radiative processes are summarized for the period 1987-1990. Topics discussed include radiation modeling; clouds and radiation; radiative effects in dynamics and climate; radiation budget and aerosol effects; and gaseous absorption, particulate scattering and surface reflection. It is concluded that the key developments of the period are a defining of the radiative forcing to the climate system by trace gases and clouds, the recognition that cloud microphysics and morphology need to be incorporated not only into radiation models but also climate models, and the isolation of a few important unsolved theoretical problems in atmospheric radiation.

  5. NOBLE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Noble Gases symposium, on which this report is based, provided comprehensive coverage of the noble gases. The coverage included, but was not limited to, the properties, biokinetics, bioeffects, production and release to the environment, detection techniques, standards, and ap...

  6. Trends in source gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehhalt, D. H.; Fraser, P. J.; Albritton, D.; Cicerone, R. J.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Legrand, M.; Makide, Y.; Rowland, F. S.; Steele, L. P.; Zander, R.

    1989-01-01

    Source gases are defined as those gases that, by their breakdown, introduce into the stratosphere halogen, hydrogen, and nitrogen compounds that are important in stratospheric ozone destruction. Given here is an update of the existing concentration time series for chlorocarbons, nitrous oxide, and methane. Also reviewed is information on halogen containing species and the use of these data for establishing trends. Also reviewed is evidence on trends in trace gases that influence tropospheric chemistry and thus the tropospheric lifetimes of source gases, such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or nitrogen oxides. Much of the information is given in tabular form.

  7. Important step in radiation carcinogenesis may be inactivation of cellular genes

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.A.; Diamond, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The loss of genetic material may result in a predisposition to malignant disease. The best studied example is retinoblastoma where deletion or transcriptional inactivation of a specific gene is associated with the development of the tumor. When hereditary retinoblastoma patients are treated with radiation, the incidence of osteosarcoma within the treatment field is extremely high compared to other cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. These data, together with cytogenetic and molecular data on the development of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment suggest that radiation-induced deletions of critical DNA sequences may be an important event in radiation carcinogenesis. Therefore, we propose that radiation-induced tumors may result from deletion of tissue specific regulatory genes. Base alterations caused by radiation in dominantly transforming oncogenes may also contribute to radiation carcinogenesis.62 references.

  8. Efficient frequency upconversion of coherent radiation from 10.26 to 1.187 ?m in a GaSe crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Ding, Yujie J.; Zotova, Ioulia B.

    2009-10-01

    Frequency upconversion of laser pulses at 10.26 ?m to those at 1.187 ?m was achieved in the presence of Nd:YAG laser pulses based on difference-frequency generation in a 10 mm-long GaSe crystal. The highest power conversion efficiency for the parametric conversion was determined to be 20.9%, corresponding to the photon conversion efficiency of 2.42%. This value is two orders of magnitude higher than the highest value reported on GaSe in the literature. The saturation of the output power at 1.187 ?m as the input power at 10.26 ?m was increased, due to the back conversion, i.e. 1.187 ?m + 10.26 ?m ? 1.064 ?m, was clearly evidenced. Such a parametric process has potential for achieving sensitive detections of mid-infrared radiation.

  9. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Babu, S. S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. K.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    The dominant sources of black carbon (BC) in South Asia and surrounding regions are inferred during March-May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period by introducing BC tracers in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry. The model reproduced the magnitude, temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed during the ICARB ship-cruise. Average and SD (representing the spatial and temporal variability) in observed and modeled BC mass concentrations along the ship-track are estimated as 755 ± 734 and 732 ± 913 ng m-3 respectively. Average modeled values at most of the inland stations were also found to fall within the range of observed values. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal during the pre-monsoon season. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 70 and 28 % of the average ± SD BC mass concentration (1480 ± 5920 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (49 %) and industrial (37 %) sectors appear to be the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominated. We find that, while all parts of continental India contributed to anthropogenic BC over the Bay of Bengal, contribution over the Arabian Sea came mostly from southern Peninsula. We also show that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contribute up to 30 % of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that it is important to consider non-local sources along with the local emissions while designing strategies for mitigating BC emissions.

  10. Sources of Black Carbon Aerosols in South Asia and Surrounding Regions During the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G.; Babu, S. S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Krishnamoorthy, K.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    The dominant sources of black carbon (BC) in South Asia and surrounding regions are inferred during March-May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)) by introducing BC tracers in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal during the pre-monsoon season. The model reproduced well the magnitude, temporal and spatial variability of BC concentrations observed during the ICARB ship-cruise. Average and standard deviation (representing the spatial and temporal variability) in observed and modeled BC mass concentrations along the ship-track are estimated as 755±734 ng m-3 and 732±913 ng m-3 respectively, where the standard deviation represents the spatial and temporal variability in the region. Average modeled values at most of the inland stations were also found to fall within the range of observed values. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 70% and 28% of the BC mass concentration in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (49%) and industrial (37%) sectors appear to be the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that, while all parts of continental India contributed to anthropogenic BC over Bay of Bengal, contribution over the Arabian Sea came mostly from southern Peninsula. We also show that long-range transport of anthropogenic emissions contribute up to 30% of BC concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that it is important to consider non-local sources along with the local emissions while designing strategies for mitigating BC emissions.

  11. Radiatively important parameters best estimate (RIPBE) value-added product (VAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Shippert,T.; Jensen,M.; McFarlane, S.; Mather, J.; Flynn, C.; Mlawer, E.; Delamere, J.; Oreopoulos, L.; Turner, D.; Xie, S.

    2010-03-15

    Currently, to calculate radiative heating rate profiles for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) product, radiatively important parameters (water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, aerosol properties, and cloud properties) from multiple VAPs and datastreams are combined into input text files that are then used to run the RRTM radiative transfer codes. These input parameters have different temporal and spatial scales and are difficult to extract from the text files to be used for other purposes such as running other radiative transfer codes, analyzing results, or error tracking. The purpose of the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP is to improve this process by creating a clearly identified set of inputs for BBHRP (and other radiation codes) on a uniform vertical and temporal grid. This process will decouple the input/output portion of the BBHRP from the core physics (the RRTM radiative transfer model) and will add error tracking and version information to the input data set. Critical parameters (which must exist for the radiation code to be run) will be designated; for other parameters, climatological or fixed values will be used when the preferred values are missing. This should increase the number of cases for which radiative transfer calculations can be run. In all cases, flags will clearly identify the source for each parameter. RIPBE will serve multiple functions: (1) it will provide a clearly identifiable set of inputs for BBHRP, (2) it will facilitate the use of BBHRP as a retrieval and radiation code development testbed by providing a vehicle for easily extracting and swapping input parameters needed to conduct radiative transfer calculations, and (3) it will be a complement to the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) VAP and will provide a significantly expanded set of parameters for model evaluation in a showcase data set form. At the ASR meeting, we will present examples and evaluation of the initial RIPBE dataset at SGP.

  12. Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE): An ARM Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, S; Shippert, T; Mather, J

    2011-06-30

    The Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to create a complete set of clearly identified set of parameters on a uniform vertical and temporal grid to use as input to a radiative transfer model. One of the main drivers for RIPBE was as input to the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP, but we also envision using RIPBE files for user-run radiative transfer codes, as part of cloud/aerosol retrieval testbeds, and as input to averaged datastreams for model evaluation.

  13. Oxidant gases

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The acute and chronic action of the oxidant gases ozone, nitrogen dioxide and oxygen on the morphological appearance of cells of the alveolar and bronchiolar epithelium is reviewed. Type I cells of the alveolar and ciliated cells of the bronchiolar epithelium appear to be sensitive targets for the oxidant gases. The degree of damage is influenced by age, nutritional status and the development of tolerance.

  14. Using Radiation Risk Models in Cancer Screening Simulations: Important Assumptions and Effects on Outcome Projections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Janie M.; McMahon, Pamela M.; Lowry, Kathryn P.; Omer, Zehra B.; Eisenberg, Jonathan D.; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Gazelle, G. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of incorporating radiation risk into microsimulation (first-order Monte Carlo) models for breast and lung cancer screening to illustrate effects of including radiation risk on patient outcome projections. Materials and Methods: All data used in this study were derived from publicly available or deidentified human subject data. Institutional review board approval was not required. The challenges of incorporating radiation risk into simulation models are illustrated with two cancer screening models (Breast Cancer Model and Lung Cancer Policy Model) adapted to include radiation exposure effects from mammography and chest computed tomography (CT), respectively. The primary outcome projected by the breast model was life expectancy (LE) for BRCA1 mutation carriers. Digital mammographic screening beginning at ages 25, 30, 35, and 40 years was evaluated in the context of screenings with false-positive results and radiation exposure effects. The primary outcome of the lung model was lung cancerspecific mortality reduction due to annual screening, comparing two diagnostic CT protocols for lung nodule evaluation. The Metropolis-Hastings algorithm was used to estimate the mean values of the results with 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs). Results: Without radiation exposure effects, the breast model indicated that annual digital mammography starting at age 25 years maximized LE (72.03 years; 95% UI: 72.01 years, 72.05 years) and had the highest number of screenings with false-positive results (2.0 per woman). When radiation effects were included, annual digital mammography beginning at age 30 years maximized LE (71.90 years; 95% UI: 71.87 years, 71.94 years) with a lower number of screenings with false-positive results (1.4 per woman). For annual chest CT screening of 50-year-old females with no follow-up for nodules smaller than 4 mm in diameter, the lung model predicted lung cancerspecific mortality reduction of 21.50% (95% UI: 20.90%, 22.10%) without radiation risk and 17.75% (95% UI: 16.97%, 18.41%) with radiation risk. Conclusion: Because including radiation exposure risk can influence long-term projections from simulation models, it is important to include these risks when conducting modeling-based assessments of diagnostic imaging. RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11110352/-/DC1 PMID:22357897

  15. Measurements of Ice Particles in Tropical Cirrus Anvils: Importance in Radiation Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Theodore; Arnott, William P.; Hallett, John; Pueschel, Rudi; Strawn, Anthony W. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Cirrus is important in the radiation balance of the global atmosphere, both at solar and thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths. In particular cirrus produced by deep convection over the oceans in the tropics may be critical in controlling processes whereby energy from warm tropical oceans is injected to different levels in the tropical atmosphere to subsequently influence not only tropical but mid latitude climate. Details of the cloud composition may differentiate between a net cooling or warming at these levels. The cloud composition may change depending on the input of nuclei from volcanic or other sources. Observations of cirrus during the FIRE-2 Project over Coffeyville, Kansas and by satellite demonstrate that cirrus, on occasion, is composed not only of larger particles with significant fall velocity (few hundred micrometers, 0.5 m/s) but much more numerous small particles, size 10-20 micrometers, with small fall velocity (cm/s), which may sometimes dominate the radiation field. This is consistent with emissivity measurements. In the thermal IR, ice absorption is strong, so that ice particles only 10 micrometers thick are opaque, at some wavelengths; on the other hand at other wavelengths and in the visible, ice is only moderately to weakly absorbing. It follows that for strongly absorbing wavelengths the average projected area of the ice particles is the important parameter, in weakly absorbing regions it is the volume (mass) of ice which is important. The shape of particles and also their internal structure may also have significant effect on their radiative properties. In order to access the role of cirrus in the radiation budget it is necessary to measure the distribution of ice particles sizes, shapes and concentrations in the regions of interest. A casual observation of any cirrus cloud shows that there is variability down to a scale of at least a few 100 m; this is confirmed by radar and lidar remote sensing. Thus aircraft measurements designed to give insight into the spatial distribution of radiation properties of ice crystals must be capable of examination of concentration, size and shape over a distance ideally of 100 m or less and to detect particles down to a size below which radiative effects are no longer significant.

  16. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  17. Dependence of the absorption of pulsed CO{sub 2}-laser radiation by silane on wavenumber, fluence, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of absorbing and nonabsorbing gases

    SciTech Connect

    Blazejowski, J.; Gruzdiewa, L.; Rulewski, J.; Lampe, F.W.

    1995-05-15

    The absorption of three lines [{ital P}(20), 944.2 cm{sup {minus}1}; {ital P}(14), 949.2 cm{sup {minus}1}; and {ital R}(24), 978.5 cm{sup {minus}1}] of the pulsed CO{sub 2} laser (00{sup 0}1--10{sup 0}0 transition) by SiH{sub 4} was measured at various pulse energy, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of the compound and nonabsorbing foreign gases. In addition, low intensity infrared absorption spectrum of silane was compared with high intensity absorption characteristics for all lines of the pulsed CO{sub 2} laser. The experimental dependencies show deviations from the phenomenological Beer--Lambert law which can be considered as arising from the high intensity of an incident radiation and collisions of absorbing molecules with surroundings. These effects were included into the expression, being an extended form of the Beer--Lambert law, which reasonably approximates all experimental data. The results, except for extending knowledge on the interaction of a high power laser radiation with matter, can help understanding and planning processes leading to preparation of silicon-containing technologically important materials.

  18. On the generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and x radiation during nanosecond discharges in dense gases (results and discussion)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Rybka, D. B.; Baksht, E. H.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2007-09-01

    Results of investigations of the generation of subnanosecond runaway electron beams and x radiation in gas diodes at elevated pressures are presented. The energy distributions of runaway electron beams generated in air at atmospheric pressure and the amplitude and duration of beam current pulses downstream of the foil have been measured, and also the mechanism of generation of a runaway electron beam has been analyzed. To record the beam current pulses, a collector which provided ˜50-ps time resolution and a Tektronix TDS6604 real-time oscilloscope were used in the experiment. It has been shown that the new experimental data and model predictions confirm in the main the results earlier obtained at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Russian Academy of Sciences Siberian Division. Evidence is cited that the key statements of L. P. Babich are erroneous.

  19. Importance of maintenance therapy in C225-induced enhancement of tumor control by fractionated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Milas, Luka . E-mail: lmilas@mdanderson.org; Fang, F.-M.; Mason, Kathy A.; Valdecanas, David B.S.; Hunter, Nancy; Koto, Masashi; Ang, K. Kian

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: C225 strongly enhances tumor radioresponse when given concurrently with radiotherapy. We investigated whether additional therapeutic benefit could be achieved by continuing maintenance treatment with C225 after the completion of fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A431 xenografts were treated with local irradiation or combined with C225 by two different schedules: (1) 6 h before the first dose of irradiation and at 3-day intervals for a total of 3 doses during the 7-day fractionated radiotherapy, or (2) 6 doses of C225 given both during radiotherapy and continuing for 3 additional doses after radiotherapy. Tumor cure was assessed by the radiation dose yielding local tumor control in 50% of animals (TCD{sub 50}), and time to recurrence was also determined. Results: Both treatment schedules increased radiocurability as evidenced by reductions in TCD{sub 50}, but the effect was greater when C225 was given both during and after radiotherapy. C225 reduced the TCD{sub 50} of 83.1 (73.2-124.8) Gy by radiation only to 46.2 (39.1-57.5) Gy when given during radiotherapy and to 30.8 (22.2-38.0) Gy when given during and after radiotherapy. Dose modification factors were 1.8 when C225 was given during radiotherapy and 2.7 when given both during and after radiotherapy. C225 was also effective in delaying the onset of tumor recurrences, and was more effective when given as both concurrent and maintenance therapy. Conclusions: Data showed that C225 strongly enhanced the curative effect of fractionated radiation, and its effect was greater if administration was extended beyond the end of radiotherapy. This important finding may influence future designs of clinical trials combining anti-EGFR (anti-epidermal growth factor receptor) agents with radiotherapy.

  20. Perceived Incidence and Importance of Lay-Ideas on Ionizing Radiation: Results of a Delphi-Study among Radiation-Experts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eijkelhof, H. M. C.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Described are lay-ideas which may exist about ionizing radiation, the importance of these ideas for risk management, and the relationships between various lay-ideas. Lay-ideas were used to gain a better insight into the problems of learning about ionizing radiation and to construct appropriate teaching materials and strategies. (KR)

  1. Measurement of Selected Organic Trace Gases During TRACE-P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Elliot

    2004-01-01

    Major goals of the TRACE-P mission were: 1) to investigate the chemical composition of radiatively important gases, aerosols, and their precursors in the Asian outflow over the western Pacific, and 2) to describe and understand the chemical evolution of the Asian outflow as it is transported and mixed into the global troposphere. The research performed as part of this proposal addressed these major goals with a study of the organic chemical composition of gases in the TRACE-P region. This work was a close collaboration with the Blake/Rowland research group at UC-Irvine, and they have provided a separate report for their funded effort.

  2. Important Role of Autophagy in Endothelial Cell Response to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kalamida, Dimitra; Karagounis, Ilias V.; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Vasculature damage is an important contributor to the side-effects of radiotherapy. The aim of this study is to provide insights into the radiobiology of the autophagic response of endothelial cells. Methods and Materials Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) were exposed to 2 Gy of ionizing radiation (IR) and studied using confocal microscopy and western blot analysis, at 4 and 8 days post-irradiation. The role of autophagy flux in HUVEC radio-sensitivity was also examined. Results IR-induced accumulation of LC3A+, LC3B+ and p62 cytoplasmic vacuoles, while in double immunostaining with lysosomal markers (LAMP2a and CathepsinD) repression of the autophagolysosomal flux was evident. Autophagy-related proteins (ATF4, HIF1?., HIF2?, Beclin1) were, however, induced excluding an eventual repressive effect of radiation on autophagy initiating protein expression. Exposure of HUVEC to SMER28, an mTOR-independent inducer of autophagy, enhanced proLC3 and LC3A, B-I protein expression and accelerated the autophagic flux. Pre-treatment of HUVEC with SMER28 protected against the blockage of autophagic flux induced by IR and conferred radio-resistance. Suppression of LC3A/LC3B proteins with siRNAs resulted in radio-sensitization. Conclusions The current data provide a rationale for the development of novel radioprotection policies targeting the autophagic pathway. PMID:25010689

  3. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most affect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space exploration.

  4. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most effect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space explorations.

  5. Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation from cosmic ray particles is one of the main challenges for long-term human space explorations such as a permanent moon base or a trip to Mars. Material shielding may provide significant radiation protection to astronauts, and models have been developed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of different shielding materials and to predict radiation environment inside the spacecraft. In this study we determine the nuclear fragmentation cross sections which will most affect the radiation risk behind typical radiation shielding materials. These cross sections thus need more theoretical studies and accurate experimental measurements in order for us to more precisely predict the radiation risk in human space explorations.

  6. Accelerated line-by-line calculations for the radiative transfer of trace gases related to climate studies. Progress report No. 1, 15 September 1993--14 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, S.A.

    1993-11-15

    In the present study we are studying the effects of including carbon dioxide, ozone, methane, and the halocarbons in addition to water vapor in the radiating atmosphere. The study has focused on two principal issues: the effect on the spectral fluxes and cooling rates of carbon dioxide, ozone and the halocarbons at 1990 concentration levels and the change in fluxes and cooling rates as a consequence of the anticipated ten year change in the profiles of these species. For the latter study the water vapor profiles have been taken as invariant in time. The radiative line-by-line calculations using LBLRTM (Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model) have been performed for tropical (TRP), mid-latitude winter (MLW) and mid-latitude summer (MLS) model atmospheres. The halocarbons considered in the present study are CCl{sub 4}, CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-22. In addition to considering the radiative effects of carbon dioxide at 355 ppM, the assumed current level, we have also obtained results for doubled carbon dioxide at 710 ppM. An important focus of the current research effort is the effect of the ozone depletion profile on atmospheric radiative effects.

  7. Physical and Optical/Radiative Characteristics of Aerosol and Cloud Particles in Tropical Cirrus: Importance in Radiation Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Howard, S. D.; Foster, T. C.; Hallett, J.; Arnott, W. P.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Whether cirrus clouds heat or cool the Earth-atmosphere system depends on the relative importance of the cloud shortwave albedo effect and the cloud thermal greenhouse effect. Both are determined by the distribution of ice condensate with cloud particle size. The microphysics instrument package flown aboard the NASA DC-8 in TOGA/COARE included an ice crystal replicator, a 2D Greyscale Cloud Particle Probe and a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Aerosol Probe. In combination, the electro-optical instruments permitted particle size measurements between 0.5 micrometer and 2.6 millimeter diameter. Ice crystal replicas were used to validate signals from the electrooptical instruments. Both optical and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to analyze aerosol and ice particle replicas between 0.1 micrometer and several 100 micrometer diameter. In first approximation, the combined aerosol-cloud particle spectrum in several clouds followed a power law N alpha D(sup -2.5). Thus, large cloud particles carried most of the condensate mass, while small cloud and aerosol particles determined the surface area. The mechanism of formation of small particles is growth of (hygroscopic, possibly ocean-derived) aerosol particles along the Kohler curves. The concentration of small particles is higher and less variable in space and time, and their tropospheric residence time is longer, than those of large cloud particles because of lower sedimentation velocities. Small particles shift effective cloud particle radii to sizes much smaller than the mean diameter of the cloud particles. This causes an increase in shortwave reflectivity and IR emissivity, and a decrease in transmissivity. Occasionally, the cloud reflectivity increased with altitude (decreasing temperature) stronger than did cloud emissivity, yielding enhanced radiative cooling at higher altitudes. Thus, cirrus produced by deep convection in the tropics may be critical in controlling processes whereby energy from warm tropical oceans is injected to different levels in the atmosphere to subsequently influence not only tropical but mid-latitude climate.

  8. Present state of knowledge of the upper atmosphere: An assessment report; processes that control ozone and other climatically important trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. T.; Geller, M. A.; Stolarski, R. S.; Hampson, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    The state of knowledge of the upper atmosphere was assessed as of January 1986. The physical, chemical, and radiative processes which control the spatial and temporal distribution of ozone in the atmosphere; the predicted magnitude of ozone perturbations and climate changes for a variety of trace gas scenarios; and the ozone and temperature data used to detect the presence or absence of a long term trend were discussed. This assessment report was written by a small group of NASA scientists, was peer reviewed, and is based primarily on the comprehensive international assessment document entitled Atmospheric Ozone 1985: Assessment of Our Understanding of the Processes Controlling Its Present Distribution and Change, to be published as the World Meteorological Organization Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project Report No. 16.

  9. Theoretical studies of spectroscopic problems of importance for atmospheric radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    Many of the instruments used to deduce the physical parameters of the Earth's atmosphere necessary for climate studies or for pollution monitoring (for instance, temperature versus pressure or number densities of trace molecules) rely on the existence of accurate spectroscopic data and an understanding of the physical processes responsible for the absorption or emission of radiation. During the summer, research was either continued or begun on three distinct problems: (1) an improved theoretical framework for the calculation of the far-wing absorption of allowed spectral lines; (2) a refinement of the calculation of the collision-induced fundamental spectrum of N2; and (3) an investigation of possible line-mixing effects in the fundamental spectrum of CH4. Progress in these three areas is summarized below. During the past few years, we have developed a theoretical framework for the calculation of the absorption of radiation by the far wings of spectral lines. Such absorption due to water vapor plays a crucial role in the greenhouse effect as well as limiting the retrieval of temperature profiles from satellite data. Several improvements in the theory have been made and the results are being prepared for publication. Last year we published results for the theoretical calculation of the absorption of radiation due to the dipoles induced during binary collisions of N2 molecules using independently measured molecular parameters; the results were in reasonable agreement with experimental data. However, recent measurements have revealed new fine structure that has been attributed to line-mixing effects. We do not think that this is correct, rather that the structure results from short-range anisotropic dipoles. We are in the process of including this refinement in our theoretical calculation in order to compare with the new experimental data. Subtle changes in the spectra of CH4 measured by researchers at Langley have also been attributed to line-mixing effects. By analyzing the same spectral lines we have attempted to verify or rule out possible line-mixing mechanisms. Due to the complexity and richness of the spectrum of this highly symmetric molecule, as well as the small magnitude of the effects, a detailed first-principle calculation of the mixing is a difficult problem. Before such a program is undertaken it is important to glean as much information as possible concerning the possible mechanisms by a systematic analysis of the existing data.

  10. Global tropospheric chemistry models for radiatively important trace species: Design and research recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.; Brothers, A.J.; Berkowitz, C.M.; Easter, R.C.; Ghan, S.J.; Saylor, R.D.

    1993-12-01

    Changes in the Earth`s climate could significantly affect regional and global concentrations of trace species that are criteria pollutants regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The policy community also needs to know how changes in global natural and anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, particulate aerosols, and aerosol precursors will affect the distribution and concentration of these pollutants. This report maps out one path for obtaining this information.

  11. TWO-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE IMPORTANCE OF PARTIAL IONIZATION IN THE CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2012-07-10

    The bulk of the solar chromosphere is weakly ionized and interactions between ionized particles and neutral particles likely have significant consequences for the thermodynamics of the chromospheric plasma. We investigate the importance of introducing neutral particles into the MHD equations using numerical 2.5D radiative MHD simulations obtained with the Bifrost code. The models span the solar atmosphere from the upper layers of the convection zone to the low corona, and solve the full MHD equations with non-gray and non-LTE radiative transfer, and thermal conduction along the magnetic field. The effects of partial ionization are implemented using the generalized Ohm's law, i.e., we consider the effects of the Hall term and ambipolar diffusion in the induction equation. The approximations required in going from three fluids to the generalized Ohm's law are tested in our simulations. The Ohmic diffusion, Hall term, and ambipolar diffusion show strong variations in the chromosphere. These strong variations of the various magnetic diffusivities are absent or significantly underestimated when, as has been common for these types of studies, using the semi-empirical VAL-C model as a basis for estimates. In addition, we find that differences in estimating the magnitude of ambipolar diffusion arise depending on which method is used to calculate the ion-neutral collision frequency. These differences cause uncertainties in the different magnetic diffusivity terms. In the chromosphere, we find that the ambipolar diffusion is of the same order of magnitude or even larger than the numerical diffusion used to stabilize our code. As a consequence, ambipolar diffusion produces a strong impact on the modeled atmosphere. Perhaps more importantly, it suggests that at least in the chromospheric domain, self-consistent simulations of the solar atmosphere driven by magnetoconvection can accurately describe the impact of the dominant form of resistivity, i.e., ambipolar diffusion. This suggests that such simulations may be more realistic in their approach to the lower solar atmosphere (which directly drives the coronal volume) than previously assumed.

  12. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Suresh Babu, S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-05-19

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March–May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inland sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model–observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average ± standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 ± 2353 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61%) and industrial (23%) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.

  13. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March-May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inland sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model-observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average +/- standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 +/- 2353 ng m(-3)) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61 %) and industrial (23 %) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.

  14. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Suresh Babu, S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-05-19

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March–May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inlandmore » sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model–observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average ± standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 ± 2353 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61%) and industrial (23%) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.« less

  15. On the possibility of the generation of high harmonics with photon energies greater than 10 keV upon interaction of intense mid-IR radiation with neutral gases

    SciTech Connect

    Emelina, A S; Emelin, M Yu; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2014-05-30

    Based on the analytical quantum-mechanical description in the framework of the modified strong-field approximation, we have investigated high harmonic generation of mid-IR laser radiation in neutral gases taking into account the depletion of bound atomic levels of the working medium and the electron magnetic drift in a high-intensity laser field. The possibility is shown to generate high-order harmonics with photon energies greater than 10 keV under irradiation of helium atoms by intense femtosecond laser pulses with a centre wavelength of 8 10.6 ?m. (interaction of radiation with matter)

  16. Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints for Normal-Tissue Effects of Radiation Therapy: The Importance of Dose-Volume Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzen, Soren M.; Parliament, Matthew; Deasy, Joseph O.; Dicker, Adam; Curran, Walter J.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2010-03-01

    Biomarkers are of interest for predicting or monitoring normal tissue toxicity of radiation therapy. Advances in molecular radiobiology provide novel leads in the search for normal tissue biomarkers with sufficient sensitivity and specificity to become clinically useful. This article reviews examples of studies of biomarkers as predictive markers, as response markers, or as surrogate endpoints for radiation side effects. Single nucleotide polymorphisms are briefly discussed in the context of candidate gene and genomewide association studies. The importance of adjusting for radiation dose distribution in normal tissue biomarker studies is underlined. Finally, research priorities in this field are identified and discussed.

  17. The Importance of Stellar Winds and Radiation in Massive Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna

    2015-08-01

    Stellar feedback, the injection of energy and momentum by stars, remains one of the largest uncertainties in star cluster formation. Massive stars dramatically affect the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) through a variety of feedback mechanisms including the direct and dust-reprocessed radiation pressure, and the hot gas shock-heated by stellar winds. These mechanisms can limit star formation efficiencies in massive star clusters (MSCs). For stellar winds, I discuss how we can use observations to constrain a range of kinetic energy loss channels, including radiative cooling, mechanical work on the cold ISM, thermal conduction, heating of dust via collisions by the hot gas, and bulk advection of thermal energy by the hot gas. I demonstrate that the kinetic energy injected by stellar winds is not a significant contributor to stellar feedback. I argue instead that radiation pressure is likely the dominant feedback mechanism in MSCs formed in massive, dense molecular clouds with escape speeds greater than 10 km/s, at least for the ~4 Myr before supernovae begin. Thus simulations of MSC formation require an accurate treatment of the radiation field which captures the first absorption event of stellar irradiation and also follows the diffuse dust-reprocessed radiation field. To this end, we have developed a multi-frequency hybrid radiation scheme in the astrophysical AMR code ORION to be used in such simulations.

  18. Importance of representing optical depth variability for estimates of global line-shaped contrail radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Krcher, Bernd; Burkhardt, Ulrike; Ponater, Michael; Frmming, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Estimates of the global radiative forcing by line-shaped contrails differ mainly due to the large uncertainty in contrail optical depth. Most contrails are optically thin so that their radiative forcing is roughly proportional to their optical depth and increases with contrail coverage. In recent assessments, the best estimate of mean contrail radiative forcing was significantly reduced, because global climate model simulations pointed at lower optical depth values than earlier studies. We revise these estimates by comparing the probability distribution of contrail optical depth diagnosed with a climate model with the distribution derived from a microphysical, cloud-scale model constrained by satellite observations over the United States. By assuming that the optical depth distribution from the cloud model is more realistic than that from the climate model, and by taking the difference between the observed and simulated optical depth over the United States as globally representative, we quantify uncertainties in the climate models diagnostic contrail parameterization. Revising the climate model results accordingly increases the global mean radiative forcing estimate for line-shaped contrails by a factor of 3.3, from 3.5mW/m2 to 11.6mW/m2 for the year 1992. Furthermore, the satellite observations and the cloud model point at higher global mean optical depth of detectable contrails than often assumed in radiative transfer (off-line) studies. Therefore, we correct estimates of contrail radiative forcing from off-line studies as well. We suggest that the global net radiative forcing of line-shaped persistent contrails is in the range 820mW/m2 for the air traffic in the year 2000. PMID:20974909

  19. Determination of Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Human Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical method to determine which partial cross sections of nuclear fragmentations most affect the shielded dose equivalent due to exposure to galactic cosmic rays. The cross sections thus determined will require more theoretical and/or experimental studies in order for us to better predict, reduce and mitigate the radiation exposure in human space explorations.

  20. Some aspects of radiation-induced free-radical chemistry of biologically important molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Sonntag, Clemens

    Biologically relevant material is usually associated with considerable amounts of water; e.g. the living cell contains about 70% water. When ionizing radiation interacts with such material one must consider two modes of energy deposition: the direct effect (ionizing radiation is absorbed by the biomolecules) and the indirect effect (ionizing radiation is absorbed by the surrounding water). In the direct effect, radical cations plus electrons, and excited states of the biomolecules are formed. In the indirect effect the water is decomposed resulting in the formation of the water radicals .OH, H . and e -aq. These reactive intermediates then interact with the biomolecules. When such systems are irradiated oxygen is often present. As a result of this, the radicals formed in the biomolecules by the various routes are converted into the corresponding peroxyl radicals. In certain cases, e.g. with the nucleobases of DNA, radical cations can be produced in dilute aqueous solutions by radiation-generated SO -4 radicals, and the fate of these nucleobase radical cations studied by pulse radiolysis and product analysis. Attention will be drawn to the fact that frequently some of the reaction products of the radical cations with water are identical to those formed by OH radical attack, but that there are also marked differences. Similarly, protonation of radical anions (formed by the reaction of solvated electrons with the biomolecules) and the reaction of H-atoms with these molecules can lead to radical intermediates with considerably differing characteristics. Our present knowledge of the variety of reactions of the peroxyl radicals occuring in aqueous solutions will be briefly discussed, emphasizing the large variety of HO .2/O -2 elimination reactions and pointing to the reversibility of the oxygen addition (RO .2?R . + O 2) in some systems recently studied.

  1. Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Courtney

    2012-12-13

    Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

  2. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi (Hoffman Estates, IL)

    1986-01-01

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  3. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.

    1986-08-19

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  4. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.

    1986-01-01

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  5. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.

    1986-08-26

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  6. On the importance of prompt oxygen changes for hypofractionated radiation treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissick, Michael; Campos, David; van der Kogel, Albert; Kimple, Randall

    2013-10-01

    This discussion is motivated by observations of prompt oxygen changes occurring prior to a significant number of cancer cells dying (permanently stopping their metabolic activity) from therapeutic agents like large doses of ionizing radiation. Such changes must be from changes in the vasculature that supplies the tissue or from the metabolic changes in the tissue itself. An adapted linear-quadratic treatment is used to estimate the cell survival variation magnitudes from repair and reoxygenation from a two-fraction treatment in which the second fraction would happen prior to significant cell death from the first fraction, in the large fraction limit. It is clear the effects of oxygen changes are likely to be the most significant factor for hypofractionation because of large radiation doses. It is a larger effect than repair. Optimal dose timing should be determined by the peak oxygen timing. A call is made to prioritize near real time measurements of oxygen dynamics in tumors undergoing hypofractionated treatments in order to make these treatments adaptable and patient-specific.

  7. Radiation track structure is not only important in determining the response of traversed cells but also non-traversed cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Mark

    2012-07-01

    The spatial distribution of energy deposition on the scale of DNA, cells and tissue for both low and high-LET radiation is important in determining the subsequent biological response in DNA, cells and ultimately people. In irradiated cells, the biological response has been shown to be critically dependant on the clustering of damage to DNA on the nanometre scale, with high-LET radiation not only producing a higher frequency of complex DNA damage but also typically producing damage sites of greater complexity than those produced by low-LET radiation. The differences in the energy distribution on the micron/cellular scale are also important with regards to chromosome aberration formation. The traversal of a cell by a high-LET track typically produces a non-homogeneous dose distribution through a cell nucleus and correlated DNA double-strand breaks along the path, resulting in an increased probability of complex chromosomal rearrangements (3 or more breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). In addition, in recent years it has become increasing clear that cells do not act in isolation, but the ultimate response of a cell or tissue is dependent on intercellular signalling. This becomes increasingly important at the low doses, or low dose rates, associated with typical human exposures. In order to help characterise the underlying mechanism of intercellular signalling, and how they are perturbed following exposure to ionising radiation, a previously well-defined model system of intercellular induction of apoptosis (IIA) was used, where neighbouring normal cells selectively eliminate transformed cells through cytokine (TGF-beta) and ROS/RNS signalling. The rate of apoptosis in unirradiated transformed cells was found to be enhanced even after extremely low doses of both low-LET (2 mGy gamma-rays) and high-LET (0.3 mGy alpha-particles) with the enhancement independent of dose and radiation quality at medium to high doses. The level of stimulation was found to be also dependent on the fraction of cells irradiated, cell type, levels of TGF-beta, distance between cell populations and oxygen concentration. The study shows that the stimulation of intercellular signalling by radiation required both sufficient energy deposition within irradiated cells and fraction of cells irradiated, with the response dependent on radiation quality only at low doses or when a small fraction of cells are irradiated. These results will be discussed in terms of their potential implications to risks associated with typical human exposures.

  8. The Importance of Technical Reachback in the Adjudication of Radiation Alarms

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W M; Allen, R W

    2009-03-18

    The large-scale deployment of radiation sensors at borders, ports-of-entry and other locations carries two disparate priorities: the reliable detection and identification of threat materials and the rapid characterization of non-threat materials comprised of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) and legitimate radioactive materials in streams of commerce. These priorities are partially achieved through the technologies contained in the detection systems and the procedures developed for their operation. However, questions and ambiguities will occur. Without established capabilities and procedures for the operators of these detector systems to 'reach back' to trained spectroscopists and appropriate subject matter experts, the system will likely experience an unacceptable number of response operations and delays resolving alarms. Technical reachback operations need to be able to address the priorities discussed above while causing minimal perturbations in the flow of legitimate streams of commerce. Yet when necessary, reachback needs to be able to rapidly mobilize the appropriate response assets.

  9. Importance of initial-state radiation to the search for the top quark at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haim, Dan

    1989-12-01

    A study was performed on initial-state radiation in the process of heavy-top-quark production, at hadron colliders (both the Fermilab Tevatron and the Superconducting Super Collider). In particular, we studied events with the hard subprocesses gg-->tt and qq-->tt, with the subsequent semileptonic decay tt-->bb+l+l-+missing pT. Using the Webber-Marchesini Monte Carlo program herwig, we produced 5000 events of this process, using top-quark masses of 100, 150, and 200 GeV. We find that in the process of tt production, when the top quark is heavier than the W boson, the initial-state radiation produces jets that can obscure the nature of the tt decay. These jets, which are mainly gluon jets, pass all the widely used cuts that are set for top-quark detection. The events therefore look like multijet events, rather than pure two-jet events. We find that there are many pure two-jet events which consist of b or b jet plus an extra gluon jet. The effect is most prominent for top-quark mass near the W mass, 100 GeV in our case. For heavier top quark, 150 and 200 GeV, the cuts that are put on the leptons and the missing energy, which come off the top-quark decay, basically eliminate this effect. The significance of this effect will extend beyond the pure tt production channel, since it is resident in every subprocess at hadron colliders.

  10. ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL RADIATIVELY IMPORTANT TRACE GASES (RITG) EMISSION: DEVELOPMENT OF A TRACE GAS ACCOUNTING SYSTEM (T-GAS) FOR 14 COUNTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a Phase 2 study to (1) develop and test a carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions model for 14 countries; (2) conduct a limited test of the model's forecasting capability by estimating and comparing emissions forecasts for Poland with those developed by other m...

  11. Rational use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy: the importance of clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    De Neve, Wilfried; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2012-01-01

    During the last 2 decades, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) became a standard technique despite its drawbacks of volume delineation, planning, robustness of delivery, challenging quality assurance, and cost as compared with non-IMRT. The theoretic advantages of IMRT dose distributions are generally accepted, but the clinical advantages remain debatable because of the lack of clinical assessment of the effort that is required to overshadow the disadvantages. Rational IMRT use requires a positive advantage/drawback balance. Only 5 randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 3 in the breast and 2 in the head and neck, which compare IMRT with non-IMRT (2-dimensional technique in four fifths of the trials), have been published (as of March 2011), and all had toxicity as the primary endpoint. More than 50 clinical trials compared results of IMRT-treated patients with a non-IMRT group, mostly historical controls. RCTs systematically showed a lower toxicity in IMRT-treated patients, and the non-RCTs confirmed these findings. Toxicity reduction, counterbalancing the drawbacks of IMRT, was convincing for breast and head and neck IMRT. For other tumor sites, the arguments favoring IMRT are weaker because of the inability to control bias outside the randomized setting. For anticancer efficacy endpoints, like survival, disease-specific survival, or locoregional control, the balance between advantages and drawbacks is fraught with uncertainties because of the absence of robust clinical data. PMID:22177877

  12. Some important issues in developing basic radiation protection recommendations: dosimetric aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.H.

    1984-03-01

    Some aspects of the difficulties encountered in the dose equivalent system used in radiation protection are explored and recent work to improve these deficiencies described. The philosophical advantages of a departure from the dose equivalent-based system and its replacement by a risk-based system are briefly discussed. The definition of dose equivalent and the debate concerning its physical dimensions and units are described. Dose equivalent is related to other physiological quantities in physics and the treatment of these quantities in the International System of Units compared. Practical problems in the determination of dose equivalent are illustrated using neutrons as an example. The proliferation of operational quantities for the evaluation of neutron dose equivalent and the concomitant potential for confusion when determinations of neutron dose equivalent are intercompared is described. The evaluation of fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients and methods of interpolation between recommended values are described. Particular emphasis is given to the accuracy and precision of dose equivalent estimation. Recent work of a Task Group of the ICRP to improve recommended conversion coefficients and the work of an ICRU committee to improve the definition of operational dose equivalent quantities is summarized. 125 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  13. Hope and challenge: the importance of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for cutaneous vitamin D synthesis and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Reichrath, Jrg; Reichrath, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Solar ultraviolet (UV)-radiation is the most important environmental risk factor for the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (most importantly basal and squamous cell carcinomas), that represent the most common malignancies in Caucasian populations. To prevent these malignancies, public health campaigns were developed to improve the awareness of the general population of the role of UV-radiation. The requirements of vitamin D is mainly achieved by UV-B-induced cutaneous photosynthesis, and the vitamin D-mediated positive effects of UV-radiation were not always adequately considered in these campaigns; a strict "no sun policy" might lead to vitamin D-deficiency. This dilemma represents a serious problem in many populations, for an association of vitamin D-deficiency and multiple independent diseases has been convincingly demonstrated. It is crucial that guidelines for UV-exposure (e.g. in skin cancer prevention campaigns) consider these facts and give recommendations how to prevent vitamin D-deficiency. In this review, we analyze the present literature to help developing well-balanced guidelines on UV-protection that ensure an adequate vitamin D-status without increasing the risk to develop UV-induced skin cancer. PMID:22536771

  14. Viscosity of dissociating gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, S. H.; Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Recent calculations of the viscosity of iodine suggest that existing predictions of viscosities of high-temperature (up to several thousands degrees) gases should be revised, with much more attention being paid to the atomic and molecular interactions in the gas. As the gas starts to dissociate, the frequency of atom-molecule and atom-atom interactions increases, and those collisions must be taken into account in calculations of viscosity at high temperature. In this study, the iodine is chosen as an example, and the dependence of its viscosity on the gas dissociation degree is shown. Several possible channels for I+I interaction are considered in addition to I+I2 and I2+I2 collisions, and the resulting collision integrals are averaged over all the important channels.

  15. Biologically important radiation damage in DNA. Annual progress report, May 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.F.

    1994-03-01

    Most DNA damage by the hydroxyl radical is confined to the bases, and this base damage represents an important component of locally multiply demanded sites (LMOS). The yields of the major damaged bases have been determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. For our propose, it was necessary to convert a known fraction of these damaged bases to strand breaks and then assay these labile sites as the increase in strand break yield over the normally observed level. Three potential agents by which this strategy of conversion of base damage to strand break could be implemented were identified in the original application: 1, Sl nuclease; 2, piperidine; and 3, base damage specific enzymes.

  16. Emissions of biogenic sulfur gases from northern bogs and fens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur gases are important components of the global cycle of S. They contribute to the acidity of precipitation and they influence global radiation balance and climate. The role of terrestrial sources of biogenic S and their effect on atmospheric chemistry remain as major unanswered questions in our understanding of the natural S cycle. The role of northern wetlands as sources and sinks of gaseous S by measuring rates of S gas exchange as a function of season, hydrologic conditions, and gradients in tropic status was investigated. Experiments were conducted in wetlands in New Hampshire, particularly a poor fen, and in Mire 239, a poor fen at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario. Emissions were determined using Teflon enclosures, gas cryotrapping methods and gas chromatography (GC) with flame photometric detection. Dynamic (sweep flow) and static enclosures were employed which yielded similar results. Dissolved S gases and methane were determined by gas stripping followed by GC.

  17. Green House Gases Measurement At Maitri, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. L.; Ghude, S. D.; Arya, B. C.

    The earth's environment is constantly changing. The scientific evidence indicates that these changes are result of a complex interplay among a number of natural and human related systems. Therefore in the recent times, concern has grown about global change - which is related to natural and anthropogenic alteration of the Earth's environment. Among them the important issues, which are dangerous for the survival of life on the earth, are global green house warming, urban and regional atmospheric pollution, regional increases in tropospheric ozone, the decrease in stratospheric ozone in general and ozone hole over Antarctica in particular, acid rain etc. The monitoring of green house gases has an important role in the understanding of global change. The green house effect of CO_2 increase which has been the subject of scientific studies since later half of the nineteenth century but the CO_2 problem gained tremendous momentum during last two decades. Now it has been recognized that the green house effect due to trace gases such as CFC's, CH_4, O_3, N_2O, H_2O etc. is as much as that due to CO_2 while it was only due to CO_2 during pre industrial era to 1950's. In view of the above various state of art systems have been set up at Maitri, Antarctica for measurements of various green house gases, column ozone, water vapour, UV-B radiation, aerosol optical depth and vertical profiles of ozone which in turn will go a long way to fill in the gaps and provide valuable data for modeling studies. An automated gas chromatograph based experiment was setup in January 2002 at Maitri, for the measurements of green house gases, such as Carbon Dioxide (CO_2), Methane (CH_4) etc. The average concentration of CO_2 during the year 2002 is found out to be 367.42 ppm and average concentration of CH_4 from February to May 2003 is found out to be 1.69 ppm. An increase of about 1.6 ppm of CO_2 concentration was observed during the year 2002. The hourly mean mixing ratios of CO was found in the range 30 ppb to 65 ppb. Diurnal variation in CO concentrations was systematically observed with higher CO concentration in day time sunlit period. In the present communication the salient features of the highly sophisticated system such as laser heterodyne, sun photometer, gas chromatogram, CO analyzer setup for atmospheric studies at Maitri and the results obtained will be discussed in detail.

  18. Vitamin D Synthesis by UV Radiation: the Importance of Ozone Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, W. J.; Moore, M. R.; Kimlin, M. G.

    2006-12-01

    The majority of humans rely on incidental sun exposure to maintain vitamin D sufficiency. Depending on where thresholds of vitamin D "sufficiency" are defined, it was recently stated that up to one billion people worldwide have suboptimal vitamin D levels (Bouillon, R., University of Leuven). Even in sunny southeast Queensland, the world's skin cancer capital, a 2006 study uncovered deficiency rates of up to 78% (at a threshold of 75 nmol/L of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D). Vitamin D regulates calcium absorption and inadequate levels are proven to result in osteomalacia, osteoporosis, rickets, bone pain and general skeletal weakness. Recent evidence also suggests vitamin D plays a preventative role in autoimmune diseases including numerous cancers, diabetes, schizophrenia, coronary heart disease, depression and other disorders. The most promising means of alleviating the worldwide burden of vitamin D deficiency seems to be by increased UV exposure. However, a much more mature understanding of UV exposures encountered in everyday life is required. This understanding is fundamentally founded in geophysics. UV exposures are strongly influenced by season/time of year, time of day, climate, location, pollution, aerosols and, importantly, ozone. In this work, we use computer simulations to obtain daily totals of vitamin D producing UV at numerous latitudes during one year. The ozone concentration is varied from 260 DU to 360 DU to determine the role of ozone variability on the ambient levels of vitamin D UV. Vitamin D synthesis is highly dependent on UVB. In our results, we demonstrate that this has important implications. Namely, vitamin D is strongly affected by ozone variability, since ozone filters UVB more strongly than UVA. Moreover, since erythema (sunburn) can occur at UVA wavelengths, ozone variation will more strongly affect vitamin D synthesis than erythema. Our results highlight that ozone monitoring is essential for understanding appropriate UV exposures for vitamin D health. We finally discuss implications for population health and how geophysics continues to play a vital role in addressing the widespread dilemma of vitamin D deficiency.

  19. The importance of tissue segmentation for dose calculations for kilovoltage radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Graves, Edward E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of tissue segmentation on the accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for kilovoltage radiation therapy, which are commonly used in preclinical radiotherapy studies and are also being revisited as a clinical treatment modality. The feasibility of tissue segmentation routinely done on the basis of differences in tissue mass densities was studied and a new segmentation scheme based on differences in effective atomic numbers was developed.Methods: MC dose calculations in a cylindrical mouse phantom with small cylindrical inhomogeneities consisting of 34 ICRU-44 tissues were performed using the EGSnrc?BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes. The dose to tissue was calculated for five different kilovoltage beams currently used in small animal radiotherapy: a microCT 120 kV beam, two 225 kV beams filtered with either 4 mm of Al or 0.5 mm of Cu, a heavily filtered 320 kV beam, and a 192Ir beam. The mean doses to the 34 ICRU-44 tissues as a function of tissue mass density and effective atomic number and beam energy were studied. A treatment plan for an orthotopic lung tumor model was created, and the dose distribution was calculated for three tissue segmentation schemes using 4, 8, and 39 tissue bins to assess the significance of the simulation results for kilovoltage radiotherapy.Results: In our model, incorrect assignment of adipose tissue to muscle caused dose calculation differences of 27%, 13%, and 7% for the 120 kV beam and the 225 kV beams filtered with 4 mm Al and 0.5 mm Cu, respectively. For the heavily filtered 320 kV beam and a 192Ir source, potential dose calculation differences due to tissue mis-assignment were below 4%. There was no clear relationship between the dose to tissue and its mass density for x-ray beams generated by tube potentials equal or less than 225 kV. A second order polynomial fit approximated well the absorbed dose to tissue as a function of effective atomic number for these beams. In the mouse study, the 120 kV beam dose to bone was overestimated by 100% and underestimated by 10% for the 4 and 8-tissue segmentation schemes compared to the 39-tissue segmentation scheme, respectively. Dose to adipose tissue was overestimated by 30% and underestimated by 10%, respectively. In general, organ at risk (OAR) doses were overestimated in the 4-tissue and the 8-tissue segmentation schemes compared to the 39-tissue segmentation.Conclusions: Tissue segmentation was shown to be a key parameter for dose calculations with kilovoltage beams used in small animal radiotherapy when an x-ray tube with a potential ?225 kV is used as a source. A new tissue segmentation scheme with 39 tissues based on effective number differences derived from mass density differences has been implemented. PMID:21815377

  20. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS): measurement of the carbon gases from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M.; Dickerson, R.; Marshall, B. T.; McHugh, M.; Fish, C.; Bloom, H.

    2013-09-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases remain highly uncertain [IPCC1] making quantitative predictions of atmospheric composition and their impacts. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) is a multi-purpose instrument designed to reduce uncertainty associated with atmospheric radiative forcing. GRIPS will measure will measure greenhouse gases and aerosols - two of the most important elements in the earth's radiation budget. GRIPS will observe carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), - the carbon gases, nitrous oxide (N2O), water vapor and aerosols with unprecedented precision through the atmosphere. The GRIPS instrument uses gas filter correlation radiometry (GFCR) to detect reflected and thermal IR radiation to detect the gases and the reflected solar radiation in the visible and short-wave infrared bands for aerosols. GRIPS is designed to have sensitivity down to the Earth's surface at ~2-8km nadir resolution. GRIPS can resolve CO2, CO, and CH4 anomalies in the planetary boundary layer and the free troposphere to quantify lofting, diurnal variations and longrange transport. With repeated measurements throughout the day GRIPS can maximize the number of cloud free measurements determining biogenic and anthropogenic sources, sinks, and fluxes. GRIPS is highly complementary to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, OCO-2, the geostationary Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and other existing and planned missions.

  1. Climate-chemical interactions and greenhouse effects of trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Guang-Yu; Fan, Xiao-Biao

    1994-01-01

    A completely coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective (RC) and photochemical-diffusion (PC) model has been developed recently and used to study the climate-chemical interactions. The importance of radiative-chemical interactions within the troposphere and stratosphere has been examined in some detail. We find that increases of radiatively and/or chemically active trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O have both the direct effects and the indirect effects on climate change by changing the atmospheric O3 profile through their interaction with chemical processes in the atmosphere. It is also found that the climatic effect of ozone depends strongly on its vertical distribution throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, as well on its column amount in the atmosphere.

  2. Aerosol chemical and radiative properties in the tropical Atlantic trade winds: The importance of African mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Jones, Xu

    This dissertation presents results relevant to aerosol radiative forcing. The focus of this dissertation is the role of mineral dust in atmospheric radiative processes over the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The aerosol mass and light scattering data concurrently measured over the tropical North Atlantic ocean yield a dust mass scattering efficiency of 0.77 m2/g, about a quarter of that measured for non-sea-salt sulfate (nss SO4=) in the North Atlantic marine boundary layer. Because of the high concentration of mineral dust relative to nss SO4= over the tropical North Atlantic, the total scattering by mineral dust is about four times that by nss SO4 = aerosol in this region. On an annual basis, aerosol optical depth is apportioned to: mineral dust 71%, nss- SO4 = 16% and sea salt 13%. The coarse-particle fraction (CPF) (aerodynamic diameter > 1 ?m) of nss SO4= varied from about 21% to 73%, with the highest CPF values associated with African dust events. The CPF nss SO 4= was believed to be a result of the heterogeneous reactions of SO2 (presumably from European sources) with dust particles suspended in the air over North Africa. This study provides the first direct evidence that confirms the importance of dust in sulfate production and resulting the coarse particle sulfate in the tropical Atlantic Ocean region. An important implication is that dust particles may reduce the effectiveness of sulfate aerosol as a radiative forcing agent in many regions where dust events are frequent and where dust concentrations are high. The aerosol scattering coefficient (ASC) measured during this experiment increased by a factor of 1.13 to 1.69 when RH was increased from about 40% to 80%. Through chemical apportioning of ASC, the HGF for sea-salt was found to be 1.8 +/- 0.2, while that of mineral dust was close to unity. This study shows that climate studies must consider the effect of mineral dust not only because of its direct effects on the radiation balance but also because of its effects on the radiative properties of other species that are present in the same air mass.

  3. Impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the ozonosphere including aerosol physics is used to examine the role of the greenhouse gases CO2 , CH4 , and N2 O in the future long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer, in particular in its recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges of chlorine and bromine compounds into the atmosphere. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) of types I and II. The scenarios of expected changes of the anthropogenic pollutants for the period from 1980 through 2050 are taken from Climate Change 2001. The processes, which determine the influence of anthropogenic growth of atmospheric abundance of the greenhouse gases on the dynamics of recovery of the Earth's ozone layer, have been studied in details. Expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by increases of greenhouse gases, most importantly CO2 , essentially influences the ozone layer by two ways: through temperature dependencies of the gas phase reaction rates and through enhancement of polar ozone depletion via increased PSC formation. The model calculations show that a weakness in efficiencies of all gas phase catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction due to cooling of the stratosphere is a dominant mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer in Antarctic as well as at the lower latitudes. This mechanism leads to a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery here because of the greenhouse gases growth. On the contrary, the mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone through PSC modification begins to be more effective in Arctic in comparison with the gas phase mechanism in springs after about 2020, which leads to retard the expected recovery of the ozone layer here. The mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the polar ozone by means of modification of sulphate aerosol distribution in the atmosphere has been revealed and investigated, too. Numerical experiments show that enhancement of the surface area density of sulphate aerosol in the stratosphere caused by the growth of the greenhouse gases will reduce significantly the ozone depletion during the Antarctic ozone hole.

  4. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1985--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-10

    The Earth`s capacity to support life depends on the moderating influences of gases that envelop the planet and warm its surface and protect it from harmful radiation. These gases are referred to as ``greenhouse gases.`` Their warming capacity, called ``the greenhouse effect,`` is essential to maintaining a climate hospitable to all plant, animal, and human life. In recent years, however, there has been increasing concern that human activity may be affecting the intricate balance between the Earth`s absorption of heat from the sun and its capacity to reradiate excess heat back into space. Emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities may be an important mechanism that affects global climate. Thus, research is intensifying to improve our understanding of the role human activities might play in influencing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. On the basis of scientific findings of the past few decades, the US Government and the international community at large are now taking steps toward stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions. This report contributes to that process. Mandated by Congress this report provides estimates of US emissions of the principal greenhouse gases--carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorcarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane volatile organic compounds. Estimates are for the period 1985 to 1990. Preliminary estimates for 1991 have also been included, whenever data were available.

  5. Radiative properties of char, fly-ash, and soot particles in coal flames. Quarterly report No. VI, December 15, 1993--March 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Manickavasagam, S.; Menguec, M.P.

    1994-09-01

    In combustion systems, particulate matter such as soot, ash, char, as well as combustion gases such as water vapor, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide participate to radiative heat transfer. In general, the radiative properties of particles are much more important than that for combustion gases because particles absorb, emit and scatter radiation continuously in the entire wavelength spectrum. By contrast, combustion gases participate radiatively only in narrow bands centered around discrete wavelengths. The radiative properties required for typical radiative transfer calculations are absorption and scattering coefficients and scattering phase function. These properties are dependent on the partial pressures and chemical composition of combustion gases, material and physical structure, size, and volume fraction distributions of particles, and of course on the wavelength of the incident radiation. The main objective of this project is to estimate the volume fractions of combustion products by observing their scattering and absorption behaviour when subjected to external electromagnetic radiation.

  6. RNA Sequencing and Proteogenomics Reveal the Importance of Leaderless mRNAs in the Radiation-Tolerant Bacterium Deinococcus deserti

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Arjan; Roche, David; Fernandez, Bernard; Ludanyi, Monika; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Pignol, David; Vallenet, David; Armengaud, Jean; Blanchard, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Deinococcus deserti is a desiccation- and radiation-tolerant desert bacterium. Differential RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed to explore the specificities of its transcriptome. Strikingly, for 1,174 (60%) mRNAs, the transcription start site was found exactly at (916 cases, 47%) or very close to the translation initiation codon AUG or GUG. Such proportion of leaderless mRNAs, which may resemble ancestral mRNAs, is unprecedented for a bacterial species. Proteomics showed that leaderless mRNAs are efficiently translated in D. deserti. Interestingly, we also found 173 additional transcripts with a 5′-AUG or 5′-GUG that would make them competent for ribosome binding and translation into novel small polypeptides. Fourteen of these are predicted to be leader peptides involved in transcription attenuation. Another 30 correlated with new gene predictions and/or showed conservation with annotated and nonannotated genes in other Deinococcus species, and five of these novel polypeptides were indeed detected by mass spectrometry. The data also allowed reannotation of the start codon position of 257 genes, including several DNA repair genes. Moreover, several novel highly radiation-induced genes were found, and their potential roles are discussed. On the basis of our RNA-seq and proteogenomics data, we propose that translation of many of the novel leaderless transcripts, which may have resulted from single-nucleotide changes and maintained by selective pressure, provides a new explanation for the generation of a cellular pool of small peptides important for protection of proteins against oxidation and thus for radiation/desiccation tolerance and adaptation to harsh environmental conditions. PMID:24723731

  7. Gases in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, P. D.; Liss, P. S.

    2003-12-01

    The annual gross and net primary productivity of the surface oceans is similar in size to that on land (IPCC, 2001). Marine productivity drives the cycling of gases such as oxygen (O2), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methyl iodide (CH3I) which are of fundamental importance in studies of marine productivity, biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, climate, and human health, respectively. For example, ˜30% of the world's population (1,570 million) is thought to be at risk of iodine-deficiency disorders that impair mental development (WHO, 1996). The main source of iodine to land is the supply of volatile iodine compounds produced in the ocean and then transferred to the atmosphere via the air-surface interface. The flux of these marine iodine species to the atmosphere is also thought to be important in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere by the production of the iodine oxide radical ( Alicke et al., 1999). A further example is that the net flux of CO2 from the atmosphere to the ocean, ˜1.7±0.5 Gt C yr-1, represents ˜30% of the annual release of anthropogenic CO2 to the atmosphere (IPCC, 2001). This net flux is superimposed on a huge annual flux (90 Gt C yr-1) of CO2 that is cycled "naturally" between the ocean and the atmosphere. The long-term sink for anthropogenic CO2 is recognized as transfer to the ocean from the atmosphere. A final example is the emission of volatile sulfur, in the form of DMS, from the oceans. Not only is an oceanic flux from the oceans needed to balance the loss of sulfur (a bioessential element) from the land via weathering, it has also been proposed as having a major control on climate due to the formation of cloud condensation nuclei (Charlson et al., 1987). Indeed, the existence of DMS and CH3I has been used as evidence in support of the Gaia hypothesis (Lovelock, 1979).There are at least four main processes that affect the concentration of gases in the water column: biological production and consumption, photochemistry, air-sea exchange, and vertical mixing. We will not discuss the effect of vertical mixing on gases in seawater and instead refer the reader to Chapter 6.08. Nor will we consider the deeper oceans as this region is discussed in chapters on benthic fluxes and early diagenesis (Chapter 6.11), the biological pump (Chapter 6.04), and the oceanic calcium carbonate cycle (Chapter 6.19) all in this volume. We will discuss the cycling of gases in surface oceans, including the thermocline, and in particular concentrate on the exchange of various volatile compounds across the air-sea interface.As we will show, while much is known about the cycling of gases such as CO2 and DMS in the water column, frustratingly little is known about many of the chemical species for which the ocean is believed to be a significant source to the atmosphere. We suspect the passage of time will reveal that the cycling of volatile compounds containing selenium and iodine may well prove as complex as that of DMS. Early studies of DMS assumed that it was produced from a precursor compound, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), known to be present in some species of phytoplankton, and that the main sink in the water column was exchange across the air-sea interface. We now know that DMSP and DMS are both rapidly cycled in water column by a complex interaction between phytoplankton, microzooplankton, bacteria, and viruses (see Figure 1). Some detailed process experiments have revealed that only ˜10% of the total DMS produced (and less than 1.3% of the DMSP produced) is transferred to the atmosphere, with the bulk of the DMS and DMSP, either being recycled in the water column or photo-oxidized (Archer et al., 2002b).

  8. The contribution from emissions of different gases to the enhanced greenhouse effect. Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    Wigley, T.M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to compare the different contributions, that mankind has made to perturbing the atmosphere`s radiative balance. We have, and will continue to perturb both the balance of outgoing long-wave radiation and the balance of incoming short-wave radiation. Human activities since preindustrial times have caused a substantial enhancement of the greenhouse effect, a process involving the absorption of outgoing long-wave radiation which leads to a warming of the lower atmosphere. Because the atmosphere`s short-wave radiative balance is affected by the presence of small particles (aerosols) produced by the oxidation of sulphur compounds, anthropogenic emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) have also caused a perturbation of the overall balance. The greenhouse gases we will consider are, in order of importance: carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), Methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and the halocarbons. We use observed and model-based concentration data together with the most recent information relating concentrations to radiative forcing to estimate the individual contributions of the different gases to the changing radiative balance of the atmosphere. We also estimate the ranges of uncertainty in each of these estimates. We base all results on the 1992 IPCC emissions scenarios IS92a-f. We begin with a summary of 1990 conditions, then consider each gas separately (but lumping the halocarbons into a single group), to compare their relative importance.

  9. Measurement of aerosol particles, gases and flux radiation in the Pico de Orizaba National Park, and its relationship to air pollution transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, C.; Castro, T.; Muhlia, A.; Moya, M.; Martínez-Arroyo, A.; Báez, A.

    Continuous atmospheric measurements were carried out at the Pico de Orizaba National Park (PONP), Mexico, in order to evaluate the characteristics and sources of air quality. This action allowed one to identify specific threats for the effective protection of natural resources and biodiversity. Results show the presence of particles and polluted gases transported by winds from the urban zones nearby (cities of Mexico, Puebla and Tlaxcala), as well as their measurable influence on the optical properties of the park environment. Nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and sulfur dioxide show a daily pattern suggesting an influence of pollution generated by anthropogenic processes. Average concentration of SO 2 was higher than recorded at the southern part of Mexico City. Ozone concentrations ranging from 0.035 to 0.06 ppm suggest residual or background ozone character. Back trajectory analysis of air parcels arriving at the site confirm pollution caused by biomass burning and mass transport from urban zones. The SO 42-/TC ratio exhibited values (0.88±0.33) similar to urban areas. Ratios BC/TC and OC/BC for PONP are similar to those reported as influenced by burning emissions of fossil fuels. Typical rural aerosols were also found at the site, and sulfate and ammonium concentrations were correlated. The most predominating mode in surface particles size distribution was at 0.32 μm with no significant presence of coarse particles. Total carbon (OC+BC) content of fine particle mass (PM less than 1 μm) comprised, on average, 75%. Optical properties retrieved from photometric data show intermittent influence from urban pollution. Time periods with low absorbing particles, great visibility and abundance of small particles alternating with short times with bigger particles and high turbidity indicated by the optical depth.

  10. Extended thermodynamics of dense gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Ruggeri, T.; Sugiyama, M.

    2012-11-01

    We study extended thermodynamics of dense gases by adopting the system of field equations with a different hierarchy structure to that adopted in the previous works. It is the theory of 14 fields of mass density, velocity, temperature, viscous stress, dynamic pressure, and heat flux. As a result, most of the constitutive equations can be determined explicitly by the caloric and thermal equations of state. It is shown that the rarefied-gas limit of the theory is consistent with the kinetic theory of gases. We also analyze three physically important systems, that is, a gas with the virial equations of state, a hard-sphere system, and a van der Waals fluid, by using the general theory developed in the former part of the present work.

  11. Reale Gase, tiefe Temperaturen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintze, Joachim

    Wir werden uns in diesem Kapitel zunchst mit der van der Waals'schen Zustandsgleichung befassen. In dieser Gleichung wird versucht, die Abweichungen, die reale Gase vom Verhalten idealer Gase zeigen, durch physikalisch motivierte Korrekturterme zu bercksichtigen. Es zeigt sich, dass die van derWaals-Gleichung geeignet ist, nicht nur die Gasphase, sondern auch die Phnomene bei der Verflssigung von Gasen und den kritischen Punkt zu beschreiben.

  12. Fluorinated greenhouse gases in the troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, Johannes C.; Gallacher, Eileen; Oram, David E.; Bönisch, Harald; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Fraser, Paul J.; Röckmann, Thomas; Sturges, William T.

    2015-04-01

    Fluorinated organic trace gases in the atmosphere are almost exclusively thought to be of anthropogenic origin. In the case of fully fluorinated alkane and cycloalkane-derivatives their IR absorption features and very long atmospheric lifetimes (on the order of thousands of years) make them very strong greenhouse gases. We here present measurements of 10 of these perfluorocarbons in the UT/LS and stratosphere as derived from deployments of regular passenger aircraft (CARIBIC project, http://www.caribic-atmospheric.com/) and the high-altitude research aircraft M55 Geophysica. In combination with long-term tropospheric records obtained from the Cape Grim observatory, Tasmania, we estimate their impact on radiative forcing expressed as CO2-equivalents. As these gases have no significant sinks in the stratosphere they could also be suitable to derive an important transport diagnostic: the so-called mean age-of-air i.e. the average stratospheric transit time of an air parcel. We evaluate this possibility for all above-mentioned species and compare their characteristics with other inert species such as SF6, SF5CF3, and long-lived chlorofluorocarbons.

  13. The Importance of Electron Source Population to the Remarkable Enhancement of Radiation belt Electrons during the October 2012 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Reeves, G. D.; Chen, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    During the October 8-9 2012 storm, the MeV electron fluxes in the heart of the outer radiation belt are first wiped out then exhibit a three-orders-of-magnitude increase on the timescale of hours, as observed by the MagEIS and REPT instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes. There is strong observational evidence that the remarkable enhancement is due to local acceleration by chorus waves, as shown in the recent Science paper by Reeves et al.1. However, the importance of the dynamic electron source population transported in from the plasma sheet, to the observed remarkable enhancement, has not been studied. We illustrate the importance of the source population with our simulation of the event using the DREAM 3D diffusion model. Three new modifications have been implemented in the model: 1) incorporating a realistic and time-dependent low-energy boundary condition at 100 keV obtained from the MagEIS data; 2) utilizing event-specific chorus wave distributions derived from the low-energy electron precipitation observed by POES and validated against the in situ wave data from EMFISIS; 3) using an ';open' boundary condition at L*=11 and implementing electron lifetimes on the order of the drift period outside the solar-wind driven last closed drift shell. The model quantitatively reproduces the MeV electron dynamics during this event, including the fast dropout at the start of Oct. 8th, low electron flux during the first Dst dip, and the remarkable enhancement peaked at L*=4.2 during the second Dst dip. By comparing the model results with realistic source population against those with constant low-energy boundary (see figure), we find that the realistic electron source population is critical to reproduce the observed fast and significant increase of MeV electrons. 1Reeves, G. D., et al. (2013), Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts, Science, DOI:10.1126/science.1237743. Comparison between data and model results during the October 2012 storm for electrons at μ=3168 MeV/G and K=0.1 G1/2Re. Top plot is the electron phase space density data measured by the two Van Allen Probes; middle plot shows the results from the DREAM 3D diffusion model with a realistic electron source population derived from MagEIS data; and the bottom plot is the model results with a constant source population.

  14. Measurements of Trace Gases Using a Tunable Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jost, Hans-Juerg

    2005-01-01

    This report is the final report for "Measurements of Trace Gases Using a Tunable Diode Laser." The tasks outlined in the proposal are listed below with a brief comment. The publications and the conference presentations are listed. Finally, the important publications are attached. The Cooperative Agreement made possible a research effort to produce high- precision and high-accuracy in-situ measurements of carbon monoxide, methane and nitrous oxide on the WB-57 during the CRYSTAL-FACE and pre-AVE field campaigns and to analyze these measurements. These measurements of CO and CH4 were of utmost importance to studies of the radiative effects of clouds. Some important results of the CRYSTAL-FACE program were contained in two scientific papers (attached). This Cooperative Agreement allowed the participation of the Argus instrument in the program and the analysis of the data.

  15. Process gases for laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faerber, Mark; Berkmann, Joachim

    1997-08-01

    To achieve a high return on investment, laser systems must be used to their fullest capacity, avoiding power losses and downtimes. High-quality laser gases are therefore needed to run the laser. But if the quality of the gas cannot be guaranteed all the way from the cylinder to the laser cavity, the risk of impurities such as water vapor and hydrocarbons or particles entering the laser system is large. Unstable laser operation and damage to the resonator optics can result in costly repairs. The profitability of laser operations is also affected by the selection of the assist gas. High-purity oxygen and high-pressure high-purity nitrogen are frequently used to optimize the productivity of laser cutting. In contrast, different assist gases are used for laser welding depending on the wavelength of the laser radiation, the material, the energy per unit length of weld or the assist gas nozzle arrangement. Helium is often the most convenient choice for CO2 laser welding of mild steel, resulting in optimum seam quality with respect to formability and appearance. Helium-argon mixtures can be used effectively for lower power CO2 laser welding and for aluminum. Nitrogen mixtures may be used to stabilize the austenitic phase in duplex steels whereas hydrogen additions give a shiny bead surface in stainless steel. Argon is suitable for Nd:YAG laser welding and productivity is increased by small additions of oxygen. In addition argon- CO2 mixtures may be used to achieve acceptable results depending on the assist gas nozzle arrangement. Consequently, high-purity gases and suitable gas distribution equipment are the basis for a satisfactory return on investment.

  16. Planetary noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the history and current status of research on planetary noble gases is presented. The discovery that neon and argon are vastly more abundant on Venus than on earth points to the solar wind rather than condensation as the fundamental process for placing noble gases in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets; however, solar wind implantation may not be able to fully reproduce the observed gradient, nor does it obviously account for similar planetary Ne/Ar ratios and dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have emphasized escape rather than accretion. Hydrodynamic escape, which is fractionating, readily accounts for the difference between atmospheric neon and isotopically light mantle neon. Atmospheric cratering, which is nearly nonfractionating, can account for the extreme scarcity of nonradiogenic noble gases (and other volatiles) on Mars.

  17. Laboratory technique for the measurement of thermal-emission spectra of greenhouse gases: CFC-12.

    PubMed

    Evans, W F; Puckrin, E

    1996-03-20

    A new technique has been developed to make possible the laboratory study of the infrared-emission spectra of gases of atmospheric interest. The thermal-emission spectra are in local thermodynamic equilibrium, just as they are in the atmosphere, and are not chemiluminescent. Demonstration results obtained by the use of this new technique are presented for dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) at a pressure of 0.5 Torr in a cell with a path length of 5 cm. The measured cell spectra have been compared with simulations with the FASCD3P radiation code. The measurements of the emission spectra of radiatively active gases may be important for the atmospheric greenhouse effect and global warming. PMID:21085268

  18. Adiabatic processes in monatomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera-Patio, Martin E.

    1988-08-01

    A kinetic model is used to predict the temperature evolution of a monatomic ideal gas undergoing an adiabatic expansion or compression at a constant finite rate, and it is then generalized to treat real gases. The effects of interatomic forces are considered, using as examples the gas with the square-well potential and the van der Waals gas. The model is integrated into a Carnot cycle operating at a finite rate to compare the efficiency's rate-dependent behavior with the reversible result. Limitations of the model, rate penalties, and their importance are discussed.

  19. The influence of land-use change and landscape dynamics on the climate system: relevance to climate-change policy beyond the radiative effect of greenhouse gases.

    PubMed

    Pielke, Roger A; Marland, Gregg; Betts, Richard A; Chase, Thomas N; Eastman, Joseph L; Niles, John O; Niyogi, Dev Dutta S; Running, Steven W

    2002-08-15

    Our paper documents that land-use change impacts regional and global climate through the surface-energy budget, as well as through the carbon cycle. The surface-energy budget effects may be more important than the carbon-cycle effects. However, land-use impacts on climate cannot be adequately quantified with the usual metric of 'global warming potential'. A new metric is needed to quantify the human disturbance of the Earth's surface-energy budget. This 'regional climate change potential' could offer a new metric for developing a more inclusive climate protocol. This concept would also implicitly provide a mechanism to monitor potential local-scale environmental changes that could influence biodiversity. PMID:12460493

  20. Latitudinal variation in ambient UV-B radiation is an important determinant of Lolium perenne forage production, quality, and digestibility.

    PubMed

    Comont, David; Winters, Ana; Gomez, Leonardo D; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan

    2013-05-01

    Few studies to date have considered the responses of agriculturally important forage grasses to UV-B radiation. Yet grasses such as Lolium perenne have a wide current distribution, representing exposure to a significant variation in ambient UV-B. The current study investigated the responses of L. perenne (cv. AberDart) to a simulated latitudinal gradient of UV-B exposure, representing biologically effective UV-B doses at simulated 70, 60, 50, 40, and 30 N latitudes. Aspects of growth, soluble compounds, and digestibility were assessed, and results are discussed in relation to UV-B effects on forage properties and the implications for livestock and bio-ethanol production. Aboveground biomass production was reduced by approximately 12.67% with every 1 kJ m(-2) day(-1) increase in biologically weighted UV-B. As a result, plants grown in the highest UV-B treatment had a total biomass of just 13.7% of controls. Total flavonoids were increased by approximately 76% by all UV-B treatments, while hydroxycinnamic acids increased in proportion to the UV-B dose. Conversely, the digestibility of the aboveground biomass and concentrations of soluble fructans were reduced by UV-B exposure, although soluble sucrose, glucose, and fructose concentrations were unaffected. These results highlight the capacity for UV-B to directly affect forage productivity and chemistry, with negative consequences for digestibility and bioethanol production. Results emphasize the need for future development and distribution of L. perenne varieties to take UV-B irradiance into consideration. PMID:23580749

  1. Carbon uptake in a marine diatom during acute exposure to ultraviolet B radiation: Relative importance of damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Lesser, M. P. ); Cullen, J.J. Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia ); Neale, P.J. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA )

    1994-04-01

    Experiments on a marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana (Hustedt) clone 3H, demonstrate that under moderate photon flux densities (75 [mu]mol quanta [center dot] m[sup [minus]2][center dot]s[sup [minus]1]) of visible light inhibition of photosynthesis by supplemental ultraviolet (UV) radiation (UV-B: 280-320 nm) is well described as a hyperbolic function of UV-B irradiance for time scales of 0.5-4 h. Results are consistent with predictions of a recently developed model of photosynthesis under the influence of UV and visible irradiance. Although net destruction of chlorophyll occurs during a 4-h exposure to UV-B, and the effect is a function of exposure, the principal effect of UV-B is a decrease in chlorophyll-specific photosynthetic rate. The dependence of photoinhibition on dosage rate, rather than cumulative dose, and the hyperbolic shape of the relationship are consistent with net photoinhibition being an equilibrium between damage and repair. The ratio of damage to repair is estimated by a mathematical analysis of the inhibition of photosynthesis during exposures to UV-B. A nitrate-limited culture was much more sensitive to UV-B than were the nutrient-replete cultures, but the kinetics of photoinhibition were similar. The analysis suggests that the nutrient-limited culture was much more sensitive than the nutrient-replete cultures because repair or turnover of critical proteins associated with photosynthesis is inhibited. An inhibitor of chloroplast protein synthesis was used to suppress repair processes. Photoinhibition by UV-B was enhanced, and inhibition was a function of cumulative dose, as expected if damage were not countered by repair. The fundamental importance of repair processes should be considered in the design of field experiments and models of UV-B effects in the environment, especially in the context of vertical mixing. Repair processes must also be considered whenever biological weighting functions are developed. 69 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Latitudinal variation in ambient UV-B radiation is an important determinant of Lolium perenne forage production, quality, and digestibility

    PubMed Central

    Comont, David; Winters, Ana; Gomez, Leonardo D; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    Few studies to date have considered the responses of agriculturally important forage grasses to UV-B radiation. Yet grasses such as Lolium perenne have a wide current distribution, representing exposure to a significant variation in ambient UV-B. The current study investigated the responses of L. perenne (cv. AberDart) to a simulated latitudinal gradient of UV-B exposure, representing biologically effective UV-B doses at simulated 70, 60, 50, 40, and 30 N latitudes. Aspects of growth, soluble compounds, and digestibility were assessed, and results are discussed in relation to UV-B effects on forage properties and the implications for livestock and bio-ethanol production. Aboveground biomass production was reduced by approximately 12.67% with every 1 kJ m2 day1 increase in biologically weighted UV-B. As a result, plants grown in the highest UV-B treatment had a total biomass of just 13.7% of controls. Total flavonoids were increased by approximately 76% by all UV-B treatments, while hydroxycinnamic acids increased in proportion to the UV-B dose. Conversely, the digestibility of the aboveground biomass and concentrations of soluble fructans were reduced by UV-B exposure, although soluble sucrose, glucose, and fructose concentrations were unaffected. These results highlight the capacity for UV-B to directly affect forage productivity and chemistry, with negative consequences for digestibility and bioethanol production. Results emphasize the need for future development and distribution of L. perenne varieties to take UV-B irradiance into consideration. PMID:23580749

  3. Gases in Tektite Bubbles.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Dunning, K L

    1962-07-20

    Spectroscopic analysis of light produced by electrodeless discharge in a tektite bubble showed the main gases in the bubble to be neon, helium, and oxygen. The neon and helium have probably diffused in from the atmosphere, while the oxygen may be atmospheric gas incorporated in the tektite during its formation. PMID:17801113

  4. Coupling the Mars dust and water cycles: The importance of radiative-dynamic feedbacks during northern hemisphere summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Wilson, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM) simulations are carried out with and without cloud radiative forcing to investigate feedbacks between the dust and water cycles that contribute to the middle-atmosphere polar warming during northern hemisphere summer. Compared to the simulation without clouds, the simulation with clouds produces stronger polar warming, which is in better agreement with observations. The enhanced polar warming in the presence of cloud formation is caused by a radiative-dynamic feedback between a strengthened circulation due to cloud radiative effects, vertical dust transport, and further circulation intensification.

  5. Deviation from the Knudsen law on quantum gases

    SciTech Connect

    Babac, Gulru

    2014-12-09

    Gas flow in micro/nano scale systems has been generally studied for the Maxwell gases. In the limits of very low temperature and very confined domains, the Maxwellian approximation can break down and the quantum character of the gases becomes important. In these cases, Knudsen law, which is one of the important equations to analyze rarefied gas flows is invalid and should be reanalyzed for quantum gases. In this work, the availability of quantum gas conditions in the high Knudsen number cases is discussed and Knudsen law is analyzed for quantum gases.

  6. Verification of imported food upon import for radiation processing: Dried herbs, including herbs used in food supplements, and spices by PSL and TL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniglia, C.; Aureli, P.; Bortolin, E.; Onori, S.

    2009-07-01

    The Italian National Institute of Health in 2005-2006 performed an analytical survey of import on dried spices and herbs, including herbs used in food supplements, to investigate the entry in Italy of irradiated, and not correctly labelled, raw materials. In this survey, 52 samples, including nine herbal extracts, were collected. The method of photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) was applied to all samples and only samples screened positive or intermediate with PSL were analysed by using the thermo-luminescence (TL) method. Out of the 12 samples screened positive or intermediate with PSL, the TL method confirmed irradiation of five samples (10% of the total assayed samples). One out of these five samples was a herbal supplement whereas three were herbal extracts that are known to be used as ingredients of herbal supplements, and another one was a spice.

  7. Radiative Relaxation and Isomeric Branching of Highly Excited H/C/N: The Importance of Delocalized Vibrational States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Troy; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bowman, Joel M.

    2003-04-01

    We report full dimensional ab initio calculations of the radiative relaxation of H/C/N at energies above and below the barrier to isomerization between hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen isocyanide. This relaxation process is believed to be central to understanding the formation of HCN and HNC in cold interstellar clouds, star-forming regions, and comets, where observed HCN/HNC abundance ratios vary between 80:1 and 1:5. We find that the radiative branching between the isomers is highly dependent on the identity of the initial vibrational state. Vibrational states can be classified into three categories: HCN-local, HNC-local, and delocalized. Delocalized states relax radiatively to both isomers, while local states radiate within one structure. We find many states above the barrier to isomerization which branch predominantly to HNC. This work demonstrates the methodology and presents initial results for an accurate ab initio treatment of isomeric radiative branching in H/C/N, and reveals that an accurate quantum treatment of radiative relaxation is consistent with the wide range of observed isomeric branching ratios.

  8. Thermodynamic models of the chemistry of lunar volcanic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Thermodynamic models and mass-balance arguments are used to constrain the chemistry of lunar volcanic gases. The results predict that lunar gases were dominated by reduced C and S gases such as CO, COS, CS2, S2. The more oxidized gases CO2 and SO2 were also important, but only in limited temperature ranges. Gases such as Cl2, CCl4, and CF4 were more abundant than HF and HCl, which were the two major H compounds in the lunar gases. Chlorides and fluorides were important species for transporting many volatile and ore-forming metals, and the implications for fractionating and concentrating metals into lunar ore-deposits merit further study.

  9. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    DOEpatents

    Shelby, James E. (Alfred Station, NY); Kenyon, Brian E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2001-05-15

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  10. Transmission Spectra and Generation of Terahertz Pulses in SiO2-GaSe, TiO2-GaSe, Ga2O3-GaSe, and GaSe:S Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereznaya, S. A.; Zarubin, A. N.; Korotchenko, Z. V.; Prudaev, I. A.; Red'kin, R. A.; Sarkisov, S. Yu.; Tolbanov, O. P.

    2015-12-01

    Thin amorphous SiO2, TiO2, and Ga2O3 films were deposited on the surface of GaSe crystals by thermal and magnetron sputtering. It was found that under different technological conditions, the SiO2 and TiO2 layers on the surface of GaSe crack, while the Ga2O3 compound forms perfect films. A comparison of the transmission spectra and generation efficiency of terahertz pulses was made for the SiO2-GaSe, TiO2-GaSe, and Ga2O3-GaSe structures and for the GaSe:S 0.9 wt % and GaSe:S 7 wt % crystals. It was found that an increase in the concentration of sulfur in the GaSe:S crystals results in a decrease in the efficiency of generation of terahertz radiation by optical rectification of femtosecond laser pulses. Among the films deposited on the surface of GaSe, the SiO2 film has the least impact on the efficiency of generation.

  11. Volcanic Gases and Their Effects

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Please see the web article, " Volcanic Gases and Climate Change Overview " for additional information. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) ... Please see the web article, " Volcanic Gases and Climate Change Overview " for more information on Volcanic versus anthropogenic ...

  12. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Characteristics of the evolution of a plasma formed by cw and pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation in various gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevski?, M. F.; Stepanova, M. A.

    1990-06-01

    An investigation was made of the interaction between high-power cw and pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation and a low-threshold optical breakdown plasma near a metal surface. Characteristics of the breakdown plasma were studied as a function of the experimental conditions. A qualitative analysis was made of the results using a simple one-dimensional model for laser combustion waves.

  13. Mechanisms and biological importance of photon-induced bystander responses: do they have an impact on low-dose radiation responses

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Masanori; Maeda, Munetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the biological effect of low linear energy transfer (LET), low-dose and/or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation is essential in ensuring radiation safety. Over the past two decades, non-targeted effects, which are not only a direct consequence of radiation-induced initial lesions produced in cellular DNA but also of intra- and inter-cellular communications involving both targeted and non-targeted cells, have been reported and are currently defining a new paradigm in radiation biology. These effects include radiation-induced adaptive response, low-dose hypersensitivity, genomic instability, and radiation-induced bystander response (RIBR). RIBR is generally defined as a cellular response that is induced in non-irradiated cells that receive bystander signals from directly irradiated cells. RIBR could thus play an important biological role in low-dose irradiation conditions. However, this suggestion was mainly based on findings obtained using high-LET charged-particle radiations. The human population (especially the Japanese, who are exposed to lower doses of radon than the world average) is more frequently exposed to low-LET photons (X-rays or ?-rays) than to high-LET charged-particle radiation on a daily basis. There are currently a growing number of reports describing a distinguishing feature between photon-induced bystander response and high-LET RIBR. In particular, photon-induced bystander response is strongly influenced by irradiation dose, the irradiated region of the targeted cells, and p53 status. The present review focuses on the photon-induced bystander response, and discusses its impact on the low-dose radiation effect. PMID:25361549

  14. Kinetic Theory of Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The theory, developed in the nineteenth century, notably by Rudolf Clausius (1822-88) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79), that the properties of a gas (temperature, pressure, etc) could be described in terms of the motions (and kinetic energy) of the molecules comprising the gases. The theory has wide implications in astrophysics. In particular, the perfect gas law, which relates the pressure, vol...

  15. Evaluation of Planck mean coefficients for particle radiative properties in combustion environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofgren, Henrik; Sundén, Bengt

    2014-09-01

    Thermal radiation is the dominating form of heat transfer in several combustion technologies that combust solid fuels, such as pulverized coal combustion and fixed bed combustion. The thermal radiation originates from the hot combustion gases and particles. For accurate modelling of thermal radiation in these environments the selection of the radiative transport model and radiative property model is important. Radiative property models for gases have received huge attention and several well documented models exist. For particles, soot has received considerable attention whereas other particles have not to a similar extent. The Planck mean coefficients are most commonly used to describe the radiative properties of the particles. For gases the Planck mean absorption coefficient is known to give large deviations from recognised exact models in predicting the radiative heat transfer. In this study the use of Planck mean coefficients for particles are investigated and compared to spectral models. Two particle mass size distributions of fly ash are used, representing biomass and coal combustion. The evaluation is conducted in several combustion-like test cases with both gases and particles. The evaluation shows that using Planck mean coefficients for particles, in combustion-like situations, can give large errors in predicting the radiative heat flux and especially the source term. A new weighted sum of grey gas approach is tested and evaluated. It includes both the particles and gases to better account for the non-greyness of the fly ash absorption coefficient.

  16. Evaluation of Planck mean coefficients for particle radiative properties in combustion environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofgren, Henrik; Sundén, Bengt

    2015-04-01

    Thermal radiation is the dominating form of heat transfer in several combustion technologies that combust solid fuels, such as pulverized coal combustion and fixed bed combustion. The thermal radiation originates from the hot combustion gases and particles. For accurate modelling of thermal radiation in these environments the selection of the radiative transport model and radiative property model is important. Radiative property models for gases have received huge attention and several well documented models exist. For particles, soot has received considerable attention whereas other particles have not to a similar extent. The Planck mean coefficients are most commonly used to describe the radiative properties of the particles. For gases the Planck mean absorption coefficient is known to give large deviations from recognised exact models in predicting the radiative heat transfer. In this study the use of Planck mean coefficients for particles are investigated and compared to spectral models. Two particle mass size distributions of fly ash are used, representing biomass and coal combustion. The evaluation is conducted in several combustion-like test cases with both gases and particles. The evaluation shows that using Planck mean coefficients for particles, in combustion-like situations, can give large errors in predicting the radiative heat flux and especially the source term. A new weighted sum of grey gas approach is tested and evaluated. It includes both the particles and gases to better account for the non-greyness of the fly ash absorption coefficient.

  17. When do plant radiations influence community assembly? The importance of historical contingency in the race for niche space.

    PubMed

    Tanentzap, Andrew J; Brandt, Angela J; Smissen, Rob D; Heenan, Peter B; Fukami, Tadashi; Lee, William G

    2015-07-01

    Plant radiations are widespread but their influence on community assembly has rarely been investigated. Theory and some evidence suggest that radiations can allow lineages to monopolize niche space when founding species arrive early into new bioclimatic regions and exploit ecological opportunities. These early radiations may subsequently reduce niche availability and dampen diversification of later arrivals. We tested this hypothesis of time-dependent lineage diversification and community dominance using the alpine flora of New Zealand. We estimated ages of 16 genera from published phylogenies and determined their relative occurrence across climatic and physical gradients in the alpine zone. We used these data to reconstruct occupancy of environmental space through time, integrating palaeoclimatic and palaeogeological changes. Our analysis suggested that earlier-colonizing lineages encountered a greater availability of environmental space, which promoted greater species diversity and occupancy of niche space. Genera that occupied broader niches were subsequently more dominant in local communities. An earlier time of arrival also contributed to greater diversity independently of its influence in accessing niche space. We suggest that plant radiations influence community assembly when they arise early in the occupancy of environmental space, allowing them to exclude later-arriving colonists from ecological communities by niche preemption. PMID:25771829

  18. Modeling TiO2 nanoparticle phototoxicity: The importance of chemical concentration, ultraviolet radiation intensity, and time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to aquatic organisms can be greatly increased upon the exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV). This phenomenon has received some attention for pelagic species, however, investigations of nano-TiO2 phototoxicity in benthic organisms are s...

  19. Radiative heat loss in gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) adults and chicks and the importance of warm feet.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R P; Adelung, D; Latorre, L

    1998-01-01

    Adult penguins and their chicks differ considerably in their apparent body insulation. The chicks are covered in down, whereas the adults have the short, hard body feathers characteristic of the family, so mechanisms of heat loss may vary considerably between the two groups. We examined radiative heat loss by measuring body surface temperatures of gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) in Antarctica. At the time the birds were considered to be in their thermoneutral zone, and there was little or no wind. Measurements of infrared emission were made on breeding adults and in large downy, and thermally independent, chicks in relation to environmental temperature. All 28 external body surface sites measured were positively correlated with ambient temperature, although there was considerable intersite variability in the relationship between site temperature and ambient temperature. Foot temperature increased most rapidly per degree ambient temperature increase, followed by the flippers, followed by the trunk. This pattern was particularly pronounced in the chicks, indicating that the exceptional heat-loss capacities of the feet may counteract for the reduced capacity of the flippers. Net heat transfer by radiation was examined using Stefan-Boltzmann's law and preliminary data on the surface area of a gentoo penguin body. This showed that between ground temperatures of 5 degrees and 15 degrees C overall heat transfer remains essentially constant, although radiative heat loss from the trunk decreases, this being counteracted by increasing heat transfer from the flippers and feet. Over the same temperature range the specific radiation heat transfer of the feet increased approximately 100 times faster per degree ambient temperature increase than did that of the flippers. This and the bimodality in foot temperature found in the study birds even under constant ambient temperatures indicate that within the thermoneutral zone heat loss by radiation in gentoo penguins is primarily executed using the feet, through which the blood circulates in pulses. PMID:9754529

  20. Constraining the Dynamical Importance of Hot Gas and Radiation Pressure in Quasar Outflows Using Emission Line Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Hennawi, Joseph F.

    2016-03-01

    Quasar feedback models often predict an expanding hot gas bubble that drives a galaxy-scale outflow. In many circumstances this hot gas radiates inefficiently and is therefore difficult to observe directly. We present an indirect method to detect the presence of a hot bubble using hydrostatic photoionization calculations of the cold (∼ {10}4 {{K}}) line-emitting gas. We compare our calculations with observations of the broad line region, the inner face of the torus, the narrow line region (NLR), and the extended NLR, and thus constrain the hot gas pressure at distances 0.1 {{pc}}{--}10 {{kpc}} from the center. We find that emission line ratios observed in the average quasar spectrum are consistent with radiation-pressure-dominated models on all scales. On scales \\lt 40 {{pc}} a dynamically significant hot gas pressure is ruled out, while on larger scales the hot gas pressure cannot exceed six times the local radiation pressure. In individual quasars, ≈25% of quasars exhibit NLR ratios that are inconsistent with radiation-pressure-dominated models, although in these objects the hot gas pressure is also unlikely to exceed the radiation pressure by an order of magnitude or more. The derived upper limits on the hot gas pressure imply that the instantaneous gas pressure force acting on galaxy-scale outflows falls short of the time-averaged force needed to explain the large momentum fluxes \\dot{p}\\gg {L}{{AGN}}/c inferred for galaxy-scale outflows. This apparent discrepancy can be reconciled if optical quasars previously experienced a buried, fully obscured phase during which the hot gas bubble was more effectively confined and during which galactic wind acceleration occurred.

  1. Mechanisms of impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the atmosphere including aerosol physics is used to examine the impact of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, and N2O on the future long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer, in particular on its expected recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges of chlorine and bromine compounds into the atmosphere. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circu-lation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the North to South Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar strato-spheric clouds (PSCs) of types I and II. The scenarios of expected changes of the anthropogenic pollutants for the period from 1980 through 2050 are taken from Climate Change 2001. The processes, which determine the influence of anthropogenic growth of atmospheric abun-dance of the greenhouse gases on the long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions, have been studied in details. Expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by increases of greenhouse gases, most importantly CO2, essentially influences the ozone layer by two ways: through temperature dependencies of the gas phase reaction rates and through enhancement of polar ozone depletion via increased PSC formation. The model calculations show that a weak-ness in efficiencies of all gas phase catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction due to cooling of the stratosphere is a dominant mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer in Antarctic as well as at the lower latitudes. This mechanism leads to a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery here because of the greenhouse gases growth. On the contrary, the mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone through PSC modification be-gins to be more effective in Arctic in comparison with the gas phase mechanism in springs after about 2020, which leads to retard the expected recovery of the ozone layer here. The difference in the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer at the southern and northern polar latitudes through PCS modification is determined by the difference in temperature regimes of the Polar Regions. The mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the polar ozone by means of modification of sulphate aerosol distribution in the atmosphere has been revealed and investigated, too. Numerical experiments show that enhancement of the surface area density of sulphate aerosol in the stratosphere caused by the growth of the greenhouse gases will reduce significantly the ozone depletion during the Antarctic ozone hole.

  2. Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    2001-01-01

    AGAGE comprises continuous high frequency in-situ gas chromatographic FID/ECD measurements of two biogenic/anthropogenic gases (CH4, N2O) and five anthropogenic gases (CFCl3, CF2Cl2, CH3CCl3, CF2ClCFCl2, CCl4) which are carried out at five globally distributed sites (Ireland, California, Barbados, Samoa, Tasmania). Also, high frequency in-situ gas-chromatographic mass spectrometric measurements of about 30 species including chlorofluorocarbon replacements and many natural halocarbons are made at two sites (Ireland, Tasmania), and will soon begin at the other three sites. Finally, high frequency in-situ gas chromatographic HgO-RD measurements of CO and H2 are performed at two sites (Ireland, Tasmania). The goal is quantitative determination of the sources, sinks, and circulation of these environmentally important gases.

  3. Synthetic greenhouse gases to decline if Montreal Protocol amended

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-07-01

    The Montreal Protocol, an international treaty designed to reduce the release into the atmosphere of ozone-depleting gases such as hydrochlorofluorocarbons and chlorofluorocarbons, has been successful since its implementation in the late 1980s. However, related greenhouse gases, such as hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), have increased in concentration in the atmosphere since then. HFCs, along with other synthetic greenhouse gases (SGHGs), account for a radiative forcing almost 20% as large as that due to the increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) since the preindustrial era.

  4. Important role of catalase in the cellular response of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation indirectly causes oxidative stress in cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radicals (OH(-)) generated by the radiolysis of water. We investigated how the catalase function was affected by ionizing radiation and analyzed the phenotype of mutants with a disrupted catalase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to radiation. The wild-type yeast strain and isogenic mutants with disrupted catalase genes were exposed to various doses of (60)Co gamma-rays. There was no difference between the wild-type strain and the cta1 disruption mutant following exposure to gamma-ray irradiation. In contrast, there was a significant decrease in the ctt1 disruption mutant, suggesting that this strain exhibited decreased survival on gamma-ray exposure compared with other strains. In all three strains, stationary phase cells were more tolerant to the exposure of gamma-rays than exponential phase cells, whereas the catalase activity in the wild-type strain and cta1 disruption mutant was higher in the stationary phase than in the exponential phase. These data suggest a correlation between catalase activity and survival following gamma-ray exposure. However, this correlation was not clear in the ctt1 disruption mutant, suggesting that other factors are involved in the tolerance to ROS induced by irradiation. PMID:25416226

  5. Greenhouse gases: What is their role in climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, J.A.; Chandler, W.U. ); Wuebbles, D. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper summarizes information relevant to understanding the role of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It examines the nature of the greenhouse effect, the Earth's radiation budget, the concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere, how these concentrations have been changing, natural processes which regulate these concentrations of greenhouse gases, residence times of these gases in the atmosphere, and the rate of release of gases affecting atmospheric composition by human activities. We address the issue of the greenhouse effect itself in the first section. In the second section we examine trends in atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases and emissions sources. In the third section, we examine the natural carbon cycle and its role in determining the atmospheric residence time of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). In the fourth section, we examine the role atmospheric chemistry plays in the determining the concentrations of greenhouse gases. This paper is not intended to be an exhaustive treatment of these issues. Exhaustive treatments can be found in other volumes, many of which are cited throughout this paper. Rather, this paper is intended to summarize some of the major findings, unknowns, and uncertainties associated with the current state of knowledge regarding the role of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. 57 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Line-driven disk winds in active galactic nuclei: The critical importance of ionization and radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbottom, Nick; Knigge, Christian; Matthews, James H.; Proga, Daniel; Long, Knox S.; Sim, Stuart A.

    2014-07-01

    Accretion disk winds are thought to produce many of the characteristic features seen in the spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). These outflows also represent a natural form of feedback between the central supermassive black hole and its host galaxy. The mechanism for driving this mass loss remains unknown, although radiation pressure mediated by spectral lines is a leading candidate. Here, we calculate the ionization state of, and emergent spectra for, the hydrodynamic simulation of a line-driven disk wind previously presented by Proga and Kallman. To achieve this, we carry out a comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation of the radiative transfer through, and energy exchange within, the predicted outflow. We find that the wind is much more ionized than originally estimated. This is in part because it is much more difficult to shield any wind regions effectively when the outflow itself is allowed to reprocess and redirect ionizing photons. As a result, the calculated spectrum that would be observed from this particular outflow solution would not contain the ultraviolet spectral lines that are observed in many AGN/QSOs. Furthermore, the wind is so highly ionized that line driving would not actually be efficient. This does not necessarily mean that line-driven winds are not viable. However, our work does illustrate that in order to arrive at a self-consistent model of line-driven disk winds in AGN/QSO, it will be critical to include a more detailed treatment of radiative transfer and ionization in the next generation of hydrodynamic simulations.

  7. NMR studies and applications of perfluorocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yulin

    Hyperpolarized 3He has been very successful in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs. It provides ways to study the physiological properties of the lungs and lung function. However, the high costs of the polarizing apparatus and the complicated polarizing procedure are preventing this technique from being clinically used routinely. Recent developments have shown that several fluorinated gases have the potential to replace 3He in some of its applications. This thesis presents some preliminary results of human excised lung imaging using C2F6 and C3F8. These two fluorinated gases were able to yield images with good signal-to-noise ratio and reasonable resolutions in a 1.5 T magnet. Using diffusion MRI of these two gases can distinguish emphysematous lungs from healthy ones. An important application of these gases would be to determine local lung surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio in vivo, which requires the unrestricted (free) diffusivity in each pixel to be known. We present data in this thesis which allow free diffusivities to be calculated from the relaxation time T1. Samples of pure C 2F6 and C3F8 at different pressures and in mixtures with oxygen at different concentrations were made. Measurements were done at two different magnetic fields and temperature was regulated to study the temperature dependence over a small range. These two gases were also used in studies of carbon-block filters, where the strong adsorption of the gases to the high surface-area carbon is beneficial. A brief review of our work on mouse lung imaging using hyperpolarized 3He is presented in Appendix A; Appendix B is a study of the longitudinal spin magnetization in the presence of a strong magnetic field gradient; the construction of the pulsed field gradient waveform measurement coils and some experimental results using these coils are contained in Appendix C.

  8. A generic biokinetic model for noble gases with application to radon.

    PubMed

    Leggett, Rich; Marsh, James; Gregoratto, Demetrio; Blanchardon, Eric

    2013-06-01

    To facilitate the estimation of radiation doses from intake of radionuclides, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publishes dose coefficients (dose per unit intake) based on reference biokinetic and dosimetric models. The ICRP generally has not provided biokinetic models or dose coefficients for intake of noble gases, but plans to provide such information for (222)Rn and other important radioisotopes of noble gases in a forthcoming series of reports on occupational intake of radionuclides (OIR). This paper proposes a generic biokinetic model framework for noble gases and develops parameter values for radon. The framework is tailored to applications in radiation protection and is consistent with a physiologically based biokinetic modelling scheme adopted for the OIR series. Parameter values for a noble gas are based largely on a blood flow model and physical laws governing transfer of a non-reactive and soluble gas between materials. Model predictions for radon are shown to be consistent with results of controlled studies of its biokinetics in human subjects. PMID:23612507

  9. Diffusivity of Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quastel, Jeremy; Valk, Benedek

    2013-10-01

    We consider one-component lattice gases with local dynamics and a stationary product Bernoulli measure on {{Z}^d}. We study the scaling exponents of the space-time correlations of the system in equilibrium at a given density. We consider a variance-like quantity computed from the correlations called the diffusivity (connected to the Green-Kubo formula) and give rigorous upper and lower bounds on it that depend on the dimension and the local behavior of the macroscopic flux function. Our results identify the cases in which the system scales superdiffusively; these cases have been predicted before, using non-rigorous scaling arguments. Our main tool is the resolvent method: the estimates are the result of a careful analysis of a complicated variational problem.

  10. EFFECTS OF INCREASED SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increases in solar UV radiation could affect terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical cycles thus altering both sources and sinks of greenhouse and chemically important trace gases (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), carbonyl sulfide (COS)). n terrestrial ecosystems,...

  11. The physics of ionized gases

    SciTech Connect

    Tanovic, L.; Konjevic, N.; Tanovic, N.

    1989-01-01

    This volume reports the proceedings of the symposium on physics of ionized gases. The program emphasized physical processes associated with the physics of ionized gases: atomic collision processes, particle and laser beam interaction with solids, low temperature plasmas and general plasma theory.

  12. Residual Gases in Crystal Growth Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Residual gases present in closed ampoules may affect different crystal growth processes. That seems to be particularly true under microgravity conditions where, due to weightlessness of the melt, the gases may lead to detached solidification and/or formation of voids and bubbles, as observed in the past. For that reason a good understanding and control of formation of residual gases is important for an optimum design and meaningful interpretation of crystal growth experiments. Our extensive experimental and theoretical studies of the subject, summarized in this paper, include degassing of silica glass and generation of gases from different source materials. Different materials processing conditions, like outgassing under vacuum, annealing in hydrogen, resublimation, different material preparation procedures, multiple annealings, different processing times, and others were applied and their effect on the amount and composition of gas were analyzed. The experimental results were interpreted based on theoretical calculations on diffusion in silica glass and source materials and thermochemistry of the system. Procedures for a reduction of the amount of gas are also discussed.

  13. Characterization of air-sea gas exchange processes and dissolved gas/ice interactions using noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Eda Maria

    In order to constrain the processes controlling the cycles of biogeochemically important gases such as O2 and CO2, and thereby infer rates of biological activity in the upper ocean or the uptake of radiatively important ``greenhouse'' gases, the noble gases are used to characterize and quantify the physical processes affecting the dissolved gases in aquatic environments. The processes of vertical mixing, gas exchange, air injection, and radiative heating are investigated using a 2 year time-series of the noble gases, temperature, and meteorological data from Station S near Bermuda, coupled with a 1-dimensional upper ocean mixing model to simulate the physical processes in the upper ocean. The rate of vertical mixing that best simulates the thermal cycle is 1.1 +/- 0.1 10-4 m s-1. The gas exchange rate required to simulate the data is consistent with the formulation of Wanninkhof (1992) to +/-40%, while the formulation of Liss and Merlivat (1986) must be increased by a factor of 1.7 +/- 0.6. The air injection rate is consistent with the formulation of Monahan and Torgersen (1991) using an air entrainment velocity of 3 +/- 1 cm s-1. Gas flux from bubbles is dominated on yearly time-scales by larger bubbles that do not dissolve completely, while the bubble flux is dominated by complete dissolution of bubbles in the winter at Bermuda. In order to obtain a high-frequency time-series of the noble gases to better parameterize the gas flux from bubbles, a moorable, sequential noble gas sampler was developed. Preliminary results indicate that the sampler is capable of obtaining the necessary data. Dissolved gas concentrations can be significantly modified by ice formation and melting, and due to the solubility of He and Ne in ice, the noble gases are shown to be unique tracers of these interactions. A three-phase equilibrium partitioning model was constructed to quantify these interactions in perennially ice-covered Lake Fryxell, and this work was extended to oceanic environments. Preliminary surveys indicate that the noble gases may provide useful and unique information about interactions between water and ice. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  14. Radiation Is an Important Component of Multimodality Therapy for Pediatric Non-Pineal Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Sean M.; Daganzo, Sally M.; Banerjee, Anuradha; Gupta, Nalin; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Prados, Michael D.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Wara, William M.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To review a historical cohort of pediatric patients with supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET), to clarify the role of radiation in the treatment of these tumors. Patients and Methods: Fifteen children aged <18 years with non-pineal sPNETs diagnosed between 1992 and 2006 were identified. Initial therapy consisted of surgical resection and chemotherapy in all patients and up-front radiotherapy (RT) in 5 patients. Five patients had RT at the time of progression, and 5 received no RT whatever. Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival were then calculated. Results: The median follow-up from diagnosis for all patients was 31 months (range, 0.5-165 months) and for surviving patients was 49 months (range, 10-165). Of the 5 patients who received up-front RT, all were alive without evidence of disease at a median follow-up of 50 months (range, 25-165 months). Only 5 of the 10 patients who did not receive up-front RT were alive at last follow-up. There was a statistically significant difference in overall survival between the patient group that received up-front RT and the group that did not (p = 0.048). In addition, we found a trend toward a statistically significant improvement in overall survival for those patients who received gross total resections (p = 0.10). Conclusions: Up-front RT and gross total resection may confer a survival benefit in patients with sPNET. Local failure was the dominant pattern of recurrence. Efforts should be made to determine patients most likely to have local failure exclusively or as a first recurrence, in order to delay or eliminate craniospinal irradiation.

  15. Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald G.; Kurylo, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    We seek funding from NASA for the third year (2005) of the four-year period January 1, 2003 - December 31, 2006 for continued support of the MIT contributions to the multi-national global atmospheric trace species measurement program entitled Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE). The case for real-time high-frequency measurement networks like AGAGE is very strong and the observations and their interpretation are widely recognized for their importance to ozone depletion and climate change studies and to verification issues arising from the Montreal Protocol (ozone) and Kyoto Protocol (climate). The proposed AGAGE program is distinguished by its capability to measure over the globe at high frequency almost all of the important species in the Montreal Protocol and almost all of the significant non-CO2 gases in the Kyoto Protocol.

  16. Regional respiratory tract absorption of inhaled reactive gases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J.; Overton, J.H.; Kimbell, J.S.; Russell, M.L.

    1992-06-29

    Highly reactive gases present unique problems due to the number of factors which must be taken into account to determine regional respiratory tract uptake. The authors reviewed some of the physical, chemical, and biological factors that affect dose and that must be understood to interpret toxicological data, to evaluate experimental dosimetry studies, and to develop dosimetry models. Selected dosimetry experiments involving laboratory animals and humans were discussed, showing the variability and uptake according to animal species and respiratory tract region for various reactive gases. New experimental dosimetry approaches, such as those involving isotope ratio mass spectroscopy and cyclotron generation reactive gases, were discussed that offer great promise for improving the ability to study regional respiratory tract absorption of reactive gases. Various dosimetry modeling applications were discussed which demonstrate: the importance of airflow patterns for site-specific dosimetry in the upper respiratory tract, the influence of the anatomical model used to make inter- and intraspecies dosimetric comparisons, the influence of tracheobronchial path length on predicted dose curves, and the implications of ventilatory unit structure and volume on dosimetry and response. Collectively, these examples illustrate important aspects of regional respiratory tract absorption of inhaled reactive gases. Given the complex nature of extent and pattern of injury in the respiratory tract from exposure to reactive gases, understanding interspecies differences in the absorption of reactive gases will continue to be an important area for study.

  17. Environmental Implications of Anesthetic Gases

    PubMed Central

    Yasny, Jeffrey S.; White, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    For several decades, anesthetic gases have greatly enhanced the comfort and outcome for patients during surgery. The benefits of these agents have heavily outweighed the risks. In recent years, the attention towards their overall contribution to global climate change and the environment has increased. Anesthesia providers have a responsibility to minimize unnecessary atmospheric pollution by utilizing techniques that can lessen any adverse effects of these gases on the environment. Moreover, health care facilities that use anesthetic gases are accountable for ensuring that all anesthesia equipment, including the scavenging system, is effective and routinely maintained. Implementing preventive practices and simple strategies can promote the safest and most healthy environment. PMID:23241038

  18. Noble gases in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, O. K.; Srinivasan, B.; Hennecke, E. W.; Sinclair, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon which were released by stepwise heating of lunar fines (15601.64) and (15271.65) were measured spectrometrically. The results of a composition of noble gases released from the lunar fines with noble gases in meteorites and in the earth are presented along with the isotopic composition of noble gases in lunar fines, in meteorites, and in the atmosphere. A study of two isotopically distinct components of trapped xenon in carbonaceous chondrites is also included.

  19. Environmental implications of anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Yasny, Jeffrey S; White, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    For several decades, anesthetic gases have greatly enhanced the comfort and outcome for patients during surgery. The benefits of these agents have heavily outweighed the risks. In recent years, the attention towards their overall contribution to global climate change and the environment has increased. Anesthesia providers have a responsibility to minimize unnecessary atmospheric pollution by utilizing techniques that can lessen any adverse effects of these gases on the environment. Moreover, health care facilities that use anesthetic gases are accountable for ensuring that all anesthesia equipment, including the scavenging system, is effective and routinely maintained. Implementing preventive practices and simple strategies can promote the safest and most healthy environment. PMID:23241038

  20. Radioactivity of cigarettes and the importance of (210)Po and thorium isotopes for radiation dose assessment due to smoking.

    PubMed

    Kubalek, Davor; Serša, Gregor; Štrok, Marko; Benedik, Ljudmila; Jeran, Zvonka

    2016-05-01

    Tobacco and tobacco smoke are very complex mixtures. In addition to various chemical and organic compounds they also contain natural radioactive elements (radionuclides). In this work, the natural radionuclide activity concentrations ((234)U, (238)U, (228)Th, (230)Th, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po) of nine different cigarette samples available on the Slovenian market are reported. In addition to (210)Po, the transfer of thorium isotopes from a cigarette to a smoker's body and lungs have been determined for the first time. Cigarette smoke and exhaled air from smokers' lungs were collected from volunteer smokers (C-4 brand) to determinate what quantity of (210)Po and thorium isotopes is transferred from the tobacco to the smoker's lungs. Cigarette ash and smoked filters were also collected and analysed. Among the determined isotopes, (210)Pb and (210)Po showed the highest activity concentrations. During the smoking of one cigarette approximately 22% of (210)Po (and presumably its predecessor (210)Pb), 0.6% of (228)Th, 24% of (230)Th, and 31% of (232)Th are transferred from the cigarette and retained in the smoker's body. The estimated annual effective dose for smokers is 61 μSv/year from (210)Po; 9 μSv/year from (210)Pb; 6 μSv/year from (228)Th; 47 μSv/year from (230)Th, and 37 μSv/year from (232)Th. These results show the importance of thorium isotopes in contributing to the annual effective dose for smoking. PMID:26942842

  1. Mycobacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Suggests Important Role of Plasmids in the Radiation of Type VII Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Emilie; Christina Boritsch, Eva; Vandenbogaert, Mathias; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C.; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Caro, Valerie; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Heym, Beate; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Brosch, Roland; Sapriel, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In mycobacteria, various type VII secretion systems corresponding to different ESX (ESAT-6 secretory) types, are contributing to pathogenicity, iron acquisition, and/or conjugation. In addition to the known chromosomal ESX loci, the existence of plasmid-encoded ESX systems was recently reported. To investigate the potential role of ESX-encoding plasmids on mycobacterial evolution, we analyzed a large representative collection of mycobacterial genomes, including both chromosomal and plasmid-borne sequences. Data obtained for chromosomal ESX loci confirmed the previous five classical ESX types and identified a novel mycobacterial ESX-4-like type, termed ESX-4-bis. Moreover, analysis of the plasmid-encoded ESX loci showed extensive diversification, with at least seven new ESX profiles, identified. Three of them (ESX-P clusters 1–3) were found in multiple plasmids, while four corresponded to singletons. Our phylogenetic and gene-order-analyses revealed two main groups of ESX types: 1) ancestral types, including ESX-4 and ESX-4-like systems from mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial actinobacteria and 2) mycobacteria-specific ESX systems, including ESX-1-2-3-5 systems and the plasmid-encoded ESX types. Synteny analysis revealed that ESX-P systems are part of phylogenetic groups that derived from a common ancestor, which diversified and resulted in the different ESX types through extensive gene rearrangements. A converging body of evidence, derived from composition bias-, phylogenetic-, and synteny analyses points to a scenario in which ESX-encoding plasmids have been a major driving force for acquisition and diversification of type VII systems in mycobacteria, which likely played (and possibly still play) important roles in the adaptation to new environments and hosts during evolution of mycobacterial pathogenesis. PMID:26748339

  2. Shock Interactions with Dusty Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omang, M. G.; Trulsen, J.

    Numerical simulations of shock interactions with dusty gases has a wide range of applications in different fields, such as dust explosions, geophysical flows, dusty plasmas in space, and industrial processes

  3. Climate-chemical interactions and effects of changing atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanathan, V.; Callis, L.; Cess, R.; Hansen, J.; Isaksen, I.

    1987-01-01

    The paper considers trace gas-climate effects including the greenhouse effect of polyatomic trace gases, the nature of the radiative-chemical interactions, and radiative-dynamical interactions in the stratosphere, and the role of these effects in governing stratospheric climate change. Special consideration is given to recent developments in the investigations of the role of oceans in governing the transient climate responses, and a time-dependent estimate of the potential trace gas warming from the preindustrial era to the early 21st century. The importance of interacting modeling and observational efforts is emphasized. One of the problems remaining on the observational front is the lack of certainty in current estimates of the rate of growth of CO, O3, and NOx; the primary challenge is the design of a strategy that will minimize the sampling errors.

  4. Climate-chemical interactions and effects of changing atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, V.; Callis, L.; Cess, R.; Hansen, J.; Isaksen, I.

    1987-08-01

    The paper considers trace gas-climate effects including the greenhouse effect of polyatomic trace gases, the nature of the radiative-chemical interactions, and radiative-dynamical interactions in the stratosphere, and the role of these effects in governing stratospheric climate change. Special consideration is given to recent developments in the investigations of the role of oceans in governing the transient climate responses, and a time-dependent estimate of the potential trace gas warming from the preindustrial era to the early 21st century. The importance of interacting modeling and observational efforts is emphasized. One of the problems remaining on the observational front is the lack of certainty in current estimates of the rate of growth of CO, O3, and NOx; the primary challenge is the design of a strategy that will minimize the sampling errors.

  5. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  6. Megacity Radiative Forcing: A Mexico City Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, M.; Olsen, S.; Mazzoleni, C.; Chylek, P.; Zhang, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Horowitz, L.

    2007-05-01

    We assess the radiative forcing of the largest megacity in North America, Mexico City. While particular aspects of the regional environmental impacts of cities on their surroundings have been thoroughly investigated, e.g., air quality and acid rain, relatively little effort has been focused on the net radiative impact of a megacity on global climate. The range of radiative impacts from a megacity covers many spatial and temporal scales from short-term regional-scale effects due to aerosols and relatively short-lived gases (ozone) to long-term global-scale impacts due to longer-lived trace gases (e.g., carbon dioxide, methane). In this study we combine chemistry-transport model simulations from the Model for Ozone And Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART-2) with in situ and satellite observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to calculate the global radiative forcing of megacity emissions. We also explore the radiative impact of various emission control strategies that focus on improving regional air quality. Our results suggest that the warming by greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and ozone can be moderated or exacerbated by aerosols depending on their optical properties. As the size and number of megacities increase and clean air regulations are implemented, metrics such as the net radiative forcing may become increasingly important in comparing the impact of urban centers and assessing the trade-offs between improving local air quality and minimizing global radiative impacts.

  7. Optical diagnostics of streamer discharges in atmospheric gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimek, M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reviews optical diagnostic methods and approaches applied to study the fundamentals of streamer discharges, considering the peculiarities of streamers developing in atmospheric gases at high (1 bar) as well as low (<10 mbar) pressures. A critical discussion is devoted to the cross-sections for electron-impact excitation/ionization/dissociation processes and corresponding rate constants in relation to methods used to probe streamer properties. The most important spectrometric signatures of radiative transitions of diatomic as well as atomic species are discussed on the basis of their synthetic models with a brief guide on how to simulate the most important emissions. Basic differences between UV-vis-NIR spectra produced by electron-impact and various heavy-particle energy-transfer processes during streamer evolution are presented and possible strategies based on 2D projections of cylindrically symmetric streamers to determine radial distributions of excited species within the streamer channel are discussed. The use of emission techniques to obtain the rotational temperatures and vibrational distributions of excited states of diatomics and laser-induced fluorescence techniques to probe the vibrational manifold of the lowest triplet metastable state of the nitrogen molecule is addressed.

  8. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 91.312 Section 91... Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. Record the expiration date stated by the gas supplier for each calibration gas. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the gases...

  9. Working gases in thermoacoustic engines.

    PubMed

    Belcher, J R; Slaton, W V; Raspet, R; Bass, H E; Lightfoot, J

    1999-05-01

    The best working gases for thermoacoustic refrigeration have high ratios of specific heats and low Prandtl numbers. These properties can be optimized by the use of a mixture of light and heavy noble gases. In this paper it is shown that light noble gas-heavy polyatomic gas mixtures can result in useful working gases. In addition, it is demonstrated that the onset temperature of a heat driven prime mover can be minimized with a gas with large Prandtl number and small ratio of specific heats. The gas properties must be optimized for the particular application of thermoacoustics; it cannot be assumed that high specific heat ratio and low Prandtl number are always desirable. PMID:10335618

  10. The strange gases of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    1990-01-01

    The various gases found in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed. A history of scientific investigation of these planets is outlined and results of these discoveries are considered. The molecular species found in these two planets are classified into several groups. The first group consists of H2, He, CH4, NH3, and H2O while the second group contains gases formed as the chemical byproducts of solar radiation, including simple hydrocarbons such as C2H2 and C2H6 and charged particles such as H3(+). The last group contains compounds which are chemically unstable in parts of Jupiter's atmosphere that have been probed and include Ge and As; two elements usually found in minerals on earth. An investigation of origin of these elements which are currently part of the upper reaches of the atmosphere of Jupiter and Saturn has led to discoveries about much deeper and hotter parts of atmospheres that can never be observed directly. A number of hypotheses are presented to account for the presence of various unexpected compounds, such as carbon monoxide.

  11. Quantum Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmettler, Peter; Kollath, Corinna

    2015-09-01

    The experimental realization of correlated quantum phases with ultracold gases in optical lattices and their theoretical understanding has witnessed remarkable progress during the last decade. In this review we introduce basic concepts and tools to describe the many-body physics of quantum gases in optical lattices. This includes the derivation of effective lattice Hamiltonians from first principles and an overview of the emerging quantum phases. Additionally, state-of-the-art numerical tools to quantitatively treat bosons or fermions on different lattices are introduced.

  12. Quasicondensation in Two-Dimensional Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chien-Te; Anderson, Brandon M.; Boyack, Rufus; Levin, K.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we follow the analysis and protocols of recent experiments, combined with simple theory, to arrive at a physical understanding of quasi-condensation in two dimensional Fermi gases. A key signature of quasi-condensation, which contains aspects of Berezinskiĭ-Kosterlitz-Thouless behavior, is a strong zero momentum peak in the pair momentum distribution. Importantly, this peak emerges at a reasonably well defined onset temperature. The resulting phase diagram, pair momentum distribution, and algebraic power law decay are compatible with recent experiments throughout the continuum from BEC to BCS.

  13. Quasicondensation in Two-Dimensional Fermi Gases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Te; Anderson, Brandon M; Boyack, Rufus; Levin, K

    2015-12-11

    In this paper we follow the analysis and protocols of recent experiments, combined with simple theory, to arrive at a physical understanding of quasi-condensation in two dimensional Fermi gases. A key signature of quasi-condensation, which contains aspects of Berezinskiĭ-Kosterlitz-Thouless behavior, is a strong zero momentum peak in the pair momentum distribution. Importantly, this peak emerges at a reasonably well defined onset temperature. The resulting phase diagram, pair momentum distribution, and algebraic power law decay are compatible with recent experiments throughout the continuum from BEC to BCS. PMID:26705613

  14. Greenhouse Effects due to Man-Mad Perturbations of Trace Gases.

    PubMed

    Wang, W C; Yung, Y L; Lacis, A A; Mo, T; Hansen, J E

    1976-11-12

    Nitrous oxide, methane, ammonia, and a number of other trace constituents in the earth's atmosphere have infrared absorption bands in the spectral region 7 to 14 microm and contribute to the atmospheric greenhouse effect. The concentrations of these trace gases may undergo substantial changes because of man's activities. Extensive use of chemical fertilizers and combustion of fossil fuels may perturb the nitrogen cycle, leading to increases in atmospheric N(2)O, and the same perturbing processes may increase the amounts of atmospheric CH(4) and NH(3). We use a one-dimensional radiative-convective model for the atmospheric thermal structure to compute the change in the surface temperature of the earth for large assumed increases in the trace gas concentrations; doubling the N(2)O, CH(4), and NH(3) concentrations is found to cause additive increases in the surface temperature of 0.7 degrees , 0.3 degrees , and 0.1 degrees K, respectively. These systematic effects on the earth's radiation budget would have substantial climatic significance. It is therefore important that the abundances of these trace gases be accurately monitored to determine the actual trends of their concentrations. PMID:17832523

  15. THE IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL MODELS FOR DERIVING DUST MASSES AND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN SUPERNOVA EJECTA. I. RADIATIVELY HEATED DUST IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-09-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 M{sub Sun }, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 {mu}m. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in external galaxies.

  16. The Importance of Physical Models for Deriving Dust Masses and Grain Size Distributions in Supernova Ejecta. I. Radiatively Heated Dust in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 Solar Mass, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 micron. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in external galaxies.

  17. New frontiers with ultracold gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2005-05-05

    This article summarizes recent work at MIT, which was presented at ICAP 2004. These examples demonstrate the broad range of topics, which are covered by research on quantum-degenerate gases: boson and fermion mixtures, cold molecules, vortices, and interactions with surfaces.

  18. Atmospheric Concentrations of Greenhouse Gases

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents trends in atmospheric concentrations of several greenhouse gases (GHGs) over geological time and in recent years. Changes in atmospheric GHGs, in part caused by human activities, affect the amount of energy held in the Earth-atmosphere system and thus a...

  19. Noble Gases as Mantle Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. R.; Porcelli, D.

    2003-12-01

    The study of the noble gases has been associated with some of the most illustrious names in experimental science, and some of the most profound discoveries. Fundamental advances in nuclear chemistry and physics - including the discovery of isotopes - have resulted from their study, earning Nobel Prizes for a number of early practitioners (Rutherford in 1908; Soddy in 1921; Aston in 1922) as well as for their discoverers (Ramsay and Rayleigh in 1904). Within the Earth Sciences, the noble gases found application soon after discovery - helium was used as a chronometer to estimate formation ages of various minerals (Strutt, 1908). In more recent times, the emphasis of noble gas research has shifted to include their exploitation as inert tracers of geochemical processes. In large part, this shift stems from the realization that primordial volatiles have been stored within the Earth since the time of planetary accretion and are still leaking to the surface today. In this introduction, we give a brief overview of the discovery of the noble gases and their continuing utility in the Earth Sciences, prior to setting into perspective the present contribution, which focuses on noble gases in the Earth's mantle.

  20. Interaction quenches of Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, Goetz S.

    2009-12-15

    It is shown that the jump in the momentum distribution of Fermi gases evolves smoothly for small and intermediate times once an interaction between the fermions is suddenly switched on. The jump does not vanish abruptly. The loci in momentum space where the jumps occur are those of the noninteracting Fermi sea. No relaxation of the Fermi surface geometry takes place.

  1. Impact of rising greenhouse gases on mid-latitude storm tracks and associated hydroclimate variability and change

    SciTech Connect

    Seager, Richard

    2014-12-08

    Project Summary This project aimed to advance physical understanding of how and why the mid-latitude jet streams and storm tracks shift in intensity and latitude in response to changes in radiative forcing with an especial focus on rising greenhouse gases. The motivation, and much of the work, stemmed from the importance that these mean and transient atmospheric circulation systems have for hydroclimate. In particular drying and expansion of the subtropical dry zones has been related to a poleward shift of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks. The work involved integrated assessment of observation and model projections as well as targeted model simulations.

  2. Mixture Working Gases in Thermoacoustic Engines for Different Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hanbing; He, Yaling; Liu, Yingwen; Cui, Fuqing

    2012-07-01

    For working gases in thermoacoustic engines, the most important characteristics are low Prandtl number and high ratio of specific heats. These properties change a lot with pressure for some gases, which makes selecting a working gas under high pressure different from that under normal pressure. This article presents optimization calculations for gas mixtures under different pressures. Results show that binary mixtures of helium and xenon can reach the lowest Prandtl number and highest ratio of specific heats when the pressure is lower than 4.5MPa. When the pressure is higher than 4.5MPa, however, the lowest Prandtl number is obtained with a mixture of helium and krypton. It is found that ternary mixtures may be better working gases than binary mixtures in thermoacoustic engines, especially under high pressure. For example, a helium-argon-xenon ternary mixture can be used to obtain a relatively low Prandtl number and high ratio of specific heats. In addition, this article shows that mixtures containing carbon dioxide and other gases can also result in useful working gases. This suggests that it is possible to replace the expensive xenon gas with cheap carbon dioxide for some applications. Finally, the effect of temperature on the Prandtl number, the ratio of specific heats, and the thermal penetration depth is also studied, and a more reasonable construction of the thermoacoutic couple is presented. The results of this study should be useful for helping select working gases in thermoacoustic engines for different applications and design goals.

  3. The state of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere using global observations through 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasova, Oksana; Koide, Hiroshi; Dlugokencky, Ed; Montzka, Stephen A.; Griffith, David; Brunke, Ernst; Scheel, Hans-Eckhart; Laurila, Tuomas; Weller, Rolf; Butler, James H.

    2013-04-01

    The Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) provides a framework for global observations and assessment of the state and development of atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases. It puts stringent requirements on the quality of the observations, and these requirements are evaluated every two years. Results of global analysis of the observational data are reported annually in the WMO/GAW Annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin. Bulletin No. 8 represents the results for the year 2011. This bulletin highlights the importance of carbon sinks (ocean and terrestrial biosphere) for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Observations used for global analysis are collected at more than 100 sites worldwide for CO2 and CH4 and at a smaller number of sites for other greenhouse gases. Globally averaged dry-air mole fractions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) reached new highs in 2011, with CO2 at 390.9 0.1 ppm, CH4 at 1813 2 ppb and N2O at 324.2 0.1 ppb. These values constitute 140%, 259% and 120% of pre-industrial (before 1750) levels, respectively. The increase of the annual mean CO2 mole fraction from 2010 to 2011 amounted to 2.0 ppm, which is greater than the average growth rate for the 1990s (~ 1.5 ppm/yr) and is equal to the average for the past decade (~ 2.0 ppm/yr). The globally averaged CH4 mole fraction increased by 5 ppb from 2010 to 2011. The growth rate of CH4 decreased from ~ 13 ppb/yr during the early 1980s to near zero during 1999-2006. Since 2007, atmospheric CH4 has been increasing again, averaging ~ 5 ppb/yr. The growth rate of N2O in 2011 was 1.0 ppb/yr, which is substantially greater than the average over the last 10 years (0.75 ppb/yr). The NOAA Annual Greenhouse Gas Index (AGGI) has been defined as the ratio of total radiative forcing due to long-lived greenhouse gases for any year for which adequate global measurements exist to that which was present in 1990. The AGGI in 2011 was 1.30 (corresponding to 2.84 W-m2 of global radiative forcing, relative to 1750, of all long-lived greenhouse gases). The AGGI indicates an increase in radiative forcing by all long-lived greenhouse gases of 30% since 1990 and of 1.2% from 2010 to 2011, while the radiative forcing by all long-lived greenhouse gases in 2011 corresponded to a CO2-equivalent mole fraction of 473 ppm (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/aggi).

  4. Greenhouse effect of chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James; Lacis, Andrew; Prather, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A comparison is made of the radiative (greenhouse) forcing of the climate system due to changes of atmospheric chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases. It is found that CFCs, defined to include chlorofluorocarbons, chlorocarbons, and fluorocarbons, now provide about one-quater of current annual increases in anthropogenic greenhouse climate forcing. If the growth rates of CFC production in the early 1970s had continued to the present, current annual growth of climate forcing due to CFCs would exceed that due to CO2.

  5. High order harmonic generation in rare gases

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K.S.

    1994-05-01

    The process of high order harmonic generation in atomic gases has shown great promise as a method of generating extremely short wavelength radiation, extending far into the extreme ultraviolet (XUV). The process is conceptually simple. A very intense laser pulse (I {approximately}10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) is focused into a dense ({approximately}10{sup l7} particles/cm{sup 3}) atomic medium, causing the atoms to become polarized. These atomic dipoles are then coherently driven by the laser field and begin to radiate at odd harmonics of the laser field. This dissertation is a study of both the physical mechanism of harmonic generation as well as its development as a source of coherent XUV radiation. Recently, a semiclassical theory has been proposed which provides a simple, intuitive description of harmonic generation. In this picture the process is treated in two steps. The atom ionizes via tunneling after which its classical motion in the laser field is studied. Electron trajectories which return to the vicinity of the nucleus may recombine and emit a harmonic photon, while those which do not return will ionize. An experiment was performed to test the validity of this model wherein the trajectory of the electron as it orbits the nucleus or ion core is perturbed by driving the process with elliptically, rather than linearly, polarized laser radiation. The semiclassical theory predicts a rapid turn-off of harmonic production as the ellipticity of the driving field is increased. This decrease in harmonic production is observed experimentally and a simple quantum mechanical theory is used to model the data. The second major focus of this work was on development of the harmonic {open_quotes}source{close_quotes}. A series of experiments were performed examining the spatial profiles of the harmonics. The quality of the spatial profile is crucial if the harmonics are to be used as the source for experiments, particularly if they must be refocused.

  6. Rare gases systematics and mantle structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allegre, C. J.; Staudacher, T.

    1994-01-01

    The following points are emphasized: one of the most important ones is certainly the first set of experimental data on the solubility of noble gases in metal phases at intermediate pressures, since the core was certainly not formed at ultra high pressures, as emphasized by Ahrens and confirmed by trace elements systematics Wanke. The experimental data clearly show that the core can not be a major reservoir for terrestrial rare gases; the second point is a more elaborate reconsideration of the (40)K-(40)Ar budget of the Earth. This shows that (40)Ar contained in continental crust plus upper mantle plus atmosphere is at maximum half of the (40)Ar inventory of the whole earth. This implies the existence of a two layered mantle; the third point is the discovery by the Australian noble gases group of the existence of high (20)Ne/(22)Ne and low (21)Ne/(22)Ne isotopic ratios in Loihi seamount samples. This results which are different to the MORB ratios confirm the idea of a two layered model, but suggest the existence of a primordial solar type Ne reservoir. Several possibilities about the origin of this (20)Ne excess in the mantle will be discussed; The high (40)Ar/(36)Ar, (129)Xe/(130)Xe and (134) Xe/(130)Xe, (136)Xe/(130)Xe are confirmed by new data. The corresponding ratios for the lower mantle will be discussed. (40)Ar/(36)Ar ratios up to 6000 can be accepted and will not modify the general model of the mantle. They confirm the atmosphere chronology, about 85 percent of the atmosphere was formed in the first 50 My and 15 percent later on.

  7. Isotopic Analysis and Evolved Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.; Boynton, William V.; Chutjian, Ara; Hoffman, John H.; Jordan, Jim L.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; McEntire, Richard W.; Nyquist, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Precise measurements of the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary surface material and gases, and observed variations in these compositions, can contribute significantly to our knowledge of the source(s), ages, and evolution of solar system materials. The analyses discussed in this paper are mostly made by mass spectrometers or some other type of mass analyzer, and address three broad areas of interest: (1) atmospheric composition - isotopic, elemental, and molecular, (2) gases evolved from solids, and (3) solids. Current isotopic data on nine elements, mostly from in situ analysis, but also from meteorites and telescopic observations are summarized. Potential instruments for isotopic analysis of lunar, Martian, Venusian, Mercury, and Pluto surfaces, along with asteroid, cometary and icy satellites, surfaces are discussed.

  8. Gases in ice cores

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Michael; Sowers, Todd; Brook, Edward

    1997-01-01

    Air trapped in glacial ice offers a means of reconstructing variations in the concentrations of atmospheric gases over time scales ranging from anthropogenic (last 200 yr) to glacial/interglacial (hundreds of thousands of years). In this paper, we review the glaciological processes by which air is trapped in the ice and discuss processes that fractionate gases in ice cores relative to the contemporaneous atmosphere. We then summarize concentration–time records for CO2 and CH4 over the last 200 yr. Finally, we summarize concentration–time records for CO2 and CH4 during the last two glacial–interglacial cycles, and their relation to records of global climate change. PMID:11607743

  9. An alternative approach to establishing trade-offs among greenhouse gases.

    PubMed

    Manne, A S; Richels, R G

    2001-04-01

    The Kyoto Protocol permits countries to meet part of their emission reduction obligations by cutting back on gases other than CO2 (ref. 1). This approach requires a definition of trade-offs among the radiatively active gases. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has suggested global warming potentials for this purpose, which use the accumulated radiative forcing of each gas by a set time horizon to establish emission equivalence. But it has been suggested that this approach has serious shortcomings: damages or abatement costs are not considered and the choice of time horizon for calculating cumulative radiative force is critical, but arbitrary. Here we describe an alternative framework for determining emission equivalence between radiatively active gases that addresses these weaknesses. We focus on limiting temperature change and rate of temperature change, but our framework is also applicable to other objectives. For a proposed ceiling, we calculate how much one should be willing to pay for emitting an additional unit of each gas. The relative prices then determine the trade-off between gases at each point in time, taking into account economical as well as physical considerations. Our analysis shows that the relative prices are sensitive to the lifetime of the gases, the choice of target and the proximity of the target, making short-lived gases more expensive to emit as we approach the prescribed ceiling. PMID:11287950

  10. Annihilation in Gases and Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This publication contains most of the papers, both invited and contributed, that were presented at the Workshop of Annihilation in Gases and Galaxies. This was the fifth in a biennial series associated with the International Conference on the Physics of Electronic and Atomic Collisions. Subjects covered included the scattering and annihilation of positrons and positronium atoms in various media, including those of astrophysical interest. In addition, the topics of antimatter and dark matter were covered.

  11. Specification for welding shielding gases. (AWS standard)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-08

    This specification for welding shielding gases specifies minimum requirements for the composition and purity of the most popular single-component shielding gases. Classification designators for both single and multicomponent gases are introduced. Other topic include testing procedures, package marking, and general application guidelines.

  12. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polypropylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Schneider, J. E.; Brauer, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of polypropylene was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. The gases from this sample appeared to be equivalent or less toxic than the gases from a sample of polyethylene under these particular test conditions. Carbon monoxide appeared to be the principal toxicant.

  13. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 90.312 Section 90... Provisions 90.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. The expiration date stated by the gas supplier must be recorded. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the...

  14. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... shall be capped or otherwise protected in accordance with 49 CFR 173.301(g). (b) Cylinders temporarily... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for...

  15. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... shall be capped or otherwise protected in accordance with 49 CFR 173.301(g). (b) Cylinders temporarily... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for...

  16. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shall be capped or otherwise protected in accordance with 49 CFR 173.301(g). (b) Cylinders temporarily... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for...

  17. Electron impact on atmospheric gases. I - Updated cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, C. H.; Garvey, R. H.; Green, A. E. S.

    1977-01-01

    The analytic characterizations of electron impact cross sections for important atmospheric gases (namely, O2, N2, O, CO, CO2, and He) are updated. With these cross sections it is simple to communicate massive quantities of experimental and theoretical results. In addition, these forms are convenient for applications in energy degradation calculations, including a new approach described in a companion paper.

  18. Soil and litter exchange of reactive trace gases

    EPA Science Inventory

    The soil and litter play an important role in the exchange of trace gases between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. - The exchange of ammonia between vegetation and the atmosphere is highly influenced by soil and litter emissions especially in managed ecosystems (grassla...

  19. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 80TH BIRTHDAY OF S.A. AKHMANOV: Self-action of a high-power 10-?m laser radiation in gases: control of the pulse duration and generation of hot electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, Vyacheslav M.; Platonenko, Viktor T.; Sterzhantov, A. F.

    2009-07-01

    The propagation of ultrashort 10-?m laser pulses of power exceeding the critical self-focusing power in xenon and air is numerically simulated. It is shown that the pulse duration in certain regimes in xenon can be decreased by 3-4 times simultaneously with the increase in the pulse power by 2-3 times. It is found that the average energy of electrons in a filament upon filamentation of 10-?m laser pulses in air can exceed 200 eV. The features of the third harmonic and terahertz radiation generation upon filamentation are discussed.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2001-07-23

    Global Warming and Methane--Global warming, an increase in Earth's near-surface temperature, is believed to result from the buildup of what scientists refer to as ''greenhouse gases.'' These gases include water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluoro-carbons, and sulfur hexafluoride. Greenhouse gases can absorb outgoing infrared (heat) radiation and re-emit it back to Earth, warming the surface. Thus, these gases act like the glass of a greenhouse enclosure, trapping infrared radiation inside and warming the space. One of the more important greenhouse gases is the naturally occurring hydrocarbon methane. Methane, a primary component of natural gas, is the second most important contributor to the greenhouse effect (after carbon dioxide). Natural sources of methane include wetlands, fossil sources, termites, oceans, fresh-waters, and non-wetland soils. Methane is also produced by human-related (or anthropogenic) activities such as fossil fuel production, coal mining, rice cultivation, biomass burning, water treatment facilities, waste management operations and landfills, and domesticated livestock operations (Figure 1). These anthropogenic activities account for approximately 70% of the methane emissions to the atmosphere. Methane is removed naturally from the atmosphere in three ways. These methods, commonly referred to as sinks, are oxidation by chemical reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl ion, oxidation within the stratosphere, and microbial uptake by soils. In spite of their important role in removing excess methane from the atmosphere, the sinks cannot keep up with global methane production. Methane concentrations in the atmosphere have increased by 145% since 1800. Increases in atmospheric methane roughly parallel world population growth, pointing to anthropogenic sources as the cause (Figure 2). Increases in the methane concentration reduce Earth's natural cooling efficiency by trapping more of the outgoing terrestrial infrared radiation, increasing the near-surface temperature.

  1. Concentration-response data on toxicity of pyrolysis gases from some natural and synthetic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Huttlinger, N. V.

    1978-01-01

    Concentration-response data are presented on the toxic effects of the pyrolysis gases from some natural and synthetic polymers, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. The pyrolysis gases from wool, red oak, Douglas fir, polycaprolactam, polyether sulfone, polyaryl sulfone, and polyphenylene sulfide appeared to exhibit the concentration-response relationships commonly encountered in toxicology. Carbon monoxide seemed to be an important toxicant in the pyrolysis gases from red oak, Douglas fir, and polycaprolactam, but did not appear to have been the principal toxicant in the pyrolysis gases from polyether sulfone and polyphenylene sulfide.

  2. Instantaneous and efficient surface wave excitation of a low pressure gas or gases

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Donald J. (Berkeley, CA); Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A system for instantaneously ionizing and continuously delivering energy in the form of surface waves to a low pressure gas or mixture of low pressure gases, comprising a source of rf energy, a discharge container, (such as a fluorescent lamp discharge tube), an rf shield, and a coupling device responsive to rf energy from the source to couple rf energy directly and efficiently to the gas or mixture of gases to ionize at least a portion of the gas or gases and to provide energy to the gas or gases in the form of surface waves. The majority of the rf power is transferred to the gas or gases near the inner surface of the discharge container to efficiently transfer rf energy as excitation energy for at least one of the gases. The most important use of the invention is to provide more efficient fluorescent and/or ultraviolet lamps.

  3. Radiative interactions in nonequilibrium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Chandrasekhar, R.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of vibrational and chemical nonequilibrium upon infrared radiative energy transfer in nonisothermal gases is investigated. Essential information is provided on rate equations, relaxation times, transfer equations, band absorption, and radiative flux equations. The methodology developed is applied to three specific cases. These are, absorbing-emitting species between isothermal parallel plates, radiating gases in the earth's atmosphere, and supersonic flow of premixed hydrogen and air in an expanding nozzle. The results obtained for different cases reveal that the extent of radiative interactions is reduced significantly under nonequilibrium conditions. The method developed can be easily extended to investigate radiative interactions in complex nonequilibrium flows.

  4. Inert gases in Sea of Fertility regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Zadorozhnyy, I. K.

    1974-01-01

    The content and isotopic composition were studied of inert gases -- He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe -- in samples of lunar regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station. The samples were taken from depths of about 12 and 30 cm. The high concentrations of inert gases exceed by several orders their concentrations observed in ordinary stony meteorites. The gases in lunar regolith were a complex mixture of gases of different origins: Solar, cosmogenic, radiogenic, and so on. Solar wind gases predominated, distributed in the thin surficial layer of the regolith grains. The concentrations of these gases in the surficial layer is several cubic centimeters per gram. The isotopic composition of the inert gases of solar origin approaches their composition measured in gas-rich meteorites.

  5. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

  6. Statistics of electron avalanches and bursts in low pressure gases below the breakdown voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Donko, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Avalanches in different types of dynamical systems have been subject of recent interest. Avalanches building up in gases play an important role in radiation detectors and in the breakdown process of gas discharges. We have used computer simulation to study statistical properties of electron avalanches and bursts (sequences of avalanches) in a gas subjected to a homogeneous electric field. Helium was used as buffer gas, but we believe that our results are more general. The bursts were initiated by injecting low energy electrons into the gas. We applied Monte Carlo procedure to trace the trajectories of electrons. The elementary processes considered in the model were anisotropic elastic scattering of electrons from He atoms, electron impact excitation and ionization of He atoms. The electrons were traced until the are reached the perfectly absorbing anode.

  7. Climate Change and Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledley, Tamara S.; Sundquist, Eric; Schwartz, Stephen; Hall, Dorothy K.; Fellows, Jack; Killeen, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU), as a scientific organization devoted to research on the Earth and space sciences, provides current scientific information to the public on issues pertinent to geophysics. The Council of the AGU approved a position statement on Climate Change and Greenhouse Gases in December 1998. The statement, together with a short summary of the procedures that were followed in its preparation, review, and adoption were published in the February 2, 1999 issue of Eos ([AGU, 1999]. The present article reviews scientific understanding of this issue as presented in peer-reviewed publications that serves as the underlying basis of the position statement.

  8. Biomethanation of biomass pyrolysis gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, C. A.; Ashare, E.

    1981-08-01

    The development of the biological methanation process and conditions for maximum performane were studied. Gasification processes have the potential to produce a synthesis gas from biomass. The advantage of such processes is that all organic components of the biomass may be converted to synthesis gas. However, this low Btu value gas is of limited use as a fuel gas. To convert the synthesis gas into pipeline quality methane, a methanation process is necessary. A more economical alternative to catalytic methanation at high temperature and pressure is the utilization of a biological system to carry out the conversion of biomass pyrolysis gases to methane.

  9. Spark ignition of flowing gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swett, Clyde C , Jr

    1956-01-01

    Research conducted at the NACA Lewis Laboratory on ignition of flowing gases by means of long-duration discharges is summarized and analyzed. Data showing the effect of a flowing combustible mixture on the physical and electrical characteristics of spark discharges and data showing the effects of variables on the spark energy required for ignition that has been developed to predict the effect of many of the gas-stream and spark variables is described and applied to a limited amount of experimental data.

  10. The changing role of non co2 greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A. K.

    During the last century, the concentrations of several greenhouse gases have increased considerably - most notably, methane and nitrous oxide. In addition, new, entirely man - made gases have been put into the atmosphere that also cause the greenhouse effect; these include the chlorofluorocarbons. Calculations have shown that the during the last century the non - CO2 greenhouse gases could together be almost as effective as the increase of carbon dioxide in causing global warming. These and similar gases were therefore included in the Kyoto Protocol to develop a comprehensive plan for controlling global warming. New studies show however that the other gases, with few exceptions, are likely to play a smaller than expected role in future global warming. The most significant non - CO2 man made greenhouse gases are methane and nitrous oxide. Methane rose from 800 ppbv about 200 years ago to about 1700 ppbv in recent times, while nitrous oxide rose from about 285 ppbv to 310 ppbv over the same time. These trends made methane the most important gas for global warming next to carbon dioxide. But now, the trends of methane have declined considerably. Budget analyses suggest that we may not see major changes of concentrations in the future comparable to the trends of the last century. Thus the role of methane in future global warming may be less than expected earlier. Nitrous oxide on the other hand, has increased slowly during the last century, but now there is an indication that it may be increasing faster. The increase of nitrous oxide is still slow, but in time it is likely to become more important than previously thought. While other greenhouse gases such as the perfluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride and hydrochlorofluorocarbons are included in the Kyoto Protocol, these are present in such minute concentrations that it is unlikely that they will have an important role in future global warming. Recent studies on the perfluorocarbons show that the trend of the major gas, carbon tetrafluoride, is slowing down as a response to industry controls designed for energy savings. These considerations suggest that while there may be many non - CO2 man made greenhouse gases, and whatever their collective role is, it is will be dominated in the future by nitrous oxide and to a lesser extent by methane.

  11. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Cell Proliferation in Human Embryonic Lung Fibroblasts but not in Lung Cancer Cells: Importance of ERK1/2 and AKT Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xinyue; Gu, Junlian; Yu, Dehai; Wang, Guanjun; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhao, Yuguang; Chen, Xiao; Zheng, Shirong; Liu, Qiang; Cai, Lu; Cui, Jiuwei; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Hormesis and adaptive responses are 2 important biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDR). In normal tissue, LDR induces hormesis as evinced by increased cell proliferation; however, whether LDR also increases tumor cell proliferation needs to be investigated. In this study, cell proliferation was assayed by total cell numbers and the Cell Counting Kit 8 assay. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphatidylinositol 3' -kinase(PI3K)-Akt (PI3K/AKT) phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Human embryonic lung fibroblast 2BS and lung cancer NCI-H446 cell lines were irradiated with LDR at different doses (20-100 mGy). In response to 20 to 75 mGy X-rays, cell proliferation was significantly increased in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. In 2BS cells, LDR at 20 to 75 mGy also stimulated phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK pathway proteins including ERK, MEK, and Raf and of the PI3K/AKT pathway protein AKT. To test whether ERK1/2 and AKT pathway activation was involved in the stimulation of cell proliferation in 2BS cells, the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways were inhibited using their specific inhibitors, U0126 and LY294002. U0126 decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and LY294002 decreased the phosphorylation of AKT; each could significantly inhibit LDR-induced 2BS cell proliferation. However, LDR did not stimulate these kinases, and kinase inhibitors also did not affect cell proliferation in the NCI-H446 cells. These results suggest that LDR stimulates cell proliferation via the activation of both MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. This finding implies the potential for applying LDR to protect normal tissues from radiotherapy without diminishing the efficacy of tumor therapy. PMID:26788032

  12. Minerals, metal production and greenhouse gases

    SciTech Connect

    Themelis, N.J.; Wernick, I.

    1997-12-31

    The construction minerals, industrial minerals, and metals used in the U.S. annually amount to about 2.3 billion tons or 72% of all materials produced by industry, agriculture and forestry, excluding the bulk of the fossil fuel production (about 1.9 billion tons) which is used for electricity, heating and transportation. On a global scale, the consumption of minerals and metals has increased by a factor of ten in the 20th century and is an important contributor to the generation of greenhouse gases. As the grades of mined ores diminish, the energy units required to produce minerals and metals, and the corresponding emissions to the atmosphere, will increase substantially. The current emissions of the dominant production technologies and the prospects for reducing emissions, by means of recycling and technological advances, will be discussed.

  13. Filter for cleaning hot gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gresch, H.; Holter, H.; Hubner, K.; Igelbuscher, H.; Weber, E.

    1981-10-20

    In an apparatus for cleaning hot gases a filter housing has an inlet for unfiltered gas and an outlet for filtered gas. A plurality of filtered inserts are placed within the housing in a manner capable of filtering undesirable components from the gas feed stream. Each filter insert is made of a fibrous filter material. Silicic-acid glass fibers have a silicic acid content of at least 90%. Coated upon the fibers and absorbed into their pores is a metal oxide of aluminum, titanium, zirconium, cromium, nickle or cobalt. A honeycombed cage filled with high temperature resistant perlite is located within the housing between the gas inlet and the fiber inserts. The cage has an inlet and outlet external to the housing for replacing the perlite. A combustion chamber mounted in the housing has a discharge nozzle located so that the nozzle is directed at the filter inserts. Combusting materials in the chamber causes an explosive backflow of gases through the filter inserts.

  14. Predicting Flows of Rarefied Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBeau, Gerald J.; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    2005-01-01

    DSMC Analysis Code (DAC) is a flexible, highly automated, easy-to-use computer program for predicting flows of rarefied gases -- especially flows of upper-atmospheric, propulsion, and vented gases impinging on spacecraft surfaces. DAC implements the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which is widely recognized as standard for simulating flows at densities so low that the continuum-based equations of computational fluid dynamics are invalid. DAC enables users to model complex surface shapes and boundary conditions quickly and easily. The discretization of a flow field into computational grids is automated, thereby relieving the user of a traditionally time-consuming task while ensuring (1) appropriate refinement of grids throughout the computational domain, (2) determination of optimal settings for temporal discretization and other simulation parameters, and (3) satisfaction of the fundamental constraints of the method. In so doing, DAC ensures an accurate and efficient simulation. In addition, DAC can utilize parallel processing to reduce computation time. The domain decomposition needed for parallel processing is completely automated, and the software employs a dynamic load-balancing mechanism to ensure optimal parallel efficiency throughout the simulation.

  15. Interactive Photochemistry in Earth System Models to Assess Uncertainty in Ozone and Greenhouse Gases. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, Michael J.; Hsu, Juno; Nicolau, Alex; Veidenbaum, Alex; Smith, Philip Cameron; Bergmann, Dan

    2014-11-07

    Atmospheric chemistry controls the abundances and hence climate forcing of important greenhouse gases including N2O, CH4, HFCs, CFCs, and O3. Attributing climate change to human activities requires, at a minimum, accurate models of the chemistry and circulation of the atmosphere that relate emissions to abundances. This DOE-funded research provided realistic, yet computationally optimized and affordable, photochemical modules to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that augment the CESM capability to explore the uncertainty in future stratospheric-tropospheric ozone, stratospheric circulation, and thus the lifetimes of chemically controlled greenhouse gases from climate simulations. To this end, we have successfully implemented Fast-J (radiation algorithm determining key chemical photolysis rates) and Linoz v3.0 (linearized photochemistry for interactive O3, N2O, NOy and CH4) packages in LLNL-CESM and for the first time demonstrated how change in O2 photolysis rate within its uncertainty range can significantly impact on the stratospheric climate and ozone abundances. From the UCI side, this proposal also helped LLNL develop a CAM-Superfast Chemistry model that was implemented for the IPCC AR5 and contributed chemical-climate simulations to CMIP5.

  16. The assessment of the impact of aviation NOx on ozone and other radiative forcing responses - The importance of representing cruise altitudes accurately

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, A.; Lee, D. S.; De Len, R. R.

    2013-08-01

    Aviation emissions of NOx result in the formation of tropospheric ozone (warming) and destruction of a small amount of methane (cooling), positive and negative radiative forcing effects. In addition, the reduction of methane results in a small long-term reduction in tropospheric ozone (cooling) and, in addition, a long-term reduction in water vapour in the stratosphere (cooling) from reduced oxidation of methane, both negative radiative forcing impacts. Taking all these radiative effects together, aircraft NOx is still thought to result in a positive (warming) radiative effect under constant emissions assumptions. Previously, comparative modelling studies have focussed on the variability between models, using the same emissions database. In this study, we rather quantify the variability and uncertainty arising from different estimations of present-day aircraft NOx emissions. Six different aircraft NOx emissions inventories were used in the global chemical transport model, MOZART v3. The inventories were normalized to give the same global emission of NOx in order to remove one element of uncertainty. Emissions differed in the normalized cases by 23% at cruise altitudes (283-200 hPa, where the bulk of emission occurs, globally). However, the resultant short-term ozone chemical perturbation varied by 15% between the different inventories. Once all the effects that give rise to positive and negative radiative impacts were accounted for, the variability of net radiative forcing impacts was 94%. Using these radiative effects to formulate a net aviation NOx Global Warming Potential (GWP) for a 100-year time horizon resulted in GWPs ranging from 60 to 4, over an order of magnitude. It is concluded that the detailed placement of emissions at chemically sensitive cruise altitudes strongly affects the assessment of the total radiative impact, introducing a hitherto previously unidentified large fraction of the uncertainty of impacts between different modelling assessments. It is recommended that future formulations of aircraft NOx emissions focus efforts on the detailed and accurate placement of emissions at cruise altitudes to reduce the uncertainty in future assessments of aviation NOx impacts.

  17. Pharmacologic inhibition of ATR and ATM offers clinically important distinctions to enhancing platinum or radiation response in ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Pang-ning; Bateman, Nicholas W.; Darcy, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Chad A.; Maxwell, George Larry; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Conrads, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Significant reductions in gynecologic (GYN) cancer mortality and morbidity require treatments that prevent and reverse resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. The objective of this study was to determine if pharmacologic inhibition of key DNA damage response kinases in GYN cancers would enhance cell killing by platinum-based chemotherapy and radiation. Methods A panel of human ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer cell lines were treated with platinum drugs or ionizing radiation (IR) along with small molecule pharmacological kinase inhibitors of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad-3-related (ATR). Results Pharmacologic inhibition of ATR significantly enhanced platinum drug response in all GYN cancer cell lines tested, whereas inhibition of ATM did not enhance the response to platinum drugs. Co-inhibition of ATM and ATR did not enhance platinum kill beyond that observed by inhibition of ATR alone. By contrast, inhibiting either ATR or ATM enhanced the response to IR in all GYN cancer cells, with further enhancement achieved with co-inhibition. Conclusions These studies highlight actionable mechanisms operative in GYN cancer cells with potential to maximize response of platinum agents and radiation in newly diagnosed as well as recurrent gynecologic cancers. PMID:25560806

  18. Probing the effect of Gases on Activated Lunar Simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, F.; Ricketts, C. L.; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Contreras, C. S.; Mattioda, A. L.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Ricca, A.

    2012-05-01

    The lunar surface is constantly activated through bombardment of solar radiation and micrometeorites. This activation is significant enough to affect the surface dust by creating free radicals, dangling bonds and lattice defeats. Hence, the reactive effect of the dust particles on spacecraft instrumentation and human toxicology is a concern. There is currently little information on the surface chemical activation of lunar regolith after exposure to gases brought to the Moon by human activities. Information is needed in order to understand the regolith toxicity, effect on spacecraft, determine lunar dust exposure limits and meet the needs of the technological development of appropriate physical/chemical tools for regolith passivation. In this experimental study, we grind JSC-1af lunar simulant to simulate micrometeorite impacts and expose the simulant to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light to simulate solar radiation. We then flow a variety of gases (N2, CO2, CH4) over the simulant to simulate the exposure of the activated dust to gases humans would bring to the Moon. Mass spectra are taken using the Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer at NASA Ames Cosmic Simulation facility (COSmIC), before, during and after exposure to VUV and the various gases. Infrared spectra and Scanning Electron Microscope images of the simulant are taken, before and after activation and gas exposure. Future plans include theory and replicating these experiments using real lunar dust. Here we describe our new custom built lunar dust holder, experimental procedure and latest results. Acknowledgments: NASA LASER supports this research. E.S.O. and C.S.C. acknowledge the support of the NASA Postdoctoral Program.

  19. Angular correlation studies in noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. G.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a recent revival of interest in the measurement of angular correlation of annihilation photons from the decay of positrons and positronium in gases. This revival has been stimulated by the possibility offered by the technique to shed new light on the apparently low positronium formation fraction in the heavier noble gases and to provide information on positronium quenching processes in gases such as oxygen. There is also the potential for learning about positronium slowing down in gases. This review focuses on experimental noble gas work and considers what new information has been, and may be, gained from these studies.

  20. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Yang, Shuxiang; Rousseau, Valry; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana; Hulet, Randall G.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2015-12-01

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing, and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. We propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a nondisordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approach the Nel temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust.

  1. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Yang, Shuxiang; Rousseau, Valry; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana; Hulet, Randall G; Scalettar, Richard T

    2015-12-11

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing, and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. We propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a nondisordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum MonteCarlo simulations, that we can approach the Nel temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust. PMID:26705614

  2. Continuous Processing With Mars Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde; Jennings, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Current Martian missions call for the production of oxygen for breathing, and fuel and oxygen for propulsion to be produced from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Adsorption and freezing are the two methods considered for capturing CO2 from the atmosphere. However, the nitrogen (N2) and argon (Ar), which make up less than 5 percent of the atmosphere, cause difficulties with both of these processes by blocking the CO2. This results in the capture process rapidly changing from a pressure driven process to a diffusion controlled process. To increase the CO2 capture rates, some type of mechanical pump is usually proposed to remove the N2 and Ar. The N2 and Ar are useful and have been proposed for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. Separation of the Martian gases with the required purity can be accomplished with a combination of membranes. These membrane systems do not require a high feed pressure and provide suitable separation. Therefore, by use of the appropriate membrane combination with the Martian atmosphere supplied by a compressor a continuous Supply Of CO2 for fuel and oxygen production can be supplied. This phase of our program has focused on the selection of the membrane system. Since permeation data for membranes did not exist for Martian atmospheric pressures and temperatures, this information had to be compiled. The general trend as the temperature was lowered was for the membranes to become more selective. In addition, the relative permeation rates between the three gases changed with temperature. The end result was to provide design parameters that could be used to separate CO2 from N2 and Ar. This paper will present the membrane data, provide the design requirements for a compressor, and compare the results with adsorption and freezer methods.

  3. Continuous Processing with Mars Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde; Jennings, Paul; Delgado, Hugo (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Current Martian missions call for the production of oxygen for breathing, and fuel and oxygen for propulsion to be produced from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Adsorption and freezing are the two methods considered for capturing CO, from the atmosphere. However, the nitrogen (N2) and argon (Ar), which make up less than 5 percent of the atmosphere, cause difficulties with both of these processes by blocking the CO2, This results in the capture process rapidly changing from a pressure driven process to a diffusion controlled process. To increase the CO, capture rates, some type of mechanical pump is usually proposed to remove the N2 and Ar. The N2 and Ar are useful and have been proposed for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. Separation of the Martian gases with the required purity can be accomplished with a combination of membranes. These membrane systems do not require a high feed pressure and provide suitable separation. Therefore, by use of the appropriate membrane combination with the Martian atmosphere supplied by a compressor a continuous supply of CO2 for fuel and oxygen production can be supplied. This phase of our program has focused on the selection of the membrane system. Since permeation data for membranes did not exist for Martian atmospheric pressures and temperatures, this information had to be compiled. The general trend as the temperature was lowered was for the membranes to become more selective. In addition, the relative permeation rates between the three gases changed with temperature. The end result was to provide design parameters that could be used to separate CO2 from N2 and Ar. This paper will present the membrane data, provide the design requirements for a compressor, and compare the results with adsorption and freezer methods.

  4. Long-term outcomes in breast cancer patients with ten or more positive axillary nodes treated with combined-modality therapy: The importance of radiation field selection

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Daniel T.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Lightsey, Judith; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Copeland, Edward M.; Mendenhall, Nancy P. . E-mail: mendenan@shands.ufl.edu

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the long-term outcome of a consistent treatment approach with electron beam postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with {>=}10 positive nodes treated with combined-modality therapy. Methods and Materials: TSixty-three breast cancer patients with {>=}10 positive lymph nodes were treated with combined-modality therapy using an electron beam en face technique for PMRT at University of Florida. Patterns of recurrence were studied for correlation with radiation fields. Potential clinical and treatment variables were tested for possible association with local-regional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: TAt 5, 10, and 15 years, OS rates were 57%, 36%, and 27%, respectively; DFS rates were 46%, 37%, and 34%; and LRC rates were 87%, 87%, and 87%. No clinical or treatment variables were associated with OS or DFS. The use of supplemental axillary radiation (SART) (p = 0.012) and pathologic N stage (p = 0.053) were associated with improved LRC. Patients who received SART had a higher rate of LRC than those who did not. Moderate to severe arm edema developed in 17% of patients receiving SART compared with 7% in patients not treated with SART (p = 0.28). Conclusions: TA substantial percentage of patients with {>=}10 positive lymph nodes survive breast cancer. The 10-year overall survival in these patients was 36%. The addition of SART was associated with better LRC.

  5. Greenhouse gases in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wenyi Zhong; Haigh, J.D. ); Pyle, J.A. )

    1993-02-20

    The potential radiative forcing in the stratosphere of changing concentrations of ozone, methane, nitrous oxide and chlorofluorocarbons 11 and 12 is assessed. Significant changes in heating rate in the lower stratosphere are found. The response of a fully interactive radiative-photochemical-dynamical two-dimensional model to such changes in gaseous concentrations is investigated. The inclusion of CH[sub 4], N[sub 2]O and the CFC in the radiation scheme causes a small (1 K) decrease in temperature throughout the stratosphere after 50 model years with a resulting increase in ozone column up to 1% in summer high latitudes. An experiment in which lower stratospheric ozone concentrations were forcibly reduced in line with recent satellite observations results in significant (several degrees) temperature decrease in this region. Such decreases may be very significant in maintaining polar ozone loss. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Recognizing and Dealing with Dangerous Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bove, Robert A.

    1978-01-01

    When handling hazardous gases, it is necessary to know their properties, precautions that can be taken to protect workers, and proper first aid. This article gives everyday rules for handling gas cylinders, and a brief first aid guide for 12 common toxic gases and vapors. (BB)

  7. Irradiated gases transferred without contamination or dilution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonn, J. L.; Kern, W.

    1967-01-01

    Vacuum chamber apparatus opens sealed canisters of irradiated gases and transfers the contents without contaminating the surrounding area, and without diluting or polluting the contained gases. The apparatus consists of the chamber, a valved piping manifold, and a special drill and sealed drilling access.

  8. Facilitating Conceptual Change in Gases Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Pinar Seda; Kaya, Ebru; Geban, Omer

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of conceptual change oriented instruction (CCOI) over traditionally designed chemistry instruction (TDCI) on overcoming 10th grade students' misconceptions on gases concepts. In addition, the effect of gender difference on students' understanding of gases concepts was investigated. The

  9. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyoxymethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Schneider, J. E.; Brauer, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of polyoxymethylene was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Under several test conditions, this material gave shorter times to death than many other synthetic polymers. Carbon monoxide appeared to be the principal toxicant in the pyrolysis gases.

  10. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  11. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  12. Effects of traces of molecular gases (hydrogen, nitrogen) in glow discharges in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steers, E. B. M.; Smid, P.; Hoffmann, V.

    2008-07-01

    The "Grimm" type of low pressure glow discharge source, introduced some forty years ago, has proved to be a versatile analytical source. A flat sample is used as the cathode and placed about 0.2mm away from the end of a hollow tubular anode leading to an obstructed discharge. When the source was first developed, it was used for the direct analysis of solid metallic samples by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), normally with argon as the plasma gas; it was soon found that, using suitable electrical parameters, the cathode material was sputtered uniformly from a circular crater of diameter equal to that of the tubular anode, so that the technique could be used for compositional depth profile analysis (CDPA). Over the years the capability and applications of the technique have steadily increased. The use of rf powered discharges now permits the analysis of non-conducting layers and samples; improved instrumental design now allows CDPA of ever thinner layers (e.g. resolution of layers 5 nm thick in multilayer stacks is possible). For the original bulk material application, pre-sputtering could be used to remove any surface contamination but for CDPA, analysis must start immediately the discharge is ignited, so that any surface contamination can introduce molecular gases into the plasma gas and have significant analytical consequences, especially for very thin layers; in addition, many types of samples now analysed contain molecular gases as components (either as occluded gas, or e.g. as a nitride or oxide), and this gas enters the discharge when the sample is sputtered. It is therefore important to investigate the effect of such foreign gases on the discharge, in particular on the spectral intensities and hence the analytical results. The presentation will concentrate mainly on the effect of hydrogen in argon discharges, in the concentration range 0-2 % v/v but other gas mixtures (e.g. Ar/N_2, Ne/H_2) will be considered for comparison. In general, the introduction of molecular gases can change the discharge impedance, alter the sputtering rate and crater profile and cause changes in the absolute and relative intensities of lines in both the atomic and ionic spectra of the sample element and the plasma gas. The authors wish to acknowledge financial support from EC funded Analytical Glow Discharge Research Training Network GLADNET, contract no. MRTN-CT-2006-035459. P. Smid thanks the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Ref 436 TSE 17/7/06) for support while carrying out experiments at IFW Dresden.

  13. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : The Effect of Inert Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1928-01-01

    Attention is called in this report to previous investigations of gaseous explosive reactions carried out under constant volume conditions, where the effect of inert gases on the thermodynamic equilibrium was determined. The advantage of constant pressure methods over those of constant volume as applied to studies of the gaseous explosive reaction is pointed out and the possibility of realizing for this purpose a constant pressure bomb mentioned. The application of constant pressure methods to the study of gaseous explosive reactions, made possible by the use of a constant pressure bomb, led to the discovery of an important kinetic relation connecting the rate of propagation of the zone of explosive reaction within the active gases, with the initial concentrations of those gases: s = K(sub 1)(A)(sup n1)(B)(sup n2)(C)(sup n3)------. By a method analogous to that followed in determining the effect of inert gases on the equilibrium constant K, the present paper records an attempt to determine their kinetic effect upon the expression given above.

  14. EOSN: A TOUGH2 module for noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-03-07

    We developed a new fluid property module for TOUGH2, called EOSN, to simulate transport of noble gases in the subsurface. Currently, users may select any of five different noble gases as well as CO2, two at a time. For the three gas components (air and two user-specified noble gases) in EOSN, the Henry's coefficients and the diffusivities in the gas phase are no longer assumed constants, but are temperature dependent. We used the Crovetto et al. (1982) model to estimate Henry's coefficients, and the Reid et al. (1987) correlations to calculate gas phase diffusivities. The new module requires users to provide names of the selected noble gases, which properties are provided internally. There are options for users to specify any (non-zero) molecular weights and half-lives for the gas components. We provide two examples to show applications of TOUGH2IEOSN. While temperature effects are relatively insignificant for one example problem where advection is dominant, they cause almost an order of magnitude difference for the other case where diffusion becomes a dominant process and temperature variations are relatively large. It appears that thermodynamic effects on gas diffusivities and Henry's coefficients can be important for low-permeability porous media and zones with large temperature variations.

  15. Research of medical gases in Poland

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Research of medical gases is well established in Poland and has been marked with the foundation of several professional societies. Numerous academic centers including those dealing with hyperbaric and diving medicine conduct studies of medical gases, in vast majority supported with intramural funds. In general, Polish research of medical gases is very much clinical in nature, covering new applications and safety of medical gases in medicine; on the other hand there are several academic centers pursuing preclinical studies, and elaborating basic theories of gas physiology and mathematical modeling of gas exchange. What dominates is research dealing with oxygen and ozone as well as studies of anesthetic gases and their applications. Finally, several research directions involving noble gas, hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide for cell protection, only begin to gain recognition of basic scientists and clinicians. However, further developments require more monetary spending on research and clinical testing as well as formation of new collective bodies for coordinating efforts in this matter. PMID:23916016

  16. Isotopic composition of gases from mud volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Valysaev, B.M.; Erokhin, V.E.; Grinchenko, Y.I.; Prokhorov, V.S.; Titkov, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    A study has been made of the isotopic composition of the carbon in methane and carbon dioxide, as well as hydrogen in the methane, in the gases of mud volcanoes, for all main mud volcano areas in the USSR. The isotopic composition of carbon and hydrogen in methane shows that the gases resemble those of oil and gas deposits, while carbon dioxide of these volcanoes has a heavier isotopic composition with a greater presence of ''ultraheavy'' carbon dioxide. By the chemical and isotopic composition of gases, Azerbaidzhan and South Sakhalin types of mud volcano gases have been identified, as well as Bulganak subtypes and Akhtala and Kobystan varieties. Correlations are seen between the isotopic composition of gases and the geological build of mud volcano areas.

  17. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    PubMed

    Cruz Hidalgo, Ral; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms. PMID:18643255

  18. Instability in shocked granular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei

    2013-11-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. In the current study, we investigate the origin of this instability. Our previous work addresses this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. By analyzing the time evolution of the material undergoing the shock wave compression and further relaxation, we found that the clustering instability is the dominant mechanism controlling this instability. In the present study we extend this work to investigate the instability at the continuum level. We model the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results demonstrate a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Slight discrepancies, such as higher frequency non-uniformities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of viscous effects.

  19. Impacts of volcanic gases on climate, the environment, and people

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Doukas, Michael P.; Kessler, Richard; Gerlach, Terrence M.

    1997-01-01

    Gases from volcanoes give rise to numerous impacts on climate, the environment, and people. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists are inventorying gas emissions at many of the almost 70 active volcanoes in the United States. This effort helps build a better understanding of the dynamic processes at work on the Earth's surface and is contributing important new information on how volcanic emissions affect global change.

  20. Method of concurrently filtering particles and collecting gases

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Mark A; Meike, Annemarie; Anderson, Brian L

    2015-04-28

    A system for concurrently filtering particles and collecting gases. Materials are be added (e.g., via coating the ceramic substrate, use of loose powder(s), or other means) to a HEPA filter (ceramic, metal, or otherwise) to collect gases (e.g., radioactive gases such as iodine). The gases could be radioactive, hazardous, or valuable gases.

  1. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for... diluent. (2) Gases for the THC analyzer shall be: (i) Single blends of propane using air as the...

  2. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for... diluent. (2) Gases for the THC analyzer shall be: (i) Single blends of propane using air as the...

  3. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for... diluent. (2) Gases for the THC analyzer shall be: (i) Single blends of propane using air as the...

  4. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for... diluent. (2) Gases for the THC analyzer shall be: (i) Single blends of propane using air as the...

  5. 40 CFR 86.514-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.514-78 Section 86... Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures 86.514-78 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for... diluent. (2) Gases for the THC analyzer shall be: (i) Single blends of propane using air as the...

  6. The state of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere using global observations through 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasova, O. A.; Koide, H.; Dlugokencky, E.; Hall, B.; Montzka, S. A.; Krummel, P.; Brunke, E.; Scheel, H.-E.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) provides a framework for observing and assessing the state and development of environmental issues related to atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases. It puts stringent requirements on the quality of the observations; these requirements are reviewed by the greenhouse gas science and measurement community at biennial WMO/IAEA Meetings on Carbon Dioxide, Other Greenhouse Gases, and Related Tracer Measurement Techniques. The 16th meeting was held in Wellington, New Zealand, on 25 - 28 October 2011 (http://www.niwa.co.nz/our-science/atmosphere/ggmt-2011). Surface observations are made at more than 100 stations worldwide for CO2 and CH4 and at a smaller number of stations for many other greenhouse gases. Results of the latest global analysis were published in the WMO/GAW Greenhouse Gas Bulletin in November 2011. It highlights the importance of N2O, the third most important long-lived greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Globally averaged dry-air mole fractions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) reached new highs in 2010, with CO2 at 389.0 ppm, CH4 at 1808 ppb and N2O at 323.2 ppb. These values are greater than those in pre-industrial times (before 1750) by 39%, 158% and 20%, respectively. An increase of the annual mean CO2 mole fraction from 2009 to 2010 amounted to 2.3 ppm, which is higher than the average growth rate for the 1990s (~ 1.5 ppm/yr) and the one for the past decade (~ 2.0 ppm/yr). The growth rate of CH4 decreased from ~ 13 ppb/yr during the early 1980s to near zero from 1999 to 2006. Since 2007, atmospheric CH4 has been increasing again. The 19 ppb rise from 2006 to 2009 was followed by a 5 ppb rise in 2010. The growth rate of N2O in 2010 was 0.8 ppb/yr which is comparable to the average over the last 10 years (0.75 ppb/yr). The NOAA Annual Greenhouse Gas Index (AGGI) shows that from 1990 to 2010, radiative forcing from nearly all long-lived greenhouse gases increased by 29% and reached 2.81W/m2, with CO2 accounting for nearly 80% of this increase. This radiative forcing corresponds to a CO2-eq mole fraction of 469.7 ppm, which falls in the middle of the IPCC AR4 category I scenario with CO2-eq in the range 445-490 ppm (corresponding to the projected global average temperature rise above pre-industrial level at equilibrium in the range of 2-2.4 degree C). The radiative forcing of N2O now exceeds that of CFC-12.

  7. Comparison of natural gases accumulated in Oligocene strata with hydrous pyrolysis gases from Menilite Shales of the Polish Outer Carpathians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kotarba, M.J.; Curtis, John B.; Lewan, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the molecular and isotopic compositions of gases generated from different kerogen types (i.e., Types I/II, II, IIS and III) in Menilite Shales by sequential hydrous pyrolysis experiments. The experiments were designed to simulate gas generation from source rocks at pre-oil-cracking thermal maturities. Initially, rock samples were heated in the presence of liquid water at 330 ??C for 72 h to simulate early gas generation dominated by the overall reaction of kerogen decomposition to bitumen. Generated gas and oil were quantitatively collected at the completion of the experiments and the reactor with its rock and water was resealed and heated at 355 ??C for 72 h. This condition simulates late petroleum generation in which the dominant overall reaction is bitumen decomposition to oil. This final heating equates to a cumulative thermal maturity of 1.6% Rr, which represents pre-oil-cracking conditions. In addition to the generated gases from these two experiments being characterized individually, they are also summed to characterize a cumulative gas product. These results are compared with natural gases produced from sandstone reservoirs within or directly overlying the Menilite Shales. The experimentally generated gases show no molecular compositions that are distinct for the different kerogen types, but on a total organic carbon (TOC) basis, oil prone kerogens (i.e., Types I/II, II and IIS) generate more hydrocarbon gas than gas prone Type III kerogen. Although the proportionality of methane to ethane in the experimental gases is lower than that observed in the natural gases, the proportionality of ethane to propane and i-butane to n-butane are similar to those observed for the natural gases. ??13C values of the experimentally generated methane, ethane and propane show distinctions among the kerogen types. This distinction is related to the ??13C of the original kerogen, with 13C enriched kerogen generating more 13C enriched hydrocarbon gases than kerogen less enriched in 13C. The typically assumed linear trend for ??13C of methane, ethane and propane versus their reciprocal carbon number for a single sourced natural gas is not observed in the experimental gases. Instead, the so-called "dogleg" trend, exemplified by relatively 13C depleted methane and enriched propane as compared to ethane, is observed for all the kerogen types and at both experimental conditions. Three of the natural gases from the same thrust unit had similar "dogleg" trends indicative of Menilite source rocks with Type III kerogen. These natural gases also contained varying amounts of a microbial gas component that was approximated using the ????13C for methane and propane determined from the experiments. These approximations gave microbial methane components that ranged from 13-84%. The high input of microbial gas was reflected in the higher gas:oil ratios for Outer Carpathian production (115-1568 Nm3/t) compared with those determined from the experiments (65-302 Nm3/t). Two natural gas samples in the far western part of the study area had more linear trends that suggest a different organic facies of the Menilite Shales or a completely different source. This situation emphasizes the importance of conducting hydrous pyrolysis on samples representing the complete stratigraphic and lateral extent of potential source rocks in determining specific genetic gas correlations. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Design of a multifunctional and portable detector for indoor gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping; Wang, Yutian; Li, Taishan

    2003-09-01

    With the increase of the living standards of city dwellers, home decoration has been more and more popular these years. Different kinds of material have come into people's home, which brings about beauties to the house as well as some bad effect. Because of differences in manufacturing techniques and quality, much of the material will emit poisonous gases more or less. Even if you have selected the qualified product, the toal amount of gases in you houses may not be guaranteed because of the simple reason that more than one kind of material are applied. Living in the complex environment for a long time will eventually have a bad effect on one's health. In addition the fear of the harm to be done will exert great impact psychologically. In another aspect, the coal-gas in the house-hood for cooking is also explosive and poisonous. In conclusion, the research on the indoor hazardous gases measurement and alarm device is of much economic and practical importance. The device is portable and versatile. We use rechargeable battery as the power supply. The device can detect the density of gases at the ppb level for the emission of the material and the measured value can be shown on the display. As for coal gas it can detect the percentage of LEL and make sound of alarm. We use two kinds of gas-sensors in the device, with catalytic combustion principal for coal gas detection and the PID method for the gas emissions of the decoration material. UV will destroy harmful material (such as: ammonia, dimethylamine, methyl-sulfhydrate, benzene etc.) into positive or negative ions. The sensor detects the electric charges of ionized gases and converts them into electric current signals. It is then amplified and changed into digits by amplifier and A/D. The digit signal is processed by micro-controller system of the device.

  9. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  10. Impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, S.; Hiyagon, H.; Iijima, Y.; Syono, Y.

    Previous shock experiments by Ahrens and his colleagues show that degassing of H2O and CO2 occurs at 8-65GPa from hydrous minerals such as serpentine. In early solar system, the impact degassing would have played an important part in the formation of primary-atmospheres of the terrestrial planets. However, degassing conditions of noble gases are not well-known because there are few experiments for them. We conducted some shock recovery experiments to investigate the degassing condition and to understand the degassing mechanisms of water and noble gases. We used natural richterites (Ri), amphibolites (Am), serpentines (Sep) and orthoclases (or) as target samples. These, except Sep, contain radiogenic noble gases such as (40)Ar. The samples were put in stainless steel containers, and were show by a rail gun at ISAS or single-stage powder guns at Nagoya or Tohoku University, Japan. We used two kinds of containers: 'open' type containers having a ventilating path for released volatiles for most of samples and 'closed' type ones for some samples for comparison. On Ri and Sep, we made shock experiments for pre-heated (at 400-500 C) and unheated targets, and for powdered and uncrushed samples. Water and noble gases were analyzed both for the recovered shocked samples and the unshocked original samples, and the fractions of the degassed volatiles were calculated by comparing them. Water content in the sample was analyzed by thermo-gravimetry. Noble gases were extracted by heating the samples under high vacuum and analyzed with a sector-type mass spectrometer.

  11. Radiation-induced ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of gas-phase radiation absorption on radiative ignition of various combustible materials under gravity conditions are studied. The physical models in this study range from a simple gas layer to a complex porous structure. Methyl methacrylate (MMA: C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O{sub 2}) vapor has been selected as a representative of participating gases in gas-phase radiation interactions. Its infrared radiation properties were measured using low-resolution spectral apparatus and then correlated in simple usable forms. As expected from its complex molecular structure, the infrared absorption capabilities of MMA vapor is much stronger than those of simpler hydrocarbon gases as well as water vapor and carbon dioxide. Radiation induced ignition was analyzed on the basis of simple theoretical models. Using Semenov's theory, results indicate a decrease in the critical surrounding temperature for a low Biot number system. For a high Biot number system, ignitability is defined through the use of Frank-Kamenetskii's critical parameter delta. One-dimensional transient models were developed for the analyses of radiation induced ignition of solid and porous solid fuels. The models include gas-phase radiation absorption, in-depth radiation interaction by the solid phase, Arrhenius-type chemical reaction, and natural convection. Predicted transmittance during ignition processes confirms the attenuation of incident radiation by pyrolyzed gases which has been already observed experimentally. An ignition process with gas-phase radiation absorption results in a quite different and widened ignition domain compared to that without gas-phase radiation absorption. Moreover, ignition is totally dependent on gas-phase radiation absorption under unfavorable conditions for a thermal runaway.

  12. Noble gases in meteorites and terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Terrestrial planets and chondrites have noble gas platforms that are sufficiently alike, especially Ne/Ar, that they may have acquired their noble gases by similar processes. Meteorites presumably obtained their noble gases during formation in the solar nebula. Adsorption onto C - the major gas carrier in chondrites - is the likely mechanism for trapping noble gases; recent laboratory simulations support this hypothesis. The story is more complex for planets. An attractive possibility is that the planets acquired their noble gases in a late accreting veneer of chondritic material. In chondrites, noble gases correlate with C, N, H, and volatile metals; by Occam's Razor, we would expect a similar coupling in planets. Indeed, the Earth's crust and mantle contain chondritic like trace volatiles and PL group metals, respectively and the Earth's oceans resemble C chondrites in their enrichment of D (8X vs 8-10X of the galactic D/H ratio). Models have been proposed to explain some of the specific noble gas patterns in planets. These include: (1) noble gases may have been directly trapped by preplanetary material instead of arriving in a veneer; (2) for Venus, irradiation of preplanetary material, followed by diffusive loss of Ne, could explain the high concentration of AR-36; (3) the Earth and Venus may have initially had similar abundances of noble gases, but the Earth lost its share during the Moon forming event; (4) noble gases could have been captured by planetestimals, possibly leading to gravitational fractionation, particularly of Xe isotopes and (5) noble gases may have been dissolved in the hot outer portion of the Earth during contact with a primordial atmosphere.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Kinetic Theory of Granular Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trizac, Emmanuel

    2005-11-01

    Granular gases are composed of macroscopic bodies kept in motion by an external energy source such as a violent shaking. The behaviour of such systems is quantitatively different from that of ordinary molecular gases: due to the size of the constituents, external fields have a stronger effect on the dynamics and, more importantly, the kinetic energy of the gas is no longer a conserved quantity. The key role of the inelasticity of collisions has been correctly appreciated for about fifteen years, and the ensuing consequences in terms of phase behaviour or transport properties studied in an increasing and now vast body of literature. The purpose of this book is to help the newcomer to the field in acquiring the essential theoretical tools together with some numerical techniques. As emphasized by the authors—who were among the pioneers in the domain— the content could be covered in a one semester course for advanced undergraduates, or it could be incorporated in a more general course dealing with the statistical mechanics of dissipative systems. The book is self-contained, clear, and avoids mathematical complications. In order to elucidate the main physical ideas, heuristic points of views are sometimes preferred to a more rigorous route that would lead to a longer discussion. The 28 chapters are short; they offer exercises and worked examples, solved at the end of the book. Each part is supplemented with a relevant foreword and a useful summary including take-home messages. The editorial work is of good quality, with very few typographical errors. In spite of the title, kinetic theory stricto sensu is not the crux of the matter covered. The authors discuss the consequences of the molecular chaos assumption both at the individual particle level and in terms of collective behaviour. The first part of the book addresses the mechanics of grain collisions. It is emphasized that considering the coefficient of restitution ɛ —a central quantity governing the inelasticity of inter-grain encounters—as velocity independent is inconsistent with the mechanical point of view. An asymptotic expression for the impact velocity dependence of ɛ is therefore derived for visco-elastic spheres. The important inelastic Boltzmann equation is introduced in part II and the associated velocity distribution characterized for a force-free medium (so-called free cooling regime). Transport processes can then be analyzed in part III at the single particle level, and part IV from a more macroscopic viewpoint. The corresponding Chapman Enskog-like hydrodynamic approach is worked out in detail, in a clear fashion. Finally, the tendency of granular gases to develop instabilities is illustrated in part V where the hydrodynamic picture plays a pivotal role. This book clearly sets the stage. For the sake of simplicity, the authors have discarded some subtle points, such as the open questions underlying the hydrodynamic description (why include the temperature among the hydrodynamic modes, and what about the separation of space and time scales between kinetic and hydrodynamic excitations?). Such omissions are understandable. To a certain extent however, the scope of the book is centered on previous work by the authors, and I have a few regrets. Special emphasis is put on the (variable ɛ) visco-elastic model, which enhances the technical difficulty of the presentation. On the other hand, the important physical effects including scaling laws, hydrodynamic behaviour and structure formation, can be understood in two steps, from the results derived within the much simpler constant ɛ model, allowing subsequently \\varepsilon to depend on the granular temperature. The authors justify their choice with the inconsistency of the constant ɛ route. The improvements brought by the visco-elastic model remain to be assessed, since the rotational degrees of freedom, discarded in the book, play an important role and require due consideration of both tangential and normal restitution coefficients, that are again velocity dependent. This seems to be the price of a consistent approach, which does not lend itself to much insight. In addition, the behaviour of driven systems is not addressed, whereas in the realm of granular media, force-free systems are the exception rather than the rule. The differences between constant ɛ and visco-elastic models is presumably less pronounced in the driven case. Study of driven systems also reveals that the rheology of granular gases is intrinsically non-Newtonian, which is a key feature. Finally, the powerful direct simulation Monte Carlo technique is not described, whereas it is an important tool, particularly relevant for the physics of the Boltzmann equation, and straightforward to implement in its simplest version. N Brilliantov and T Pöschel concentrate on the (equally relevant) molecular dynamics method instead. In conclusion, the book fills a gap in the field. The companion webpage from where molecular dynamics and symbolic algebra programs can be downloaded is also useful.

  14. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the continuum calculations and the experiments.

  15. Sun and dust versus greenhouse gases - An assessment of their relative roles in global climate change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    1990-01-01

    Many mechanisms, including variations in solar radiation and atmospheric aerosol concentrations, compete with anthropogenic greenhouse gases as causes of global climate change. Comparisons of available data show that solar variability will not counteract greenhouse warming and that future observations will need to be made to quantify the role of tropospheric aerosols, for example.

  16. Sun and dust versus greenhouse gases: an assessment of their relative roles in global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, James E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    1990-08-01

    Many mechanisms, including variations in solar radiation and atmospheric aerosol concentrations, compete with anthropogenic greenhouse gases as causes of global climate change. Comparisons of available data show that solar variability will not counteract greenhouse warming and that future observations will need to be made to quantify the role of tropospheric aerosols, for example.

  17. Detailed Investigations of Interactions between Ionizing Radiation and Neutral Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, Allen L

    2014-03-31

    We are investigating phenomena that stem from the many body dynamics associated with ionization of an atom or molecule by photon or charged particle. Our program is funded through the Department of Energy EPSCoR Laboratory Partnership Award in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. We are using variations on the well established COLTRIMS technique to measure ions and electrons ejected during these interactions. Photoionization measurements take place at the Advanced Light Source at LBNL as part of the ALS-COLTRIMS collaboration with the groups of Reinhard Dörner at Frankfurt and Ali Belkacem at LBNL. Additional experiments on charged particle impact are conducted locally at Auburn University where we are studying the dissociative molecular dynamics following interactions with either ions or electrons over a velocity range of 1 to 12 atomic units.

  18. Measurement of Individual Doses of Radiation by Personal Dosimeter Is Important for the Return of Residents from Evacuation Order Areas after Nuclear Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Taira, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Ide, Juichi; Endo, Yuuko; Kudo, Takashi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    To confirm the availability of individual dose evaluation for the return of residents after the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), we evaluated individual doses of radiation as measured by personal dosimeters in residents who temporarily stayed in Evacuation Order Areas in Kawauchi village, which is partially located within a 20 km radius of the FNPP. We also compared individual doses with the external radiation doses estimated from the ambient dose rates and with doses estimated from the concentrations of radionuclides in the soil around each individuals house. Individual doses were significantly correlated with the ambient doses in front of the entrances to the houses (r = 0.90, p<0.01), in the backyards (r = 0.41, p<0.01) and in the nearby fields (r = 0.80, p<0.01). The maximum cumulative ambient doses in the backyards and fields around the houses were 6.38 and 9.27 mSv/y, respectively. The maximum cumulative individual dose was 3.28 mSv/y, and the median and minimum doses were 1.35 and 0.71 mSv/y. The estimated external effective doses from concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples ranged from 0.03 to 23.42 mSv/y. The individual doses were moderately correlated with external effective doses in the backyards (r = 0.38, p<0.01) and in the fields (r = 0.36, p<0.01); however, the individual doses were not significantly correlated with the external effective doses in front of the entrances (r = 0.01, p = 0.92). Our study confirmed that individual doses are low levels even in the evacuation order area in Kawauchi village, and external effective dose levels are certainly decreasing due to the decay of artificial radionuclides and the decontamination of contaminated soil. Long-term follow-up of individual doses as well as internal-exposure doses, environmental monitoring and reconstruction of infrastructure are needed so that residents may return to their hometowns after a nuclear disaster. PMID:25806523

  19. Measurement of individual doses of radiation by personal dosimeter is important for the return of residents from evacuation order areas after nuclear disaster.

    PubMed

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Taira, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Ide, Juichi; Endo, Yuuko; Kudo, Takashi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    To confirm the availability of individual dose evaluation for the return of residents after the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), we evaluated individual doses of radiation as measured by personal dosimeters in residents who temporarily stayed in Evacuation Order Areas in Kawauchi village, which is partially located within a 20 km radius of the FNPP. We also compared individual doses with the external radiation doses estimated from the ambient dose rates and with doses estimated from the concentrations of radionuclides in the soil around each individual's house. Individual doses were significantly correlated with the ambient doses in front of the entrances to the houses (r = 0.90, p<0.01), in the backyards (r = 0.41, p<0.01) and in the nearby fields (r = 0.80, p<0.01). The maximum cumulative ambient doses in the backyards and fields around the houses were 6.38 and 9.27 mSv/y, respectively. The maximum cumulative individual dose was 3.28 mSv/y, and the median and minimum doses were 1.35 and 0.71 mSv/y. The estimated external effective doses from concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples ranged from 0.03 to 23.42 mSv/y. The individual doses were moderately correlated with external effective doses in the backyards (r = 0.38, p<0.01) and in the fields (r = 0.36, p<0.01); however, the individual doses were not significantly correlated with the external effective doses in front of the entrances (r = 0.01, p = 0.92). Our study confirmed that individual doses are low levels even in the evacuation order area in Kawauchi village, and external effective dose levels are certainly decreasing due to the decay of artificial radionuclides and the decontamination of contaminated soil. Long-term follow-up of individual doses as well as internal-exposure doses, environmental monitoring and reconstruction of infrastructure are needed so that residents may return to their hometowns after a nuclear disaster. PMID:25806523

  20. Present state of eb removal of so2 and nox from combustion flue gases in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, D. C. R.; Osso, J. A.; Rivelli, V.; Vieira, J. M.; Lugo, A. B.

    1995-09-01

    Environmental problems caused by the increased world energy demands are becoming of growing importance and Brazil is now starting to set limits to the emission of toxic gases. The development of technologies for removal of these gases are therefore necessary and this work shows the present state of the technology of SO2 and NOX removal by electron beam irradiation in Brazil. Data concerning the increasing energy demand in Brazil and the environmental governmental measures are presented, along with the design and implementation of a laboratory pilot plant for the electron beam flue gases removal process located at IPEN-CNEN/SP.

  1. Collective modes in cold paramagnetic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, T L; Rubin, P L

    2014-02-28

    We have obtained a condition for the emergence of spin waves in paramagnetic gases Re >> Im, which is fulfilled only at temperatures of the order of 1 ?K. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Silicon Carbide Transistor For Detecting Hydrocarbon Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Williams, Roger M.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed silicon carbide variable-potential insulated-gate field-effect transistor specially designed for use in measuring concentrations of hydrocarbon gases. Devices like this prove useful numerous automotive, industrial, aeronautical, and environmental monitoring applications.

  3. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

  4. Denitrification of combustion gases. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Yang, R.T.

    1980-10-09

    A method for treating waste combustion gas to remove the nitrogen oxygen gases therefrom is disclosed wherein the waste gas is first contacted with calcium oxide which absorbs and chemically reacts with the nitrogen oxide gases therein at a temperature from about 100/sup 0/ to 430/sup 0/C. The thus reacted calcium oxide (now calcium nitrate) is then heated at a temperature range between about 430/sup 0/ and 900/sup 0/C, resulting in regeneration of the calcium oxide and production of the decomposition gas composed of nitrogen and nitrogen oxide gas. The decomposition gases can be recycled to the calcium oxide contacting step to minimize the amount of nitrogen oxide gases in the final product gas.

  5. Megacity Radiative Forcing: A Mexico City Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, S. C.; Dubey, M. K.; Chylek, P.; Mazzoleni, C.; Zhang, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Horowitz, L.

    2006-12-01

    We assess the radiative forcing budget of the largest megacity in North America, Mexico City. While particular aspects of the regional environmental impacts of cities on their surroundings have been thoroughly investigated, e.g., air quality and acid rain, relatively little effort has been focused on the net radiative impact of a megacity on global climate. The range of radiative impacts from a megacity covers many spatial and temporal scales from short-term regional-scale effects due to aerosols and relatively short-lived gases (O3) to long-term global-scale impacts due to long-lived trace gases (e.g., CH4, CO2). In this study we use both bottom-up and top-down approaches to evaluate these radiative forcings. From the bottom up we utilize emission inventories and the Model for Ozone And Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART-2) chemistry-aerosol model. From the top down we use observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), and in situ aerosol single scattering albedo measurements collected during the Megacity Initiative-Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. We also explore the radiative impact of various emission control strategies that focus on improving urban air quality. We show that the warming by greenhouse gases like CO2 and ozone can be moderated or exacerbated by aerosols depending on their optical properties. As the size and number of megacities increase and clean air regulations are implemented, metrics such as the net radiative forcing may become increasingly important in comparing the impact of urban centers and assessing pollution abatement policies.

  6. Sidelobes in multiphoton ionization of inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kami?ski, J. Z.; Ehlotzky, F.

    1997-06-01

    We consider above-threshold ionization of inert gases within the framework of the Keldysh-Faisal-Reiss model. However, we represent the state of the ionized electron by a more precise Coulomb-Volkov wave function. Thus we find sidelobes in the angular distribution of the emitted electrons at about the right high nonlinear orders and in the correct angular range as found experimentally for inert gases.

  7. Biological production of products from waste gases

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    2002-01-22

    A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  8. Nonhydrodynamic Transport in Trapped Unitary Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Jasmine; Romatschke, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Many strongly coupled fluids are known to share similar hydrodynamic transport properties. In this work we argue that this similarity could extend beyond hydrodynamics to transient dynamics through the presence of nonhydrodynamic modes. We review nonhydrodynamic modes in kinetic theory and gauge-gravity duality and discuss their signatures in trapped Fermi gases close to unitarity. Reanalyzing previously published experimental data we find hints of nonhydrodynamic modes in cold Fermi gases in two and three dimensions.

  9. Flux Jacobian Matrices For Equilibrium Real Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    Improved formulation includes generalized Roe average and extension to three dimensions. Flux Jacobian matrices derived for use in numerical solutions of conservation-law differential equations of inviscid flows of ideal gases extended to real gases. Real-gas formulation of these matrices retains simplifying assumptions of thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium, but adds effects of vibrational excitation, dissociation, and ionization of gas molecules via general equation of state.

  10. Nonhydrodynamic Transport in Trapped Unitary Fermi Gases.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Jasmine; Romatschke, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Many strongly coupled fluids are known to share similar hydrodynamic transport properties. In this work we argue that this similarity could extend beyond hydrodynamics to transient dynamics through the presence of nonhydrodynamic modes. We review nonhydrodynamic modes in kinetic theory and gauge-gravity duality and discuss their signatures in trapped Fermi gases close to unitarity. Reanalyzing previously published experimental data we find hints of nonhydrodynamic modes in cold Fermi gases in two and three dimensions. PMID:26588365

  11. Noble gases and the early history of the Earth: Inappropriate paradigms and assumptions inhibit research and communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, G. R.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The development of models as tracers of nobel gases through the Earth's evolution is discussed. A new set of paradigms embodying present knowledge was developed. Several important areas for future research are: (1) measurement of the elemental and isotopic compositions of the five noble gases in a large number of terrestrial materials, thus better defining the composition and distribution of terrestrial noble gases; (2) determinations of relative diffusive behavior, chemical behavior, and the distribution between solid and melt of noble gases under mantle conditions are urgently needed; (3) disequilibrium behavior in the nebula needs investigation, and the behavior of plasmas and possible cryotrapping on cold nebular solids are considered.

  12. Prognostic Importance of Gleason 7 Disease Among Patients Treated With External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Detailed Biopsy Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Zumsteg, Zach; Ghadjar, Pirus; Pangasa, Misha; Pei, Xin; Fine, Samson W.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary Gleason (pG) grade among a large cohort of Gleason 7 prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From May 1989 to January 2011, 1190 Gleason 7 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT at a single institution. Of these patients, 613 had a Gleason 7 with a minimum of a sextant biopsy with nonfragmented cores and full biopsy core details available, including number of cores of cancer involved, percentage individual core involvement, location of disease, bilaterality, and presence of perineural invasion. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 1-16 years). The prognostic implication for the following outcomes was analyzed: biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: The 8-year bRFS rate for pG3 versus pG4 was 77.6% versus 61.3% (P<.0001), DMFS was 96.8% versus 84.3% (P<.0001), and PCSM was 3.7% versus 8.1% (P=.002). On multivariate analysis, pG4 predicted for significantly worse outcome in all parameters. Location of disease (apex, base, mid-gland), perineural involvement, maximum individual core involvement, and the number of Gleason 3+3, 3+4, or 4+3 cores did not predict for distant metastases. Conclusions: Primary Gleason grade 4 independently predicts for worse bRFS, DMFS, and PCSM among Gleason 7 patients. Using complete core information can allow clinicians to utilize pG grade as a prognostic factor, despite not having the full pathologic details from a prostatectomy specimen. Future staging and risk grouping should investigate the incorporation of primary Gleason grade when complete biopsy core information is used.

  13. Reporting emissions of greenhouse gases in Canada.

    PubMed

    Finlay, P; Stobbs, R

    1994-05-01

    Non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gases are considered in "Canada's National Report on Climate Change: Actions to Meet Commitments Under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change". By including all major greenhouse gases and their anthropogenic sources and sinks using best available science, the Report provides a practical illustration of the "comprehensive approach" policy to implementing the Convention's requirements. In addition to carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion, the Report includes information on other sources and sinks for carbon dioxide, and for methane and nitrous oxide. Other gases considered include polyflourocarbons, hydroflourocarbons, and the primary tropospheric ozone precursors, nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds. Current Global Warming Potential indices are used to compare and integrate the best estimates of climate change impacts of the major greenhouse gases. The presentation of emission data is intended to be transparent and comparable. The relative quality of the data for various gases and sources is indicated. The existence of environmental, economic, and other benefits to limiting emissions of all greenhouse gases, in addition to carbon dioxide, should be recognized. Continuing assessments and actions on non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gas emissions, both nationally and internationally, are suggested. PMID:24213890

  14. Source gases: Concentrations, emissions, and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, Paul J.; Harriss, Robert; Penkett, Stuart A.; Makide, Yoshihiro; Sanhueza, Eugenio; Alyea, Fred N.; Rowland, F. Sherwood; Blake, Don; Sasaki, Toru; Cunnold, Derek M.

    1991-01-01

    Source gases are defined as those gases that influence levels of stratospheric ozone (O3) by transporting species containing halogen, hydrogen, and nitrogen to the stratosphere. Examples are the CFC's, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Other source gases that also come under consideration in an atmospheric O3 context are those that are involved in the O3 or hydroxyl (OH) radical chemistry of the troposphere. Examples are CH4, carbon monoxide (CO), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC's). Most of the source gases, along with carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O), are climatically significant and thus affect stratospheric O3 levels by their influence on stratospheric temperatures. Carbonyl sulphide (COS) could affect stratospheric O3 through maintenance of the stratospheric sulphate aerosol layer, which may be involved in heterogeneous chlorine-catalyzed O3 destruction. The previous reviews of trends and emissions of source gases, either from the context of their influence on atmospheric O3 or global climate change, are updated. The current global abundances and concentration trends of the trace gases are given in tabular format.

  15. Classification and generation of terrestrial rare gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.

    1978-01-01

    A Kr-84/Xe-130 versus Ne-20/Ar-36 diagram is a very useful format with which to study the elemental ratios of rare gases from terrestrial materials. It can separate not only the three types of rare gases which Ozima and Alexander (1976) classified but also the 'planetary' type rare gases from the other three types of rare gases. When all the available terrestrial rare gas data are plotted in a Kr-84/Xe-130 versus Ne-20/Ar-36 diagram, several observations can be made. First, most of the analyses of rare gases from shales yield Kr-84/Xe-130 ratios between the 'planetary' and atmospheric values. If, however, the atmosphere's high Kr-84/Xe-130 ratio was produced by the selective adsorption of xenon onto shales from an initially 'planetary' atmosphere, as is widely accepted, then the Kr-84/Xe-130 ratio in shales should be even lower than the 'planetary' value. Second, the rare gas pattern in the quenched rims of submarine basalts may be explained as fractionated samples of the rare gases in sea water.

  16. Abiotic uptake of gases by organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, A. V.

    2007-12-01

    Methodological and experimental studies of the abiotic uptake of gaseous substances by organic soils were performed. The static adsorption method of closed vessels for assessing the interaction of gases with the solid and liquid soil phases and the dynamic method of determining the sorption isotherms of gases by soils were analyzed. The theoretical substantiation of the methods and their practical implementations on the basis of a PGA-7 portable gas analyzer (Russia) were considered. Good agreement between the equilibrium sorption isotherms of the gases and the Langmuir model was revealed; for the real ranges of natural gas concentrations, this model can be reduced to the linear Henry equation. The limit values of the gas sorption (Langmuir monolayer capacity) are typical for dry samples; they vary from 670 4000 g/m3 for methane and oxygen to 20 000 25 000 g/m3 for carbon dioxide. The linear distribution coefficients of gases between the solid and gas phases of organic soils (Henry constants) are 8 18 units for poorly sorbed gases (O2, CH4) and 40 60 units for CO2. The kinetics of the chemicophysical uptake of gases by the soil studied is linear in character and obeys the relaxation kinetic model of the first order with the corresponding relaxation constants, which vary from 1 h -1 in wet samples to 10 h -1 in dry samples.

  17. Remote monitoring of volcanic gases using passive Fourier transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Love, S.P.; Goff, F.; Counce, D.; Schmidt, S.C.; Siebe, C.; Delgado, H.

    1999-06-01

    Volcanic gases provide important insights on the internal workings of volcanoes and changes in their composition and total flux can warn of impending changes in a volcano`s eruptive state. In addition, volcanoes are important contributors to the earth`s atmosphere, and understanding this volcanic contribution is crucial for unraveling the effect of anthropogenic gases on the global climate. Studies of volcanic gases have long relied upon direct in situ sampling, which requires volcanologists to work on-site within a volcanic crater. In recent years, spectroscopic techniques have increasingly been employed to obtain information on volcanic gases from greater distances and thus at reduced risk. These techniques have included UV correlation spectroscopy (Cospec) for SO{sub 2} monitoring, the most widely-used technique, and infrared spectroscopy in a variety of configurations, both open- and closed-path. Francis et al. have demonstrated good results using the sun as the IR source. This solar occultation technique is quite useful, but puts rather strong restrictions on the location of instrument and is thus best suited to more accessible volcanoes. In order to maximize the flexibility and range of FTIR measurements at volcanoes, work over the last few years has emphasized techniques which utilize the strong radiance contrast between the volcanic gas plume and the sky. The authors have successfully employed these techniques at several volcanoes, including the White Island and Ruapehu volcanoes in New Zealand, the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii, and Mt. Etna in Italy. But Popocatepetl (5452 m), the recently re-awakened volcano 70 km southeast of downtown Mexico City, has provided perhaps the best examples to date of the usefulness of these techniques.

  18. ABSORPTION OF INHALED REACTIVE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In inhalation toxicology, an important concept involves the determination of dose as a major component for providing a perspective to judge the applicability of various toxicological results to human exposure conditions. This chapter reviewed some of the biological, physical, and...

  19. Greenhouse effects due to man-made perturbations of trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W. C.; Yung, Y. L.; Lacis, A. A.; Mo, T.; Hansen, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Nitrous oxide, methane, ammonia, and a number of other trace constituents of the earth's atmosphere have infrared absorption bands in the spectral range from 7 to 14 microns. Despite their small amounts, these gases can have a significant effect on the thermal structure of the atmosphere by transmitting most of the thermal radiation from the earth's surface to the lower atmosphere. In the present paper, this greenhouse effect is computed for a number of trace gases. The nature and climatic implications of possible changes in the concentrations of N2O, CH4, NH3, and HNO3 are discussed.

  20. Radiation Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus

    Radiation protection is a very important aspect for the application of particle detectors in many different fields, like high energy physics, medicine, materials science, oil and mineral exploration, and arts, to name a few. The knowledge of radiation units, the experience with shielding, and information on biological effects of radiation are vital for scientists handling radioactive sources or operating accelerators or X-ray equipment. This article describes the modern radiation units and their conversions to older units which are still in use in many countries. Typical radiation sources and detectors used in the field of radiation protection are presented. The legal regulations in nearly all countries follow closely the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Tables and diagrams with relevant information on the handling of radiation sources provide useful data for the researcher working in this field.

  1. Experimental infection of the digeneans to some congeneric snail species radiated in a single water system: Relative importance of local evolution and phylogenetic constraint.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Misako

    2016-06-01

    To determine the relative importance of local adaptation caused by host-parasite coevolution and resource tracking by the parasites, the susceptibility of the freshwater snail genus Semisulcospira to the digenean parasite genus Genarchopsis was investigated experimentally. Four snail species endemic to the Lake Biwa system in Japan and two non-endemic species were investigated. All but one species was also tested for local variation in susceptibility. Parasites were obtained from Takashima (mix population of Genarchopsis gigi and Genarchopsis chubuensis) and Nagahama (G. chubuensis). In endemic Semisulcospira, closely related specie pairs (Semisulcospira habei and Semisulcospira niponica, Semisulcospira decipiens and Semisulcospira nakasekoae) showed similar susceptibilities to parasites from both localities. S. habei and S. niponica were highly susceptible to parasites from Takashima, but were resistant to parasites from Nagahama. S. decipiens and S. nakasekoae showed moderate susceptibility to parasites from both localities. None of the endemic snail species showed a clear local variation in susceptibility. These results show that the susceptibility of endemic Semisulcospira to Genarchopsis is conservative and can be regarded as an example of resource-tracking. One of the non-endemic snails, Semisulcospira libertina, showed local variation in susceptibility. This variation was not related to the sympatry of the parasites used for the experimental infection, suggesting that it was not the result of local adaptation by parasites. PMID:26773868

  2. Air Pollution, Greenhouse Gases and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, V.

    2007-12-01

    The global build up of greenhouse gases (GHGs), is the most significant environmental issue facing the planet. GHGs warm the surface and the atmosphere with significant implications for, rainfall, retreat of glaciers and sea ice, sea level, among other factors. What is less recognized, however, is a comparably major global problem dealing with air pollution. Until about ten years ago, air pollution was thought to be just an urban or a local problem. But new data have revealed that, due to fast long range transport, air pollution is transported across continents and ocean basins, resulting in trans-oceanic and trans-continental plumes of atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) containing sub micron size particles, i.e, aerosols. ABCs intercept sunlight by absorbing as well as reflecting it, both of which lead to a large surface dimming. The dimming effect is enhanced further because aerosols nucleate more cloud drops which makes the clouds reflect more solar radiation. While the solar heating at the surface is reduced by aerosols in ABCs, the atmospheric solar heating increases due to soot solar absorption. The net difference between the dimming and the atmospheric solar heating is estimated be negative which contributes to a global cooling effect. The global cooling from this negative ABC forcing may have masked as much as 50% of the warming due to GHGs. We will identify regional and mega-city hot spots of ABCs. Long range transport from these hot spots gives rise to wide spread plumes over the adjacent oceans. Such a pattern of regionally concentrated surface dimming and atmospheric solar heating, accompanied by wide spread dimming over the oceans, gives rise to large regional effects. Only during the last decade, we have begun to comprehend the surprisingly large regional impacts. The large north-south gradient in the ABC dimming has altered the north-south gradients in sea surface temperatures, which in turn has been shown by models to decrease rainfall over the continents. The uncertainties in our understanding of the ABC effects are large, but we are discovering new ways in which human activities are changing the climate and the environment.

  3. [Experimental studies on the recovery of anesthetic gases].

    PubMed

    Marx, T; Gross-Alltag, F; Ermisch, J; Hhnel, J; Weber, L; Friesdorf, W

    1992-02-01

    The volatile anesthetic agents halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane are chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) and contribute to ozone depletion. Although the contribution is small, its importance is rising, as technical CFCs will be phased out according to the Montreal protocol (1987) and the London conference (1990) by the year 2000. Alternative procedures and CFC-free volatile agents such as des- and sevoflurane do not contribute to depletion of the ozone layer, but will not replace standard methods using volatile anesthetic agents in the near future. METHODS. In an experimental setup, we filtered anesthetic waste gases from scavenging systems of rebreathing circles by activated carbon filters. The filtered substances were desorbed by a heat chamber and condensed in a cold trap. RESULTS. By this method, it was possible to retrieve 50%-60% of the applied gases. Gas chromatographic analysis showed halothane containing traces of pollutants and isoflurane and enflurane as pure substances. DISCUSSION. The retrieval of anesthetic waste gases is easy; no sophisticated technical equipment is necessary. Purity of substances could make recycling possible and offer a method to avoid environmental pollution by volatile anesthetics. PMID:1562100

  4. Biogenic and anthropogenic trace gases in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, G. P.; Prinn, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of biogenic and anthropogenic trace gases for the global environment and for the climate system. The paper briefly reviews the currently available estimates of sources and strengths of the biogenic and anthropogenic gases on the global scale. One of the major concerns for the global environment is the rapid increase in the concentration of long-lived trace gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O and the chlorofluorocarbons. The trend in the carbon dioxide concentration, as a result of fossil-fuel burning, is of the order of 0.4 percent per year, and this trend is related to the CO2 uptake by the ocean and by terrestrial ecosystems, which are likely to be modified if the planet warms up in the forthcoming decades. The concentrations of methane and nitrous oxide are increasing by 0.9 and 0.25 percent per year, respectively. In the case of the most widely used chlorofluorocarbons, trends as large as 10 percent per year or more are being measured.

  5. Experimental Research of Pyrolysis Gases Cracking on Surface of Charcoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosov, Valentin; Kosov, Vladimir; Zaichenko, Victor

    For several years, in the Joint Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, two-stage technology of biomass processing has been developing [1]. The technology is based on pyrolysis of biomass as the first stage. The second stage is high-temperature conversion of liquid fraction of the pyrolysis on the surface of porous charcoal matrix. Synthesis gas consisted of carbon monoxide and hydrogen is the main products of the technology. This gas is proposed to be used as fuel for gas-engine power plant. For practical implementation of the technology it is important to know the size of hot char filter for full cracking of the pyrolysis gases on the surface of charcoal. Theoretical determination of the cracking parameters of the pyrolysis gases on the surface of coal is extremely difficult because the pyrolysis gases include tars, whose composition and structure is complicated and depends on the type of initial biomass. It is also necessary to know the surface area of the char used in the filter, which is also a difficult task. Experimental determination of the hot char filter parameters is presented. It is shown that proposed experimental method can be used for different types of biomass.

  6. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1990, with annual updates thereafter. This report is the fifth annual update, covering national emissions over the period 1989--1995, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1996. The estimates contained in this report have been revised from those in last year`s report. Emissions estimates for carbon dioxide are reported in metric tons of carbon; estimates for other gases are reported in metric tons of gas. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapter 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Five appendixes are included with this report. 216 refs., 11 figs., 38 tabs.

  7. 40 CFR 86.1214-85 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1214-85 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for the... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1214-85...

  8. 40 CFR 86.1214-85 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1214-85 Analytical gases. (a) Analyzer gases. (1) Gases for the... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1214-85...

  9. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  10. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  11. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  12. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  13. 41 CFR 50-204.70 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressed gases. 50-204... Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists 50-204.70 Compressed gases. The in-plant handling, storage, and utilization of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tankcars, or motor vehicle cargo...

  14. Gases as Idealized Lattices: A Rational Reconstruction of Students' Understanding of the Behavior of Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor

    2000-01-01

    Establishes a relationship between students' understanding of gases and its parallels in the history of science. Finds that college freshman students' alternative conceptions about gas behavior are resistant to change and recapitulate theories scientists held in the past, such as the Lattice Theory of Gases. (Contains 52 references.) (Author/WRM)

  15. Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases.

    PubMed

    Anglin, James R; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2002-03-14

    The early experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic gases accomplished three long-standing goals. First, cooling of neutral atoms into their motional ground state, thus subjecting them to ultimate control, limited only by Heisenberg's uncertainty relation. Second, creation of a coherent sample of atoms, in which all occupy the same quantum state, and the realization of atom lasers - devices that output coherent matter waves. And third, creation of a gaseous quantum fluid, with properties that are different from the quantum liquids helium-3 and helium-4. The field of Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases has continued to progress rapidly, driven by the combination of new experimental techniques and theoretical advances. The family of quantum-degenerate gases has grown, and now includes metastable and fermionic atoms. Condensates have become an ultralow-temperature laboratory for atom optics, collisional physics and many-body physics, encompassing phonons, superfluidity, quantized vortices, Josephson junctions and quantum phase transitions. PMID:11894104

  16. Where do California's greenhouse gases come from?

    ScienceCinema

    Fischer, Marc

    2013-05-29

    Last March, more than two years after California passed legislation to slash greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Marc Fischer boarded a Cessna loaded with air monitoring equipment and crisscrossed the skies above Sacramento and the Bay Area. Instruments aboard the aircraft measured a cocktail of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use, methane from livestock and landfills, CO2 from refineries and power plants, traces of nitrous oxide from agriculture and fuel use, and industrially produced other gases like refrigerants. The flight was part of the Airborne Greenhouse Gas Emissions Survey, a collaboration between Berkeley Lab, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of California, and UC Davis to pinpoint the sources of greenhouse gases in central California. The survey is intended to improve inventories of the states greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn will help scientists verify the emission reductions mandated by AB-32, the legislation enacted by California in 2006.

  17. Where do California's greenhouse gases come from?

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Last March, more than two years after California passed legislation to slash greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Marc Fischer boarded a Cessna loaded with air monitoring equipment and crisscrossed the skies above Sacramento and the Bay Area. Instruments aboard the aircraft measured a cocktail of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use, methane from livestock and landfills, CO2 from refineries and power plants, traces of nitrous oxide from agriculture and fuel use, and industrially produced other gases like refrigerants. The flight was part of the Airborne Greenhouse Gas Emissions Survey, a collaboration between Berkeley Lab, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of California, and UC Davis to pinpoint the sources of greenhouse gases in central California. The survey is intended to improve inventories of the states greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn will help scientists verify the emission reductions mandated by AB-32, the legislation enacted by California in 2006.

  18. Density Fluctuations in Uniform Quantum Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.; Singh, G. S.

    2011-12-12

    Analytical expressions are given for the static structure factor S(k) and the pair correlation function g(r) for uniform ideal Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac gases for all temperatures. In the vicinity of Bose Einstein condensation (BEC) temperature, g(r) becomes long ranged and remains so in the condensed phase. In the dilute gas limit, g(r) of bosons and fermions do not coincide with Maxwell-Boltzmann gas but exhibit bunching and anti-bunching effect respectively. The width of these functions depends on the temperature and is scaled as {radical}(inverse atomic mass). Our numerical results provide the precise quantitative values of suppression/increase (antibunching and bunching) of the density fluctuations at small distances in ideal quantum gases in qualitative agreement with the experimental observation for almost non-trapped dilute gases.

  19. Rare gases in cyclosilicates and cogenetic minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.; Alexander, E. C., Jr.; Dragon, J. C.; Zashu, S.

    1984-01-01

    The cyclosilicate minerals, beryl, tourmaline, and cordierite, typically contain large amounts of He-4 and Ar-40 which are not in situ radiogenic products. In the study of excess rare gases in cyclosilicates, one of the most enigmatic observations is the age effect, a qualitative tendency for geologically older samples to contain more excess He-4 and Ar-40 than younger samples. The present investigation is concerned with measurements regarding the abundance and isotopic composition of all five rare gases in a number of cyclosilicates as well as in their cogenetic minerals. The significance of the obtained data is discussed. The data indicate that cyclosilicates sample the rare gases present in the environment in which they crystallize. This 'sampling' involves major elemental fractionations which are variable but mineral specific. Cyclosilicates can, therefore, be used to probe the isotopic ratios and elemental compositions.

  20. Maximum entropy principle for rarefied polyatomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavić, Milana; Ruggeri, Tommaso; Simić, Srboljub

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that the procedure of maximum entropy principle for the closure of the moments equations for rarefied monatomic gases can be extended also to polyatomic gases. The main difference with respect to the usual procedure is the existence of two hierarchies of macroscopic equations for moments of suitable distribution function, in which the internal energy of a molecule is taken into account. The field equations for 14 moments of the distribution function, which include dynamic pressure, are derived. The entropy and the entropy flux are shown to be a generalization of the ones for classical Grad’s distribution. The results are in perfect agreement with the recent macroscopic approach of extended thermodynamics for real gases.

  1. In-situ infrared detection of stack gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Derek D.

    1993-03-01

    Infrared measurement using gas-filter correlation (GFC) detection offers an accurate, sensitive, and highly selective technique for the quantitative detection of a number of common industrial gases. A radiative transfer model based on the HITRAN database has been developed to permit the response function of such an instrument to be calculated. The model has been applied to a number of gases, calculating the instrument response to both the target gas and selected interferent species over a broad range of stack temperatures. An optical probe GFC detector has been designed for in-stack measurements of CO and HCl from incinerators and thermal power stations. The probe can be purged with clean air for a true baseline check and a calibration chamber is provided which allows the instrument to be calibrated using bottled gas mixtures. The instrument has completed a successful plant trial during which it measured CO emissions from a coal-fired power station, showing a detection sensitivity of 5 ppm. Detection of HCl has also been demonstrated in the laboratory.

  2. Radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rantanen, J.

    1980-09-01

    In radiation-induced carcinogenesis the stages of initiation, transformation, and promotion can be identified. Radiation carcinogenesis is a stochastic phenomenon that does not exhibit any threshold in the dose-response relationship. The most important risk to be controlled is that of the population - either industrial or medical - exposed to radiation at low levels and low dose rates. Despite the expanding use of radiation, the average doses in most industrialized societies have not been increasing during the last few years. However, sensitive subpopulations with high cancer risks are included within the present low-level average exposure figures.

  3. Temporally multiplexed quantum repeaters with atomic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Christoph; Riedmatten, Hugues de; Afzelius, Mikael

    2010-07-15

    We propose a temporally multiplexed version of the Duan-Lukin-Cirac-Zoller (DLCZ) quantum-repeater protocol using controlled inhomogeneous spin broadening in atomic gases. A first analysis suggests that the advantage of multiplexing is negated by noise due to spin-wave excitations corresponding to unobserved directions of Stokes photon emission. However, this problem can be overcome with the help of a moderate-finesse cavity which is in resonance with Stokes photons, but invisible to the anti-Stokes photons. Our proposal promises greatly enhanced quantum repeater performance with atomic gases.

  4. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  5. Comparison of driving gases for IABPs.

    PubMed

    Kayser, K L; Johnson, W D; Shore, R T

    1981-01-01

    Several aspects of CO2 vs He as the driving gas in intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation systems were reviewed and investigated. Carbon dioxide seems to be significantly safer than other gases, but not benign. Helium produces a faster balloon response, but the physiologic significance has not been defined. Balloon driving gases become diluted in relatively short time. Leak detection systems have significant limitations. It seems prudent for users of dual-balloon systems to periodically measure the PCO2 of the driving gas. A better method of purging the single-balloon system was developed. PMID:6785559

  6. The Flow of Gases in Narrow Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R E H

    1951-01-01

    Measurements were made of the flow of gases through various narrow channels a few microns wide at average pressures from 0.00003 to 40 cm. Hg. The flow rate, defined as the product of pressure and volume rate of flow at unit pressure difference, first decreased linearly with decrease in mean pressure in the channel, in agreement with laminar-flow theory, reached a minimum when the mean path length was approximately equal to the channel width, and then increased to a constant value. The product of flow rate and square root of molecular number was approximately the same function of mean path length for all gases for a given channel.

  7. Origins of geothermal gases at Yellowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-09-01

    Gas emissions at the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) reflect open-system mixing of gas species originating from diverse rock types, magmas, and crustal fluids, all combined in varying proportions at different thermal areas. Gases are not necessarily in chemical equilibrium with the waters through which they vent, especially in acid sulfate terrain where bubbles stream through stagnant acid water. Gases in adjacent thermal areas often can be differentiated by isotopic and gas ratios, and cannot be tied to one another solely by shallow processes such as boiling-induced fractionation of a parent liquid. Instead, they inherit unique gas ratios (e.g., CH4/He) from the dominant rock reservoirs where they originate, some of which underlie the Quaternary volcanic rocks. Steam/gas ratios (essentially H2O/CO2) of Yellowstone fumaroles correlate with Ar/He and N2/CO2, strongly suggesting that H2O/CO2 is controlled by addition of steam boiled from water rich in atmospheric gases. Moreover, H2O/CO2 varies systematically with geographic location, such that boiling is more enhanced in some areas than others. The δ13C and 3He/CO2 of gases reflect a dominant mantle origin for CO2 in Yellowstone gas. The mantle signature is most evident at Mud Volcano, which hosts gases with the lowest H2O/CO2, lowest CH4 concentrations and highest He isotope ratios (~ 16Ra), consistent with either a young subsurface intrusion or less input of crustal and meteoric gas than any other location at Yellowstone. Across the YPVF, He isotope ratios (3He/4He) inversely vary with He concentrations, and reflect varied amounts of long-stored, radiogenic He added to the magmatic endmember within the crust. Similarly, addition of CH4 from organic-rich sediments is common in the eastern thermal areas at Yellowstone. Overall, Yellowstone gases reflect addition of deep, high-temperature magmatic gas (CO2-rich), lower-temperatures crustal gases (4He- and CH4-bearing), and those gases (N2, Ne, Ar) added principally through boiling of the meteoric-water-derived geothermal liquid found in the upper few kilometers. We also briefly explore the pathways by which Cl, F, and S, move through the crust.

  8. Ultracold Lattice Gases with Periodically Modulated Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, kos; Deng, Xiaolong; Santos, Luis

    2012-11-01

    We show that a time-dependent magnetic field inducing a periodically modulated scattering length may lead to interesting novel scenarios for cold gases in optical lattices, characterized by a nonlinear hopping depending on the number difference at neighboring sites. We discuss the rich physics introduced by this hopping, including pair superfluidity, exactly defect-free Mott-insulator states for finite hopping, and pure holon and doublon superfluids. We also address experimental detection, showing that the introduced nonlinear hopping may lead in harmonically trapped gases to abrupt drops in the density profile marking the interface between different superfluid regions.

  9. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  10. Seeing Spin Dynamics in Atomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of internal spin, electronic orbital, and nuclear motion states of atoms and molecules have preoccupied the atomic and molecular physics community for decades. Increasingly, such dynamics are being examined within many-body systems composed of atomic and molecular gases. Our findings sometimes bear close relation to phenomena observed in condensed-matter systems, while on other occasions they represent truly new areas of investigation. I discuss several examples of spin dynamics that occur within spinor Bose-Einstein gases, highlighting the advantages of spin-sensitive imaging for understanding and utilizing such dynamics.

  11. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  12. BIOSIGNATURE GASES IN H{sub 2}-DOMINATED ATMOSPHERES ON ROCKY EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Seager, S.; Bains, W.; Hu, R.

    2013-11-10

    Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H{sub 2} atmospheres and habitable surface temperatures, using a model atmosphere with photochemistry and a biomass estimate framework for evaluating the plausibility of a range of biosignature gas candidates. We find that photochemically produced H atoms are the most abundant reactive species in H{sub 2} atmospheres. In atmospheres with high CO{sub 2} levels, atomic O is the major destructive species for some molecules. In Sun-Earth-like UV radiation environments, H (and in some cases O) will rapidly destroy nearly all biosignature gases of interest. The lower UV fluxes from UV-quiet M stars would produce a lower concentration of H (or O) for the same scenario, enabling some biosignature gases to accumulate. The favorability of low-UV radiation environments to accumulate detectable biosignature gases in an H{sub 2} atmosphere is closely analogous to the case of oxidized atmospheres, where photochemically produced OH is the major destructive species. Most potential biosignature gases, such as dimethylsulfide and CH{sub 3}Cl, are therefore more favorable in low-UV, as compared with solar-like UV, environments. A few promising biosignature gas candidates, including NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}O, are favorable even in solar-like UV environments, as these gases are destroyed directly by photolysis and not by H (or O). A more subtle finding is that most gases produced by life that are fully hydrogenated forms of an element, such as CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}S, are not effective signs of life in an H{sub 2}-rich atmosphere because the dominant atmospheric chemistry will generate such gases abiologically, through photochemistry or geochemistry. Suitable biosignature gases in H{sub 2}-rich atmospheres for super-Earth exoplanets transiting M stars could potentially be detected in transmission spectra with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  13. Importance timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, John

    2013-08-01

    Bayesian evidence Z = ? L(x)d?(x) is defined as likelihood L integrated over prior ?, and is often computed in that form with nested sampling as the preferred algorithm for passing from prior to posterior in large or complicated applications. However, a user may suspect that some locations x are more useful than others, and wish to guide the computation by using a suitable weight function w(x). In conventional importance sampling, such weights are incorporated by re-writing Z as ?(L/w)(wd?), using a weighted prior w? and correspondingly de-weighted likelihood L/w. Unfortunately, w cannot be updated during a run without altering the likelihood surfaces (which nested sampling requires to be fixed). Also, the normalization ? wd? must be known if the value of Z is to be retrieved. Importance timing removes those disadvantages by preserving the likelihood unchanged. Excess prior weight w is cancelled, not through L, but by adjusting the rate of the MCMC clock which defines termination of a trial exploration. This preserves the evidence value and enables the weights to be (slowly) learned as iterations proceed.

  14. Climate change and trace gases.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James; Sato, Makiko; Kharecha, Pushker; Russell, Gary; Lea, David W; Siddall, Mark

    2007-07-15

    Palaeoclimate data show that the Earth's climate is remarkably sensitive to global forcings. Positive feedbacks predominate. This allows the entire planet to be whipsawed between climate states. One feedback, the 'albedo flip' property of ice/water, provides a powerful trigger mechanism. A climate forcing that 'flips' the albedo of a sufficient portion of an ice sheet can spark a cataclysm. Inertia of ice sheet and ocean provides only moderate delay to ice sheet disintegration and a burst of added global warming. Recent greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions place the Earth perilously close to dramatic climate change that could run out of our control, with great dangers for humans and other creatures. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the largest human-made climate forcing, but other trace constituents are also important. Only intense simultaneous efforts to slow CO2 emissions and reduce non-CO2 forcings can keep climate within or near the range of the past million years. The most important of the non-CO2 forcings is methane (CH4), as it causes the second largest human-made GHG climate forcing and is the principal cause of increased tropospheric ozone (O3), which is the third largest GHG forcing. Nitrous oxide (N2O) should also be a focus of climate mitigation efforts. Black carbon ('black soot') has a high global warming potential (approx. 2000, 500 and 200 for 20, 100 and 500 years, respectively) and deserves greater attention. Some forcings are especially effective at high latitudes, so concerted efforts to reduce their emissions could preserve Arctic ice, while also having major benefits for human health, agricultural productivity and the global environment. PMID:17513270

  15. Condensate fluctuations of interacting Bose gases within a microcanonical ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianhui; He Jizhou; Ma Yongli

    2011-05-15

    Based on counting statistics and Bogoliubov theory, we present a recurrence relation for the microcanonical partition function for a weakly interacting Bose gas with a finite number of particles in a cubic box. According to this microcanonical partition function, we calculate numerically the distribution function, condensate fraction, and condensate fluctuations for a finite and isolated Bose-Einstein condensate. For ideal and weakly interacting Bose gases, we compare the condensate fluctuations with those in the canonical ensemble. The present approach yields an accurate account of the condensate fluctuations for temperatures close to the critical region. We emphasize that the interactions between excited atoms turn out to be important for moderate temperatures.

  16. Thermodynamic design principle of mixed-gases Kleemenko refrigeration cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, M. Q.; Luo, E. C.; Wu, J. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2002-05-01

    Mixed-gases throttling refrigeration cycles are recuperative cycles. The refrigeration system has at least one heat exchanger and from zero to three or more phase separators. Detailed discussions are made in this paper on the thermodynamic performance of several cycles, including extensive simulations and optimizations of mixtures, operating parameters of pressures, and flow configurations. The results show that the mixed refrigerant is the most important design parameter that influences the performance of the system. From a thermodynamic point of view, the configurations that were studied can all achieve about the same efficiency with an appropriate selection of the mixture and operating pressures.

  17. Structure and thermodynamic properties of relativistic electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-07-01

    Relativistic effect is important in many quantum systems but theoretically complicated from both fundamental and practical perspectives. Herein we introduce an efficient computational procedure to predict the structure and energetic properties of relativistic quantum systems by mapping the Pauli principle into an effective pairwise-additive potential such that the properties of relativistic nonquantum systems can be readily predicted from conventional liquid-state methods. We applied our theoretical procedure to relativistic uniform electron gases and compared the pair correlation functions with those for systems of nonrelativistic electrons. A simple analytical expression has been developed to correlate the exchange-correlation free energy of relativistic uniform electron systems.

  18. Free energy of random sound oscillations in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalfaoui, A. H.; Wilhelm, H. E.

    1982-02-01

    The contribution of sound-wave oscillations to the free energy of noncondensed gases is described in terms of a theory which takes into consideration the energy of the random sound-wave oscillations, in addition to the random thermal energies of the gas particles. It is shown that the effect of the sound waves is important only at high temperatures and high gas densities. The proposed theory is applicable to various high-temperature engineering systems such as gas turbines, jet engines, and rocket exhausts.

  19. Radiation and combined heat transfer in channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tamonis, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a concise, practical treatment of numerical methods of calculation for radiative and combined (convection and conduction) heat transfer -- encompassing channel flows of radiating and nonradiating media. The volume offers results from calculations for various flow conditions, and analyzes methods used in determining the spectral optical properties of molecular gases. Topics considered include optical properties of molecular gases, transfer equations for combined heat transfer, experimental techniques, convective heat transfer in heat gas flows, radiative heat transfer in gaseous media, combined heat transfer, and radiative and combined heat transfer in applied problems.

  20. Radiation and combined heat transfer in channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tamonis, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents numerical methods of calculation of radiative and combined heat transfer in channel flows of radiating as well as nonradiating media. Results obtained in calculations for flow conditions of combustion products from organic fuel products are given and methods used in determining the spectral optical properties of molecular gases are analyzed. The book presents applications of heat transfer in solving problems. Topic covered are as follows: optical properties of molecular gases; transfer equations for combined heat transfer; experimental technique; convective heat transfer in heated gas flows; radiative heat transfer in gaseous media; combined heat transfer; and radiative and combined heat transfer in applied problems.

  1. Remote detection of gases by gas correlation spectroradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, J. S.; Mccleese, B. J.; Martonchik, J. V.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the application of a pressure modulated radiometer (PMR) to the remote sensing of trace amounts of gases in the atmospheres as well as to the direct measurement of upper atmospheric winds. The PMR operates as a gas correlation spectrometer. Compared to conventional gas correlation parameters, it has some advantages which are related to greater versatility and the employment of a simpler method for maintaining electrical/optical balance. The PMR has a high sensitivity in connection with its essentially very high effective resolution. It represents a passive system and emits no radiation. A PMR is flown on Nimbus 6 which was launched in 1975. The instrument has also been used on the Nimbus 7 satellite and the Tiros N satellite.

  2. Using Thermal Infrared Absorption and Emission to Determine Trace Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerbaux, Cathy; Drummond, James R.; Flaud, Jean-Marie; Orphal, Johannes

    The light emerging from the top of the atmosphere in the greater part of the infrared region is thermal radiation from the Earth's surface. The resultant spectra obtained depend on the temperature difference between the emitting feature and absorbing gas. In this region the greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, CO2, methane, CH4, ozone, O3, and water, H2O, are observed as well as carbon monoxide, CO, a product indicative of fossil fuel combustion, methanol, CH3OH, from biomass burning, and ammonia, NH3, from agriclulture. Chapter 3 describes the techniques for retrieving atmospheric abundances of these and other species from a number of satellite instruments, and concludes with suggestions for future developments.

  3. Impact of Radiatively Active Water Ice Clouds in the GEM-Mars GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neary, L.; Daerden, F.

    2015-10-01

    Water ice clouds have proven to be an important driver in the temperature distribution and overall climate of the Martian atmosphere. Clouds have both a direct and indirect radiative effect on temperature and circulation, which in turn can modify the water vapour distribution and that of other trace gases.We have included the radiative effect of water ice clouds (RAC) in the GEM-Mars GCM model, using Mie code and optical indices to compute the scattering properties of ice particles.We present preliminary results from simulations with and without RAC, and compare these initial tests with Mars Climate Sounder (MCS), Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Mars Color Imager (MARCI).

  4. Fullerenes and the Nature of Planetary Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; Poreda, Robert J.; Nuth, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Over the past several decades, two issues have dominated the discussion of planetary noble gas patterns: 1) the general resemblance of the noble gas abundances in carbonaceous chondrites to those measured in the Earth s atmosphere and; 2) atmospheric inventories of argon and neon that fall off significantly with increasing distance from the Sun. The recognition of the latter has led to the conclusion that the planetary component is not found on planets. In particular, the inability to explain the missing xenon reservoir, once thought to be sequestered in crustal rocks has been extremely troublesome. Some models have focused on various fractionations of solar wind rather than condensation as the process for the evolution of noble gases in the terrestrial planets. However, these models cannot explain the observed gradient of the gases, nor do they account for the similar Ne/Ar ratios and the dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have focused on hydrodynamic escape to explain the fractionation of gases, like neon, in the atmosphere and the mantle. Escape theory also seems to explain, in part, the isotopically heavy argon on Mars, however, it does not explain the discrepancies observed for the abundances of argon and neon on Venus and the Earth. This has led to the assumption that some combination of solar wind implantation, absorption and escape are needed to explain the nature of planetary noble gases.

  5. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  6. Teacher's Guide for Balloons and Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Joe H.; And Others

    This guide was developed to provide children with an opportunity to prepare and collect several common gases and to discover and work with some of their properties. The guide is divided into five major sections: (1) introduction, (2) materials, (3) activities, (4) balloons aloft, and (5) an appendix. The introduction provides information

  7. Managing biogeochemical cycles to reduce greenhouse gases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue focuses on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and their roles in determining current continental-scale budgets and future trends in biogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) for North America. Understanding the current magnitude and forecasting future trajectories of atmospheric GHG concent...

  8. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyether sulfone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Olcomendy, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of polyether sulfone was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Animal response times were relatively short at pyrolysis temperatures of 600 to 800 C, with death occurring within 6 min. The principal toxicant appeared to be a compound other than carbon monoxide.

  9. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from foam plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.; Casey, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-three samples of flexible foams and twelve samples of rigid foams were evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the USF toxicity screening test method. Polychloroprene among the flexible foams, and polystyrene among the rigid foams, appeared to exhibit the least toxicity under these particular test conditions.

  10. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Hydrocarbon analyzer burner air. The concentration of oxygen must be within 1 mole percent of the oxygen... concentration is greater than 1 mole percent, then the oxygen interference must be checked and the analyzer... with oxygen concentrations between 18 and 21 mole percent. (2) Calibration gases shall be accurate...

  11. Removing Sulphur Dioxide From Stack Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    Process types, process concepts, claims and counterclaims, cost factors, and the level of developed technology for sulfur dioxide control in stack gases are focused upon and evaluated. Wet and dry processes as well as recovery and throwaway processes are compared. (BL)

  12. Refractive Indices of Gases at Microwave Frequencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhead, D. T.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple microwave interferometer capable of measuring small phase shifts. Proposes laboratory exercises involving the use of the interferometer in the determination of refractive indices of gases and the analysis of the reflection in a test chamber. (Author/CP)

  13. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1514 Section 86.1514 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New...

  14. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1514 Section 86.1514 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines,...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 86.1514 Section 86.1514 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines,...

  16. Method and apparatus for demisting gases

    SciTech Connect

    Claes, J.; De B.R.

    1981-02-17

    A method and apparatus are described for demisting gases wherein a stream of gas containing submicron liquid particles is caused to pass through a filter material comprising at least in part a material having a porosity of at least 0.985.

  17. Elimination of gases and contamination from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, A. P.

    1970-01-01

    Filtration system with membrane type hydrophilic and hydrophobic filters gives absolute filtration with automatic venting of freed gases, and prevents backward transmission of contamination with no bacterial growth through the filters. Filter aids in degassing industrial solutions and in removing oxygen from sea water.

  18. Retrieval of CFC concentrations from thermal infrared spectrum observed by Greenhouse gases Observation SATellite (GOSAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagoya, A.; Imasu, R.; Hayashi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Chemical substances emitted by the anthropological activities cause serious environmental problems. Among them, CFCs have been depleting ozone layer in the stratosphere. Also, it is reported that their radiative forcing is 0.268 W/m2 and they could largely account for global warming. To mitigate these problems, it is important to estimate their distribution and amount globally with good accuracy. Though on site measurements provide considerably precise data, the observation sites are quite limited. In contrast, results retrieved from data obtained by remote sensing may contain more errors, but its wide spatial coverage is great advantage to monitor atmosphere globally and continuously for long term. The purpose of this study is to retrieve concentrations of CFC-11 and CFC-12, and replacements for CFCs from thermal infrared spectrum data obtained by Greenhouse gases Observation SATellite (GOSAT). We use spectrum data taken from its main sensor, Fourier transform spectrometer TANSO-FTS, particularly its band 4 (5.5 - 14.3?m). The sub-sensor called TANSO-CAI is used for cloud screening. To calculate simulated spectrum using a radiative transfer model, LBLRTM, the meteorological reanalysis data including atmospheric information at each point such as surface temperature and atmospheric composition are prepared. As the first step, we focus on CFC-11 and CFC-12 which have strong absorption band near 850 cm-1 and 920 cm-1 respectably. For retrieving the gases, the baselines of the observed and calculated spectrum need to be matched. However, it is not always true due to the uncertainty of information in the reanalysis data. To match baselines, we first set the constant emissivity and estimate the surface temperature. Even after the procedure, spectral residue still remained particularly on the peaks of water vapor absorption lines. We will retrieve more precise surface temperature and the amount of water vapor from observed each spectrum so that we could get better a priori for gas retrieval. We will also discuss how accurately CFC-11 and CFC-12 can be retrieved by GOSAT data.

  19. Three toxic gases meet in the mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Decréau, Richard A; Collman, James P

    2015-01-01

    The rationale of the study was two-fold: (i) develop a functional synthetic model of the Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) active site, (ii) use it as a convenient tool to understand or predict the outcome of the reaction of CcO with ligands (physiologically relevant gases and other ligands). At physiological pH and potential, the model catalyzes the 4-electron reduction of oxygen. This model was immobilized on self-assembled-monolayer (SAM) modified electrode. During catalytic oxygen reduction, electron delivery through SAMs is rate limiting, similar to the situation in CcO. This model contains all three redox-active components in CcO's active site, which are required to minimize the production of partially-reduced-oxygen-species (PROS): Fe-heme ("heme a3") in a myoglobin-like model fitted with a proximal imidazole ligand, and a distal tris-imidazole Copper ("CuB") complex, where one imidazole is cross-linked to a phenol (mimicking "Tyr244"). This functional CcO model demonstrates how CcO itself might tolerate the hormone NO (which diffuses through the mitochondria). It is proposed that CuB delivers superoxide to NO bound to Fe-heme forming peroxynitrite, then nitrate that diffuses away. Another toxic gas, H2S, has exceptional biological effects: at ~80 ppm, H2S induces a state similar to hibernation in mice, lowering the animal's temperature and slowing respiration. Using our functional CcO model, we have demonstrated that at the same concentration range H2S can reversibly inhibit catalytic oxygen reduction. Such a reversible catalytic process on the model was also demonstrated with an organic compound, tetrazole (TZ). Following studies showed that TZ reversibly inhibits respiration in isolated mitochondria, and induces deactivation of platelets, a mitochondria-rich key component of blood coagulation. Hence, this program is a rare example illustrating the use of a functional model to understand and predict physiologically important reactions at the active site of CcO. PMID:26347655

  20. Three toxic gases meet in the mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Decréau, Richard A.; Collman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    The rationale of the study was two-fold: (i) develop a functional synthetic model of the Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) active site, (ii) use it as a convenient tool to understand or predict the outcome of the reaction of CcO with ligands (physiologically relevant gases and other ligands). At physiological pH and potential, the model catalyzes the 4-electron reduction of oxygen. This model was immobilized on self-assembled-monolayer (SAM) modified electrode. During catalytic oxygen reduction, electron delivery through SAMs is rate limiting, similar to the situation in CcO. This model contains all three redox-active components in CcO's active site, which are required to minimize the production of partially-reduced-oxygen-species (PROS): Fe-heme (“heme a3”) in a myoglobin-like model fitted with a proximal imidazole ligand, and a distal tris-imidazole Copper (“CuB”) complex, where one imidazole is cross-linked to a phenol (mimicking “Tyr244”). This functional CcO model demonstrates how CcO itself might tolerate the hormone NO (which diffuses through the mitochondria). It is proposed that CuB delivers superoxide to NO bound to Fe-heme forming peroxynitrite, then nitrate that diffuses away. Another toxic gas, H2S, has exceptional biological effects: at ~80 ppm, H2S induces a state similar to hibernation in mice, lowering the animal's temperature and slowing respiration. Using our functional CcO model, we have demonstrated that at the same concentration range H2S can reversibly inhibit catalytic oxygen reduction. Such a reversible catalytic process on the model was also demonstrated with an organic compound, tetrazole (TZ). Following studies showed that TZ reversibly inhibits respiration in isolated mitochondria, and induces deactivation of platelets, a mitochondria-rich key component of blood coagulation. Hence, this program is a rare example illustrating the use of a functional model to understand and predict physiologically important reactions at the active site of CcO. PMID:26347655

  1. Increased soil emissions of potent greenhouse gases under increased atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Osenberg, Craig W.; Hungate, Bruce A.

    2011-07-01

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) can affect biotic and abiotic conditions in soil, such as microbial activity and water content. In turn, these changes might be expected to alter the production and consumption of the important greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) (refs 2, 3). However, studies on fluxes of N2O and CH4 from soil under increased atmospheric CO2 have not been quantitatively synthesized. Here we show, using meta-analysis, that increased CO2 (ranging from 463 to 780 parts per million by volume) stimulates both N2O emissions from upland soils and CH4 emissions from rice paddies and natural wetlands. Because enhanced greenhouse-gas emissions add to the radiative forcing of terrestrial ecosystems, these emissions are expected to negate at least 16.6 per cent of the climate change mitigation potential previously predicted from an increase in the terrestrial carbon sink under increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Our results therefore suggest that the capacity of land ecosystems to slow climate warming has been overestimated.

  2. Increased soil emissions of potent greenhouse gases under increased atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Osenberg, Craig W; Hungate, Bruce A

    2011-07-14

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) can affect biotic and abiotic conditions in soil, such as microbial activity and water content. In turn, these changes might be expected to alter the production and consumption of the important greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and methane (CH(4)) (refs 2, 3). However, studies on fluxes of N(2)O and CH(4) from soil under increased atmospheric CO(2) have not been quantitatively synthesized. Here we show, using meta-analysis, that increased CO(2) (ranging from 463 to 780 parts per million by volume) stimulates both N(2)O emissions from upland soils and CH(4) emissions from rice paddies and natural wetlands. Because enhanced greenhouse-gas emissions add to the radiative forcing of terrestrial ecosystems, these emissions are expected to negate at least 16.6 per cent of the climate change mitigation potential previously predicted from an increase in the terrestrial carbon sink under increased atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. Our results therefore suggest that the capacity of land ecosystems to slow climate warming has been overestimated. PMID:21753852

  3. Quantified estimates of total GWPs for greenhouse gases taking into account tropospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Tamaresis, J.S.; Patten, K.O.

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to give interim account of the progress being made at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in developing an improved capability for assessing the direct and indirect effects on Global Warming Potentials. Much of our current efforts are being devoted to improving the capability for modeling of global tropospheric processes in our state-of-the-art zonally-averaged chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere. These efforts are in preparation for an improved evaluation and better quantification of the indirect GWPs resulting from effects on tropospheric ozone from ethane and other gases with significant human-related emissions. There are three major findings that should result from this project that should have significant impacts on EPA and its programs. First, the current and ongoing studies of the direct and indirect GWPs should have a significant influence on the continuing national and international assessments of climate change. Second, the improved capability for modeling of chemical and physical processes should lead to enhanced understanding of the controlling factors influencing ozone, hydroxyl and other key tropospheric constituents. Third, the enhanced modeling capability should be important to future studies of human-related influences on tropospheric and stratospheric chemical processes.

  4. Medical intelligence article: assessing the impact on global climate from general anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Nielsen, Ole J; Wallington, Timothy J; Karpichev, Boris; Sander, Stanley P

    2012-05-01

    Although present in the atmosphere with a combined concentration approximately 100,000 times lower than carbon dioxide (i.e., the principal anthropogenic driver of climate change), halogenated organic compounds are responsible for a warming effect of approximately 10% to 15% of the total anthropogenic radiative forcing of climate, as measured relative to the start of the industrial era (approximately 1750). The family of anesthetic gases includes several halogenated organic compounds that are strong greenhouse gases. In this short report, we provide an overview of the state of knowledge regarding the impact of anesthetic gas release on the environment, with particular focus on its contribution to the radiative forcing of climate change. PMID:22492189

  5. Plume radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirscherl, R.

    1993-06-01

    The electromagnetic radiation originating from the exhaust plume of tactical missile motors is of outstanding importance for military system designers. Both missile- and countermeasure engineer rely on the knowledge of plume radiation properties, be it for guidance/interference control or for passive detection of adversary missiles. To allow access to plume radiation properties, they are characterized with respect to the radiation producing mechanisms like afterburning, its chemical constituents, and reactions as well as particle radiation. A classification of plume spectral emissivity regions is given due to the constraints imposed by available sensor technology and atmospheric propagation windows. Additionally assessment methods are presented that allow a common and general grouping of rocket motor properties into various categories. These methods describe state of the art experimental evaluation techniques as well as calculation codes that are most commonly used by developers of NATO countries. Dominant aspects influencing plume radiation are discussed and a standardized test technique is proposed for the assessment of plume radiation properties that include prediction procedures. These recommendations on terminology and assessment methods should be common to all employers of plume radiation. Special emphasis is put on the omnipresent need for self-protection by the passive detection of plume radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral band.

  6. Radiative heating in contrail cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Mayer, Bernhard; Hamann, Ulrich; Graf, Kaspar

    2010-05-01

    In the course of analysis and modeling of aviation induced contrail cirrus, we found that observed time scales of contrail cirrus and thin cirrus in general requires particle losses by radiative heating besides other loss processes. For thin cirrus near the tropopause, radiative warming dominates over cooling in most cases, in particular in the lower part of cirrus layers. Both terrestrial and solar radiances contribute to warming, but the terrestrial part is often the larger one. The radiation is absorbed mainly by the ice particles while a smaller fraction is absorbed by water vapor and other gases inside the cirrus. The heating directly absorbed in the ice particles causes a temperature difference between the ice particles and ambient air. Because of the small heat capacity of the ice particles and because of the small particle scales, local equilibrium between radiative heating and conductive cooling is reached quickly. In agreement with Gierens (1994) and others, this causes a temperature surplus of order 0.1 K for ice particles larger than about 100 micro meters. For smaller particles, the temperature increases about linearly with the particle radius. The contribution is important for very low ice particle concentrations (below 0.1/cm**3) and solar optical depth larger 0.1. After heat exchange with the ambient air, and by additional absorption of radiation in the gas phase, the radiation also causes a bulk warming of the cirrus, again of order 0.1 K. The contribution is important for high ice particle concentrations (> 1 /cm**3) and for rather modest optical depth values (0.01 to 0.1). Quasi equilibrium is reached in proportion to the inverse heating rate, which may take hours. In case of heating the increased ice particle temperature causes reduced water vapor saturation at the ice surface and hence sublimation. Hence, both effects may contribute to a loss of ice particles in cirrus, in particular, when relative humidity inside the cirrus is close to ice saturation. In addition, the radiative heating may cause convective turbulence because of warm air masses rising and cold air masses sinking. Finally, the whole cirrus may rise slowly rise by the diabatic heating. In order to simulate these effects in contrail cirrus we developed an effective model (within our contrail cirrus prediction model, CoCiP) which computes the radiative heating rate in both the longwave and shortwave spectral ranges. The model parameterizes the impact of radiative heating on turbulent mixing and sublimation of ice particles in a thin cirrus layer. The heating rate is modeled as a function of cirrus properties (optical depth, temperature, humidity, effective particle radius, and particle habit), solar radiation, solar zenith angle, and the radiances at the top of the atmosphere (solar direct radiation, reflected solar radiation, and outgoing longwave radiation). The model parameters were determined by least square fits of the model results to the results of forward calculations with the libRadtran system using the DISORT 2.0 solver with 16 streams for about 32000 cases with different atmospheres, surface properties and cloud parameters. The model has been applied for various test cases in comparison to cirrus cover derived from SEVIRI-IR data from Meteosat (MSG) observations. The comparison shows that radiative heating may enhance vertical mixing and reduce the life time of contrail cirrus (and thin cirrus in general) by factors of order two.

  7. An estimating formula for ion-atom association rates in gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, B. K.; Johnsen, R.

    1990-01-01

    A simple estimating formula is derived for rate coefficients of three-body ion atom association in gases and compare its predictions to experimental data on ion association and three-body radiative charge transfer reactions of singly- and doubly-charged rare-gas ions. The formula appears to reproduce most experimental data quite well. It may be useful for estimating the rates of reactions that have not been studied in the laboratory.

  8. Noble Gases in a Heterogeneous, Dynamic Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. F.

    2010-12-01

    The source of unradiogenic noble gases in oceanic basalts has been perhaps the most enigmatic aspect of mantle geochemistry. One popular hypothetical source, a large enriched layer deep in the mantle, is incompatible with geophysical evidence. Not only does seismic tomography preclude a separate lower mantle, but any such layer ought to generate mantle plumes, and associated hotspot swells, much stronger than those observed. The only layering compatible with geophysical evidence is the D region, which is only around 200 km thick and comprises only about 2% of the mantles mass. It is argued that when the major-element heterogeneity of the mantle is more fully considered the noble gas observations can be reconciled with a mantle structure compatible with geophysics and dynamics. The mantle is observed, and expected, to comprise a refractory peridotite matrix containing eclogites and pyroxenites that are more fusible and more enriched in incompatible elements. These heterogeneities will melt deeper, and not all of their off-axis melt will be extracted at mid-ocean ridges, so it will recirculate internally within the mantle. Such recirculated heterogeneities will retain their incompatible elements, and the incompatibles will become concentrated within them, probably from early in Earth history. The heterogeneities, more mafic than ultramafic, will tend to be denser than average mantle through most of the mantles depth. They will therefore tend to accumulate within the D region, as dynamical models have demonstrated for subducted (mafic) oceanic crust. D would thus contain a mixture of subducted oceanic crust, which will have been degassed at the surface, and recirculated heterogeneities carrying noble gases. Dynamical models show that residence times in D are longer than for the mantle interior, so the noble gases in D would tend to be older, as well as higher in concentration. This can explain why mantle plumes, tapping D, contain noble gases that are less radiogenic than mid-ocean ridge basalts. Quantitative models bear this out. This picture requires that the bulk of the mantles noble gases reside in the MORB source, which comprises most of the mantle. Recent estimates of MORB source composition may have underestimated the content of incompatible elements because they are tied to peridotite compositions, which will probably not have equilibrated with all of the incompatibles residing in fusible heterogeneities. Most estimates of MORB source composition also focus on so-called normal MORB, which is actually more depleted than the mean. When more enriched components and plume-related components are considered, the budgets of the noble gases can be plausibly accounted for.

  9. Infrared band absorptance correlations and applications to nongray radiation. [mathematical models of absorption spectra for nongray atmospheres in order to study air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Manian, S. V. S.

    1976-01-01

    Various mathematical models for infrared radiation absorption spectra for atmospheric gases are reviewed, and continuous correlations for the total absorptance of a wide band are presented. Different band absorptance correlations were employed in two physically realistic problems (radiative transfer in gases with internal heat source, and heat transfer in laminar flow of absorbing-emitting gases between parallel plates) to study their influence on final radiative transfer results. This information will be applied to the study of atmospheric pollutants by infrared radiation measurement.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  11. Coherent terahertz echo of tunnel ionization in gases.

    PubMed

    Karpowicz, N; Zhang, X-C

    2009-03-01

    We study tunnel ionized electron wave packet dynamics during the initial transition from a gas to a plasma by detecting the terahertz radiation emitted in the process. Experimental and theoretical results show that much of the observed radiation is due to coherent buildup of bremsstrahlung released during the first electron-atom collision. Coherent control of the tunnel ionization process combined with ab initio modeling provides a real-time view of the initial stages of the formation of a laser-induced plasma and allows us to fully understand this important source of terahertz radiation. PMID:19392516

  12. Coherent Terahertz Echo of Tunnel Ionization in Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Karpowicz, N.; Zhang, X.-C.

    2009-03-06

    We study tunnel ionized electron wave packet dynamics during the initial transition from a gas to a plasma by detecting the terahertz radiation emitted in the process. Experimental and theoretical results show that much of the observed radiation is due to coherent buildup of bremsstrahlung released during the first electron-atom collision. Coherent control of the tunnel ionization process combined with ab initio modeling provides a real-time view of the initial stages of the formation of a laser-induced plasma and allows us to fully understand this important source of terahertz radiation.

  13. The importance of the Montreal Protocol in protecting climate

    PubMed Central

    Velders, Guus J. M.; Andersen, Stephen O.; Daniel, John S.; Fahey, David W.; McFarland, Mack

    2007-01-01

    The 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer is a landmark agreement that has successfully reduced the global production, consumption, and emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). ODSs are also greenhouse gases that contribute to the radiative forcing of climate change. Using historical ODSs emissions and scenarios of potential emissions, we show that the ODS contribution to radiative forcing most likely would have been much larger if the ODS link to stratospheric ozone depletion had not been recognized in 1974 and followed by a series of regulations. The climate protection already achieved by the Montreal Protocol alone is far larger than the reduction target of the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. Additional climate benefits that are significant compared with the Kyoto Protocol reduction target could be achieved by actions under the Montreal Protocol, by managing the emissions of substitute fluorocarbon gases and/or implementing alternative gases with lower global warming potentials. PMID:17360370

  14. The importance of the Montreal Protocol in protecting climate.

    PubMed

    Velders, Guus J M; Andersen, Stephen O; Daniel, John S; Fahey, David W; McFarland, Mack

    2007-03-20

    The 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer is a landmark agreement that has successfully reduced the global production, consumption, and emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). ODSs are also greenhouse gases that contribute to the radiative forcing of climate change. Using historical ODSs emissions and scenarios of potential emissions, we show that the ODS contribution to radiative forcing most likely would have been much larger if the ODS link to stratospheric ozone depletion had not been recognized in 1974 and followed by a series of regulations. The climate protection already achieved by the Montreal Protocol alone is far larger than the reduction target of the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. Additional climate benefits that are significant compared with the Kyoto Protocol reduction target could be achieved by actions under the Montreal Protocol, by managing the emissions of substitute fluorocarbon gases and/or implementing alternative gases with lower global warming potentials. PMID:17360370

  15. Itinerant ferromagnetism in ultracold Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Heiselberg, H.

    2011-05-15

    Itinerant ferromagnetism in cold Fermi gases with repulsive interactions is studied applying the Jastrow-Slater approximation generalized to finite polarization and temperature. For two components at zero temperature, a second-order transition is found at ak{sub F}{approx_equal}0.90 compatible with results of quantum-Monte-Carlo (QMC) calculations. Thermodynamic functions and observables, such as the compressibility and spin susceptibility and the resulting fluctuations in number and spin, are calculated. For trapped gases, the resulting cloud radii and kinetic energies are calculated and compared to recent experiments. Spin-polarized systems are recommended for effective separation of large ferromagnetic domains. Collective modes are predicted and tricritical points are calculated for multicomponent systems.

  16. Anesthetic gases and occupationally exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Casale, Teodorico; Caciari, Tiziana; Rosati, Maria Valeria; Gioffrè, Pier Agostino; Schifano, Maria Pia; Capozzella, Assunta; Pimpinella, Benedetta; Tomei, Gianfranco; Tomei, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate whether the occupational exposure to low dose anesthetic gases could cause alterations of blood parameters in health care workers. 119 exposed subjects and 184 not exposed controls were included in the study. Each worker underwent the complete blood count test (CBC), proteinaemia, leukocyte count, serum lipids, liver and kidney blood markers. The liver blood markers show statistically significant differences in health care workers compared with controls (p<0.05), a statistically significant decrease in neutrophils and an increase of lymphocytes in health care workers compared with controls (p<0.05). The prevalence of values outside the range for GPT, GGT, total bilirubin, lymphocytes and neutrophils was statistically significant in health care workers compared with controls (p<0.05). The results suggest that occupational exposure to low dose anesthetic gases could influence some haematochemical hepatic and hematopoietic parameters in exposed health care workers. PMID:24374387

  17. Quantum fluctuations in dipolar Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Aristeu R. P.; Pelster, Axel

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the influence of quantum fluctuations upon dipolar Bose gases by means of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory. Thereby, we make use of the local density approximation to evaluate the dipolar exchange interaction between the condensate and the excited particles. This allows to obtain the Bogoliubov spectrum analytically in the limit of large particle numbers. After discussing the condensate depletion and the ground-state energy correction, we derive quantum-corrected equations of motion for harmonically trapped dipolar Bose gases by using superfluid hydrodynamics. These equations are subsequently applied to analyze the equilibrium configuration, the low-lying oscillation frequencies, and the time-of-flight dynamics. We find that both atomic magnetic and molecular electric dipolar systems offer promising scenarios for detecting beyond mean-field effects.

  18. Biofilters remove VOCs from stack gases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Weyerhaeuser's strandboard plant in Grayling, Mich., is using biofiltration to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the site. Primary constituents in the Weyerhaeuser stack gases are alcohols, aldehydes, organic acids, benzene and toluene. The alternative to biofiltration is incineration, but because the concentration of VOCs in the stack gases is so dilute, natural gas would be required. Incineration would be costly, and could introduce pollution problems by generating excess carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) and possibly nitrogen oxides. Two pilot biofilters, each about 20ft by 100ft in area, with 4-ft thick media of bark and ground trim ends, are using naturally occurring bacteria to destroy VOCs emanating from a wood panel press and a wood flake dryer. The press offgas biofilter, activated February 1993, had risen to 93% efficiency in removing VOCs by mid-May. The flake dryer exhaust biofilter, placed in service in April, already was more than 80% efficient.

  19. Study of electron transport in hydrocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, H.; Date, H.

    2015-04-01

    The drift velocity and the effective ionization coefficient of electrons in the organic gases, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CH3OH, C2H5OH, C6H6, and C6H5CH3, have been measured over relatively wide ranges of density-reduced electric fields (E/N) at room temperature (around 300 K). The drift velocity was measured, based on the arrival-time spectra of electrons by using a double-shutter drift tube over the E/N range from 300 to 2800 Td, and the effective ionization coefficient (? - ?) was determined by the steady-state Townsend method from 150 to 3000 Td. Whenever possible, these parameters were compared with those available in the literature. It has been shown that the swarm parameters for these gases have specific tendencies, depending on their molecular configurations.

  20. Dilute spin-orbit Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Mundo, Daniel; He, Lianyi; Öhberg, Patrik; Valiente, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    We study repulsive Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling in two and three dimensions when they are dilute enough that a single branch of the spectrum is occupied in the non-interacting ground state. We develop an effective renormalizable theory for fermions in the lower branch and obtain the energy of the system in three dimensions to second order in the renormalized coupling constant. We then exploit the non-Galilean-relativistic nature of spin-orbit coupled gases. We find that at finite momentum, the two-dimensional Fermi sea is deformed in a non-trivial way. Using mean-field theory to include interactions, we show that the ground-state of the system acquires a finite momentum, and is consequently deformed, when the interaction is stronger than a critical value. Heriot-Watt University. CM-DTC. SUPA. EPSRC.

  1. In Situ Imaging of Atomic Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chen-Lung; Chin, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    One exciting progress in recent cold atom experiments is the development of high resolution, in situ imaging techniques for atomic quantum gases.1-3 These new powerful tools provide detailed information on the distribution of atoms in a trap with resolution approaching the level of single atom and even single lattice site, and complement the welldeveloped time-of-flight method that probes the system in momentum space. In a condensed matter analogy, this technique is equivalent to locating electrons of a material in a snap shot. In situ imaging has offered a new powerful tool to study atomic gases and inspired many new research directions and ideas. In this chapter, we will describe the experimental setup of in situ absorption imaging, observables that can be extracted from the images, and new physics that can be explored with this technique.

  2. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  3. Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Turick, C.E.

    1997-06-10

    A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases. 3 figs.

  4. Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Turick, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases.

  5. Global Reactive Gases in the MACC project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    In preparation for the planned atmospheric service component of the European Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative, the EU FP7 project Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) developed a preoperational data assimilation and modelling system for monitoring and forecasting of reactive gases, greenhouse gases and aerosols. The project is coordinated by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and the system is built on ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) which has been coupled to the chemistry transport models MOZART-3 and TM5. In order to provide daily forecasts of up to 96 hours for global reactive gases, various satellite retrieval products for ozone (total column and profile data), CO, NO2, CH2O and SO2 are either actively assimilated or passively monitored. The MACC system is routinely evaluated with in-situ data from ground-based stations, ozone sondes and aircraft measurements, and with independent satellite retrievals. Global MACC reactive gases forecasts are used in the planning and analysis of large international field campaigns and to provide dynamical chemical boundary conditions to regional air quality models worldwide. Several case studies of outstanding air pollution events have been performed, and they demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of chemical data assimilation based on current satellite data products. Besides the regular analyses and forecasts of the tropospheric chemical composition, the MACC system is also used to monitor the evolution of stratospheric ozone. A comprehensive reanalysis simulation from 2003 to 2010 provides new insights into the interannual variability of the atmospheric chemical composition.

  6. Toxicity of Pyrolysis Gases from Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, Carlos J.; Kosola, Kay L.; Solis, Alida N.; Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Parker, John A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acryltonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions; carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  7. Splitting of inviscid fluxes for real gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Van Leer, Bram; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1988-01-01

    Flux-vector and flux-difference splittings for the inviscid terms of the compressible flow equations are derived under the assumption of a general equation of state for a real gas in equilibrium. No necessary assumptions, approximations or auxiliary quantities are introduced. The formulas derived include several particular cases known for ideal gases and readily apply to curvilinear coordinates. Applications of the formulas in a TVD algorithm to one-dimensional shock-tube and nozzle problems show their quality and robustness.

  8. Splitting of inviscid fluxes for real gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Van Leer, Bram; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1990-01-01

    Flux-vector and flux-difference splittings for the inviscid terms of the compressible flow equations are derived under the assumption of a general equation of state for a real gas in equilibrium. No necessary assumptions, approximations for auxiliary quantities are introduced. The formulas derived include several particular cases known for ideal gases and readily apply to curvilinear coordinates. Applications of the formulas in a TVD algorithm to one-dimensional shock-tube and nozzle problems show their quality and robustness.

  9. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...—General Specifications for Purified Gases 1 Constituent Purified air Purified N2 THC (C1-equivalent) ≤ 0....41) mol/mol, balance He or N2, and a stated total hydrocarbon concentration of 0.05 µmol/mol or less. For GC-FIDs that measure methane (CH4) using a FID fuel that is balance N2, perform the...

  10. Mass spectrometer for the analyses of gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J. R.; Rogers, E. R.

    1980-06-30

    A 6-in-radius, 60/sup 0/ magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (designated as the MS-200) has been constructed for the quantitative and qualitative analyses of fixed gases and volatile organics in the concentration range from 1 ppM (by volume) to 100%. A partial pressure of 1 x 10/sup -6/ torr in the inlet expansion volume is required to achieve a useful signal at an electron-multiplier gain of 10,000.

  11. The Osher scheme for real gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, Ambady; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1990-01-01

    An extension of Osher's approximate Riemann solver to include gases with an arbitrary equation of state is presented. By a judicious choice of thermodynamic variables, the Riemann invariats are reduced to quadratures which are then approximated numerically. The extension is rigorous and does not involve any further assumptions or approximations over the ideal gas case. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method.

  12. Noble Gases in the Chelyabinsk Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haba, Makiko K.; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke; Mikouchi, Takashi; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fell in Russia on February 15, 2013 and was classified as LL5 chondrite. The diameter before it entered the atmosphere has been estimated to be about 20 m [1]. Up to now, numerous fragments weighing much greater than 100 kg in total have been collected. In this study, all noble gases were measured for 13 fragments to investigate the exposure history of the Chelyabinsk meteorite and the thermal history of its parent asteroid.

  13. Thermodynamics of dilute gases in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Criado-Sancho, M.

    2001-03-01

    We consider the effect of shear and normal viscous pressures on the non-equilibrium entropy of ideal gases in Couette flow. These results extend the previous ones (Bidar et al., Physica A 233 (1996) 163), where normal pressure effects were ignored. Furthermore, we analyze the non-equilibrium contributions to the chemical potential, which may be useful in the analysis of shear-induced effects on colligative properties and chemical equilibrium.

  14. From unitary to uniform Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2014-05-01

    In this talk I will give an overview of our recent experiments on Bose gases in extreme interaction regimes. In one limit, we studied the stability of a unitary Bose gas, with strongest possible interactions allowed by quantum mechanics. In the other limit, we studied purely quantum-statistical ideal-gas phenomena, such as the quantum Joule-Thomson effect, by achieving Bose-Einstein condensation in a quasi-uniform potential of an optical-box trap.

  15. Microwave limb sounder. [measuring trace gases in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustincic, J. J. (inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Trace gases in the upper atmosphere can be measured by comparing spectral noise content of limb soundings with the spectral noise content of cold space. An offset Cassegrain antenna system and tiltable input mirror alternately look out at the limb and up at cold space at an elevation angle of about 22. The mirror can also be tilted to look at a black body calibration target. Reflection from the mirror is directed into a radiometer whose head functions as a diplexer to combine the input radiation and a local ocillator (klystron) beam. The radiometer head is comprised of a Fabry-Perot resonator consisting of two Fabry-Perot cavities spaced a number of half wavelengths apart. Incoming radiation received on one side is reflected and rotated 90 deg in polarization by the resonator so that it will be reflected by an input grid into a mixer, while the klystron beam received on the other side is also reflected and rotated 90 deg, but not without passing some energy to be reflected by the input grid into the mixer.

  16. Treatment of flue gas containing noxious gases

    SciTech Connect

    Dvirka, M.; Psihos, G.J.; Cosulich, J.J.

    1987-07-21

    A method is described of reducing the noxious gases such as chlorides including hydrogen chloride and chlorine from the flue gases derived from the incineration of solid waste materials in a furnace with a combustion chamber and a combustion zone to substantially reduce the formation of dioxins for a cleaner effluent gas to the atmosphere, comprising: introducing sodium bicarbonate into the flue gas of a furnace incinerating the waste materials, positioning introduction of sodium bicarbonate for at least one location along the path of the flue gas at a temperature below about 1564/sup 0/F but not below about 518/sup 0/F, heating the sodium bicarbonate in the flue gas for a time sufficient to drive off the water and carbon dioxide from the sodium bicarbonate, forming sodium carbonate particle during the heating of the sodium bicarbonate, the sodium carbonate having a higher porosity to produce a greater reaction area on the surface of the particles, contacting the porous sodium carbonate with chlorides in the flue gases for a sufficient time and temperature to react and produce sodium chloride and prevent their formation of dioxins; and separating the sodium chloride from the flue gas to produce a cleaner gas for exit to the atmosphere.

  17. Sulfur recovery from low hydrogen sulfide gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chute, A.E.

    1982-10-01

    Describes processes for recovering sulfur from acid gases containing less hydrogen sulfide than can be processed satisfactorily in a typical Claus sulfur recovery unit (as shown in diagram). One feature of the Recycle Selectox process is that the circulating gas acts like a flywheel to maintain steady operating conditions, even when the acid gas feed fluctuates. When the acid gas concentration falls below that which can be handled in a Claus or Selectox plant, direct conversion in a Stretford of similar process such as Unisulf is indicated. When the acid gases are weak in hydrogen sulfide, there are several considerations in conditioning the feed gas. Most of the hydrocarbons entering a Clause plant are oxidized to water and oxides of carbon. The weaker the acid gas feed, the greater is the advantage in using the Recycle Selectox process. Below 30%, the sulfur-burning Claus process can be applied. At 30% and lower, or even at higher concentrations, the Recycle Selectox or Selectox process offers a simpler yet effective means of converting and recovering sulfur. Concludes that simple modifications to the Claus process are adequate to convert hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur from reasonably prepared acid gases (CO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/S) having hydrogen sulfide concentrations as low as 30%.

  18. Learning the Critical Points for Addition in Matematika GASING

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siregar, Johannes Hamonangan; Wiyanti, Wiwik; Wakhyuningsih, Nur Safitri; Godjali, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We propose learning Matematika GASING to help students better understand the addition material. Matematika GASING is a way of learning mathematics in an easy, fun and enjoyable fashion. GASING is short for GAmpang, aSyIk, and menyenaNGkan (Bahasa Indonesia for easy, fun and enjoyable). It was originally developed by Prof. Yohanes Surya at the…

  19. 49 CFR 174.201 - Class 2 (gases) material cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. 174.201... RAIL Detailed Requirements for Class 2 (Gases) Materials 174.201 Class 2 (gases) material cylinders. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, cylinders containing Class 2...

  20. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become

  1. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  2. 46 CFR 194.20-17 - Compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... chemical storeroom. (b) Flammable compressed gases and oxygen shall be stowed in accordance with 49 CFR part 176, subpart H. (c) Compressed gas cylinders shall have valve protection in accordance with 49 CFR... Compressed gases. (a) Nonflammable compressed gases (excluding oxygen) may be securely stowed in...

  3. 49 CFR 173.307 - Exceptions for compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions for compressed gases. 173.307 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging 173.307 Exceptions for compressed gases. (a) The following materials are not subject to the requirements of this subchapter:...

  4. 49 CFR 173.307 - Exceptions for compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions for compressed gases. 173.307 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging 173.307 Exceptions for compressed gases. (a) The following materials are not subject to the requirements of this subchapter:...

  5. 40 CFR 600.108-08 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 600.108-08 Section... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Test Procedures 600.108-08 Analytical gases. The analytical gases for all fuel economy...

  6. 49 CFR 173.307 - Exceptions for compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exceptions for compressed gases. 173.307 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging 173.307 Exceptions for compressed gases. (a) The following materials are not subject to the requirements of this subchapter:...

  7. 40 CFR 600.108-08 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Analytical gases. 600.108-08 Section... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Test Procedures 600.108-08 Analytical gases. The analytical gases for all fuel economy...

  8. 49 CFR 173.307 - Exceptions for compressed gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exceptions for compressed gases. 173.307 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging 173.307 Exceptions for compressed gases. (a) The following materials are not subject to the requirements of this subchapter:...

  9. 40 CFR 600.108-08 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 600.108-08 Section... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Test Procedures 600.108-08 Analytical gases. The analytical gases for all fuel economy...

  10. 40 CFR 600.108-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 600.108-78 Section 600.108-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL... Model Year Automobiles-Test Procedures 600.108-78 Analytical gases. The analytical gases for all...

  11. 40 CFR 600.108-78 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 600.108-78 Section 600.108-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL... gases. The analytical gases for all fuel economy testing must meet the criteria given in 86.114...

  12. Experimental studies concerning the drying of voloxidizer off-gases

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, W.D.; Shah, A.H.; Kaiser, A.F.; McGee, J.C.

    1981-07-01

    The results of an experimental program conducted to aid in the design of a tritium retention system to remove tritiated water from voloxidizer off-gases are presented. The retention system is expected to be a fixed-bed adsorption unit using a commercially available desiccant, such as molecular sieves, to dry the off-gases. The presence of iodine in the off-gas stream somewhat complicates the drying process since some iodine will be retained in the drying bed along with the tritiated water. The present work represents a follow-up to a study in which a small-scale (2-in.-diam by 30-in.-long) packed column of Linde Molecular Sieves (LMS) type 3A was repeatedly loaded and regenerated using a non-radioactive simulated voloxidizer off-gas containing water and iodine vapor. Both water and iodine loadings were measured and the regeneration characteristics of the bed were observed. The following studies were carried out: (1) testing of other desiccants showed LMS type 3A to be superior because of its high water loading and low iodine retention; (2) development of a column-mounted moisture detector; (3) adsorption isotherms; (4) iodine analysis using a commercial oxidant monitor; (5) tests on cartridge-type beds - a series of tests were conducted using three small drying beds connected in series. One further finding of this study was the importance of the clay binder (used in pelletized molecular sieves) in obtaining satisfactory or acceptably low iodine retention.

  13. Mobile MAX-DOAS observations of tropospheric trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Ibrahim, O.; Shaiganfar, R.; Platt, U.

    2009-11-01

    From Multi-Axis- (MAX-) DOAS observations information on tropospheric trace gases close to the surface and up to the free troposphere can be obtained. Usually MAX-DOAS observations are performed at fixed locations, which allows to retrieve the diurnal variation of tropospheric species at that location. Alternatively, MAX-DOAS observations can also be made on mobile platforms like cars, ships or aircrafts. Then, in addition to the vertical (and temporal) distribution, also the horizontal variation of tropospheric trace gases can be measured. Such information is important for the quantitative comparison with model simulations, study of transport processes, and for the validation of tropospheric trace gas products from satellite observations. However, for MAX-DOAS observations from mobile platforms, the standard analysis techniques for MAX-DOAS observations can usually not be applied, because the probed airmasses can change rapidly between successive measurements. In this study we introduce a new technique which overcomes these problems and allows the exploitation of the full information content of mobile MAX-DOAS observations. Our method can also be applied to MAX-DOAS observations made at fixed locations in order to improve the accuracy especially in cases of strong winds. We apply the new technique to MAX-DOAS observations made during an automobile trip from Brussels to Heidelberg.

  14. Mobile MAX-DOAS observations of tropospheric trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Ibrahim, O.; Shaiganfar, R.; Platt, U.

    2010-02-01

    From Multi-Axis- (MAX-) DOAS observations, information on tropospheric trace gases close to the surface and up to the free troposphere can be obtained. Usually MAX-DOAS observations are performed at fixed locations, which allows to retrieve the diurnal variation of tropospheric species at that location. Alternatively, MAX-DOAS observations can also be made on mobile platforms like cars, ships or aircrafts. Then, in addition to the vertical (and temporal) distribution, also the horizontal variation of tropospheric trace gases can be measured. Such information is important for the quantitative comparison with model simulations, study of transport processes, and for the validation of tropospheric trace gas products from satellite observations. However, for MAX-DOAS observations from mobile platforms, the standard analysis techniques for MAX-DOAS observations can usually not be applied, because the probed airmasses can change rapidly between successive measurements. In this study we introduce a new technique which overcomes these problems and allows the exploitation of the full information content of mobile MAX-DOAS observations. Our method can also be applied to MAX-DOAS observations made at fixed locations in order to improve the accuracy especially in cases of strong winds. We apply the new technique to MAX-DOAS observations made during an automobile trip from Brussels to Heidelberg.

  15. Indoor exposures to fine aerosols and acid gases.

    PubMed Central

    Koutrakis, P; Brauer, M; Briggs, S L; Leaderer, B P

    1991-01-01

    Indoor exposures to aerosols and gases are associated with both indoor and outdoor air pollution sources. The identification of sources and the assessment of their relative contribution can be a complicated process due to a) the presence of numerous indoor sources, which can vary from building to building; b) the uncertainties associated with the estimation of the impact of outdoor sources on indoor air quality; c) the interactions between pollutants; and d) the importance of reactions between pollutants and indoor surfaces. It is well established that fine particles (diameter less than or equal to 2.5 microns) originating from outdoor sources such as automobiles, oil and coal combustion, incineration, and diverse industrial activities can penetrate into the indoor environment. Indoor/outdoor ratios, usually varying between 0.4 and 0.8, depend on parameters such as particle size and density, air exchange rate, and the surface-to-volume ratio of the indoor environment. Determining fine particle elemental composition makes it possible to identify the contribution of different outdoor sources. This paper focuses on the origin and the concentration of indoor aerosols and acid gases by highlighting the results from two indoor air quality studies. PMID:1821374

  16. Solubilities of nitrogen and noble gases in basalt melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazaki, A.; Hiyagon, H.; Sugiura, N.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen and noble gases are important tracers in geochemistry and chosmochemistry. Compared to noble gases, however, physicochemical properties of nitrogen, such as solubility in melt or melt/silicate partition, are not well known. Solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt depends on redox condition of the atmosphere. For example, solubility of nitrogen in E chondrite melt under reducing conditions is as high as 2 mol percent at 1500 C, suggesting that nitrogen is chemically dissolved in silicate melts, i.e., being dissolved as free anions or replacing oxygen sites in silicate network. However, the solubility and the dissolution mechanism of nitrogen under oxidizing conditions are not well investigated. To obtain nitrogen solubility in silicate melts under various redox conditions and to understand its mechanism, we are conducting experiments by using (15)N(15)N-labeled nitrogen gas. This makes it easy to distinguish dissolved nitrogen from later contamination of atmospheric nitrogen, and hence enables us to measure the nitrogen solubility accurately. As a preliminary experiment, we have measured solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt under the atmospheric oxygen pressure.

  17. Transonic flows of dense gases over finite wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinnella, P.

    2008-04-01

    Transonic inviscid flows of dense gases of the Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson (BZT) type over finite wings are numerically investigated. BZT gases are fluids of the retrograde type (i.e., that superheat when expanded), which exhibit a region of negative values of the fundamental derivative of gas dynamics ?. As a consequence, they display, in the transonic and supersonic regime, nonclassical gas dynamic behaviors, such as rarefaction shock waves and mixed shock/fan waves. The peculiar properties of BZT fluids have received increased interest in recent years because of their possible application in energy-conversion cycles. The present research aims at providing insight about the transonic aerodynamics of BZT fluids past finite wings, roughly representative of isolated turbine blades with infinite tip leakage. This represents an important step toward the design of advanced turbine blades by using organic working fluids. An investigation of the flow patterns and aerodynamic performance for several choices of the upstream thermodynamic conditions is provided, and the advantages of using BZT working fluids instead of classical ones are discussed.

  18. Degenerate quantum gases with spin-orbit coupling: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Hui

    2015-02-01

    This review focuses on recent developments in synthetic spin-orbit (SO) coupling in ultracold atomic gases. Two types of SO coupling are discussed. One is Raman process induced coupling between spin and motion along one of the spatial directions and the other is Rashba SO coupling. We emphasize their common features in both single-particle and two-body physics and the consequences of both in many-body physics. For instance, single particle ground state degeneracy leads to novel features of superfluidity and a richer phase diagram; increased low-energy density-of-state enhances interaction effects; the absence of Galilean invariance and spin-momentum locking gives rise to intriguing behaviours of superfluid critical velocity and novel quantum dynamics; and the mixing of two-body singlet and triplet states yields a novel fermion pairing structure and topological superfluids. With these examples, we show that investigating SO coupling in cold atom systems can, enrich our understanding of basic phenomena such as superfluidity, provide a good platform for simulating condensed matter states such as topological superfluids and more importantly, result in novel quantum systems such as SO coupled unitary Fermi gas and high spin quantum gases. Finally we also point out major challenges and some possible future directions. PMID:25640665

  19. Seeded optical breakdown of molecular and noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Polynkin, Pavel; Scheller, Maik; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2012-07-30

    We report experimental results on the dual laser-pulse plasma excitation in various gases at atmospheric pressure. Dilute plasma channels generated through filamentation of ultraintense femtosecond laser pulses in air, argon, and helium are densified through the application of multi-Joule nanosecond heater pulses. Optical breakdown in atomic gases can be achieved for considerably longer delays between femtosecond and nanosecond pulses compared to that in molecular gases. The densification of the seed channel in molecular gases is always accompanied by its fragmentation into discrete bubbles, while in atomic gases the densified channel remains smooth and continuous.

  20. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

  1. [Research advances in microbial ecology of biofilter and biotrickling filter for waste gases treatment].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Xu; Ding, Ying; Han, Zhi-Ying; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2007-09-01

    Waste gases biofiltration is an emerging technology, and has played important roles in air pollution control. In this paper, the structure of biofilter and biotrickling filter and their mechanisms in air pollution removal were introduced, with focus on the research advances in the isolation and identification of microbes in the filters, correlations between microbial abundance, activity and community diversity, influences of operation conditions on microbial community, spatiotemporal change patterns of microbial community structure during operation, development of biofilm, and biodegrading dynamic models. The research perspectives in microbial ecology during biofiltration of waste gases were discussed. PMID:18062325

  2. Photosensitive dopants for liquid noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F. (Wheaton, IL)

    1988-01-01

    In an ionization type detector for high energy radiation wherein the energy of incident radiation is absorbed through the ionization of a liquid noble gas and resulting free charge is collected to form a signal indicative of the energy of the incident radiation, an improvement comprising doping the liquid noble gas with photosensitive molecules to convert scintillation light due to recombination of ions, to additional free charge.

  3. Energy Relaxation of Helium Atoms in Astrophysical Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V.; Zhang, P.

    2012-09-01

    We report accurate parameters describing energy relaxation of He atoms in atomic gases, important for astrophysics and atmospheric science. Collisional energy exchange between helium atoms and atomic constituents of the interstellar gas, heliosphere, and upper planetary atmosphere has been investigated. Energy transfer rates, number of collisions required for thermalization, energy distributions of recoil atoms, and other major parameters of energy relaxation for fast He atoms in thermal H, He, and O gases have been computed in a broad interval of energies from 10 meV to 10 keV. This energy interval is important for astrophysical applications involving the energy deposition of energetic atoms and ions into atmospheres of planets and exoplanets, atmospheric evolution, and analysis of non-equilibrium processes in the interstellar gas and heliosphere. Angular- and energy-dependent cross sections, required for an accurate description of the momentum-energy transfer, are obtained using ab initio interaction potentials and quantum mechanical calculations for scattering processes. Calculation methods used include partial wave analysis for collisional energies below 2 keV and the eikonal approximation at energies higher than 100 eV, keeping a significant energy region of overlap, 0.1-2 keV, between these two methods for their mutual verification. The partial wave method and the eikonal approximation excellently match results obtained with each other as well as experimental data, providing reliable cross sections in the astrophysically important interval of energies from 10 meV to 10 keV. Analytical formulae, interpolating obtained energy- and angular-dependent cross sections, are presented to simplify potential applications of the reported database. Thermalization of fast He atoms in the interstellar gas and energy relaxation of hot He and O atoms in the upper atmosphere of Mars are considered as illustrative examples of potential applications of the new database.

  4. MEMS analyzer for fast determination of mixed gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Weiss, Alexander; Stock, Volker; Throl, Oliver; Grhlert, Wulf; Kaskel, Stefan; Schreck, Holger; Gessner, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative determination of gas compositions are important for operation and control of different industrial processes, e.g. in thermo process line operations. Changing gas conditions are affecting such processes significantly. Thus direct measurement of these gases enables adjustment of variable gas composition very fast and precisely and can improve process and product quality. Traditional analyzers, designed primarily for laboratory use, are too large, too delicate, and too costly to deploy. Cost efficient devices can however measure individual parameters (e.g. IR absorption at a specific wavelength, heat conductivity etc.) of gases and compositions can be derived directly by calculating it online. To bridge the gap between these traditional and expensive gas analyzers and favorable, cost-effective gas measurements, we have developed a low cost MEMS-based gas analyzer system. By using near infrared spectroscopy, individual components of the mixed gas can be determined quantitatively. Also disadvantages of existing cost-effective systems like selectivity, sensitivity and measurement time is avoided. Requirements of a suitable system are precise determination and adoption of the overall optical system as well as a high wavelength stability, which represents one important condition for exact chemometric evaluation. Likewise a robust and exact spectral evaluation procedure is important. Other challenges are MEMS design and packaging as well as optimization of insensitivity against vibrations and thermal stress. In this paper, the application of MEMS analyzer in gas measuring is described and above mentioned challenges will be discussed. To demonstrate the performance of the whole system, measurement results of gas mixtures will be shown.

  5. ENERGY RELAXATION OF HELIUM ATOMS IN ASTROPHYSICAL GASES

    SciTech Connect

    Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V.; Zhang, P.

    2012-09-01

    We report accurate parameters describing energy relaxation of He atoms in atomic gases, important for astrophysics and atmospheric science. Collisional energy exchange between helium atoms and atomic constituents of the interstellar gas, heliosphere, and upper planetary atmosphere has been investigated. Energy transfer rates, number of collisions required for thermalization, energy distributions of recoil atoms, and other major parameters of energy relaxation for fast He atoms in thermal H, He, and O gases have been computed in a broad interval of energies from 10 meV to 10 keV. This energy interval is important for astrophysical applications involving the energy deposition of energetic atoms and ions into atmospheres of planets and exoplanets, atmospheric evolution, and analysis of non-equilibrium processes in the interstellar gas and heliosphere. Angular- and energy-dependent cross sections, required for an accurate description of the momentum-energy transfer, are obtained using ab initio interaction potentials and quantum mechanical calculations for scattering processes. Calculation methods used include partial wave analysis for collisional energies below 2 keV and the eikonal approximation at energies higher than 100 eV, keeping a significant energy region of overlap, 0.1-2 keV, between these two methods for their mutual verification. The partial wave method and the eikonal approximation excellently match results obtained with each other as well as experimental data, providing reliable cross sections in the astrophysically important interval of energies from 10 meV to 10 keV. Analytical formulae, interpolating obtained energy- and angular-dependent cross sections, are presented to simplify potential applications of the reported database. Thermalization of fast He atoms in the interstellar gas and energy relaxation of hot He and O atoms in the upper atmosphere of Mars are considered as illustrative examples of potential applications of the new database.

  6. The state of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere using global observations through 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasova, Oksana; Koide, Hiroshi; Dlugokencky, Edward; Montzka, Stephen A.; Butler, James H.

    2014-05-01

    The Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) provides a framework for global observations and assessment of the state and development of atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases. It puts stringent requirements on the quality of the observations. These requirements are reviewed by the greenhouse gas science and measurement community at biennial WMO/IAEA Meetings on Carbon Dioxide, Other Greenhouse Gases, and Related Tracer Measurement Techniques. The 17th meeting was held in Beijing, China, on 10 - 14 June 2013 (http://ggmt-2013.cma.gov.cn/dct/page/1). Results of global analysis of the observational data are reported annually in the WMO/GAW Annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin. Bulletin No. 9 represents an update of the results for the year 2012 (extended version is available at http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ghg/ghg9-en-online.html). The cover story of this bulletin presents the attribution of methane sources in the context of the renewed growth of the global average methane mole fraction in 2007. The bulletin is prepared by the WMO/GAW Scientific Advisory Group for Greenhouse Gases (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/www/CBS/Lists_WorkGroups/CAS/opag-epac/gaw%20sag%20ghg) in collaboration with the World Data Center for Greenhouse Gases. Observations used for global analysis are collected at more than 100 marine and terrestrial sites worldwide for CO2 and CH4 and at a smaller number of sites for other greenhouse gases. Globally averaged dry-air mole fractions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) derived from this network reached new highs in 2012, with CO2 at 393.10.1 ppm, CH4 at 18191 ppb and N2O at 325.10.1 ppb. These values constitute 141%, 260% and 120% of pre-industrial (before 1750) levels, respectively. The increase of the annual mean CO2 mole fraction from 2011 to 2012 amounted to 2.2 ppm, which is greater than the average growth rate for the 1990s (~1.5 ppm yr-1) and for the past decade (~2.0 ppm yr-1). The globally averaged CH4 mole fraction increased by 6 ppb from 2011 to 2012. The growth rate of CH4 decreased from ~13 ppb yr-1 during the early 1980s to near zero during 1999-2006. Since 2007, atmospheric CH4 has been increasing again, averaging ~5 ppb yr-1. The growth rate of N2O in 2012 was 0.9 ppb yr-1, which is greater than the average growth rate over the last 10 years (0.75 ppb yr-1). The NOAA Annual Greenhouse Gas Index (AGGI) has been defined as the ratio of total radiative forcing due to long-lived greenhouse gases for any year for which adequate global measurements exist to that which was present in 1990. The AGGI in 2012 was 1.32 (corresponding to 2.87 W m-2 of global radiative forcing, relative to 1750, of all long-lived greenhouse gases). The AGGI indicates an increase in radiative forcing by all long-lived greenhouse gases of 32% since 1990 and of 1.2% from 2011 to 2012, while the radiative forcing by all long-lived greenhouse gases in 2012 corresponded to a CO2-equivalent mole fraction of 475.6 ppm (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/aggi).

  7. On the evaluation of halocarbon radiative forcing and global warming potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.S.; Solomon, S.; Albritton, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Net global warming potentials and instantaneous radiative forcing values that include the cooling from halocarbon-induced ozone destruction have been calculated for 14 of the most significant halocarbons. These calculations were performed by incorporating knowledge of direct global warming potentials with an evaluation of the relationship between tropospheric cooling from stratospheric ozone loss and tropospheric halocarbon mixing ratios. The indirect cooling effect is strongly dependent upon the effectiveness of each halocarbon for ozone destruction. Strong net cooling is ascribed to additions of bromocarbon gases, while methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride are more nearly climate-neutral, and the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) display strong net warming. Consideration of indirect cooling also has important implications for the expected future net halocarbon forcing of the climate system: in the next 20 years, halocarbon radiative forcing is not predicted to decrease as mixing ratios of strongly ozone-depleting gases decline because of faster decreases in radiative cooling than in radiative warming. Furthermore, continuing production of HFCs as substitutes for CFCs could result in sharply increasing halocarbon radiative heating in the latter part of the 21st century because of the increasing atmospheric burden of these compounds.

  8. 1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change on trace gases and the biosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, J.A.; Moore, B. III

    1998-07-01

    This proposal seeks multi-agency funding to conduct an international, multidisciplinary 1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change to take place from August 7 through 21, 1988, on the topic: Trace Gases and the Biosphere. The institute, to be held in Snowmass, Colorado, is envisioned as a pilot version of a continuing series of institutes on Global Change (IGC). This proposal seeks support for the 1988 pilot institute only. The concept and structure for the continuing series, and the definition of the 1988 pilot institute, were developed at an intensive and multidisciplinary Summer Institute Planning Meeting in Boulder, Colorado, on August 24--25, 1987. The theme for the 1988 PIGC, Trace Gases and the Biosphere, will focus a concerted, high-level multidisciplinary effort on a scientific problem central to the Global Change Program. Dramatic year-to-year increases in the global concentrations of radiatively-active trace gases such as methane and carbon dioxide are now well documented. The predicted climatic effects of these changes lend special urgency to efforts to study the biospheric sources and sinks of these gases and to clarify their interactions and role in the geosphere-biosphere system.

  9. A Ni-Doped Carbon Nanotube Sensor for Detecting Oil-Dissolved Gases in Transformers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoxing; Wu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Ziqiang; Zhang, Jinbin

    2015-01-01

    C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 are important oil-dissolved gases in power transformers. Detection of the composition and content of oil-dissolved gases in transformers is very significant in the diagnosis and assessment of the state of transformer operations. The commonly used oil-gas analysis methods have many disadvantages, so this paper proposes a Ni-doped carbon nanotube (Ni-CNT) gas sensor to effectively detect oil-dissolved gases in a transformer. The gas-sensing properties of the sensor to C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 were studied using the test device. Based on the density functional theory (DFT) the adsorption behaviors of the three gases on intrinsic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and Ni-CNTs were calculated. The adsorption energy, charge transfer, and molecular frontier orbital of the adsorption system were also analyzed. Results showed that the sensitivity of the CNT sensor to the three kinds of gases was in the following order: C2H2 > C2H4 > C2H6. Moreover, the doped Ni improved the sensor response, and the sensor response and gas concentration have a good linear relationship. PMID:26066989

  10. What are functional ionic liquids for the absorption of acidic gases?

    PubMed

    Ren, Shuhang; Hou, Yucui; Tian, Shidong; Chen, Xiumei; Wu, Weize

    2013-02-28

    As a kind of novel and efficient material, ionic liquids (ILs) are used for capture of acidic gases including SO2 and CO2 from flue gas. Due to very low content of acidic gases in flue gas, it is important to find functional ILs to absorb the acidic gases. However, up to now, there is no criterion to distinguish if the ILs are functional or not before use, which greatly influences the design of functional ILs. In this work, a series of ILs were synthesized and used to determine functional or normal ILs for the capture of acidic gases. It has been found that the pKa of organic acids forming the anion of ILs can be used to differentiate functional ILs from normal ILs for the capture of acidic gases from flue gas. If the pKa of an organic acid is larger than that of sulfurous acid (or carbonic acid), the ILs formed by the organic acid can be called functional ILs for SO2 (or CO2) capture, and it can have a high absorption capacity of SO2 (or CO2) with low SO2 (or CO2) concentrations. If not, the IL is just a normal IL. The pKa of organic acids can also be used to explain the absorption mechanism and guide the synthesis of functional ILs. PMID:23360403

  11. A Ni-Doped Carbon Nanotube Sensor for Detecting Oil-Dissolved Gases in Transformers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoxing; Wu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Ziqiang; Zhang, Jinbin

    2015-01-01

    C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 are important oil-dissolved gases in power transformers. Detection of the composition and content of oil-dissolved gases in transformers is very significant in the diagnosis and assessment of the state of transformer operations. The commonly used oil-gas analysis methods have many disadvantages, so this paper proposes a Ni-doped carbon nanotube (Ni-CNT) gas sensor to effectively detect oil-dissolved gases in a transformer. The gas-sensing properties of the sensor to C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 were studied using the test device. Based on the density functional theory (DFT) the adsorption behaviors of the three gases on intrinsic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and Ni-CNTs were calculated. The adsorption energy, charge transfer, and molecular frontier orbital of the adsorption system were also analyzed. Results showed that the sensitivity of the CNT sensor to the three kinds of gases was in the following order: C2H2 > C2H4 > C2H6. Moreover, the doped Ni improved the sensor response, and the sensor response and gas concentration have a good linear relationship. PMID:26066989

  12. What Can Ultracold Fermi Gases Teach Us About High Tc Superconductors and Vice Versa?

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Kathryn

    2007-01-10

    Studies of superfluidity in ultracold trapped Fermi gases are attracting physicists from a wide range of sub-disciplines including nuclear, condensed matter and particle physics. The excitement in the field is due, in large part, to the remarkable tuneability of these Fermi gases. One can tune the attractive interaction strength continuously from weak to strong (thereby effecting a transition from a BCS to Bose Einstein condensed (BEC) superfluid). One can introduce polarization into the gases at will, which may lead to long-sought-after, but not yet confirmed, exotic superfluid phases. In this talk we discuss the relevance of the cold Fermi gases to other physics subdisciplines. We then summarize how BCS-BEC crossover in the ultracold gases connects with a particularly important topic in condensed matter: high temperature superconductivity. We emphasize some striking similarities relating to the very unusual normal or 'pseudogap' phase of each of the two systems. In the process we give a summary of some of the latest exciting experimental developments in the two fields.

  13. Residual Gases in Crystal Growth Systems: Their Origin, Magnitude, and Dependence on the Processing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Residual gases present in closed ampoules may affect different crystal growth processes. Their presence may affect techniques requiring low pressures and affect the crystal quality in different ways. For that reason a good understanding and control of formation of residual gases may be important for an optimum design and meaningful interpretation of crystal growth experiments. Our extensive experimental and theoretical study includes degassing of silica glass and generation of gases from various source materials. Different materials processing conditions, like outgassing under vacuum, annealing in hydrogen, resublimation, different material preparation procedures, multiple annealings, different processing times, and others were applied and their effect on the amount and composition of gas were analyzed. The experimental results were interpreted based on theoretical calculations on diffusion in silica glass and source materials and thermochemistry of the system. Procedures for a reduction of the amount of gas are also discussed.

  14. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... previous continue Common Side Effects of Radiation (continued) Hair Loss Radiation therapy to the head and neck may cause hair thinning or hair loss shortly after treatment begins. It's important to remember, ...

  15. Numerical study of radiation effect on the municipal solid waste combustion characteristics inside an incinerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingfu; Xue, Yanqing; Zhang, Xinxin; Shu, Xinran

    2015-10-01

    Due to its advantages of high degree volume reduction, relatively stable residue, and energy reclamation, incineration becomes one of the best choices for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal. However, detailed measurements of temperature and gas species inside a furnace are difficulty by conventional experimental techniques. Therefore, numerical simulation of MSW incineration in the packed bed and gas flow field was applied. In this work, a three dimensional (3-D) model of incinerator system, including flow, heat transfer, detailed chemical mechanisms, and non-gray gas models, was developed. Radiation from the furnace wall and the flame formed above the bed is of importance for drying and igniting the waste. The preheated air with high temperature is used for the MSW combustion. Under the conditions of high temperature and high pressure, MSW combustion produces a variety of radiating gases. The wavelength-depend radiative properties of flame adopted in non-gray radiation model were obtained from a statistical narrow-band model. The influence of radiative heat transfer on temperature, flow field is researched by adiabatic model (without considering radiation), gray radiation model, and non-gray radiation model. The simulation results show that taking into account the non-gray radiation is essential. PMID:26233882

  16. Sensory Detection and Responses to Toxic Gases

    PubMed Central

    Bessac, Bret F.; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    The inhalation of reactive gases and vapors can lead to severe damage of the airways and lung, compromising the function of the respiratory system. Exposures to oxidizing, electrophilic, acidic, or basic gases frequently occur in occupational and ambient environments. Corrosive gases and vapors such as chlorine, phosgene, and chloropicrin were used as warfare agents and in terrorist acts. Chemical airway exposures are detected by the olfactory, gustatory, and nociceptive sensory systems that initiate protective physiological and behavioral responses. This review focuses on the role of airway nociceptive sensory neurons in chemical sensing and discusses the recent discovery of neuronal receptors for reactive chemicals. Using physiological, imaging, and genetic approaches, Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels in sensory neurons were shown to respond to a wide range of noxious chemical stimuli, initiating pain, respiratory depression, cough, glandular secretions, and other protective responses. TRPA1, a TRP ion channel expressed in chemosensory C-fibers, is activated by almost all oxidizing and electrophilic chemicals, including chlorine, acrolein, tear gas agents, and methyl isocyanate, the highly noxious chemical released in the Bhopal disaster. Chemicals likely activate TRPA1 through covalent protein modification. Animal studies using TRPA1 antagonists or TRPA1-deficient mice confirmed the role of TRPA1 in chemically induced respiratory reflexes, pain, and inflammation in vivo. New research shows that sensory neurons are not merely passive sensors of chemical exposures. Sensory channels such as TRPA1 are essential for maintenance of airway inflammation in asthma and may contribute to the progression of airway injury following high-level chemical exposures. PMID:20601631

  17. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L?V), and liquid-commensurate (L?CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L?V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  18. Preserving noble gases in a convecting mantle.

    PubMed

    Gonnermann, Helge M; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    2009-05-28

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios sampled at many ocean islands are usually attributed to an essentially undegassed lower-mantle reservoir with high (3)He concentrations. A large and mostly undegassed mantle reservoir is also required to balance the Earth's (40)Ar budget, because only half of the (40)Ar produced from the radioactive decay of (40)K is accounted for by the atmosphere and upper mantle. However, geophysical and geochemical observations suggest slab subduction into the lower mantle, implying that most or all of Earth's mantle should have been processed by partial melting beneath mid-ocean ridges and hotspot volcanoes. This should have left noble gases in both the upper and the lower mantle extensively outgassed, contrary to expectations from (3)He/(4)He ratios and the Earth's (40)Ar budget. Here we suggest a simple solution: recycling and mixing of noble-gas-depleted slabs dilutes the concentrations of noble gases in the mantle, thereby decreasing the rate of mantle degassing and leaving significant amounts of noble gases in the processed mantle. As a result, even when the mass flux across the 660-km seismic discontinuity is equivalent to approximately one lower-mantle mass over the Earth's history, high (3)He contents, high (3)He/(4)He ratios and (40)Ar concentrations high enough to satisfy the (40)Ar mass balance of the Earth can be preserved in the lower mantle. The differences in (3)He/(4)He ratios between mid-ocean-ridge basalts and ocean island basalts, as well as high concentrations of (3)He and (40)Ar in the mantle source of ocean island basalts, can be explained within the framework of different processing rates for the upper and the lower mantle. Hence, to preserve primitive noble gas signatures, we find no need for hidden reservoirs or convective isolation of the lower mantle for any length of time. PMID:19478782

  19. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  20. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  1. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  2. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  3. 40 CFR 70.12 - Enforceable commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). 70.12 Section 70.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... commitments for further actions addressing greenhouse gases (GHGs). (a) Definitions. (1) Greenhouse Gases... six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons,...

  4. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region. PMID:26729101

  5. Collisions and Reactions in Ultracold Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, N.; Hazra, Jisha

    2015-06-01

    Cooling, trapping, and manipulating molecules at temperatures close to absolute zero have become a fertile area of research in recent years, thanks to the highly quantum nature of their interactions and the prospects of controlling the interactions using external electric and magnetic fields. The possibility of observing chemical reactions at the pure quantum level in these systems has led to breakthrough experiments that allow investigation of chemical reactions at the single partial wave level. Here, we highlight recent progress in theoretical investigations of barrierless chemical reactions in ultracold gases and discuss the promise, opportunities, and challenges that these systems present.

  6. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Schneider, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of polytetrafluoroethylene was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using various test conditions of the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Time to death appears to be affected by the material of which the pyrolysis tube is made, with Monel tending to give longer times to death than quartz. When quartz tubes are used, time to death seems to be related to carbon monoxide concentration. When Monel tubes are used, carbon monoxide does not appear to be the principal toxicant.

  7. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from wood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Huttlinger, N. V.; Oneill, B. A.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from nine wood samples was investigated. The samples of hardwoods were aspen poplar, beech, yellow birch, and red oak. The samples of softwoods were western red cedar, Douglas fir, western hemlock, eastern white pine, and southern yellow pine. There was no significant difference between the wood samples under rising temperature conditions, which are intended to simulate a developing fire, or under fixed temperature conditions, which are intended to simulate a fully developed fire. This test method is used to determine whether a material is significantly more toxic than wood under the preflashover conditions of a developing fire.

  8. Catalytic Generation of Lift Gases for Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Berggren, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A lift-gas cracker (LGC) is an apparatus that generates a low-molecular-weight gas (mostly hydrogen with smaller amounts of carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide) at low gauge pressure by methanol reforming. LGCs are undergoing development for use as sources of buoyant gases for filling zero-gauge-pressure meteorological and scientific balloons in remote locations where heavy, high-pressure helium cylinders are not readily available. LGCs could also be used aboard large, zero-gauge-pressure, stratospheric research balloons to extend the duration of flight.

  9. Interactive Instruction on Ideal and ``Real'' Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringlein, James

    2004-02-01

    This article explores efforts to use simulation software in conjunction with peer instruction techniques toward improving student comprehension of particle interactions in ideal and "real" gases. A series of Interactive Physics simulations builds group student inquiry from small-scale ideal gas cases through larger, more realistic particle simulations. The mathematics associated with the simulations is intentionally minimized in order to focus student attention on conceptual understanding. References are made to other efforts in this educational direction, both in terms of rationale and applications. A website is cited in the Notes section containing both movie versions of the simulations, and includes the files available for download by IP users.

  10. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region. PMID:26729101

  11. Thermalization of atomic particles in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Volpyas, V. A. Kozyrev, A. B.

    2011-07-15

    A model of the atomic particle thermalization process due to scattering in various gases with application of the Born-Mayer potential is presented. The thermalization process of atomic particles using the statistical modeling method is considered. Our thermalization model is adapted to a wide class of atomic collision partners, takes into account the real energy and angular distributions of atomic particle sources, and makes it possible to calculate the parameters of the spatial zone of their thermalization and transfer into the diffusion motion mode. The energy range of applicability for the atomic particle thermalization model is interesting for many applied problems in plasma physics, gas discharge, and ion plating processes.

  12. Far-infrared measurements of trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolt, I. G.; Radostitz, J. V.

    1980-01-01

    A better detector system was developed for far infrared spectroscopy by usng cryogenic technology to cool bolometric detectors to approximately 0.4K. Technical assistance was provided to two submillimeter infrared balloon experiment (SIBEX) flights which demonstrated the diagnostic capability of far IR emission spectroscopy. It is estimated that more than a hundred spectral emission features were detected which are not due to the main emitting gases O3, O2, and H2O. The trace species sources for many features still remain unidentified and the spectra obtained during the SIBEX flights present a new source of information on stratospheric composition.

  13. Apparatus Measures Permeation Of Gases Through Coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Steven J.; Morrow, Jim T.; David, Carey E.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus measures permeation of any variety of commercially available pure or mixed gases through polymeric or other material coupons of various thicknesses. Permeability measured at wide range of temperatures and pressures. Includes residual-gas-analyzer (RGA) sensor head and associated circuitry, and vacuum system. Also includes manifold with valves, through which gas of interest allowed to permeate through test coupon before traveling downstream to evacuated RGA sensor head. Temperature of test coupon monitored by thermocouple and maintained at specified value above ambient by use of electrical heating mantle or below ambient by use of bath of ethylene glycol, water, and dry ice.

  14. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M. (Santa Fe, NM); Maier, II, William B. (Los Alamos, NM); Holland, Redus F. (Los Alamos, NM); Beattie, Willard H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (.about.2 ppm) present in commercial Xe and ppm levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  15. Optical remote measurement of toxic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Kagann, R. H.; McClenny, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 has resulted in increased ambient air monitoring needs for industry, some of which may be met efficiently using open-path optical remote sensing techniques. These techniques include Fourier transform spectroscopy, differential optical absorption spectroscopy, laser long-path absorption, differential absorption lidar, and gas cell correlation spectroscopy. With this regulatory impetus, it is an opportune time to consider applying these technologies to the remote and/or path-averaged measurement and monitoring of toxic gases covered by the CAAA. This article reviews the optical remote sensing technology and literature for that application.

  16. Traveling dark solitons in superfluid Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Renyuan; Brand, Joachim

    2011-04-15

    Families of dark solitons exist in superfluid Fermi gases. The energy-velocity dispersion and number of depleted particles completely determine the dynamics of dark solitons on a slowly varying background density. For the unitary Fermi gas, we determine these relations from general scaling arguments and conservation of local particle number. We find solitons to oscillate sinusoidally at the trap frequency reduced by a factor of 1/{radical}(3). Numerical integration of the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation determines spatial profiles and soliton-dispersion relations across the BEC-BCS crossover, and proves consistent with the scaling relations at unitarity.

  17. Radio-Frequency Spectroscopy of strongly interacting Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirotzek, Andre; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Sommer, Ariel; Zwierlein, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Strongly interacting Fermi gases exhibit a rich phase diagram in the BEC-BCS crossover. In recent experiments we have used radio frequency spectroscopy to probe two physically very different regimes: 1.) We have observed Spin-Polarons in a highly imbalanced Fermi mixture. A single spin down atom immersed in a spin up Fermi sea dresses itself with a cloud of majority atoms, thus forming a Spin-Polaron. rf spectroscopy can directly reveal the polaron and allows for an experimental measure of the quasiparticle residue Z and the chemical potential ? of this Fermi liquid. At a critical interaction strength, the transition to two-particle molecular binding is observed. 2.) rf spectroscopy of quasiparticles in a polarized superfluid allowed us to determine the superfluid gap ? and has demonstrated the importance of the Hartree energy U in rf spectra [1]. [1] Andre Schirotzek, Yong-il Shin, Christian H. Schunck and Wolfgang Ketterle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 140403 (2008)

  18. Spin-imbalanced quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gases.

    PubMed

    Ong, W; Cheng, Chingyun; Arakelyan, I; Thomas, J E

    2015-03-20

    We measure the density profiles for a Fermi gas of (6)Li containing N(1) spin-up atoms and N(2) spin-down atoms, confined in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry. The spatial profiles are measured as a function of spin imbalance N(2)/N(1) and interaction strength, which is controlled by means of a collisional (Feshbach) resonance. The measured cloud radii and central densities are in disagreement with mean-field Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory for a true two-dimensional system. We find that the data for normal-fluid mixtures are reasonably well fit by a simple two-dimensional polaron model of the free energy. Not predicted by the model is a phase transition to a spin-balanced central core, which is observed above a critical value of N(2)/N(1). Our observations provide important benchmarks for predictions of the phase structure of quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gases. PMID:25839246

  19. Spectral investigations of photoionized plasmas induced in atomic and molecular gases using nanosecond extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Wachulak, P.

    2014-07-15

    In this paper, results of spectral investigations of low temperature photoionized plasmas, created by irradiation of gases with intense pulses of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from a laser-produced plasma (LPP) source, are presented. The LPP source was based on a double-stream KrXe/He gas-puff target irradiated with 4 ns/0.8 J/10 Hz Nd:YAG laser pulses. The most intense emission from the source spanned a relatively narrow spectral region λ ≈ 10–12 nm; however, spectrally integrated intensity at longer wavelengths was also significant. The EUV beam was focused on a gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV pulses. Irradiation of gases resulted in formation of photoionized plasmas emitting radiation in the EUV range. Radiation spectra, measured for plasmas produced in various gases, are dominated by emission lines, originating from single charged ions. Significant differences in spectral intensities and distributions between plasmas created in neon and molecular gases were observed.

  20. Distribution and origin of dissolved gases of groundwaters at Las Caadas aquifer, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, R.; Melian, G.; Padron, E.; Sortino, F.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Lopez, D. L.; Perez, N.

    2009-12-01

    Volcanic aquifers commonly trap an important fraction of the main soluble components of fluids released from volcanic-hydrothermal system (CO2, SO2, H2S, HCl, HF, etc.). In particular, the interactions between volcanic gases and volcanic aquifers have been studied through hydrogeochemical parameters, as major and minor ions contents and dissolved gases in groundwaters. In the context of hydrogeochemical studies applied to active volcanic areas, studies of dissolved gases species in groundwater could be a useful tool to better understand the subsurface processes as gas-water-rock interaction or to strengthen the geochemical seismic-volcanic surveillance programs. In this work, we report the results of the geochemical characterization of dissolved gases (N2, O2, Ar, CO2, CH4, CO, H2, He, 222Rn, ?13CTDIC) in 96 groundwater samples from Las Caadas aquifer (around Teide volcano) between May and October, 2006. The main aims of this work are: (1) to determine the background level of magmatic gas input in the aquifer during quiescent periods, (2) to better define the origin of dissolved gases in Las Caadas aquifer, specially CO2, (3) to evaluate the gas-water-rock interaction processes occurring at depth, and (4) to delineate high permeable pathway of upward migration of volcanic-hydrothermal gases. In general, the dissolved gas phase in groundwaters of Las Caadas aquifer is relatively enriched in endogenous gases (CO2, He and H2) while it is relatively depleted in atmospheric gases (N2, O2 and Ar). N2-O2-CO2 triangular diagram shows that dissolved gases in most of analyzed groundwater are variable mixtures of CO2-rich fluids from the volcanic-hydrothermal system (as represent the Teide fumaroles) with dissolved air. The relatively high N2/O2 ratio in some groundwater compared to the air saturated water suggests an O2 consumption during gas-water-rock interactions occurring at depth. Spatial distribution maps show anomalous concentration of 222Rn CH4, H2 and CO2 dissolved in groundwater at the westernmost area of Las Caadas aquifer, which is in good spatial correlation with geophysical and geochemical anomalies related to 2004-2005 seismic-volcanic unrest at Tenerife Island. Determinations of ?13C values in the total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) in groundwater in Las Caadas aquifer ranging from -5 to +5 ( vs PDB). This result was explained by isotopic fractionation of either volcanic-hydrothermal CO2 partially dissolved in groundwater or due to precipitation of CaCO3 and CO2 degassing related to silicate hydrolysis dissolving Ca2+.

  1. Uptake of Ambient Organic Gases to Acidic Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.

    2009-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere has been an area of significant interest due to its climatic relevance, its effects on air quality and human health. Due largely to the underestimation of SOA by regional and global models, there has been an increasing number of studies focusing on alternate pathways leading to SOA. In this regard, recent work has shown that heterogeneous and liquid phase reactions, often leading to oligomeric material, may be a route to SOA via products of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Although oligomer formation in chamber studies has been frequently observed, the applicability of these experiments to ambient conditions, and thus the overall importance of oligomerization reactions remain unclear. In the present study, ambient air is drawn into a Teflon smog chamber and exposed to acidic sulfate aerosols which have been formed in situ via the reaction of SO3 with water vapor. The aerosol composition is measured with a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), and particle size distributions are monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The use of ambient air and relatively low inorganic particle loading potentially provides clearer insight into the importance of heterogeneous reactions. Results of experiments, with a range of sulfate loadings show that there are several competing processes occurring on different timescales. A significant uptake of ambient organic gases to the particles is observed immediately followed by a slow shift towards higher m/z over a period of several hours indicating that higher molecular weight products (possibly oligomers) are being formed through a reactive process. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions can occur with ambient organic gases, even in the presence of ammonia, which may have significant implications to the ambient atmosphere where particles may be neutralized after their formation.

  2. Solubility calculations for acid gases in amine blends

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, T.

    1985-01-01

    Treating with alkanolamines is often used to sweeten gases containing only a few parts per million of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S. Primary amines such as monoethanolamine (MEA) have great affinity for acid gases and are able to produce high purity sweet gas; on the other hand, tertiary amines like methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) have large capacity and are easy to regenerate but, because they do not bind chemically with CO/sub 2/, they are unable to produce a sweetened gas low in this component. Recently, the use of amine blends has become a subject of potentially great commercial importance. Since, the range of possible amines and blend formulations is large, a method for predicting equilibrium solubility is needed. A rigorous thermodynamic model has been developed which uses the extended Debye-Huckel expression, is very similar to one developed for single-amine solutions, and involves the fitting of binary interaction parameters to experimental data. In this work the interaction parameters found to be important in the activity coefficient expression were fitted to each single-acid-gas single-amine subsystem using all published solubility data. The resulting model was then validated by comparing mixed-acid-gas single-amine solubility predictions with published VLE data. MEA-MDEA and DEA-MDEA blends have been studied in detail in this work. It is found that each amine contributes to the overall acid gas solubility in a nonlinear way and that the solubility curves can exhibit maxima and minima as a function of the relative concentrations of the amines.

  3. Emissions of sulfur gases from wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    Data on the emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands are summarized with respect to wetland vegetation type and possible formation mechanisms. The current data base is largest for salt marshes inhabited by Spartina alterniflora. Both dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) dominate emissions from salt marshes, with lesser quantities of methyl mercaptan (MeSH), carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon disulfide (CS2) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) being emitted. High emission rates of DMS are associated with vegetation that produces the DMS precursor dimethylsulfonionpropionate (DMSP). Although large quantities of H2S are produced in marshes, only a small percentage escapes to the atmosphere. High latitude marshes emit less sulfur gases than temperate ones, but DMS still dominates. Mangrove-inhabited wetlands also emit less sulfur than temperate S. alterniflora marshes. Few data are available on sulfur gas emissions from freshwater wetlands. In most instances, sulfur emissions from temperate freshwater sites are low. However, some temperate and subtropical freshwater sites are similar in magnitude to those from marine wetlands which do not contain vegetation that produces DMSP. Emissions are low in Alaskan tundra but may be considerably higher in some bogs and fens.

  4. Study of electron transport in hydrocarbon gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, H.; Date, H.

    2015-04-07

    The drift velocity and the effective ionization coefficient of electrons in the organic gases, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}, have been measured over relatively wide ranges of density-reduced electric fields (E/N) at room temperature (around 300 K). The drift velocity was measured, based on the arrival-time spectra of electrons by using a double-shutter drift tube over the E/N range from 300 to 2800 Td, and the effective ionization coefficient (α − η) was determined by the steady-state Townsend method from 150 to 3000 Td. Whenever possible, these parameters were compared with those available in the literature. It has been shown that the swarm parameters for these gases have specific tendencies, depending on their molecular configurations.

  5. Cope with dissolved gases in pump calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.C. )

    1993-10-01

    The pressure of the liquid at the inlet of a centrifugal pump must be high enough to prevent vaporization within the pump, because this vaporization hinders the pumping and can damage the impellers. This pressure requirement must be taken into account when deciding how high to place the pump feed vessel relative to the height of the pump itself. Basically, the pump suction pressure must be greater than the fluid's vapor pressure at the pumping temperature. The difference between pump suction pressure and vapor pressure is the net positive suction head (NPSH). For cases in which the liquid contains no dissolved gases, the vapor-pressure determination is straightforward. With dissolved gases, the situation is more complicated, because vapor-pressure data for such systems are usually not at hand. Adding to the complication is the fact that centrifugal pumps generally can, as it happens, tolerate a small amount of vapor at the impeller eye. If the solubility of the dissolved gas is low and the temperature is far below the boiling point of liquid, the amount of vapor released in a pump is likely not to exceed the tolerable value unless the pressure reduction is substantial.

  6. Volatile metals and metalloids in hydrothermal gases.

    PubMed

    Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Merkel, Broder J

    2006-05-15

    Volatile metals and metalloids were sampled from hot springs, fumaroles, and a hydrothermally influenced wetland in Yellowstone National Park. The sampling was based on diffusion through gas sampling chambers. Collected gases were stabilized by dissolution and oxidation in 1:100 diluted NaOCl. Special procedures were developed to analyze the oxidized samples by GF-AAS and HG-AAS. For ICP-MS, samples had to be blank-corrected for polyatomic isotope interferences, especially by 23Na35Cl+ and 23Na37Cl+ on 58Ni and 60Ni and by 40Ar23Na+ on 63Cu. From the concentrations trapped in solution, net diffusion rates were calculated by Fick's first law. The highest concentrations reached a maximum of 8 g/m3 for volatile silicon. Volatile nickel, tungsten, zinc, copper, and molybdenum, previously only known from anthropogenic sources, occurred naturally in the hydrothermal gases in ranges of tens to hundreds of microg/m3. Replicate measurements indicated significant temporal variations in concentrations, probably the result of complex changes in the hydrothermal regime as well as varying microbial activity. Global correlations between gaseous and superficial aqueous phases were missing. PMID:16749679

  7. Hydrodynamics and universality in cold atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanov, Alexander; Kulkarni, Manas

    2013-03-01

    Recent flurry of experiments on out-of-equilibrium dynamics in cold gases (Bosonic and Fermionic) has raised great interest in understanding collective behaviour of interacting particles. Although the dynamics of interacting gases depends on many details of the system, a great insight can be obtained in a rather universal limit of weak non-linearity, dispersion and dissipation. In this limit, using a reductive perturbation method we map many hydrodynamic models relevant to cold atoms to well known chiral one-dimensional equations such as Korteweg-de Vries (KdV), Burgers, KdV-Burgers, and Benjamin-Ono equations. This mapping of rather complicated hydrodynamic equations to known chiral one-dimensional equations is of great experimental and theoretical interest. For instance, this mapping gives a simple way to make estimates for original hydrodynamic equations and to study phenomena such as shock waves, solitons and the interplay between nonlinearity, dissipation and dispersion. All these phenomena have been observed in experiments and are the hallmarks of nonlinear hydrodynamics.

  8. Remote Sensing of Greenhouse Gases and Their Sources and Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, Andre; Babenhauserheide, Arne; Bertleff, Marco; Checa-Garcia, Ramiro; Hahne, Philipp; Hase, Frank; Klappenbach, Friedrich; Kostinek, Julian; Aben, Ilse; Hasekamp, Otto; Landgraf, Jochen; Galli, Andre; Basu, Sourish

    2014-06-01

    The man-made emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are considered the main drivers of anthropogenically induced climate change. Major uncertainties persist when it comes to quantifying regional scale surface fluxes of these gases or predicting the evolution of the relevant source/sink processes in a changing climate. Remote sensing of the atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations from space-borne and ground-based platforms offers the opportunity to significantly advance our knowledge on spatial and temporal scales that are suitable for process attribution and mitigation actions. Overall, the most promising remote-sensing strategy exploits the rotational-vibrational absorption of CO2 and CH4 in sunlight penetrating the Earth's atmosphere. Typically, satellite sounders such as GOSAT (Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite), OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory), and S5P (Sentinel-5 precursor) as well as the ground-based spectrometers of the TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network) cover various CO2, CH4, and O2 absorption bands in the near and shortwave infrared spectral range between 0.75 micron (13400cm-1) and 2.5 micron (4000cm-1). Accuracy of the inferred gas concentrations is contingent on the accuracy of the adopted spectroscopic parameters and spectroscopic models available in these spectral regions. Here, I will report on recent achievements and challenges within our greenhouse-gas remote-sensing activities mainly focusing on the GOSAT observational record. Since its launch in early 2009, the Fourier Transform Spectrometer onboard GOSAT delivers solar absorption spectra with good spectral resolution and high signal-to-noise. It has been shown that the CO2 and CH4 retrievals from these observations can achieve an accuracy on the order of fractions of a percent which makes them suitable for tracking regional scale source/sink processes and their response to climate events. In order to achieve the required accuracy, it is crucial to develop highly accurate radiative-transfer algorithms and to validate the satellite soundings by ground-based observations. I will illustrate some cases where the excellent quality of the absorption spectra collected by GOSAT reveals spectroscopic deficiencies and inconsistencies among the various absorption bands covered. As such, lessons learned from GOSAT can be used as a feedback to the spectroscopy community. Beyond GOSAT, future satellite missions such as S5P or the planned S5 (Sentinel-5, launch ˜2020) will cover spectral ranges which have not yet been spectroscopically optimized for remote-sensing purposes. In that case, simulations and studies based on ground-based observations show that spectroscopic uncertainties constitute a dominant contribution to the error budget of the retrieved gas concentrations. Therefore, further improvements of spectroscopic parameters and line-shape models is of paramount interest for remote sensing of greenhouse gases.

  9. Halogenated source gases measured by FTIR at the Jungfraujoch station: updated trends and new target species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahieu, Emmanuel; Bader, Whitney; Bovy, Benoît; Franco, Bruno; Lejeune, Bernard; Servais, Christian; Notholt, Justus; Palm, Mathias; Toon, Geoffrey C.

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric abundances of chlorine and fluorine increased very significantly during the second half of last century, following large emissions of long-lived halogenated source gases used in numerous industrial and domestic applications. Given the phase-out schedule of ozone depleting substances adopted by the Montreal Protocol, its Amendments and Adjustments, the loading of the CFCs in the Earth's atmosphere is now slowly decreasing. In contrast, their first replacement products, the HCFCs, are still on the rise, with current rates of increase substantially larger than at the beginning of the 21st century. As potent greenhouse gases, a suite of fluorinated compounds are targeted by the Kyoto Protocol. At present, they continue to accumulate in the atmosphere (Montzka et al., 2011). Given their environmental impacts, continuous monitoring of the abundances of these gases is of primary importance. In addition to the in situ networks, remote sensing techniques operated from space, balloon or from the ground provide valuable information to assess the long-term tropospheric and lower stratospheric trends of an increasing number of halogenated source gases, as well as of the reservoirs resulting from their photolysis in the stratosphere (e.g. Mahieu et al., 2014a). In this contribution, we will present decadal time series of halogenated source gases monitored at the high altitude station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5° N, 8° E, 3580 m asl) with Fourier Transform Infared (FTIR) spectrometers, within the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, see http://www.ndacc.org). Total column trends presented in previous studies for CFC-11, -12 and HCFC-22 (Zander at al., 2008), CCl4 (Rinsland et al., 2012), HCFC-142b (Mahieu et al., 2013), CF4 (Mahieu et al., 2014b) and SF6 (Zander et al., 2008) will be updated using the latest available Jungfraujoch solar observations. Investigations dealing with the definition of approaches to retrieve additional halogenated source gases from FTIR spectra will also be evoked. Our trend results will be critically discussed and compared with measurements performed in the northern hemisphere by the in situ networks. Acknowledgments The University of Liège contribution to the present work has primarily been supported by the AGACC-II project of the SSD program funded by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO), Brussels. E. Mahieu is Research Associate with the F.R.S. - FNRS. Laboratory developments and mission expenses at the Jungfraujoch station were funded by the F.R.S. - FNRS and the Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, respectively. We thank the International Foundation High Altitude Research Stations Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat (HFSJG, Bern) for supporting the facilities needed to perform the observations. We further acknowledge the vital contribution from all the Belgian colleagues in performing the Jungfraujoch observations used here. References Mahieu, E., S. O'Doherty, S. Reimann, et al., First retrievals of HCFC-142b from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar observations: application to high-altitude Jungfraujoch spectra, poster presentation at the 'EGU 2013 General Assembly', 07-12 April 2013, Vienna, Austria, 2013. [http://hdl.handle.net/2268/144709] Mahieu, E., M.P. Chipperfield, J. Notholt, et al., Recent Northern Hemisphere stratospheric HCl increase due to atmospheric circulation changes, Nature, 515, 104-107, doi:10.1038/nature13857, 2014a. Mahieu, E., R. Zander, G.C. Toon, et al., Spectrometric monitoring of atmospheric carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) above the Jungfraujoch station since 1989: evidence of continued increase but at a slowing rate, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 333-344, 2014b. [http://hdl.handle.net/2268/154767] Montzka, S.A., S. Reimann, A. Engel, et al., Ozone-Depleting Substances (ODSs) and Related Chemicals, Chapter 1 in Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2010, Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project-Report No. 52, 516 pp., World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2011. Rinsland, C.P., E. Mahieu, P. Demoulin, et al., Decrease of the Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Loading above Jungfraujoch, based on High Resolution Infrared Solar Spectra recorded between 1999 and 2011, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 113, 1322-1329, 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.02.016, 2012. [http://hdl.handle.net/2268/121150] Zander, R., E. Mahieu, P. Demoulin, et al., Our changing atmosphere: Evidence based on long-term infrared solar observations at the Jungfraujoch since 1950, Sci. Total Environ., 391, 184-195, 2008. [http://hdl.handle.net/2268/2421

  10. Laser-based detection of trace gases released by crops under long-term storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomens, Jos; Persijn, S.; Veltman, R. H.; van Schaik, A. C. R.; de Vries, Hugo S. M.; Harren, Frans J. M.; Parker, David H.

    1997-05-01

    A CO laser emitting radiation between 1300 and 2000 cm-1 is applied to monitor trace gas emissions using photoacoustic detection. Several biologically interesting gases can be detected by tuning the laser frequency to absorption bands of these species. The sensitivity of the system reaches the ppbv level (acetaldehyde: 0.1 ppbv, ethanol: 3 ppbv, C2H6: 1 ppbv) allowing us to study e.g. an individual piece of fruit. The selectivity is enhanced by a cold trap kept at a temperature between 0 and minus 180 degrees Celsius so that unwanted species can be frozen out. The biological sample is placed in a continuous flow system of a few liters per hour which leads the released gases from the sample to the photoacoustic cell, thus creating an on-line and non-intrusive technique.

  11. Anesthetic gases and global warming: Potentials, prevention and future of anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Gadani, Hina; Vyas, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Global warming refers to an average increase in the earth?s temperature, which in turn causes changes in climate. A warmer earth may lead to changes in rainfall patterns, a rise in sea level, and a wide range of impacts on plants, wildlife, and humans. Greenhouse gases make the earth warmer by trapping energy inside the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases are any gas that absorbs infrared radiation in the atmosphere and include: water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), halogenated fluorocarbons (HCFCs), ozone (O3), perfluorinated carbons (PFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Hazardous chemicals enter the air we breathe as a result of dozens of activities carried out during a typical day at a healthcare facility like processing lab samples, burning fossil fuels etc. We sometimes forget that anesthetic agents are also greenhouse gases (GHGs). Anesthetic agents used today are volatile halogenated ethers and the common carrier gas nitrous oxide known to be aggressive GHGs. With less than 5% of the total delivered halogenated anesthetic being metabolized by the patient, the vast majority of the anesthetic is routinely vented to the atmosphere through the operating room scavenging system. The global warming potential (GWP) of a halogenated anesthetic is up to 2,000 times greater than CO2. Global warming potentials are used to compare the strength of different GHGs to trap heat in the atmosphere relative to that of CO2. Here we discuss about the GWP of anesthetic gases, preventive measures to decrease the global warming effects of anesthetic gases and Xenon, a newer anesthetic gas for the future of anesthesia. PMID:25885293

  12. Detection of volcanic gases and particles by satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortore, Emiliano; Laneve, Giovanni; Bernini, Guido

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the detection of components of volcanic eruption has been carried out investigating, in appropriate bands of the electromagnetic spectrum (6.25, 8.7, 10.8, 12 ?m), the values of the brightness temperature. The analysis has been performed in the Thermal Infrared Region (TIR) studying both the absorption-emission and scattering phenomena related to the interactions between electromagnetic radiation and volcanic emissions. The results have been achieved by means of a combined use of numerical simulations, devoted to examining the behaviour of the atmosphere gases and volcanic components, and remotely sensed satellite images. The proposed methodologies allow an estimate of the amount of gaseous and solid components, of the size of the emitted particles, of the height of the volcanic plume and of the distance of the volcanic components from the crater. The processed images come from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) sensor on board the geo-stationary satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) and take into consideration an eruption of the Etna volcano as a study case (1st of April 2012, 04:30 and 05:30 UTC). The procedures are general and may therefore be extended to any other similar case.

  13. Veracruz State Preliminary Greenhouse Gases Emissions Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh Rodriguez, C.; Rodriquez Viqueira, L.; Guzman Rojas, S.

    2007-05-01

    At recent years, the international organisms such as United Nations, has discussed that the temperature has increased slightly and the pattern of precipitations has changed in different parts of the world, which cause either extreme droughts or floods and that the extreme events have increased. These are some of the risks of global climate change because of the increase of gas concentration in the atmosphere such as carbon dioxides, nitrogen oxides and methane - which increase the greenhouse effect. Facing the consequences that could emerge because of the global temperature grown, there is a genuine necessity in different sectors of reduction the greenhouse gases and reduced the adverse impacts of climate change. To solve that, many worldwide conventions have been realized (Rio de Janeiro, Kyoto, Montreal) where different countries have established political compromises to stabilize their emissions of greenhouse gases. The mitigation and adaptation policies merge as a response to the effects that the global climate change could have, on the humans as well as the environment. That is the reason to provide the analysis of the areas and geographic zones of the country that present major vulnerability to the climate change. The development of an inventory of emissions that identifies and quantifies the principal sources of greenhouse gases of a country, and also of a region is basic to any study about climate change, also to develop specific political programs that allow to preserve and even improve a quality of the atmospheric environment, and maybe to incorporate to international mechanisms such as the emissions market. To estimate emissions in a systematic and consistent way on a regional, national and international level is a requirement to evaluate the feasibility and the cost-benefit of instrumented possible mitigation strategies and to adopt politics and technologies to reduce emissions. Mexico has two national inventories of emissions, 1990 and 1995, now it is on the press the year 2000, both published by the National Institute of Ecology of the SEMARNAT. There is not an emissions inventory of Veracruz, the few measurements campaigns that have been done in urban centers, it has not been possible to have access data, neither it has been designed a public politic that suggests the necessity of counting on information on the matter. In spite of it, because of the geographic conditions of Veracruz, the potential impact will transform Veracruz in a short period of time, thats why the Veracruz University must leadership studies around it, where the social distribution of the obtained results will make possible the creation of politics, strategies directed to a sustainable development, economically viable, socially fair and environmentally respectful.

  14. Snowpack Chemistry of Reactive Gases at Station Concordia, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Mass, Alex; Hueber, Jacques; Fain, Xavier; Dommergue, Aurelien; Barbero, Albane; Savarino, Joel

    2013-04-01

    During December 2012 a new experiment for the study of snow photochemical processes and surface gas exchange was installed at Dome Concordia, Antarctica. The experiment consists of two sampling manifolds ('snow tower') which facilitate the withdrawal of interstitial firn air from four depths in the snowpack and from above the surface. One of these snow towers can be shaded for investigation of the dependency of snow chemistry on solar radiation. A nearby 12 m meteorological tower facilitates above surface turbulence and trace gas gradient measurements. Temperature profiles and UV and IR light penetration are monitored in the snowpack. Air samples are directed through sampling lines to a nearby underground laboratory that houses the experiment control system and gas monitors. The system is fully automated, sampling gases from the array of inlet ports sequentially, and is intended to be operated continuously for a full annual cycle. The computerized control system can be accessed remotely for data retrieval and quality control and for configuring experimental details. Continuous gas measurements include ozone, nitrogen oxides, methane, carbon monoxide, and gaseous elemental mercury. Whole air samples were sampled on four occasions for volatile organic compound analysis. The objective of this research is the study of the year-round snowpack gas chemistry and its dependency on snowpack and above surface physical and environmental conditions. A particular emphasis will be the investigation of the effects of increased UV radiation during the occurrence of the stratospheric ozone hole. We will present the conceptual design of the experiment and data examples from the first three months of the experiment.

  15. Greenhouse gases accounting and reporting for waste management - A South African perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Elena; Trois, Cristina

    2010-11-15

    This paper investigates how greenhouse gases are accounted and reported in the waste sector in South Africa. Developing countries (including South Africa) do not have binding emission reduction targets, but many of them publish different greenhouse gas emissions data which have been accounted and reported in different ways. Results show that for South Africa, inventories at national and municipal level are the most important tools in the process of accounting and reporting greenhouse gases from waste. For the development of these inventories international initiatives were important catalysts at national and municipal levels, and assisted in developing local expertise, resulting in increased output quality. However, discrepancies in the methodology used to account greenhouse gases from waste between inventories still remain a concern. This is a challenging issue for developing countries, especially African ones, since higher accuracy methods are more data intensive. Analysis of the South African inventories shows that results from the recent inventories can not be compared with older ones due to the use of different accounting methodologies. More recently the use of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) procedures in Africa, geared towards direct measurements of greenhouse gases from landfill sites, has increased and resulted in an improvement of the quality of greenhouse gas inventories at municipal level.

  16. Greenhouse gases accounting and reporting for waste management--a South African perspective.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Elena; Trois, Cristina

    2010-11-01

    This paper investigates how greenhouse gases are accounted and reported in the waste sector in South Africa. Developing countries (including South Africa) do not have binding emission reduction targets, but many of them publish different greenhouse gas emissions data which have been accounted and reported in different ways. Results show that for South Africa, inventories at national and municipal level are the most important tools in the process of accounting and reporting greenhouse gases from waste. For the development of these inventories international initiatives were important catalysts at national and municipal levels, and assisted in developing local expertise, resulting in increased output quality. However, discrepancies in the methodology used to account greenhouse gases from waste between inventories still remain a concern. This is a challenging issue for developing countries, especially African ones, since higher accuracy methods are more data intensive. Analysis of the South African inventories shows that results from the recent inventories can not be compared with older ones due to the use of different accounting methodologies. More recently the use of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) procedures in Africa, geared towards direct measurements of greenhouse gases from landfill sites, has increased and resulted in an improvement of the quality of greenhouse gas inventories at municipal level. PMID:20646920

  17. Relativistic quantum thermodynamics of ideal gases in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Blas, H; Pimentel, B M; Tomazelli, J L

    1999-11-01

    In this work we study the behavior of relativistic ideal Bose and Fermi gases in two space dimensions. Making use of polylogarithm functions we derive a closed and unified expression for their densities. It is shown that both type of gases are essentially inequivalent, and only in the non-relativistic limit the spinless and equal mass Bose and Fermi gases are equivalent as known in the literature. PMID:11970524

  18. Suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kazazis, D.; Bourhis, E.; Gierak, J.; Gennser, U.; Bourgeois, O.; Antoni, T.

    2013-12-04

    We report on the fabrication of fully suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases in III-V heterostructures. Low temperature transport measurements verify that the properties of the suspended gases are only slightly degraded with respect to the non-suspended gases. Focused ion beam technology is used to pattern suspended nanostructures with minimum damage from the ion beam, due to the small width of the suspended membrane.

  19. Non-thermal plasma for exhaust gases treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva R., Elvia; Pacheco P., Marquidia; Gómez B., Fernando; Pacheco P., Joel; Colín C., Arturo; Sánchez-Mendieta, Víctor; Valdivia B., Ricardo; Santana D., Alfredo; Huertas C., José; Frías P., Hilda

    2015-09-01

    This article describes a study on a non-thermal plasma device to treat exhaust gases in an internal combustion engine. Several tests using a plasma device to treat exhaust gases are conducted on a Honda GX200-196 cm3 engine at different rotational speeds. A plasma reactor could be efficient in degrading nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. Monoxide and carbon dioxide treatment is minimal. However, achieving 1%-3% degradation may be interesting to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases.

  20. Method for controlling corrosion in thermal vapor injection gases

    DOEpatents

    Sperry, John S.; Krajicek, Richard W.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in the method for producing high pressure thermal vapor streams from combustion gases for injection into subterranean oil producing formations to stimulate the production of viscous minerals is described. The improvement involves controlling corrosion in such thermal vapor gases by injecting water near the flame in the combustion zone and injecting ammonia into a vapor producing vessel to contact the combustion gases exiting the combustion chamber.

  1. A comparison of hydrocarbon gases from natural sources in the northwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenson, T.D.; Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The northwestern United States hosts a remarkable quantity and variety of thermal springs, seeps, and other natural-gas sources. Although many studies have dealt with the liquids and nonhydrocarbon gases emanating from these sources, few have focused on hydrocarbon gases. Of these gases, methane in particular is now recognized as an important reactive trace gas in the Earth's atmosphere that plays a significant role in global warming because of its greenhouse properties. To understand better the magnitude and occurrence of emissions of hydrocarbons from natural sources to the atmosphere, we have begun a survey of these gases throughout the northwestern United States. This area encompasses a number of different tectonic provinces: The Yellowstone hot spot, the northern Basin and Range Province, the Cascade volcanic arc, and the Cascadia subduction complex. Each province hosts springs and seeps with some unique compositions owing to the geological processes operating there. Methane is present in each area at concentration levels ranging from about 2 parts per million by volume (ppm-v) to 95.6 percent (by volume). Hydrothermal activity in the Yellowstone area produces spring gases containing less than 4 percent methane, with carbon dioxide as the balance gas. The Grand Teton National Park area, immediately to the south, has a wide variety of gas compositions with either methane, carbon dioxide, or nitrogen as the primary gas component. Where methane is abundant, higher molecular weight hydrocarbon gases (ethane, ethene, propane, propene, isobutane, and n-butane) are also found in ppm-v concentrations. In the northern Great Basin, thermal springs and seeps typically occur along fault zones at the base of mountain ranges. Methane concentrations range from 0.2 to 47 percent, with higher molecular weight hydrocarbon concentrations from 0 to 3,100 ppm-v. 47 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases, Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    2003-08-28

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including atmospheric concentrations and atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  3. The search for active release of volcanic gases on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Alain; Villanueva, Geronimo; Mumma, Michael; Tokunaga, Alan

    2015-11-01

    The study of planetary atmospheres by means of spectroscopy is important for understanding their origin and evolution. The presence of short-lived trace gases in the martian atmosphere would imply recent production, for example, by ongoing geologic activity. On Earth, sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfur monoxide (SO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are the main sulfur-bearing gases released during volcanic outgassing. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), also released from some volcanoes on Earth (e.g., Erebus and Nyiragongo), could be formed by reactions involving SO2 or H2S inside magma chambers. We carried out the first ground-based, semi-simultaneous, multi-band and multi-species search for such gases above the Tharsis and Syrtis volcanic regions on Mars. The submillimeter search extended between 23 November 2011 and 13 May 2012 which corresponded to Mars’ mid Northern Spring and early Northern Summer seasons (Ls = 34-110°). The strong submillimeter rotational transitions of SO2, SO and H2S were targeted using the high-resolution heterodyne receiver (aka Barney) on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We reached sensitivities sufficient to detect a volcanic release on Mars that is 4% of the SO2 released continuously from Kilauea volcano in Hawaii, or 5% that of the Masaya volcano in Nicaragua. The infrared search covered OCS in its combination band (ν2+ν3) at 3.42 μm at two successive Mars years, during Mars’ late Northern Spring and mid Northern Summer seasons, spanning Ls= 43º and Ls= 147º. The targeted volcanic districts were observed during the two intervals, 14 Dec. 2011 to 6 Jan. 2012 in the first year, and 30 May 2014 to 16 June 2014 in the second year, using the high resolution infrared spectrometer (CSHELL) on NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility (NASA/IRTF). We will present our results and discuss their implications for current volcanic outgassing activity on the red planet. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program under NASA contract NNH14CK55B that supported A.K. and A.T., RTOP 344-32-07 and NASA’s Astrobiology Program (RTOP 344-53-51) that supported M.J.M., and G.L.V.

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Enhances Removal of NOx from Flue Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    Pilot scale experiments have demonstrated a method of reducing the amounts of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emitted by industrial boilers and powerplant combustors that involves (1) injection of H2O2 into flue gases and (2) treatment of the flue gases by caustic wet scrubbing like that commonly used to remove SO2 from combustion flue gases. Heretofore, the method most commonly used for removing NOx from flue gases has been selective catalytic reduction (SCR), in which the costs of both installation and operation are very high. After further development, the present method may prove to be an economically attractive alternative to SCR.

  5. Upper ocean model of dissolved atmospheric gases

    SciTech Connect

    Schudlich, R.; Emerson, S.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to estimate the rate of biological oxygen production at Hawaiian Ocean Time-series station ALOHA in the central North Pacific ocean. Our approach is to use an upper ocean model together with measurements to interpret an annual cycle of temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, argon, nitrogen, and the stable isotope ratio of oxygen at station ALOHA. This project represents the first upper ocean geochemical study in which model predictions are verifiable by independent measurements. Using the model, we will be able to assess the relative roles played by physical processes (air-sea gas exchange, air injection by bubbles, temperature-induced changes in gas solubility, trapping below the mixed layer, and diffusion) and biological processes (photosynthesis, respiration, and nutrient recycling) in producing the observed distribution of dissolved atmospheric gases. The long term goal of this project is to understand the utility of chemical tracers for quantifying biological processes in the ocean.

  6. Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

    2012-03-29

    Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

  7. Multiply-Substituted Isotopologues of Atmospheric Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J. M.; Schauble, E.; Wang, Z.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope geochemistry is principally concerned with bulk isotopic compositions of natural materials (e.g., d13C). In atmospheric gases, these bulk compositions effectively depend only on abundances of molecules containing one rare isotope (e.g., 16O13C16O). However, the common di- and tri-atomic atmospheric gases also contain ca. 10-5 to 10-6 mole fraction of molecules containing two or more rare isotopes (e.g., 18O13C16O). These rare isotopologues are an untapped resource of constraints on physical chemistry and geochemical budgets. There are sparse data on the vapor pressures and chemical kinetics of multiply-substituted isotopologues, and the reduced partition functions of some were estimated by Urey (1947) and Bigeleisen and Mayer (1947). These studies demonstrate that these rare isotopologues have unique thermodynamic and kinetic properties, and thus that routine measurements of them could uniquely constrain geochemical problems. However, distributions of these rare isotopologues in nature are essentially unknown. We have developed a gas source mass spectrometer for analysis of doubly substituted isotopologues of N2, NO, CO, O2, CO2 and N2O at their naturally occurring abundances (in addition to the common and singly substituted isotopologues of these gases); associated sample preparation techniques and standardization protocols have been developed for CO2, N2O and are in progress for O2. Capabilities of this instrument vary with the abundances of the isotopologue of interest; external precision for the most abundant (e.g., 18O13C16O; 40 ppm of natural CO2) is typically ~0.03 per mil, 1s, whereas that for more rare species (e.g., 18O12C18O; ca. 4 ppm of respective molecules) is typically ~0.1 to 0.2 per mil, 1s. Accuracy based on comparisons to standards having the stochastic distribution of isotopes is similar to external precision. Interferences are the greatest analytical difficulty, with hydrocarbon fragments and recombination products being the most common and recalcitrant problem. The most extensive use of this instrument to-date has been to measure abundances of 18O13C16O in air and in experimental products. Preliminary results for 18O13C18O, 15N14N18O and 14N15N18O will also be reviewed, as will expected data for 18O18O and 17O18O if sufficiently complete. Near-surface air in southern California in mid-2003 is characterized by a 0.72 per mil enrichment in 18O13C16O relative to the abundance predicted for a stochastic (random) distribution of 18O and 13C among all CO2 isotopologues. This enrichment can be attributed to enhanced thermodynamic stability of 18O13C16O during air-sea and air-leaf water exchange - which generates ca. 0.9 per mil enrichments - modulated by anthropogenic emissions, fires and diffusive fractionations during photosynthesis - all of which slightly (less than 0.1 per mil) reduce 18O13C16O mixing ratios. Variations in 18O13C16O in air with time and location will constrain the mean temperature of air-sea and air-leaf water exchange (and thereby add to the interpretation of d18O of CO2), and contributions from anthropogenic emissions and biomass burning. We will present data comparing southern California and Alaska during summer, 2003 as examples of these effects. Photolysis experiments on N2O demonstrate that photochemical reactions can generate large (up to tens of per mil) enrichments in multiply substituted isotopologues relative to their predicted stochastic abundance. Potential uses of such effects to constrain the physical budgets and physical chemistry of atmospheric gases will be discussed.

  8. Bose-Condensed Gases at Finite Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Allan; Nikuni, Tetsuro; Zaremba, Eugene

    2009-02-01

    Preface; 1. Overview and introduction; 2. Condensate dynamics at T=0; 3. Couple equations for the condensate and thermal cloud; 4. Green's functions and self-energy approximations; 5. The Beliaev approximation and the time-dependent HFB; 6. 6. Kadanoff-Baym derivation of the ZNG equations; 7. Kinetic equations for Bogoliubov thermal excitations; 8. Static thermal cloud approximation; 9. Vortices and vortex lattices at finite temperatures; 10. Dynamics at finite temperatures using the moment method; 11. Numerical simulation of the ZNG equations; 12. Numerical simulation of collective modes at finite temperature; 13. Landau damping in trapped Bose-condensed gases; 14. Landau's theory of superfluidity; 15. Two-fluid hydrodynamics in a dilute Bose gas; 16. Variational formulation of the Landau two-fluid equations; 17. The Landau-Khalatnikov two-fluid equations; 18. Transport coefficients and relaxation times; 19. General theory of damping of hydrodynamic modes; Appendices; References; Index.

  9. Spectroscopic Temperature Determination of Degenerate Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrun, Marijan; Cote, Robin

    2003-05-01

    We present a simple method to determine the temperature of ultracold gases made of fermions populating two hyperfine states. We show that by using a two-photon Raman probe, it is possible to obtain line shapes with characteristic profiles that can be used to reveal the temperature of the sample. We calculate the two-photon absorption rate coefficient l K (J.L. Bohn and P.S. Julienne, Phys. Rev. A 54) (1996), R4637. for various temperatures near the Fermi temperature, and obtain line profiles by sweeping the detuning of one of the lasers. By analyzing the features of the line profiles, one can establish the temperature T of the sample down to 0.1 T_F. We illustrate this non-destructive method for realistic conditions in the case of ^6Li.

  10. Biomedical imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases (HNGs), polarized to approximately 50% or higher, have led to major advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of porous structures and air-filled cavities in human subjects, particularly the lung. By boosting the available signal to a level about 100 000 times higher than that at thermal equilibrium, air spaces that would otherwise appear as signal voids in an MR image can be revealed for structural and functional assessments. This review discusses how HNG MR imaging differs from conventional proton MR imaging, how MR pulse sequence design is affected and how the properties of gas imaging can be exploited to obtain hitherto inaccessible information in humans and animals. Current and possible future imaging techniques, and their application in the assessment of normal lung function as well as certain lung diseases, are described.

  11. Industrial gases offer new processing alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Jackow, F.

    1996-07-01

    Creative use of industrial gases, such as oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen and carbon dioxide, can provide new approaches to many chemical and industrial processes. One example is using pure oxygen to replace air for combustion, a technique that makes it possible to increase incineration efficiency and reduce the amount of nitrogen oxides produced, thus lowering a plant`s environmental impact. Recent downsizing trends, cost-reduction efforts and environmental regulations have modified the relationship between major chemical and industrial gas companies. Chemical producers are now often interested in outsourcing not only industrial gas supply but also technology and turnkey solutions. Among the benefits to the end users are enhanced safety, reduced environmental impact and improved profitability.

  12. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

  13. Sir William Ramsay and the noble gases.

    PubMed

    Davies, Alwyn G

    2012-01-01

    Sir William Ramsay was one of the world's leading scientists at the end of the 19th century, and in a spectacular period of research between 1894 and 1898, he discovered five new elements. These were the noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon; they added a whole new group to the Periodic Table of the elements, and provided the keystone to our understanding of the electronic structure of atoms, and the way those electrons bind the atoms together into molecules. For this work he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904, the first such prize to come to a British subject. He was also a man of great charm, a good linguist, and a composer and performer of music, poetry and song. This review will trace his career, describe his character and give and account of the chemistry which led to the award of the Nobel Prize. PMID:22574384

  14. Peltier cooling of fermionic quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Ch; Georges, A; Kollath, C

    2014-11-14

    We propose a cooling scheme for fermionic quantum gases, based on the principles of the Peltier thermoelectric effect and energy filtering. The system to be cooled is connected to another harmonically trapped gas acting as a reservoir. The cooling is achieved by two simultaneous processes: (i)the system is evaporatively cooled, and (ii)cold fermions from deep below the Fermi surface of the reservoir are injected below the Fermi level of the system, in order to fill the "holes" in the energy distribution. This is achieved by a suitable energy dependence of the transmission coefficient connecting the system to the reservoir. The two processes can be viewed as simultaneous evaporative cooling of particles and holes. We show that both a significantly lower entropy per particle and faster cooling rate can be achieved in this way than by using only evaporative cooling. PMID:25432033

  15. Electrochemical sensor monitoring of volcanic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Freshwater, Ray; Oppenheimer, Clive; Saffell, John; Jones, Rod; Griffiths, Paul; Braban, Christine; Mead, Iqbal

    2010-05-01

    Advances in instrumentation have fuelled a recent growth of interest in using portable sensor systems for environmental monitoring of pollution. Developments in wireless technology are enabling such systems to operate remotely and autonomously, generating a wealth of environmental data. We report here on the application of miniature Alphasense electrochemical sensors to the detection and characterisation of gases in volcanic plumes. A highly portable sensor system was developed to operate an array of 6 low cost electrochemical sensors to detect CO, H2, HCl, SO2, H2S and NO2 at 1 Hz. A miniature pump draws air over all sensors simultaneously (i.e. sensors arranged in parallel). The sensor output in these campaigns was logged on PDAs for real-time viewing, and later download (with a view to future data-streaming). The instrument was deployed at a number of volcanoes and was subject to extremely harsh conditions including highly acidic environments, low (Antarctic) temperatures, and transport over rough terrain. Analysis methods are demonstrated that consider calibration, cross-sensitivities of the sensors to multiple gases, differing sensor response times, temperature dependence, and background sensor drift with time. The analysis is applied to a range of plume field-measurements to extract gas concentrations ranging from 100's ppmv to sub-ppmv and to characterise the individual volcano emissions. Applications of similar sensor systems for real-time long-term monitoring of volcanic emissions (which may indicate and ultimately predict eruptive behavior), and UAV and balloon-borne plume sampling are now already being realised. This work focused on demonstrating the application of electrochemical sensors to monitoring of environmental pollution from volcanoes. Other applications for similar sensors include the near-source monitoring of industrial emissions, and of pollutant levels enhanced by traffic emissions in the urban environment.

  16. From ultracold Fermi Gases to Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    Ultracold dilute atomic gases can be considered as model systems to address some pending problem in Many-Body physics that occur in condensed matter systems, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. We have developed a general method to probe with high precision the thermodynamics of locally homogeneous ultracold Bose and Fermi gases [1,2,3]. This method allows stringent tests of recent many-body theories. For attractive spin 1/2 fermions with tunable interaction (^6Li), we will show that the gas thermodynamic properties can continuously change from those of weakly interacting Cooper pairs described by Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory to those of strongly bound molecules undergoing Bose-Einstein condensation. First, we focus on the finite-temperature Equation of State (EoS) of the unpolarized unitary gas. Surprisingly, the low-temperature properties of the strongly interacting normal phase are well described by Fermi liquid theory [3] and we localize the superfluid phase transition. A detailed comparison with theories including recent Monte-Carlo calculations will be presented. Moving away from the unitary gas, the Lee-Huang-Yang and Lee-Yang beyond-mean-field corrections for low density bosonic and fermionic superfluids are quantitatively measured for the first time. Despite orders of magnitude difference in density and temperature, our equation of state can be used to describe low density neutron matter such as the outer shell of neutron stars. [4pt] [1] S. Nascimbène, N. Navon, K. Jiang, F. Chevy, and C. Salomon, Nature 463, 1057 (2010) [0pt] [2] N. Navon, S. Nascimbène, F. Chevy, and C. Salomon, Science 328, 729 (2010) [0pt] [3] S. Nascimbène, N. Navon, S. Pilati, F. Chevy, S. Giorgini, A. Georges, and C. Salomon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 215303 (2011)

  17. Controls on fluxes of trace gases from Brazilian cerrado soils

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.C.; Poth, M.A.

    1998-09-01

    Tropical ecosystems play an important role in production or consumption of atmospheric trace gases including nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and methane (CH{sub 4}). Here the authors describe field and laboratory experiments, performed during 1994, to determine the influence of fire on processes responsible for fluxes of gases from cerrado sites burned 17 and 45 d earlier, and a control site, last burned in 1974. Burning stimulated gross N mineralization but depressed nitrification rates; however, rates were sufficient to support NO fluxes observed in a 1992 study at the same site. Extractable nutrients and fluxes of NO and N{sub 2}O from wetted and dry soils were measured prior to and for a 3-d period following burning. Over this period NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} declined to undetectable levels; NH{sub 4}{sup +} increased, and NO fluxes remained relatively constant, suggesting that nitrifiers replaced the NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} reduced to NO. Soils at burned and unburned sites exhibited CH{sub 4} uptake, which was inhibited by CH{sub 3}F, thereby converting soils from a strong sink to a weak source of CH{sub 4}. Carbon dioxide fluxes did not increase, and there were no detectable fluxes of N{sub 2}O following burning. In lab studies NO and N{sub 2}O emissions were inhibited by autoclaving, suggesting that nitrification was key to their production. However, addition of NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} to autoclaved soil resulted in large fluxes of NO but no detectable N{sub 2}O, suggesting that chemodenitrification may have been responsible for NO but not N{sub 2}O production. Further research is needed to determine whether NO is produced directly by nitrifier NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} reduction or indirectly by chemodenitrification of NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} produced by nitrifiers.

  18. Effects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption on the chemistry, radiative, and transport processes in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Kinnison, D.E.; Grant, K.E.; Connell, P.S.

    1992-09-01

    Volcanic eruptions can significantly impact trace gas distribution in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Massive eruptions, produce large quantities of SO[sub 2], H[sub 2]O, chlorine compounds, and particulates. Modeling the effects of these impulsive increases in traces gases and comparing the results with observations from ground and satellite measurements provide unique opportunities to test current multi-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport models of the global atmosphere. Since these models are currently being used in assessment studies for future anthropogenic emissions of trace gases quantitative understanding of the accuracy of these models is essential. In this study, we have used observed data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) to realistically represent both the time dependent change in aerosol surface area density and wavelength dependent extinction values from the Mt. Pinatubo Eruption. Increases in the aerosol loading increase the rate of important heterogeneous chemical reactions converting odd nitrogen in both ClONO[sup 2] and N[sub 2]O[sub 5] to HNO[sub 3]. Radiative effects of increases aerosol optical thickness include changes to net radiative heating rates and to actinic fluxes. Changes to heating rates will indirectly change chemical reaction rates via changes in atmospheric temperatures. changes in actinic fluxes will directly modify photodissociation rates.

  19. Effects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption on the chemistry, radiative, and transport processes in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Kinnison, D.E.; Grant, K.E.; Connell, P.S.

    1992-09-01

    Volcanic eruptions can significantly impact trace gas distribution in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Massive eruptions, produce large quantities of SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, chlorine compounds, and particulates. Modeling the effects of these impulsive increases in traces gases and comparing the results with observations from ground and satellite measurements provide unique opportunities to test current multi-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport models of the global atmosphere. Since these models are currently being used in assessment studies for future anthropogenic emissions of trace gases quantitative understanding of the accuracy of these models is essential. In this study, we have used observed data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) to realistically represent both the time dependent change in aerosol surface area density and wavelength dependent extinction values from the Mt. Pinatubo Eruption. Increases in the aerosol loading increase the rate of important heterogeneous chemical reactions converting odd nitrogen in both ClONO{sup 2} and N{sub 2}O{sub 5} to HNO{sub 3}. Radiative effects of increases aerosol optical thickness include changes to net radiative heating rates and to actinic fluxes. Changes to heating rates will indirectly change chemical reaction rates via changes in atmospheric temperatures. changes in actinic fluxes will directly modify photodissociation rates.

  20. Aerothermodynamic radiation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, K.; Reinecke, W. G.; Rossi, D.; Marinelli, W. J.; Krech, R. H.; Caledonia, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have built and made operational a 6 in. electric arc driven shock tube which alloys us to study the non-equilibrium radiation and kinetics of low pressure (0.1 to 1 torr) gases processed by 6 to 12 km/s shock waves. The diagnostic system allows simultaneous monitoring of shock radiation temporal histories by a bank of up to six radiometers, and spectral histories with two optical multi-channel analyzers. A data set of eight shots was assembled, comprising shocks in N2 and air at pressures between 0.1 and 1 torr and velocities of 6 to 12 km/s. Spectrally resolved data was taken in both the non-equilibrium and equilibrium shock regions on all shots. The present data appear to be the first spectrally resolved shock radiation measurements in N2 performed at 12 km/s. The data base was partially analyzed with salient features identified.