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Sample records for radical stability directs

  1. Direct generation of oxygen-stabilized radicals by H• transfer from transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jonathan L; Hartung, John; Han, Arthur; Norton, Jack R

    2015-01-28

    Transition-metal hydrides generate α-alkoxy radicals by H• transfer to enol ethers. We have measured the rate constant for transfer from CpCr(CO)3H to n-butyl vinyl ether and have examined the chemistry of radicals generated by such transfers. Radicals from appropriate substrates undergo 5-exo cyclization, with higher diastereoselectivity than the analogous all-carbon radicals. From such radicals it is straightforward to make substituted tetrahydrofurans. PMID:25569214

  2. Mechanically Stabilized Tetrathiafulvalene Radical Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Coskun, Ali; Spruell, Jason M.; Barin, Gokhan; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Forgan, Ross S.; Colvin, Michael T.; Carmieli, Raanan; Benitez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Friedman, Douglas C.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Goddard, William A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Two donor-acceptor [3]catenanes—composed of a tetracationic molecular square, cyclobis(paraquat-4,4'-biphenylene), as the π-electron deficient ring and either two tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) containing macrocycles or two TTF-butadiyne-containing macrocycles as the π-electron rich components—have been investigated in order to study their ability to form TTF radical dimers. It has been proven that the mechanically interlocked nature of the [3]catenanes facilitates the formation of the TTF radical dimers under redox control, allowing an investigation to be performed on these intermolecular interactions in a so-called “molecular flask” under ambient conditions in considerable detail. In addition, it has also been shown that the stability of the TTF radical-cation dimers can be tuned by varying the secondary binding motifs in the [3]catenanes. By replacing the DNP station with a butadiyne group, the distribution of the TTF radical-cation dimer can be changed from 60% to 100%. These findings have been established by several techniques including cyclic voltammetry, spectroelectrochemistry and UV-vis-NIR and EPR spectroscopies, as well as with X-ray diffraction analysis which has provided a range of solid-state crystal structures. The experimental data are also supported by high-level DFT calculations. The results contribute significantly to our fundamental understanding of the interactions within the TTF radical dimers.

  3. Competition of charge- versus radical-directed fragmentation of gas-phase protonated cysteine sulfinyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Love, Chasity B; Tan, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-24

    The fragmentation behavior of various cysteine sulfinyl ions (intact, N-acetylated, and O-methylated), new members of the gas-phase amino acid radical ion family, was investigated by low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). The dominant fragmentation channel for the protonated cysteine sulfinyl radicals ((SO•)Cys) was the radical-directed Cα-Cβ homolytic cleavage, resulting in the formation of glycyl radical ions and loss of CH2SO. This channel, however, was not observed for protonated N-acetylated cysteine sulfinyl radicals (Ac-(SO•)Cys); instead, charge-directed H2O loss followed immediately by SH loss prevailed. Counterintuitively, the H2O loss did not derive from the carboxyl group but involved the sulfinyl oxygen, a proton, and a Cβ hydrogen atom. Theoretical calculations suggested that N-acetylation significantly increases the barrier (~14 kcal mol(-1)) for the radical-directed fragmentation channel because of its reduced capability to stabilize the thus-formed glycyl radical ions via the captodative effect. N-Acetylation also assists in moving the proton to the sulfinyl site, which reduces the barrier for H2O loss. Our studies demonstrate that for cysteine sulfinyl radical ions, the stability of the product ions (glycyl radical ions) and the location of the charge (proton) can significantly modulate the competition between radical- and charge-directed fragmentation. PMID:23527556

  4. The stabilization energies of polyenyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu-Ran; Holmes, John L.

    1994-10-01

    The resonance stabilization energies, Es, of polyenyl radicals can be estimated by the equation Es( N)=-13.2+[3.95-15.8(2) -2/ n] kcal mol -1, where N is the number of C, C-π bonds in the polyenyl radicals. This correlation has been extended for predicting the weakest HC, CC and COH bond dissociation energies in vitamin A and similar compounds.

  5. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; Degrado, William F.

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol-1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry.

  6. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    PubMed Central

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; DeGrado, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(ii) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal–ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol−1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry. PMID:27001731

  7. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical.

    PubMed

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T; DeGrado, William F

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol(-1)). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry. PMID:27001731

  8. Radical attached aluminum nanoclusters: an alternative way of cluster stabilization.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Turbasu; Pal, Sourav

    2016-08-21

    The stability and electronic structure of radical attached aluminum nanoclusters are investigated using density functional theory (DFT). A detailed investigation shows good correlation between the thermodynamic stability of radical attached clusters and the stability of the attached radical anions. All other calculated parameters like HOMO-LUMO gap and charge transfer are also found to be consistent with the observed thermodynamic stabilities of the complexes. Investigation of the electronic structure of radical attached complexes further shows the presence of jellium structures within the core similar to the ligated clusters. Comparison with available experimental and theoretical data also proves the validity of superatomic complex theory for the radical attached clusters as well. Based on the evaluated thermodynamic parameters, selected radical attached clusters are observed to be more thermodynamically stable in comparison with experimentally synthesized ligated clusters. Stabilization of small metal clusters is one of the greatest challenges in current cluster science and the present investigation confirms the fact that radical attached clusters can provide a viable alternative to ligated clusters in the future. PMID:27435912

  9. Domino Fragmentations in Traceless Directing Groups of Radical Cascades: Evidence for the Formation of Alkoxy Radicals via C-O Scission.

    PubMed

    Harris, Trevor; Gomes, Gabriel Dos Passos; Clark, Ronald J; Alabugin, Igor V

    2016-07-15

    Direct evidence for the formation of alkoxy radicals is reported in radical cascades using traceless directing groups. Despite the possibility of hydrogen abstraction in the fragmenting step, followed by loss of R-OH, β-scission is preferred for the formation of alkoxy radicals. For the first time, the C-O radical was intermolecularly trapped using a silyl enol ether. Various C-X fragmenting groups were explored as possible traceless directing groups for the preparation of extended polyaromatics. Computational evidence shows that a combination of aromatization, steric and stereoelectronic effects assists the fragmentation to alkoxy radicals. Additionally, a new through-space interaction was discovered between O and Sn in the fragmentation as a specific transition state stabilizing effect. PMID:27304982

  10. The Radical Stabilization Energy of a Substituted Carbon-centered Free Radical Depends both on the Functionality of the Substituent and the Ordinality of the Radical

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2011-01-01

    Chemical intuition suggests that the stabilization of a carbon-centered free radical by a substituent X would be the greatest for a prim and least for a more stable tert radical because of saturation. However, analysis of a comprehensive recent set of bond dissociation energies computed by Coote and coworkers (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2010 12 9597) and transformed into radical stabilization energies (RSE) suggests that this supposition is often violated. The RSE for a given X depends not only on the nature of X but also on the ordinality (i.e., prim, sec, or tert) of the radical onto which it is substituted. For substituents that stabilize by electron delocalization but also contain electron-withdrawing centers, such as the carbonyl function, the stabilization of XCMe2 compared with HCMe2 is greater than for XCH2 compared with HCH2 . However, for substituents that stabilize by lone-pair electron donation, such as N or O centers, the order is strongly reversed. This contrast can be qualitatively rationalized by considering charge-separated VB contributors to the radical structure (R2C+ X- and R2C- X+ ) and the contrasting effects of methyl substituents on them. This conclusion is not dependent on the particular definition used for RSE.

  11. Haptoglobin Binding Stabilizes Hemoglobin Ferryl Iron and the Globin Radical on Tyrosine β145

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, Dominik J.; Buehler, Paul W.; Wilson, Michael T.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Silkstone, Gary; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Bulow, Leif; Alayash, Abdu I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Hemoglobin (Hb) becomes toxic when released from the erythrocyte. The acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp) binds avidly to Hb and decreases oxidative damage to Hb itself and to the surrounding proteins and lipids. However, the molecular mechanism underpinning Hp protection is to date unclear. The aim of this study was to use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, stopped flow optical spectrophotometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to explore the mechanism and specifically the role of specific tyrosine residues in this protection. Results: Following peroxide challenge Hb produces reactive oxidative intermediates in the form of ferryl heme and globin free radicals. Hp binding increases the steady state level of ferryl formation during Hb-catalyzed lipid peroxidation, while at the same time dramatically inhibiting the overall reaction rate. This enhanced ferryl stability is also seen in the absence of lipids and in the presence of external reductants. Hp binding is not accompanied by a decrease in the pK of ferryl protonation; the protonated ferryl species still forms, but is intrinsically less reactive. Ferryl stabilization is accompanied by a significant increase in the concentration of the peroxide-induced tyrosine free radical. EPR spectral parameters and mutagenesis studies suggest that this radical is located on tyrosine 145, the penultimate C-terminal amino acid on the beta Hb subunit. Innovation: Hp binding decreases both the ferryl iron and free radical reactivity of Hb. Conclusion: Hp protects against Hb-induced damage in the vasculature, not by preventing the primary reactivity of heme oxidants, but by rendering the resultant protein products less damaging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2264–2273. PMID:22702311

  12. Tested Demonstrations: The Effect of Free Radical Stability on the Rate of Bromination of Hydrocarbons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents a demonstration of the effect of alkyl free radical stability on the rate of free radical halogenation of hydrocarbons. The arenes toluene, ethylbenzene and comene are photobrominated comparatively, using an overhead projector both to provide a light source for the chemical reaction and to project the results on a screen. (CS)

  13. Spectroscopy and Ionization Thresholds of Isoelectronic 1-PHENYLALLYL and Benzylallenyl Resonance Stabilized Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebree, Joshua A.; Kidwell, Nathan; Buchanan, Evan; Zwier, Timothy S.; Zgierski, Marek

    2011-06-01

    In recent years it has been proposed that resonance-stabilized radicals (RSRs) may play an important role as intermediates in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). RSRs gain extra stability by delocalizing the unpaired electron through a neighboring conjugated π-system. Because of this extra stability, RSRs are able to build up in concentration, allowing for the creation of larger, more complex systems through their recombination with other RSRs. Mass-selective two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectra of two RSRs, phenylallyl and benzylallenyl radicals, have been recorded under jet-cooled conditions. These two radicals, while sharing the same radical conjugation, have unique properties. The phenylallyl and benzylallenyl radicals were respectively produced via discharge of trans-β-methylstyrene and benzylallene in argon prior to supersonic expansion. The D0-D1 origin of the phenylallyl radical was found at 19204 wn and was found to have a strong vertical ionization energy of 6.905(2) eV. By comparison, the benzylallenyl radical has an origin at 19703 wn and, while showing similar Franck-Condon activity to phenylallyl, has an IP curve indicative of a large geometry change between the ground state and the ion 7.50(2) eV. Visible-visible holeburning was used to show that each radical exists in one conformeric form in the expansion. The CH stretch region of each radical was taken using D0-Resonant Ion Dip Infrared Spectroscopy in a novel four laser experiment. A combination of this and DFT calculations was used to show that each radical exists in a trans geometry.

  14. Electron exchange involving a sulfur-stabilized ruthenium radical cation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Anthony P; Ryland, Bradford L; Norton, Jack R; Buccella, Daniela; Moscatelli, Alberto

    2007-07-01

    Half-sandwich Ru(II) amine, thiol, and thiolate complexes were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The thiol and amine complexes react slowly with acetonitrile to give free thiol or amine and the acetonitrile complex. With the thiol complex, the reaction is dissociative. The thiolate complex has been oxidized to its Ru(III) radical cation and the solution EPR spectrum of that radical cation recorded. Cobaltocene reduces the thiol complex to the thiolate complex. The 1H and 31P NMR signals of the thiolate complex in acetonitrile become very broad whenever the thiolate and thiol complexes are present simultaneously. The line broadening is primarily due to electron exchange between the thiolate complex and its radical cation; the latter is generated by an unfavorable redox equilibrium between the thiol and thiolate complexes. Pyramidal inversion of sulfur in the thiol complex is fast at room temperature but slow at lower temperatures; major and minor conformers of the thiol complex were observed by 31P NMR at -98 degrees C in CD2Cl2. PMID:17569530

  15. Stabilization of Superoxide and CO3- Radicals through Crystalliation of CaCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Kazuhide; Ikeya, Motoji

    1993-08-01

    Unstable superoxide radicals (ga{=}2.010, gb{=}2.064, gc{=}2.049, and gd{=}2.006) and CO3- hole centers (gx{=}2.017, gy{=}2.011, and gz{=}2.002) were stabilized in CaCO3 when the inorganic material was crystallized from radical solution. The radicals surrounded by the lattice give strong electron spin resonance (ESR) signals at room temperature. The signal intensities of superoxide and CO3- radicals generated in H2O2 solution and doped in CaCO3 are much stronger than those obtained by adsorption. The color of radical-doped CaCO3 is different from that of the radical-adsorbed one. On heating the samples, the spectrum and the color of the radical-doped CaCO3 powder changed. The effects of impurities on the spectrum of radical-doped inorganic materials are studied. Some doping experiments have been conducted using other inorganic materials.

  16. Stabilization of superoxide and CO(-)3 radicals through crystallization of CaCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Kazuhide; Ikeya, Motoji

    1993-08-01

    Unstable superoxide radicals (g(sub a) = 2.010, g(sub b) = 2.064, g(sub c) = 2.049, and g(sub d) = 2.066) and CO(-)3 hole centers (g(sub x) = 2.017, g(sub y) = 2.011, and g(sub z) = 2.002) were stabilized in CaCO3 when the inorganic material was crystallized from radical solution. The radicals surrounded by the lattice give strong electron spin resonance (ESR) signals at room temperature. The signal intensities of superoxide and CO(-)3 radicals generated in H2O2 solution and doped in CaCO are much stronger than those obtained by adsorption. The color of radical-doped CaCO3 is different from that of the radical-adsorbed one. On heating the samples, the spectrum and the color of the radical-doped CaCO3 powder changed. The effects of impurities on the spectrum of radical-doped inorganic materials are studied. Some doping experiments have been conducted using other inorganic materials.

  17. Charge-transfer-directed radical substitution enables para-selective C-H functionalization.

    PubMed

    Boursalian, Gregory B; Ham, Won Seok; Mazzotti, Anthony R; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Efficient C-H functionalization requires selectivity for specific C-H bonds. Progress has been made for directed aromatic substitution reactions to achieve ortho and meta selectivity, but a general strategy for para-selective C-H functionalization has remained elusive. Herein we introduce a previously unappreciated concept that enables nearly complete para selectivity. We propose that radicals with high electron affinity elicit arene-to-radical charge transfer in the transition state of radical addition, which is the factor primarily responsible for high positional selectivity. We demonstrate with a simple theoretical tool that the selectivity is predictable and show the utility of the concept through a direct synthesis of aryl piperazines. Our results contradict the notion, widely held by organic chemists, that radical aromatic substitution reactions are inherently unselective. The concept of radical substitution directed by charge transfer could serve as the basis for the development of new, highly selective C-H functionalization reactions. PMID:27442288

  18. Charge-transfer-directed radical substitution enables para-selective C–H functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boursalian, Gregory B.; Ham, Won Seok; Mazzotti, Anthony R.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    Efficient C–H functionalization requires selectivity for specific C–H bonds. Progress has been made for directed aromatic substitution reactions to achieve ortho and meta selectivity, but a general strategy for para-selective C–H functionalization has remained elusive. Herein we introduce a previously unappreciated concept that enables nearly complete para selectivity. We propose that radicals with high electron affinity elicit arene-to-radical charge transfer in the transition state of radical addition, which is the factor primarily responsible for high positional selectivity. We demonstrate with a simple theoretical tool that the selectivity is predictable and show the utility of the concept through a direct synthesis of aryl piperazines. Our results contradict the notion, widely held by organic chemists, that radical aromatic substitution reactions are inherently unselective. The concept of radical substitution directed by charge transfer could serve as the basis for the development of new, highly selective C–H functionalization reactions.

  19. Sensing magnetic directions in birds: radical pair processes involving cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Birds can use the geomagnetic field for compass orientation. Behavioral experiments, mostly with migrating passerines, revealed three characteristics of the avian magnetic compass: (1) it works spontaneously only in a narrow functional window around the intensity of the ambient magnetic field, but can adapt to other intensities, (2) it is an "inclination compass", not based on the polarity of the magnetic field, but the axial course of the field lines, and (3) it requires short-wavelength light from UV to 565 nm Green. The Radical Pair-Model of magnetoreception can explain these properties by proposing spin-chemical processes in photopigments as underlying mechanism. Applying radio frequency fields, a diagnostic tool for radical pair processes, supports an involvement of a radical pair mechanism in avian magnetoreception: added to the geomagnetic field, they disrupted orientation, presumably by interfering with the receptive processes. Cryptochromes have been suggested as receptor molecules. Cry1a is found in the eyes of birds, where it is located at the membranes of the disks in the outer segments of the UV-cones in chickens and robins. Immuno-histochemical studies show that it is activated by the wavelengths of light that allow magnetic compass orientation in birds. PMID:25587420

  20. Sensing Magnetic Directions in Birds: Radical Pair Processes Involving Cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Birds can use the geomagnetic field for compass orientation. Behavioral experiments, mostly with migrating passerines, revealed three characteristics of the avian magnetic compass: (1) it works spontaneously only in a narrow functional window around the intensity of the ambient magnetic field, but can adapt to other intensities, (2) it is an “inclination compass”, not based on the polarity of the magnetic field, but the axial course of the field lines, and (3) it requires short-wavelength light from UV to 565 nm Green. The Radical Pair-Model of magnetoreception can explain these properties by proposing spin-chemical processes in photopigments as underlying mechanism. Applying radio frequency fields, a diagnostic tool for radical pair processes, supports an involvement of a radical pair mechanism in avian magnetoreception: added to the geomagnetic field, they disrupted orientation, presumably by interfering with the receptive processes. Cryptochromes have been suggested as receptor molecules. Cry1a is found in the eyes of birds, where it is located at the membranes of the disks in the outer segments of the UV-cones in chickens and robins. Immuno-histochemical studies show that it is activated by the wavelengths of light that allow magnetic compass orientation in birds. PMID:25587420

  1. Stability and reactivity of free radicals: a physicochemical perspective with biological implications.

    PubMed

    Karogodina, Tatiana Yu; Sergeeva, Svetlana V; Stass, Dmitri V

    2011-01-01

    Several factors control the reactivity of radicals and can provide the strategies to convert highly reactive species into more persistent species that are easier to detect in an experiment. A reaction can only proceed if sufficient mobility and thermodynamic driving force are provided and the reaction is allowed by steric considerations and by electronic states of the reagents and products. A violation of at least one of these conditions can make the radical relatively stable. In certain cases, these factors occur naturally, in other situations, they can be purposefully manipulated to reduce the reactivity of highly reactive radicals, prolonging their lifetime and increasing their concentration. The discussed examples cover a vast range of lifetimes, from 10(-9) seconds to 10(9) years, at concentration levels down to 10(3) radicals per sample (10(-18) M), and stress that stability and reactivity are not independent notions and are the two sides of the same coin. PMID:21599439

  2. Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    J Kiselar; M Chance

    2011-12-31

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposure of proteins to a 'white' X-ray beam for milliseconds provides sufficient oxidative modification to surface amino acid side chains, which can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular subdomains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review, we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis

  3. The stability of allyl radicals following the photodissociation of allyl iodide at 193 nm.

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, H.; Pratt, S. T.; Chemistry

    2006-01-01

    The photodissociation of allyl iodide (C{sub 3}H{sub 5}I) at 193 nm was investigated by using a combination of vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization of the allyl radical, resonant multiphoton ionization of the iodine atoms, and velocity map imaging. The data provide insight into the primary C-I bond fission process and into the dissociative ionization of the allyl radical to produce C{sub 3}H{sup 3+}. The experimental results are consistent with the earlier results of Szpunar et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 5078 (2003)], in that some allyl radicals with internal energies higher than the secondary dissociation barrier are found to be stable. This stability results from the partitioning of available energy between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of the radical, the effects of a centrifugal barrier along the reaction coordinate, and the effects of the kinetic shift in the secondary dissociation of the allyl radical. The present results suggest that the primary dissociation of allyl iodide to allyl radicals plus I*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) is more important than previously suspected.

  4. The stability of allyl radicals following the photodissociation of allyl iodide at 193 nm.

    PubMed

    Fan, H; Pratt, S T

    2006-10-14

    The photodissociation of allyl iodide (C3H5I) at 193 nm was investigated by using a combination of vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization of the allyl radical, resonant multiphoton ionization of the iodine atoms, and velocity map imaging. The data provide insight into the primary C-I bond fission process and into the dissociative ionization of the allyl radical to produce C3H3+. The experimental results are consistent with the earlier results of Szpunar et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 5078 (2003)], in that some allyl radicals with internal energies higher than the secondary dissociation barrier are found to be stable. This stability results from the partitioning of available energy between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of the radical, the effects of a centrifugal barrier along the reaction coordinate, and the effects of the kinetic shift in the secondary dissociation of the allyl radical. The present results suggest that the primary dissociation of allyl iodide to allyl radicals plus I*(2P(1/2)) is more important than previously suspected. PMID:17042585

  5. Photodissociation of TEMPO-modified peptides: new approaches to radical-directed dissociation of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David L; Hansen, Christopher S; Trevitt, Adam J; Oh, Han Bin; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2014-03-14

    Radical-directed dissociation of gas phase ions is emerging as a powerful and complementary alternative to traditional tandem mass spectrometric techniques for biomolecular structural analysis. Previous studies have identified that coupling of 2-[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl)methyl]benzoic acid (TEMPO-Bz) to the N-terminus of a peptide introduces a labile oxygen-carbon bond that can be selectively activated upon collisional activation to produce a radical ion. Here we demonstrate that structurally-defined peptide radical ions can also be generated upon UV laser photodissociation of the same TEMPO-Bz derivatives in a linear ion-trap mass spectrometer. When subjected to further mass spectrometric analyses, the radical ions formed by a single laser pulse undergo identical dissociations as those formed by collisional activation of the same precursor ion, and can thus be used to derive molecular structure. Mapping the initial radical formation process as a function of photon energy by photodissociation action spectroscopy reveals that photoproduct formation is selective but occurs only in modest yield across the wavelength range (300-220 nm), with the photoproduct yield maximised between 235 and 225 nm. Based on the analysis of a set of model compounds, structural modifications to the TEMPO-Bz derivative are suggested to optimise radical photoproduct yield. Future development of such probes offers the advantage of increased sensitivity and selectivity for radical-directed dissociation. PMID:24473158

  6. Role of the Filters in the Formation and Stabilization of Semiquinone Radicals Collected from Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Maskos, Zofia; Dellinger, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The fractional pyrolysis of Bright tobacco was performed in nitrogen atmosphere over the temperature range of 240 – 510 °C in a specially constructed, high temperature flow reactor system. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to analyze the free radicals in the initially produced total particular matter (TPM) and in TPM after exposure to ambient air (aging). Different filters have been used to collect TPM from tobacco smoke: cellulosic, cellulose nitrate, cellulose acetate, nylon, Teflon and Cambridge. The collection of the primary radicals (measured immediately after collection of TPM on filters), the formation and stabilization of the secondary radicals (defined as radicals formed during aging of TPM samples on the filters) depend significantly on the material of the filter. A mechanistic explanation about different binding capability of the filters decreasing in the order: cellulosic < cellulose nitrate < cellulose acetate < nylon ~ teflon is presented. Different properties were observed for the Cambridge filter. Specific care must be taken using the filters for identification of radicals from tobacco smoke to avoid artifacts in each case. PMID:24265513

  7. Thrust vectoring for lateral-directional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peron, Lee R.; Carpenter, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of using thrust vectoring for lateral-directional control and the effects of reducing the tail size of a single-engine aircraft were investigated. The aerodynamic characteristics of the F-16 aircraft were generated by using the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System II panel code. The resulting lateral-directional linear perturbation analysis of a modified F-16 aircraft with various tail sizes and yaw vectoring was performed at several speeds and altitudes to determine the stability and control trends for the aircraft compared to these trends for a baseline aircraft. A study of the paddle-type turning vane thrust vectoring control system as used on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle is also presented.

  8. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  9. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; et al

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-Smore » cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.« less

  10. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  11. 14 CFR 27.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static directional stability. 27.177... directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense and direction... sideslip angle versus directional control position curve may have a negative slope within a small range...

  12. 14 CFR 27.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static directional stability. 27.177... directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense and direction... sideslip angle versus directional control position curve may have a negative slope within a small range...

  13. 14 CFR 27.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static directional stability. 27.177... directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense and direction... sideslip angle versus directional control position curve may have a negative slope within a small range...

  14. In vivo triarylmethyl radical stabilization through encapsulation in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Kahina; Boutier-Pischon, Audrey; Auger, Florian; Françon, Dominique; Almario, Antonio; Frapart, Yves-Michel

    2016-09-01

    In vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging and spectroscopy are non-invasive technologies used to specifically detect and quantify paramagnetic species. However, the relative instability of spin probes such as triarylmethyl radicals limits their application to conduct oxygen quantification and mapping. In this study we encapsulated tetrathiatriarylmethyl radical (TAM; known as "Finland" probe) in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel (PF-127) in order to limit its degradation and evaluate its in vitro and in vivo EPR properties as a function of oxygen. Our results show that the EPR signal of encapsulated TAM in PF-127 hydrogel is similar to the one in solution. Although it is less sensitive to oxygen, it is suitable for oximetry. We also demonstrated that the incorporation of TAM in PF-127 hydrogel leads to an improved in vivo EPR stability of the radical under anesthesia. This new formulation enables high quality EPR imaging and oximetry and paves the way for the application of TAM radical-based probes in various biomedical fields.

  15. 14 CFR 29.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static directional stability. 29.177... Static directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense... versus directional control position curve may have a negative slope within a small range of angles...

  16. 14 CFR 29.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static directional stability. 29.177... Static directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense... versus directional control position curve may have a negative slope within a small range of angles...

  17. 14 CFR 29.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static directional stability. 29.177... Static directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense... versus directional control position curve may have a negative slope within a small range of angles...

  18. Stability of eutectic interface during directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.H.

    1996-04-23

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys shows different types of eutectic morphologies. These include lamellar, rod, oscillating and tilting modes. The growth of these morphologies occurs with a macroscopically planar interface. However, under certain conditions, the planar eutectic front becomes unstable and gives rise to a cellular or a dendritic structure. This instability leads to the cellular/dendritic structure of either a primary phase or a two-phase structure. The objective of this work is to develop a fundamental understanding of the instability of eutectic structure into cellular/dendritic structures of a single phase and of two-phases. Experimental studies have been carried out to examine the transition from a planar to two-phase cellular and dendritic structures in a ceramic system of Alumina-Zirconia (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}) and in a transparent organic system of carbon tetrabromide and hexachloroethane (CBr{sub 4}-C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}). Several aspects of eutectic interface stability have been examined.

  19. Free radicals and SOD activity of jaw cyst. Direct measurement and spin trapping studies by ESR.

    PubMed

    Kimura, H; Simodate, H; Suzuki, M

    1990-01-01

    Free radicals produced in the fluid of jaw cysts were directly measured at room temperature using ESR. With these samples, SOD activity of the cyst fluid was measured by the ESR spin trapping method with DMPO as a trapping agent. Freeze-dried samples of cyst fluid showed a broad ESR signal at g = 2.005. Relative signal intensity of samples from jaw cysts with inflammation was higher than jaw cysts without inflammation. SOD activity of cyst fluid with high viscosity showed higher values than that of cyst fluid with low viscosity. We suggest that free radicals produced in jaw cyst damage tissues while higher SOD activity of cyst fluid play a role in a self-defense mechanism against free radicals. PMID:2167266

  20. 213 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation on Peptide Anions: Radical-Directed Fragmentation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Mohammad A.; Girod, Marion; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of acidic peptides and proteins is greatly hindered due to lack of suitable analytical techniques. Here we present the implementation of 213 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) in high-resolution quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer in negative polarity for peptide anions. Radical-driven backbone fragmentation provides 22 distinctive fragment ion types, achieving the complete sequence coverage for all reported peptides. Hydrogen-deficient radical anion not only promotes the cleavage of Cα-C bond but also stimulates the breaking of N-Cα and C-N bonds. Radical-directed loss of small molecules and specific side chain of amino acids are detected in these experiments. Radical containing side chain of amino acids (Tyr, Ser, Thr, and Asp) may possibly support the N-Cα backbone fragmentation. Proline comprising peptides exhibit the unusual fragment ions similar to reported earlier. Interestingly, basic amino acids such as Arg and Lys also stimulated the formation of abundant b and y ions of the related peptide anions. Loss of hydrogen atom from the charge-reduced radical anion and fragment ions are rationalized by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation, locating the potential energy surface (PES) of ππ* and repulsive πσ* excited states of a model amide system.

  1. 213 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation on Peptide Anions: Radical-Directed Fragmentation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Halim, Mohammad A; Girod, Marion; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of acidic peptides and proteins is greatly hindered due to lack of suitable analytical techniques. Here we present the implementation of 213 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) in high-resolution quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer in negative polarity for peptide anions. Radical-driven backbone fragmentation provides 22 distinctive fragment ion types, achieving the complete sequence coverage for all reported peptides. Hydrogen-deficient radical anion not only promotes the cleavage of Cα-C bond but also stimulates the breaking of N-Cα and C-N bonds. Radical-directed loss of small molecules and specific side chain of amino acids are detected in these experiments. Radical containing side chain of amino acids (Tyr, Ser, Thr, and Asp) may possibly support the N-Cα backbone fragmentation. Proline comprising peptides exhibit the unusual fragment ions similar to reported earlier. Interestingly, basic amino acids such as Arg and Lys also stimulated the formation of abundant b and y ions of the related peptide anions. Loss of hydrogen atom from the charge-reduced radical anion and fragment ions are rationalized by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation, locating the potential energy surface (PES) of ππ* and repulsive πσ* excited states of a model amide system. PMID:26545767

  2. Direct measurements of HOx radicals in the marine boundary layer: testing the current tropospheric chemistry mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Yugo; Akimoto, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    OH and HO(2) radicals, atmospheric detergents, and the reservoir thereof, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. In spite of their importance, we had no choice but to trust their concentrations predicted by modeling studies based on known chemical processes. However, recent direct measurements of these radicals have enabled us to test and revise our knowledge of the processes by comparing the predicted and observed values of the radical concentrations. We developed a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument and successfully observed OH and HO(2) at three remote islands of Japan (Oki Island, Okinawa Island, and Rishiri Island). At Okinawa Island, the observed daytime level of HO(2) agreed closely with the model estimates, suggesting that the photochemistry at Okinawa is well described by the current chemistry mechanism. At Rishiri Island, in contrast, the observed daytime level of HO(2) was consistently much lower than the calculated values. We proposed that iodine chemistry, usually not incorporated into the mechanism, is at least partly responsible for the discrepancy in the results. At night, HO(2) was detected at levels greater than 1 pptv at all three islands, suggesting the presence of processes in the dark that produce radicals. We showed that ozone reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons, including monoterpenes, could significantly contribute to radical production. PMID:12112871

  3. 14 CFR 29.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static directional stability. 29.177 Section 29.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Static directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the...

  4. The spinal accessory nerve plexus, the trapezius muscle, and shoulder stabilization after radical neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Burns, S; Kaiser, C W

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and anatomic study of the spinal accessory, the eleventh cranial nerve, and trapezius muscle function of patients who had radical neck cancer surgery was conducted. This study was done not only to document the indispensibility of the trapezius muscle to shoulder-girdle stability, but also to clarify the role of the eleventh cranial nerve in the variable motor and sensory changes occurring after the loss of this muscle. Seventeen male patients, 49-69 years of age, (average of 60 years of age) undergoing a total of 23 radical neck dissections were examined for upper extremity function, particularly in regard to the trapezius muscle, and for subjective signs of pain. The eleventh nerve, usually regarded as the sole motor innervation to the trapezius, was cut in 17 instances because of tumor involvement. Dissection of four fresh and 30 preserved adult cadavers helped to reconcile the motor and sensory differences in patients who had undergone loss of the eleventh nerve. The dissections and clinical observations corroborate that the trapezius is a key part of a "muscle continuum" that stabilizes the shoulder. Variations in origins and insertions of the trapezius may influence its function in different individuals. As regards the spinal accessory nerve, it is concluded that varying motor and sensory connections form a plexus with the eleventh nerve, accounting, in part, for the variations in motor innervation and function of the trapezius, as well as for a variable spectrum of sensory changes when the eleventh nerve is cut. For this reason, it is suggested that the term "spinal accessory nerve plexus" be used to refer to the eleventh nerve when it is considered in the context of radical neck cancer surgery. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3056289

  5. Structural basis for hydration dynamics in radical stabilization of bilin reductase mutants†#

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Amanda C.; Gae, David D.; Richley, Michael A.; Stoll, Stefan; Gunn, Alexander; Lim, Sunghyuk; Martin, Shelley S.; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Britt, R. David; Ames, James B.; Lagarias, J. Clark; Fisher, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Heme-derived linear tetrapyrroles (phytobilins) in phycobiliproteins and phytochromes perform critical light-harvesting and light-sensing roles in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. A key enzyme in their biogenesis, phycocyanobilin:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PcyA), catalyzes the overall four-electron reduction of biliverdin IXα to phycocyanobilin – the common chromophore precursor for both classes of biliproteins. This interconversion occurs via semi-reduced bilin radical intermediates that are profoundly stabilized by selected mutations of two critical catalytic residues, Asp105 and His88. To understand the structural basis for this stabilization and to gain insight into the overall catalytic mechanism, we report the high-resolution crystal structures of substrate-loaded Asp105Asn and His88Gln mutants of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 PcyA in the initial oxidized and one-electron reduced radical state. Unlike wild-type PcyA, both mutants possess a bilin-interacting axial water molecule that is ejected from the active site upon formation of the enzyme-bound neutral radical complex. Structural studies of both mutants also show that the side chain of Glu76 is unfavorably located for D-ring vinyl reduction. Based on these structures and companion 15N-1H long-range HMQC NMR analyses to assess the protonation state of histidine residues, we propose a new mechanistic scheme for PcyA-mediated reduction of both vinyl groups of biliverdin wherein an axial water molecule, that prematurely binds and ejects from both mutants upon one electron reduction, is required for catalytic turnover of the semi-reduced state. PMID:20557110

  6. Stabilities of nitrogen containing heterocyclic radicals and geometrical influences on non-radiative processes in organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evleth, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    Stabilities of nitrogen containing heterocyclic radicals were studied to detect radicals of the type R-N-R, and to theoretically rationalize their electronic structure. The computation of simple potential energy surfaces for ground and excited states is discussed along with the photophysical properties of indolizine. Methods of calculation and problems associated with the calculations are presented. Results, tables, diagrams, discussions, and references are included.

  7. Direct Excitation of the Reaction Coordinate: Overtone-Induced Predissociation of the Hydroxymethyl Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisler, Hanna; Ryazanov, Mikhail; Rodrigo, Chirantha P.

    2011-06-01

    The overtone-induced vibrational predissociation of the hydroxymethyl radical is achieved following excitation of the radical to the third O-H stretch overtone. The excited O-H stretch is also the bond that breaks; i.e. overtone excitation is in the reaction coordinate. The production of H atoms takes place via tunneling through the barrier to the H + formaldehyde channel. H-atom photofragment yield spectra in the region of the third overtone reveal two mixed bands with contributions from the third OH overtone and a combination band comprised of two quanta of OH stretch and one quantum of CH asymmetric stretch. Using velocity map imaging, sliced images of H-atom products are obtained with kinetic energy resolution sufficient to reveal the vibrational structure in the formaldehyde co-fragment. As expected, most of the formaldehyde molecules are born without vibrational excitation but some exhibit excitation in other modes, such as wagging and CO stretch. The rotational contours of the vibrational bands are well described by temperatures in the range 100-150 K. Slice imaging allows scanning the pump laser while monitoring H fragments in selected kinetic energy ranges, and in this way it is demonstrated that all the observed vibrational levels of formaldehyde have their parentage in the hydroxymethyl radical. The barrier to isomerization to methoxy is comparable to the barrier to direct dissociation and the role of isomerization is investigated by using partially deuterated radicals.

  8. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25.177 Section 25.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.177 Static...

  9. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25.177 Section 25.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.177 Static...

  10. Degradation pathways of lamotrigine under advanced treatment by direct UV photolysis, hydroxyl radicals, and ozone.

    PubMed

    Keen, Olya S; Ferrer, Imma; Michael Thurman, E; Linden, Karl G

    2014-12-01

    Lamotrigine is recently recognized as a persistent pharmaceutical in the water environment and wastewater effluents. Its degradation was studied under UV and ozone advanced oxidation treatments with reaction kinetics of lamotrigine with ozone (≈4 M(-1)s(-1)), hydroxyl radical [(2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(9)M(-1)s(-1)] and by UV photolysis with low and medium pressure mercury vapor lamps [quantum yields ≈0 and (2.7 ± 0.4)× 10(-4) respectively] determined. All constants were measured at pH 6 and at temperature ≈20°C. The results indicate that lamotrigine is slow to respond to direct photolysis or oxidation by ozone and no attenuation of the contaminant is expected in UV or ozone disinfection applications. The compound reacts rapidly with hydroxyl radicals indicating that advanced oxidation processes would be effective for its treatment. Degradation products were identified under each treatment process using accurate mass time-of-flight spectrometry and pathways of decay were proposed. The main transformation pathways in each process were: dechlorination of the benzene ring during direct photolysis; hydroxyl group addition to the benzene ring during the reaction with hydroxyl radicals; and triazine ring opening after reaction with ozone. Different products that form in each process may be to a varying degree less environmentally stable than the parent lamotrigine. In addition, a novel method of ozone quenching without addition of salts is presented. The new quenching method would allow subsequent mass spectrometry analysis without a solid phase extraction clean-up step. The method involves raising the pH of the sample to approximately 10 for a few seconds and lowering it back and is therefore limited to applications for which temporary pH change is not expected to affect the outcome of the analysis. PMID:25150682

  11. Choice of Bond Dissociation Enthalpies on which to Base the Stabilization Energies of Simple Radicals: DH(R-H)is Preferred because DH(R-Me) is Perturbed by Changes in Chain Branching

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2008-01-01

    The relative stabilization energies of radicals, SE(R ), along the simple series methyl/ethyl/i-propyl/t-butyl are known to vary in spread and even direction dependent on which dissociation enthalpies, DH(R-X), they are based on. Using a highly electronegative X is recognized as unwise, but it is not clear whether a choice of X = Me or X = R might not be preferred over the almost universal use of R = H. The enthalpies of isomerization of C4 radical pairs that vary only in the substitution pattern at the radical center but not in carbon skeleton illustrate that R = H is indeed the better choice. Comparisons in the context of recent predictive models for alkane and radical stability indicate that, while relative DH(R-H) values highlight the desired difference in substitution pattern at the radical center, relative DH(R-Me) values are perturbed by differences in skeletal branching or protobranching which are well-known to affect thermochemistry. As a result, SE(R ) values derived from relative DH(R-Me) values are consistently too small. The same pattern is illustrated for prim, sec, and tert allylic and benzylic radicals (larger SE(R )) and for the parent vinyl, phenyl, and ethynyl radicals (negative SE(R )).

  12. Infants Show Stability of Goal-Directed Imitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakkalou, Elena; Ellis-Davies, Kate; Fowler, Nia C.; Hilbrink, Elma E.; Gattis, Merideth

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that infants selectively reproduce observed actions and have argued that this selectivity reflects understanding of intentions and goals, or goal-directed imitation. We reasoned that if selective imitation of goal-directed actions reflects understanding of intentions, infants should demonstrate stability across…

  13. Stability and properties of the two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride monolayer functionalized by hydroxyl (OH) radicals: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-mei; Liu, Yue-jie; Wang, Hong-xia; Zhao, Jing-xiang; Cai, Qing-hai; Wang, Xuan-zhang

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by the great advance in graphene hydroxide--a versatile material with various applications--we performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the functionalization of the two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheet with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, which has been achieved experimentally recently. Particular attention was paid to searching for the most favorable site(s) for the adsorbed OH radicals on a h-BN sheet and addressing the roles of OH radical coverage on the stability and properties of functionalized h-BN sheet. The results indicate that, for an individual OH radica, the most stable configuration is that it is adsorbed on the B site of the h-BN surface with an adsorption energy of -0.88 eV and a magnetic moment of 1.00 μ(B). Upon adsorption of more than one OH radical on a h-BN sheet, however, these adsorbates prefer to adsorb in pairs on the B and its nearest N atoms from both sides of h-BN sheet without magnetic moment. An energy diagram of the average adsorption energy of OH radicals on h-BN sheet as a function of its coverage indicates that when the OH radical coverage reaches to 60 %, the functionalized h-BN sheet is the most stable among all studied configurations. More importantly, this configuration exhibits good thermal and dynamical stability at room temperature. Owing to the introduction of certain impurity levels, the band gap of h-BN sheet gradually decreases with increasing OH coverage, thereby enhancing its electrical conductivity. PMID:24092267

  14. Formation and Stabilization of Combustion-Generated, Environmentally Persistent Radicals on Ni(II)O Supported on a Silica Surface

    PubMed Central

    Vejerano, Eric; Lomnicki, Slawomir M.; Dellinger, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs) are formed when hydroxyl- and chlorine-substituted aromatics chemisorbed on Cu(II)O and Fe(III)2O3 surfaces and were stabilized through their interactions with the surface metal cation. The current study reports our laboratory investigation on the formation and stabilization of EPFRs on an Ni(II)O surface. The EPFRs were produced by the chemisorption of adsorbates on the supported metal oxide surface and transfer of an electron from the adsorbate to the metal center, resulting in reduction of the metal cation. Depending on the temperature and the nature of the adsorbate, more than one type of organic radical was formed. A phenoxyl-type radical, with g-value between 2.0029 and 2.0044, and a semiquinone-type radical, with g-value from 2.0050 to as high as 2.0081, were observed. The half-lives on Ni(II)O were long and ranged from 1.5 to 5.2 days, which were similar to what were observed on Fe(III)2O3,. The yields of the EPFRs formed on Ni(II)O was ~ 8x higher than on Cu(II)O and ~50x higher than on Fe(III)2O3. PMID:22831558

  15. Formation and Stabilization of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals Induced by the Interaction of Anthracene with Fe(III)-Modified Clays.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hanzhong; Nulaji, Gulimire; Gao, Hongwei; Wang, Fu; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-06-21

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are occasionally detected in Superfund sites but the formation of EPFRs induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not well understood. In the present work, the formation of EPFRs on anthracene-contaminated clay minerals was quantitatively monitored via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and surface/interface-related environmental influential factors were systematically explored. The obtained results suggest that EPFRs are more readily formed on anthracene-contaminated Fe(III)-montmorillonite than in other tested systems. Depending on the reaction condition, more than one type of organic radicals including anthracene-based radical cations with g-factors of 2.0028-2.0030 and oxygenic carbon-centered radicals featured by g-factors of 2.0032-2.0038 were identified. The formed EPFRs are stabilized by their interaction with interlayer surfaces, and such surface-bound EPFRs exhibit slow decay with 1/e-lifetime of 38.46 days. Transformation pathway and possible mechanism are proposed on the basis of experimental results and quantum mechanical simulations. Overall, the formation of EPFRs involves single-electron-transfer from anthracene to Fe(III) initially, followed by H2O addition on formed aromatic radical cation. Because of their potential exposure in soil and atmosphere, such clay surface-associated EPFRs might induce more serious toxicity than PAHs and exerts significant impacts on human health. PMID:27224055

  16. Two tyrosyl radicals stabilize high oxidation states in cytochrome c oxidase for efficient energy conservation and proton translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2012-02-01

    The reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (bCcO) was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to determine the properties of radical intermediates. Two distinct radicals with widths of 12 and 46 G are directly observed by X-band CW-EPR in the reaction of bCcO with H2O2 at pH 6 and pH 8. High-frequency EPR (D-band) provides assignments to tyrosine for both radicals based on well-resolved g-tensors. The 46 G wide radical has extensive hyperfine structure and can be fit with parameters consistent with Y129. However, the 12 G wide radical has minimal hyperfine structure and can be fit using parameters unique to the post-translationally modified Y244 in CcO. The results are supported by mixed quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. This study reports spectroscopic evidence of a radical formed on the modified tyrosine in CcO and resolves the much debated controversy of whether the wide radical seen at low pH in the bovine system is a tyrosine or tryptophan. A model is presented showing how radical formation and migration may play an essential role in proton translocation. This work was done in collaboration with Michelle A. Yu, Tsuyoshi Egawa, Syun-Ru Yeh and Gary J. Gerfen from Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Kyoko Shinzawa-Itoh and Shinya Yoshikawa from the University of Hyogo; and Victor Guallar from the Barcelona Supercomputing Center.

  17. Potential role of stabilized Criegee radicals in sulfuric acid production in a high biogenic VOC environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Saewung; Guenther, Alex; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James; Griffin, Robert; Rutter, Andrew P; Gong, Longwen; Cevik, Basak Karakurt

    2015-03-17

    We present field observations made in June 2011 downwind of Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, and evaluate the role of stabilized Criegee radicals (sCIs) in gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) production. Zero-dimensional model calculations show that sCI from biogenic volatile organic compounds composed the majority of the sCIs. The main uncertainty associated with an evaluation of H2SO4 production from the sCI reaction channel is the lack of experimentally determined reaction rates for sCIs formed from isoprene ozonolysis with SO2 along with systematic discrepancies in experimentally derived reaction rates between other sCIs and SO2 and water vapor. In general, the maximum of H2SO4 production from the sCI channel is found in the late afternoon as ozone increases toward the late afternoon. The sCI channel, however, contributes minor H2SO4 production compared with the conventional OH channel in the mid-day. Finally, the production and the loss rates of H2SO4 are compared. The application of the recommended mass accommodation coefficient causes significant overestimation of H2SO4 loss rates compared with H2SO4 production rates. However, the application of a lower experimental value for the mass accommodation coefficient provides good agreement between the loss and production rates of H2SO4. The results suggest that the recommended coefficient for the H2O surface may not be suitable for this relatively dry environment. PMID:25700170

  18. Extraordinary stability of naphthalenediimide radical ion and its ultra-electron-deficient precursor: strategic role of the phosphonium group.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sharvan; Ajayakumar, M R; Hundal, Geeta; Mukhopadhyay, Pritam

    2014-08-27

    Stabilization of radical ions and highly electron-deficient systems under ambient conditions is of great significance. A new design concept is presented that applies the multifaceted features of the phosphonium group to achieve isolation of (a) the first naphthalenediimide (NDI) radical ion [(1a•+)BPh4(–)] as single crystals and (b) an ultra-electron-deficient NDI [(1a(2+))2BF4(–)] having the lowest LUMO level recorded for an NDI, overwhelming the formative tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) molecule. Both 1a•+ and 1a(2+) exhibit unprecedented stability to normal workup procedures, chromatography, and anion metathesis in open air. To our knowledge, this is the first instance where radical ions stable toward chromatography have been obtained, which is a noteworthy development in the field of synthetic radical chemistry. The crucial components of thermodynamic and kinetic stabilization, namely, the nonbonded P···O interaction, hypervalency, and propeller-like shape of the phosphonium groups in 1a(2+) and 1a•+, were substantiated by crystallography and theoretical studies. Natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations validated the P···O contact to be an nO → σP–C* orbital interaction. Spontaneous electron transfer reactions of 1a(2+) even in nonpolar solvents, anion−π interactions of 1a(2+) with the naphthalene core, and panchromism of 1a•+ are the other emergent properties. The high-yielding (∼90%) in situ synthesis of 1a•+ and the extraordinary stability fostered by the phosphonium group have the potential to turn hitherto unstable organic systems into a new genre of stable off-the-shelf systems. PMID:25093533

  19. Direct observation of roaming radicals in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-21

    The thermal dissociation of acetaldehyde has been studied with the reflected shock tube technique using H(D)-atom atomic resonance absorption spectrometry detection. The use of an unreversed light source yields extraordinarily sensitive H atom detection. As a result, we are able to measure both the total decomposition rate and the branching to radical versus molecular channels. This branching provides a direct measure of the contribution from the roaming radical mechanism since the contributions from the usual tight transition states are predicted by theory to be negligible. The experimental observations also provide a measure of the rate coefficient for H + CH{sub 3}CHO. Another set of experiments employing C{sub 2}H{sub 5}I as an H-atom source provides additional data for this rate coefficient that extends to lower temperature. An evaluation of the available experimental results for H + CH{sub 3}CHO can be expressed by a three-parameter Arrhenius expression as k = 7.66 x 10{sup -20}T{sup 2.75} exp((-486 K)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (298-1415 K). Analogous experiments employing C{sub 2}D{sub 5}I as a D-atom source allow for the study of the isotopically substituted reaction. The present experiments are the only direct measure for this reaction rate constant, and the results can be expressed by an Arrhenius expression as k = 5.20 x 10{sup -10} exp((-4430 K)/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (1151-1354 K). The H/D + CH{sub 3}CHO reactions are also studied with ab initio transition-state theory, and the results are in remarkably good agreement with the current experimental data.

  20. Stability of 2{radical} (2) {times}2{radical} (2) oxygen ordered superstructures in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}

    SciTech Connect

    Aligia, A.A.; Koval, S.; Migoni, R.

    1998-01-01

    We have compared the ground-state energy of several observed or proposed {open_quotes}2{radical} (2) {times}2{radical} (2) oxygen ordered superstructures{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}herringbone{close_quotes} structures (HS{close_quote}s)], with those of {open_quotes}chain superstructures{close_quotes} (CS{close_quote}s) (in which the O atoms of the basal plane are ordered in chains), for different compositions x in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}. The model Hamiltonian contains (i) the Madelung energy, (ii) a term linear in the difference between Cu and O hole occupancies which controls charge transfer, and (iii) covalency effects based on known results for t-J models in one and two dimensions. The optimum distribution of charge is determined, minimizing the total energy, and depends on two parameters which are determined from known results for x=1 and x=0.5. We obtain that on the O lean side, only CS{close_quote}s are stable, while for x=7/8, a HS with regularly spaced O vacancies added to the x=1 structure is more stable than the corresponding CS for the same x. We find that the detailed positions of the atoms in the structure and long-range Coulomb interactions are crucial for the electronic structure, the mechanism of charge transfer, the stability of the different phases, and the possibility of phase separation. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Reforming the EU Clinical Trials Directive: streamlining processes or a radical "new" agenda?.

    PubMed

    McHale, Jean V

    2013-09-01

    From its conception the EU Clinical Trials Directive met with controversy. Some saw it as an unnecessary inhibitor to scientific research, introducing bureaucracy which was unduly expensive, slowing down the clinical trial approval system. The Directive however also enshrined respect for fundamental rights in relation to clinical trials decision-making and impacted upon the domestic law of member states facilitating the alignment of trial review processes. Nearly a decade after its implementation the EU is moving towards implementation of further reform in this area, from a Directive to a Regulation, from a system placing the research ethics system at the heart of the clinical trials approval committee to one which does not and which represents a see change in international and domestic approaches to research ethics. This article critically examines the proposed reform of the regulation of clinical trials on medicinal product through the introduction of a new EU Regulation and asks whether this can be seen as a natural streamlining of processes or a radical new agenda in EU health law and regulation. PMID:23977734

  2. 14 CFR 27.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static directional stability. 27.177 Section 27.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Flight Characteristics § 27.177...

  3. Triarylporphyrin meso-Oxy Radicals: Remarkable Chemical Stabilities and Oxidation to Oxophlorin π-Cations.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Daiki; Oh, Juwon; Furukawa, Ko; Kim, Dongho; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2015-12-16

    5-Hydroxy-10,15,20-triarylporphyrin (oxophlorin) and its Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were oxidized with PbO2 to give the corresponding porphyrin meso-oxy radicals as remarkably stable species. These radicals were fully characterized with X-ray diffraction analysis, UV/vis/NIR absorption and ESR spectroscopies, magnetic susceptibility measurement, electrochemical studies, and theoretical calculations. Free-base radical and its Ni(II) complex have been shown to exist as a monoradical in solution, while the Zn(II) complex exists in an equilibrium between monomer (doublet monoradical) and dimer (a non-Kekulé singlet biradicaloid) with a dimerization constant of KD = 3.0 × 10(5) M(-1) in noncoordinating CH2Cl2 but becomes a pyridine-coordinated monoradical upon addition of pyridine. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements of these radicals revealed different magnetic interactions in the solid-states, which has been interpreted in terms of their different packing structures in a microscopic sense. These radicals undergo one-electron oxidation and reduction in a reversible manner within narrow potential windows of 0.57-0.82 V. Finally, one-electron oxidation of Ni(II) and Zn(II) porphyrin meso-oxy radicals with tris(4-bromophenyl)aminium hexachloroantimonate furnished oxophlorin π-cations, which displayed nonaromatic closed-shell character, NIR absorption, and significant double bond character of the C-O bond. PMID:26609815

  4. The elimination of free radicals in irradiated UHMWPEs with and without vitamin E stabilization by annealing under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru; Ghali, Bassem W.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation crosslinking of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used to decrease the wear of joint implant bearing surfaces. While radiation crosslinking has been successful in decreasing femoral head penetration into UHMWPE acetabular liners in vivo, postirradiation thermal treatment of the polymer is required to ensure the oxidative stability of joint implants in the long term. Two types of thermal treatment have been used: (i) annealing below the melting point preserves the mechanical properties but the residual free radicals trapped in the crystalline regions are not completely eliminated, leading to oxidation in the long-term and (ii) annealing above the melting point (melting) eliminates the free radicals but leads to a decrease in mechanical properties through loss of crystallinity during the melting process. In this study, we hypothesized that free radicals could be reduced by annealing below the melting point under pressure effectively without melting due to the elevation of the melting point. By avoiding the complete melting of UHMWPE, mechanical properties would be preserved. Our hypothesis tested positive in that we found the radiation-induced free radicals to be markedly reduced (below the detection limit of state-of-the-art electron spin resonance) by thermal annealing under pressure in radiation crosslinked virgin UHMWPE and UHMWPE/vitamin-E blends without loss of mechanical properties. PMID:21381192

  5. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E.; Maher, Cameron A.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities—that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150°C for up to five hours or to 125°C for up to 24 hours if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125°C for up to 5 hours if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal

  6. Comparison of commercial uv lamps for radical oxidation and direct photolysis in water

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, W; Wang, F T

    1999-08-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is charged with developing methods for treating contaminated sites and destroying waste organic compounds that are currently being accumulated, including Trimsol (machining oil), trichloroethene (ICE), tributyl phosphate (TBP), kerosene, and many other organics. These organics are sometimes present mixed with radioactive waste, and in these cases it is important to destroy the organics in such a way as to not increase the total volume of the waste and to ensure that no radioactivity is released in the process. Among the most promising techniques for treating aqueous mixed wastes are ultraviolet light (UV) oxidation and the molten salt process, as opposed to methods like incineration or supercritical water oxidation that might lead to air emissions of radioactivity if not very carefully controlled. The purpose of the present study was to compare the energy efficiency of various commercial UV lamp systems designed for photooxidation. Two type of tests were conducted: (1) direct photolysis of a chlorinated compound and (2) photolysis of hydrogen peroxide, which is an additive often used to photooxidize compounds that are not amenable to direct photolysis. The results should allow LLNL to select the most cost-effective system for treating wastes by UV- enhanced radical oxidation processes.

  7. Stability of superoxide radicals in glyme solvents for non-aqueous Li-O2 battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, K Uta; Meini, Stefano; Wu, Xiaohan; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Piana, Michele

    2013-07-28

    Glyme-based electrolytes were studied for the use in lithium-air batteries because of their greater stability towards oxygen reduction reaction intermediates (e.g., superoxide anion radicals (O2˙(-))) produced upon discharge at the cathode compared to previously employed carbonate-based electrolytes. However, contradictory results of glyme stability tests employing KO2 as an O2˙(-) source were reported in the literature. For clarification, we investigated the reaction of KO2 with glymes of various chain lengths qualitatively using (1)H NMR and FTIR spectroscopy as well as more quantitatively using UV-Vis spectroscopy. During our experiments we found a huge impact of small quantities of impurities on the stability of the solvents. Therefore, we studied further the influence of impurities in the glymes on the cycling behavior of Li-O2 cells, demonstrating the large effect of electrolyte impurities on Li-O2 cell performance. PMID:23760527

  8. Stability of phenol and thiophenol radical cations - interpretation by comparative quantum chemical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, R.; Naumov, S.; Mahalaxmi, G. R.; Brede, O.

    2000-07-01

    The deprotonation kinetics of phenol-type radical cations, formed via a very efficient electron transfer in the pulse radiolysis of non-polar solutions, for example n-chlorobutane, is governed mainly by electronic effects due to the nature of the phenol substituents, whereas steric effects are of minor importance; thiophenols, which are sulphur analogues of phenols, exhibit a similar behavior. Comparative quantum chemical calculations show that the calculated spin densities at the hetero atoms correlate well with the experimentally determined radical cation lifetimes. Not only the Density Functional Theory (DTF) B3LYP but also the semiempirical quantum chemical model PM3 can be applied for the open shell systems mentioned.

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis identifies a tyrosine radical involved in the photosynthesized oxygen-evolving system

    SciTech Connect

    Debus, R.J.; Barry, B.A.; Babcock, G.T.; McIntosh, L.

    1988-01-01

    Photosynthetic oxygen evolution takes place in the thylakoid protein complex known as photosystem II. The reaction center core of this photosystem, where photochemistry occurs, is a heterodimer of homologous polypeptides called D1 and D2. Besides chlorophyll and quinone, photosystem II contains other organic cofactors, including two known as Z and D. Z transfers electrons from the site of water oxidation to the oxidized reaction center primary donor, P/sub 680//sup +/, while D /center dot//sup +/ gives rise to the dark-stable EPR spectrum known as signal II. D/center dot//sup +/ has recently been shown to be a tyrosine radical. Z is probably a second tyrosine located in a similar environment. Indirect evidence indicates that Z and D are associated with the D1 and E2 polypeptides, respectively. To identify the specific tyrosine residue corresponding to D, the authors have changed Tyr-160 of the D2 polypeptide to phenylalanine by site-directed mutagenesis of a psbD gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. The resulting mutant grows photosynthetically, but it lacks the EPR signal of D/center dot//sup +/. The authors conclude that D is Tyr-160 of the D2 polypeptide. They suggest that the C/sub 2/ symmetry in photosystem II extends beyond P/sub 680/ to its immediate electron donor and conclude that Z is Try-161 of the D1 polypeptide.

  10. Instantaneous Directional Growth of Block Copolymer Nanowires During Heterogeneous Radical Polymerization (HRP).

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunliang; Urban, Marek W

    2016-04-13

    Polymeric nanowires that consist of ultrahigh molecular weight block copolymers were instantaneously prepared via one-step surfactant-free heterogeneous radical polymerization (HRP). Under heterogeneous reaction and initiator-starvation conditions, the sequential copolymerization of hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers facilitates the formation of amphiphilic ultrahigh molecular weight block copolymers, which instantaneously assemble to polymeric nanowires. As polymerization progresses, initially formed nanoparticles exhibit the directional growth due to localized repulsive forces of hydrophilic blocks and confinement of the hydrophobic blocks that adopt favorable high aspect ratio nanowire morphologies. Using one-step synthetic approach that requires only four ingredients (water as a solvent, two polymerizable monomers (one hydrophilic and one hydrophobic), and water-soluble initiator), block copolymer nanowires ∼70 nm in diameter and hundreds of microns in length are instantaneously grown. For example, when 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and styrene (St) were copolymerized, high aspect ratio nanowires consist of ultrahigh (>10(6) g/mol) molecular weight pDMAEMA-b-St block copolymers and the presence of temperature responsive pDMAEMA blocks facilitates nanowire diameter changes as a function of temperature. These morphologies may serve as structural components of the higher order biological constructs at micro and larger length scales, ranging from single strand nanowires to engineered biomolecular networks capable of responding to diverse and transient environmental signals, and capable of dimensional changes triggered by external stimuli. PMID:27002238

  11. Development of Initiation Strategies for the Optimization and Stabilization of Brushes Formed by Surface-Initiated Radical Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Erich D.

    Three challenges facing the continued development of the surface-initiated (SI) polymerization field are addressed. The first challenge is that surface-initiated free radical polymerization (SI-FRP) is currently under-represented in literature reports, despite the fact that SI-FRP offers several important advantages over surface-initiated controlled radical polymerization (SI-CRP) and represents a complementary approach. Recognizing that simple, efficient, and safer approaches to synthesizing effective surface free radical initiators are needed, we present a novel synthetic route to an azo type free radical initiator that forms self-assembled monolayers on oxide coated surfaces such as silicon and glass. The yield of the novel synthetic approach is approximately double that of the previous method, and the usage of cyanide is reduced dramatically. We characterize the decomposition kinetics of the initiator using differential scanning calorimetry, comparing it with other similar initiators. We characterize the surface properties of initiator layers on silicon using ellipsometry, water contact angle measurements, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We demonstrate the use of the initiator for SI-FRP as well as SI-CRP mechanisms including reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (RATRP) and reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization. A second challenge facing the field of SI polymerization involves the stability of grafted polymer brushes in aqueous environments and under tension, both of which are commonly encountered in many applications. We hypothesize that the mechanism of brush degrafting involves hydrolysis of ester backbone units in the initiator, which are ubiquitous in surface-bound polymerization initiator systems. The novel initiator described herein is unique in that its backbone consists of a chemically stable alkane chain, free of esters or other easily hydrolysable groups. We present results of experiments demonstrating

  12. Are gait variability and stability measures influenced by directional changes?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many gait variability and stability measures have been proposed in the literature, with the aim to quantify gait impairment, degree of neuro-motor control and balance disorders in healthy and pathological subjects. These measures are often obtained from lower trunk acceleration data, typically acquired during rectilinear gait, but relevant experimental protocols and data processing techniques lack in standardization. Since directional changes represent an essential aspect of gait, the assessment of their influence on such measures is essential for standardization. In addition, their investigation is needed to evaluate the applicability of these measures in laboratory trials and in daily life activity analysis. A further methodological aspect to be standardized concerns the assessment of the sampling frequency, which could affect stability measures. The aim of the present study was hence to assess if gait variability and stability measures are affected by directional changes, and to evaluate the influence of sampling frequency of trunk acceleration data on the results. Methods Fifty-one healthy young adults performed a 6-minute walk test along a 30 m straight pathway, turning by 180 deg at each end of the pathway. Nine variability and stability measures (Standard deviation, Coefficient of variation, Poincaré plots, maximum Floquet multipliers, short-term Lyapunov exponents, Recurrence quantification analysis, Multiscale entropy, Harmonic ratio and Index of harmonicity) were calculated on stride duration and trunk acceleration data (acquired at 100 Hz and 200 Hz) coming from straight walking windows and from windows including both straight walking and the directional change. Results Harmonic ratio was the only measure that resulted to be affected by directional changes and sampling frequency, decreasing with the presence of a directional change task. HR was affected in the AP and V directions for the 200 Hz, but only in AP direction for the 100 Hz group

  13. Direct and quasi-direct band gap silicon allotropes with remarkable stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chaoyu; Zhang, Chunxiao; Li, Jin; Peng, Xiangyang; Meng, Lijun; Tang, Chao; Zhong, Jianxin

    In our present work, five previously proposed sp$^3$ carbon crystals were suggested as silicon allotropes and their stabilities, electronic and optical properties were investigated by first-principles method. We find that these allotropes with direct or quasi-direct band gaps in range of 1.2-1.6 eV are very suitable for applications in thin-film solar cells. They display strong adsorption coefficients in the visible range of the sunlight in comparison with diamond silicon. These five silicon allotropes are confirmed possessing positive dynamical stability and remarkable themodynamical stability close to that of diamond silicon. Especially, the direct band gap M585-silicon possessing energy higher than diamond silicon only 25 meV per atom is expected to be experimentally produced for thin-film solar cells.

  14. Human Cryptochrome-1 Confers Light Independent Biological Activity in Transgenic Drosophila Correlated with Flavin Radical Stability

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Jacqueline; Jones, Alex R.; Danon, Antoine; Sakuma, Michiyo; Hoang, Nathalie; Robles, David; Tait, Shirley; Heyes, Derren J.; Picot, Marie; Yoshii, Taishi; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppee, Jean-Yves; Klarsfeld, André; Rouyer, Francois; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Ahmad, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Cryptochromes are conserved flavoprotein receptors found throughout the biological kingdom with diversified roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in animals. Light perception is proposed to occur through flavin radical formation that correlates with biological activity in vivo in both plants and Drosophila. By contrast, mammalian (Type II) cryptochromes regulate the circadian clock independently of light, raising the fundamental question of whether mammalian cryptochromes have evolved entirely distinct signaling mechanisms. Here we show by developmental and transcriptome analysis that Homo sapiens cryptochrome - 1 (HsCRY1) confers biological activity in transgenic expressing Drosophila in darkness, that can in some cases be further stimulated by light. In contrast to all other cryptochromes, purified recombinant HsCRY1 protein was stably isolated in the anionic radical flavin state, containing only a small proportion of oxidized flavin which could be reduced by illumination. We conclude that animal Type I and Type II cryptochromes may both have signaling mechanisms involving formation of a flavin radical signaling state, and that light independent activity of Type II cryptochromes is a consequence of dark accumulation of this redox form in vivo rather than of a fundamental difference in signaling mechanism. PMID:22427812

  15. Radical prostatectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Prostatectomy - radical; Radical retropubic prostatectomy; Radical perineal prostatectomy; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy; LRP; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy; RALP; Pelvic lymphadenectomy; ...

  16. Direct measurement of methyl radicals in a methane/air flame at atmospheric pressure by radar REMPI.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Bottom, Andrew; Zhang, Zhili; Ombrello, Timothy M; Katta, Viswanath R

    2011-11-21

    We report the direct measurements of methyl radicals (CH(3)) in methane/air flames at atmospheric pressure by using coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering (Radar) from Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI), also known as the Radar REMPI technique. A tunable dye laser was used to selectively induce the (2 + 1) REMPI ionization of methyl radicals (CH(3), 3p(2)A(2)('')0(0)(0) band) in a near adiabatic and premixed laminar methane/air flame, generated by a Hencken burner. In situ measurements of the REMPI electrons were made by non-intrusively using a microwave homodyne transceiver detection system. The REMPI spectrum of the CH(3) radical was obtained and a spatial distribution of the radicals limited by focused laser beam geometry, approximately 20 µm normal to the flame front and 2.4 mm parallel to the flame, was determined. The measured CH(3) was in good agreement with numerical simulations performed using the detailed kinetic mechanism of GRI-3.0. To the authors' knowledge, these experiments represent the first directly-measured spatially-resolved CH(3) in a flame at atmospheric pressure. PMID:22109424

  17. Direct Evidence for PCB Destruction in the Subtropical Troposphere by OH Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandalakis, M.; Berresheim, H.; Stephanou, E.

    2003-04-01

    Although polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) production and use were banned by the mid-1970s, PCBs are ubiquitous pollutants in nearly all environmental compartments. Because of their high persistence and toxicity PCBs can pose toxic effects on animals and humans, decades after their release into the environment. It has been supported that warm temperatures at the tropical and subtropical regions of the earth favor the volatilization of PCBs, which are subsequently transported to colder areas of high latitude. This process, known as "global distillation effect", could cause an enhancement of PCB concentrations in the plant biomass and the marine mammals of Earth's polar regions. It has been experimentally established, that chemical reactions of PCBs with OH radicals might be the dominant loss processes in the atmosphere1. Nevertheless, PCBs atmospheric removal by OH radicals has never been positively demonstrated under real atmospheric conditions, mainly due to the difficulties to measure simultaneously the concentration of OH radicals and PCBs in the atmosphere. By applying elaborated sampling and analytical techniques2,3, under real atmospheric conditions, we achieved the simultaneous determination of OH radicals and PCBs congeners and demonstrated for the first time that PCB removal from the troposphere of subtropical regions is due to a large extent to reactions with OH radicals. References 1. Anderson, P. N. &Hites, R. A. OH radical reactions: The major removal pathway for polychlorinated biphenyls from the atmosphere. Environ. Sci. Technol. 30, 1756-1763 (1996). 2. Berresheim, H., Elste, T., Plass-Dülmer, C., Eisele, F. L. &Tanner, D. J. Chemical ionization mass spectrometer for long-term measurements of atmospheric OH and H2SO4. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 202, 91-109 (2000). 3. Mandalakis, M., M. Tsapakis, and E.G. Stephanou, Optimization and application of high-resolution gas chromatography with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry to the determination of

  18. Stability of water-stable C60 clusters to OH radical oxidation and hydrated electron reduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaesang; Song, Weihua; Jang, Seung S; Fortner, John D; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Cooper, William J; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2010-05-15

    Reactions of water-stable C(60) clusters (nC(60)) in water with OH radicals (*OH) and hydrated electrons (e(aq)(-)), generated by steady-state gamma-radiation, were observed and characterized. Ordered C(60) clusters were relatively recalcitrant to highly reactive *OH and e(aq)(-) species, with only a fraction of carbons oxidized and reduced, respectively. Pulse radiolysis suggested that the reactions of nC(60) with OH* and e(aq)(-) were diffusion limited, with rate constants of (7.34 +/- 0.31) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) and (2.34 +/- 0.02) x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Quantum mechanical calculations of binding energy of the C(60)-OH adduct as a function of C(60) clustering degree indicate, despite an initial fast reaction, a slower overall conversion due to thermodynamic instability of C(60)-OH intermediates. The results imply that ordered clustering of C(60) in the aqueous phase significantly hinders C(60)'s fundamental reactivity with radical species. PMID:20397700

  19. Directional dependence of surface morphological stability of heteroepitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, Y.; Shintani, K.

    1998-09-01

    Surface morphological stability in coherent heteroepitaxial layers is analyzed focusing on the directional dependence of surface undulations created by surface diffusion. The critical stability condition is defined in terms of the free energy of the system which is assumed to be the sum of the elastic strain energy and the surface free energy. The displacement and stress fields of the semi-infinite anisotropic solid with the slightly undulating surface are calculated by using the surface admittance tensor and the vector complex potential function. Numerical results for the Si1-xGex/Si systems show that the critical wavelength of the <100> surface undulations is smaller than that of the <110> surface undulations, which means that surface undulations are likely to be formed in the <100> directions. It is also found that the critical wavelength decreases with the increase of Ge fraction. These tendencies are in good agreement with the observations in annealing experiments for the Si1-xGex/Si systems in the literature. If the substrate is assumed to be rigid, the range of layer thickness where the system is absolutely stable against a surface undulation of any wavelength exists. Finally, the growth rate of the amplitude of surface undulations is estimated from an evolution equation for the surface shape. It is shown that even if anisotropy is taken into account, the growth rate of the amplitude takes the maximum value when the wavelength is 4/3 times the critical wavelength, which is the same as in the isotropic approximation.

  20. Redox reactivity in propolis: direct detection of free radicals in basic medium and interaction with hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Mot, Augustin-Catalin; Damian, Grigore; Sarbu, Costel; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2009-01-01

    Propolis is one of many natural products with known antioxidant properties. The present work aims to investigate the intimate molecular-level mechanisms of this antioxidant reactivity. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-detectable free radical signals are described here for the first time in propolis extracts. The shape of these signals and the conditions in which they were obtained, point to polyphenolic flavonoids as the sites of the radicals. An inverse correlation between antioxidant capacity and free radical signal intensity is shown. The free radical reactivity of propolis is also illustrated by the effect it exerts on the biologically-relevant peroxide reactivity of hemoglobin. A new test of antioxidant ability in natural extracts such as propolis is proposed, based on modulation of the ascorbate peroxidase activity of hemoglobin (HAPX). Results of this test correlate well with those obtained via traditional methods such as those based on DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl), or on ABTS (2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid). PMID:20003712

  1. Novel Synthesis of Surface-Grafted Radical Initiator With Improved Stability and Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Erich; Dawes, Keith; Hu, Xinfang; Gorman, Christopher; Srogl, Jiri; Genzer, Jan

    2012-02-01

    Polymers grafted at interfaces are attractive for applications including antifouling coatings, biologically functionalized materials, and responsive surfaces. The ``grafting from'' approach to form densely packed brushes involves functionalizing a substrate with initiating moieties, and carrying out polymerization, e.g., surface-inititated free-radical polymerization (SI-FRP). Azo initiators for SI-FRP are commonly synthesized by a low-yielding route requiring large amounts of potassium cyanide. Those initiators are linked to a substrate by means of an ester group, rendering tethered polymers susceptible to degrafting by hydrolysis. We present a novel synthetic route to an asymmetric azo initiator, whose yield is nearly double that of previous syntheses. Cyanide usage in the new method is reduced by 72 percent. The spacer linking the initiator to a substrate contains only carbon-carbon bonds, resulting in stable brushes. Results are demonstrated for SI-FRP as well as reverse ATRP and RAFT.

  2. Efficient radical cation stabilization of PANI-ZnO and PANI-ZnO-GO composites and its optical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathavan, T.; Divya, A.; Archana, J.; Ramasubbu, A.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jothirajan, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) and its composites PANI-ZnO (Zinc oxide) and PANI-ZnO-GO (Graphene oxide) were successfully constructed. These materials were characterized by electron spin resonance (ESR) technique and ultraviolet visible spectrometry. The parameters such as line width, g-factor and spin concentration were deduced from ESR spectra, from the results the radical cation stabilization of PANI, PANI-ZnO and PANI-ZnO-GO composites were compared by the polaron and bipolaron formation. The absorption features obtained in the UV absorption spectra reveal the band gap of these modified PANI composites and also predicted the information of increasing and decreasing features of signal intensity and spin concentration.

  3. New insights into the aquatic photochemistry of fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Direct photodegradation, hydroxyl-radical oxidation, and antibacterial activity changes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Linke; Na, Guangshui; Zhang, Siyu; Li, Kai; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Honglei; Yao, Ziwei

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquity and photoreactivity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in surface waters urge new insights into their aqueous photochemical behavior. This study concerns the photochemistry of 6 FQs: ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, levofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin and enrofloxacin. Methods were developed to calculate their solar direct photodegradation half-lives (td,E) and hydroxyl-radical oxidation half-lives (tOH,E) in sunlit surface waters. The td,E values range from 0.56 min to 28.8 min at 45° N latitude, whereas tOH,E ranges from 3.24h to 33.6h, suggesting that most FQs tend to undergo fast direct photolysis rather than hydroxyl-radical oxidation in surface waters. However, a case study for levofloxacin and sarafloxacin indicated that the hydroxyl-radical oxidation induced risky photochlorination and resulted in multi-degradation pathways, such as piperazinyl hydroxylation and clearage. Changes in the antibacterial activity of FQs caused by photodegradation in various waters were further examined using Escherichia coli, and it was found that the activity evolution depended on primary photodegradation pathways and products. Primary intermediates with intact FQ nuclei retained significant antibacterial activity. These results are important for assessing the fate and risk of FQs in surface waters. PMID:25956144

  4. Direct Evidence of Solution-Mediated Superoxide Transport and Organic Radical Formation in Sodium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chun; Fernandes, Russel; Cho, Franklin H; Sudhakar, Niranjan; Buonacorsi, Brandon; Walker, Sean; Xu, Meng; Baugh, Jonathan; Nazar, Linda F

    2016-09-01

    Advanced large-scale electrochemical energy storage requires cost-effective battery systems with high energy densities. Aprotic sodium-oxygen (Na-O2) batteries offer advantages, being comprised of low-cost elements and possessing much lower charge overpotential and higher reversibility compared to their lithium-oxygen battery cousins. Although such differences have been explained by solution-mediated superoxide transport, the underlying nature of this mechanism is not fully understood. Water has been suggested to solubilize superoxide via formation of hydroperoxyl (HO2), but direct evidence of these HO2 radical species in cells has proven elusive. Here, we use ESR spectroscopy at 210 K to identify and quantify soluble HO2 radicals in the electrolyte-cold-trapped in situ to prolong their lifetime-in a Na-O2 cell. These investigations are coupled to parallel SEM studies that image crystalline sodium superoxide (NaO2) on the carbon cathode. The superoxide radicals were spin-trapped via reaction with 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide at different electrochemical stages, allowing monitoring of their production and consumption during cycling. Our results conclusively demonstrate that transport of superoxide from cathode to electrolyte leads to the nucleation and growth of NaO2, which follows classical mechanisms based on the variation of superoxide content in the electrolyte and its correlation with the crystallization of cubic NaO2. The changes in superoxide content upon charge show that charge proceeds through the reverse solution process. Furthermore, we identify the carbon-centered/oxygen-centered alkyl radicals arising from attack of these solubilized HO2 species on the diglyme solvent. This is the first direct evidence of such species, which are likely responsible for electrolyte degradation. PMID:27498623

  5. Tuning the Reactivity of Radical through a Triplet Diradical Cu(II) Intermediate in Radical Oxidative Cross-Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liangliang; Yi, Hong; Zhu, Lei; Qi, Xiaotian; Jiang, Hanpeng; Liu, Chao; Feng, Yuqi; Lan, Yu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    Highly selective radical/radical cross-coupling is paid more attention in bond formations. However, due to their intrinsic active properties, radical species are apt to achieve homo-coupling instead of cross-coupling, which makes the selective cross-coupling as a great challenge and almost untouched. Herein a notable strategy to accomplish direct radical/radical oxidative cross-coupling has been demonstrated, that is metal tuning a transient radical to a persistent radical intermediate followed by coupling with another transient radical. Here, a transient nitrogen-centered radical is tuned to a persistent radical complex by copper catalyst, followed by coupling with a transient allylic carbon-centered radical. Firstly, nitrogen-centered radical generated from N-methoxybenzamide stabilized by copper catalyst was successfully observed by EPR. Then DFT calculations revealed that a triplet diradical Cu(II) complex formed from the chelation N-methoxybenzamide nitrogen-centered radical to Cu(II) is a persistent radical species. Moreover, conceivable nitrogen-centered radical Cu(II) complex was observed by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Ultimately, various allylic amides derivatives were obtained in good yields by adopting this strategy, which might inspire a novel and promising landscape in radical chemistry. PMID:26525888

  6. Tuning the Reactivity of Radical through a Triplet Diradical Cu(II) Intermediate in Radical Oxidative Cross-Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liangliang; Yi, Hong; Zhu, Lei; Qi, Xiaotian; Jiang, Hanpeng; Liu, Chao; Feng, Yuqi; Lan, Yu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-11-01

    Highly selective radical/radical cross-coupling is paid more attention in bond formations. However, due to their intrinsic active properties, radical species are apt to achieve homo-coupling instead of cross-coupling, which makes the selective cross-coupling as a great challenge and almost untouched. Herein a notable strategy to accomplish direct radical/radical oxidative cross-coupling has been demonstrated, that is metal tuning a transient radical to a persistent radical intermediate followed by coupling with another transient radical. Here, a transient nitrogen-centered radical is tuned to a persistent radical complex by copper catalyst, followed by coupling with a transient allylic carbon-centered radical. Firstly, nitrogen-centered radical generated from N-methoxybenzamide stabilized by copper catalyst was successfully observed by EPR. Then DFT calculations revealed that a triplet diradical Cu(II) complex formed from the chelation N-methoxybenzamide nitrogen-centered radical to Cu(II) is a persistent radical species. Moreover, conceivable nitrogen-centered radical Cu(II) complex was observed by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Ultimately, various allylic amides derivatives were obtained in good yields by adopting this strategy, which might inspire a novel and promising landscape in radical chemistry.

  7. Tuning the Reactivity of Radical through a Triplet Diradical Cu(II) Intermediate in Radical Oxidative Cross-Coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liangliang; Yi, Hong; Zhu, Lei; Qi, Xiaotian; Jiang, Hanpeng; Liu, Chao; Feng, Yuqi; Lan, Yu; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-01-01

    Highly selective radical/radical cross-coupling is paid more attention in bond formations. However, due to their intrinsic active properties, radical species are apt to achieve homo-coupling instead of cross-coupling, which makes the selective cross-coupling as a great challenge and almost untouched. Herein a notable strategy to accomplish direct radical/radical oxidative cross-coupling has been demonstrated, that is metal tuning a transient radical to a persistent radical intermediate followed by coupling with another transient radical. Here, a transient nitrogen-centered radical is tuned to a persistent radical complex by copper catalyst, followed by coupling with a transient allylic carbon-centered radical. Firstly, nitrogen-centered radical generated from N-methoxybenzamide stabilized by copper catalyst was successfully observed by EPR. Then DFT calculations revealed that a triplet diradical Cu(II) complex formed from the chelation N-methoxybenzamide nitrogen-centered radical to Cu(II) is a persistent radical species. Moreover, conceivable nitrogen-centered radical Cu(II) complex was observed by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Ultimately, various allylic amides derivatives were obtained in good yields by adopting this strategy, which might inspire a novel and promising landscape in radical chemistry. PMID:26525888

  8. Quantitative assessment on the contribution of direct photolysis and radical oxidation in photochemical degradation of 4-chlorophenol and oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiqing; He, Xuexiang; Fu, Yongsheng; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-07-01

    In UV-254 nm/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP), the potential degradation pathways for organic pollutants include (1) hydrolysis, (2) direct H2O2 oxidation, (3) UV direct photolysis, and (4) hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) reaction. In this study, the contribution of these pathways was quantitatively assessed in the photochemical destruction of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP), demonstrating pathways (3) and (4) to be predominantly responsible for the removal of 4-CP by UV/H2O2 in 50 mM phosphate buffer solution. Increasing reaction pH could significantly enhance the contribution of direct photolysis in UV/H2O2 process. The contribution of HO(•) oxidation was improved with increasing initial H2O2 concentration probably due to the increased formation of HO(•). Presence of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) as in UV/H2O2/Na2CO3 system promoted the degradation of 4-CP, with carbonate radical (CO3 (•-)) reaction and direct photolysis identified to be the main contributing pathways. The trends in the contribution of each factor were further evaluated and validated on the degradation of the antibiotic compound oxytetracycline (OTC). This study provides valuable information on the relative importance of different reaction pathways on the photochemical degradation of organic contaminants such as 4-CP and OTC in the presence and absence of a CO3 (•-) precursor. PMID:27055892

  9. N-substituted phenothiazine derivatives: how the stability of the neutral and radical cation forms affects overcharge performance in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Kishore Anand; Casselman, Matthew D; Elliott, Corrine F; Ergun, Selin; Parkin, Sean R; Risko, Chad; Odom, Susan A

    2015-04-27

    Phenothiazine and five N-substituted derivatives were evaluated as electrolyte additives for overcharge protection in LiFePO4 /synthetic graphite lithium-ion batteries. We report on the stability and reactivity of both the neutral and radical-cation forms of these six compounds. While three of the compounds show extensive overcharge protection, the remaining three last for only one to a few cycles. UV/Vis studies of redox shuttle stability in the radical cation form are consistent with the overcharge performance: redox shuttles with spectra that show little change over time exhibit extensive overcharge performance, whereas those with changing spectra have limited overcharge protection. In one case, we determined that a C-N bond cleaves upon oxidation, forming the phenothiazine radical cation and leading to premature overcharge protection failure; in another case, poor solubility appears to limit protection. PMID:25504135

  10. 14 CFR 23.177 - Static directional and lateral stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... stability, as shown by the tendency to recover from a wings level sideslip with the rudder free, must be... stability, as shown by the tendency to raise the low wing in a sideslip with the aileron controls free,...

  11. Liquid falling films: linear stability and direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Patrick; O'Naraigh, Lennon; Valluri, Prashant; Lucquiaud, Mathieu

    2013-11-01

    Interfacial instability of falling liquid films in counter-current contact with a turbulent gas phase is investigated by means of an Orr-Sommerfeld analysis. This study is complemented by a full energy budget analysis, identifying the key mechanisms of the instability. This gives first insight into the dynamic behaviour of the two-phase system, which is relevant for a wide range of technical applications, such as absorption and distillation. The linear stability analysis is also used to identify the operating limits of a counter-current operation i.e. the so-called loading and flooding limits. In addition, the results of this analysis are benchmark for direct numerical simulations using the newly launched Two-Phase Level Set (http://sourceforge.net/projects/tpls/) solver. High resolution DNS is used to obtain detailed knowledge of important mechanisms at play, especially with regard to interfacial instability and transient system behaviour, which can help to design more efficient mass transfer equipment such as structured packings. Sulzer Chemtech Ltd, EPSRC, Energy Technology Partnership.

  12. Effect of hydrogen pressure on free radicals in direct coal liquefaction/coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Seehra, M.S.; Ibrahim, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to investigate the coprocessing of coal with waste tires and commingled plastics and to characterize the relevant catalysts, using high pressure/high temperature in-situ ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) spectroscopy. The recent results from high pressure ESR spectroscopy are emphasized. During this period, considerable progress was made in developing the high pressure capabilities in in-situ ESR spectroscopy and new results carried out in 1000 psi of H{sub 2}gas are presented. In these experiments, sapphire tubes were used to contain the high pressures at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C. Results of the experiments carried out under 1000 psi of H{sub 2} are compared with those under 1000 psi of non-interacting argon and with the earlier experiments in flowing H{sub 2} gas where the volatiles are removed by the flowing gas. In these experiments, the free radical density N of the Blind Canyon coal was measured at each temperature and pressure by double integration of the ESR signal and calibrating it against a standard. The details of the experimental apparatus and procedures have been described in earlier publications.

  13. The production mechanisms of OH radicals in a pulsed direct current plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. Y.; Pei, X. K.; Lu, X. P.; Liu, D. W.; Ostrikov, K.

    2014-09-15

    The production mechanism of OH radicals in a pulsed DC plasma jet is studied by a two-dimensional (2-D) plasma jet model and a one-dimensional (1-D) discharge model. For the plasma jet in the open air, electron-impact dissociation of H{sub 2}O, electron neutralization of H{sub 2}O{sup +}, as well as dissociation of H{sub 2}O by O(1D) are found to be the main reactions to generate the OH species. The contribution of the dissociation of H{sub 2}O by electron is more than the others. The additions of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, air, and H{sub 2}O into the working gas increase the OH density outside the tube slightly, which is attributed to more electrons produced by Penning ionization. On the other hand, the additions of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O into the working gas increase the OH density inside the tube substantially, which is attributed to the increased O (1D) and H{sub 2}O concentration, respectively. The gas flow will transport high density OH out of the tube during pulse off period. It is also shown that the plasma chemistry and reactivity can be effectively controlled by the pulse numbers. These results are supported by the laser induced fluorescence measurements and are relevant to several applications of atmospheric-pressure plasmas in health care, medicine, and materials processing.

  14. On the Electronic Spectroscopy of Closed Shell Cations Derived from Resonance Stabilized Radicals: Insights from Theory and Franck-Condon Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troy, Tyler P.; Kable, Scott H.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Reid, Scott A.

    2012-06-01

    Recent attention has been directed on closed shell aromatic cations as potential carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The spectra of mass-selected, matrix-isolated benzylium and tropylium cations were recently reported [Nagy, A., Fulara, J., Garkusha, I. and Maier, J. P. (2011), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 50: 3022-3025]. The benzylium spectrum shows an extended progression in a low frequency (510 cm-1) ring distortion mode. Modeling of the benzylium spectrum using (TD)DFT and MCSCF-PT2 methods in concert with multidimensional Franck-Condon (FC) analysis is found to yield excellent agreement with the experimental spectrum. We extended this analysis to larger (2 and 3 ring) PAH cations derived from resonance stabilized radicals, which are predicted to show strong S0 → Sn transitions in the visible region. The FC progression is significantly quenched in the larger species, and our results for 1-napthylmethylium are in excellent agreement with very recent experiments [Nagy, A., Fulara, J., and Maier, J. P. (2011), J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 19796]. Since carriers of the DIBs should exhibit spectra dominated by a single vibronic transition, our results demonstrate that closed-shell cations may present spectra with the required properties. Furthermore, the calculated ionization energies of a range of CSCs were found to be in the 13-14 eV range, consistent with variations in behaviour of the DIB carriers with respect to various astrophysical environments.

  15. Direct observation of unimolecular decay of CH3CH2CHOO Criegee intermediates to OH radical products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2016-07-01

    The unimolecular decay of carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates, produced in alkene ozonolysis is a significant source of OH radicals in the troposphere. Here, the rate of appearance of OH radical products is examined directly in the time-domain for a prototypical alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, CH3CH2CHOO, following vibrational activation under collision-free conditions. Complementary statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations of the microcanonical unimolecular decay rate for CH3CH2CHOO are also carried out at energies in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen atom transfer that leads to OH products. Tunneling through the barrier, derived from high level electronic structure calculations, contributes significantly to the decay rate. Infrared transitions of CH3CH2CHOO are identified in the CH stretch overtone region, which are detected by ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of the resultant OH products. The features observed are attributed to CH vibrational excitations and conformational forms utilizing insights from theory. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates for CH3CH2CHOO of ca. 107 s-1, which are slower than those obtained for syn-CH3CHOO or (CH3)2COO reported previously [Fang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 061102 (2016)] at similar energies. Master equation modeling is also utilized to predict the thermal decay rate of CH3CH2CHOO under atmospheric conditions, giving a rate of 279 s-1 at 298 K.

  16. Direct observation of unimolecular decay of CH3CH2CHOO Criegee intermediates to OH radical products.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Lester, Marsha I

    2016-07-28

    The unimolecular decay of carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates, produced in alkene ozonolysis is a significant source of OH radicals in the troposphere. Here, the rate of appearance of OH radical products is examined directly in the time-domain for a prototypical alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate, CH3CH2CHOO, following vibrational activation under collision-free conditions. Complementary statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations of the microcanonical unimolecular decay rate for CH3CH2CHOO are also carried out at energies in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen atom transfer that leads to OH products. Tunneling through the barrier, derived from high level electronic structure calculations, contributes significantly to the decay rate. Infrared transitions of CH3CH2CHOO are identified in the CH stretch overtone region, which are detected by ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence of the resultant OH products. The features observed are attributed to CH vibrational excitations and conformational forms utilizing insights from theory. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates for CH3CH2CHOO of ca. 10(7) s(-1), which are slower than those obtained for syn-CH3CHOO or (CH3)2COO reported previously [Fang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 061102 (2016)] at similar energies. Master equation modeling is also utilized to predict the thermal decay rate of CH3CH2CHOO under atmospheric conditions, giving a rate of 279 s(-1) at 298 K. PMID:27475366

  17. Reductive Umpolung of Carbonyl Derivatives with Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Direct Access to Vicinal Diamines and Amino Alcohols via α-Amino Radicals and Ketyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Fava, Eleonora; Millet, Anthony; Nakajima, Masaki; Loescher, Sebastian; Rueping, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    Visible-light-mediated photoredox-catalyzed aldimine-aniline and aldehyde-aniline couplings have been realized. The reductive single electron transfer (SET) umpolung of various carbonyl derivatives enabled the generation of intermediary ketyl and α-amino radical anions, which were utilized for the synthesis of unsymmetrically substituted 1,2-diamines and amino alcohols. PMID:27136443

  18. Direct formation of the C5'-radical in the sugar-phosphate backbone of DNA by high-energy radiation.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Amitava; Becker, David; Palmer, Brian J; Heizer, Alicia N; Sevilla, Michael D

    2012-05-24

    Neutral sugar radicals formed in DNA sugar-phosphate backbone are well-established as precursors of biologically important damage such as DNA strand scission and cross-linking. In this work, we present electron spin resonance (ESR) evidence showing that the sugar radical at C5' (C5'(•)) is one of the most abundant (ca. 30%) sugar radicals formed by γ- and Ar ion-beam irradiated hydrated DNA samples. Taking dimethyl phosphate as a model of sugar-phosphate backbone, ESR and theoretical (DFT) studies of γ-irradiated dimethyl phosphate were carried out. CH(3)OP(O(2)(-))OCH(2)(•) is formed via deprotonation from the methyl group of directly ionized dimethyl phosphate at 77 K. The formation of CH(3)OP(O(2)(-))OCH(2)(•) is independent of dimethyl phosphate concentration (neat or in aqueous solution) or pH. ESR spectra of C5'(•) found in DNA and of CH(3)OP(O(2)(-))OCH(2)(•) do not show an observable β-phosphorus hyperfine coupling (HFC). Furthermore, C5'(•) found in DNA does not show a significant C4'-H β-proton HFC. Applying the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d) method, a study of conformational dependence of the phosphorus HFC in CH(3)OP(O(2)(-))OCH(2)(•) shows that in its minimum energy conformation, CH(3)OP(O(2)(-))OCH(2)(•), has a negligible β-phosphorus HFC. On the basis of these results, the formation of radiation-induced C5'(•) is proposed to occur via a very rapid deprotonation from the directly ionized sugar-phosphate backbone, and the rate of this deprotonation must be faster than that of energetically downhill transfer of the unpaired spin (hole) from ionized sugar-phosphate backbone to the DNA bases. Moreover, C5'(•) in irradiated DNA is found to be in a conformation that does not exhibit β-proton or β-phosphorus HFCs. PMID:22553971

  19. Role of the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with peroxy radicals in particle formation and growth in air.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Wingen, Lisa M; Perraud, Véronique; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-05-21

    Ozonolysis of alkenes is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. However, the mechanisms by which stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI) react to form and grow the particles, and in particular the contributions from oligomers, are not well understood. In this study, ozonolysis of trans-3-hexene (C6H12), as a proxy for small alkenes, was investigated with an emphasis on the mechanisms of particle formation and growth. Ozonolysis experiments were carried out both in static Teflon chambers (18-20 min reaction times) and in a glass flow reactor (24 s reaction time) in the absence and presence of OH or SCI scavengers, and under different relative humidity (RH) conditions. The chemical composition of polydisperse and size-selected SOA particles was probed using different mass spectrometric techniques and infrared spectroscopy. Oligomers having SCI as the chain unit are found to be the dominant components of such SOA particles. The formation mechanism for these oligomers suggested by our results follows the sequential addition of SCI to organic peroxy (RO2) radicals, in agreement with previous studies by Moortgat and coworkers. Smaller particles are shown to have a relatively greater contribution from longer oligomers. Higher O/C ratios are observed in smaller particles and are similar to those of oligomers resulting from RO2 + nSCI, supporting a significant role for longer oligomers in particle nucleation and early growth. Under atmospherically relevant RH of 30-80%, water vapor suppresses oligomer formation through scavenging SCI, but also enhances particle nucleation. Under humid conditions, or in the presence of formic or hydrochloric acid as SCI scavengers, peroxyhemiacetals are formed by the acid-catalyzed particle phase reaction between oligomers from RO2 + nSCI and a trans-3-hexene derived carbonyl product. In contrast to the ozonolysis of trans-3-hexene, oligomerization involving RO2 + nSCI does not appear to be prevalent in the

  20. Perturbative stability along the supersymmetric directions of the landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, Kepa

    2015-02-01

    We consider the perturbative stability of non-supersymmetric configurations in N=1 supergravity models with a spectator sector not involved in supersymmetry breaking. Motivated by the supergravity description of complex structure moduli in Large Volume Compactifications of type IIB-superstrings, we concentrate on models where the interactions are consistent with the supersymmetric truncation of the spectator fields, and we describe their couplings by a random ensemble of generic supergravity theories. We characterise the mass spectrum of the spectator fields in terms of the statistical parameters of the ensemble and the geometry of the scalar manifold. Our results show that the non-generic couplings between the spectator and the supersymmetry breaking sectors can stabilise all the tachyons which typically appear in the spectator sector before including the supersymmetry breaking effects, and we find large regions of the parameter space where the supersymmetric sector remains stable with probability close to one. We discuss these results about the stability of the supersymmetric sector in two physically relevant situations: non-supersymmetric Minkowski vacua, and slow-roll inflation driven by the supersymmetry breaking sector. For the class of models we consider, we have reproduced the regimes in which the KKLT and Large Volume Scenarios stabilise all supersymmetric moduli. We have also identified a new regime in which the supersymmetric sector is stabilised at a very robust type of dS minimum without invoking a large mass hierarchy.

  1. Perturbative stability along the supersymmetric directions of the landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Kepa; Ortiz, Pablo

    2015-02-01

    We consider the perturbative stability of non-supersymmetric configurations in Script N=1 supergravity models with a spectator sector not involved in supersymmetry breaking. Motivated by the supergravity description of complex structure moduli in Large Volume Compactifications of type IIB-superstrings, we concentrate on models where the interactions are consistent with the supersymmetric truncation of the spectator fields, and we describe their couplings by a random ensemble of generic supergravity theories. We characterise the mass spectrum of the spectator fields in terms of the statistical parameters of the ensemble and the geometry of the scalar manifold. Our results show that the non-generic couplings between the spectator and the supersymmetry breaking sectors can stabilise all the tachyons which typically appear in the spectator sector before including the supersymmetry breaking effects, and we find large regions of the parameter space where the supersymmetric sector remains stable with probability close to one. We discuss these results about the stability of the supersymmetric sector in two physically relevant situations: non-supersymmetric Minkowski vacua, and slow-roll inflation driven by the supersymmetry breaking sector. For the class of models we consider, we have reproduced the regimes in which the KKLT and Large Volume Scenarios stabilise all supersymmetric moduli. We have also identified a new regime in which the supersymmetric sector is stabilised at a very robust type of dS minimum without invoking a large mass hierarchy.

  2. A computational study on directional stability of chine-shaped forebodies at high-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, R.; Mason, William H.

    1992-01-01

    CFD is employed to study the flowfields over chine-shaped forebodies at low-speed high-angle-of-attack conditions with sideslip. This study is conducted to define forebody geometries that provide good directional stability characteristics under these conditions. An analytically defined generic forebody model is developed and a systematic examination of forebody shapes is performed to determine which shapes promote a positive contribution to directional stability at high-alpha. Results of the initial parametric study and some guidelines for aerodynamic design to promote positive directional stability are presented.

  3. Model of diffusion-assisted direct laser writing by means of nanopolymerization in the presence of radical quencher

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulin, Alexander Bityurin, Nikita; Sokolov, Viktor I.

    2015-12-15

    Diffusion-assisted direct laser writing (DA-DLW) by multiphoton polymerization has been recently shown to be one of the most promising methods for the high-resolution 3D nanofabrication [I. Sakellari, et al., ACS Nano 6, 2302 (2012)]. The improvement of the writing spatial resolution has been observed under certain conditions when the mobile radical quencher (polymerization inhibitor) is added to the photosensitive composition. In this work, we present a theoretical study of this method, focusing on the resolution capabilities and optimal writing parameters. The laser beam absorption in the polymerizable composition causes the localized depletion of the quencher molecules. If the quencher depletion is balanced by its diffusion from the outside of the focal volume, the quasi-stationary non-equillibrium concentration spatial profile with zero minimum can be obtained. The polymer is then effectively formed only in the domain where the quencher is depleted. The spatially-distributed quencher, in this case, has the effect similar to that of the vortex beam in STimulated Emission Microscopy (STED)

  4. Chemistry of carotenoid neutral radicals.

    PubMed

    Ligia Focsan, A; Magyar, Adam; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-04-15

    Proton loss from the carotenoid radical cations (Car(+)) to form neutral radicals (#Car) was investigated by numerous electrochemical, EPR, ENDOR and DFT studies described herein. The radical cation and neutral radicals were formed in solution electrochemically and stabilized on solid silica-alumina and MCM-41 matrices. Carotenoid neutral radicals were recently identified in Arabidopsis thaliana plant and photosystem II samples. Deprotonation at the terminal ends of a zeaxanthin radical cation could provide a secondary photoprotection pathway which involves quenching excited state chlorophyll by the long-lived zeaxanthin neutral radicals formed. PMID:25687648

  5. Radicalization and Radical Catalysis of Biomass Sugars: Insights from First-principles Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gang; Zhu, Chang; Zou, Xianli; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Ab initio and density functional calculations are conducted to investigate the radicalization processes and radical catalysis of biomass sugars. Structural alterations due to radicalization generally focus on the radicalized sites, and radicalization affects H-bonds in D-fructofuranose more than in D-glucopyranose, potentially with outcome of new H-bonds. Performances of different functionals and basis sets are evaluated for all radicalization processes, and enthalpy changes and Gibbs free energies for these processes are presented with high accuracy, which can be referenced for subsequent experimental and theoretical studies. It shows that radicalization can be utilized for direct transformation of biomass sugars, and for each sugar, C rather than O sites are always preferred for radicalization, thus suggesting the possibility to activate C-H bonds of biomass sugars. Radical catalysis is further combined with Brønsted acids, and it clearly states that functionalization fundamentally regulates the catalytic effects of biomass sugars. In presence of explicit water molecules, functionalization significantly affects the activation barriers and reaction energies of protonation rather than dehydration steps. Tertiary butyl and phenyl groups with large steric hindrances or hydroxyl and amino groups resulting in high stabilities for protonation products drive the protonation steps to occur facilely at ambient conditions.

  6. Radicalization and Radical Catalysis of Biomass Sugars: Insights from First-principles Studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gang; Zhu, Chang; Zou, Xianli; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio and density functional calculations are conducted to investigate the radicalization processes and radical catalysis of biomass sugars. Structural alterations due to radicalization generally focus on the radicalized sites, and radicalization affects H-bonds in D-fructofuranose more than in D-glucopyranose, potentially with outcome of new H-bonds. Performances of different functionals and basis sets are evaluated for all radicalization processes, and enthalpy changes and Gibbs free energies for these processes are presented with high accuracy, which can be referenced for subsequent experimental and theoretical studies. It shows that radicalization can be utilized for direct transformation of biomass sugars, and for each sugar, C rather than O sites are always preferred for radicalization, thus suggesting the possibility to activate C-H bonds of biomass sugars. Radical catalysis is further combined with Brønsted acids, and it clearly states that functionalization fundamentally regulates the catalytic effects of biomass sugars. In presence of explicit water molecules, functionalization significantly affects the activation barriers and reaction energies of protonation rather than dehydration steps. Tertiary butyl and phenyl groups with large steric hindrances or hydroxyl and amino groups resulting in high stabilities for protonation products drive the protonation steps to occur facilely at ambient conditions. PMID:27405843

  7. Radicalization and Radical Catalysis of Biomass Sugars: Insights from First-principles Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gang; Zhu, Chang; Zou, Xianli; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio and density functional calculations are conducted to investigate the radicalization processes and radical catalysis of biomass sugars. Structural alterations due to radicalization generally focus on the radicalized sites, and radicalization affects H-bonds in D-fructofuranose more than in D-glucopyranose, potentially with outcome of new H-bonds. Performances of different functionals and basis sets are evaluated for all radicalization processes, and enthalpy changes and Gibbs free energies for these processes are presented with high accuracy, which can be referenced for subsequent experimental and theoretical studies. It shows that radicalization can be utilized for direct transformation of biomass sugars, and for each sugar, C rather than O sites are always preferred for radicalization, thus suggesting the possibility to activate C-H bonds of biomass sugars. Radical catalysis is further combined with Brønsted acids, and it clearly states that functionalization fundamentally regulates the catalytic effects of biomass sugars. In presence of explicit water molecules, functionalization significantly affects the activation barriers and reaction energies of protonation rather than dehydration steps. Tertiary butyl and phenyl groups with large steric hindrances or hydroxyl and amino groups resulting in high stabilities for protonation products drive the protonation steps to occur facilely at ambient conditions. PMID:27405843

  8. [Anti-radical activity of products of processing of holothurian Cucumaria japonica and their practical application for lipid stabilization].

    PubMed

    Tabakaeva, O V; Kalenik, T K; Tabakaev, A V

    2015-01-01

    Products of technological and biotechnological modification (acid and enzymatic hydrolyzates and hydrothermal extracts) of the holothurian Cucumariajaponica from the Far East region are the complex multicomponent systems containing biologically active agents of a sea origin that has to provide them biological activity. The research objective consisted in quantitative studying of anti-radical properties of acid, enzymatic hydrolyzates and hydrothermal extracts from soft fabrics of a holothurian from the Far East region (Cucumaria japonica) and their influence on oxidation of lipids in fat emulsion products. The reaction with stable free 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical was used as a model system. Radical relating activity of hydrolyzates and extracts from Cucumaria japonica varied over a wide range from 48 to 78%. The maximum radical binding activity was noted for acid hydrolyzates. The activity of the hydrolyzate from a nimbus and feelers of Cucumaria japonica was comparable with activity of ionol. It has been defined that levels of manifestation of anti-radical activity depended on a way of technological and biotechnological processing of raw materials. Studying of fractional composition of melanoidins of hydrolyzates and extracts from Cucumaria japonica established that they can be divided into fractions--with molecular masses about 10,000 and 1000 Da. The maximum content of melanoidins has been defined in fraction weighing about 1000 Da. Introduction of acid, enzymatic hydrolyzates and hydrothermal extracts from Cucumaria japonica in the composition of oil-fat emulsion systems allowed to slow down processes of lipid oxidation and triglyceride hydrolysis in mayonnaise. Introduction of hydrolyzates and hydrothermal extracts from Cucumaria japonica in an oil-fat emulsion product allowed to reduce peroxide value by 22-45%, acid value by 12-35% on the 90th days of storage. Acid hydrolysates of Cucumaria Japonica most significantly reduce the rate of

  9. Beta-Carotene chemical stability in nanoemulsions was improved by stabilized with Beta-Lactoglobulin-Catechin conjugates through free radical method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG)-catechin conjugates were prepared by a free radical method and investigated with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and far-UV circular dichroism (CD). Covalent binding between BLG and cat...

  10. Towards reducing DBP formation potential of drinking water by favouring direct ozone over hydroxyl radical reactions during ozonation.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Glen Andrew; Stalter, Daniel; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Weinberg, Howard S; Keller, Jurg; Farré, Maria José

    2015-12-15

    When ozonation is employed in advanced water treatment plants to produce drinking water, dissolved organic matter reacts with ozone (O3) and/or hydroxyl radicals (OH) affecting disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation with subsequently used chlorine-based disinfectants. This study presents the effects of varying exposures of O3 and •OH on DBP concentrations and their associated toxicity generated after subsequent chlorination. DBP formation potential tests and in vitro bioassays were conducted after batch ozonation experiments of coagulated surface water with and without addition of tertiary butanol (t-BuOH, 10 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mg/mg O3), and at different pH (6-8) and transferred ozone doses (0-1 mg/mg TOC). Although ozonation led to a 24-37% decrease in formation of total trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetamides, an increase in formation of total trihalonitromethanes, chloral hydrate, and haloketones was observed. This effect however was less pronounced for samples ozonated at conditions favoring molecular ozone (e.g., pH 6 and in the presence of t-BuOH) over •OH reactions (e.g., pH 8 and in the presence of H2O2). Compared to ozonation only, addition of H2O2 consistently enhanced formation of all DBP groups (20-61%) except trihalonitromethanes. This proves that •OH-transformed organic matter is more susceptible to halogen incorporation. Analogously, adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) concentrations increased under conditions that favor •OH reactions. The ratio of unknown to known AOX, however, was greater at conditions that promote direct O3 reactions. Although significant correlation was found between AOX and genotoxicity with the p53 bioassay, toxicity tests using 4 in vitro bioassays showed relatively low absolute differences between various ozonation conditions. PMID:26378731

  11. Effect of nucleobase sequence on the proton-transfer reaction and stability of the guanine-cytosine base pair radical anion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Yin; Yeh, Shu-Wen; Hsu, Sodio C N; Kao, Chai-Lin; Dong, Teng-Yuan

    2011-02-21

    The formation of base pair radical anions is closely related to many fascinating research fields in biology and chemistry such as radiation damage to DNA and electron transport in DNA. However, the relevant knowledge so far mainly comes from studies on isolated base pair radical anions, and their behavior in the DNA environment is less understood. In this study, we focus on how the nucleobase sequence affects the properties of the guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair radical anion. The energetic barrier and reaction energy for the proton transfer along the N(1)(G)-H···N(3)(C) hydrogen bond and the stability of GC˙(-) (i.e., electron affinity of GC) embedded in different sequences of base-pair trimer were evaluated using density functional theory. The computational results demonstrated that the presence of neighboring base pairs has an important influence on the behavior of GC˙(-) in the gas phase. The excess electron was found to be localized on the embedded GC and the charge leakage to neighboring base pairs was very minor in all of the investigated sequences. Accordingly, the sequence behavior of the proton-transfer reaction and the stability of GC˙(-) is chiefly governed by electrostatic interactions with adjacent base pairs. However, the effect of base stacking, due to its electrostatic nature, is severely screened upon hydration, and thus, the sequence dependence of the properties of GC˙(-) in aqueous environment becomes relatively weak and less than that observed in the gas phase. The effect of geometry relaxation associated with neighboring base pairs as well as the possibility of proton transfer along the N(2)(G)-H···O(2)(C) channel have also been investigated. The implications of the present findings to the electron transport and radiation damage of DNA are discussed. PMID:21152551

  12. Spin-trapping studies of peroxynitrite decomposition and of 3-morpholinosydnonimine N-ethylcarbamide autooxidation: direct evidence for metal-independent formation of free radical intermediates.

    PubMed

    Augusto, O; Gatti, R M; Radi, R

    1994-04-01

    Decomposition of peroxynitrite, the reaction product of superoxide and nitric oxide, was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin-trapping experiments with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO). Proton-catalyzed decomposition of peroxynitrite at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of the DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct (DMPO-OH). Yields were low as DMPO-OH decomposes by direct reactions with peroxynitrite anion and nitrogen dioxide. The yield of DMPO-OH greatly increased in the presence of glutathione or cysteine. Both thiols inhibited the DMPO-OH signal decay by scavenging excess peroxynitrite anion and presumably nitrogen dioxide yielded during peroxynitrite decomposition. In turn, the reactions of peroxynitrite with either glutathione or cysteine resulted in the formation of thiyl radicals, detectable as the corresponding DMPO adduct. Systematic spin-trapping studies of peroxynitrite decomposition in the presence of glutathione established that DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct formation was metal independent, occurring in a metal-free buffer and being unaffected by diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid. Also, quantitative competition experiments with ethanol and formate demonstrated that the oxidant generated during peroxynitrite decomposition reacts with rate constants similar to those expected for free hydroxyl radical and forming the same free radical intermediates, alpha-ethyl-hydroxy and carbon dioxide radicals, respectively. Similar spin-trapping results were obtained in studies of the autooxidation of 3-morpholinosydnonimine, a sydnonimine which generates a flux of both superoxide and nitric oxide. The obtained results contribute for the understanding of the reactivity of peroxynitrite, a transient intermediate of emerging biological significance. PMID:8161194

  13. Theoretical investigations of reactions of some radicals with HO sub 2. 1. Hydrogen abstractions by direct mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Toohey, D.W.; Anderson, J.G. )

    1989-02-09

    Ab initio quantum mechanical methods are used to calculate saddle-point geometries and energies for hydrogen abstractions from HO{sub 2} by N, ClO, O, Cl, H, OH, and F assuming direct attack at the hydrogen atom. Results are consistent with bond energy-bond order principles and indicate that activation energies for these reactions should decrease with increasing exothermicity of reaction. In addition, the large rate constant for OH + HO{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2}O + O{sub 2} is interpreted to be due to long-range dipole-dipole attraction, leading ultimately to formation of a hydrogen bond and to stabilization of an early transition state. Results for the ClO + HO{sub 2} {yields} HOCl + O{sub 2} reaction suggest a dual mechanism dominated by direct abstraction at high temperatures and by elimination from a stable intermediate at lower temperatures, perhaps the only reaction in this series which does so. These results are in good agreement with current experimental rate data.

  14. The formation and stability of the superoxide radical (O2-) on rock-forming minerals: Band gaps, hydroxylation state, and implications for Mars oxidant chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Quinn, Richard C.; Harding, Heather K.

    2008-09-01

    We have examined the generation and stability of O2 - on TiO2 and albite, a common Na feldspar. We were not able to produce thermally stable superoxide on albite, in contrast to the results of Yen et al., who reported the generation of O2 - that was stable up to 200°C on labradorite, another common feldspar. The superoxide radical did form under UV irradiation at 77 K on albite that was not dehydrated but decayed rapidly at room temperature. On dehydrated albite, no superoxide signal was observed. We studied the kinetics of O2 - decomposition on hydrated albite and derived an activation energy, E a = 15.2 kJ/mol. Assuming pseudo first-order kinetics, a simple thermal model of Mars' regolith demonstrates that the surface O2 - population does not go to zero overnight; superoxide extinction at the surface is only complete when the seasonal CO2 cap covers the surface and surface photolysis is inhibited. Depending on the specific quantum efficiency of the e-/h+ generation process, a finite, non-equilibrium population of O2 - should be observable on Martian surface materials throughout the Martian year. However, on the basis of our inability to generate stable O2 - on hydrated albite via direct UV irradiation, we do not believe that this mechanism is capable of explaining the O2 release in the Viking Gas Exchange (GEx) results, since O2 release in that case was observed even after samples had been stored for 143 sols in the dark at 10°C, then heated to 145°C for 3 hours. At least two other potential pathways to the generation of O2 - are identified in this article. The first possibility is that metal oxides common on the Martian surface, particularly hematite, may be photoactive on Mars and play a role analogous to TiO2 in surface catalysis. Secondly, we found that superoxide that formed during the sorption or drying of a 1% H2O2 solution on TiO2, and potentially other oxides seems to be stable indefinitely.

  15. Direct measurement of intracellular free Ca2+ in rat peritoneal macrophages: correlation with oxygen-radical production.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M B; Campbell, A K

    1983-01-01

    A novel method has been developed, based on osmotic lysis of intracellular pinocytotic vesicles, to introduce the Ca2+-activated photoprotein obelin into the cytoplasm of rat peritoneal macrophages. The change in osmolarity of the incubating medium necessary to induce lysis of the pinocytotic vesicles did not significantly affect the viability or responsiveness of the cells. The method enabled on average 3 fl of external medium to be introduced into each cell. Macrophages loaded with photoprotein had a resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration of 0.24 +/- 0.02 microM, calculated from the obelin consumption rate. The calcium ionophore, A23187, induced a prolonged rise in intracellular Ca2+ and also stimulated oxygen-radical production, monitored by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. The chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, 1 microM, produced a transient increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ which reached a plateau of 1.2 +/- 0.64 microM (n = 7) and declined with a half-time of approximately 40 sec. Unopsonized particles, latex beads (diameter = 1 micron), did not produce any detectable rise in intracellular Ca2+. Incorporation of a calcium chelator EGTA-ethylene-glycol-bis-(aminoethylether) tetra-acetate--into the cytoplasm abolished the transient intracellular Ca2+ rise induced by chemotactic peptide. Oxygen-radical production was also abolished. However, oxygen radical production induced by unopsonized particles was unaffected by intracellular EGTA. It was concluded that oxygen-radical production detected by chemiluminescence can be triggered by a rise in intracellular Ca2+. Chemotactic peptide induces oxygen-radical production by this mechanism. However, unopsonized particles induce oxygen-radical production by a mechanism independent of a rise in intracellular Ca2+. Images Figure 1 PMID:6414943

  16. Stabilities of nitrogen containing heterocyclic radicals and geometrical influences on non-radiative processes in organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evleth, E. M.

    1971-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental work on generating radicals by removal of a hydrogen atom from pyrrole, imidazole, indole, and carbazole is reported. Photophysical studies on indolizine and related aza-derivatives show that materials having large S2-S1 energy gaps might exhibit upper state fluorescence. Photodecomposition quantum yields of a series of sterically hindered p-aminobenzene diazonium cations in water were found structurally and wavelength dependent and unquenched in aqueous sodium bromide solutions. Photodecomposition of diazonium materials did not produce a metastable species with a longer lifetime than 1 msec.

  17. Beta-carotene chemical stability in Nanoemulsions was improved by stabilized with beta-lactoglobulin-catechin conjugates through free radical method.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiang; Zhang, Yuzhu; Liang, Rong; Zhong, Fang; Ma, Jianguo

    2015-01-14

    Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG)–catechin conjugates were prepared by a free radical method and investigated with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and far-UV circular dichroism (CD). Covalent binding between BLG and catechin were confirmed with SDS-PAGE and ESI-MS. About 93% of beta-lactoglobulin was conjugated with catechin or catecin fragments according to the gel intensity analysis software. Far-UV CD results showed that the content of β-sheet decreased with a corresponding increase in unordered structures after grafting. Both nanoemulsions with mean particle size between 160 and 170 nm were prepared. Both the rate of particle growth and the total beta-carotene (BC) loss at 50 °C were significantly greater than at 4 and 25 °C. The retention rates of BC in nanoemulsions were 27.8% and 48.6% for BLG and BLG–catechin conjugates, respectively, after 30 days of storage at 50 °C. The BC retention encapsulated in nanoemulsion was significantly improved using BLG–catechin conjugates, compared with BLG alone. The increase of BC retention in nanoemulsions encapsulated with BLG–catechin conjugates was due to the significant improvement of antioxidative properties (reducing power, free radical scavenging activity, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity) of BLG after covalent binding with catechin. The results indicated that the proteins modified with polyphenols can be widely used in a labile bioactive compounds encapsulation delivery system. PMID:25514513

  18. An extension of A-stability to alternating direction implicit methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warming, R. F.; Beam, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    An alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme was constructed by the method of approximate factorization. An A-stable linear multistep method (LMM) was used to integrate a model two-dimensional hyperbolic-parabolic partial differential equation. Sufficient conditions for the A-stability of the LMM were determined by applying the theory of positive real functions to reduce the stability analysis of the partial differential equations to a simple algebraic test. A linear test equation for partial differential equations is defined and then used to analyze the stability of approximate factorization schemes. An ADI method for the three-dimensional heat equation is also presented.

  19. Direct {anti b}b production in {anti p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, J.

    1993-12-31

    The first measurement of bottom quark production in the forward detector at CDF is presented in this thesis. Events from the 1988/89 Fermilab collider run were selected with forward muons with nearby jets to form a bottom quark tag. The efficiency and acceptance of the detector are then taken into account and the number of events is turned into a cross section: {sigma}(p{sub t}{sup b} > 20 GeV, 1.9 < {vert_bar}{eta}{sup b}{vert_bar} < 2.5) = (124. {+-} 35. {+-} 76.) nb. The contribution from direct bottom quarks is {sigma}(p{sub t}{sup b} > 20 GeV, p{sub t}{sup {anti b}} > 15 GeV, 1.9 < {vert_bar}{eta}{sup b}{vert_bar} < 2.5) = (100. {+-} 30.{sub {minus}31.}{sup +30.}) nb.

  20. Rheology and stability kinetics of bare silicon nanoparticle inks for low-cost direct printing

    SciTech Connect

    More, Priyesh V.; Jeong, Sunho; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Seong Jip; Nahm, Sahn

    2013-12-16

    Highly dispersed and stable silicon nanoparticles ink is formulated for its application in direct printing or printable electronics. These dispersions are prepared from free-standing silicon nanoparticles which are not capped with any organic ligand, making it suitable for electronic applications. Silicon nanoparticles dispersions are prepared by suspending the nanoparticles in benzonitrile or ethanol by using polypropylene glycol (PPG) as a binder. All the samples show typical shear thinning behavior while the dispersion samples show low viscosities signifying good quality dispersion. Such thinning behavior favors in fabrication of dense films with spin-coating or patterns with drop casting. The dispersion stability is monitored by turbiscan measurements showing good stability for one week. A low-cost direct printing method for dispersion samples is also demonstrated to obtain micro-sized patterns. Low electrical resistivity of resulting patterns, adjustable viscosity and good stability makes these silicon nanoparticles dispersions highly applicable for direct printing process.

  1. Rheology and stability kinetics of bare silicon nanoparticle inks for low-cost direct printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Priyesh V.; Jeong, Sunho; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Kim, Seong Jip; Nahm, Sahn; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin

    2013-12-01

    Highly dispersed and stable silicon nanoparticles ink is formulated for its application in direct printing or printable electronics. These dispersions are prepared from free-standing silicon nanoparticles which are not capped with any organic ligand, making it suitable for electronic applications. Silicon nanoparticles dispersions are prepared by suspending the nanoparticles in benzonitrile or ethanol by using polypropylene glycol (PPG) as a binder. All the samples show typical shear thinning behavior while the dispersion samples show low viscosities signifying good quality dispersion. Such thinning behavior favors in fabrication of dense films with spin-coating or patterns with drop casting. The dispersion stability is monitored by turbiscan measurements showing good stability for one week. A low-cost direct printing method for dispersion samples is also demonstrated to obtain micro-sized patterns. Low electrical resistivity of resulting patterns, adjustable viscosity and good stability makes these silicon nanoparticles dispersions highly applicable for direct printing process.

  2. System for imposing directional stability on a rocket-propelled vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved system for use in imposing directional stability on a rocket-propelled vehicle is described. The system includes a pivotally supported engine-mounting platform, a gimbal ring mounted on the platform and adapted to pivotally support a rocket engine and an hydraulic actuator connected to the platform for imparting selected pivotal motion. An accelerometer and a signal comparator circuit for providing error intelligence indicative of aberration in vehicle acceleration is included along with an actuator control circuit connected with the actuator and responsive to error intelligence for imparting pivotal motion to the platform. Relocation of the engine's thrust vector is thus achieved for imparting directional stability to the vehicle.

  3. Catalytic surface radical in dye-decolorizing peroxidase: a computational, spectroscopic and site-directed mutagenesis study

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Dolores; Pogni, Rebecca; Cañellas, Marina; Lucas, Fátima; Guallar, Victor; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Sinicropi, Adalgisa; Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Coscolín, Cristina; Romero, Antonio; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, Angel T.

    2014-01-01

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) of Auricularia auricula-judae has been expressed in Escherichia coli as a representative of a new DyP family, and subjected to mutagenic, spectroscopic, crystallographic and computational studies. The crystal structure of DyP shows a buried haem cofactor, and surface tryptophan and tyrosine residues potentially involved in long-range electron transfer from bulky dyes. Simulations using PELE (Protein Energy Landscape Exploration) software provided several binding-energy optima for the anthraquinone-type RB19 (Reactive Blue 19) near the above aromatic residues and the haem access-channel. Subsequent QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) calculations showed a higher tendency of Trp-377 than other exposed haem-neighbouring residues to harbour a catalytic protein radical, and identified the electron-transfer pathway. The existence of such a radical in H2O2-activated DyP was shown by low-temperature EPR, being identified as a mixed tryptophanyl/tyrosyl radical in multifrequency experiments. The signal was dominated by the Trp-377 neutral radical contribution, which disappeared in the W377S variant, and included a tyrosyl contribution assigned to Tyr-337 after analysing the W377S spectra. Kinetics of substrate oxidation by DyP suggests the existence of high- and low-turnover sites. The high-turnover site for oxidation of RB19 (kcat> 200 s−1) and other DyP substrates was assigned to Trp-377 since it was absent from the W377S variant. The low-turnover site/s (RB19 kcat ~20 s−1) could correspond to the haem access-channel, since activity was decreased when the haem channel was occluded by the G169L mutation. If a tyrosine residue is also involved, it will be different from Tyr-337 since all activities are largely unaffected in the Y337S variant. PMID:25495127

  4. Lactoferrin Directly Scavenges Hydroxyl Radicals and Undergoes Oxidative Self-Degradation: A Possible Role in Protection against Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Yuki; Imase, Megumi; Oda, Hirotsugu; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the protective effect of lactoferrin against DNA damage induced by various hydroxyl radical generation systems. Lactoferrin (LF) was examined with regard to its potential role as a scavenger against radical oxygen species using bovine milk LF. Native LF, iron-saturated LF (holo-LF), and apolactoferrin (apo-LF) effectively suppressed strand breaks in plasmid DNA due to hydroxyl radicals produced by the Fenton reaction. In addition, both native LF and holo-LF clearly protected calf thymus DNA from fragmentation due to ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of H2O2. We also demonstrated a protective effect of all three LF molecules against 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in calf thymus DNA following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with H2O2. Our results clearly indicate that native LF has reactive oxygen species-scavenging ability, independent of its nature as a masking component for transient metals. We also demonstrated that the protective effect of LF against oxidative DNA damage is due to degradation of LF itself, which is more susceptible to degradation than other bovine milk proteins. PMID:24424315

  5. Direct fiber comb stabilization to a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shun; Wang, Chenchen; Fourcade-Dutin, Coralie; Washburn, Brian R; Benabid, Fetah; Corwin, Kristan L

    2014-09-22

    We have isolated a single tooth from a fiber laser-based optical frequency comb for nonlinear spectroscopy and thereby directly referenced the comb. An 89 MHz erbium fiber laser frequency comb is directly stabilized to the P(23) (1539.43 nm) overtone transition of (12)C(2)H(2) inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. To do this, a single comb tooth is isolated and amplified from 20 nW to 40 mW with sufficient fidelity to perform saturated absorption spectroscopy. The fractional stability of the comb, ~7 nm away from the stabilized tooth, is shown to be 6 × 10(-12) at 100 ms gate time, which is over an order of magnitude better than that of a comb referenced to a GPS-disciplined Rb oscillator. PMID:25321837

  6. Direct observation of the low-spin Fe(III)-NO(radical) intermediate state during rebinding of NO to photodeligated ferric cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeheung; Lee, Taegon; Lim, Manho

    2013-10-10

    Nitrosylated ferric heme is autoreduced readily to the more stable Fe(II)-NO adduct, but it is stabilized in NO-carrier heme proteins where maintaining the Fe(III) oxidation state is crucial for efficient NO delivery. Density functional theory calculations by Lehnert and co-workers have shown that a NO-bound ferric model heme has a low-spin (LS) Fe(III)-NO(radical) state that might be critical for efficient NO transport by NO-carrier heme proteins. Recently, the elusive LS Fe(III)-NO(radical) state was observed as an electronic intermediate state during geminate rebinding (GR) of NO to ferric myoglobin (Mb(III)). Cytochrome c (Cytc), a ubiquitous heme protein, is useful for generalizing the presence of the LS Fe(III)-NO(radical) state. Photoexcitation dynamics of NO-bound ferric Cytc (Cytc(III)NO) was probed after excitation of Cytc(III)NO in D2O solution at 294 K with a 575 nm pulse using femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy. The time-resolved spectra displayed several weak absorption bands in the 1900-1800 cm(-1) range and a dominant bleach at 1917 cm(-1), the position of the absorption at equilibrium. Two absorptions, with 37 cm(-1) isotope shift of (15)NO, shifted toward higher energy and narrowed with an average time constant of 8 ps, indicating that they arose from thermally and/or vibrationally excited NO in the ground electronic state of Cytc(III)NO. Three absorption bands, showing 33 cm(-1) isotope shift of (15)NO and peaked at 1865, 1836, and 1807 cm(-1), were assigned to the deligated NO residing in the interior of the protein, to the rebound Cytc(III)NO in the LS Fe(III)-NO(radical) state, and to the vibrationally excited NO of Cytc(III)NO in the LS Fe(III)-NO(radical) state, respectively. The quantum yield for NO deligation of Cytc(III)NO by a 575 nm photon was 0.8 ± 0.1. Most of the deligated NO showed non-exponential GR, and the GR kinetics was described by exp(-(t/7 ps)(0.7)). Every rebound Cytc(III)NO formed the LS Fe(III)-NO(radical) state that

  7. Hypersonic lateral and directional stability characteristics of aeroassist flight experiment configuration in air and CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micol, John R.; Wells, William L.

    1993-01-01

    Hypersonic lateral and directional stability characteristics measured on a 60 deg half-angle elliptical cone, which was raked at an angle of 73 deg from the cone centerline and with an ellipsoid nose (ellipticity equal to 2.0 in the symmetry plane), are presented for angles of attack from -10 to 10 deg. The high normal-shock density ratio of a real gas was simulated by tests at a Mach number of 6 in air and CF4 (density ratio equal to 5.25 and 12.0, respectively). Tests were conducted in air at Mach 6 and 10 and in CF4 at Mach 6 to examine the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and normal-shock density ratio. Changes in Mach number from 6 to 10 in air or in Reynolds number by a factor of 4 at Mach 6 had a negligible effect on lateral and directional stability characteristics. Variations in normal-shock density ratio had a measurable effect on lateral and directional aerodynamic coefficients, but no significant effect on lateral and directional stability characteristics. Tests in air and CF4 indicated that the configuration was laterally and directionally stable through the test range of angle of attack.

  8. Structures and stabilities of hemi-bonded vs proton-transferred isomers of dimer radical cation systems (XH3sbnd YH3)+ (X,Y = N, P, As)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Li Fei; Li, An Yong; Li, Zhuo Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Structures, bonding and relative stabilities of the radical dimer cations (XH3sbnd YH3)+ (X,Y = N, P, As) have been studied theoretically. Two kinds of structures (hemi-bonded and proton-transferred isomers) are obtained for each system. For (NH3sbnd N/P/AsH3)+ the stable conformer is the proton-transferred structure; for (PH3sbnd PH3)+ and (AsH3sbnd AsH3)+ the stable structure is the hemi-bonded one; for (PH3sbnd AsH3)+ three proton-transferred and one hemi-bonded isomers were found with the stability order: (Hsbnd PH3+⋯AsH2) I > (H3PH+⋯AsH2) II > (H3P⋯AsH3+) > (H3AsH+⋯PH2) III. The hemi-bonds have large interaction energies 25.2-35.1 kcal/mol and are partially covalent in nature, while the proton-transferred structures have moderate interaction energies 6.5-22.2 kcal/mol.

  9. Enhancement of the organic solvent-stability of the LST-03 lipase by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Takuya; Ogino, Hiroyasu

    2009-01-01

    LST-03 lipase from an organic solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa LST-03 has high stability and activity in the presence of various organic solvents. In this research, enhancement of organic solvent-stability of LST-03 lipase was attempted by directed evolution. The structural gene of the LST-03 lipase was amplified by the error prone-PCR method. Organic solvent-stability of the mutated lipases was assayed by formation of a clear zone of agar which contained dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and tri-n-butyrin and which overlaid a plate medium. And the organic solvent-stability was also confirmed by measuring the half-life of activity in the presence of DMSO. Four mutated enzymes were selected on the basis of their high organic solvent-stability in the presence of DMSO. The organic solvent-stabilities of mutated LST-03 lipase in the presence of various organic solvents were measured and their mutated amino acid residues were identified. The half-lives of the LST-03-R65 lipase in the presence of cyclohexane and n-decane were about 9 to 11-fold longer than those of the wild-type lipase, respectively. Some substituted amino acid residues of mutated LST-03 lipases have been located at the surface of the enzyme molecules, while some other amino acid residues have been changed from neutral to basic residues. PMID:19731302

  10. Direct observation of multimer stabilization in the mechanical unfolding pathway of a protein undergoing oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Zackary N; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2015-02-24

    Understanding how protein oligomerization affects the stability of monomers in self-assembled structures is crucial to the development of new protein-based nanomaterials and protein cages for drug delivery. Here, we use single-molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS), protein engineering, and computer simulations to evaluate how dimerization and tetramerization affects the stability of the monomer of Streptavidin, a model homotetrameric protein. The unfolding force directly relates to the folding stability, and we find that monomer of Streptavidin is mechanically stabilized by 40% upon dimerization, and that it is stabilized an additional 24% upon tetramerization. We also find that biotin binding increases stability by another 50% as compared to the apo-tetrameric form. We used the distribution of unfolding forces to extract properties of the underlying energy landscape and found that the distance to the transition state is decreased and the barrier height is increased upon multimerization. Finally, we investigated the origin of the strengthening by ligand binding. We found that, rather than being strengthened through intramolecular contacts, it is strengthened due to the contacts provided by the biotin-binding loop that crosses the interface between the dimers. PMID:25639698

  11. Direct production of OH radicals upon CH overtone activation of (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COO Criegee intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fang; Beames, Joseph M.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2014-12-21

    Ozonolysis of alkenes, a principle non-photolytic source of atmospheric OH radicals, proceeds through unimolecular decay of energized carbonyl oxide intermediates, known as Criegee intermediates. In this work, cold dimethyl-substituted Criegee intermediates are vibrationally activated in the CH stretch overtone region to drive the 1,4 hydrogen transfer reaction that leads to OH radical products. IR excitation of (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COO reveals the vibrational states with sufficient oscillator strength, coupling to the reaction coordinate, and energy to surmount the effective barrier (≤ 16.0 kcal mol{sup −1}) to reaction. Insight on the dissociation dynamics is gleaned from homogeneous broadening of the spectral features, indicative of rapid intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution and/or reaction, as well as the quantum state distribution of the OH X{sup 2}Π (v = 0) products. The experimental results are compared with complementary electronic structure calculations, which provide the IR absorption spectrum and geometric changes along the intrinsic reaction coordinate. Additional theoretical analysis reveals the vibrational modes and couplings that permit (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COO to access to the transition state region for reaction. The experimental and theoretical results are compared with an analogous recent study of the IR activation of syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO and its unimolecular decay to OH products [F. Liu, J. M. Beames, A. S. Petit, A. B. McCoy, and M. I. Lester, Science 345, 1596 (2014)].

  12. Some effects of nonlinear variation in the directional-stability and damping-in-yawing derivatives on the lateral stability of an airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sternfield, Leonard

    1951-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made to determine the effect of nonlinear stability derivatives on the lateral stability of an airplane. Motions were calculated on the assumption that the directional-stability and the damping-in-yawing derivatives are functions of the angle of sideslip. The application of the Laplace transform to the calculation of an airplane motion when certain types of nonlinear derivatives are present is described in detail. The types of nonlinearities assumed correspond to the condition in which the values of the directional-stability and damping-in-yawing derivatives are zero for small angle of sideslip.

  13. Effects of antioxidants and additional emulsifiers on the stability of emulsified milk fat in the photo/radical oxidation system.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yukihiro; Hiyama, Shinichiro; Takase, Yoshihiko; Kadowaki, Akio; Hara, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of antioxidants on the oxidative deterioration of emulsified oils and fats differ depending on the oxidation conditions, oils and fats used, and type of emulsifier. In this study, milk fat was emulsified to obtain water-oil (O/W) emulsion using Tween20 as emulsifier. The antioxidative effects of several antioxidants with various lipophilic properties, such as δ-tocopherol (Toc), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), quercetin (Qu), green tea extract (GTE), and rooibos tea extract (RTE) were investigated, the effects of additional emulsifiers such as polyglycerol and sucrose esters of fatty acids on the oxidation stability of the emulsion were also investigated. Under oxidative conditions of 30°C in 650 lx, Toc was more effective than GTE in suppressing the increase of the peroxide value (PV, meq/kg) of the emulsified milk fat. Under these oxidative conditions, the antioxidative effect of GTE was enhanced by the addition of polyglycerol and sucrose esters of fatty acids. Under the oxidative conditions at 40°C in dark with 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) or 2,2'-azobis (2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) (AMVN), Toc showed the most antioxidative effect on suppression of the increase of PV and anisidine value (AnV) of the emulsified milk fat. Furthermore, additional emulsifiers also showed suppressive effects on the increase of the PV and AnV of the emulsified milk fat even without any antioxidants. The effects of additional emulsifiers on the oxidative stability of O/W emulsions were enhanced with antioxidants such as Toc, EGCg, and Qu. PMID:25174675

  14. Designing and building nanowires: directed nanocrystal self-assembly into radically branched and zigzag PbS nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Ma, Xin; Gerlein, L. Felipe; Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2011-07-01

    Lead sulfide nanowires with controllable optoelectronic properties would be promising building blocks for various applications. Here, we report the hot colloidal synthesis of radically branched and zigzag nanowires through self-attachment of star-shaped and octahedral nanocrystals in the presence of multiple surfactants. We obtained high-quality single-crystal nanowires with uniform diameter along the entire length, and the size of the nanowire can be tuned by tailoring the reaction parameters. This slow oriented attachment provides a better understanding of the intricacies of this complex nanocrystal assembly process. Meanwhile, these self-assembled nanowire structures have appealing lateral conformations with narrow side arms or highly faceted edges, where strong quantum confinement can occur. Consequently, the single-crystal nanowire structures exhibit strong photoluminescence in the near-infrared region with a large blue-shift compared to the bulk material.

  15. Calculation of the relative geometry of tRNAs in the ribosome from directed hydroxyl-radical probing data.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S; Whirl, M L; Kondo, D; Noller, H F; Altman, R B

    2000-01-01

    The many interactions of tRNA with the ribosome are fundamental to protein synthesis. During the peptidyl transferase reaction, the acceptor ends of the aminoacyl and peptidyl tRNAs must be in close proximity to allow peptide bond formation, and their respective anticodons must base pair simultaneously with adjacent trinucleotide codons on the mRNA. The two tRNAs in this state can be arranged in two nonequivalent general configurations called the R and S orientations, many versions of which have been proposed for the geometry of tRNAs in the ribosome. Here, we report the combined use of computational analysis and tethered hydroxyl-radical probing to constrain their arrangement. We used Fe(II) tethered to the 5' end of anticodon stem-loop analogs (ASLs) of tRNA and to the 5' end of deacylated tRNA(Phe) to generate hydroxyl radicals that probe proximal positions in the backbone of adjacent tRNAs in the 70S ribosome. We inferred probe-target distances from the resulting RNA strand cleavage intensities and used these to calculate the mutual arrangement of A-site and P-site tRNAs in the ribosome, using three different structure estimation algorithms. The two tRNAs are constrained to the S configuration with an angle of about 45 degrees between the respective planes of the molecules. The terminal phosphates of 3'CCA are separated by 23 A when using the tRNA crystal conformations, and the anticodon arms of the two tRNAs are sufficiently close to interact with adjacent codons in mRNA. PMID:10688361

  16. Stability analysis of direct contact heat exchangers subject to system perturbations. Final report, Task 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    This report includes a project summary, copies of two papers resulting from the work and the Ph.D. Dissertation of Dr. Mehdi Golafshani entitled, ''Stability of a Direct Contact Heat Exchanger''. Specifically, the work deals with the operational stability of a spray column type heat exchanger subject to disturbances typical of those which can occur for geothermal applications. A computer program was developed to solve the one-dimensional transient two-phase flow problem and it was applied to the design of a spray column. The operation and design of the East Mesa 500kW/sub e/ direct contactor was assessed. It is shown that the heat transfer is governed by the internal resistance of the dispersed phase. In fact, the performance is well-represented by diffusion of heat within the drops. 5 refs.

  17. Uncoupling of increased cellular oxidative stress and myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury by directed sarcolemma stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Martindale, Joshua J.; Metzger, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major clinical problem leading to cardiac dysfunction and myocyte death. It is widely held that I/R causes damage to membrane phospholipids, and is a significant mechanism of cardiac I/R injury. Molecular dissection of sarcolemmal damage in I/R, however, has been difficult to address experimentally. We studied here cardiac I/R injury under conditions targeting gain- or loss-of sarcolemma integrity. To implement gain-in-sarcolemma integrity during I/R, synthetic copolymer-based sarcolemmal stabilizers (CSS), including Poloxamer 188 (P188), were used as a tool to directly stabilize the sarcolemma. Consistent with the hypothesis of sarcolemmal stabilization, cellular markers of necrosis and apoptosis evident in untreated myocytes were fully blocked in sarcolemma stabilized myocytes. Unexpectedly, sarcolemmal stabilization of adult cardiac myocytes did not affect the status of myocyte-generated oxidants or lipid peroxidation in two independent assays. We also investigated the loss of sarcolemmal integrity using two independent genetic mouse models, dystrophin-deficient mdx or dysferlin knockout (Dysf KO) mice. Both models of sarcolemmal loss-of-function were severely affected by I/R injury ex vivo, and this was lessened by CSS. In vivo studies also showed that infarct size was significantly reduced in CSS-treated hearts. Mechanistically, these findings support a model whereby I/R-mediated increased myocyte oxidative stress is uncoupled from myocyte injury. Because the sarcolemma stabilizers used here do not transit across the myocyte membrane this is evidence that intracellular targets of oxidants are not sufficiently altered to affect cell death when sarcolemma integrity is preserved by synthetic stabilizers. These findings, in turn, suggest that sarcolemma destabilization, and consequent Ca2+ mishandling, as a focal initiating mechanism underlying myocardial I/R injury. PMID:24362314

  18. Direct epoxidation of propylene over stabilized Cu(+) surface sites on titanium-modified Cu2O.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofang; Kattel, Shyam; Xiong, Ke; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Rykov, Sergei; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Rodriguez, José A; Liu, Ping; Stacchiola, Dario J; Chen, Jingguang G

    2015-10-01

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate that by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu(+) active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide the epoxidation selectivity can be tuned. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, an oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene. PMID:26215635

  19. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  20. Development and validation of a simple high performance thin layer chromatography method combined with direct 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay to quantify free radical scavenging activity in wine.

    PubMed

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Morton, David W; Yusof, Ahmad P

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to: (a) develop a simple, high performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method combined with direct 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay to rapidly assess and compare free radical scavenging activity or anti-oxidant activity for major classes of polyphenolics present in wines; and (b) to investigate relationship between free radical scavenging activity to the total polyphenolic content (TPC) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the wine samples. The most potent free radical scavengers that we tested for in the wine samples were found to be resveratrol (polyphenolic non-flavonoid) and rutin (flavonoid), while polyphenolic acids (caffeic acid and gallic acid) although present in all wine samples were found to be less potent free radical scavengers. Therefore, the total antioxidant capacity was mostly affected by the presence of resveratrol and rutin, while total polyphenolic content was mostly influenced by the presence of the less potent free radical scavengers gallic and caffeic acids. PMID:26616951

  1. Hi-alpha forebody design. Part 2: Determination of body shapes for positive directional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, R.; Mason, William H.

    1991-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used to study aircraft forebody flowfields at low speed high angle-of-attack conditions with sideslip. The purpose is to define forebody geometries which provide good directional stability characteristics under these conditions. The flows of the F-5A forebody and Erickson forebody were recomputed with better and refined grids. The results were obtained using a modified version of cfl3d to solve either the Euler equations or the Reynolds equations employing a form of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. Based on those results, we conclude that current CFD methods can be used to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies to achieve desirable high angle-of-attack characteristics. An analytically defined generic forebody model is described, and a systematic study of forebody shapes was then conducted to determine which shapes promote a positive contribution to directional stability at high angle-of-attack. A novel way of presenting the results is used to illustrate how the positive contribution arises. Based on the results of this initial parametric study, some guidelines for aerodynamic design to promote positive directional stability are presented.

  2. A computational examination of directional stability for smooth and chined forebodies at high-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, Ramakrishnan; Mason, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used to study aircraft forebody flowfields at low-speed, angle-of-attack conditions with sideslip. The purpose is to define forebody geometries which provide good directional stability characteristics under these conditions. The flows over the experimentally investigated F-5A forebody and chine type configuration, previously computed by the authors, were recomputed with better grid topology and resolution. The results were obtained using a modified version of CFL3D (developed at NASA Langley) to solve either the Euler equations or the Reynolds equations employing the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model with the Degani-Schiff modification to account for massive crossflow separation. Based on the results, it is concluded that current CFD methods can be used to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies to achieve desirable high angle-of-attack characteristics. An analytically defined generic forebody model is described, and a parametric study of various forebody shapes was then conducted to determine which shapes promote a positive contribution to directional stability at high angle-of-attack. An unconventional approach for presenting the results is used to illustrate how the positive contribution arises. Based on the results of this initial parametric study, some guidelines for aerodynamic design to promote positive directional stability are presented.

  3. Direct-current cathodic vacuum arc system with magnetic-field mechanism for plasma stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.-S.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2008-07-15

    Filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition is characterized by plasma beam directionality, plasma energy adjustment via substrate biasing, macroparticle filtering, and independent substrate temperature control. Between the two modes of FCVA deposition, namely, direct current (dc) and pulsed arc, the dc mode yields higher deposition rates than the pulsed mode. However, maintaining the dc arc discharge is challenging because of its inherent plasma instabilities. A system generating a special configuration of magnetic field that stabilizes the dc arc discharge during film deposition is presented. This magnetic field is also part of the out-of-plane magnetic filter used to focus the plasma beam and prevent macroparticle film contamination. The efficiency of the plasma-stabilizing magnetic-field mechanism is demonstrated by the deposition of amorphous carbon (a-C) films exhibiting significantly high hardness and tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp{sup 3}) contents higher than 70%. Such high-quality films cannot be produced by dc arc deposition without the plasma-stabilizing mechanism presented in this study.

  4. Direct-current cathodic vacuum arc system with magnetic-field mechanism for plasma stabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H-S; Komvopoulos, K

    2008-07-01

    Filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition is characterized by plasma beam directionality, plasma energy adjustment via substrate biasing, macroparticle filtering, and independent substrate temperature control. Between the two modes of FCVA deposition, namely, direct current (dc) and pulsed arc, the dc mode yields higher deposition rates than the pulsed mode. However, maintaining the dc arc discharge is challenging because of its inherent plasma instabilities. A system generating a special configuration of magnetic field that stabilizes the dc arc discharge during film deposition is presented. This magnetic field is also part of the out-of-plane magnetic filter used to focus the plasma beam and prevent macroparticle film contamination. The efficiency of the plasma-stabilizing magnetic-field mechanism is demonstrated by the deposition of amorphous carbon (a-C) films exhibiting significantly high hardness and tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp3) contents higher than 70%. Such high-quality films cannot be produced by dc arc deposition without the plasma-stabilizing mechanism presented in this study. PMID:18681714

  5. Lateral-directional stability and control characteristics of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Jack D.; Jeske, James A.; Hardy, Gordon H.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of flight experiments to determine the lateral-directional stability and control characteristics of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA), an experimental aircraft designed to furnish information on various aerodynamic characteristics of a transport type of airplane that makes use of the upper-surface blown (USB) flap technology to achieve short takeoff and landing (STOL) performance. The flight program designed to acquire the data consisted of maneuvers produced by rudder and control-wheel inputs with the airplane in several configurations that had been proposed for landing approach and takeoff operation. The normal stability augmentation system was not engaged during these maneuvers. Time-history records from the maneuvers were analyzed with a parameter estimation procedure to extract lateral-directional stability and control derivatives. For one aircraft configuration in which the USB flaps were deflected 50 deg, several maneuvers were performed to determine the effects of varying the average angle of attack, varying the thrust coefficient, and setting the airplane's upper surface spoilers at a 13 deg symmetrical bias angle . The effects on the lateral characteristics of deflecting the spoilers were rather small and generally favorable. The data indicate that for one test, conducted at low thrust (a thrust coefficient of 0.38), compared with results from tests at thrust coefficients of 0.77 and larger, there was a significant decrease in the lateral control effectiveness, in the yaw damping and in the directional derivative. The directional derivative was also decreased (by about 30 percent) when the average angle of attack of the test was increased from 3 to 16 deg.

  6. Direct Grout Stabilization of High Cesium Salt Waste: Cesium Leaching Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    1999-09-19

    'The direct grout alternative is a viable option for treatment/stabilization and disposal of salt waste containing Cs-137 concentrations of 1-3 Ci/gal. The significant difference between these waste solutions is that the high cesium salt solution will contain between 1 and 3 Curies of Cs-137 per gallon compared to a negligible amount in the current salt solution. This difference will require special engineering and shielding for a direct grout processing facility and disposal units to achieve acceptable radiation exposure conditions. The higher cesium concentrations in the direct grout also require that the cesium leaching be evaluated as a function of curing temperature. ANS 16.1 leaching results and distribution ratios (approximations of distribution coefficients) as a function of temperature are presented in this report.'

  7. Determination of direct photolysis rate constants and OH radical reactivity of representative odour compounds in brewery broth using a continuous flow-stirred photoreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgens, Marion; Jacob, Fritz; Ekici, Perihan; Friess, Albrecht; Parlar, Harun

    A method based on photolysis was developed for the appropriate treatment of organic pollutants in air exhausting from breweries upon wort decoction, and thereby causing smell nuisance. A continuous flow stirred photoreactor was built-up exclusively, allowing OH radicals to react with selected odorous compounds contained in exhaust vapours, such as: 2-methylpropanal, 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methyl-1-butanol, n-hexanal, 2-methylbutyl isobutyrate, 2-undecanone, phenyl acetaldehyde, myrcene, limonene, linalool, humulene, dimethylsulphide, and dimethyltrisulphide. These substances were quantified in brewery broth before and after UV irradiation using high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS). For odour analysis, high-resolution gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (HRGC-FID) coupled with sensory methods was used. Determined quantum yields of about 10 -3 for phenyl acetaldehyde, myrcene, and humulene pointed out that direct photolysis contributed to their decay. Quantum yields of below 10 -4 for the other substances indicated that UV irradiation did not contribute significantly to their degradation processes. Hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and Henry constants of organic compounds were also measured. Substances accompanied with low Henry constants converted rapidly, whereas those with higher ones, relatively slowly. Determined aroma values concluded that after UV-H 2O 2 treatment, only dimethylsulphide and myrcene remained as important odorous compounds, but in significantly reduced concentrations. The UV-H 2O 2 treatment of brewery broth has been proved effective to reduce smell-irritating substances formed upon wort decoction.

  8. High p{sub T} direct photon and {pi}{sup 0} triggered azimuthal jet correlations and measurement of k{sub T} for isolated direct photons in p+p collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Bickley, A. A.; Ellinghaus, F.; Glenn, A.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Seele, J.; Wysocki, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alexander, J.; Chung, P.

    2010-10-01

    Correlations of charged hadrons of 1direct photons and {pi}{sup 0} mesons in the range 5direct photon-associated hadron spectrum as well as its charge asymmetry are found to be consistent with a sample dominated by quark-gluon Compton scattering. No significant evidence of fragmentation photon correlated production is observed within experimental uncertainties.

  9. Morphological stability analysis of directional solidification into an oscillatory fluid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volfson, Dmitri; Viñals, Jorge

    2001-12-01

    We study the stability of a planar solid-melt boundary during directional solidification of a binary alloy when the solid is being periodically vibrated in the direction parallel to the boundary (or equivalently, under a far field uniform and oscillatory flow parallel to the planar boundary). The analysis is motivated by directional solidification experiments under the low level residual acceleration field characteristic of a microgravity environment, and possible effects on crystal growth in space. It is known that periodic modulation of the solid-melt interface under the conditions stated induces second order stationary streaming flows within a boundary layer adjacent to the interface, the thickness of which is the same as the wavelength of the modulation. We derive an effective solute transport equation by averaging over the fast time scale of the oscillatory flow, and obtain the resulting dispersion relation for a small disturbance of a planar interface. We find both regions of stationary and oscillatory instability. For small ratios of the viscous to solutal layer thicknesses, s, the flow generally destabilizes the planar interface. For s≃1, the flow stabilizes the stationary branch, but it can also excite an oscillatory instability. For large s, the effect of the flow is small.

  10. Directional versus Stabilizing Selection for Developmental Time in Natural and Laboratory Populations of Flour Beetles.

    PubMed

    Dawson, P S

    1975-08-01

    Artificial selection for fast development is successful in long-established laboratory populations of Tribolium, but not in strains recently derived from natural populations. It is shown that selection against fast development in dense, synchronized cultures operates through cannibalism of early pupae by larvae. Since standard husbandry procedures for laboratory strains involve the periodic creation of dense, synchronized cultures, it is suggested that these populations are subjected to stabilizing selection for intermediate developmental time. Natural populations, on the other hand, are probably subjected to directional selection for rapid development. PMID:17248688

  11. Direct Formation of the C5′-Radical in the Sugar-Phosphate Backbone of DNA by High Energy Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Becker, David; Palmer, Brian J.; Heizer, Alicia N.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Neutral sugar radicals formed in DNA sugar-phosphate backbone are well-established as precursors of biologically important damage such as DNA-strand scission and crosslinking. In this work, we present electron spin resonance (ESR) evidence showing that the sugar radical at C5′ (C5′•) is one of the most abundant (ca. 30%) sugar radicals formed by γ- and Ar ion-beam irradiated hydrated DNA samples. Taking dimethyl phosphate as a model of sugar-phosphate backbone, ESR and theoretical (DFT) studies of γ-irradiated dimethyl phosphate were carried out. CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• is formed via deprotonation from the methyl group of directly ionized dimethyl phosphate at 77 K. Formation of CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• is independent of dimethyl phosphate concentration (neat or in aqueous solution) or pH. ESR spectra of C5′• found in DNA and of CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• do not show an observable β-phosphorous hyperfine coupling (HFC). Further, C5′• found in DNA does not show a significant C4′-H β–proton HFC. Applying the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d) method, a study of conformational dependence of the phosphorous HFC in CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• shows that in its minimum energy conformation, CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• has a negligible β-phosphorous HFC. Based on these results, formation of radiation-induced C5′• is proposed to occur via a very rapid deprotonation from the directly ionized sugar-phosphate backbone and rate of this deprotonation must be faster than that of energetically downhill transfer of the unpaired spin (hole) from ionized sugar-phosphate backbone to the DNA bases. Moreover, C5′• in irradiated DNA is found to be in a conformation that does not exhibit β proton or β phosphorous HFCs. PMID:22553971

  12. Improving Kinetic or Thermodynamic Stability of an Azoreductase by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Brissos, Vânia; Gonçalves, Nádia; Melo, Eduardo P.; Martins, Lígia O.

    2014-01-01

    Protein stability arises from a combination of factors which are often difficult to rationalise. Therefore its improvement is better addressed through directed evolution than by rational design approaches. In this study, five rounds of mutagenesis/recombination followed by high-throughput screening (≈10,000 clones) yielded the hit 1B6 showing a 300-fold higher half life at 50°C than that exhibited by the homodimeric wild type PpAzoR azoreductase from Pseudomonas putida MET94. The characterization using fluorescence, calorimetry and light scattering shows that 1B6 has a folded state slightly less stable than the wild type (with lower melting and optimal temperatures) but in contrast is more resistant to irreversible denaturation. The superior kinetic stability of 1B6 variant was therefore related to an increased resistance of the unfolded monomers to aggregation through the introduction of mutations that disturbed hydrophobic patches and increased the surface net charge of the protein. Variants 2A1 and 2A1-Y179H with increased thermodynamic stability (10 to 20°C higher melting temperature than wild type) were also examined showing the distinctive nature of mutations that lead to improved structural robustness: these occur in residues that are mostly involved in strengthening the solvent-exposed loops or the inter-dimer interactions of the folded state. PMID:24475252

  13. Radical Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the base of her partner’s penis during intercourse. Orgasm after radical hysterectomy Women who have had a ... the surgery will affect their ability to have orgasms. This has not been studied a great deal, ...

  14. The Stability of Double White Dwarf Binaries Undergoing Direct-Impact Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Frank, Juhan; Tohline, Joel E.; D'Souza, Mario C. R.

    2007-12-01

    We present numerical simulations of dynamically unstable mass transfer in a double white dwarf binary with initial mass ratio q=0.4. The binary components are approximated as polytropes of index n=3/2, and the initially synchronously rotating, semidetached equilibrium binary is evolved hydrodynamically, with the gravitational potential being computed through the solution of Poisson's equation. Upon initiating deep contact in our baseline simulation, the mass transfer rate grows by more than an order of magnitude over approximately 10 orbits, as would be expected for dynamically unstable mass transfer. However, the mass transfer rate then reaches a peak value, the binary expands, and the mass transfer event subsides. The binary must therefore have crossed the critical mass ratio for stability against dynamical mass transfer. Despite the initial loss of orbital angular momentum into the spin of the accreting star, we find that the accretor's spin saturates and that angular momentum is returned to the orbit more efficiently than has been previously suspected for binaries in the direct-impact accretion mode. To explore this surprising result, we directly measure the critical mass ratio for stability by imposing artificial angular momentum loss at various rates to drive the binary to an equilibrium mass transfer rate. For one of these driven evolutions, we attain equilibrium mass transfer and deduce that, effectively, qcrit has evolved to approximately 2/3. Despite the absence of a fully developed disk, tidal interactions appear to be effective in returning excess spin angular momentum to the orbit.

  15. Direct mass measurements above uranium bridge the gap to the island of stability.

    PubMed

    Block, M; Ackermann, D; Blaum, K; Droese, C; Dworschak, M; Eliseev, S; Fleckenstein, T; Haettner, E; Herfurth, F; Hessberger, F P; Hofmann, S; Ketelaer, J; Ketter, J; Kluge, H-J; Marx, G; Mazzocco, M; Novikov, Yu N; Plass, W R; Popeko, A; Rahaman, S; Rodríguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L; Thirolf, P G; Vorobyev, G K; Weber, C

    2010-02-11

    The mass of an atom incorporates all its constituents and their interactions. The difference between the mass of an atom and the sum of its building blocks (the binding energy) is a manifestation of Einstein's famous relation E = mc(2). The binding energy determines the energy available for nuclear reactions and decays (and thus the creation of elements by stellar nucleosynthesis), and holds the key to the fundamental question of how heavy the elements can be. Superheavy elements have been observed in challenging production experiments, but our present knowledge of the binding energy of these nuclides is based only on the detection of their decay products. The reconstruction from extended decay chains introduces uncertainties that render the interpretation difficult. Here we report direct mass measurements of trans-uranium nuclides. Located at the farthest tip of the actinide species on the proton number-neutron number diagram, these nuclides represent the gateway to the predicted island of stability. In particular, we have determined the mass values of (252-254)No (atomic number 102) with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. The uncertainties are of the order of 10 keV/c(2) (representing a relative precision of 0.05 p.p.m.), despite minute production rates of less than one atom per second. Our experiments advance direct mass measurements by ten atomic numbers with no loss in accuracy, and provide reliable anchor points en route to the island of stability. PMID:20148034

  16. A novel method to directionally stabilize enzymes together with redox mediators by electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wentao; Lin, Nansen; Song, Yilin; Liu, Chunxiu; Zhou, Shuai; Cai, Xinxia

    2014-01-15

    This paper depicts a novel method to directionally stabilize enzymes together with redox mediators by electrodeposition. Chitosan was used as a stabilizing matrix. By electrochemical removal of local H(+), chitosan close to working electrode became locally insoluble, and enzymes and redox mediators in chitosan were stabilized. The microelectrode on home-made microelectrode array (MEA) served as the working electrode. Three model enzymes--horseradish peroxidase (HRP), glucose oxidase (GOD), and glutamate oxidase (GlOD)--were used to fabricate different biosensors, and the redox mediator model was a poly(vinylpyridine) complex of Os(bpy)2Cl and a diepoxide (PVP-Os). Biosensors fabricated by the method exhibited very high performance. For HRP biosensor fabricated by this method, the sensitivity was 5.274 nA μM(-1) mm(-2), with linear detection range (LDR) of 2-220 μM and limit of detection (LOD) of 1 μM (S/N=3); for GOD biosensor, the sensitivity was 2.65 nA μM(-1) mm(-2), with LDR of 4-500 μM and LOD of 2 μM (S/N=3); for GlOD biosensor, the sensitivity was 0.33 nA μM(-1)mm(-2), with LDR of 4-500 μM and LOD of 2 μM (S/N=3). Since this method is very simple and especially suitable for directionally introducing enzymes and redox mediators onto microelectrode without contaminating other sites in the same microenvironment, it could be used for fabricating in vivo or in vitro 2nd generation biosensors in μm-scale, especially in neuroscience. PMID:23974156

  17. In vivo copper-mediated free radical production: an ESR spin-trapping study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadiiska, Maria B.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2002-04-01

    Copper has been suggested to facilitate oxidative tissue injury through a free radical-mediated pathway analogous to the Fenton reaction. By applying the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique, evidence for hydroxyl radical formation in vivo was obtained in rats treated simultaneously with copper and ascorbic acid or paraquat. A secondary radical spin-trapping technique was used in which the hydroxyl radical formed the methyl radical upon reaction with dimethylsulfoxide. The methyl radical was then detected by ESR spectroscopy as its adduct with the spin trap phenyl- N- t-butyl- nitrone (PBN). In contrast, lipid derived radical was detected in vivo in copper-challenged, vitamin E and selenium-deficient rats. These findings support the proposal that dietary selenium and vitamin E can protect against lipid peroxidation and copper toxicity. Since copper excreted into the bile from treated animals is expected to be maintained in the Cu(I) state (by ascorbic acid or glutathione), a chelating agent that would redox-stablilize it in the Cu(I) state was used to prevent ex vivo redox chemistry. Bile samples were collected directly into solutions of bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, a Cu(I)-stabilizing agent, and 2,2'-dipyridyl, a Fe(II)-stabilizing agent. If these precautions were not taken, radical adducts generated ex vivo could be mistaken for radical adducts produced in vivo and excreted into the bile.

  18. Direct Grout Stabilization of High Cesium Salt Waste: Salt Alternative Phase III Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    1998-12-07

    The direct grout alternative is a viable option for treatment/stabilization and disposal of salt waste containing Cs-137 concentrations of 1-3 Ci/gal. The composition of the direct grout salt solution is higher in sodium salts and contains up to a few hundred ppm Cs-137 more than the current reference salt solution. However it is still similar to the composition of the current reference salt solution. Consequently, the processing, setting, and leaching properties (including TCLP for Cr and Hg) of the direct grout and current saltstone waste forms are very similar. The significant difference between these waste solutions is that the high cesium salt solution will contain between 1 and 3 Curies of Cs-137 per gallon compared to a negligible amount in the current salt solution. This difference will require special engineering and shielding for a direct grout processing facility and disposal units to achieve acceptable radiation exposure conditions. The Cs-137 concentration in the direct grout salt solution will also affect the long-term curing temperature of the waste form since 4.84 Watts of energy are generated per 1000 Ci of Cs-137. The temperature rise of the direct grout during long-term curing has been calculated by A. Shaddy, SRTC.1 The effect of curing temperature on the strength, leaching and physical durability of the direct grout saltstone is described in this report. At the present time, long term curing at 90 degrees C appears to be unacceptable because of cracking which will affect the structural integrity as evaluated in the immersion test. (The experiments conducted in this feasibility study do not address the effect of cracking on leaching of contaminants other than Cr, Hg, and Cs.) No cracking of the direct grout or reference saltstone waste forms was observed for samples cured at 70 degrees C. At the present time the implications of waste form cracking at elevated curing temperatures has not been fully addressed. The direct grout falls within the

  19. High-speed fuel tracer fluorescence and OH radical chemiluminescence imaging in a spark-ignition direct-injection engine.

    PubMed

    Smith, James D; Sick, Volker

    2005-11-01

    An innovative technique has been demonstrated to achieve crank-angle-resolved planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of fuel followed by OH* chemiluminescence imaging in a firing direct-injected spark-ignition engine. This study used two standard KrF excimer lasers to excite toluene for tracking fuel distribution. The intensified camera system was operated at single crank-angle resolution at 2000 revolutions per minute (RPM) for 500 consecutive cycles. Through this work, it has been demonstrated that toluene and OH* can be imaged through the same optical setup while similar signal levels are obtained from both species, even at these high rates. The technique is useful for studying correlations between fuel distribution and subsequent ignition and flame propagation without the limitations of phase-averaging imaging approaches. This technique is illustrated for the effect of exhaust gas recirculation on combustion and will be useful for studies of misfire causes. Finally, a few general observations are presented as to the effect of preignition fuel distribution on subsequent combustion. PMID:16270557

  20. Enhanced Production of Direct Photons in Au+Au Collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV and Implications for the Initial Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Bickley, A. A.; Ellinghaus, F.; Kelly, S.; Kinney, E.; Nagle, J. L.; Seele, J.; Wysocki, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L.; Aidala, C.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Chi, C. Y.; Cole, B. A.; D'Enterria, D.

    2010-04-02

    The production of e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs for m{sub e}{sup +}{sub e}{sup -}<0.3 GeV/c{sup 2} and 1radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. An enhanced yield above hadronic sources is observed. Treating the excess as photon internal conversions, the invariant yield of direct photons is deduced. In central Au+Au collisions, the excess of the direct photon yield over p+p is exponential in transverse momentum, with an inverse slope T=221{+-}19{sup stat{+-}}19{sup syst} MeV. Hydrodynamical models with initial temperatures ranging from T{sub init{approx}}300-600 MeV at times of {approx}0.6-0.15 fm/c after the collision are in qualitative agreement with the data. Lattice QCD predicts a phase transition to quark gluon plasma at {approx}170 MeV.

  1. STABILITY OF THE DIRECTLY IMAGED MULTIPLANET SYSTEM HR 8799: RESONANCE AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.

    2010-02-20

    A new era of directly imaged extrasolar planets has produced a three-planet system, where the masses of the planets have been estimated by untested cooling models. We point out that the nominal circular, face-on orbits of the planets lead to a dynamical instability in {approx}10{sup 5} yr, a factor of at least 100 shorter than the estimated age of the star. Reduced planetary masses produce stability only for unreasonably small planets ({approx}<2 M{sub Jup}). Relaxing the face-on assumption, but still requiring circular orbits while fitting the observed positions, makes the instability time even shorter. A promising solution is that the inner two planets have a 2:1 commensurability between their periods, and they avoid close encounters with each other through this resonance. The fact that the inner resonance has lasted until now, in spite of the perturbations of the outer planet, leads to a limit {approx}<10 M{sub Jup} on the masses unless the outer two planets are also engaged in a 2:1 mean-motion resonance. In a double resonance, which is consistent with the current data, the system could survive until now even if the planets have masses of {approx}20 M{sub Jup}. Apsidal alignment can further enhance the stability of a mean-motion resonant system. A completely different dynamical configuration, with large eccentricities and large mutual inclinations among the planets, is possible but finely tuned.

  2. Linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation of two layer channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kirti; Govindarajan, Rama; Tripathi, Manoj

    2015-11-01

    We study the stability of two-fluid flow through a plane channel at Reynolds numbers of a hundred to a thousand. The two fluids have the same density but different viscosities. The fluids, when miscible, are separated from each other by a mixed layer of small but finite thickness, across which viscosity changes from that of one fluid to that of the other. When immiscible, the interface is sharp. Our study spans a range of Schmidt numbers, viscosity ratios and location and thickness of the mixed layer. Our two-dimensional linear stability results predict well the behaviour displayed by our three-dimensional direct numerical simulations at early times. In both linear and non-linear regimes, the miscible flow is more unstable than the corresponding immiscible one, and the miscible flow breaks spanwise symmetry more readily to go into three-dimensionality. We show that the miscible flow over our range of parameters is always significantly more unstable than the corresponding immiscible case.

  3. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyeong-jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  4. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyeong-Jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  5. Directed evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor for expression, stability, and binding selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Casim A.; Dodevski, Igor; Kenig, Manca; Dudli, Stefan; Mohr, Anja; Hermans, Emmanuel; Plückthun, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    We outline a powerful method for the directed evolution of integral membrane proteins in the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. For a mammalian G protein-coupled receptor, we arrived at a sequence with an order-of-magnitude increase in functional expression that still retains the biochemical properties of wild type. This mutant also shows enhanced heterologous expression in eukaryotes (12-fold in Pichia pastoris and 3-fold in HEK293T cells) and greater stability when solubilized and purified, indicating that the biophysical properties of the protein had been under the pressure of selection. These improvements arise from multiple small contributions, which would be difficult to assemble by rational design. In a second screen, we rapidly pinpointed a single amino acid substitution in wild type that abolishes antagonist binding while retaining agonist-binding affinity. These approaches may alleviate existing bottlenecks in structural studies of these targets by providing sufficient quantities of stable variants in defined conformational states. PMID:18812512

  6. A computational study of the F-5A forebody emphasizing directional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, William H.; Ravi, R.

    1991-01-01

    CFD has been used to study the F-5A forebody flowfield at high angle-of-attack combined with sideslip. The classic wind tunnel experiment demonstrating the dominant contribution of the F-5A forebody to directional stability at high angle-of-attack has been simulated computationally over an angle-of-attack range from 10 deg to 45 deg. The key wind tunnel trend for C (n-beta) was obtained computationally using the code known as cfl3d to solve the Reynolds' equations using a modified form of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. The computations provide detailed and fascinating insights into the physics of flowfield. The results of the investigation show that CFD has reached a level of development where computational methods can be used for high angle-of-attack aerodynamic design.

  7. Stability robustness improvement of direct eigenspace assignment based feedback systems using singular value sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    1989-01-01

    A methodology to improve the stability robustness of feedback control systems designed using direct eigenspace assignment techniques is presented. The method consists of considering the sensitivity of the minimum singular value of the return difference transfer matrix at the plant input to small changes in the desired closed-loop eigenvalues and the specified elements of the desired closed-loop eigenvectors. Closed-form expressions for the gradient of the minimum return difference singular value with respect to desired closed-loop eigenvalue and eigenvector parameters are derived. Closed-form expressions for the gradients of the control feedback gains with respect to the specified eigenspace parameters are obtained as an intermediate step. The use of the gradient information to improve the guaranteed gain and phase margins in eigenspace assignment based designs is demonstrated by application to an advanced fighter aircraft.

  8. Direct osmolyte-macromolecule interactions confer entropic stability to folded states.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ropero, Francisco; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2014-07-01

    Protective osmolytes are chemical compounds that shift the protein folding/unfolding equilibrium toward the folded state under osmotic stresses. The most widely considered protection mechanism assumes that osmolytes are depleted from the protein's first solvation shell, leading to entropic stabilization of the folded state. However, recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest that protective osmolytes may directly interact with the macromolecule. As an exemplary and experimentally well-characterized system, we herein discuss poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) in water whose folding/unfolding equilibrium shifts toward the folded state in the presence of urea. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulations of this specific system, we propose a new microscopic mechanism that explains how direct osmolyte-macromolecule interactions confer stability to folded states. We show that urea molecules preferentially accumulate in the first solvation shell of PNiPAM driven by attractive van der Waals dispersion forces with the hydrophobic isopropyl groups, leading to the formation of low entropy urea clouds. These clouds provide an entropic driving force for folding, resulting in preferential urea binding to the folded state and a decrease of the lower folding temperature in agreement with experiment. The simulations further indicate that thermodynamic nonideality of the bulk solvent opposes this driving force and may lead to denaturation, as illustrated by simulations of PNiPAM in aqueous solutions with dimethylurea. The proposed mechanism provides a new angle on relations between the properties of protecting and denaturing osmolytes, salting-in or salting-out effects, and solvent nonidealities. PMID:24927256

  9. O-GlcNAcylation stabilizes β-catenin through direct competition with phosphorylation at threonine 41

    PubMed Central

    Olivier-Van Stichelen, Stéphanie; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Buzy, Armelle; Zachayus, Jean-Luc; Guinez, Céline; Mir, Anne-Marie; El Yazidi-Belkoura, Ikram; Copin, Marie-Christine; Boureme, Didier; Loyaux, Denis; Ferrara, Pascual; Lefebvre, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctions in Wnt signaling increase β-catenin stability and are associated with cancers, including colorectal cancer. In addition, β-catenin degradation is decreased by nutrient-dependent O-GlcNAcylation. Human colon tumors and colons from mice fed high-carbohydrate diets exhibited higher amounts of β-catenin and O-GlcNAc relative to healthy tissues and mice fed a standard diet, respectively. Administration of the O-GlcNAcase inhibitor thiamet G to mice also increased colonic expression of β-catenin. By ETD-MS/MS, we identified 4 O-GlcNAcylation sites at the N terminus of β-catenin (S23/T40/T41/T112). Furthermore, mutation of serine and threonine residues within the D box of β-catenin reduced O-GlcNAcylation by 75%. Interestingly, elevating O-GlcNAcylation in human colon cell lines drastically reduced phosphorylation at T41, a key residue of the D box responsible for β-catenin stability. Analyses of β-catenin O-GlcNAcylation mutants reinforced T41 as the most crucial residue that controls the β-catenin degradation rate. Finally, inhibiting O-GlcNAcylation decreased the β-catenin/α-catenin interaction necessary for mucosa integrity, whereas O-GlcNAcase silencing improved this interaction. These results suggest that O-GlcNAcylation regulates not only the stability of β-catenin, but also affects its localization at the level of adherens junctions. Accordingly, we propose that O-GlcNAcylation of β-catenin is a missing link between the glucose metabolism deregulation observed in metabolic disorders and the development of cancer.—Olivier-Van Stichelen, S., Dehennaut, V., Buzy, A., Zachayus, J.-L., Guinez, C., Mir, A.-M., El Yazidi-Belkoura, I., Copin, M.-C., Boureme, D., Loyaux, D., Ferrara, P., Lefebvre, T. O-GlcNAcylation stabilizes β-catenin through direct competition with phosphorylation at threonine 41. PMID:24744147

  10. Which trunk inclination directions best predict multidirectional-seated limits of stability among individuals with spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Cindy; Gagnon, Dany; Jacquemin, Géraldine; Duclos, Cyril; Masani, Kei; Popovic, Milos R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine which trunk inclination directions most accurately predict multidirectional-seated limits of stability among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Predictive study using cross-sectional data. Setting Pathokinesiology Laboratory. Participants Twenty-one individuals with complete or incomplete sensorimotor SCI affecting various vertebral levels participated in this study. Interventions Participants were instructed to lean their trunk as far as possible in eight directions, separated by 45° intervals, while seated on an instrumented chair with their feet positioned on force plates. Outcomes measures Eight direction-specific stability indices (DSIs) were used to define an overall stability index (OSI) (limits of stability). Results All DSIs significantly correlated with the OSI (r = 0.816–0.925). A protocol that only tests the anterior, left postero-lateral, and right lateral trunk inclinations accurately predicts multidirectional-seated postural stability (R2 = 0.98; P < 0.001). Conclusion Multidirectional-seated postural stability can be predicted almost perfectly by evaluating trunk inclinations performed toward the anterior, left postero-lateral, and right lateral directions. PMID:23031171

  11. Reliable Quantum Chemical Prediction of the Localized/Delocalized Character of Organic Mixed-Valence Radical Anions. From Continuum Solvent Models to Direct-COSMO-RS.

    PubMed

    Renz, Manuel; Kess, Martin; Diedenhofen, Michael; Klamt, Andreas; Kaupp, Martin

    2012-11-13

    A recently proposed quantum-chemical protocol for the description of the character of organic mixed-valence (MV) compounds, close from both sides to the localized/delocalized borderline, is evaluated and extended for a series of dinitroaryl radical anions 1-6. A combination of global hybrid functionals with exact-exchange admixtures of 35% (BLYP35) or 42% (BMK) with appropriate solvent modeling allows an essentially quantitative treatment of, for example, structural symmetry-breaking in Robin/Day class II systems, thermal electron transfer (ET) barriers, and intervalence charge-transfer (IV-CT) excitation energies, while covering also the delocalized class III cases. Global hybrid functionals with lower exact-exchange admixtures (e.g., B3LYP, M05, or M06) provide a too delocalized description, while functionals with higher exact-exchange admixtures (M05-2X, M06-2X) provide a too localized one. The B2PLYP double hybrid gives reasonable structures but far too small barriers in class II cases. The CAM-B3LYP range hybrid gives somewhat too high ET barriers and IV-CT energies, while the range hybrids ωB97X and LC-BLYP clearly exhibit too much exact exchange. Continuum solvent models describe the situation well in most aprotic solvents studied. The transition of 1,4-dinitrobenzene anion 1 from a class III behavior in aprotic solvents to a class II behavior in alcohols is not recovered by continuum solvent models. In contrast, it is treated faithfully by the novel direct conductor-like screening model for real solvents (D-COSMO-RS). The D-COSMO-RS approach, the TURBOMOLE implementation of which is reported, also describes accurately the increased ET barriers of class II systems 2 and 3 in alcohols as compared to aprotic solvents and can distinguish at least qualitatively between different aprotic solvents with identical or similar dielectric constants. The dominant role of the solvent environment for the ET character of these MV radical anions is emphasized, as in

  12. Production of sulfate radical from peroxymonosulfate induced by a magnetically separable CuFe2O4 spinel in water: efficiency, stability, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Haibo; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-03-19

    A simple, nonhazardous, efficient and low energy-consuming process is desirable to generate powerful radicals from peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for recalcitrant pollutant removal. In this work, the production of radical species from PMS induced by a magnetic CuFe(2)O(4) spinel was studied. Iopromide, a recalcitrant model pollutant, was used to investigate the efficiency of this process. CuFe(2)O(4) showed higher activity and 30 times lower Cu(2+) leaching (1.5 μg L(-1) per 100 mg L(-1)) than a well-crystallized CuO at the same dosage. CuFe(2)O(4) maintained its activity and crystallinity during repeated batch experiments. In comparison, the activity of CuO declined significantly, which was ascribed to the deterioration in its degree of crystallinity. The efficiency of the PMS/CuFe(2)O(4) was highest at neutral pH and decreased at acidic and alkaline pHs. Sulfate radical was the primary radical species responsible for the iopromide degradation. On the basis of the stoichiometry of oxalate degradation in the PMS/CuFe(2)O(4), the radical production yield from PMS was determined to be near 1 mol/mol. The PMS decomposition involved an inner-sphere complexation with the oxide's surface Cu(II) sites. In situ characterization of the oxide surface with ATR-FTIR and Raman during the PMS decomposition suggested that surface Cu(II)-Cu(III)-Cu(II) redox cycle was responsible for the efficient sulfate radical generation from PMS. PMID:23439015

  13. Selective stabilization of microtubules oriented toward the direction of cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, G G; Bulinski, J C

    1988-01-01

    A small subset of the microtubule (MT) array in many cultured cells does not exhibit the rapid turnover (t 1/2 approximately equal to 10 min) shown by most cellular MTs. The function of the stable class of MTs is unknown and has been confounded by the apparent lack of organization of stable MTs within cells. Using an antibody against detyrosinated tubulin, a post-translationally modified form of tubulin that accumulates in stable MTs, we localized the stable MTs in mouse 3T3 cells induced to initiate directional migration by experimental wounding of confluent monolayers. Immediately after monolayer wounding, the distribution of stable MTs in cells at the wound edge resembled that in cells in the monolayer interior; most cells either contained randomly distributed stable MTs or lacked them entirely. However, by 20 min after wounding, cells at the wound margin began to generate an asymmetric MT array, with virtually all stable MTs oriented toward the cell edge in contact with the wound. Two hours after monolayer wounding, greater than or equal to 80% of cells at the wound margin had generated this polarized array of stable MTs, and the array was maintained for at least 12 hr. MTs in the polarized array showed enhanced resistance to depolymerization by nocodazole, thus providing an independent test of their stability. Formation of the polar array of stable MTs appeared to precede onset of cell migration and closely paralleled reorientation of the MT-organizing center. These results show that cultured cells can remodel their MT array rapidly in response to an extracellular signal and suggest that selective stabilization of MTs is an early event in the generation of cellular asymmetry. Images PMID:3413068

  14. Direct and indirect effects of glomalin, mycorrhizal hyphae, and roots on aggregate stability in rhizosphere of trifoliate orange.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Cao, Ming-Qin; Zou, Ying-Ning; He, Xin-hua

    2014-01-01

    To test direct and indirect effects of glomalin, mycorrhizal hyphae, and roots on aggregate stability, perspex pots separated by 37-μm nylon mesh in the middle were used to form root-free hyphae and root/hyphae chambers, where trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings were colonized by Funneliformis mosseae or Paraglomus occultum in the root/hyphae chamber. Both fungal species induced significantly higher plant growth, root total length, easily-extractable glomalin-related soil protein (EE-GRSP) and total GRSP (T-GRSP), and mean weight diameter (an aggregate stability indicator). The Pearson correlation showed that root colonization or soil hyphal length significantly positively correlated with EE-GRSP, difficultly-extractable GRSP (DE-GRSP), T-GRSP, and water-stable aggregates in 2.00-4.00, 0.50-1.00, and 0.25-0.50 mm size fractions. The path analysis indicated that in the root/hyphae chamber, aggregate stability derived from a direct effect of root colonization, EE-GRSP or DE-GRSP. Meanwhile, the direct effect was stronger by EE-GRSP or DE-GRSP than by mycorrhizal colonization. In the root-free hyphae chamber, mycorrhizal-mediated aggregate stability was due to total effect but not direct effect of soil hyphal length, EE-GRSP and T-GRSP. Our results suggest that GRSP among these tested factors may be the primary contributor to aggregate stability in the citrus rhizosphere. PMID:25059396

  15. LMO2 Oncoprotein Stability in T-Cell Leukemia Requires Direct LDB1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Justin H.; Alford, Catherine E.; McDonald, W. Hayes

    2015-01-01

    LMO2 is a component of multisubunit DNA-binding transcription factor complexes that regulate gene expression in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development. Enforced expression of LMO2 causes leukemia by inducing hematopoietic stem cell-like features in T-cell progenitor cells, but the biochemical mechanisms of LMO2 function have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we systematically dissected the LMO2/LDB1-binding interface to investigate the role of this interaction in T-cell leukemia. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the LIM interaction domain of LDB1 revealed a discrete motif, R320LITR, required for LMO2 binding. Most strikingly, coexpression of full-length, wild-type LDB1 increased LMO2 steady-state abundance, whereas coexpression of mutant proteins deficient in LMO2 binding compromised LMO2 stability. These mutant LDB1 proteins also exerted dominant negative effects on growth and transcription in diverse leukemic cell lines. Mass spectrometric analysis of LDB1 binding partners in leukemic lines supports the notion that LMO2/LDB1 function in leukemia occurs in the context of multisubunit complexes, which also protect the LMO2 oncoprotein from degradation. Collectively, these data suggest that the assembly of LMO2 into complexes, via direct LDB1 interaction, is a potential molecular target that could be exploited in LMO2-driven leukemias resistant to existing chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26598604

  16. Microstructural stability of directionally solidified eutectic NiAl-Mo under static and thermal cycling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kush, M.T.; Holmes, J.W.; Gibala, R.

    1997-12-31

    The quasi-binary eutectic NiAl-9% Mo with faceted molybdenum fibers was subjected to both thermal annealing conditions and to annealing under thermal cycling conditions to determine the microstructural stability of this alloy. The static temperature tests were run at 0.85T{sub M}--0.97T{sub M} in an argon gas atmosphere. The thermal cycling tests were performed between temperatures of 700 C and 1,200 C by induction heating disk-shaped specimens in an argon gas atmosphere using time-temperature heating and cooling profiles to approximate potential engine applications. To quantify microstructural changes, the fiber size and size distribution and number of fibers per unit area were measured as a function of time at temperature. The overall results demonstrate that the directionally solidified eutectic NiAl-9Mo subjected to thermal fatigue conditions exhibits cell boundary coarsening and large shape changes, whereas the microstructure under static stress-free annealing is stable.

  17. MOF-5-Polystyrene: Direct Production from Monomer, Improved Hydrolytic Stability, and Unique Guest Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H; McDonald, Kyle A; Matzger, Adam J

    2016-09-19

    An unprecedented mode of reactivity of Zn4 O-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offers a straightforward and powerful approach to polymer-hybridized porous solids. The concept is illustrated with the production of MOF-5-polystyrene wherein polystyrene is grafted and uniformly distributed throughout MOF-5 crystals after heating in pure styrene for 4-24 h. The surface area and polystyrene content of the material can be fine-tuned by controlling the duration of heating styrene in the presence of MOF-5. Polystyrene grafting significantly alters the physical and chemical properties of pristine MOF-5, which is evident from the unique guest adsorption properties (solvatochromic dye uptake and improved CO2 capacity) as well as the dramatically improved hydrolytic stability of composite. Based on the fact that MOF-5 is the best studied member of the structure class, and has been produced at scale by industry, these findings can be directly leveraged for a range of current applications. PMID:27555362

  18. Direct ab initio dynamics studies on the hydrogen-abstraction reactions of OH radicals with HOX (X = F, Cl, and Br).

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jing-Yao; Li, Ze-Sheng; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2004-03-01

    The hydrogen abstract reactions of OH radicals with HOF (R1), HOCl (R2), and HOBr (R3) have been studied systematically by a dual-level direct-dynamics method. The geometries and frequencies of all the stationary points are optimized at the MP2/6-311+G(2d, 2p) level of theory. A hydrogen-bonded complex is located at the product channel for the OH + HOBr reaction. To improve the energetics information along the minimum energy path (MEP), single-point energy calculations are carried out at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) level of theory. Interpolated single-point energy (ISPE) method is employed to correct the energy profiles for the three reactions. It is found that neither the barrier heights (DeltaE) nor the H-O bond dissociation energies [D(H-O)] exhibit any clear-cut linear correlations with the halogen electronegative. The decrease of DeltaE and D(H-O) for the three reactions are in order of HOF > HOBr > HOCl. Rate constants for each reaction are calculated by canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) with a small-curvature tunneling correction (SCT) within 200-2000 K. The agreement of the rate constants with available experimental values for reactions R2 and R3 at 298 K is good. Our results show that the variational effect is small while the tunneling correction has an important contribution in the calculation of rate constants in the low-temperature range. Due to the lack of the kinetic data of these reactions, the present theoretical results are expected to be useful and reasonable to estimate the dynamical properties of these reactions over a wide temperature range where no experimental value is available. PMID:14735573

  19. A Stability Study of Ni/Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Anode for Direct Ammonia Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Molouk, Ahmed Fathi Salem; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Matsui, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Koichi

    2015-12-30

    In recent years, solid oxide fuel cells fueled with ammonia have been attracting intensive attention. In this work, ammonia fuel was supplied to the Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) cermet anode at 600 and 700 °C, and the change of electrochemical performance and microstructure under the open-circuit state was studied in detail. The influence of ammonia exposure on the microstructure of Ni was also investigated by using Ni/YSZ powder and Ni film deposited on a YSZ disk. The obtained results demonstrated that Ni in the cermet anode was partially nitrided under an ammonia atmosphere, which considerably roughened the Ni surface. Moreover, the destruction of the anode support layer was confirmed for the anode-supported cell upon the temperature cycling test between 600 and 700 °C because of the nitriding phenomenon of Ni, resulting in severe performance degradation. PMID:26642379

  20. Direct kinetic study of radical transformation reaction Me sub 2 COH + Ph sub 2 CO yields Me sub 2 CO + Ph sub 2 COH

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, A.; Berces, T. )

    1991-02-07

    Reaction Me{sub 2}COH + Ph{sub 2}CO {yields} Me{sub 2}CO + Ph{sub 2}COH (5) was studied by laser flash photolysis under such experimental conditions where the changes in the concentrations of ketyl radicals with reaction time were controlled by this radical transformation process. Diphenylketyl radical concentration profiles were obtained by monitoring transient absorption at 540 nm and the rate coefficient k{sub 5} was extracted from that part of the concentration trajectory which was determined solely by reaction 5. Thus, k{sub 5} = (3.6 {plus minus} 0.6) {times} 10{sup 5} dm{sup 3} mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} was determined at 298 K in acetonitrile, which is higher than the two recently reported values derived from quantum yields measured under steady-state conditions. A reaction mechanism for the radical transformation process (5) is proposed in which hydrogen-bonded species formed from ketyl radical and benzophenone participate.

  1. Roaming Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Joel M.; Shepler, Benjamin C.

    2011-05-01

    Roaming is a recently verified unusual pathway to molecular products from unimolecular dissociation of an energized molecule. Here we present the evidence for this pathway for H2CO and CH3CHO. Theoretical analysis shows that this path visits the plateau region of the potential energy surface near dissociation to radical products. It is not clear whether roaming is a distinct isolated pathway, in addition to the conventional one via the well-known molecular saddle-point transition state. Evidence is presented to suggest that the two pathways may originate from a single, but highly complicated, dividing surface. Other examples of unusual reaction dynamics are also reviewed.

  2. Stability of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide as a spin-trap for quantification of hydroxyl radicals in processes based on Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Fontmorin, J M; Burgos Castillo, R C; Tang, W Z; Sillanpää, M

    2016-08-01

    Fenton reaction was used to produce hydroxyl radicals under conditions similar to AOPs with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap agent in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis. A theoretical kinetics model was developed to determine conditions under which the spin-adduct DMPO-OH is not further oxidized by Fe(3+) and excessive radicals, so that hydroxyl radicals concentration could be accurately inferred. Experiments were designed based upon the model and H2O2 and Fe(2+) concentrations were varied from 1 to 100 mM and from 0.1 to 10 mM, respectively, with a constant H2O2: Fe(2+) ratio of 10:1. Results confirmed that DMPO concentration should be at least 20 times higher than the concentration of H2O2 and 200 times higher than iron concentration to produce stable DMPO-OH EPR signal. When DMPO: H2O2 ratio varied from 1 to 10, DMPO-OH could generate intermediates and be further oxidized leading to the apparition of an additional triplet. This signal was attributed to a paramagnetic dimer: its structure and a formation mechanism were proposed. Finally, the utilization of sodium sulfite and catalase to terminate Fenton reaction was discussed. Catalase appeared to be compatible with DMPO. However, sodium sulfite should be avoided since it reacted with DMPO-OH to form DMPO-SO3. PMID:27132196

  3. Performance, methanol tolerance and stability of Fe-aminobenzimidazole derived catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastián, David; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Aricò, Antonino S.; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2016-07-01

    Highly active and durable non-platinum group metals (non-PGM) catalyst based on iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) derived from pyrolyzed Fe-aminobenzimidazole (Fe-ABZIM) was synthesized by sacrificial support method (SSM), and characterized by several physical-chemical techniques: scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In half-cell electrochemical configuration, the Fe-ABZIM catalyst presented a significant improvement of ORR activity with respect to a recently reported non-PGM formulation based on Fe-aminoantipyrine, with an enhancement of half-wave potential of about 85 mV in O2-saturated sulfuric acid solution. To the moment, the gap with respect to a benchmark Pt/C catalyst was about 90 mV. The Fe-ABZIM catalyst showed a remarkably high tolerance to methanol, resulting in superior ORR performance compared to Pt/C at methanol concentrations higher than 0.02 M. In direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) good performances were also obtained. A durability test (100 h) at 90 °C, feeding 5 M methanol, was carried out. A certain decrease of performance was recorded, amounting to -0.20 mW cm-2 h-1 at the very beginning of test and -0.05 mW cm-2 h-1 at the end. However, the Fe-ABZIM is more adequate than previously reported formulations in terms of both ORR activity and stability.

  4. Non-covalent interaction between dietary stilbenoids and human serum albumin: Structure-affinity relationship, and its influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Jia, Xueping; Shi, Jian; Xiao, Jianbo; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    Dietary stilbenoids are associated with many benefits for human health, which depend on their bioavailability and bioaccessibility. The stilbenoid-human serum albumin (HSA) interactions are investigated to explore the structure-affinity relationship and influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids. The structure-affinity relationship of the stilbenoids-HSA interaction was found as: (1) the methoxylation enhanced the affinity, (2) an additional hydroxyl group increases the affinity and (3) the glycosylation significantly weakened the affinity. HSA obviously masked the free radical scavenging potential of stilbenoids. The stabilities of stilbenoids in different medium were determined as: HSA solution>human plasma>Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. It appears that the milk enhanced the cell uptake of stilbenoids with multi-hydroxyl groups and weakened the cell uptake of stilbenoids with methoxyl group on EA.hy 926 endothelial cells. The stilbenoids are hardly absorbed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of milk. PMID:26920308

  5. Effects of craniocervical flexion exercise on upper-limb postural stability during a goal-directed pointing task

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Min-Sik; Lee, Hae-Yong; Ryu, Young-Uk; Lee, Mi-Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of craniocervical flexion exercise on upper-limb postural stability by measuring upper-limb postural tremor during a goal-directed pointing task. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to the exercise or control group. The exercise group performed craniocervical flexion exercise four days per week for five weeks. Upper-limb postural tremor was measured by using a three-dimensional electromagnetic motion tracking system (trakSTAR™, Ascension Technology Corporation, Burlington, VT, USA) during a goal-directed pointing task. [Results] In the exercise group, the range and velocity of the trajectories of the shoulder, wrist, and finger in the lateral direction improved significantly. However, no significant changes were observed in the control group. [Conclusion] Craniocervical flexion exercise reduces the range and velocity of upper-limb postural tremor, thereby increasing postural stability. PMID:26180368

  6. Reduced Graphene Oxide-Ag3PO4 Heterostructure: A Direct Z-Scheme Photocatalyst for Augmented Photoreactivity and Stability.

    PubMed

    Samal, Alaka; Das, D P; Nanda, K K; Mishra, B K; Das, J; Dash, A

    2016-02-18

    A visible light driven, direct Z-scheme reduced graphene oxide-Ag3PO4 (RGO-Ag3 PO4 ) heterostructure was synthesized by means of a simple one-pot photoreduction route by varying the amount of RGO under visible light illumination. The reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and growth of Ag3PO4 took place simultaneously. The effect of the amount of RGO on the textural properties and photocatalytic activity of the heterostructure was investigated under visible light illumination. Furthermore, total organic carbon (TOC) analysis confirmed 97.1 % mineralization of organic dyes over RGO-Ag3PO4 in just five minutes under visible-light illumination. The use of different quenchers in the photomineralization suggested the presence of hydroxyl radicals ((.)OH), superoxide radicals ((.)O2 (-)), and holes (h(+)), which play a significant role in the mineralization of organic dyes. In addition to that, clean hydrogen fuel generation was also observed with excellent reusability. The 4 RGO-Ag3PO4 heterostructure has a high H2 evolution rate of 3690 μmol h(-1)  g(-1), which is 6.15 times higher than that of RGO. PMID:26639552

  7. SIRT1 deacetylates and stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) via direct interactions during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Yun, Miyong; Jeong, Jaemin; Park, Eun-Ran; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Woo, Seon Rang; Jung, Jin Kyu; Kim, Yong-Min; Park, Joong-Jean; Kim, Joon; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2015-07-10

    Upon shift to a hypoxic environment, cellular HIF-1α protein is stabilized, with a rapid decline in oxygen-sensitive hydroxylation. Several additional post-translational modifications of HIF-1α are critical in controlling protein stability during hypoxia. In the present study, we showed that SIRT1 stabilizes HIF-1α via direct binding and deacetylation during hypoxia. SIRT1 depletion or inactivation led to reduced hypoxic HIF-1α accumulation, accompanied by an increase in HIF-1α acetylation. Impaired HIF-1α accumulation was recovered upon inhibition of 26S proteasome activity, indicating that SIRT1 is essential for HIF-1α stabilization during hypoxia. Consistently, HIF-1α accumulation was enhanced upon overexpression of wild-type SIRT1, but not its dominant-negative form. SIRT1-mediated accumulation of HIF-1α protein led to increased expression of HIF-1α target genes, including VEGF, GLUT1 and MMP2, and ultimate promotion of cancer cell invasion. These findings collectively imply that hypoxic HIF-1α stabilization requires SIRT1 activation. Furthermore, SIRT1 protection of HIF-1α from acetylation may be a prerequisite for stabilization and consequent enhancement of cell invasion. PMID:25979359

  8. Homolytic dissociation of the vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD) and structures and stabilities of the related radicals Me2NCSn* (n = 1-4).

    PubMed

    Steudel, Ralf; Steudel, Yana; Mak, Adrian Matthew; Wong, Ming Wah

    2006-12-01

    The homolytic dissociation of the important vulcanization accelerator tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD) has been studied by ab initio calculations according to the G3X(MP2) and G3X(MP2)-RAD theories. Homolytic cleavage of the SS bond requires a low enthalpy of 150.0 kJ mol-1, whereas 268.0 kJ mol-1 is needed for the dissociation of one of the C-S single bonds. To cleave one of the SS bonds of the corresponding trisulfide (TMTT) requires 191.1 kJ mol-1. Me2NCS2* is a particularly stable sulfur radical as reflected in the low S-H bond dissociation enthalpy of the corresponding acid Me2NC(=S)SH (301.7 kJ mol-1). Me2NCS2* (2B2) is a sigma radical characterized by the unpaired spin density shared equally between the two sulfur atoms and by a 4-center (NCS2) delocalized pi system. The ESR g-tensors of the radicals Me2NCSn* (n = 1-3) have been calculated. Both TMTD and the mentioned radicals form stable chelate complexes with a Li+ cation, which here serves as a model for the zinc ions used in accelerated rubber vulcanization. Although the binding energy of the complex [Li(TMTD)]+ is larger than that of the isomeric species [Li(S2CNMe2)2]+ (12), the dissociation enthalpy of TMTD as a ligand is smaller (125.5 kJ mol-1) than that of free TMTD. In other words, the homolytic dissociation of the SS bonds of TMTD is facilitated by the presence of Li+ ions. The sulfurization of TMTD in the presence of Li+ to give the paramagnetic complex [Li(S3CNMe2)2]+ is strongly exothermic. These results suggest that TMTD reacts with naked zinc ions as well as with the surface atoms of solid zinc oxide particles in an analogous manner producing highly reactive complexes, which probably initiate the crosslinking process during vulcanization reactions of natural or synthetic rubber accelerated by TMTD/ZnO. PMID:17137356

  9. Effect of polar solvents on beta-carotene radical precursor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu-Xi; Han, Rui-Min; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2008-03-01

    Beta-carotene forms radicals in chloroform upon photo-excitation (i) in the femtosecond time-scale by direct electron ejection into chloroform and (ii) in the microsecond time-scale by secondary reactions with chloroform radicals formed in the faster reactions. The precursor for beta-carotene radical cation decays in a second-order reaction in the mixed solvents, with a rate decreasing for increasing dielectric constant of cosolvent (acetic acid < ethanol < acetonitrile approximately methanol). The precursor is assigned as an ion pair from which the beta-carotene radical cation is formed in neat chloroform, but in more polar solvents it reacts at least partly through disproportionation in a bimolecular reaction promoted by the presence of ions. The stabilization of the radical precursor by increased solvent polarity, allowing for deactivation of the precursor by an alternative reaction channel, is discussed in relation to the balance of pro- and antioxidative properties of beta-carotene at lipid/water interfaces. PMID:18344123

  10. Enhancement of oxidative stability of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Weng, MeiZhi; Zheng, ZhongLiang; Bao, Wei; Cai, YongJun; Yin, Yan; Zou, GuoLin; Zou, GouLin

    2009-11-01

    Nattokinase (subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with strong fibrinolytic activity and it is a potent cardiovascular drug. In medical and commercial applications, however, it is susceptible to chemical oxidation, and subsequent inactivation or denaturation. Here we show that the oxidative stability of NK was substantially increased by optimizing the amino acid residues Thr(220) and Met(222), which were in the vicinity of the catalytic residue Ser(221) of the enzyme. Two nonoxidative amino acids (Ser and Ala) were introduced at these sites using site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and enzymes were purified to homogeneity. The purified enzymes were analyzed with respect to oxidative stability, kinetic parameters, fibrinolytic activity and thermal stability. M222A mutant was found to have a greatly increased oxidative stability compared with wild-type enzyme and it was resistant to inactivation by more than 1 M H(2)O(2), whereas the wild-type enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M H(2)O(2) (t(1/2) approximately 11.6 min). The other mutant (T220S) also showed an obvious increase in antioxidative ability. Molecular dynamic simulations on wild-type and T220S mutant proteins suggested that a hydrogen bond was formed between Ser(220) and Asn(155), and the spatial structure of Met(222) was changed compared with the wild-type. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of improving oxidative stability of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve stability of NK as a potent therapeutic agent. PMID:19631297

  11. Calculation of lateral-directional stability derivatives for wing-body combinations with and without jet-interaction effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for predicting the lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with or without the blowing jet effect. The fuselage effect is accounted for by the axial distribution of vortex multiplets. Comparison of the predicted results with experiments and other theoretical methods show good agreement for configurations without the blowing jet. More applicable experimental data with blowing jets are needed to establish the accuracy of the theory.

  12. Dual high-resolution α-glucosidase and radical scavenging profiling combined with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR for identification of minor and major constituents directly from the crude extract of Pueraria lobata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Qinglei, Sun; Nyberg, Nils T; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2015-02-27

    The crude methanol extract of Pueraria lobata was investigated by dual high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition and radical scavenging profiling combined with hyphenated HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Direct analysis of the crude extract without preceding purification was facilitated by combining chromatograms from two analytical-scale HPLC separations of 120 and 600 μg on-column, respectively. High-resolution α-glucosidase and radical scavenging profiles were obtained after microfractionation of the eluate in 96-well microplates. This allowed full bioactivity profiling of individual peaks in the HPLC chromatogram of the crude methanol extract. Subsequent HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis allowed identification of 21 known compounds in addition to two new compounds, i.e., 3'-methoxydaidzein 8-C-[α-D-apiofuranosyl-(1→6)]-β-D-glucopyranoside and 6″-O-malonyl-3'-methoxydaidzin, as well as an unstable compound tentatively identified as 3'-de-O-methylpuerariafuran. PMID:25679337

  13. Optimizing wind farm layout via LES-calibrated geometric models inclusive of wind direction and atmospheric stability effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Cristina; Ghaisas, Niranjan

    2015-04-01

    The energy generation at a wind farm is controlled primarily by the average wind speed at hub height. However, two other factors impact wind farm performance: 1) the layout of the wind turbines, in terms of spacing between turbines along and across the prevailing wind direction; staggering or aligning consecutive rows; angles between rows, columns, and prevailing wind direction); and 2) atmospheric stability, which is a measure of whether vertical motion is enhanced (unstable), suppressed (stable), or neither (neutral). Studying both factors and their complex interplay with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is a valid approach because it produces high-resolution, 3D, turbulent fields, such as wind velocity, temperature, and momentum and heat fluxes, and it properly accounts for the interactions between wind turbine blades and the surrounding atmospheric and near-surface properties. However, LES are computationally expensive and simulating all the possible combinations of wind directions, atmospheric stabilities, and turbine layouts to identify the optimal wind farm configuration is practically unfeasible today. A new, geometry-based method is proposed that is computationally inexpensive and that combines simple geometric quantities with a minimal number of LES simulations to identify the optimal wind turbine layout, taking into account not only the actual frequency distribution of wind directions (i.e., wind rose) at the site of interest, but also atmospheric stability. The geometry-based method is calibrated with LES of the Lillgrund wind farm conducted with the Software for Offshore/onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA), based on the open-access OpenFOAM libraries. The geometric quantities that offer the best correlations (>0.93) with the LES results are the blockage ratio, defined as the fraction of the swept area of a wind turbine that is blocked by an upstream turbine, and the blockage distance, the weighted distance from a given turbine to all upstream turbines

  14. Measurements of the Lateral and Directional Stability and Control Characteristics of a P-51H Airplane (AAF No. 44-64164)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Christopher C., Jr.; Reeder, J. P.

    1948-01-01

    Flight tests of a P-51H airplane with two different vertical-tail assemblies were made to determine lateral and directional stability and control characteristics. The airplane had satisfactory directional stability in the landing, approach, and wave-off conditions with either tail. In the power-on clean and glide conditions, however, the airplane had weak directional stability with the original tail. The production tail, which had a 7-inch fin extension and a shorter span rudder, improved the directional stability in the power-on clean and glide conditions, but the stability was still weak in the power-on clean condition. Increased altitude in either case caused a slight decrease in the stability. The rudder-trim-force change with speed with either vertical-tail assembly was high. The general aileron control characteristics were satisfactory but the aileron effectiveness failed to meet the Army handling-qualities requirements.

  15. Temporal Variability and Stability in Infant-Directed Sung Speech: Evidence for Language-Specific Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Simone

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, sung speech is used as a methodological tool to explore temporal variability in the timing of word-internal consonants and vowels. It is hypothesized that temporal variability/stability becomes clearer under the varying rhythmical conditions induced by song. This is explored cross-linguistically in German--a language that exhibits a…

  16. Temporal variability and stability in infant-directed sung speech: evidence for language-specific patterns.

    PubMed

    Falk, Simone

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, sung speech is used as a methodological tool to explore temporal variability in the timing of word-internal consonants and vowels. It is hypothesized that temporal variability/stability becomes clearer under the varying rhythmical conditions induced by song.This is explored crosslinguistically in German - a language that exhibits a potential vocalic quantity distinction - and the non-quantity languages French and Russian. Songs by non-professional singers, i.e. parents that sang to their infants aged 2 to 13 months in a non-laboratory setting, were recorded and analyzed.Vowel and consonant durations at syllable contacts of trochaic word types with CVCV or CV:CV structure were measured under varying rhythmical conditions. Evidence is provided that in German non-professional singing, the two syllable structures can be differentiated by two distinct temporal variability patterns: vocalic variability (and consonantal stability) was found to be dominant in CV:CV structures whereas consonantal variability (and vocalic stability) was characteristic for CVCV structures. In French and Russian, however, only vocalic variability seemed to apply.Additionally, findings suggest that the different temporal patterns found in German were also supported by the stability pattern at the tonal level. These results point to subtle (supra) segmental timing mechanisms in sung speech that affect temporal targets according to the specific prosodic nature of the language in question. PMID:21848078

  17. Longitudinal Double Spin Asymmetry and Cross Section for Direct Photon Production Measured at Mid-rapidity in Polarized {radical}(s) = 200 GeV pp Collisions at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Robert

    2009-08-04

    Direct photon production in pp collisions at RHIC is one of the important channels PHENIX will employ to determine the polarized gluon distribution {delta}G. The direct photon A{sub LL} is linear in {delta}G, therefore sensitive to its sign and magnitude. To establish the applicability of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (pQCD) to this process, we present a comparison of the direct photon unpolarized cross section, with next-to-leading order pQCD calculations. We then evaluate the double helicity spin asymmetries, A{sub LL}, from these data and compare with theoretical models. We present results and the current status the analysis of 2005 and 2006 data sets.

  18. Improvement of the directional stability of passenger car trailer couplings with actively controlled steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desens, Jens

    The stabilization of pendulum oscillations of passenger car trailer couplings, using active steering, was examined. A linear model of the couplings was presented. Each axle was provided with a controller. The controllers were optimized, with regard to necessary sensors, in order to minimize costs. The rear and the front axles were provided with a control unit in order to compute the potential prevailing in the active steering of several axles. It was shown that the passenger car rear axle was the most suitable for coupling stabilization. The experiment was simulated, using a complex coupling model. The developed controller allowed the passenger car trailer to be driven at a speed higher than 150 km per hour.

  19. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  20. Improvement of stability and enzymatic activity by site-directed mutagenesis of E. coli asparaginase II.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shikha; Mehta, Ranjit Kumar; Maiti, Prasanta; Röhm, Klaus-Heinrich; Sonawane, Avinash

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial asparaginases (EC 3.5.1.1) have attracted considerable attention because enzymes of this group are used in the therapy of certain forms of leukemia. Class II asparaginase from Escherichia coli (EcA), a homotetramer with a mass of 138 kDa, is especially effective in cancer therapy. However, the therapeutic potential of EcA is impaired by the limited stability of the enzyme in vivo and by the induction of antibodies in the patients. In an attempt to modify the properties of EcA, several variants with amino acid replacements at subunit interfaces were constructed and characterized. Chemical and thermal denaturation analysis monitored by activity, fluorescence, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry showed that certain variants with exchanges that weaken dimer-dimer interactions exhibited complex denaturation profiles with active dimeric and/or inactive monomeric intermediates appearing at low denaturant concentrations. By contrast, other EcA variants showed considerably enhanced activity and stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme. Thus, even small changes at a subunit interface may markedly affect EcA stability without impairing its catalytic properties. Variants of this type may have a potential for use in the asparaginase therapy of leukemia. PMID:24721562

  1. Stability of formation control using a consensus protocol under directed communications with two time delays and delay scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Gomez, Rudy; Olgac, Nejat

    2016-01-01

    We consider a linear algorithm to achieve formation control in a group of agents which are driven by second-order dynamics and affected by two rationally independent delays. One of the delays is in the position and the other in the velocity information channels. These delays are taken as constant and uniform throughout the system. The communication topology is assumed to be directed and fixed. The formation is attained by adding a supplementary control term to the stabilising consensus protocol. In preparation for the formation control logic, we first study the stability of the consensus, using the recent cluster treatment of characteristic roots (CTCR) paradigm. This effort results in a unique depiction of the non-conservative stability boundaries in the domain of the delays. However, CTCR requires the knowledge of the potential stability switching loci exhaustively within this domain. The creation of these loci is done in a new surrogate coordinate system, called the 'spectral delay space (SDS)'. The relative stability is also investigated, which has to do with the speed of reaching consensus. This step leads to a paradoxical control design concept, called the 'delay scheduling', which highlights the fact that the group behaviour may be enhanced by increasing the delays. These steps lead to a control strategy to establish a desired group formation that guarantees spacing among the agents. Example case studies are presented to validate the underlying analytical derivations.

  2. Optimisation of ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil from papaya seed by response surface methodology: oil recovery, radical scavenging antioxidant activity, and oxidation stability.

    PubMed

    Samaram, Shadi; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Bordbar, Sara; Serjouie, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) condition on the yield, antioxidant activity and stability of the oil from papaya seed. The studied ultrasound variables were time, temperature, ultrasound power and solvent to sample ratio. The main goal was to optimise UAE condition providing the highest recovery of papaya seed oil with the most desirable antioxidant activity and stability. The interaction of ultrasound variables had the most and least significant effects on the antioxidant activity and stability, respectively. Ultrasound-assisted extraction provided a relatively high oil recovery (∼ 73%) from papaya seed. The strongest antioxidant activity was achieved by the extraction at the elevated temperature using low solvent to sample ratio. The optimum ultrasound extraction was set at the elevated temperature (62.5 °C) for 38.5 min at high ultrasound power (700 W) using medium solvent to sample ratio (∼ 7:1 v/w). The optimum point was practically validated. PMID:25442517

  3. Direct force measurement of the stability of poly(ethylene glycol)-polyethylenimine graft films.

    PubMed

    Nnebe, Ijeoma M; Tilton, Robert D; Schneider, James W

    2004-08-15

    The stability and passivity of poly(ethylene glycol)-polyethylenimine (PEG-PEI) graft films are important for their use as antifouling coatings in a variety of biotechnology applications. We have used AFM colloidal-probe force measurements combined with optical reflectometry to characterize the surface properties and stability of PEI and dense PEG-PEI graft films on silica. Initial contact between bare silica probes and PEI-modified surfaces yields force curves that exhibit a long-range electrostatic repulsion and short-range attraction between the surfaces, indicating spontaneous desorption of PEI in the aqueous medium. Further transfer of PEI molecules to the probe occurs with subsequent application of forces between FR = 300 and 500 microN/m. The presence of PEG reduces the adhesive properties of the PEI surface and prevents transfer of PEI molecules to the probe with continuous contact, though an initial desorption of PEI still occurs. Glutaraldehyde crosslinking of the graft films prevents both the initial desorption and subsequent transfer of the PEI, resulting in sustained attractive interaction forces of electrostatic origin between the negatively charged probe and the positively charged copolymer graft films. PMID:15271557

  4. Direct association between diet and the stability of human atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Isabel; Andersson Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören; Skog, Göran; Pedro, Luís; Fernandes e Fernandes, José; Dias, Nuno; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Jan; Stenström, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean diet has been suggested to explain why coronary heart disease mortality is lower in southern than northern Europe. Dietary habits can be revealed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) measurement of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in biological tissues. To study if diet is associated with human plaque stability, atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomy on 56 patients (21 Portuguese and 35 Swedish) were analysed by IRMS and histology. Plaque components affecting rupture risk were measured. Swedish plaques had more apoptosis, lipids and larger cores, as well as fewer proliferating cells and SMC than the Portuguese, conferring the Swedish a more rupture-prone phenotype. Portuguese plaques contained higher δ13C and δ15N than the Swedish, indicating that Portuguese plaques were more often derived from marine food. Plaque δ13C correlated with SMC and proliferating cells, and inversely with lipids, core size, apoptosis. Plaque δ15N correlated with SMC and inversely with lipids, core size and apoptosis. This is the first observational study showing that diet is reflected in plaque components associated with its vulnerability. The Portuguese plaques composition is consistent with an increased marine food intake and those plaques are more stable than those from Swedish patients. Marine-derived food is associated with plaque stability. PMID:26490319

  5. Direct association between diet and the stability of human atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Isabel; Andersson Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören; Skog, Göran; Pedro, Luís; Fernandes E Fernandes, José; Dias, Nuno; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Jan; Stenström, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean diet has been suggested to explain why coronary heart disease mortality is lower in southern than northern Europe. Dietary habits can be revealed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) measurement of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in biological tissues. To study if diet is associated with human plaque stability, atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomy on 56 patients (21 Portuguese and 35 Swedish) were analysed by IRMS and histology. Plaque components affecting rupture risk were measured. Swedish plaques had more apoptosis, lipids and larger cores, as well as fewer proliferating cells and SMC than the Portuguese, conferring the Swedish a more rupture-prone phenotype. Portuguese plaques contained higher δ(13)C and δ(15)N than the Swedish, indicating that Portuguese plaques were more often derived from marine food. Plaque δ(13)C correlated with SMC and proliferating cells, and inversely with lipids, core size, apoptosis. Plaque δ(15)N correlated with SMC and inversely with lipids, core size and apoptosis. This is the first observational study showing that diet is reflected in plaque components associated with its vulnerability. The Portuguese plaques composition is consistent with an increased marine food intake and those plaques are more stable than those from Swedish patients. Marine-derived food is associated with plaque stability. PMID:26490319

  6. Calculation of lateral-directional stability derivatives of wings by a nonplanar quasi-vortex-lattice method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    The nonplanar quasi-vortex-lattice method is applied to the calculation of lateral-directional stability derivatives of wings with and without vortex-lift effect. Results for conventional configurations and those with winglets, V-tail, etc. are compared with available data. All rolling moment derivatives are found to be accurately predicted. The prediction of side force and yawing moment derivatives for some configurations is not as accurate. Causes of the discrepancy are discussed. A user's manual for the program and the program listing are also included.

  7. Entry dynamics of space shuttle orbiter with lateral-directional stability and control uncertainties at supersonic and hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. W.; Powell, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom simulation analysis was conducted to examine the effects of the lateral-directional static aerodynamic stability and control uncertainties on the performance of the automatic (no manual inputs) entry-guidance and control systems of the space shuttle orbiter. To establish the acceptable boundaries of the uncertainties, the static aerodynamic characteristics were varied either by applying a multiplier to the aerodynamic parameter or by adding an increment. Control-system modifications were identified that decrease the sensitivity to off-nominal aerodynamics. With these modifications, the acceptable aerodynamic boundaries were determined.

  8. Histidine-rich stabilized polyplexes for cMet-directed tumor-targeted gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Petra; Lächelt, Ulrich; Herrmann, Annika; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Döblinger, Markus; He, Dongsheng; Krhač Levačić, Ana; Morys, Stephan; Bräuchle, Christoph; Wagner, Ernst

    2015-03-01

    Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing terminal cysteines for redox-sensitive polyplex stabilization, were assembled by solid-phase supported syntheses. The resulting oligomers exhibited a greatly enhanced cellular uptake and gene transfer over non-targeted control sequences, confirming the efficacy and target-specificity of the formed polyplexes. Implementation of endosomal escape-promoting histidines in the cationic core was required for gene expression without additional endosomolytic agent. The histidine-enriched polyplexes demonstrated stability in serum as well as receptor-specific gene transfer in vivo upon intratumoral injection. The co-formulation with an analogous PEG-free cationic oligomer led to a further compaction of pDNA polyplexes with an obvious change of shape as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Such compaction was critically required for efficient intravenous gene delivery which resulted in greatly enhanced, cMBP2 ligand-dependent gene expression in the distant tumor.Overexpression of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor/c-Met proto oncogene on the surface of a variety of tumor cells gives an opportunity to specifically target cancerous tissues. Herein, we report the first use of c-Met as receptor for non-viral tumor-targeted gene delivery. Sequence-defined oligomers comprising the c-Met binding peptide ligand cMBP2 for targeting, a monodisperse polyethylene glycol (PEG) for polyplex surface shielding, and various cationic (oligoethanamino) amide cores containing

  9. Direct and indirect effects of unilateral divorce law on marital stability.

    PubMed

    Kneip, Thorsten; Bauer, Gerrit; Reinhold, Steffen

    2014-12-01

    Previous research examining the impact of unilateral divorce law (UDL) on the prevalence of divorce has provided mixed results. Studies based on cross-sectional cross-country/cross-state survey data have received criticism for disregarding unobserved heterogeneity across countries, as have studies using country-level panel data for failing to account for possible mediating mechanisms at the micro level. We seek to overcome both shortcomings by using individual-level event-history data from 11 European countries (SHARELIFE) and controlling for unobserved heterogeneity over countries and cohorts. We find that UDL in total increased the incidence of marital breakdown by about 20 %. This finding, however, neglects potential selection effects into marriage. Accordingly, the estimated effect of unilateral divorce laws becomes much larger when we control for age at marriage, which is used as indicator for match quality. Moreover, we find that UDL particularly affects marital stability in the presence of children. PMID:25354572

  10. Comparison of Critical Trajectory Methods for Direct CCT Computation for Transient Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadi, Ardyono; Yorino, Naoto; Sasaki, Yutaka; Tanaka, Masahide; Fujiwara, Takuma; Zoka, Yoshifumi; Kakui, Hironori; Takeshita, Mitsuhiro

    This paper studies new techniques for critical trajectory method, a recent new method proposed by the authors for obtaining critical clearing time (CCT) for transient stability analysis. A specific feature of the proposed method lies in its ability to provide exact CCT without approximations since no such methods have existed so far. The method is based on the computation of the critical trajectory, which is defined as the trajectory that starts from a point on a fault-on trajectory at CCT and reaches an end point. There are a few possible methods for the treatment of the end point conditions, computational performances of the methods are investigated in terms of accuracy of CCT and computational efficiency. It is shown that the proposed methods successfully provide the exact CCT that agrees with the conventional numerical simulation method.

  11. The direct criterion of Newcomb for the ideal MHD stability of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented for determining the ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma, based on a toroidal generalization of the method developed by Newcomb for fixed-boundary modes in a cylindrical plasma. For toroidal mode number n ≠ 0 , the stability problem is reduced to the numerical integration of a high-order complex system of ordinary differential equations, the Euler-Lagrange equation for extremizing the potential energy, for the coupled amplitudes of poloidal harmonics m as a function of the radial coordinate ψ in a straight-fieldline flux coordinate system. Unlike the cylindrical case, different poloidal harmonics couple to each other, which introduces coupling between adjacent singular intervals. A boundary condition is used at each singular surface, where m = nq and q ( ψ ) is the safety factor, to cross the singular surface and continue the solutions beyond it. Fixed-boundary instability is indicated by the vanishing of a real determinant of a Hermitian complex matrix constructed from the fundamental matrix of solutions, the generalization of Newcomb's crossing criterion. In the absence of fixed-boundary instabilities, an M × M plasma response matrix W P , with M the number of poloidal harmonics used, is constructed from the Euler-Lagrange solutions at the plasma-vacuum boundary. This is added to a vacuum response matrix W V to form a total response matrix W T . The existence of negative eigenvalues of W T indicates the presence of free-boundary instabilities. The method is implemented in the fast and accurate DCON code.

  12. Preparation of Mg(OH)2 hybrid pigment by direct precipitation and graft onto cellulose fiber via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Yue; Lv, Lihua; Cui, Yongzhu; Wei, Chunyan; Pang, Guibing

    2016-02-01

    Mg(OH)2 flame retardant hybrid pigment is synthesized through simultaneous solution precipitation and adsorption of anionic dyes (C.I. Acid Red 6). The Mg(OH)2 hybrid pigment bearing vinyl groups after surface silane modification is immobilized onto the surface of bromo end-functional cellulose fiber by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The morphology and structure of Mg(OH)2 pigments and cellulose fibers grafted with modified pigments are characterized. The thermal properties, flammability and color fastness of cellulose fibers grafted with modified pigments are measured. The results reveal that anionic dye molecules are adsorbed onto Mg(OH)2 crystals and affect the formation of lamella-like Mg(OH)2 crystals. The cellulose fiber grafted with modified Mg(OH)2 hybrid pigment absorbs about four times heat more than original cellulose fiber with about 4% immobilization ratio of pigment, which shortens nearly half of afterflame time and afterglow time.

  13. The Nucleus Prepositus Hypoglossi Contributes to Head Direction Cell Stability in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Butler, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Head direction (HD) cells in the rat limbic system fire according to the animal's orientation independently of the animal's environmental location or behavior. These HD cells receive strong inputs from the vestibular system, among other areas, as evidenced by disruption of their directional firing after lesions or inactivation of vestibular inputs. Two brainstem nuclei, the supragenual nucleus (SGN) and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (NPH), are known to project to the HD network and are thought to be possible relays of vestibular information. Previous work has shown that lesioning the SGN leads to a loss of spatial tuning in downstream HD cells, but the NPH has historically been defined as an oculomotor nuclei and therefore its role in contributing to the HD signal is less clear. Here, we investigated this role by recording HD cells in the anterior thalamus after either neurotoxic or electrolytic lesions of the NPH. There was a total loss of direction-specific firing in anterodorsal thalamus cells in animals with complete NPH lesions. However, many cells were identified that fired in bursts unrelated to the animals' directional heading and were similar to cells seen in previous studies that damaged vestibular-associated areas. Some animals with significant but incomplete lesions of the NPH had HD cells that were stable under normal conditions, but were unstable under conditions designed to minimize the use of external cues. These results support the hypothesis that the NPH, beyond its traditional oculomotor function, plays a critical role in conveying vestibular-related information to the HD circuit. PMID:25673848

  14. The nucleus prepositus hypoglossi contributes to head direction cell stability in rats.

    PubMed

    Butler, William N; Taube, Jeffrey S

    2015-02-11

    Head direction (HD) cells in the rat limbic system fire according to the animal's orientation independently of the animal's environmental location or behavior. These HD cells receive strong inputs from the vestibular system, among other areas, as evidenced by disruption of their directional firing after lesions or inactivation of vestibular inputs. Two brainstem nuclei, the supragenual nucleus (SGN) and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (NPH), are known to project to the HD network and are thought to be possible relays of vestibular information. Previous work has shown that lesioning the SGN leads to a loss of spatial tuning in downstream HD cells, but the NPH has historically been defined as an oculomotor nuclei and therefore its role in contributing to the HD signal is less clear. Here, we investigated this role by recording HD cells in the anterior thalamus after either neurotoxic or electrolytic lesions of the NPH. There was a total loss of direction-specific firing in anterodorsal thalamus cells in animals with complete NPH lesions. However, many cells were identified that fired in bursts unrelated to the animals' directional heading and were similar to cells seen in previous studies that damaged vestibular-associated areas. Some animals with significant but incomplete lesions of the NPH had HD cells that were stable under normal conditions, but were unstable under conditions designed to minimize the use of external cues. These results support the hypothesis that the NPH, beyond its traditional oculomotor function, plays a critical role in conveying vestibular-related information to the HD circuit. PMID:25673848

  15. The location of protein S8 and surrounding elements of 16S rRNA in the 70S ribosome from combined use of directed hydroxyl radical probing and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, L; Culver, G M; Yusupova, G Z; Cate, J H; Yusupov, M M; Noller, H F

    2000-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S8, which is essential for the assembly of the central domain of 16S rRNA, is one of the most thoroughly studied RNA-binding proteins. To map its surrounding RNA in the ribosome, we carried out directed hydroxyl radical probing of 16S rRNA using Fe(II) tethered to nine different positions on the surface of protein S8 in 70S ribosomes. Hydroxyl radical-induced cleavage was observed near the classical S8-binding site in the 620 stem, and flanking the other S8-footprinted regions of the central domain at the three-helix junction near position 650 and the 825 and 860 stems. In addition, cleavage near the 5' terminus of 16S rRNA, in the 300 region of its 5' domain, and in the 1070 region of its 3'-major domain provide information about the proximity to S8 of RNA elements not directly involved in its binding. These data, along with previous footprinting and crosslinking results, allowed positioning of protein S8 and its surrounding RNA elements in a 7.8-A map of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. The resulting model is in close agreement with the extensive body of data from previous studies using protein-protein and protein-RNA crosslinking, chemical and enzymatic footprinting, and genetics. PMID:10836793

  16. Dynamics of Radical-Mediated Enzyme Catalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    1997-11-01

    An emergent class of enzymes harnesses the extreme reactivity of electron-deficient free radical species to perform some of the most difficult reactions in biology. The regio- and stereo-selectivity achieved by these enzymes defies long-held ideas that radical reactions are non-specific. The common primary step in these catalyses is metal- or metallocenter-assisted generation of an electron-deficient organic "initiator radical". The initiator radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate, opening a new reaction channel for rearrangement to the product. Our aim is to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms of the radical pair separation and radical rearrangement steps. Radical pair separation and substrate radical rearrangement are tracked by using time-resolved (10-7 to 10-3 s) techniques of pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FT-EPR, ESEEM). Synchronous time-evolution of the reactions is attained by triggering with a visible laser pulse. Transient non-Boltzmann population of the states of the spin-coupled systems, and resultant electron spin polarization, facilitates study at or near room temperature under conditions where the enzymes are operative. The systems examined include ethanolamine deaminase, a vitamin B12 coenzyme-dependent enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase and photosynthetic reaction centers. The electronic and nuclear structural and kinetic information obtained from the pulsed-EPR studies is used to address how the initiator radicals are stabilized against deleterious recombination with the metal, and to distinguish the participation of concerted versus sequential rearrangement pathways.

  17. Structural Characterization of Hydroxyl Radical Adducts in Aqueous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Ireneusz; Tripathi, G. N. R.

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation by the hydroxyl (OH) radical is one of the most widely studied reactions because of its central role in chemistry, biology, organic synthesis, and photocatalysis in aqueous environments, wastewater treatment, and numerous other chemical processes. Although the redox potential of OH is very high, direct electron transfer (ET) is rarely observed. If it happens, it mostly proceeds through the formation of elusive OH adduct intermediate which facilitates ET and formation of hydroxide anion. Using time resolved resonance Raman technique we structurally characterized variety of OH adducts to sulfur containing organic compounds, halide ions as well as some metal cations. The bond between oxygen of OH radical and the atom of oxidized molecule differs depending on the nature of solute that OH radical reacts with. For most of sulfur containing organics, as well as halide and pseudo-halide ions, our observation suggested that this bond has two-center three-electron character. For several metal aqua ions studied, the nature of the bond depends on type of the cation being oxidized. Discussion on spectral parameters of all studied hydroxyl radical adducts as well as the role solvent plays in their stabilization will be presented.

  18. The stability of Taylor bubbles in large-diameter tubes: direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanjal, Amanjalot; Saravan-Butler, Maya; Smith, Sydney; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Slug flow corresponds to intermittent Taylor bubbles and liquid slugs, and is widely observed in the oil-and-gas industry. The fluctuating flow rate caused by Taylor bubbles is problematical; thus, the destabilisation of this regime would be beneficial. To gain better understanding of this regime in vertical tubes, three-dimensional CFD simulations of Taylor air bubble rise in initially stagnant water and progressively larger diameter tubes, are carried out. Tubes with diameters in the range of 0.032m-0.290m and a height of 2m are considered. The topology of the Taylor bubbles and their rise velocity are predicted and validated against experimental results. Our results suggest that the wake of leading bubbles plays a key role in the deformation and break-up of trailing bubbles. Motivated by these results, the effect of bubble separation distance, and aspect ratio, on bubble stability and the slug flow regime is investigated. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  19. Direct measurement of human ankle stiffness during quiet standing: the intrinsic mechanical stiffness is insufficient for stability

    PubMed Central

    Loram, Ian D; Lakie, Martin

    2002-01-01

    During quiet standing the human ‘inverted pendulum’ sways irregularly. In previous work where subjects balanced a real inverted pendulum, we investigated what contribution the intrinsic mechanical ankle stiffness makes to achieve stability. Using the results of a plausible model, we suggested that intrinsic ankle stiffness is inadequate for providing stability. Here, using a piezo-electric translator we applied small, unobtrusive mechanical perturbations to the foot while the subject was standing freely. These short duration perturbations had a similar size and velocity to movements which occur naturally during quiet standing, and they produced no evidence of any stretch reflex response in soleus, or gastrocnemius. Direct measurement confirms our earlier conclusion; intrinsic ankle stiffness is not quite sufficient to stabilise the body or pendulum. On average the directly determined intrinsic stiffness is 91 ± 23 % (mean ± s.d.) of that necessary to provide minimal stabilisation. The stiffness was substantially constant, increasing only slightly with ankle torque. This stiffness cannot be neurally regulated in quiet standing. Thus we attribute this stiffness to the foot, Achilles’ tendon and aponeurosis rather than the activated calf muscle fibres. Our measurements suggest that the triceps surae muscles maintain balance via a spring-like element which is itself too compliant to guarantee stability. The implication is that the brain cannot set ankle stiffness and then ignore the control task because additional modulation of torque is required to maintain balance. We suggest that the triceps surae muscles maintain balance by predictively controlling the proximal offset of the spring-like element in a ballistic-like manner. PMID:12482906

  20. Radical Behaviorism and Buddhism: Complementarities and Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diller, James W.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between Buddhism and the philosophy of science in general, but there have been only a few attempts to draw comparisons directly with the philosophy of radical behaviorism. The present review therefore considers heretofore unconsidered points of comparison between Buddhism and radical behaviorism in terms of their…

  1. VORSTAB: A computer program for calculating lateral-directional stability derivatives with vortex flow effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward

    1985-01-01

    A computer program based on the Quasi-Vortex-Lattice Method of Lan is presented for calculating longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of nonplanar wing-body combination. The method is based on the assumption of inviscid subsonic flow. Both attached and vortex-separated flows are treated. For the vortex-separated flow, the calculation is based on the method of suction analogy. The effect of vortex breakdown is accounted for by an empirical method. A summary of the theoretical method, program capabilities, input format, output variables and program job control set-up are described. Three test cases are presented as guides for potential users of the code.

  2. Deposition and properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia thin films using reactive direct current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, E.S.; Wang, L.S.; Mason, T.O.; Barnett, S.A. . Dept. of Materials Science Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL . Materials Research Center)

    1991-11-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputter deposition from a composite Zr--Y target in Ar--O{sub 2} mixtures. Hysteresis was observed as a function of oxygen flow rate {ital f}. For a discharge current of 0.4 A and a total pressure {ital P} of 5 mTorr, for example, the target oxidized at {ital f}{gt}2.3 ml/min, with the reverse transition from an oxidized to a metallic target surface occurring at 1.95 ml/min. The deposition rate was 2.7 {mu}m/h in the metallic mode and 0.1 {mu}m/h in the oxide mode. Fully oxidized (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.1}(ZrO{sub 2}){sub 0.9} was obtained for {ital f}{gt}2.0 ml/min, even in the metallic mode. While films deposited with {ital P}=3--20 mTorr were continuous, for {ital P}{gt}20 mTorr crazing was apparent as expected for a ceramic film in a tensile stress state. For {ital P}{lt}3 mTorr, the films delaminated due to excessive compressive stress. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy results showed that the films were polycrystalline cubic YSZ with a columnar structure and an average grain diameter of 15 nm. Fully dense films were obtained at a deposition temperature of 350 {degree}C. Temperature-dependent impedance spectroscopy analysis of YSZ films with Ag electrodes showed that the oxygen ion conductivity was as expected for YSZ.

  3. Direct Observation of Transient Surface Species during Ge Nanowire Growth and Their Influence on Growth Stability.

    PubMed

    Sivaram, Saujan V; Shin, Naechul; Chou, Li-Wei; Filler, Michael A

    2015-08-12

    Surface adsorbates are well-established choreographers of material synthesis, but the presence and impact of these short-lived species on semiconductor nanowire growth are largely unknown. Here, we use infrared spectroscopy to directly observe surface adsorbates, hydrogen atoms and methyl groups, chemisorbed to the nanowire sidewall and show they are essential for the stable growth of Ge nanowires via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. We quantitatively determine the surface coverage of hydrogen atoms during nanowire growth by comparing ν(Ge-H) absorption bands from operando measurements (i.e., during growth) to those after saturating the nanowire sidewall with hydrogen atoms. This method provides sub-monolayer chemical information at relevant reaction conditions while accounting for the heterogeneity of sidewall surface sites and their evolution during elongation. Our findings demonstrate that changes to surface bonding are critical to understand Ge nanowire synthesis and provide new guidelines for rationally selecting catalysts, forming heterostructures, and controlling dopant profiles. PMID:26147949

  4. Selective Radical-Radical Cross-Couplings: Design of a Formal β-Mannich Reaction.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Jenna L; Petronijević, Filip R; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-07-01

    A direct β-coupling of cyclic ketones with imines has been accomplished via the synergistic combination of photoredox catalysis and organocatalysis. Transient β-enaminyl radicals derived from ketones via enamine and oxidative photoredox catalysis readily combine with persistent α-amino radicals in a highly selective hetero radical-radical coupling. This novel pathway to γ-aminoketones is predicated upon the use of DABCO as both a base and an electron transfer agent. This protocol also formally allows for the direct synthesis of β-Mannich products via a chemoselective three-component coupling of aryl aldehydes, amines, and ketones. PMID:26075347

  5. TRIM32 modulates pluripotency entry and exit by directly regulating Oct4 stability.

    PubMed

    Bahnassawy, Lamia'a; Perumal, Thanneer M; Gonzalez-Cano, Laura; Hillje, Anna-Lena; Taher, Leila; Makalowski, Wojciech; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fuellen, Georg; del Sol, Antonio; Schwamborn, Jens Christian

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have revolutionized the world of regenerative medicine; nevertheless, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their generation and differentiation remain elusive. Here, we investigated the role of the cell fate determinant TRIM32 in modulating such processes. TRIM32 is essential for the induction of neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells by poly-ubiquitinating cMyc to target it for degradation resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. To elucidate the role of TRIM32 in regulating somatic cell reprogramming we analysed the capacity of TRIM32-knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in generating iPSC colonies. TRIM32 knock-out MEFs produced a higher number of iPSC colonies indicating a role for TRIM32 in inhibiting this cellular transition. Further characterization of the generated iPSCs indicated that the TRIM32 knock-out iPSCs show perturbed differentiation kinetics. Additionally, mathematical modelling of global gene expression data revealed that during differentiation an Oct4 centred network in the wild-type cells is replaced by an E2F1 centred network in the TRIM32 deficient cells. We show here that this might be caused by a TRIM32-dependent downregulation of Oct4. In summary, the data presented here reveal that TRIM32 directly regulates at least two of the four Yamanaka Factors (cMyc and Oct4), to modulate cell fate transitions. PMID:26307407

  6. TRIM32 modulates pluripotency entry and exit by directly regulating Oct4 stability

    PubMed Central

    Bahnassawy, Lamia’a; Perumal, Thanneer M.; Gonzalez-Cano, Laura; Hillje, Anna-Lena; Taher, Leila; Makalowski, Wojciech; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fuellen, Georg; Sol, Antonio del; Schwamborn, Jens Christian

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have revolutionized the world of regenerative medicine; nevertheless, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their generation and differentiation remain elusive. Here, we investigated the role of the cell fate determinant TRIM32 in modulating such processes. TRIM32 is essential for the induction of neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells by poly-ubiquitinating cMyc to target it for degradation resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. To elucidate the role of TRIM32 in regulating somatic cell reprogramming we analysed the capacity of TRIM32-knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in generating iPSC colonies. TRIM32 knock-out MEFs produced a higher number of iPSC colonies indicating a role for TRIM32 in inhibiting this cellular transition. Further characterization of the generated iPSCs indicated that the TRIM32 knock-out iPSCs show perturbed differentiation kinetics. Additionally, mathematical modelling of global gene expression data revealed that during differentiation an Oct4 centred network in the wild-type cells is replaced by an E2F1 centred network in the TRIM32 deficient cells. We show here that this might be caused by a TRIM32-dependent downregulation of Oct4. In summary, the data presented here reveal that TRIM32 directly regulates at least two of the four Yamanaka Factors (cMyc and Oct4), to modulate cell fate transitions. PMID:26307407

  7. Effect of gas-containing microspheres and echo contrast agents on free radical formation by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Misík, V; Riesz, P

    1998-09-01

    Stabilized microbubbles (microspheres) are widely used to enhance the contrast of ultrasound imaging. Our data provide direct evidence that the contrast agents, Levovist, PVC-AN (polyvinylidene chloride-acrylonitryl copolymer), and Albunex (compared to 5% human albumin), at concentrations comparable to those used for ultrasound imaging, enhance H2O2 production (through the superoxide-dependent pathway) in air-saturated aqueous solutions exposed to 47 kHz ultrasound above the cavitation threshold. These agents also act as scavengers of .H atoms and .OH radicals, thus lowering H2O2 formation (by recombination of .OH radicals) in argon-saturated solutions. EPR spin trapping also reveals that secondary radicals derived from the contrast agents are produced by reactions with .H and .OH which are formed by pyrolysis of water inside cavitation bubbles. In addition, the contrast agents themselves undergo pyrolysis reactions in the cavitation bubbles as demonstrated by formation of methyl radicals. Possible deleterious consequences of the formation of sonochemical intermediates may have to be assessed, particularly since some of the echo contrast agents have been shown to lower the cavitation threshold of diagnostic ultrasound. Unlike the microspheres formed from organic molecules, inorganic microspheres, Eccospheres, because of their stability and inert nature with respect to participation in free radical processes, appear to be suitable tools for enhancing the yields of aqueous sonochemical reactions. PMID:9741598

  8. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostatectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - discharge; LRP - discharge; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy - discharge ; RALP - discharge; Pelvic lymphadenectomy - ...

  9. Direct force measurements reveal that protein Tau confers short-range attractions and isoform-dependent steric stabilization to microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Peter J.; Choi, Myung Chul; Miller, Herbert P.; Feinstein, H. Eric; Raviv, Uri; Li, Youli; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are hollow cytoskeletal filaments assembled from αβ-tubulin heterodimers. Tau, an unstructured protein found in neuronal axons, binds to MTs and regulates their dynamics. Aberrant Tau behavior is associated with neurodegenerative dementias, including Alzheimer’s. Here, we report on a direct force measurement between paclitaxel-stabilized MTs coated with distinct Tau isoforms by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of MT-Tau mixtures under osmotic pressure (P). In going from bare MTs to MTs with Tau coverage near the physiological submonolayer regime (Tau/tubulin-dimer molar ratio; ΦTau = 1/10), isoforms with longer N-terminal tails (NTTs) sterically stabilized MTs, preventing bundling up to PB ∼ 10,000–20,000 Pa, an order of magnitude larger than bare MTs. Tau with short NTTs showed little additional effect in suppressing the bundling pressure (PB ∼ 1,000–2,000 Pa) over the same range. Remarkably, the abrupt increase in PB observed for longer isoforms suggests a mushroom to brush transition occurring at 1/13 < ΦTau < 1/10, which corresponds to MT-bound Tau with NTTs that are considerably more extended than SAXS data for Tau in solution indicate. Modeling of Tau-mediated MT–MT interactions supports the hypothesis that longer NTTs transition to a polyelectrolyte brush at higher coverages. Higher pressures resulted in isoform-independent irreversible bundling because the polyampholytic nature of Tau leads to short-range attractions. These findings suggest an isoform-dependent biological role for regulation by Tau, with longer isoforms conferring MT steric stabilization against aggregation either with other biomacromolecules or into tight bundles, preventing loss of function in the crowded axon environment. PMID:26542680

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis of tobacco anionic peroxidase: Effect of additional aromatic amino acids on stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Poloznikov, A A; Zakharova, G S; Chubar, T A; Hushpulian, D M; Tishkov, V I; Gazaryan, I G

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco anionic peroxidase (TOP) is known to effectively catalyze luminol oxidation without enhancers, in contrast to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). To pursue structure-activity relationship studies for TOP, two amino acids have been chosen for mutation, namely Thr151, close to the heme plane, and Phe140 at the entrance to the active site pocket. Three mutant forms TOP F140Y, T151W and F140Y/T151W have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and reactivated to yield active enzymes. Single-point mutations introducing additional aromatic amino acid residues at the surface of TOP exhibit a significant effect on the enzyme catalytic activity and stability as judged by the results of steady-state and transient kinetics studies. TOP T151W is up to 4-fold more active towards a number of aromatic substrates including luminol, whereas TOP F140Y is 2-fold more stable against thermal inactivation and 8-fold more stable in the reaction course. These steady-state observations have been rationalized with the help of transient kinetic studies on the enzyme reaction with hydrogen peroxide in a single turnover regime. The stopped-flow data reveal (a) an increased stability of F140Y Compound I towards hydrogen peroxide, and thus, a higher operational stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme, and (b) a lesser leakage of oxidative equivalents from TOP T151W Compound I resulting in the increased catalytic activity. The results obtained show that TOP unique properties can be further improved for practical applications by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:25957835

  11. Sunlight and free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Thomas Tidwell reflects on the overlooked -- but prescient -- proposal by the British chemists Arthur Downes and Thomas Blunt for photochemical free-radical formation, decades before Moses Gomberg launched the field of radical chemistry by preparing triphenylmethyl, the first stable organic radical.

  12. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Garbett, W. J.; Ramis, R.

    2015-10-01

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  13. Sub-kilohertz linewidth narrowing of a mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator idler frequency by direct cavity stabilization.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, I; Mosca, S; Parisi, M; Maddaloni, P; Santamaria, L; De Natale, P; De Rosa, M

    2015-10-15

    We stabilize the idler frequency of a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator directly to the resonance of a mid-infrared Fabry-Perot reference cavity. This is accomplished by the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme, controlling either the pump laser or the resonant signal frequency. A residual relative frequency noise power spectral density below 10(3)  Hz(2)/Hz is reached on average, with a Gaussian linewidth of 920 Hz over 100 ms, which reveals the potential for reaching spectral purity down to the hertz level by locking the optical parametric oscillator against a mid-infrared cavity with state-of-the-art superior performance. PMID:26469609

  14. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Garbett, W. J.; Ramis, R.

    2015-10-15

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  15. On the time behaviour of the concentration of pyrazinium radical cations in the early stage of the Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoesser, Reinhard; Klein, Jeannette; Peschke, Simone; Zehl, Andrea; Cämmerer, Bettina; Kroh, Lothar W.

    2007-08-01

    During the early stage of the Maillard reaction pyrazinium radical cations were detected by ESR within the reaction system D-glucose/glycine. The spectra were characterized by completely resolved hyperfine structure. The partial pressure of oxygen and the radical concentrations were measured directly in the reaction mixture by ESR using solutions of the spin probe TEMPOL and of DPPH, respectively. There are quantitative and qualitative relations of the actual concentration of the radical ions to the partial pressure of oxygen, the temperature-time regime and the mechanical mixing of the reaction system. These macroscopic parameters significantly affect both the induction period and the velocity of the time-dependent formation of free radicals. From in situ variations of p(O 2) and p(Ar) including the connected mixing effects caused by the passing the gases through the reaction mixture, steric and chemical effects of the stabilization of the radical ions were established. The determination of suitable and relevant conditions for stabilization and subsequent radical reactions contributes to the elucidation of the macroscopically known antioxidant activity of Maillard products.

  16. Vinculin directly binds zonula occludens-1 and is essential for stabilizing connexin-43-containing gap junctions in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zemljic-Harpf, Alice E.; Godoy, Joseph C.; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Asfaw, Elizabeth K.; Busija, Anna R.; Domenighetti, Andrea A.; Ross, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vinculin (Vcl) links actin filaments to integrin- and cadherin-based cellular junctions. Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1, also known as TJP1) binds connexin-43 (Cx43, also known as GJA1), cadherin and actin. Vcl and ZO-1 anchor the actin cytoskeleton to the sarcolemma. Given that loss of Vcl from cardiomyocytes causes maldistribution of Cx43 and predisposes cardiomyocyte-specific Vcl-knockout mice with preserved heart function to arrhythmia and sudden death, we hypothesized that Vcl and ZO-1 interact and that loss of this interaction destabilizes gap junctions. We found that Vcl, Cx43 and ZO-1 colocalized at the intercalated disc. Loss of cardiomyocyte Vcl caused parallel loss of ZO-1 from intercalated dics. Vcl co-immunoprecipitated Cx43 and ZO-1, and directly bound ZO-1 in yeast two-hybrid studies. Excision of the Vcl gene in neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes caused a reduction in the amount of Vcl mRNA transcript and protein expression leading to (1) decreased protein expression of Cx43, ZO-1, talin, and β1D-integrin, (2) reduced PI3K activation, (3) increased activation of Akt, Erk1 and Erk2, and (4) cardiomyocyte necrosis. In summary, this is the first study showing a direct interaction between Vcl and ZO-1 and illustrates how Vcl plays a crucial role in stabilizing gap junctions and myocyte integrity. PMID:24413171

  17. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during sleep has a sleep-stabilizing effect in chronic insomnia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Saebipour, Mohammad R; Joghataei, Mohammad T; Yoonessi, Ali; Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Khalighinejad, Nima; Khademi, Soroush

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that lack of slow-wave activity may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of insomnia. Pharmacological approaches and brain stimulation techniques have recently offered solutions for increasing slow-wave activity during sleep. We used slow (0.75 Hz) oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation during stage 2 of non-rapid eye movement sleeping insomnia patients for resonating their brain waves to the frequency of sleep slow-wave. Six patients diagnosed with either sleep maintenance or non-restorative sleep insomnia entered the study. After 1 night of adaptation and 1 night of baseline polysomnography, patients randomly received sham or real stimulation on the third and fourth night of the experiment. Our preliminary results show that after termination of stimulations (sham or real), slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation increased the duration of stage 3 of non-rapid eye movement sleep by 33 ± 26 min (P = 0.026), and decreased stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement sleep duration by 22 ± 17.7 min (P = 0.028), compared with sham. Slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation decreased stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement sleep and wake time after sleep-onset durations, together, by 55.4 ± 51 min (P = 0.045). Slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation also increased sleep efficiency by 9 ± 7% (P = 0.026), and probability of transition from stage 2 to stage 3 of non-rapid eye movement sleep by 20 ± 17.8% (P = 0.04). Meanwhile, slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation decreased transitions from stage 2 of non-rapid eye movement sleep to wake by 12 ± 6.7% (P = 0.007). Our preliminary results suggest a sleep-stabilizing role for the intervention, which may mimic the effect of sleep slow-wave-enhancing drugs. PMID:26014344

  18. Contemporary Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Moul, Judd W.; Sun, Leon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer have more surgical treatment options than in the past. This paper focuses on the procedures' oncological or functional outcomes and perioperative morbidities of radical retropubic prostatectomy, radical perineal prostatectomy, and robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods. A MEDLINE/PubMed search of the literature on radical prostatectomy and other new management options was performed. Results. Compared to the open procedures, robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy has no confirmed significant difference in most literatures besides less blood loss and blood transfusion. Nerve sparing is a safe means of preserving potency on well-selected patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Positive surgical margin rates of radical prostatectomy affect the recurrence and survival of prostate cancer. The urinary and sexual function outcomes have been vastly improved. Neoadjuvant treatment only affects the rate of positive surgical margin. Adjuvant therapy can delay and reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of the high risk prostate cancer. Conclusions. For the majority of patients with organ-confined prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy remains a most effective approach. Radical perineal prostatectomy remains a viable approach for patients with morbid obesity, prior pelvic surgery, or prior pelvic radiation. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) has become popular among surgeons but has not yet become the firmly established standard of care. Long-term data have confirmed the efficacy of radical retropubic prostatectomy with disease control rates and cancer-specific survival rates. PMID:22110994

  19. Bacterial Fucose-Rich Polysaccharide Stabilizes MAPK-Mediated Nrf2/Keap1 Signaling by Directly Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species during Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis of Human Lung Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and 1H/13C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  20. Bacterial fucose-rich polysaccharide stabilizes MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling by directly scavenging reactive oxygen species during hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy Chowdhury, Sougata; Sengupta, Suman; Biswas, Subir; Sinha, Tridib Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Adhikari, Basudam; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Continuous free radical assault upsets cellular homeostasis and dysregulates associated signaling pathways to promote stress-induced cell death. In spite of the continuous development and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies, limitations in treatments for stress-induced toxicities remain. The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential therapeutic efficacy of bacterial fucose polysaccharides against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress in human lung fibroblast (WI38) cells and to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. In two different fermentation processes, Bacillus megaterium RB-05 biosynthesized two non-identical fucose polysaccharides; of these, the polysaccharide having a high-fucose content (∼ 42%) conferred the maximum free radical scavenging efficiency in vitro. Structural characterizations of the purified polysaccharides were performed using HPLC, GC-MS, and (1)H/(13)C/2D-COSY NMR. H2O2 (300 µM) insult to WI38 cells showed anti-proliferative effects by inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, followed by apoptosis. The polysaccharide (250 µg/mL) attenuated the cell death process by directly scavenging intracellular ROS rather than activating endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This process encompasses inhibition of caspase-9/3/7, a decrease in the ratio of Bax/Bcl2, relocalization of translocated Bax and cytochrome c, upregulation of anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family and a decrease in the phosphorylation of MAPKs (mitogen activated protein kinases). Furthermore, cellular homeostasis was re-established via stabilization of MAPK-mediated Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and transcription of downstream cytoprotective genes. This molecular study uniquely introduces a fucose-rich bacterial polysaccharide as a potential inhibitor of H2O2-induced stress and toxicities. PMID:25412177

  1. A Mechanochemical Switch to Control Radical Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    B12-dependent enzymes employ radical species with exceptional prowess to catalyze some of the most chemically challenging, thermodynamically unfavorable reactions. However, dealing with highly reactive intermediates is an extremely demanding task, requiring sophisticated control strategies to prevent unwanted side reactions. Using hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations, we follow the full catalytic cycle of an AdoB12-dependent enzyme and present the details of a mechanism that utilizes a highly effective mechanochemical switch. When the switch is “off”, the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical moiety is stabilized by releasing the internal strain of an enzyme-imposed conformation. Turning the switch “on,” the enzyme environment becomes the driving force to impose a distinct conformation of the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical to avoid deleterious radical transfer. This mechanochemical switch illustrates the elaborate way in which enzymes attain selectivity of extremely chemically challenging reactions. PMID:24846280

  2. A mechanochemical switch to control radical intermediates.

    PubMed

    Brunk, Elizabeth; Kellett, Whitney F; Richards, Nigel G J; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2014-06-17

    B₁₂-dependent enzymes employ radical species with exceptional prowess to catalyze some of the most chemically challenging, thermodynamically unfavorable reactions. However, dealing with highly reactive intermediates is an extremely demanding task, requiring sophisticated control strategies to prevent unwanted side reactions. Using hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations, we follow the full catalytic cycle of an AdoB₁₂-dependent enzyme and present the details of a mechanism that utilizes a highly effective mechanochemical switch. When the switch is "off", the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical moiety is stabilized by releasing the internal strain of an enzyme-imposed conformation. Turning the switch "on," the enzyme environment becomes the driving force to impose a distinct conformation of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical to avoid deleterious radical transfer. This mechanochemical switch illustrates the elaborate way in which enzymes attain selectivity of extremely chemically challenging reactions. PMID:24846280

  3. Identifying the tobacco related free radicals by UPCC-QTOF-MS with radical trapping method in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Misha; Zhu, Yingjing; Cheng, Kuan; Da Wu; Liu, Baizhan; Li, Fengting

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco related free radicals (TFRs) in the cigarette smoke are specific classes of hazardous compounds that merit concern. In this study, we developed a hybrid method to identify TFRs directly based on ultra-performance convergence chromatography with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPCC-QTOF MS) combined spin trapping technique. The short-lived TFRs were stabilized successfully in situ through spin trapping procedure and UPCC was applied to facilitate efficient separation of complex derivative products. Coupling of orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), UPCC-QTOF MS system enabled us to identify specific potential TFRs with exact chemical formula. Moreover, computational stimulations have been carried out to evaluate the optimized stability of TFRs. This work is a successful demonstration for the application of an advanced hyphenated technique for separation of TFRs with short detection time (less than 7min) and high throughput. PMID:27591593

  4. Measurement of Flying Qualities of a Dehavilland Mosquito F-8 Airplane (AAF No. 43-334960) I: Lateral and Directional Stability and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, W.E.; Talmage, D.B.; Crane, H.L.

    1945-01-01

    The data presented have no bearing on performance characteristics of airplane, which were considered exceptionally good in previous tests. Some of the undesirable features of lateral and directional stability and control characteristics of the F-8 are listed. Directional stability, with rudder fixed, did not sufficiently restrict aileron yaw; rudder control was inadequate during take-off and landing, and was insufficient to fly airplane with one engine; in clean condition, power of ailerons was slightly below minimum value specified; it was difficult to trim airplane in rough air.

  5. A computer program for calculating symmetrical aerodynamic characteristics and lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with blowing jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Mehrotra, S. C.; Fox, C. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The necessary information for using a computer program to calculate the aerodynamic characteristics under symmetrical flight conditions and the lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with upper-surface-blowing (USB) or over-wing-blowing (OWB) jets are described. The following new features were added to the program: (1) a fuselage of arbitrary body of revolution has been included. The effect of wing-body interference can now be investigated, and (2) all nine lateral-directional stability derivatives can be calculated. The program is written in FORTRAN language and runs on CDC Cyber 175 and Honeywell 66/60 computers.

  6. Stability-indicating simultaneous determination of paracetamol and three of its related substances using a direct GC/MS method.

    PubMed

    Belal, Tarek; Awad, Tamer; Clark, C Randall

    2009-01-01

    A simple, direct, and selective stability-indicating GC/MS procedure was developed for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol (PR) and three of its related substances: 4-aminophenol (4-AP), acetanilide (AD), and 4'-chloroacetanilide (4-CA). The method involved resolution of the underivatized compounds using a 100% dimethylpolysiloxane (Rtx-1) column, and MS detection was carried out in the electron-impact mode. The four compounds were completely resolved in less than 11 min. The fragmentation pathways for the four compounds were described, and the structures of the major fragment ions peaks were proposed. Quantification of the analytes was based on measuring their peak areas. The reliability and analytical performance of the proposed method including linearity, range, precision, accuracy, and detection and quantification limits were statistically validated. Calibration curves were linear over the ranges 75-500, 25-350, 25-350, and 25-350 microg/mL for PR, 4-AP, AD, and 4-CA, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PR and its related substances in laboratory-prepared mixtures of different proportions. Also, it was applied for the assay of PR in several commercially available pharmaceutical formulations with recoveries of 98.95-100.76%. PMID:20166578

  7. Direct Measurements of the Mechanical Stability of Zinc-Thiolate Bonds in Rubredoxin by Single-Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Peng; Li, Hongbin

    2011-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is one of the most abundant metals and is essential for life. Through ligand interactions, often with thiolate from cysteine residues in proteins, Zn can play important structural roles in organizing protein structure and augmenting protein folding and stability. However, it is difficult to separate the contributions of Zn-ligand interactions from those originating from intrinsic protein folding in experimental studies of Zn-containing metalloproteins, which makes the study of Zn-ligand interactions in proteins challenging. Here, we used single-molecule force spectroscopy to directly measure the mechanical rupture force of the Zn-thiolate bond in Zn-rubredoxin. Our results show that considerable force is needed to rupture Zn-thiolate bonds (∼170 pN, which is significantly higher than the force necessary to rupture the coordination bond between Zn and histidines). To our knowledge, our study not only provides new information about Zn-thiolate bonds in rubredoxin, it also opens a new avenue for studying metal-ligand bonds in proteins using single-molecule force spectroscopy. PMID:21943428

  8. Investigation of the active site and the conformational stability of nucleoside diphosphate kinase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Tepper, A D; Dammann, H; Bominaar, A A; Véron, M

    1994-12-23

    Nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (EC 2.7.4.6) catalyzes phosphate exchange between nucleoside triphosphates and nucleoside diphosphates. Its 17 kDa subunits are highly conserved throughout evolution in both sequence and tertiary structure. Using site-directed mutagenesis we investigated the function of 8 amino acids (Lys16, Tyr56, Arg92, Thr98, Arg109, Asn119, Ser124, and Glu133) that are totally conserved among all nucleoside diphosphate kinases known to date. The mutant proteins all show decreased specific activity and support roles for these residues in catalysis, substrate binding, or both, as was previously proposed on the basis of the x-ray structure (Moréra, S., Lascu, I., Dumas, C., LeBras, G., Briozzo, P., Véron, M., and Janin, J. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 459-467). Furthermore, residues Lys16, Arg109, and Asn 119 were identified to play important roles in conformational stability or subunit interactions. We show that Lys16 and Asn119 form a rigid structure that is important for enzymatic function and that Arg109, known to interact with the phosphate moiety of the substrate, also plays an important role in subunit association. The dual roles of Lys16, Arg109, and Asn119 in both substrate binding and subunit assembly provide further evidence for a functional coupling between catalytic activity and quaternary structure in nucleoside diphosphate kinase. PMID:7798215

  9. Influence of the external torques in the angle between the spin axis and the Sun direction for spin stabilized satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, G. B.; Zanardi, M. C.

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this paper is the study of the influence of the environmental torques in the angle between the spin axis and the Sun direction (solar aspect angle) for spin stabilized satellite. The theory uses a cylindrical satellite in an illumined orbit, considering the gravity gradient, aerodynamic, solar radiation, residual magnetic and eddy current torques. The mathematic model for each torque is shown. The dynamic equations are represented in a reference system fixed in the satellite and described by spin velocity and the right ascension and declination angles of the spin axis. An analytical solution for the spin velocity and the attitude angles is used to study the behavior of the solar aspect angle. The theory is applied for the real data of the Brazilian Satellite of Data Collection - SCD1 and SCD2. Two approaches are presented. The results agree with the real satellite behavior for specific time simulation. Then the theory has consistency and can be applied to predict the behavior of the solar aspect angle.

  10. Extraction of Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives for the Basic F-18 Aircraft at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1997-01-01

    The results of parameter identification to determine the lateral-directional stability and control derivatives of an F-18 research aircraft in its basic hardware and software configuration are presented. The derivatives are estimated from dynamic flight data using a specialized identification program developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The formulation uses the linearized aircraft equations of motions in their continuous/discrete form and a maximum likelihood estimator that accounts for both state and measurement noise. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics, such as separated and vortical flows, over the aircraft. The derivatives are plotted as functions of angle of attack between 3 deg and 47 deg and compared with wind-tunnel predictions. The quality of the derivative estimates obtained by parameter identification is somewhat degraded because the maneuvers were flown with the aircraft's control augmentation system engaged, which introduced relatively high correlations between the control variables and response variables as a result of control motions from the feedback control system.

  11. X-29A Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives Extracted From High-Angle-of-Attack Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles Wang

    1996-01-01

    The lateral-directional stability and control derivatives of the X-29A number 2 are extracted from flight data over an angle-of-attack range of 4 degrees to 53 degrees using a parameter identification algorithm. The algorithm uses the linearized aircraft equations of motion and a maximum likelihood estimator in the presence of state and measurement noise. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics over the aircraft at angles of attack above 15 degrees. The results supported the flight-envelope-expansion phase of the X-29A number 2 by helping to update the aerodynamic mathematical model, to improve the real-time simulator, and to revise flight control system laws. Effects of the aircraft high gain flight control system on maneuver quality and the estimated derivatives are also discussed. The derivatives are plotted as functions of angle of attack and compared with the predicted aerodynamic database. Agreement between predicted and flight values is quite good for some derivatives such as the lateral force due to sideslip, the lateral force due to rudder deflection, and the rolling moment due to roll rate. The results also show significant differences in several important derivatives such as the rolling moment due to sideslip, the yawing moment due to sideslip, the yawing moment due to aileron deflection, and the yawing moment due to rudder deflection.

  12. Reactive intermediates: Radicals with multiple personalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Malcolm D. E.

    2013-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental approach has revealed that radicals can be significantly stabilized by the presence of a remote anionic site in the same molecule. This finding has implications for understanding and potentially controlling the reactivity of these important reactive intermediates.

  13. Regioselective Radical Arylation of 3-Hydroxypyridines.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Michael C D; Bock, Leonard R; Heinrich, Markus R

    2016-07-01

    The titanium(III)-mediated radical arylation of 3-hydroxypyridines was found to proceed with high regioselectivity for the 2-position. Using aryldiazonium chlorides, which were prepared from the corresponding anilines, as aryl radical sources, a range of 3-hydroxy-2-phenylpyridines were obtained in moderate to good yields under simple reaction conditions. Reactions of ortho-carboxylic ester substituted phenyldiazonium salts directly provided tricyclic benzopyranopyridinones. PMID:27258367

  14. Reassessing Radical Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Responds to comments about, and critiques of, his own article on radical pedagogy. Outlines major points of contention raised by other commentators and responds to them, including matters of definition, power relations in the classroom, and tempering radical theory with pragmatism. (DSK)

  15. [Alchemists' humid radical].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The term radical has been used by chemists since the beginnings and even when they still were alchemists. The term "humid radical" is present in numerous alchemists' texts. It was used to represent a kind of "humid", which was considered as different from what is nowadays called "humid", but was a sort of principle necessary for life. PMID:17575839

  16. Making graphene holey. Gold-nanoparticle-mediated hydroxyl radical attack on reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Radich, James G; Kamat, Prashant V

    2013-06-25

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) have important applications in the development of new electrode and photocatalyst architectures. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have now been employed as catalyst to generate OH(•) and oxidize RGO via hydroxyl radical attack. The oxidation of RGO is marked by pores and wrinkles within the 2-D network. Nanosecond laser flash photolysis was used in conjunction with competition kinetics to elucidate the oxidative mechanism and calculate rate constants for the AuNP-catalyzed and direct reaction between RGO and OH(•). The results highlight the use of the AuNP-mediated oxidation reaction to tune the properties of RGO through the degree of oxidation and/or functional group selectivity in addition to the nanoporous and wrinkle facets. The ability of AuNPs to catalyze the photolytic decomposition of H2O2 as well as the hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of RGO raises new issues concerning graphene stability in energy conversion and storage (photocatalysis, fuel cells, Li-ion batteries, etc.). Understanding RGO oxidation by free radicals will aid in maintaining the long-term stability of RGO-based functional composites where intimate contact with radical species is inevitable. PMID:23641756

  17. Femtogram detection of cytokines in a direct dot-blot assay using SERS microspectroscopy and hydrophilically stabilized Au-Ag nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuling; Salehi, Mohammad; Schütz, Max; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2014-03-14

    Rapid parallel detection of two cytokines (IL-6 and IL-8) with femtogram sensitivity in a simple direct dot-blot assay is demonstrated. The microspectroscopic SERS acquisition scheme employs rationally designed, hydrophilically stabilized Au-Ag nanoshells as SERS labels, which are optimized for signal enhancement upon red laser excitation. PMID:24398564

  18. Formation and Fragmentation of Unsaturated Fatty Acid [M - 2H + Na]- Ions: Stabilized Carbanions for Charge-Directed Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael C.; Kirk, Benjamin B.; Altvater, Jens; Blanksby, Stephen J.; Nette, Geoffrey W.

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids are long-chain carboxylic acids that readily produce [M - H]- ions upon negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and cationic complexes with alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals in positive ion ESI. In contrast, only one anionic monomeric fatty acid-metal ion complex has been reported in the literature, namely [M - 2H + FeIICl]-. In this manuscript, we present two methods to form anionic unsaturated fatty acid-sodium ion complexes (i.e., [M - 2H + Na]-). We find that these ions may be generated efficiently by two distinct methods: (1) negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium fluoride forming an [M - H + NaF]- ion. Subsequent collision-induced dissociation (CID) results in the desired [M - 2H + Na]- ion via the neutral loss of HF. (2) Direct formation of the [M - 2H + Na]- ion by negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium hydroxide or bicarbonate. In addition to deprotonation of the carboxylic acid moiety, formation of [M - 2H + Na]- ions requires the removal of a proton from the fatty acid acyl chain. We propose that this deprotonation occurs at the bis-allylic position(s) of polyunsaturated fatty acids resulting in the formation of a resonance-stabilized carbanion. This proposal is supported by ab initio calculations, which reveal that removal of a proton from the bis-allylic position, followed by neutral loss of HX (where X = F- and -OH), is the lowest energy dissociation pathway.

  19. EGF-stimulated activation of Rab35 regulates RUSC2-GIT2 complex formation to stabilize GIT2 during directional lung cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Duan, Biao; Cui, Jie; Sun, Shixiu; Zheng, Jianchao; Zhang, Yujie; Ye, Bixing; Chen, Yan; Deng, Wenjie; Du, Jun; Zhu, Yichao; Chen, Yongchang; Gu, Luo

    2016-08-28

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains one of the most metastasizing tumors, and directional cell migration is critical for targeting tumor metastasis. GIT2 has been known to bind to Paxillin to control cell polarization and directional migration. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying roles of GIT2 in controlling cell polarization and directional migration remain elusive. Here we demonstrated GIT2 control cell polarization and direction dependent on the regulation of Golgi through RUSC2. RUSC2 interacts with SHD of GIT2 in various lung cancer cells, and stabilizes GIT2 (Mazaki et al., 2006; Yu et al., 2009) by decreasing degradation and increasing its phosphorylation. Silencing of RUSC2 showed reduced stability of GIT2, defective Golgi reorientation toward the wound edge and decreased directional migration. Moreover, short-term EGF stimulation can increase the interaction between RUSC2 and GIT2, prolonged stimulation leads to a decrease of their interaction through activating Rab35. Silencing of Rab35 also reduced stability and phosphorylation of GIT2 and decreased cell migration. Taken together, our study indicated that RUSC2 participates in EGFR signaling and regulates lung cancer progression, and may be a new therapeutic target against lung cancer metastasis. PMID:27238570

  20. Ultrafast Photoinduced Charge Separation Leading to High-Energy Radical Ion-Pairs in Directly Linked Corrole-C60 and Triphenylamine-Corrole-C60 Donor-Acceptor Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Kolanu; Gokulnath, Sabapathi; Giribabu, Lingamallu; Lim, Gary N; Trâm, Tạ; D'Souza, Francis

    2015-12-01

    Closely positioned donor-acceptor pairs facilitate electron- and energy-transfer events, relevant to light energy conversion. Here, a triad system TPACor-C60 , possessing a free-base corrole as central unit that linked the energy donor triphenylamine (TPA) at the meso position and an electron acceptor fullerene (C60) at the β-pyrrole position was newly synthesized, as were the component dyads TPA-Cor and Cor-C60. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and DFT studies confirmed the molecular integrity and existence of a moderate level of intramolecular interactions between the components. Steady-state fluorescence studies showed efficient energy transfer from (1) TPA* to the corrole and subsequent electron transfer from (1) corrole* to fullerene. Further studies involving femtosecond and nanosecond laser flash photolysis confirmed electron transfer to be the quenching mechanism of corrole emission, in which the electron-transfer products, the corrole radical cation (Cor(⋅+) in Cor-C60 and TPA-Cor(⋅+) in TPACor-C60) and fullerene radical anion (C60(⋅-)), could be spectrally characterized. Owing to the close proximity of the donor and acceptor entities in the dyad and triad, the rate of charge separation, kCS , was found to be about 10(11)  s(-1), suggesting the occurrence of an ultrafast charge-separation process. Interestingly, although an order of magnitude slower than kCS , the rate of charge recombination, kCR , was also found to be rapid (kCR ≈10(10)  s(-1)), and both processes followed the solvent polarity trend DMF>benzonitrile>THF>toluene. The charge-separated species relaxed directly to the ground state in polar solvents while in toluene, formation of (3) corrole* was observed, thus implying that the energy of the charge-separated state in a nonpolar solvent is higher than the energy of (3) corrole* being about 1.52 eV. That is, ultrafast formation of a high-energy charge-separated state in toluene has been achieved in these closely spaced corrole

  1. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Solodova, S. L.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2010-12-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  2. Site-specific insertion of 3-aminotyrosine into subunit alpha2 of E. coli ribonucleotide reductase: direct evidence for involvement of Y730 and Y731 in radical propagation.

    PubMed

    Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R; Xie, Jianming; Chan, Clement T Y; Schultz, Peter G; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2007-12-01

    E. coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the production of deoxynucleotides using complex radical chemistry. Active RNR is composed of a 1:1 complex of two subunits: alpha2 and beta2. Alpha2 binds nucleoside diphosphate substrates and deoxynucleotide/ATP allosteric effectors and is the site of nucleotide reduction. Beta2 contains the stable diiron tyrosyl radical (Y122.) cofactor that initiates deoxynucleotide formation. This process is proposed to involve reversible radical transfer over >35 A between the Y122 in beta2 and C439 in the active site of alpha2. A docking model of alpha2beta2, based on structures of the individual subunits, suggests that radical initiation involves a pathway of transient, aromatic amino acid radical intermediates, including Y730 and Y731 in alpha2. In this study the function of residues Y730 and Y731 is investigated by their site-specific replacement with 3-aminotyrosine (NH2Y). Using the in vivo suppressor tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase method, Y730NH2Y-alpha2 and Y731NH2Y-alpha2 have been generated with high fidelity in yields of 4-6 mg/g of cell paste. These mutants have been examined by stopped flow UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies in the presence of beta2, CDP, and ATP. The results reveal formation of an NH2Y radical (NH2Y730. or NH2Y731.) in a kinetically competent fashion. Activity assays demonstrate that both NH2Y-alpha2s make deoxynucleotides. These results show that the NH2Y. can oxidize C439 suggesting a hydrogen atom transfer mechanism for the radical propagation pathway within alpha2. The observed NH2Y. may constitute the first detection of an amino acid radical intermediate in the proposed radical propagation pathway during turnover. PMID:17990884

  3. Radical-pair based avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    Behavioural experiments suggest that migratory birds possess a magnetic compass sensor able to detect the direction of the geomagnetic. One hypothesis for the basis of this remarkable sensory ability is that the coherent quantum spin dynamics of photoinduced radical pair reactions transduces directional magnetic information from the geomagnetic field into changes of reaction yields, possibly involving the photoreceptor cryptochrome in the birds retina. The suggested radical-pair based avian magnetoreception has attracted attention in the field of quantum biology as an example of a biological sensor which might exploit quantum coherences for its biological function. Investigations on such a spin-based sensor have focussed on uncovering the design features for the design of a biomimetic magnetic field sensor. We study the effects of slow fluctuations in the nuclear spin environment on the directional signal. We quantitatively evaluate the robustness of signals under fluctuations on a timescale longer than the lifetime of a radical pair, utilizing two models of radical pairs. Our results suggest design principles for building a radical-pair based compass sensor that is both robust and highly directional sensitive.

  4. Hydroxyl radical detection in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chevion, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Hydroxyl radicals have been implicated as the actual species responsible for the deleterious effects of active oxygen in biology. However, in most cases, its presence has only been inferred by circumstantial evidence. Using electrochemical detection coupled to HPLC separation technique the authors can identify and quantitate (at sub-picomole level) the hydroxylated products of 3 aromatic compounds (phenol, salicylate, and 2-deoxy-guanosine) as a direct measure of hydroxyl radical formation. Firstly, the authors showed that mixing ascorbate with copper ions (in the absence of presence of a protein) yields catechols, dihydroxybenzoic acids and 8-OH-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG). This approach has been used to study the formation of OH in vivo. Human granulocytes stimulated with TPA showed that 8-OHdG was formed in the cellular DNA at high levels (one 8-OHdG/800 DNA bases). Unstimulated granulocytes contained 8-OHdG below detection level. Formation of 8-OHdG in the TPA-stimulated granulocytes DNA was decreased by the addition of SOD and catalase. Using salicylate as an in vivo scavenger of hydroxyl radicals the authors showed that the level of trapped-dihydroxybenzoic acids is increased approx.8 and approx.3 fold in the lungs and liver of paraquat-poisoned mice, respectively, as compared to normal animals. Similarly, the detected level of dihydroxybenzoic acids in the hearts of adriamycin-treated rats was increased over 100-fold as compared to the hearts of control animals.

  5. Hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Golam; Corsi, Richard; Kimura, Yosuke; Allen, David; Weschler, Charles J.

    Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations were estimated using a new indoor air quality model which employs the SAPRC-99 atmospheric chemistry model to simulate indoor homogenous reactions. Model results indicate that typical indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are lower than typical outdoor summertime urban hydroxyl radical levels of 5-10×10 6 molecules cm -3; however, indoor levels can be similar to or greater than typical nighttime outdoor hydroxyl radical levels of approximately 5×10 4 molecules cm -3. Effects of selected parameters on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are presented herein. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are predicted to increase non-linearly with increasing outdoor ozone concentrations, indoor alkene emission rates, and air exchange rates. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations decrease with increasing outdoor nitric oxide concentrations. Indoor temperature and indoor light intensity have moderate impacts on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Outdoor hydroxyl radical concentrations, outdoor nitrate (NO 3rad ) radical concentrations, outdoor hydroperoxy radical concentrations, and hydroxyl radical removal by indoor surfaces are predicted to have no appreciable impact on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Production of hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments appears to be controlled primarily by reactions of alkenes with ozone, and nitric oxide with hydroperoxy radical. Estimated indoor hydroxyl radical levels may potentially affect indoor air quality. Two examples are presented in which reactions of d-limonene and α-pinene with indoor hydroxyl radicals produce aldehydes, which may be of greater concern than the original compounds.

  6. Effect of aging on dynamic postural stability and variability during a multi-directional lean and reach object transportation task.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Andrew H; Zettel, John L; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2016-01-01

    A "reach and transport object" task that represents common activities of daily living may provide improved insight into dynamic postural stability and movement variability deficits in older adults compared to previous lean to reach and functional reach tests. Healthy young and older, community dwelling adults performed three same elevation object transport tasks and two multiple elevation object transport tasks under two self-selected speeds, self-paced and fast-paced. Dynamic postural stability and movement variability was quantified by whole-body center of mass motion. Older adults demonstrated significant decrements in frontal plane stability during the multiple elevation tasks while exhibiting the same movement variability as their younger counterparts, regardless of task speed. Interestingly, older adults did not exhibit a tradeoff in maneuverability in favour of maintaining stability throughout the tasks, as has previously been reported. In conclusion, the multi-planar, ecologically relevant tasks employed in the current study were specific enough to elucidate decrements in dynamic stability, and thus may be useful for assessing fall risk in older adults with suspected postural instability. PMID:27327237

  7. Influence of polymer network in polymer-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystals and its direct observation using a confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovšek, R.; Pirš, J.; Kralj, S.; Čopič, M.; Šuput, D.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of the three-dimensional polymer network distribution inside the polymer-stabilized ferroelectric liquid-crystal layer based on the laser scanning fluorescence confocal microscopy and a fluorescent dye tagging of the polymer. The studies of polymer-stabilized ferroelectric liquid-crystal structures described in this paper are focused on the comparison of the influence of polymer network in case that the polymerization is initiated in the chevron as well as in the quasibookshelf liquid-crystal molecular orientation. In the case of the chevron structure the regular distribution of the polymer network within the layer leads to the monostability of the chevron state. On the other hand the specific distribution of the polymer in the polymer-stabilized quasibookshelf stripe textures leads to the perfect bistability, improved multiplex driving, and analog gray scale capability.

  8. Direct relationship between the level of p53 stabilization induced by rRNA synthesis-inhibiting drugs and the cell ribosome biogenesis rate.

    PubMed

    Scala, F; Brighenti, E; Govoni, M; Imbrogno, E; Fornari, F; Treré, D; Montanaro, L; Derenzini, M

    2016-02-25

    Many drugs currently used in chemotherapy work by hindering the process of ribosome biogenesis. In tumors with functional p53, the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis may contribute to the efficacy of this treatment by inducing p53 stabilization. As the level of stabilized p53 is critical for the induction of cytotoxic effects, it seems useful to highlight those cancer cell characteristics that can predict the degree of p53 stabilization following the treatment with inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis. In the present study we exposed a series of p53 wild-type human cancer cell lines to drugs such as actinomycin D (ActD), doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and CX-5461, which hinder ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis. We found that the amount of stabilized p53 was directly related to the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells before the drug treatment. This was due to different levels of inactivation of the ribosomal proteins-MDM2 pathway of p53 digestion. Inhibition of rRNA synthesis always caused cell cycle arrest, independent of the ribosome biogenesis rate of the cells, whereas apoptosis occurred only in cells with a high rDNA transcription rate. The level of p53 stabilization induced by drugs acting in different ways from the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis, such as hydroxyurea (HU) and nutlin-3, was independent of the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells and always lower than that occurring after the inhibition of rRNA synthesis. Interestingly, in cells with a low ribosome biogenesis rate, the combined treatment with ActD and HU exerted an additive effect on p53 stabilization. These results indicated that (i) drugs inhibiting ribosome biogenesis may be highly effective in p53 wild-type cancers with a high ribosome biogenesis rate, as they induce apoptotic cell death, and (ii) the combination of drugs capable of stabilizing p53 through different mechanisms may be useful for treating cancers with a low ribosome biogenesis rate. PMID:25961931

  9. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  10. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  11. OVERVIEW OF THE HISTORY, PRESENT STATUS, AND FUTURE DIRECTION OF SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) technology processes are currently being utilized in the United States to treat inorganic and organic hazardous waste and radioactive waste. These wastes are generated from operating industry or have resulted from the uncontrolled management of ...

  12. Direct evidence that density-dependent regulation underpins the temporal stability of abundant species in a diverse animal community

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Peter A.; Magurran, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how ecosystems are structured and stabilized, and to identify when communities are at risk of damage or collapse, we need to know how the abundances of the taxa in the entire assemblage vary over ecologically meaningful timescales. Here, we present an analysis of species temporal variability within a single large vertebrate community. Using an exceptionally complete 33-year monthly time series following the dynamics of 81 species of fishes, we show that the most abundant species are least variable in terms of temporal biomass, because they are under density-dependent (negative feedback) regulation. At the other extreme, a relatively large number of low abundance transient species exhibit the greatest population variability. The high stability of the consistently common high abundance species—a result of density-dependence—is reflected in the observation that they consistently represent over 98% of total fish biomass. This leads to steady ecosystem nutrient and energy flux irrespective of the changes in species number and abundance among the large number of low abundance transient species. While the density-dependence of the core species ensures stability under the existing environmental regime, the pool of transient species may support long-term stability by replacing core species should environmental conditions change. PMID:25100702

  13. OVERVIEW OF THE HISTORY, PRESENT STATUS, AND FUTURE DIRECTION OF SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) technology processes are currently being utilized in the United States to treat inorganic and organic hazardous waste and radioactive waste. hese waters are generated from operating industry or have resulted from the uncontrolled management of h...

  14. Carbon-Centered Free Radicals in Particulate Matter Emissions from Wood and Coal Combustion

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the free radicals in the particulate matter (PM) emissions from wood and coal combustion. The intensity of radicals in PM dropped linearly within two months of sample storage and stabilized after that. This factor of storage time was adjusted when comparing radical intensities among different PM samples. An inverse relationship between coal rank and free radical intensities in PM emissions was observed, which was in contrast with the pattern of radical intensities in the source coals. The strong correlation between intensities of free radical and elemental carbon in PM emissions suggests that the radical species may be carbon-centered. The increased g-factors, 2.0029−2.0039, over that of purely carbon-centered radicals may indicate the presence of vicinal oxygen heteroatom. The redox and biology activities of these carbon-centered radicals are worthy of evaluation. PMID:19551161

  15. Direct measurements of rate constants for the reactions of CH3 radicals with C2H6, C2H4, and C2H2 at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Peukert, S L; Labbe, N J; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-10-10

    The shock tube technique has been used to study the reactions CH3 + C2H6 → C2H4 + CH4 + H (1), CH3 + C2H4 → Products + H (2), and CH3 + C2H2 → Products + H (3). Biacetyl, (CH3CO)2, was used as a clean high temperature thermal source for CH3-radicals for all the three reactions studied in this work. For reaction 1, the experiments span a T-range of 1153 K ≤ T ≤ 1297 K, at P ~ 0.4 bar. The experiments on reaction 2 cover a T-range of 1176 K ≤ T ≤ 1366 K, at P ~ 1.0 bar, and those on reaction 3 a T-range of 1127 K ≤ T ≤ 1346 K, at P ~ 1.0 bar. Reflected shock tube experiments performed on reactions 1-3, monitored the formation of H-atoms with H-atom Atomic Resonance Absorption Spectrometric (ARAS). Fits to the H-atom temporal profiles using an assembled kinetics model were used to make determinations for k1, k2, and k3. In the case of C2H6, the measurements of [H]-atoms were used to derive direct high-temperature rate constants, k1, that can be represented by the Arrhenius equation k1(T) = 5.41 × 10(-12) exp(-6043 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1153 K ≤ T ≤ 1297 K) for the only bimolecular process that occurs, H-atom abstraction. TST calculations based on ab initio properties calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS//M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory show excellent agreement, within ±20%, of the measured rate constants. For the reaction of CH3 with C2H4, the present rate constant results, k2', refer to the sum of rate constants, k(2b) + k(2c), from two competing processes, addition-elimination, and the direct abstraction CH3 + C2H4 → C3H6 + H (2b) and CH3 + C2H4 → C2H2 + H + CH4 (2c). Experimental rate constants for k2' can be represented by the Arrhenius equation k2'(T) = 2.18 × 10(-10) exp(-11830 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1176 K ≤ T ≤ 1366 K). The present results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The present study provides the only direct measurement for the high-temperature rate constants for these channels

  16. [Aging and free radicals].

    PubMed

    Manso, C

    1992-02-01

    Several theories on aging are presented. All of them give important contributions but none explains all the aspects of the problem. Oxygen radicals produced during cellular combustion contribute to aging through multiple cumulative microlesions throughout life. The importance of glucose is emphasized; it forms early and late Maillard compounds. Other causes of aging are discussed. PMID:1595373

  17. Radical School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Beatrice, Ed.; Gross, Ronald, Ed.

    This book provides a comprehensive examination of the nature of the school crisis and the ways in which radical thinkers and educators are dealing with it. Excerpts from the writings of Jonathan Kozol, John Holt, Kenneth Clark, and others are concerned with the realities of education in ghettos and suburbs. Paul Goodman, Marshall McLuhan, Sylvia…

  18. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains*

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL. PMID:25505244

  19. The application of parameter estimation to flight measurements to obtain lateral-directional stability derivatives of an augmented jet-flap STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Flight experiments with an augmented jet flap STOL aircraft provided data from which the lateral directional stability and control derivatives were calculated by applying a linear regression parameter estimation procedure. The tests, which were conducted with the jet flaps set at a 65 deg deflection, covered a large range of angles of attack and engine power settings. The effect of changing the angle of the jet thrust vector was also investigated. Test results are compared with stability derivatives that had been predicted. The roll damping derived from the tests was significantly larger than had been predicted, whereas the other derivatives were generally in agreement with the predictions. Results obtained using a maximum likelihood estimation procedure are compared with those from the linear regression solutions.

  20. Calculation of the Lateral Stability of a Directly Coupled Tandem-Towed Fighter Airplane and Correlation with Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanks, Robert E.

    1958-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for predicting the dynamic lateral stability characteristics of an airplane towed in tandem by a much larger airplane. Values of period and time to damp to one-half amplitude and rolling motions calculated by an analog computer have been correlated with results of two experimental investigations conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel which were part of a U.S. Air Force program (Project FICON) to develop a satisfactory arrangement by which a bomber could tow a parasite fighter. In general, the theoretical results agree with the experimental results.

  1. Explicit determination of lateral-directional stability and control derivatives by simutaneous time vector analysis of two maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, G. B.

    1973-01-01

    An extension of the time vector technique for determining stability and control derivatives from flight data is formulated. The technique provides for explicit determination of derivatives by means of simultaneous analysis of two maneuvers which differ by a dependent control input. The control derivatives for the dependent input are also explicitly determined. This extended technique is preferable to the application of the time vector method to single maneuvers in that no estimates of derivatives are required. An example illustrating the application of the technique is given.

  2. Cell damage by oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, G

    1991-02-01

    The exposure of isolated and cultured cells to oxygen free radicals generated extracellularly or intracellularly during the metabolism of foreing compounds results in the development of damage that eventually lead to cell death. Multiple mechanisms are involved in these cytopathological processes, including direct attack of free radicals to macromolecules essential for cell life, as well as indirect activation of catabolic processes such as proteases, endonucleases and phospholipases. A key role in triggering these indirect events is played by Ca(2+) whose cytosolic concentration during oxidative stress raises well above the physiological limits. PMID:22358959

  3. Radical Behaviorism and Buddhism: Complementarities and Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Diller, James W; Lattal, Kennon A

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between Buddhism and the philosophy of science in general, but there have been only a few attempts to draw comparisons directly with the philosophy of radical behaviorism. The present review therefore considers heretofore unconsidered points of comparison between Buddhism and radical behaviorism in terms of their respective goals, conceptualization of human beings, and the outcomes of following either philosophy. From these comparisons it is concluded that the commonalities discerned between these two philosophies may enhance both philosophical systems. PMID:22478509

  4. Resonant cavity spectroscopy of radical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Grant

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH, with contributions from Cl atoms, and at night by either NO3 radicals or ozone. Chemical oxidation cycles, which couple OH, HO2 and peroxy (RO2) radical species, remove primary emitted trace species which are harmful to humans or to the wider environment. However, many of the secondary products produced by atmospheric photo-oxidation are also directly harmful, for example O3, NO2, acidic and multifunctional species, many of which are of low volatility and are able to partition effectively to the condensed phase, creating secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which contributes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol, with associated impacts on climate and human health. The accuracy of atmospheric models to predict these impacts necessarily requires accurate knowledge of the chemical oxidative cycling. Two of the simplest intermediates are the hydroperoxy radical, HO2, and the smallest and dominant organic peroxy radical, CH3O2, formed directly by the reactions of OH with CO/O2 and CH4/O2, respectively, and indirectly following the oxidation of larger VOCs. OH, HO2 and RO2 (collectively known as ROx) are rapidly cycled, being at the centre of tropospheric oxidation, and hence are some of the best targets for models to compare with field data. The reaction of HO2 and RO2 with NO constitutes the only tropospheric in-situ source of O3. Despite their importance, neither HO2 nor CH3O2 is measured directly in the atmosphere. HO2 is only measured indirectly following its conversion to OH and CH3O2 is not measured at all. Typically only the sum of RO2 radicals is measured, making no distinction between different organic peroxy radicals. This contribution will detail recent studies using (i) optical feedback cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with both quantum and inter-band cascade lasers in the mid-IR, and (ii

  5. Tyrosyl Radicals in Dehaloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Dumarieh, Rania; D'Antonio, Jennifer; Deliz-Liang, Alexandria; Smirnova, Tatyana; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Ghiladi, Reza A.

    2013-01-01

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from Amphitrite ornata, having been shown to catalyze the hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of trihalophenols to dihaloquinones, is the first oxygen binding globin that possesses a biologically relevant peroxidase activity. The catalytically competent species in DHP appears to be Compound ES, a reactive intermediate that contains both a ferryl heme and a tyrosyl radical. By simulating the EPR spectra of DHP activated by H2O2, Thompson et al. (Thompson, M. K., Franzen, S., Ghiladi, R. A., Reeder, B. J., and Svistunenko, D. A. (2010) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 17501–17510) proposed that two different radicals, depending on the pH, are formed, one located on either Tyr-34 or Tyr-28 and the other on Tyr-38. To provide additional support for these simulation-based assignments and to deduce the role(s) that tyrosyl radicals play in DHP, stopped-flow UV-visible and rapid-freeze-quench EPR spectroscopic methods were employed to study radical formation in DHP when three tyrosine residues, Tyr-28, Tyr-34, and Tyr-38, were replaced either individually or in combination with phenylalanines. The results indicate that radicals form on all three tyrosines in DHP. Evidence for the formation of DHP Compound I in several tyrosine mutants was obtained. Variants that formed Compound I showed an increase in the catalytic rate for substrate oxidation but also an increase in heme bleaching, suggesting that the tyrosines are necessary for protecting the enzyme from oxidizing itself. This protective role of tyrosines is likely an evolutionary adaptation allowing DHP to avoid self-inflicted damage in the oxidative environment. PMID:24100039

  6. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of a turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame in a heated coflow: flame stabilization and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jackie; Sankaran, Ramanan; Yoo, Chun S

    2009-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the near field of a three-dimensional spatially developing turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame in heated coflow is performed with a detailed mechanism to determine the stabilization mechanism and the flame structure. The DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 11,000 with over 940 million grid points. The results show that auto-ignition in a fuel-lean mixture at the flame base is the main source of stabilization of the lifted jet flame. A chemical flux analysis shows the occurrence of near-isothermal chemical chain branching preceding thermal runaway upstream of the stabilization point, indicative of hydrogen auto-ignition in the second limit. The Damkoehler number and key intermediate-species behaviour near the leading edge of the lifted flame also verify that auto-ignition occurs at the flame base. At the lifted-flame base, it is found that heat release occurs predominantly through ignition in which the gradients of reactants are opposed. Downstream of the flame base, both rich-premixed and non-premixed flames develop and coexist with auto-ignition. In addition to auto-ignition, Lagrangian tracking of the flame base reveals the passage of large-scale flow structures and their correlation with the fluctuations of the flame base. In particular, the relative position of the flame base and the coherent flow structure induces a cyclic motion of the flame base in the transverse and axial directions about a mean lift-off height. This is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking of key scalars, heat release rate and velocity at the stabilization point.

  7. Effects of Dynamic Multi-directional Loading on the Microstructural Evolution and Thermal Stability of Pure Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Yadong

    2016-07-01

    Microstructural evolution and thermal stability of 1050 commercial pure aluminum processed by means of split Hopkinson pressure bar and Instron-3369 mechanical testing machine to an accumulated strain of 3.6 were investigated. The nominal strain rates reached up to 3.0 × 103 and 1 × 10-3/s, respectively. Samples in the deformed state and annealed in the temperature interval 423-523 K for 1 h were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations reveal that the initial coarse grains are refined significantly, and the deformed structures mainly consist of equiaxed subgrains and dislocation cells with a high density of interior dislocation. In addition, the average subgrain/cell sizes of these two kinds of deformed samples are nearly the same. As to recovery behavior, recovered subgrains are observed at 473 (dynamic) versus 523 K (quasi-static), that is to say, recovery is fairly slow in the quasi-static deformed samples. It is therefore to be expected that thermal stability of this dynamic deformed aluminum is weaker than that of the quasi-static compressed one, which is due to the higher density of dislocation and nonequilibrium dislocation configurations produced during dynamic loading.

  8. Enhancement of thermal stability of chondroitinase ABC I by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot.

    PubMed

    Nazari-Robati, Mahdieh; Khajeh, Khosro; Aminian, Mahdi; Mollania, Nasrin; Golestani, Abolfazl

    2013-02-01

    The application of chondroitinase ABC I (cABC I) in damaged nervous tissue is believed to prune glycosaminoglycan chains of proteoglycans, thereby facilitates axon regeneration. However, the utilization of cABC I as therapeutics is notably restricted due to its thermal instability. In the present study, we have explored the possibility of thermostabilization of cABC I through release of its conformational strain using Ramachandran plot information. In this regard, Gln140 with non-optimal φ and ψ values were replaced with Gly, Ala and Asn. The results indicated that Q140G and Q140A mutants were able to improve both activity and thermal stability of the enzyme while Q140N variant reduced the enzyme activity and destabilized it. Moreover, the two former variants displayed a remarkable resistance to trypsin degradation. Structural analysis of all mutants showed an increase in intrinsic fluorescence intensity and secondary structure content of Q140G and Q140A compared to the wild type which indicated more compact structure upon mutation. This investigation demonstrated that relief of conformational tension can be considered as a possible approach to increase the stability of the protein. PMID:23159774

  9. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopic Studies of Radical Cation Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Sheng

    1990-01-01

    produced by the radiolytic oxidation of semibullvalene in Freon matrices. The 3,4-dimethylenecyclobutene radical cation has been characterized as a ^2B_1 state by ESR spectroscopy, prepared by the radiolytic oxidation of the parent compound in Freon matrices. The ring-opening of the 3,4-dimethylenecyclobutene radical cation to the 1,2,4,5-hexatetraene radical cation was observed in the photolysis of the 3,4-dimethylenecyclobutene radical cation. The cyclooctatetraene radical cation generated by radiolytic oxidation photoisomerizes to the bicyclo (3.3.0) octa-2,6 -diene-4,8-diyl radical cation identical to the species produced directly from the radiolytic oxidation of semibullvalene. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  10. Exploratory investigation of the effects of vortex bursting on the high angle-of-attack lateral-directional stability characteristics of highly-swept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. L., Jr.; Grafton, S. B.; Yip, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    A recent low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of highly-swept wings has shown that vortex breakdown at high angles of attack can cause large destabilizing effects on static lateral-directional stability characteristics, and that the destabilizing effects of vortex breakdown can be greatly aggravated by model support strut interference effects. The present paper discusses these effects based on the results of static force tests of several highly-swept wing configurations for different wind-tunnel strut setup arrangements. Also included in the paper are photographs obtained during tuft-, smoke-, and helium-bubble flow visualization studies to indicate wing flow behavior patterns

  11. FLiK: a direct-binding assay for the identification and kinetic characterization of stabilizers of inactive kinase conformations.

    PubMed

    Simard, Jeffrey R; Rauh, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the hundreds of kinase inhibitors currently in discovery and preclinical phases, the number of FDA-approved kinase inhibitors remains very low by comparison, a discrepancy which reflects the challenges which accompanies kinase inhibitor development. Targeting protein kinases with ATP-competitive inhibitors has been the classical approach to inhibit kinase activity, but the highly conserved nature of the ATP-binding site often contributes to the poor inhibitor selectivity. To address this problem, we developed a high-throughput screening technology that can discriminate for inhibitors, which stabilize inactive kinase conformations by binding within allosteric pockets in the kinase domain. Here, we describe how to use the Fluorescence Labels in Kinases approach to measure the K(d) of ligands as well as how to kinetically characterize the binding and dissociation of ligands to the kinase. We also describe how this technology can be used to rapidly screen small molecule libraries in high throughput. PMID:25399645

  12. Direct Measurement of the Nanomechanical Stability of a Redox Protein Active Site and Its Dependence upon Metal Binding.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Marina I; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Artés, Juan M; Sanz, Fausto; Guallar, Victor; Gorostiza, Pau

    2015-09-10

    The structural basis of the low reorganization energy of cupredoxins has long been debated. These proteins reconcile a conformationally heterogeneous and exposed metal-chelating site with the highly rigid copper center required for efficient electron transfer. Here we combine single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments with statistical analysis and computer simulations to show that the metal-binding region of apo-azurin is mechanically flexible and that high mechanical stability is imparted by copper binding. The unfolding pathway of the metal site depends on the pulling residue and suggests that partial unfolding of the metal-binding site could be facilitated by the physical interaction with certain regions of the redox protein. PMID:26305718

  13. Dynamics of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Kozawa, Takahiro; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2008-03-01

    Poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) has been used in KrF excimer laser (248 nm) lithography as a backbone polymer, and is also a promising material for EUV or electron beam lithography. Analysis of the intermediate species is important for the control of reactions in resist materials. Since the size of integrated circuits fabricated for mass production will decrease below 30 nm and the size error must also be decreased to the molecular level, the elucidation of proton dynamics at the molecular level is also important for reducing the deviation of the resist pattern size. In this study, the dynamics of PHS radical cations were studied, because PHS radical cation is main source of proton. The transient absorption of PHS was observed in the near-infrared region (NIR) in p-dioxane solutions by pulse radiolysis. The intramolecular PHS dimer radical cation (M2 +.) were observed, whereas p-cresol shows no distinct CR band. Although the radical cations of phenol derivatives are known to be easily deprotonated, it was found that M2 +. formation prevents deprotonation by its charge resonance stabilization.

  14. Toward Radicalizing Community Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates a radicalized theoretical construction of community service learning. To accomplish this radicalization, I initially take up a discussion of traditional understandings of CSL rooted in pragmatic/progressive thought. I then suggest that this traditional structural foundation can be radicalized by incorporating Deborah…

  15. Ion radical cycloadditions and the synthesis of novel, electron-rich polymer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Yeonsuk

    The aminium salt initiated cation radical chain cycloaddition polymerization of various oxygenated difunctional monomers is investigated in order to minimize a limiting factor, a competing carbocation pathway, by applying a dichloromethane/water binary solvent mixture. Polymerizations have also been initiated by electrochemical oxidation and photosensitized electron transfer. The synthesis of cation radical cycloaddition polymers of difunctional carbazole monomers which contain reactive trans-1-propenyl groups for polymerization in the N-, 3- or 6-positions of carbazole, is presented. All polymers containing carbazole units in the polymer main chain show good solubility in halogenated organic solvents, high molecular weights, and high thermal stabilities. The reaction appears to proceed via a highly efficient cation radical chain mechanism which circumvents the usual hole transfer step of the propagation cycle. This polymerization represents the first observation of direct cation radical Diels-Alder cycloaddition polymerization and affords a novel polymer structure. The cation radical Diels-Alder cycloadditions of monofunctional, highly electron-rich substrates such as N-(trans-1-propenyl)carbazoles and N-phenyl-3-(trans-1-propenyl)carbazole to generate monomers of interest in connection with ring-opening metathesis polymerization are also presented. The cycloadditions of various electron-rich monomers to 1,3-cyclopentadiene efficiently generate norbornene monomers, which readily undergo ring-opening metathesis polymerization to yield electron rich polymers. Both ring-opened homopolymers and copolymers containing carbazole groups are synthesized. In addition, investigations of photorefractive effects resulting from a combination of photoconductive and electro-optic effects (change in refractive index in response to an electric field) in composites which utilize new carbazole-containing polymers as charge transport components are carried out, and their

  16. Free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  17. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a free radical propulsion system, utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust, is analyzed. The system, operating at a theoretical impulse with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, is hypothesized to bridge the gap between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. A comparative methodology is outlined by which characteristics of chemical and electric propulsion for orbit raising mission can be investigated. It is noted that free radicals proposed in rockets previously met with difficulty and complexity in terms of storage requirements; the present study proposes to eliminate the storage requirements by using electric energy to achieve a continuous-flow product of free radicals which are recombined to produce a high velocity propellant. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas is transferred to the propellant via three-body-recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Microwave plasma discharge was found in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressure in preliminary experiments, and microwave heating compared to electrothermal heating showed much higher temperatures in gasdynamic equations.

  18. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fergany, Amr

    2012-01-01

    Objective Laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to open radical cystectomy (ORC). This review focuses on patient selection criteria, technical aspects and postoperative outcomes of LRC. Methods Material for the review was obtained by a PubMed search over the last 10 years, using the keywords ‘laparoscopic radical cystectomy’ and ‘laparoscopic bladder cancer’ in human subjects. Results Twenty-two publications selected for relevance and content were used for this review from the total search yield. The level of evidence was IIb and III. LRC results in comparable short- and intermediate-range oncological outcomes to ORC, with generally longer operative times but decreased blood loss, postoperative pain and hospital stay. Overall operative and postoperative morbidity are equivalent. Conclusion In experienced hands, LRC is an acceptable minimally invasive alternative to ORC in selected patients, with the main advantage of decreased blood loss and postoperative pain, as well as a shorter hospital stay and recovery. PMID:26558003

  19. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the posterior parietal cortex reduces steady-state postural stability during the effect of light touch.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Tomoya; Imai, Ryota; Morioka, Shu

    2016-09-28

    Touching a stable object with a fingertip using slight force (<1 N) stabilizes standing posture independent of mechanical support, which is referred to as the effect of light touch (LT). In the neural mechanism of the effect of LT, the specific contribution of the cortical brain activity toward the effect of LT remains undefined, particularly the contribution toward steady-state postural sway. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cortical region responsible for the reduction of postural sway in response to the effect of LT. Active LT was applied with the right fingertip and transcranial direct current stimulation (sham or cathodal) was applied to the left primary sensorimotor cortex or the left posterior parietal cortex in the two groups. The experiments were conducted using a single-blind sham-controlled crossover design. Steady-state postural sway was compared with the factors of transcranial direct current stimulation (sham or cathodal) and time (pre or post). In the results, the effect of LT reduced postural stability in the mediolateral direction after cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the left posterior parietal cortex. No effect was observed after stimulation of the left primary sensorimotor cortex. This indicates that the left posterior parietal cortex is partly responsible for the effect of LT when touching a fixed point with the right fingertip during suprapostural tasks, where posture is adjusted according to the precision requirements. Cortical processing of sensory integration for voluntary postural orientation in response to touch occurs in the posterior parietal cortex. PMID:27495219

  20. Free radicals and ocular disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R E; Kretzer, F L; Rapp, L M

    1994-01-01

    Ames, Shigenaga, and Hagen recently published a thorough review of the relationship between oxidants, antioxidants, and degenerative diseases of ageing. They point out that only 9% of Americans daily consume the two fruits and three vegetables recommended by the National Cancer Institute and the National Research Council/National Academy of Science. In addition to antioxidants, these foodstuffs contain many essential micronutrients. To date, specific recommendations for antioxidant supplementation have not been made by any governmental agency or professional association. A number of clinical, basic, and epidemiological studies have implicated free radical induced lipid peroxidation in various ocular disorders. It would seem prudent that those persons at greatest risk for these disorders take some precautions, which could include sunglasses that filter ultraviolet light; hats that shield the eyes from direct sunlight; and the ingestion of fruits, vegetables, and antioxidants. PMID:7771292

  1. Validation of three-dimensional incompressible spatial direct numerical simulation code: A comparison with linear stability and parabolic stability equation theories for boundary-layer transition on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    1992-01-01

    Spatially evolving instabilities in a boundary layer on a flat plate are computed by direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. In a truncated physical domain, a nonstaggered mesh is used for the grid. A Chebyshev-collocation method is used normal to the wall; finite difference and compact difference methods are used in the streamwise direction; and a Fourier series is used in the spanwise direction. For time stepping, implicit Crank-Nicolson and explicit Runge-Kutta schemes are used to the time-splitting method. The influence-matrix technique is used to solve the pressure equation. At the outflow boundary, the buffer-domain technique is used to prevent convective wave reflection or upstream propagation of information from the boundary. Results of the DNS are compared with those from both linear stability theory (LST) and parabolized stability equation (PSE) theory. Computed disturbance amplitudes and phases are in very good agreement with those of LST (for small inflow disturbance amplitudes). A measure of the sensitivity of the inflow condition is demonstrated with both LST and PSE theory used to approximate inflows. Although the DNS numerics are very different than those of PSE theory, the results are in good agreement. A small discrepancy in the results that does occur is likely a result of the variation in PSE boundary condition treatment in the far field. Finally, a small-amplitude wave triad is forced at the inflow, and simulation results are compared with those of LST. Again, very good agreement is found between DNS and LST results for the 3-D simulations, the implication being that the disturbance amplitudes are sufficiently small that nonlinear interactions are negligible.

  2. Direct measurement of salt-bridge solvation energies using a peptide model system: implications for protein stability.

    PubMed Central

    Wimley, W C; Gawrisch, K; Creamer, T P; White, S H

    1996-01-01

    The solvation energies of salt bridges formed between the terminal carboxyl of the host pentapeptide AcWL- X-LL and the side chains of Arg or Lys in the guest (X) position have been measured. The energies were derived from octanol-to-buffer transfer free energies determined between pH 1 and pH 9. 13C NMR measurements show that the salt bridges form in the octanol phase, but not in the buffer phase, when the side chains and the terminal carboxyl group are charged. The free energy of salt-bridge formation in octanol is approximately -4 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.184 J), which is equal to or slightly larger than the sum of the solvation energies of noninteracting pairs of charged side chains. This is about one-half the free energy that would result from replacing a charge pair in octanol with a pair of hydrophobic residues of moderate size. Therefore, salt bridging in octanol can change the favorable aqueous solvation energy of a pair of oppositely charged residues to neutral or slightly unfavorable but cannot provide the same free energy decrease as hydrophobic residues. This is consistent with recent computational and experimental studies of protein stability. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8610155

  3. The effect of oxygen, antioxidants, and superoxide radical on tyrosine phenoxyl radical dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, E.P.; Desrosiers, M.F.; Simic, M.G. )

    1989-01-01

    Dimerization of tyrosine phenoxyl radical yields bityrosine (BT) which can easily be monitored by its characteristic fluorescence at 400 nm. The reactivity of tyrosine phenoxyl radical with O{sub 2} was examined by a variety of techniques. BT fluorescence was measured as a function of O{sub 2} concentration. Over a range of pH values (4-12) there was no effect of oxygen on BT production ((O{sub 2}) less than or equal to 0.72 mM). In addition, oxygen uptake by the phenoxyl radical was measured directly with an oxygen electrode. It was determined by this technique that oxygen does not react with the phenoxyl radical with a rate constant greater than 10(3) M-1 s-1. Tyrosine phenoxyl radical repair by superoxide and physiological antioxidants was examined by BT fluorescence quenching as well as pulse radiolysis. Implications of these results as to the fate of tyrosine phenoxyl radicals produced in biological systems is discussed.

  4. Photochemical generation, isomerization, and oxygenation of stilbene cation radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, F.D.; Bedell, A.M.; Dykstra, R.E.; Elbert, J.E. ); Gould, I.R.; Farid, S. )

    1990-10-24

    The cation radicals of cis- and trans-stilbene and several of their ring-substituted derivatives have been generated in solution directly by means of pulsed-laser-induced electron transfer to singlet cyanoanthracenes or indirectly via electron transfer from biphenyl to the singlet cyanoanthracene followed by secondary electron transfer from the stilbenes to the biphenyl cation radical. Transient absorption spectra of the cis- and trans-stilbene cation radicals generated by secondary electron transfer are similar to those previously obtained in 77 K matrices. Quantum yields for radical ion-pair cage escape have been measured for direct electron transfer from the stilbenes to three neutral and one charged singlet acceptor. These values increase as the ion-pair energy increases due to decreased rate constants for radical ion-pair return electron transfer, in accord with the predictions of Marcus theory for highly exergonic electron transfer. Cage-escape efficiencies are larger for trans- vs cis-stilbene cation radicals, possibly due to the greater extent of charge delocalization in the planar trans vs nonpolar cis cation radicals. Cage-escape stilbene cation radicals can initiate a concentration-dependent one way cis- {yields} trans-stilbene isomerization reaction.

  5. Alternative radical pairs for cryptochrome-based magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alpha A; Lau, Jason C S; Hogben, Hannah J; Biskup, Till; Kattnig, Daniel R; Hore, P J

    2014-06-01

    There is growing evidence that the remarkable ability of animals, in particular birds, to sense the direction of the Earth's magnetic field relies on magnetically sensitive photochemical reactions of the protein cryptochrome. It is generally assumed that the magnetic field acts on the radical pair [FAD•- TrpH•+] formed by the transfer of an electron from a group of three tryptophan residues to the photo-excited flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor within the protein. Here, we examine the suitability of an [FAD•- Z•] radical pair as a compass magnetoreceptor, where Z• is a radical in which the electron spin has no hyperfine interactions with magnetic nuclei, such as hydrogen and nitrogen. Quantum spin dynamics simulations of the reactivity of [FAD•- Z•] show that it is two orders of magnitude more sensitive to the direction of the geomagnetic field than is [FAD•- TrpH•+] under the same conditions (50 µT magnetic field, 1 µs radical lifetime). The favourable magnetic properties of [FAD•- Z•] arise from the asymmetric distribution of hyperfine interactions among the two radicals and the near-optimal magnetic properties of the flavin radical. We close by discussing the identity of Z• and possible routes for its formation as part of a spin-correlated radical pair with an FAD radical in cryptochrome. PMID:24671932

  6. Iridium(III) amine complexes as high-stability structure-directing agents for the synthesis of metal phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.J.; Kruger, J.S.; McLeroy, A.F.; Wilkinson, A.P.; Hanson, J.C.

    1999-08-01

    Structure-directing agents based on iridium(III) complexes provide a hydrothermally robust alternative to the corresponding cobalt compounds. The slight size difference between Co(III) and Ir(III) does not dramatically influence the nature of the AlPO products that are obtained from hydrothermal synthesis using complexes based upon the ligands 1,2-diaminoethane and trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (chxn). However, the very slow ligand exchange kinetics of the Ir(III) complexes facilitate the use of increased hydrothermal synthesis temperatures when compared to the corresponding Co(III) complexes. For the two systems that they have examined, the use of Ir(III) allows the synthesis temperatures to be increased by {approximately} 40 C over the maximum that is viable for the corresponding cobalt complexes. This increase allowed us to prepare AlPO single crystals using Ir({+-}chxn){sub 3}{sup 3+}, whereas they authors could only obtain powders using the corresponding cobalt complexes. The use of iridium in place of cobalt increases the range of ligands that can be considered in constructing chelate complexes for use as structure-directing agents and may facilitate the preparation of different AlPO products from those found using cobalt complexes, as higher hydrothermal synthesis temperatures can be employed.

  7. Energy and Entropy Effects in Dissociation of Peptide Radical Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Lam, Corey; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-04-15

    Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of peptide radical anions was studied for the first time using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) configured for SID experiments. Peptide radical cations and anions were produced by gas-phase fragmentation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes. The effect of the charge, radical, and the presence of a basic residue on the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of peptide ions was examined using RVYIHPF (1) and HVYIHPF (2) as model systems. Comparison of the survival curves for of [M+H]{sup +}, [M-H]{sup -}, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, and [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}} ions of these precursors demonstrated that even-electron ions are more stable towards fragmentation than their odd-electron counterparts. RRKM modeling of the experimental data demonstrated that the lower stability of the positive radicals is mainly attributed to lower dissociation thresholds while entropy effects are responsible the relative instability of the negative radicals. Substitution of arginine with less basic histidine residue has a strong destabilizing effect on the [M+H]{sup +} ions and a measurable stabilizing effect on the odd-electron ions. Lower threshold energies for dissociation of both positive and negative radicals of 1 are attributed to the presence of lower-energy dissociation pathways that are most likely promoted by the presence of the basic residue.

  8. Formation of ions and radicals from icy grains in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William M.; Gerth, Christopher; Hendricks, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Ion and radical formation in comets are thought to occur primarily by photodissociation of gas phase molecules. Experimental evidence and theoretical calculations are presented that show that some of the radical and ions can come directly from ice grains. The experimental evidence suggest that if the frozen molecules on the surface of grains undergo direct dissociation then they may be able to release radicals directly in the gas phase. If the molecules undergo predissociation it is unlikely that they will release radicals in the gas phase since they should be quenched. Calculations of this direct photodissociation mechanism further indicate that even if the parent molecule undergoes direct dissociation, the yield will not be high enough to explain the rays structure in comets unless the radicals are stored in the grains and then released when the grain evaporates. Calculations were also performed to determine the maximum number of ions that can be stored in an icy grain's radius. This number is compared with the ratio of the ion to neutral molecular density. The comparison suggests that some of the ions observed near the nucleus of the comet could have originally been present in the cometary nucleus. It is also pointed out that the presence of these ions in icy grains could lead to radical formation via electron recombination. Finally, an avalanche process was evaluated as another means of producing ions in comets.

  9. miR-181b-3p promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cells through Snail stabilization by directly targeting YWHAG.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Je-Ok; Kwak, Seo-Young; An, Hyun-Ju; Bae, In-Hwa; Park, Myung-Jin; Han, Young-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is essential for increased invasion and metastasis during cancer progression. Among the candidate EMT-regulating microRNAs that we previously identified, miR-181b-3p was found to induce EMT in MCF7 breast cancer cells, as indicated by an EMT-characteristic morphological change, increased invasiveness, and altered expression of an EMT marker. Transfection with a miR-181b-3p inhibitor reduced the expression of mesenchymal markers and the migration and invasion of highly invasive breast cancer cells. miR-181b-3p induced the upregulation of Snail, a master EMT inducer and transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin, through protein stabilization. YWHAG was identified as a direct target of miR-181b-3p, downregulation of which induced Snail stabilization and EMT phenotypes. Ectopic expression of YWHAG abrogated the effect of miR-181b-3p, including Snail stabilization and the promotion of invasion. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses indicated that YWHAG expression was inversely correlated with the expression of miR-181b-3p and Snail in human breast cancer tissues. Furthermore, transfection with miR-181b-3p increased the frequency of metastatic nodule formation in the lungs of mice in experimental metastasis assays using MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-181b-3p functions as a metastasis activator by promoting Snail-induced EMT, and may therefore be a therapeutic target in metastatic cancers. PMID:27102539

  10. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Wei-Guang; Sun, Junling; Wu, Yilei; Nassar, Majed S; Botros, Youssry Y; Goddard, William A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-02-24

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components-namely oligoviologens-in which different numbers of 4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY(2+)) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY(•+) radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne-azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  11. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components—namely oligoviologens—in which different numbers of 4,4′-bipyridinium (BIPY2+) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY•+ radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne–azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  12. Radically innovative steelmaking technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Julian

    1980-09-01

    The steel industry is faced with serious problems caused by the increasing cost of energy, labor and capital and by tough overseas competition, employing new highly efficient process plants. The very high cost of capital and of capital equipment renders the construction of new green field site plants, exemplifying the best available technology economically unattractive. For this reason, over the long term the development radically innovative steelmaking technologies appears to be the only satisfactory resolution of this dilemma. The purpose of this article is to present a critical review of some of the radically innovative steelmaking technologies that have been proposed during the past few years and to develop the argument that these indeed do deserve serious consideration at the present time. It should be stressed, however, that these innovative technologies can be implemented only as part of a carefully conceived long range plan, which contains as a subset short term solutions, such as trigger prices improved investment credits, and so forth and intermediate term solutions, such as more extensive use of continuous casting, external desulfurization and selective modernization in general.

  13. Radical-radical interactions among oxidized guanine bases including guanine radical cation and dehydrogenated guanine radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Yang, Hongfang; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ping; Bu, Yuxiang

    2013-09-19

    We present here a theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of di-ionized GG base pairs (G(•+)G(•+),G(-H1)(•)G(•+), and G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•)) consisting of the guanine cation radical (G(•+)) and/or dehydrogenated guanine radical (G(-H1)(•)) using density functional theory calculations. Different coupling modes (Watson-Crick/WC, Hoogsteen/Hoog, and minor groove/min hydrogen bonding, and π-π stacking modes) are considered. We infer that a series of G(•+)G(•+) complexes can be formed by the high-energy radiation. On the basis of density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent (CASSCF) calculations, we reveal that in the H-bonded and N-N cross-linked modes, (G(•+)G(•+))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minI, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minIII have the triplet ground states; (G(•+)G(•+))HoogI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))HoogI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minII, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minII possess open-shell broken-symmetry diradical-characterized singlet ground states; and (G(•+)G(•+))HoogII, (G(•+)G(•+))minI, (G(•+)G(•+))minII, (G(•+)G(•+))minIII, (G(•+)G(•+))HoHo, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minIII, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))HoHo, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))HoHo are the closed-shell systems. For these H-bonded diradical complexes, the magnetic interactions are weak, especially in the diradical G(•+)G(•+) series and G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•) series. The magnetic coupling interactions of the diradical systems are controlled by intermolecular interactions (H-bond, electrostatic repulsion, and radical coupling). The radical-radical interaction in the π-π stacked di-ionized GG base pairs ((G(•+)G(•+))ππ, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))ππ, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))ππ) are also considered, and the magnetic coupling interactions in these π-π stacked base pairs are large. This is the first theoretical prediction that some di

  14. Pion femtoscopy in p + p collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Dong, X.; Grebenyuk, O.; Hjort, E.; Jacobs, P.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Ploskon, M. A.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Ritter, H. G.; Rose, A.

    2011-06-15

    The STAR Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured two-pion correlation functions from p+p collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV. Spatial scales are extracted via a femtoscopic analysis of the correlations, though this analysis is complicated by the presence of strong nonfemtoscopic effects. Our results are put into the context of the world data set of femtoscopy in hadron-hadron collisions. We present the first direct comparison of femtoscopy in p+p and heavy ion collisions, under identical analysis and detector conditions.

  15. Incorporation of HVDC and SVC models in the Northern State Power Co. (NSP) network for on-line implementation of direct transient stability assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Vittal, V.; Ejebe, G.C.; Irisarri, G.D.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the incorporation of the 4 dc systems and 2 SVCs in the NSP network for on-line implementation of direct transient stability assessment. The dc and SVC models used are more complicated than those used in the existing AC-DC-SVC Transient Energy Function (TEF) literature. In this new approach, the commutation failure of the HVDC is also considered. It is necessary to use these complicated dc and SVC models because in the NSP network they are located in an area where the transient stability is of great concern. The dc and SVC systems are treated as part of the ac network and their effect on the transient energy function is included. The effect of dc and SVC on the calculation of the potential energy is reflected in the ac network solution. The equivalent models and the proposed procedure developed is tested on a NSP equivalent network of 273 generators and 2,217 buses. The result obtained are in excellent agreement with those obtained by time domain simulation using EPRI ETMSP V3.0.

  16. Highly Enhanced Electromechanical Stability of Large-Area Graphene with Increased Interfacial Adhesion Energy by Electrothermal-Direct Transfer for Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Gi Gyu; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-09-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice structure, has been extensively investigated for research and industrial applications as a promising material with outstanding electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties. To fabricate graphene-based devices, graphene transfer to the target substrate with a clean and minimally defective surface is the first step. However, graphene transfer technologies require improvement in terms of uniform transfer with a clean, nonfolded and nontorn area, amount of defects, and electromechanical reliability of the transferred graphene. More specifically, uniform transfer of a large area is a key challenge when graphene is repetitively transferred onto pretransferred layers because the adhesion energy between graphene layers is too low to ensure uniform transfer, although uniform multilayers of graphene have exhibited enhanced electrical and optical properties. In this work, we developed a newly suggested electrothermal-direct (ETD) transfer method for large-area high quality monolayer graphene with less defects and an absence of folding or tearing of the area at the surface. This method delivers uniform multilayer transfer of graphene by repetitive monolayer transfer steps based on high adhesion energy between graphene layers and the target substrate. To investigate the highly enhanced electromechanical stability, we conducted mechanical elastic bending experiments and reliability tests in a highly humid environment. This ETD-transferred graphene is expected to replace commercial transparent electrodes with ETD graphene-based transparent electrodes and devices such as a touch panels with outstanding electromechanical stability. PMID:27564120

  17. Stability of several oxide dispersion strengthened alloys and a directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime-alpha eutectic alloy in a thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staniek, G.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal gradient testing of three oxide dispersion strengthened alloys (two Ni-base alloys, MA 754 and MA 6000 E, and the Fe-base MA 956) and the directionally solidified eutectic alloy, gamma/gamma prime-alpha, have been conducted. Experiments were carried out with maximum temperatures up to 1200 C and thermal gradients on the order of 100 C/mm. The oxide dispersion strengthened alloys were difficult to test because the thermal stresses promoted crack nucleation and growth; thus the ability of these alloys to maintain a thermal gradient may be limited. The stability of individual fibers in gamma/gamma prime-alpha was excellent; however, microstructural changes were observed in the vicinity of grain boundaries. Similar structures were also observed in isothermally annealed material; therefore thermal gradients do not affect the microstructure of gamma/gamma prime-alpha in any significant manner.

  18. Superoxide Radical Lifetime on the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zent, A. P.; Ichimura, A.; Quinn, R. C.

    2005-08-01

    We have examined the formation and stability of the superoxide radical O2-, which has been hypothesized as a potential Mars oxidant. Rutile (TiO2) was heated to ˜ 400 degrees C under vacuum. The samples were tipped off in ampules under 8-9 torr O2, photolyzed with a Hg lamp for 30 minutes; EPR spectra were immediately obtained at 77K. The signature of O2- was clearly observed in the rutile. The sealed ampules were stored at room temperature for up to 2 weeks without any decrease in the number of spins. The same process, applied to rutile that was not baked out yielded superoxide signals that could not be detected once the photolyzing flux was cut off. To examine the effects of partial dehydration, we carried out the same series of experiments on rutile that was baked out at 200 degrees C. This material showed decay of superoxide spins to zero in less than 10 minutes. This qualitative pattern is also observed in experiments on anatase (Attwood, et al., , 2003). We hypothesize that O2- can be stabilized against reaction with H2O and OH by crystalline surface defects. On hydrated surfaces, O2- must compete for stabilizing sites, and the population is quickly extinguished; in dehydrated samples, it can migrate to stabilizing defects. Once sorbed, the O2- radical is stable in the presence of H2O. OMEGA Mars Express data (Poullet et al, 2005) suggest one to several percent adsorbed H2O across the Martian surface, which will significantly decrease O2- lifetime. One possibility for subsurface stabilization of O2- can be postulated based on EPR spectra of anatase, exposed to H2O2 in our lab in 1996, and which in 2005 shows the signature of O2-. Evidently, H2O2 can convert to stable O2- on some surfaces. This hypothesis might allow subsurface diffusion of H2O2, followed by conversion to O2-.

  19. Serendipitous findings while researching oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Robert A

    2009-04-15

    This review is based on the honor of receiving the Discovery Award from the Society of Free Radical Biology and Medicine. The review is reflective and presents our thinking that led to experiments that yielded novel observations. Critical questioning of our understanding of oxygen free radicals in biomedical problems led us to use and develop more direct and extremely sensitive methods. This included nitrone free radical spin trapping and HPLC-electrochemical detection. This technology led to the pioneering use of salicylate to trap hydroxyl free radicals and show increased flux in ischemia/reperfused brain regions and also to first sensitively detect 8-hydroxyl-2-deoxyguanosine in oxidatively damaged DNA and help assess its role in cancer development. We demonstrated that methylene blue (MB) photoinduces formation of 8-hydroxyguanine in DNA and RNA and discovered that MB sensitively photoinactivates RNA viruses, including HIV and the West Nile virus. Studies in experimental stroke led us serendipitously to discover that alpha-phenyl-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) was neuroprotective if given after the stroke. This led to extensive commercial development of NXY-059, a PBN derivative, for the treatment of stroke. More recently we discovered that PBN nitrones have potent anti-cancer activity and are active in preventing hearing loss caused by acute acoustical trauma. PMID:19439210

  20. Neurotoxins: Free Radical Mechanisms and Melatonin Protection

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Russel J.; Manchester, Lucien C.; Tan, Dun-Xian

    2010-01-01

    Toxins that pass through the blood-brain barrier put neurons and glia in peril. The damage inflicted is usually a consequence of the ability of these toxic agents to induce free radical generation within cells but especially at the level of the mitochondria. The elevated production of oxygen and nitrogen-based radicals and related non-radical products leads to the oxidation of essential macromolecules including lipids, proteins and DNA. The resultant damage is referred to as oxidative and nitrosative stress and, when the molecular destruction is sufficiently severe, it causes apoptosis or necrosis of neurons and glia. Loss of brain cells compromises the functions of the central nervous system expressed as motor, sensory and cognitive deficits and psychological alterations. In this survey we summarize the publications related to the following neurotoxins and the protective actions of melatonin: aminolevulinic acid, cyanide, domoic acid, kainic acid, metals, methamphetamine, polychlorinated biphenyls, rotenone, toluene and 6-hydroxydopamine. Given the potent direct free radical scavenging activities of melatonin and its metabolites, their ability to indirectly stimulate antioxidative enzymes and their efficacy in reducing electron leakage from mitochondria, it would be expected that these molecules would protect the brain from oxidative and nitrosative molecular mutilation. The studies summarized in this review indicate that this is indeed the case, an action that is obviously assisted by the fact that melatonin readily crosses the blood brain barrier. PMID:21358970

  1. Accumulation and evolution of the spatial distribution of radicals in vitreous propanol in a glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kurshev, V.V.; Raitsimring, A.M.

    1992-09-01

    Analysis of the dipole broadening of an EPR line is used to explain the change in the spatial distribution of radicals formed in the plasma of a high-frequency glow discharge on the surface of vitreous propanol, which contains an electron acceptor. The contributions of various mechanisms for radical formation are evaluated. A model is proposed to describe both the accumulation and the evolution of the stabilization region of radicals in the plasmolysis process. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Oxygen radicals and renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Klahr, S

    1997-01-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and hypochlorous acid) are important mediators of renal damage in acute renal failure and glomerular and tubulointerstitial diseases. The role of these oxygen metabolites in the above entities is discussed, and the effects of antioxidants and scavengers of O2 radicals are considered. The role of oxygen radicals in the regulation of gene transcription is also considered. PMID:9387104

  3. Carotenoid cation radicals: electrochemical, optical, and EPR study

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, J.L.; Kramer, V.J.; Ding, R.; Kispert, L.D.

    1988-03-30

    The general aim of this investigation is to determine whether carotenoid cation radicals can be produced, and stabilized, electrochemically. Hence, the authors have undertaken a detailed study of the electrooxidation of various carotenoids (..beta..-carotene (I), ..beta..-apo-8'-carotenal (II), and canthaxanthin (III) using the techniques of cyclic voltammetry, controlled-potential electrolysis (cpe) in conjunction with optical spectroscopy, and EPR spectroscopy coupled with in situ electrolysis. They report the successful generation of carotenoid cation radicals via electrochemical oxidation and, furthermore, the stabilization of these radicals for several minutes in CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/ solvents.

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis of Gln103 reveals the influence of this residue on the redox properties and stability of MauG.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sooim; Yukl, Erik T; Sehanobish, Esha; Wilmot, Carrie M; Davidson, Victor L

    2014-03-01

    The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes a six-electron oxidation that is required for the posttranslational modification of a precursor of methylamine dehydrogenase (preMADH) to complete the biosynthesis of its protein-derived cofactor, tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ). Crystallographic and computational studies have implicated Gln103 in stabilizing the Fe(IV)═O moiety of the bis-Fe(IV) state by hydrogen bonding. The role of Gln103 was probed by site-directed mutagenesis. Q103L and Q103E mutations resulted in no expression and very little expression of the protein, respectively. Q103A MauG exhibited oxidative damage when isolated. Q103N MauG was isolated at levels comparable to that of wild-type MauG and exhibited normal activity in catalyzing the biosynthesis of TTQ from preMADH. The crystal structure of the Q103N MauG-preMADH complex suggests that a water may mediate hydrogen bonding between the shorter Asn103 side chain and the Fe(IV)═O moiety. The Q103N mutation caused the two redox potentials associated with the diferric/diferrous redox couple to become less negative, although the redox cooperativity of the hemes of MauG was retained. Upon addition of H2O2, Q103N MauG exhibits changes in the absorbance spectrum in the Soret and near-IR regions consistent with formation of the bis-Fe(IV) redox state. However, the rate of spontaneous return of the spectrum in the Soret region was 4.5-fold greater for Q103N MauG than for wild-type MauG. In contrast, the rate of spontaneous decay of the absorbance at 950 nm, which is associated with charge-resonance stabilization of the high-valence state, was similar for wild-type MauG and Q103N MauG. This suggests that as a consequence of the mutation a different distribution of resonance structures stabilizes the bis-Fe(IV) state. These results demonstrate that subtle changes in the structure of the side chain of residue 103 can significantly affect the overall protein stability of MauG and alter the redox properties of the

  5. Reaction engineering in direct coal liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Y. T.

    Processes for direct coal liquefaction by solvent extraction are considered along with the structure and properties of coal and the mechanism of coal liquefaction, heteroatom removal during liquefaction, kinetic models for donor-solvent coal liquefaction, the design of coal liquefaction reactors, and the refining of coal liquids. Attention is given to the catalytic hydrogenation of coal in the presence of a solvent, the origin and character of coal, laboratory reactors for rate measurements, reaction networks based on lumped fractions, free-radical reaction models, reactor types, the compatibility of coal-derived liquids and petroleum fuels, the stability of coal liquids, thermal cracking, catalytic hydrotreating, catalytic cracking, and catalytic reforming.

  6. Ion-radical intermediates of the radiation-chemical transformations of organic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Sosulin, Ilya S.; Saenko, Elizaveta V.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2016-07-01

    The spectral features and reactions of ion-radical intermediates produced from organic carbonates in low-temperature matrices were investigated by EPR spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations. It was shown that radical cations of diethyl carbonate and dimethyl carbonate underwent intramolecular hydrogen transfer to yield alkyl-type species, as was suggested previously. Meanwhile, radical cation of EC demonstrates a ring cleavage even at 77 K, while radical cation of PC is probably intrinsically stable and undergo an ion-molecule reaction with a neighboring neutral molecule in dimers or associates. Radical anions were obtained in glassy matrices of diethyl ether or perdeuteroethanol. The radical anions of linear carbonates show photoinduced fragmentation to yield the corresponding alkyl radicals; such process may also occur directly under radiolysis. Radical anions of cyclic carbonates are relatively stable and yield only trace amounts of fragmentation products under similar conditions.

  7. Comparative evaluation of effects of bleaching on color stability and marginal adaptation of discolored direct and indirect composite laminate veneers under in vivo conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Veena; Das, Taposh K.; Pruthi, Gunjan; Shah, Naseem; Rajendiran, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    CLV's showed significant color change at CE and IE regions when ΔE was compared at 180 days and 284 days (CE 10 vs. CE 30, P = 0.008, IE 10 vs. IE 30, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found when within group comparison was made for indirect laminates. Intergroup comparison between the groups showed significant difference in marginal adaptation at CE margin at all.time points (at baseline, P = 0.005; at 180 days, P = 0.007; 194 days, P = 0.025; at 284 days, P = 0.067). Conclusion: After bleaching, indirect CLVs performed better in terms of color stability whereas direct CLVs performed better in terms of marginal adaptation. Clinical Significance: Indirect composites should be preferred to direct composites as veneering materials as they have better color stability. Special attention should be given to their marginal adaptation especially in the CE region. Bleaching should be avoided in patients with composite restorations in the mouth. PMID:26929486

  8. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    A free radical propulsion concept utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust was examined. The concept offered promise of a propulsion system operating at a theoretical impulse, with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, thus filling the gas existing between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas was transferred to the propellant via three body recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Power absorption by the microwave plasma discharge was in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressures. Gas temperatures inferred from gas dynamic equations showed much higher temperatures from microwave heating than from electrothermal heating. Spectroscopic analysis appeared to corroborate the inferred temperatures of one of the gases tested.

  9. Radicals in Berkeley?

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595–605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually. PMID:25713083

  10. Comparison of Thiyl, Alkoxyl, and Alkyl Radical Addition to Double Bonds: The Unusual Contrasting Behavior of Sulfur and Oxygen Radical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, Isa; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-03-17

    High-level ab initio calculations have been used to compare prototypical thiyl, alkoxyl, and alkyl radical addition reactions. Thiyl radical addition to the sulfur center of thioketones is exothermic and rapid, occurring with negative enthalpic barriers and only weakly positive Gibbs free energy barriers. In stark contrast, alkoxyl radical addition to the oxygen center of ketones is highly endothermic and occurs with very high reaction barriers, though these are also suppressed. On the basis of analysis of the corresponding alkyl radical additions to these substrates and the corresponding reactions of these heteroatom radicals with alkenes, it suggested that addition reactions involving thiyl radicals have low intrinsic barriers because their unpaired electrons are better able to undergo stabilizing resonance interactions with the π* orbitals of the substrate in the transition state. PMID:26932454

  11. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Maranzana, Andrea E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it Giordana, Anna E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it Indarto, Antonius Tonachini, Glauco; Barone, Vincenzo E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it; Causà, Mauro E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it; Pavone, Michele E-mail: anna.giordana@hotmail.com E-mail: mauro.causa@unina.it

    2013-12-28

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ΔE{sub AB}. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ΔE{sub AB} are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A−B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ωB97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Møller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [E{sub MP2/CBS}] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ΔE{sub CC-MP}, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ΔE{sub AB} with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting

  12. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranzana, Andrea; Giordana, Anna; Indarto, Antonius; Tonachini, Glauco; Barone, Vincenzo; Causà, Mauro; Pavone, Michele

    2013-12-01

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ΔEAB. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ΔEAB are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A-B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ωB97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Møller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [EMP2/CBS] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ΔECC-MP, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ΔEAB with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting deviation from the computational

  13. Density functional theory study of the interaction of vinyl radical, ethyne, and ethene with benzene, aimed to define an affordable computational level to investigate stability trends in large van der Waals complexes.

    PubMed

    Maranzana, Andrea; Giordana, Anna; Indarto, Antonius; Tonachini, Glauco; Barone, Vincenzo; Causà, Mauro; Pavone, Michele

    2013-12-28

    Our purpose is to identify a computational level sufficiently dependable and affordable to assess trends in the interaction of a variety of radical or closed shell unsaturated hydro-carbons A adsorbed on soot platelet models B. These systems, of environmental interest, would unavoidably have rather large sizes, thus prompting to explore in this paper the performances of relatively low-level computational methods and compare them with higher-level reference results. To this end, the interaction of three complexes between non-polar species, vinyl radical, ethyne, or ethene (A) with benzene (B) is studied, since these species, involved themselves in growth processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and soot particles, are small enough to allow high-level reference calculations of the interaction energy ΔEAB. Counterpoise-corrected interaction energies ΔEAB are used at all stages. (1) Density Functional Theory (DFT) unconstrained optimizations of the A-B complexes are carried out, using the B3LYP-D, ωB97X-D, and M06-2X functionals, with six basis sets: 6-31G(d), 6-311 (2d,p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd); aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ; N07T. (2) Then, unconstrained optimizations by Møller-Plesset second order Perturbation Theory (MP2), with each basis set, allow subsequent single point Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles and perturbative estimate of the Triples energy computations with the same basis sets [CCSD(T)//MP2]. (3) Based on an additivity assumption of (i) the estimated MP2 energy at the complete basis set limit [EMP2/CBS] and (ii) the higher-order correlation energy effects in passing from MP2 to CCSD(T) at the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, ΔECC-MP, a CCSD(T)/CBS estimate is obtained and taken as a computational energy reference. At DFT, variations in ΔEAB with basis set are not large for the title molecules, and the three functionals perform rather satisfactorily even with rather small basis sets [6-31G(d) and N07T], exhibiting deviation from the computational

  14. ESR measurement of radical clearance in lung of whole mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, K.; Utsumi, H.; Hamada, A. )

    1991-06-14

    Clearance of the nitroxide radicals, hydroxy-TEMPO and carboxy-PROxYL, in whole-mouse lung was directly measured by in vivo ESR. After injecting a nitroxide radical, distribution of the nitroxide radical all over the lung was confirmed by ESR imaging. The ESR signal of hydroxy-TEMPO was reduced in the lung and the clearance obeyed first-order kinetics, whereas the signal of carboxy-PROxYL remained constant. Comparison of the clearance rates of live and dead mice indicated the presence of 2 different clearance systems in the lung: loss of its paramagnetism in the lung, and transfer from alveolar to the blood circulation system.

  15. Direct growth of NiCo2O4 nanostructures on conductive substrates with enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability for methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lei; Gu, Li; Yang, Li; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan

    2013-08-21

    In this report, NiCo2O4 nanostructures with different morphologies were directly grown on conductive substrates (stainless steel and ITO) by a facile electrodeposition method in addition to a post-annealing process. The morphology changes on different conductive substrates are discussed in detail. The NiCo2O4 on stainless steel (SS) had a high surface area (119 m(2) g(-1)) and was successfully used in the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol. The electrocatalytic performance was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Impressively, the NiCo2O4 showed much higher electrocatalytic activity, lower overpotential and greater stability compared to that of only NiO or Co3O4 synthesized by the same method. The higher electrocatalytic activity is due to the high electron conductivity, large surface area of NiCo2O4 and the fast ion/electron transport in the electrode and at the electrolyte-electrode interface. This is important for further development of high performance non-platinum electrocatalysts for application in direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:23828628

  16. Human papillomavirus 16 E2 stability and transcriptional activation is enhanced by E1 via a direct protein-protein interaction

    SciTech Connect

    King, Lauren E.; Dornan, Edward S.; Donaldson, Mary M.; Morgan, Iain M.

    2011-05-25

    Human papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 interact with cellular factors to replicate the viral genome. E2 forms homodimers and binds to 12 bp palindromic sequences adjacent to the viral origin and recruits E1 to the origin. E1 forms a di-hexameric helicase complex that replicates the viral genome. This manuscript demonstrates that E1 stabilises the E2 protein, increasing the half life in both C33a and 293 T cells respectively. This stabilisation requires a direct protein--protein interaction. In addition, the E1 protein enhances E2 transcription function in a manner that suggests the E1 protein itself can contribute to transcriptional regulation not simply by E2 stabilisation but by direct stimulation of transcription. This activation of E2 transcription is again dependent upon an interaction with E1. Overall the results suggest that in the viral life cycle, co-expression of E1 with E2 can increase E2 stability and enhance E2 function.

  17. Austenite stabilization and high strength-elongation product of a low silicon aluminum-free hot-rolled directly quenched and dynamically partitioned steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Yun-Bo; Yang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Zhi-Ping; Peng, Fei; Ju, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Di

    2015-06-15

    Microstructures composed of lath martensite and retained austenite with volume fraction between 8.0 vol.% and 12.0 vol.% were obtained in a low-C low-Si Al-free steel through hot-rolling direct quenching and dynamical partitioning (HDQ&DP) processes. The austenite stabilization mechanism in the low-C low-Si Al-free steel under the special dynamical partitioning processes is investigated by analyzing the carbon partition behavior from martensite to austenite and the carbide precipitation-coarsening behavior in martensite laths combining with the possible hot rolling deformation inheritance. Results show that the satisfying retained austenite amount in currently studied low-Si Al-free HDQ&DP steel is caused by the high-efficiency carbon enrichment in the 30–80 nm thick regions of austenite near the interfaces in the hot-rolled ultra-fast cooled structure and the avoidance of serious carbides coarsening during the continuous cooling procedures. The excellent strength-elongation product reaching up to 26,000 MPa% shows that the involved HDQ&DP process is a promising method to develop a new generation of advanced high strength steel. - Highlights: • HDQ&DP processes were applied to a low-C low-Si Al-free steel. • Effective partitioning time during the continuous cooling processes is 1–220 s. • Retained austenite with volume fraction between 8.0 vol. % and 12.0 vol. % has been obtained. • The special austenite stabilization mechanism has been expounded.

  18. The Radical-Pair Mechanism of Magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Hore, P J; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Although it has been known for almost half a century that migratory birds can detect the direction of the Earth's magnetic field, the primary sensory mechanism behind this remarkable feat is still unclear. The leading hypothesis centers on radical pairs-magnetically sensitive chemical intermediates formed by photoexcitation of cryptochrome proteins in the retina. Our primary aim here is to explain the chemical and physical aspects of the radical-pair mechanism to biologists and the biological and chemical aspects to physicists. In doing so, we review the current state of knowledge on magnetoreception mechanisms. We dare to hope that this tutorial will stimulate new interdisciplinary experimental and theoretical work that will shed much-needed additional light on this fascinating problem in sensory biology. PMID:27216936

  19. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Syed Johar; Field, Erinn; Kibel, Adam S.; Mottrie, Alex; Weizer, Alon Z.; Wagner, Andrew; Hemal, Ashok K.; Scherr, Douglas S.; Schanne, Francis; Gaboardi, Franco; Wu, Guan; Peabody, James O.; Koauk, Jihad; Redorta, Joan Palou; Pattaras, John G.; Rha, Koon-Ho; Richstone, Lee; Balbay, M. Derya; Menon, Mani; Hayn, Mathew; Stoeckle, Micheal; Wiklund, Peter; Dasgupta, Prokar; Pruthi, Raj; Ghavamian, Reza; Khan, Shamim; Siemer, Stephan; Maatman, Thomas; Wilson, Timothy; Poulakis, Vassilis; Wilding, Greg; Guru, Khurshid A.

    2014-01-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC). Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium. PMID:25097319

  20. Ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the cyclohexyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Michael; Liu, Yanlin; Zhang, Jingsong

    2015-03-01

    Cycloalkanes are important components in conventional fuels and oil shale derived fuels and the combustion of cyclohexane fuels leads to the production of benzene, a pollutant precursor. One of the pathways from cyclohexane to benzene is through sequential hydrogen loss, including the cyclohexyl radical as an intermediate. The ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation dynamics of the cyclohexyl (c-C6H11) radical was studied for the first time using the high- n Rydberg atom time-of-flight (HRTOF) technique in the range of 232-262 nm. The translational energy distributions of the H-atom loss product channel, P (ET) 's, show a large translational energy release and a large fraction of average translational energy in the total excess energy, , from 232-262 nm. The H-atom product angular distribution is anisotropic with a positive β parameter. The most likely H-atom loss pathway is an axial H ejection from the β-carbon in cyclohexyl to form cyclohexene + H, which along with the positive β parameter, indicates that the transition dipole moment, μ, is perpendicular to the ring. The P (ET) and anisotropy of the H-atom loss product channel are significantly larger than those expected for a statistical unimolecular dissociation of a hot radical, indicating a non-statistical dissociation mechanism. The dissociation mechanism is consistent with direct dissociation on a repulsive excited state surface or on the repulsive part of the ground state surface to produce cyclohexene + H, possibly mediated by a conical intersection. Cyclohexyl is the largest radical so far showing a direct dissociation mechanism.

  1. Fluorescence probes to detect lipid-derived radicals.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Mito, Fumiya; Matsuoka, Yuta; Ide, Satsuki; Shikimachi, Kazushige; Fujiki, Ayano; Kusakabe, Daiki; Ishida, Yuma; Enoki, Masataka; Tada, Arisa; Ariyoshi, Miyuki; Yamasaki, Toshihide; Yamato, Mayumi

    2016-08-01

    Lipids and their metabolites are easily oxidized in chain reactions initiated by lipid radicals, forming lipid peroxidation products that include the electrophiles 4-hydroxynonenal and malondialdehyde. These markers can bind cellular macromolecules, causing inflammation, apoptosis and other damage. Methods to detect and neutralize the initiating radicals would provide insights into disease mechanisms and new therapeutic approaches. We describe the first high-sensitivity, specific fluorescence probe for lipid radicals, 2,2,6-trimethyl-4-(4-nitrobenzo[1,2,5]oxadiazol-7-ylamino)-6-pentylpiperidine-1-oxyl (NBD-Pen). NBD-Pen directly detected lipid radicals in living cells by turn-on fluorescence. In a rat model of hepatic carcinoma induced by diethylnitrosamine (DEN), NBD-Pen detected lipid radical generation within 1 h of DEN administration. The lipid radical scavenging moiety of NBD-Pen decreased inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress markers at 24 h after DEN, and liver tumor development at 12 weeks. Thus, we have developed a novel fluorescence probe that provides imaging information about lipid radical generation and potential therapeutic benefits in vivo. PMID:27294322

  2. Tar balls from Deep Water Horizon oil spill: environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR) formation during crude weathering.

    PubMed

    Kiruri, Lucy W; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawo

    2013-05-01

    Tar balls collected from the Gulf of Mexico shores of Louisiana and Florida after the BP oil spill have shown the presence of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra characteristic of organic free radicals as well as transition metal ions, predominantly iron(III) and manganese(II). Two types of organic radicals were distinguished: an asphaltene radical species typically found in crude oil (g = 2.0035) and a new type of radical resulting from the environmental transformations of crude (g = 2.0041-47). Pure asphaltene radicals are resonance stabilized over a polyaromatic structure and are stable in air and unreactive. The new radicals were identified as products of partial oxidation of crude components and result from the interaction of the oxidized aromatics with metal ion centers. These radicals are similar to semiquinone-type, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) previously observed in combustion-generated particulate and contaminated soils. PMID:23510127

  3. Electron spin resonance identification of a methyl associated organic radical in irradiated amorphous SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.R.; Leisure, R.G.

    1996-12-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) signal comprised of three resolved lines of equal 19.3 Gauss separation (3{times}19.3 G), but unequal amplitude, is observed in x-irradiated amorphous silicon dioxide. The radical appears exclusively in silica samples which also exhibit the methyl radical, a familiar indicator of trace carbon and hydrogen contamination. The 3{times}19.3 G signal is observed to grow most rapidly versus irradiation dose when methyl radical concentration is near maximum. This evidence suggests that the ESR signal is due to a radiolytic, organic radical which evolves after the methyl radical and, like the methyl radical, is trapped and stabilized in the amorphous silica network. Experimental methods of radical generation are presented, followed by discussion of models for the chemical structure of the 3{times}19.3 G radical. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Tar Balls from Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill: Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFR) Formation During Crude Weathering

    PubMed Central

    Kiruri, Lucy W.; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawo

    2014-01-01

    Tar balls collected from the Gulf of Mexico shores of Louisiana and Florida after the BP oil spill have shown the presence of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra characteristic of organic free radicals as well as transition metal ions, predominantly iron(III) and manganese(II). Two types of organic radicals were distinguished: an asphaltene radical species typically found in crude oil (g = 2.0035) and a new type of radical resulting from the environmental transformations of crude (g = 2.0041−47). Pure asphaltene radicals are resonance stabilized over a polyaromatic structure and are stable in air and unreactive. The new radicals were identified as products of partial oxidation of crude components and result from the interaction of the oxidized aromatics with metal ion centers. These radicals are similar to semiquinone-type, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) previously observed in combustion-generated particulate and contaminated soils. PMID:23510127

  5. Time-resolved study on the reactions of organic selenides with hydroxyl and oxide radicals, hydrated electrons, and H-atoms in aqueous solution, and DFT calculations of transients in comparison with sulfur analogues.

    PubMed

    Tobien, Thomas; Bonifacić, Marija; Naumov, Sergej; Asmus, Klaus-Dieter

    2010-07-01

    A complementary experimental and quantum chemical study has been undertaken on the reactivity, formation and properties of transients generated in the reaction of selected organic selenides with hydroxyl radicals, oxide radical ions, hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms in aqueous solution. A detailed study of the OH and O (-) reactions with Me(2)Se revealed the formation of the respective adduct-radicals as precursors of (Me(2)Se thereforeSeMe(2))(+) radical cations. In case of the neutral adduct radical Me(2)Se (OH) the conversion into the three-electron bonded dimer species proceeds, in part, via the molecular (Me(2)Se thereforeOH(2))(+) radical cation. Absolute rate constants have been determined for all the underlying processes. The respective reactions with hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms indicate that selenides exhibit a higher reactivity towards redox-active species than sulfides. A most interesting finding is that the reaction of Me(2)Se with H atoms is faster (k = 4.1 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) than the reduction by hydrated electrons (k = 2.1 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)), precluding an electron transfer as mechanistic background. The rationale is rather an effective dissociative attack of the hydrogen atom on the selenium. Both, the e(aq)(-)- and H -induced reductions of Me(2)Se and Me(2)S lead, under cleavage of CH(3) radicals, to the direct formation of selenol and thiol, respectively. Complementary quantum chemical studies, performed with Density Functional Theory (DFT) BHandHLYP methods, confirm this mechanism. They also reveal a generally higher thermodynamic stability of the Se-centered radicals relative to the S-centered ones, e.g., for the molecular radical anions (Me(2)Se) (-) (DeltaH-27 kJ mol(-1)) and (Me(2)S) (-) (DeltaH-16 kJ mol(-1)). Despite of these stabilization energies the calculations indicate an instantaneous Se/S-CH(3) bond lengthening in the respective molecular radical anions. The same applies for the reaction of Me(2)S and Me(2)Se with

  6. Unstructured Grid Euler Method Assessment for Longitudinal and Lateral/Directional Stability Analysis of the HSR Reference H Configuration at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Transonic Euler computations, based on unstructured grid methodology, are performed for a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration, designated as the Reference H configuration within the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. The predicted results are correlated with appropriate experimental wind-tunnel data for the baseline configuration with and without control surface deflections for a range of angle of attack at M(sub infinity) = 0.95. Good correlations between the predictions and measured data have been obtained for the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline configuration. The incremental effects in the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics due to horizontal rail deflections as well as wing leading-edge and trailing-edge flap deflections have also been predicted reasonably well. Computational results and correlations with data are also presented for the lateral and directional stability characteristics for a range of angle of attack at a constant sideslip angle as well as a range of sideslip angles at a constant angle of attack. In addition, the results are presented to assess the computational method performance and convergence characteristics.

  7. Detection of DNA–protein crosslinks (DPCs) by novel direct fluorescence labeling methods: distinct stabilities of aldehyde and radiation-induced DPCs

    PubMed Central

    Shoulkamy, Mahmoud I.; Nakano, Toshiaki; Ohshima, Makiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Uzawa, Akiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ide, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are covalently trapped on DNA to form DNA–protein crosslinks (DPCs) when cells are exposed to DNA-damaging agents. DPCs interfere with many aspects of DNA transactions. The current DPC detection methods indirectly measure crosslinked proteins (CLPs) through DNA tethered to proteins. However, a major drawback of such methods is the non-linear relationship between the amounts of DNA and CLPs, which makes quantitative data interpretation difficult. Here we developed novel methods of DPC detection based on direct CLP measurement, whereby CLPs in DNA isolated from cells are labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and quantified by fluorometry or western blotting using anti-FITC antibodies. Both formats successfully monitored the induction and elimination of DPCs in cultured cells exposed to aldehydes and mouse tumors exposed to ionizing radiation (carbon-ion beams). The fluorometric and western blotting formats require 30 and 0.3 μg of DNA, respectively. Analyses of the isolated genomic DPCs revealed that both aldehydes and ionizing radiation produce two types of DPC with distinct stabilities. The stable components of aldehyde-induced DPCs have half-lives of up to days. Interestingly, that of radiation-induced DPCs has an infinite half-life, suggesting that the stable DPC component exerts a profound effect on DNA transactions over many cell cycles. PMID:22730301

  8. Stability-indicating determination of trimetazidine dihydrochloride inthe presence of two of its related substances using a direct GC/MS method.

    PubMed

    Belal, Tarek S; Awad, Tamer; Clark, C Randall

    2014-01-01

    A novel, simple, direct, and selective stability- indicating GC/MS procedure was developed for the determination of the anti-ischemic drug trimetazidine dihydrochloride (TMZ) in the presence of two of its related substances (potential impurities), namely, 2,3,4-trimethoxybenzyl alcohol (T1) and 2,3,4-trimethoxybenzaldehyde (T2). The method involved resolution of the undeilvatized compounds using a 100% dimethylpolysiloxane (Rtx-1) capillary column, and MS detection was carried out in the electron-impact mode. The peaks of the three compounds eluted at retention times 11.69, 11.92, and 15.47 min for T1, T2, and TMZ, respectively. Quantification of the parent drug TMZ was based on measuring its peak area. The reliability and analytical performance of the proposed method, including linearity, range, precision, accuracy, selectivity, detection, and quantification limits, were statistically validated. The calibration curve of TMZ was linear over the range 100-600 μg/mL. The proposed method was successfully applied to the assay of TMZ in several commercially available pharmaceutical formulations with recoveries not lessthan 96.2%. PMID:25632428

  9. Electronic structures, vibrational spectra, and revised assignment of aniline and its radical cation: Theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, Piotr M.; Zierkiewicz, Wiktor; Michalska, Danuta; Hobza, Pavel

    2003-06-01

    Comprehensive studies of the molecular and electronic structures, vibrational frequencies, and infrared and Raman intensities of the aniline radical cation, C6H5NH2+ have been performed by using the unrestricted density functional (UB3LYP) and second-order Møller-Plesset (UMP2) methods with the extended 6-311++G(df,pd) basis set. For comparison, analogous calculations were carried out for the closed-shell neutral aniline. The studies provided detailed insight into the bonding changes that take place in aniline upon ionization. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has revealed that the pπ-radical conjugative interactions are of prime importance in stabilizing the planar, quinoid-type structure of the aniline radical cation. It is shown that the natural charges calculated for aniline are consistent with the chemical properties of this molecule (an ortho- and para-directing power of the NH2 group in electrophilic substitutions), whereas Mulliken charges are not reliable. The theoretical vibrational frequencies of aniline, calculated by the B3LYP method, show excellent agreement with the available experimental data. In contrast, the MP2 method is deficient in predicting the frequencies of several modes in aniline, despite the use of the extended basis set in calculations. The frequencies of aniline radical cation, calculated at the UB3LYP/6-311++G(df,pd) level, are in very good agreement with the recently reported experimental data from zero kinetic energy photoelectron and infrared depletion spectroscopic studies. The clear- cut assignment of the IR and Raman spectra of the investigated molecules has been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distributions. Several bands in the spectra have been reassigned. It is shown that ionization of aniline can be easily identified by the appearance of the very strong band at about 1490 cm-1, in the Raman spectrum. The redshift of the N-H stretching frequencies and the blueshift of the C-H stretching

  10. Peroxy radical partitioning during the AMMA radical intercomparison exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Hernández, M. D.; Stone, D.; Brookes, D. M.; Commane, R.; Reeves, C. E.; Huntrieser, H.; Heard, D. E.; Monks, P. S.; Burrows, J. P.; Schlager, H.; Kartal, D.; Evans, M. J.; Floquet, C. F. A.; Ingham, T.; Methven, J.; Parker, A. E.

    2010-11-01

    Peroxy radicals were measured onboard two scientific aircrafts during the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) campaign in summer 2006. This paper reports results from the flight on 16 August 2006 during which measurements of HO2 by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy at low pressure (LIF-FAGE) and total peroxy radicals (RO2* = HO2+ΣRO2, R = organic chain) by two similar instruments based on the peroxy radical chemical amplification (PeRCA) technique were subject of a blind intercomparison. The German DLR-Falcon and the British FAAM-BAe-146 flew wing tip to wing tip for about 30 min making concurrent measurements on 2 horizontal level runs at 697 and 485 hPa over the same geographical area in Burkina Faso. A full set of supporting measurements comprising photolysis frequencies, and relevant trace gases like CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and a wider range of VOCs were collected simultaneously. Results are discussed on the basis of the characteristics and limitations of the different instruments used. Generally, no data bias are identified and the RO2* data available agree quite reasonably within the instrumental errors. The [RO2*]/[HO2] ratios, which vary between 1:1 and 3:1, as well as the peroxy radical variability, concur with variations in photolysis rates and in other potential radical precursors. Model results provide additional information about dominant radical formation and loss processes.

  11. Peroxy radical partitioning during the AMMA radical intercomparison exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Hernández, M. D.; Stone, D.; Brookes, D. M.; Commane, R.; Reeves, C. E.; Huntrieser, H.; Heard, D. E.; Monks, P. S.; Burrows, J. P.; Schlager, H.; Kartal, D.; Evans, M. J.; Floquet, C. F. A.; Ingham, T.; Methven, J.; Parker, A. E.

    2010-04-01

    Peroxy radicals were measured onboard two scientific aircrafts during the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) campaign in summer 2006. This paper reports results from the flight on 16 August 2006 during which measurements of HO2 by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy at low pressure (LIF-FAGE) and total peroxy radicals (RO2*=HO2+ΣRO2, R= organic chain) by two similar instruments based on the peroxy radical chemical amplification (PerCA) technique were subject of a blind intercomparison. The German DLR-Falcon and the British FAAM-BAe-146 flew wing tip to wing tip for about 30 min making concurrent measurements on 2 horizontal level runs at 697 and 485 hPa over the same geographical area in Burkina Faso. A full set of supporting measurements comprising photolysis frequencies, and relevant trace gases like CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and a wider range of VOCs were collected simultaneously. Results are discussed on the basis of the characteristics and limitations of the different instruments used. Generally, no data bias are identified and the RO2* data available agree quite reasonably within the instrumental errors. The [RO2*]/[HO2] ratios, which vary between 1:1 and 3:1, as well as the peroxy radical variability, concur with variations in photolysis rates and in other potential radical precursors. Model results provide additional information about dominant radical formation and loss processes.

  12. Radical formation in the coma from photodissociation of ice grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William M.; Gerth, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Long ago visual observations of comets suggested that there are jets in comets but it has only been recently that A'Hearn et al. have proven that some of these jets are due to emission from the CN radical. Recent studies in the lab have shown that CN radicals can be ejected directly into the gas phase from the photolysis of frozen vapors if the parent molecular has been excited to repulsive excited state. This later observation suggests that the jets that have been observed may be due to photodissociation of icy grains in the coma. A theory of radical formation from icy grains is presented. It is shown that direct formation of free radicals in the coma is an effective way to produce radicals from icy grains in the coma. The model predicts that icy grains could produce from 6 to 800,000 OH radicals/s per grain depending upon whether the radius of the grain is 0.3 to 100 micron.

  13. Photoinduced reactions of 1-(dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl and cyclohexyl radicals in low-temperature solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Takada, Tomoya; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Lund, Anders

    2001-06-01

    Photoinduced reactions of 1-(dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl and cyclohexyl radicals in 77 K solids were studied by the ESR method. 1-(Dimethylethyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl is converted to 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentyl radical with photoirradiation of 254 nm light. A hydrogen atom of methyl groups can hence directly transfer to the radical site at a carbon atom other than an adjacent one in the photoinduced reactions of alkyl radicals. Cyclohexyl radical is converted to cyclopentylmethyl radical with irradiation of 254 nm light. The photolysis of cyclohexyl radical causes C-C bond scission, and results in the formation of 5-hexenyl radical. It is then converted to cyclopentylmethyl radical through intramolecular rearrangement.

  14. Complications of Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W.; Kelly, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy and orthotopic reconstruction significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in minimal invasive and robotic technology. In this review, we will discuss early and late complications, as well as describe efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality, with a focus on ileal orthotopic bladder substitute (OBS). We summarise efforts to minimize morbidity and mortality including enhanced recovery as well as early and late complications seen after radical cystectomy and OBS. Centralisation of complex cancer services in the UK has led to a fall in mortality and high volume institutions have a significantly lower rate of 30-day mortality compared to low volume institutions. Enhanced recovery pathways have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay and potentially a reduction in morbidity. Early complications of radical cystectomy occur as a direct result of the surgery itself while late complications, which can occur even after 10 years after surgery, are due to urinary diversion. OBS represents the ideal urinary diversion for patients without contraindications. However, all patients with OBS should have regular long term follow-up for oncological surveillance and to identify complications should they arise. PMID:26697063

  15. Investigating Biological Assumptions through Radical Reimplementation.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Joel; Stanley, Kenneth O

    2015-01-01

    An important goal in both artificial life and biology is uncovering the most general principles underlying life, which might catalyze both our understanding of life and engineering lifelike machines. While many such general principles have been hypothesized, conclusively testing them is difficult because life on Earth provides only a singular example from which to infer. To circumvent this limitation, this article formalizes an approach called radical reimplementation. The idea is to investigate an abstract biological hypothesis by intentionally reimplementing its main principles to diverge maximally from existing natural examples. If the reimplementation successfully exhibits properties resembling biology, it may support the underlying hypothesis better than an alternative example inspired more directly by nature. The approach thereby provides a principled alternative to a common tradition of defending and minimizing deviations from nature in artificial life. This work reviews examples that can be interpreted through the lens of radical reimplementation to yield potential insights into biology despite having purposely unnatural experimental setups. In this way, radical reimplementation can help renew the relevance of computational systems for investigating biological theory and can act as a practical philosophical tool to help separate the fundamental features of terrestrial biology from the epiphenomenal. PMID:25514432

  16. Chemical Nonlinearities and Radical Pair Lifetime Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Gregory

    2013-03-01

    Much attention has recently developed around chemical reactions that depend on applied static magnetic fields as weak as earth's. This interest is largely motivated by experiments that implicate the role of spin-selective radical pair recombination in biological magnetic sensing. Existing literature uses a straightforward calculation to approximate the expected lifetime of coherent radical pairs as a function of the minimum RF amplitude that is observed to disrupt magnetic navigation, apparently by decohering the radical pair via electronic Zeeman excitations. But we show that chemical nonlinearities can preclude direct computation of coherent pair lifetime without considering the cellular signalling mechanisms involved, and discuss whether it can explain the surprising fragility of some animals' compass sense. In particular, we demonstrate that an autocatalytic cycle can introduce threshold effects on the disruption sensitivity to applied oscillatory magnetic fields. We will show examples in the mean-field limit and consider the consequences of noise and fluctuations in the Freidlin-Wentzell picture of perturbed dynamical systems.

  17. Radical induction theory of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pravda, Jay

    2005-01-01

    To propose a new pathogenesis called Radical Induction to explain the genesis and progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). UC is an inflammatory bowel disease. Colonic inflammation in UC is mediated by a buildup of white blood cells (WBCs) within the colonic mucosal lining; however, to date there is no answer for why WBCs initially enter the colonic mucosa to begin with. A new pathogenesis termed “Radical Induction Theory” is proposed to explain this and states that excess un-neutralized hydrogen peroxide, produced within colonic epithelial cells as a result of aberrant cellular metabolism, diffuses through cell membranes to the extracellular space where it is converted to the highly damaging hydroxyl radical resulting in oxidative damage to structures comprising the colonic epithelial barrier. Once damaged, the barrier is unable to exclude highly immunogenic fecal bacterial antigens from invading the normally sterile submucosa. This antigenic exposure provokes an initial immune response of WBC infiltration into the colonic mucosa. Once present in the mucosa, WBCs are stimulated to secrete toxins by direct exposure to fecal bacteria leading to mucosal ulceration and bloody diarrhea characteristic of this disease. PMID:15832404

  18. School Finance-Radical Departure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimple, James

    1983-01-01

    It is proposed that New Jersey assume approximately 70 percent of the cost of its public schools. Several other proposals are presented, all a radical departure from current school funding practices. (BW)

  19. Free radical inactivation of pepsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josimović, Lj; Ruvarac, I.; Janković, I.; Jovanović, S. V.

    1994-06-01

    Alkylperoxy radicals containing one, two or three chlorine atoms, CO -2, O 2 - were reacted with pepsin in aqueous solutions. It was found that only Cl 3COO and CO -2 inactive pepsin, attacking preferentially the disulfide bridge. Transient spectra obtained upon completion of the Cl 3COO + pepsin reaction at pH 5 indicate that 20% of initially produced Cl 3COO radicals oxidizes tryptophan residues, and 40% disulfide bridges. The inactivation induced by the Cl 3COO radical increases at lower pH, and the maximal inactivation, Gin = 5.8, was observed at pH 1.5. The inactivation of pepsin by CO -2 radicals depends on the absorbed dose. The maximal inactivation, Gin = 4.5, was determined in the dose range from 38 to 53 Gy.

  20. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  1. [Alcohol and free oxygen radicals].

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Manso, C F

    1993-05-01

    Oxygen free radicals may be generated during ethanol metabolization by cytochrome P450, or due to the formation of xanthine oxidase by ethanol effect on xanthine dehydrogenase. After transformation into acetaldehyde, the metabolism of this compound by xanthine oxidase or by aldehyde oxidase also generates oxygen radicals. We present the hypothesis of a vicious cycle during ethanol metabolization by aldehyde oxidase, which would amplify the process and be responsible for an increased degree of lipid peroxidation. PMID:8393265

  2. Communication: Real time observation of unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates to OH radical products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Barber, Victoria P.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; McCoy, Anne B.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2016-02-01

    In the atmosphere, a dominant loss process for carbonyl oxide intermediates produced from alkene ozonolysis is also an important source of hydroxyl radicals. The rate of appearance of OH radicals is revealed through direct time-domain measurements following vibrational activation of prototypical methyl-substituted Criegee intermediates under collision-free conditions. Complementary theoretical calculations predict the unimolecular decay rate for the Criegee intermediates in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen transfer that leads to OH products. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates of ca. 108 and 107 s-1 for syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO, respectively, at energies near the barrier. Tunneling through the barrier, computed from high level electronic structure theory and experimentally validated, makes a significant contribution to the decay rate. Extension to thermally averaged unimolecular decay of stabilized Criegee intermediates under atmospheric conditions yields rates that are six orders of magnitude slower than those evaluated directly in the barrier region.

  3. Communication: Real time observation of unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates to OH radical products.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Barber, Victoria P; Klippenstein, Stephen J; McCoy, Anne B; Lester, Marsha I

    2016-02-14

    In the atmosphere, a dominant loss process for carbonyl oxide intermediates produced from alkene ozonolysis is also an important source of hydroxyl radicals. The rate of appearance of OH radicals is revealed through direct time-domain measurements following vibrational activation of prototypical methyl-substituted Criegee intermediates under collision-free conditions. Complementary theoretical calculations predict the unimolecular decay rate for the Criegee intermediates in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen transfer that leads to OH products. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates of ca. 10(8) and 10(7) s(-1) for syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO, respectively, at energies near the barrier. Tunneling through the barrier, computed from high level electronic structure theory and experimentally validated, makes a significant contribution to the decay rate. Extension to thermally averaged unimolecular decay of stabilized Criegee intermediates under atmospheric conditions yields rates that are six orders of magnitude slower than those evaluated directly in the barrier region. PMID:26874475

  4. Scavenging of hydroxyl radical by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Berczyński, Paweł; Kruk, Irena; Michalska, Teresa; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2012-01-01

    The direct effects of the four catecholamines (CATs), adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (D) and isoproterenol (I), on free radicals were investigated using the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) and hydroxyl radial (HO(•)). The CATs examined were found to inhibit the ESR signal intensity of DPPH(•) in a dose-dependent manner over the range 0.1-2.5 mmol/L in the following order: NA > A > I > D, with IC50= 0.30 ± 0.03 for noradrenaline and IC50= 0.86 ± 0.02 for dopamine. Hydroxyl radicals were produced using a Fenton reaction in the presence of the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), and ESR technique was applied to detect the CATs reactivity toward the radicals. The reaction rates constant (k(r)) of CATs with HO(•) were found to be in the order of 10(9)  L/mol/s, and the k(r) value for noradrenaline was the highest (k(r)= 8.4 × 10(9)  L/mol/s). The CATs examined exhibited also a strong decrease in the light emission (62-73% at 1 mmol/L concentration and 79-89% at 2 mmol/L concentration) from a Fenton-like reaction. These reactions may be relevant to the biological action of these important polyphenolic compounds. PMID:22238226

  5. Solvation of benzophenone anion radical in ethanol and ethanol/2-methyltetrahydrofuran mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yoshida, H.

    1988-01-28

    The electron spin-echo modulations and the absoprtion spectra of benzophenone anion radicals generated by ..gamma..-irradiation in the glassy matrices of ethanol and ethanol2-methyltetrahydrofuran mixtures have been measured for elucidating the mechanism of spectral shift observed during the solvation of the anion radicals in alcohols. The anion radical generated at 4.2 K in the ethanol matrix maintains the same solvation structure as that of neutral benzophenone. At 77 K ethanol molecules solvate the anion radical by orienting the O-H dipoles toward the anion radical. The anion radical is hydrogen-bonded by two ethanol molecules through the p/sub z/ orbital on the benzophenone oxygen which composes the ..pi.. orbitals of anion radical. Three kinds of anion radicals are observed in the mixed matrix at 77 K. Two of them are essentially the same as those observed in the ethanol matrix at 4.2 and 77 K. The third has the absorption maximum at 700 nm and is attributed to the anion radical hydrogen-bonded by one ethanol molecule through the p/sub z/ orbital. It is concluded that the spectral shift observed in alcohols is caused by the stabilization of a SOMO ..pi..* orbital induced by the hydrogen bonding with the (RO)H--O--H(OR) angle perpendicular to the molecular plane of the anion radical

  6. Ethyl Radical Ejection During Photodecomposition of Butanone on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-10-15

    The photodecomposition of acetone and butanone were examined on the (110) surface of rutile TiO2 using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and photon stimulated desorption (PSD). In both cases, photodecomposition was proceeded by a required thermal reaction between the adsorbed ketone and coadsorbed oxygen resulting in a diolate species. The diolate photodecomposed by ejection of an organic radical from the surface leaving behind a carboxylate species. In the acetone case, only methyl radical PSD was detected and acetate was left on the surface. In the butanone case there was a possibility of either methyl or ethyl radical ejection, with propionate or acetate left behind, respectively. However, only ethyl radical PSD was detected and the species left on the surface (acetate) was the same as in the acetone case. The preference for ethyl radical ejection is linked to the greater thermal stability of the ethyl radical over that of the methyl radical. Unlike in the acetone case, where the ejected methyl radicals did not participate in thermal chemistry on the TiO2(110) surface after photoactivation of the acetone diolate, ethyl radicals photodesorbing at 100 K from butanone diolate showed a preference for dehydrogenation to ethene through the influence of coadsorbed oxygen. These results reemphasize the mechanistic importance of organic radical production during photooxidation reactions on TiO2 surface. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  7. Ethyl Radical Ejection During Photodecomposition of Butanone on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-10-15

    The photodecomposition of acetone and butanone were examined on the (110) surface of rutile TiO2 using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and photon stimulated desorption (PSD). In both cases, photodecomposition was proceeded by a required thermal reaction between the adsorbed ketone and coadsorbed oxygen resulting in a diolate species. The diolate photodecomposed by ejection of an organic radical from the surface leaving behind a carboxylate species. In the acetone case, only methyl radical PSD was detected and acetate was left on the surface. In the butanone case there was a possibility of either methyl or ethyl radical ejection, with propionate or acetate left behind, respectively. However, only ethyl radical PSD was detected and the species left on the surface (acetate) was the same as in the acetone case. The preference for ethyl radical ejection is linked to the greater thermal stability of the ethyl radical over that of the methyl radical. Unlike in the acetone case, where the ejected methyl radicals did not participate in thermal chemistry on the TiO2(110) surface after photoactivation of the acetone diolate, ethyl radicals photodesorbing at 100 K from butanone diolate showed a preference for dehydrogenation to ethene through the influence of coadsorbed oxygen. These results reemphasize the mechanistic importance of organic radical production during photooxidation reactions on TiO2 surface.

  8. Jet Diffusion Flame Stabilization via Pulsed Plasma Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungal, Godfrey

    2008-10-01

    In this work we investigate the use of high repetition rate pulsed plasma sources as a means to enhance the stability of jet diffusion flames for application to practical combustion devices. Such plasma sources have recently become popular owing to their low power requirements and their proven abilities to ignite leaner mixtures and hold stable flames. They are known to create a radical pool which can enhance combustion chemistry and thus provide increased flame stability. By first investigating a fully premixed methane/air environment we show that the resulting radical species quickly decay but leave behind a set of stable chemical species. Thus, the plasma source appears to act as a fuel reformer leading to the formation of a ``cool flame'' -- a trailing zone of weak oxidation consisting of a slightly elevated temperature stream of products containing small amounts of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These two key species are then directly responsible for the enhanced flame behaviors. Flame stability enhancements are shown for methane jets in co-flow and cross-flow in room temperature air, and in elevated temperature vitiated air environments. Elevated ambient temperatures deplete the hydrogen and carbon monoxide due to enhanced oxidation, so while there is an enhancement to flame stability, the beneficial effects diminish with increasing temperatures in a non-linear fashion, and ultimately, provide very limited benefits at ˜1000K ambient temperature for the present studies. The conclusions here are supported by simple plasma and chemical kinetic modeling and spectroscopic and chemiluminescence measurements.

  9. Fragmentation Pathways in the Uracil Radical Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula; Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.

    2012-08-24

    We investigate pathways for fragmentation in the uracil radical cation using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We focus on the main fragments produced in pump–probe dissociative ionization experiments. These are fragments with mass to charge ratios (m/z) of 69, 28, 41, and 42. Barriers to dissociation along the ground ionic surface are reported, which provide an estimate of the energetic requirements for the production of the main fragments. Finally, direct and sequential fragmentation mechanisms have been analyzed, and it is concluded that sequential fragmentation after production of fragment with m/z 69 is the dominant mechanism for the production of the smaller fragments.

  10. Spectroscopy of Organometallic Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, Michael D.

    2015-12-14

    In this grant, we have been mainly concerned with characterization of the chemical bond between transition metals and carbon, although some work has also been directed toward understanding the bonding between transition metals and other main group elements. We have also undertaken some studies on the actinide metals, U and Th.

  11. Exergonic and Spontaneous Production of Radicals through Beryllium Bonds.

    PubMed

    Brea, Oriana; Alkorta, Ibon; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Elguero, José; Corral, Inés

    2016-07-18

    High-level ab initio calculations show that the formation of radicals, by the homolytic bond fission of Y-R (Y=F, OH, NH2 ; R=CH3 , NH2 , OH, F, SiH3 , PH2 , SH, Cl, NO) bonds is dramatically favored by the association of the molecule with BeX2 (X=H and Cl) derivatives. This finding is a consequence of two concomitant effects, the significant activation of the Y-R bond after the formation of the beryllium bond, and the huge stabilization of the F(.) (OH(.) , NH2 (.) ) radical upon BeX2 attachment. In those cases where R is an electronegative group, the formation of the radicals is not only exergonic, but spontaneous. PMID:27308835

  12. π-Radical to σ-Radical Tautomerization in One-Electron-Oxidized 1-Methylcytosine and Its Analogs.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Bishop, Casandra T; Wiegand, Tyler J; Hindi, Ragda M; Adhikary, Ananya; Sevilla, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    In this work, iminyl σ-radical formation in several one-electron-oxidized cytosine analogs, including 1-MeC, cidofovir, 2'-deoxycytidine (dCyd), and 2'-deoxycytidine 5'-monophosphate (5'-dCMP), were investigated in homogeneous, aqueous (D2O or H2O) glassy solutions at low temperatures by employing electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Upon employing density functional theory (DFT) (DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method), the calculated hyperfine coupling constant (HFCC) values of iminyl σ-radical agree quite well with the experimentally observed ones, thus confirming its assignment. ESR and DFT studies show that the cytosine iminyl σ-radical is a tautomer of the deprotonated cytosine π-cation radical [cytosine π-aminyl radical, C(N4-H)(•)]. Employing 1-MeC samples at various pHs ranging from ca. 8 to 11, ESR studies show that the tautomeric equilibrium between C(N4-H)(•) and the iminyl σ-radical at low temperature is too slow to be established without added base. ESR and DFT studies agree that, in the iminyl σ-radical, the unpaired spin is localized on the exocyclic nitrogen (N4) in an in-plane pure p-orbital. This gives rise to an anisotropic nitrogen hyperfine coupling (Azz = 40 G) from N4 and a near isotropic β-nitrogen coupling of 9.7 G from the cytosine ring nitrogen at N3. Iminyl σ-radical should exist in its N3-protonated form, as the N3-protonated iminyl σ-radical is stabilized in solution by over 30 kcal/mol (ΔG = -32 kcal/mol) over its conjugate base, the N3-deprotonated form. This is the first observation of an isotropic β-hyperfine ring nitrogen coupling in an N-centered DNA radical. Our theoretical calculations predict that the cytosine iminyl σ-radical can be formed in double-stranded DNA by a radiation-induced ionization-deprotonation process that is only 10 kcal/mol above the lowest energy path. PMID:26237072

  13. Pathogens and fecal indicators in waste stabilization pond systems with direct reuse for irrigation: Fate and transport in water, soil and crops.

    PubMed

    Verbyla, M E; Iriarte, M M; Mercado Guzmán, A; Coronado, O; Almanza, M; Mihelcic, J R

    2016-05-01

    Wastewater use for irrigation is expanding globally, and information about the fate and transport of pathogens in wastewater systems is needed to complete microbial risk assessments and develop policies to protect public health. The lack of maintenance for wastewater treatment facilities in low-income areas and developing countries results in sludge accumulation and compromised performance over time, creating uncertainty about the contamination of soil and crops. The fate and transport of pathogens and fecal indicators was evaluated in waste stabilization ponds with direct reuse for irrigation, using two systems in Bolivia as case studies. Results were compared with models from the literature that have been recommended for design. The removal of Escherichia coli in both systems was adequately predicted by a previously-published dispersed flow model, despite more than 10years of sludge accumulation. However, a design equation for helminth egg removal overestimated the observed removal, suggesting that this equation may not be appropriate for systems with accumulated sludge. To assess the contamination of soil and crops, ratios were calculated of the pathogen and fecal indicator concentrations in soil or on crops to their respective concentrations in irrigation water (termed soil-water and crop-water ratios). Ratios were similar within each group of microorganisms but differed between microorganism groups, and were generally below 0.1mLg(-1) for coliphage, between 1 and 100mLg(-1) for Giardia and Cryptosporidium, and between 100 and 1000mLg(-1) for helminth eggs. This information can be used for microbial risk assessments to develop safe water reuse policies in support of the United Nations' 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda. PMID:26881733

  14. Crystalline bipyridinium radical complexes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barnes, Jonathan C.; Li, Hao; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Basuray, Ashish Neil; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2015-09-01

    Described herein are methods of generating 4,4'-bipyridinium radical cations (BIPY.sup..cndot.+), and methods for utilizing the radical-radical interactions between two or more BIPY.sup..cndot.+ radical cations that ensue for the creation of novel materials for applications in nanotechnology. Synthetic methodologies, crystallographic engineering techniques, methods of physical characterization, and end uses are described.

  15. Identification of free radical intermediates in oxidized wine using electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ryan J; Andersen, Mogens L; Skibsted, Leif H; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2009-05-27

    Free radicals are thought to be key intermediates in the oxidation of wine, but their nature has not been established. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect and identify several free radical species in wine under oxidative conditions with the aid of spin traps. The 1-hydroxylethyl radical was the sole radical species observed when α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone was used as a spin trap in a heated (55 °C), low-sulfite (15 mg L(-1)) red wine. This radical appears to arise from ethanol oxidation via the hydroxyl radical, and this latter species was confirmed by using a high concentration (1.5 M) of the 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide spin trap, thus providing the first direct evidence of the Fenton reaction in wine. Hydroxyl radical formation in wine was corroborated by converting hydroxyl radicals to methyl radicals by its reaction with dimethyl sulfoxide. The novel spin trap 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl 5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide was also used in this study to identify sulfite radicals in wine for the first time. This spin trap has also been shown to trap hydroperoxyl radicals, the generation of which is predicted in wine; however, no evidence of this species was observed. PMID:19358607

  16. Role of alkoxyl radicals on the fluorescein-based ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) assay.

    PubMed

    Dorta, E; Atala, E; Aspee, A; Speisky, H; Lissi, E; Lopez-Alarcon, C

    2014-10-01

    During the last decades the ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) assay has been widely employed to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant capacity of polyphenol-rich fruits, vegetables and beverages. The method employs fluorescein (FLH) as target molecule and AAPH (2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride) as the source of peroxyl radicals (ROO•). The protection of FLH, afforded by antioxidants (XH), is often characterized by kinetic profiles with clear lag times (LT), which are directly associated with the stoichiometry (n) of the XH-ROO• reaction. However, even for simple phenolic compounds, the LT measured imply large n values (defined as the number of ROO• moles trapped by each antioxidant molecule) which cannot be explained by a simple reaction mechanism. Nonetheless, they can be explained when considering the formation of alkoxyl radicals (RO•) from the recombination of two AAPH-derived ROO•. In the present work, we provide kinetic data showing that, in the zero order kinetic limit of FLH consumption, there is a low reaction rate incompatible with total trapping of ROO•. Thus, the consumption of FLH should be mostly related to its reaction with RO•. In addition, we present data regarding the assumption that in competitive measurements, the LT is due to efficient trapping of the ROO• by the added phenols, leading to high n values (1.7 to 23) for mono and polyphenols. These values are not in agreement with kinetic studies of the antioxidant consumption mediated by the presence of AAPH carried out by HPLC-DAD technique, which imply a competition by RO•. The results suggest that the use of FLH as probe at low concentrations give, for several antioxidants, ORAC values mainly related to their reaction towards RO• radicals instead of primary ROO•radicals. PMID:26461359

  17. Free radicals and the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes: beta-cell cytokine-mediated free radical generation via cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, Tahereh; Vasquez-Weldon, Angelica; Moore, Danny R; Kotake, Yashige

    2003-08-01

    Free radical formation evoked by proinflammatory cytokines has been suggested to be involved in the destruction of beta-cells in the course of type 1 diabetes development. However, there is no direct evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, we used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with spin-trapping methodology to directly determine whether cytokines give rise to free radical formation in the islets. Our results demonstrate that direct, in vivo administration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (1,000 units), interleukin-1beta (1,000 units), and interferon-gamma (2,000 units) into the rat pancreas through a bile duct cannula leads to the formation of lipid-derived free radicals in this tissue. These free radicals most likely are generated by the beta-cells because previous depletion of these cells by streptozotocin abolished the cytokine-induced free radical formation. Furthermore, macrophage depletion was found to decrease the production of free radicals. Inhibition of the enzyme inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) significantly diminished the free radicals' signal intensity, implicating these factors in the formation of free radicals. We have also demonstrated that cytokine treatment leads to the activation of NF-kappaB in the pancreatic islets of the rats. PMID:12882915

  18. Recombination Coefficient Measurements of O and N radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harmeet; Coburn, John; Graves, David

    1999-10-01

    Surface recombination of radicals in low-pressure high-density plasmas has direct influence on the neutral and ionic composition of the plasma. While, electron impact dissociation of molecules is the dominant mechanism for creation of radicals, the surface recombination of radicals is often expected to be the dominant loss mechanism. We have a combination of measurements and a model to determine the recombination coefficients of O and N, to O2 and N2, respectively on the stainless steel walls of our inductively coupled plasma chamber. The radial variation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is measured using a tuned, cylindrical Langmuir probe. The number density of the molecular species is measured using line-of-sight modulated beam mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometer is differentially pumped in three stages to ensure a good beam to background signal ratio. The radical absolute number density is measured using appearance potential mass spectrometry with the aforementioned mass spectrometer. The recombination coefficient is calculated using a balance of the volume-generation and surface-loss rates of the radicals in the plasma. The generation rate of the radicals is calculated using the number density measurements of the parent molecule and the spatially resolved EEDFs. At approximately 330 K on stainless steel, the recombination coefficient for O is 0.16, and recombination coefficient for N is 0.07.

  19. Is Silybin the Best Free Radical Scavenger Compound in Silymarin?

    PubMed

    Reina, Miguel; Martínez, Ana

    2016-05-26

    Silymarin is a natural mixture with beneficial properties for health, specifically due to its antiradical characteristics. The major components of this mixture are silybin (SIL), silychristin (SILYC), isosilybin (ISOSIL), silydianin (SILYD), and taxifolin (TAX). In this report, the electronic properties of these substances are investigated using density functional theory calculations, mainly in order to fully understand the free radical scavenger properties of these compounds. Optimized geometries and Raman spectra are reported. These results could be experimentally useful for identifying some of the major components of the mixture. The relative abundance of deprotonated species under physiological conditions is also included. The free radical scavenger capacity is studied in relation to three mechanisms: the single electron transfer (SET), the radical adduct formation (RAF), and the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). According to this investigation, the HAT mechanism is the most efficient mechanism for scavenging free radicals for these compounds followed by the RAF mechanism where intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed in order to stabilize the (•)OOH free radical. A particularly important factor is that none of the compounds being studied showed an outstanding antiradical capacity performance compared to the others. In this sense, silymarin is an interesting mixture with antiradical properties and we now know that one single component should be as effective as the mixture. PMID:27149000

  20. Standard Electrode Potentials Involving Radicals in Aqueous Solution: Inorganic Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, David A.; Huie, Robert E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Merenyi, Gabor; Neta, Pedatsur; Ruscic, Branko; Stanbury, David M.; Steenken, Steen; Wardman, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Recommendations are made for standard potentials involving select inorganic radicals in aqueous solution at 25 °C. These recommendations are based on a critical and thorough literature review and also by performing derivations from various literature reports. The recommended data are summarized in tables of standard potentials, Gibbs energies of formation, radical pKa’s, and hemicolligation equilibrium constants. In all cases, current best estimates of the uncertainties are provided. An extensive set of Data Sheets is appended that provide original literature references, summarize the experimental results, and describe the decisions and procedures leading to each of the recommendations

  1. Flight Investigation of Effect of Various Vertical-Tail Modifications on the Directional Stability and Control Characteristics of the P-63A-1 Airplane (AAF No. 42-68889)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Harold I.

    1946-01-01

    Because the results of preliminary flight tests had indicated. the P-63A-1 airplane possessed insufficient directional stability, the NACA and the manufacturer (Bell Aircraft Corporation) suggested three vertical-tail modifications to remedy the deficiencies in the directional characteristics. These modifications included an enlarged vertical tail formed by adding a tip extension to the original vertical tail, a large sharp-edge ventral fin, and a small dorsal fin. The enlarged vertical tail involved only a slight increase in total vertical-tail area from 23.73 to 26.58 square feet but a relatively much larger increase in geometric aspect ratio from 1.24 to 1.73 based on height and area above the horizontal tail. At the request of the Air Material Command, Army Air Forces, flight tests were made to determine the effect of these modifications and of some combinations of these modifications on the directional stability and control characteristics of the airplane, In all, six different vertical-tail. configurations were investigated to determine the lateral and directional oscillation characteristics of the airplane, the sideslip characteristics, the yaw due to ailerons in rudder-fixed rolls from turns and pull-outs, the trim changes due to speed changes; and the trim changes due to power changes. Results of the tests showed that the enlarged vertical tail approximately doubled the directional stability of the airplane and that the pilots considered the directional stability provided by the enlarged vertical tail to be satisfactory. Calculations based on sideslip data obtained at an indicated airspeed of 300 miles per hour showed that the directional stability of the airplane with the original vertical tail corresponded to a value of 0(sub n beta) of -0.00056 whereas for the enlarged vertical tail the estimated va1ue of C(sub n beta) was -0.00130, The ventral fin was found to increase by a moderate amount the directional stability of the airplane with the original

  2. Epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions: Products from the improper chemical repair of 2-deoxyribose radicals.

    PubMed

    Amato, Nicholas J; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-04-21

    Genomic integrity is constantly challenged by DNA damaging agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Consequently, DNA damage can compromise the fidelity and efficiency of essential DNA metabolic processes, including replication and transcription, which may contribute significantly to the etiology of many human diseases. Here, we review one family of DNA lesions, the epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions, which arise from the improper chemical repair of the 2-deoxyribose radicals. Unlike most other DNA lesions, the epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions are indistinguishable from their corresponding unmodified nucleosides in both molecular mass and chemical reactivity. We placed our emphasis of discussion on the formation of these lesions, their impact on the structure and stability of duplex DNA, their biological consequences, their potential therapeutic relevance, and future research directions about these modified nucleosides. PMID:24517165

  3. Theoretical study on the gas phase reaction of allyl chloride with hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunju; Chao, Kai; Sun, Jingyu; Zhang, Wanqiao; Shi, Haijie; Yao, Cen; Su, Zhongmin; Pan, Xiumei; Zhang, Jingping; Wang, Rongshun

    2014-02-28

    The reaction of allyl chloride with the hydroxyl radical has been investigated on a sound theoretical basis. This is the first time to gain a conclusive insight into the reaction mechanism and kinetics for important pathways in detail. The reaction mechanism confirms that OH addition to the C=C double bond forms the chemically activated adducts, IM1 (CH2CHOHCH2Cl) and IM2 (CH2OHCHCH2Cl) via low barriers, and direct H-abstraction paths may also occur. Variational transition state model and multichannel RRKM theory are employed to calculate the temperature-, pressure-dependent rate constants. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with the experimental data. At 100 Torr with He as bath gas, IM6 formed by collisional stabilization is the major products in the temperature range 200-600 K; the production of CH2CHCHCl via hydrogen abstractions becomes dominant at high temperatures (600-3000 K). PMID:24588171

  4. Dramatic effect of furanose C2' substitution on structure and stability: directing the folding of the human telomeric quadruplex with a single fluorine atom.

    PubMed

    Martín-Pintado, Nerea; Yahyaee-Anzahaee, Maryam; Deleavey, Glen F; Portella, Guillem; Orozco, Modesto; Damha, Masad J; González, Carlos

    2013-04-10

    Human telomeric DNA quadruplexes can adopt different conformations in solution. We have found that arabinose, 2'F-arabinose, and ribose substitutions stabilize the propeller parallel G-quadruplex form over competing conformers, allowing NMR structural determination of this particularly significant nucleic acid structure. 2'F-arabinose substitution provides the greatest stabilization as a result of electrostatic (F-CH---O4') and pseudo-hydrogen-bond (F---H8) stabilizing interactions. In contrast, 2'F-rG substitution provokes a dramatic destabilization of the quadruplex structure due to unfavorable electrostatic repulsion between the phosphate and the 2'-F. PMID:23521511

  5. Stable Radical Content and Anti-Radical Activity of Roasted Arabica Coffee: From In-Tact Bean to Coffee Brew

    PubMed Central

    Troup, Gordon J.; Navarini, Luciano; Liverani, Furio Suggi; Drew, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    The roasting of coffee beans generates stable radicals within melanoidins produced by non-enzymatic browning. Roasting coffee beans has further been suggested to increase the antioxidant (AO) capacity of coffee brews. Herein, we have characterized the radical content and AO capacity of brews prepared from Coffea arabica beans sourced directly from an industrial roasting plant. In-tact beans exhibited electron paramagnetic resonance signals arising from Fe3+, Mn2+ and at least three distinct stable radicals as a function of roasting time, whose intensity changed upon grinding and ageing. In coffee brews, the roasting-induced radicals were harboured within the high molecular weight (> 3 kD) melanoidin-containing fraction at a concentration of 15 nM and was associated with aromatic groups within the melanoidins. The low molecular weight (< 3 kD) fraction exhibited the highest AO capacity using DPPH as an oxidant. The AO activity was not mediated by the stable radicals or by metal complexes within the brew. While other non-AO functions of the roasting-induced radical and metal complexes may be possible in vivo, we confirm that the in vitro antiradical activity of brewed coffee is dominated by low molecular weight phenolic compounds. PMID:25856192

  6. Superoxide anion radical scavenging property of catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Berczyński, Paweł; Kruk, Irena; Michalska, Teresa; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2013-01-01

    The direct effect of the four catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine and isoproterenol) on superoxide anion radicals (O2•) was investigated. The reaction between 18-crown-6-ether and potassium superoxide in dimethylsulfoxide was used as a source of O2•. The reactivity of catecholamines with O2• was examined using chemiluminescence, reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping techniques. 5,5-Dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide was included as the spin trap. The results showed that the four catecholamines were effective and efficient in inhibiting chemiluminescence accompanying the potassium superoxide/18-crown-6-ether system in a dose-dependent manner over the range 0.05-2 mM in the following order: adrenaline > noradrenaline > dopamine > isoproterenol, with, IC50 = 0.15 ± 0.02 mM 0.21 ± 0.03 mM, 0.27 ± 0.03 mM and 0.50 ± 0.04 mM, respectively. The catecholamines examined also exhibited a strong scavenging effect towards O2• when evaluated this property by the inhibition of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction (56-73% at 1 M concentration). A very similar capacity of O2• scavenging was monitored in the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide spin-trapping assay. The results suggest that catecholamines tested may involve a direct effect on scavenging O2- radicals. PMID:23319391

  7. Radiation-induced radicals in different polymorphic modifications of D-mannitol: Structure, conformations and dosimetric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosulin, Ilya S.; Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2015-12-01

    The structure and conformation of radicals produced by X-ray irradiation of three polymorphic forms of D-mannitol were investigated using EPR spectroscopy. In all the cases, primary species were identified as radicals resulting from hydrogen abstraction from position 3 or 4 of the mannitol molecule. It was found that molecular packing in crystals of different polymorphic modifications had noticeable effect on the conformation of radicals observed after irradiation at room temperature and the dehydration of the primary radicals occurring at 400 K. The radicals trapped in stable modifications (β- and δ-forms) were found to be very stable at room temperature. Relatively high radical yields and remarkable stability of radicals suggest that D-mannitol can be used as an EPR dosimeter or irradiation marker.

  8. Radical Compatibility with Nonaqueous Electrolytes and Its Impact on an All-Organic Redox Flow Battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Walter, Eric; Lawrence, Chad; Vijayakumar, M; Henderson, Wesley A; Liu, Tianbiao; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Li, Bin; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-07-20

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries hold the promise of achieving higher energy density because of the broader voltage window than aqueous systems, but their current performance is limited by low redox material concentration, cell efficiency, cycling stability, and current density. We report a new nonaqueous all-organic flow battery based on high concentrations of redox materials, which shows significant, comprehensive improvement in flow battery performance. A mechanistic electron spin resonance study reveals that the choice of supporting electrolytes greatly affects the chemical stability of the charged radical species especially the negative side radical anion, which dominates the cycling stability of these flow cells. This finding not only increases our fundamental understanding of performance degradation in flow batteries using radical-based redox species, but also offers insights toward rational electrolyte optimization for improving the cycling stability of these flow batteries. PMID:25891480

  9. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  10. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  11. Free radical decay in adamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Tegowski, A.T.; Pratt, D.W.

    1984-01-11

    Kinetic electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques have been used to characterize the decay behavior of the ''stable'' free radical 2-cyclohexanonyl in the plastic crystal phase f an adamantane matrix over the temperature range 257-313 K. Typical plots of the EPR signal intensity as a function of time are biexponential in nature, suggesting the existence of at least two channels for free radical decay. The activation parameters for both processes have been measured in both protonated and deuterated samples. A comparison of these results with those in other systems suggests that the host does, as expected, considerably reduce the pre-exponential factors for decay of the radical by bimolecular processes but has relatively little influence on the corresponding activation energies. 3 figures.

  12. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zavada, Scott R; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes--catalytic proteins--owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol-ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  13. Donor free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  14. DETECTION OF RADICALS PRODUCED IN VIVO DURING INHALATION EXPOSURE TO OZONE: USE OF VARIOUS SPIN TRAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is known to induce lipid peroxidation of lung tissue, although no direct evidence of free radical formation has been reported. e have used the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique to search for free radicals produced in vivo by ozone exposure. he sp...

  15. Quantum trajectory tests of radical-pair quantum dynamics in CIDNP measurements of photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsampourakis, K.; Kominis, I. K.

    2015-11-01

    Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization is a ubiquitous phenomenon in photosynthetic reaction centers. The relevant nuclear spin observables are a direct manifestation of the radical-pair mechanism. We here use quantum trajectories to describe the time evolution of radical-pairs, and compare their prediction of nuclear spin observables to the one derived from the radical-pair master equation. While our approach provides a consistent description, we unravel a major inconsistency within the conventional theory, thus challenging the theoretical interpretation of numerous CIDNP experiments sensitive to radical-pair reaction kinetics.

  16. Extension of polyphenolics by CWPO-C peroxidase mutant containing radical-robust surface active site.

    PubMed

    Pham, L T Mai; Kim, S Jin; Ahn, U Suk; Choi, J Weon; Song, B Keun; Kim, Y Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Expressed as insoluble forms in Escherichia coli, native cationic cell wall peroxidase (CWPO-C) from the poplar tree and mutant variants were successfully reactivated via refolding experiments and used to elucidate the previously presumed existence of an electron transfer (ET) pathway in the CWPO-C structure. Their catalytic properties were fully characterized through various analyses including steady-state kinetic, direct oxidation of lignin macromolecules and their respective stabilities during the polymerization reactions. The analysis results proved that the 74th residue on the CWPO-C surface plays an important role in catalyzing the macromolecules via supposed ET mechanism. By comparing the residual activities of wild-type CWPO-C and mutant 74W CWPO-C after 3 min, mutation of tyrosine 74 residue to tryptophan increased the radical resistance of peroxidase up to ten times dramatically while maintaining its capability to oxidize lignin macromolecules. Furthermore, extension of poly(catechin) as well as lignin macromolecules with CWPO-C Y74W mutant clearly showed that this radical-resistant peroxidase mutant can increase the molecular weight of various kinds of polyphenolics by using surface-located active site. The anti-oxidation activity of the synthesized poly(catechin) was confirmed by xanthine oxidase assay. The elucidation of a uniquely catalytic mechanism in CWPO-C may improve the applicability of the peroxidase/H2O2 catalyst to green polymer chemistry. PMID:24122664

  17. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of "narrow mental states"; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without…

  18. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Kurpad, Raj; Woods, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) has rapidly penetrated the field of urology since its inception in 2003. Several observational studies, retrospective reports, and three randomized controlled trials (RCT) have preliminarily demonstrated the safety and efficacy of (RARC). Additionally, results from the RAZOR RCT will be available in 2016-2017 to better substantiate the use of (RARC). PMID:26310514

  19. Free radicals, antioxidants, and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yun-Zhong; Yang, Sheng; Wu, Guoyao

    2002-10-01

    Radiation hazards in outer space present an enormous challenge for the biological safety of astronauts. A deleterious effect of radiation is the production of reactive oxygen species, which result in damage to biomolecules (e.g., lipid, protein, amino acids, and DNA). Understanding free radical biology is necessary for designing an optimal nutritional countermeasure against space radiation-induced cytotoxicity. Free radicals (e.g., superoxide, nitric oxide, and hydroxyl radicals) and other reactive species (e.g., hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, and hypochlorous acid) are produced in the body, primarily as a result of aerobic metabolism. Antioxidants (e.g., glutathione, arginine, citrulline, taurine, creatine, selenium, zinc, vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin A, and tea polyphenols) and antioxidant enzymes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidases) exert synergistic actions in scavenging free radicals. There has been growing evidence over the past three decades showing that malnutrition (e.g., dietary deficiencies of protein, selenium, and zinc) or excess of certain nutrients (e.g., iron and vitamin C) gives rise to the oxidation of biomolecules and cell injury. A large body of the literature supports the notion that dietary antioxidants are useful radioprotectors and play an important role in preventing many human diseases (e.g., cancer, atherosclerosis, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, neurodegeneration, and diabetes). The knowledge of enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidative defense mechanisms will serve as a guiding principle for establishing the most effective nutrition support to ensure the biological safety of manned space missions. PMID:12361782

  20. Radical Coupling Mechanisms in Lignification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechansim by which lignification, the polymerization process by which lignins are formed, is via combinatorial radical coupling reactions. Understanding such reactions allows the range of structures in lignins to be understood, and the ability of lignins to accommodate various phenolic precursor...

  1. The Other Women: Radicalizing Feminism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puigvert, Lidia; Darder, Antonia; Merrill, Barbara; de los Reyes, Eileen; Stromquist, Nelly

    A recent international symposium on radicalizing feminism explored ways of developing a dialogic feminism that emphasizes working in different settings under the common goal of including women who have been invisible in the dominant feminist literature by furthering theories and practices based on the principles of dialogic feminism. The seminar…

  2. Radical Additions to Aromatic Residues in Peptides Facilitate Unexpected Side Chain and Backbone Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Julian, Ryan R.

    2014-04-01

    Accurate identification of fragments in tandem mass spectrometry experiments is aided by knowledge of relevant fragmentation mechanisms. Herein, novel radical addition reactions that direct unexpected side-chain dissociations at tryptophan and tyrosine residues are reported. Various mechanisms that can account for the observed dissociation channels are investigated by experiment and theory. The propensity for radical addition at a particular site is found to be primarily under kinetic control, which is largely dictated by molecular structure. In certain peptides, intramolecular radical addition reactions are favored, which leads to the observation of numerous unexpected fragments. In one pathway, radical addition leads to migration of an aromatic side chain to another residue. Alternatively, radical addition followed by hydrogen atom loss leads to cyclization of the peptide and increased observation of internal sequence fragments. Radical addition reactions should be considered when assigning fragmentation spectra obtained from activation of hydrogen deficient peptides.

  3. Vascular effects of free radicals generated by electrical stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, F.S.; Webb, R.C.

    1984-11-01

    Electrical field stimulation (9 V, 1.0 ms, 4 Hz) of isolated segments of rat tail arteries and dog coronary arteries inhibits contractile response to exogenous norephinephrine and elevated potassium concentration. This inhibitory effect of electrical stimulation is blocked by various agents that alter oxygen metabolism: superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, ascorbate, and dimethyl sulfoxide. The observations suggest that the inhibitory effect is due to an action of oxygen free radical metabolites that are generated by the electrical stimulation of the oxygen-rich buffer. These free radical metabolites have two actions: 1) they oxidize drugs in the experimental system, and 2) they exert a direct inhbitory action on vascular smooth muscle.

  4. The microwave spectrum of the AlO radical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Chikashi; Fujitake, Masaharu; Hirota, Eizi; Cohen, Edward A.

    1990-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of the aluminum monoxide radical in the ground electronic state X 2Sigma(+) was observed in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave region. Aluminum monoxide radicals were generated directly in a flow reactor absorption cell by the reaction of N2O with aluminum vaporized from a high-temperature crucible. The observed spectrum was analyzed to yield molecular constants including the rotational constant, centrifugal distortion constant, spin-rotation interaction constant, magnetic hyperfine interaction constants, and nuclear quadrupole coupling constant.

  5. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  6. Wind-Tunnel Investigation at Subsonic and Supersonic Speeds of a Fighter Model Employing a Low-aspect-ratio Unswept Wing and a Horizontal Tail Mounted Well above the Wing Plane - Lateral and Directional Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetzel, Benton E.

    1954-01-01

    The static lateral- and directional-stability characteristics of a high-speed fighter-type airplane, obtained from wind-tunnel tests of a model, are presented. The model consisted of a thin, unswept wing of aspect ratio 2.3 and taper ratio 0.385, a body, and a horizontal tail mounted in a high position on a vertical tail. Rolling-moment, yawing moment, and cross-wind-force coefficients are presented for a range of sideslip angles of -5 deg. to +5 deg, for Mach numbers of 0.90, 1.45, and 1.90. Data are presented which show the effects on the lateral and directional stability of: (1) component parts of the complete model, (2) modification of the empennage so as to provide different heights of the horizontal tail above the wing plane, (3) angle of attack, and (4) dihedral of the wing.

  7. Infectious Morbidity After Radical Vulvectomy

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Linda F.; Brooker, Doris C.; Carter, Jonathan R.; Twiggs, Leo B.

    1994-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective investigation describes the infectious morbidity of patients following radical vulvectomy with or without inguinal lymph node dissection. Methods: The charts of patients undergoing radical vulvectomy between January 1, 1986, and September 1, 1989, were reviewed for age, weight, cancer type, tumor stage, operative procedure(s), prophylactic antibiotic and its length of use, febrile morbidity, infection site, culture results, significant medical history, and length of use and number of drains or catheters used. Results: The study group was composed of 61 patients, 14 of whom underwent a radical vulvectomy and 47 who also had inguinal lymph node dissection performed. Twenty-nine patients (48%) had at least 1 postoperative infection. Five patients (8%) had 2 or more postoperative infections. The site and incidence of the infections were as follows: urinary tract 23%, wound 23%, lymphocyst 3%, lymphatics (lymphangitis) 5%, and bowel (pseudomembranous colitis) 3%. The most common pathogens isolated from both urine and wound sites were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enterococcus, and Escherichia coli. A significant decrease in wound infection was demonstrated when separate incisions were made for inguinal lymph node dissection (P <0.05). The mean number of days to onset of postoperative infection for wound, urine, lymphatics, lymphocyst, and bowel were 11, 8, 57, 48, and 5, respectively. Conclusions: We conclude that the clinical appearance of post-radical vulvectomy infections is delayed when compared with other post-surgical wound infections. Second, utilizing separate inguinal surgical incisions may reduce infectious morbidity. Finally, tumor stage and type do not necessarily increase the infectious morbidity of radical vulvar surgery. PMID:18475379

  8. Hydrogen Radicals, Nitrogen Radicals, and the Production of O3 in the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Hanisco, T. F.; Jaegle, L.; Jacob, D. J.; Hintsa, E. J.; Lanzendorf, E. J.; Anderson, J. G.; Gao, R.-S.; Keim, E. R.; Donnelly, S. G.; DelNegro, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; McKeen, S. A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Proffitt, M. H.; Margitan, J. J.; Atlas, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    The concentrations of the hydrogen radicals OH and HO2 in the middle and upper troposphere were measured simultaneously with those of NO, O3, CO, H2O, CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons, and with the ultraviolet and visible radiation field. The data allow a direct examination of the processes that produce O3, in this region of the atmosphere. Comparison of the measured concentrations of OH and HO2 with calculations based on their production from water vapor, ozone, and methane demonstrate that these sources are insufficient to explain the observed radical concentrations in the upper troposphere. The photolysis of carbonyl and peroxide compounds transported to this region from the lower troposphere may provide the source of HO(x) required to sustain the measured abundances of these radical species. The mechanism by which NO affects the production of 03 is also illustrated by the measurements. In the upper tropospheric air masses sampled, the production rate for ozone (determined from the measured concentrations of HO2 and NO) is calculated to be about 1 part per billion by volume each day.This production rate is faster than previously thought and implies that anthropogenic activities that add NO to the upper troposphere, such as biomass burning and aviation, will lead to production of more 03 than expected.

  9. Hydrogen Radicals, Nitrogen Radicals, and the Production of O3 in the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Hanisco, T. F.; Jaegle, L.; Jacob, D. J.; Hintsa, E. J.; Lanzendorf, E. J.; Anderson, J. G.; Gao, R.-S.; Keim, E. R.; Donnelly, S. G.; DelNegro, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; McKeen, S. A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Proffitt, M. H.; Margitan, J. J.; Atlas, E. L.; Schauffler, S. M.; Flocke, F.; McElroy, C. T.; Bui, T.P.

    1998-01-01

    The concentrations of the hydrogen radicals OH and HO2 in the middle and upper troposphere were measured simultaneously with those of NO, O3, CO, H2O, CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons, and with the ultraviolet and visible radiation field. The data allow a direct examination of the processes that produce O3 in this region of the atmosphere. Comparison of the measured concentrations of OH and HO2 with calculations based on their production from water vapor, ozone, and methane demonstrate that these sources are insufficient to explain the observed radical concentrations in the upper troposphere. The photolysis of carbonyl and peroxide compounds transported to this region from the lower troposphere may provide the source of HO, required to sustain the measured abundances of these radical species. The mechanism by which NO affects the production Of O3 is also illustrated by the measurements. In the upper tropospheric air masses sampled, the production rate for ozone (determined from the measured concentrations of HO2 and NO) is calculated to be about I part per billion by volume each day. This production rate is faster than previously thought and implies that anthropogenic activities that add NO to the upper troposphere, such as biomass burning and aviation, will lead to production of more 03 than expected.

  10. Hydrogen Radicals, Nitrogen Radicals, and the Production of O3 in the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Hanisco, T. F.; Jaegle, L.; Jacob, D. J.; Hintsa, E. J.; Lanzendorf, E. J.; Anderson, J. G.; Gao, R.-S.; Keim, E. R.; Donnelly, S. G.; DelNegro, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; McKeen, S. A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Profitt, M. H.; Margitan, J. J.; Atlas, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    The concentrations of the hydrogen radicals OH and HO2 in the middle and upper troposphere were measured simultaneously with those of NO, O3, CO, H2O, CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons, and with the ultraviolet and visible radiation field. The data allow a direct examination of the processes that produce O3 in this region of the atmosphere. Comparison of the measured concentrations of OH and HO2 with calculations based on their production from water vapor, ozone, and methane demonstrate that these sources are insufficient to explain the observed radical concentrations in the upper troposphere. The photolysis of carbonyl and peroxide compounds transported to this region from the lower troposphere may provide the source of HO(sub x) required to sustain the measured abundances of these radical species. The mechanism by which NO affects the production of O3 is also illustrated by the measurements. In the upper tropospheric air masses sampled, the production rate for ozone (determined from the measured concentrations of HO2 and NO) is calculated to be about 1 part per billion by volume each day. This production rate is faster than previously thought and implies that anthropogenic activities that add NO to the upper troposphere, such as biomass burning and aviation, will lead to production of more O3 than expected.

  11. Effects of vertical fins near the nose of the fuselage on the directional and damping-in-yaw stability derivatives of an airplane model under steady-state and oscillatory conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queijo, M J; Wells, Evalyn G

    1956-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been made at low speed to determine the effects of vertical fins placed ahead of the vertical tail on the directional stability and damping-in-yaw characteristics of a swept-wing model under steady-state oscillatory conditions. Various sizes of fins were used above and below the fuselage center line. The vertical-tail size also was varied.

  12. Halogen radicals contribute to photooxidation in coastal and estuarine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Kimberly M.; Mitch, William A.

    2016-05-01

    Although halogen radicals are recognized to form as products of hydroxyl radical (•OH) scavenging by halides, their contribution to the phototransformation of marine organic compounds has received little attention. We demonstrate that, relative to freshwater conditions, seawater halides can increase photodegradation rates of domoic acid, a marine algal toxin, and dimethyl sulfide, a volatile precursor to cloud condensation nuclei, up to fivefold. Using synthetic seawater solutions, we show that the increased photodegradation is specific to dissolved organic matter (DOM) and halides, rather than other seawater salt constituents (e.g., carbonates) or photoactive species (e.g., iron and nitrate). Experiments in synthetic and natural coastal and estuarine water samples demonstrate that the halide-specific increase in photodegradation could be attributed to photochemically generated halogen radicals rather than other photoproduced reactive intermediates [e.g., excited-state triplet DOM (3DOM*), reactive oxygen species]. Computational kinetic modeling indicates that seawater halogen radical concentrations are two to three orders of magnitude greater than freshwater •OH concentrations and sufficient to account for the observed halide-specific increase in photodegradation. Dark •OH generation by gamma radiolysis demonstrates that halogen radical production via •OH scavenging by halides is insufficient to explain the observed effect. Using sensitizer models for DOM chromophores, we show that halogen radicals are formed predominantly by direct oxidation of Cl‑ and Br‑ by 3DOM*, an •OH-independent pathway. Our results indicate that halogen radicals significantly contribute to the phototransformation of algal products in coastal or estuarine surface waters.

  13. Halogen radicals contribute to photooxidation in coastal and estuarine waters.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kimberly M; Mitch, William A

    2016-05-24

    Although halogen radicals are recognized to form as products of hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) scavenging by halides, their contribution to the phototransformation of marine organic compounds has received little attention. We demonstrate that, relative to freshwater conditions, seawater halides can increase photodegradation rates of domoic acid, a marine algal toxin, and dimethyl sulfide, a volatile precursor to cloud condensation nuclei, up to fivefold. Using synthetic seawater solutions, we show that the increased photodegradation is specific to dissolved organic matter (DOM) and halides, rather than other seawater salt constituents (e.g., carbonates) or photoactive species (e.g., iron and nitrate). Experiments in synthetic and natural coastal and estuarine water samples demonstrate that the halide-specific increase in photodegradation could be attributed to photochemically generated halogen radicals rather than other photoproduced reactive intermediates [e.g., excited-state triplet DOM ((3)DOM*), reactive oxygen species]. Computational kinetic modeling indicates that seawater halogen radical concentrations are two to three orders of magnitude greater than freshwater (•)OH concentrations and sufficient to account for the observed halide-specific increase in photodegradation. Dark (•)OH generation by gamma radiolysis demonstrates that halogen radical production via (•)OH scavenging by halides is insufficient to explain the observed effect. Using sensitizer models for DOM chromophores, we show that halogen radicals are formed predominantly by direct oxidation of Cl(-) and Br(-) by (3)DOM*, an (•)OH-independent pathway. Our results indicate that halogen radicals significantly contribute to the phototransformation of algal products in coastal or estuarine surface waters. PMID:27162335

  14. Involvement of free radicals in excitotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J B; Henshaw, D R; Siwek, D; Jenkins, B G; Ferrante, R J; Cipolloni, P B; Kowall, N W; Rosen, B R; Beal, M F

    1995-05-01

    Recent evidence has linked excitotoxicity with the generation of free radicals. We examined whether free radical spin traps can attenuate excitotoxic lesions in vivo. Pretreatment with N-tert-butyl-alpha-(2-sulfophenyl)-nitrone (S-PBN) significantly attenuated striatal excitotoxic lesions in rats produced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainic acid, and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). In a similar manner, striatal lesions produced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), malonate, and 3-acetylpyridine were significantly attenuated by either S-PBN or alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) treatment. Administration of S-PBN in combination with the NMDA antagonist MK-801 produced additive effects against malonate and 3-acetylpyridine toxicity. Malonate injections resulted in increased production of hydroxyl free radicals (.OH) as assessed by the conversion of salicylate to 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA). This increase was significantly attenuated by S-PBN, consistent with a free radical scavenging effect. S-PBN had no effects on malonate-induced ATP depletions and had no significant effect on spontaneous striatal electrophysiologic activity. These results provide the first direct in vivo evidence for the involvement of free radicals in excitotoxicity and suggest that antioxidants may be useful in treating neurologic illnesses in which excitotoxic mechanisms have been implicated. PMID:7536809

  15. Electron attachment to fluorocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    Most plasma environments contain populations of short-lived species such as radicals, the chemistry of which can have significant effects on the overall chemistry of the system. However, few experimental measurements of the kinetics of electron attachment to radicals exist due to the inherent difficulties of working with transient species. Calculations from first principles have been attempted, but are arduous and, because electron attachment is so sensitive to the specifics of the potential surface, their accuracy has not been established. Electron attachment to small fluorocarbon radicals is particularly important, as the data are needed for predictive modeling of plasma etching of semiconductor materials, a key process in the industrial fabrication of microelectronics. We have recently developed a novel flowing afterglow technique to measure several types of otherwise difficult to study plasma processes, including thermal electron attachment to radicals. Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry (VENDAMS) exploits dissociative electron attachment in a weakly ionized plasma as a radical source. Here, we apply VENDAMS to a series of halofluorocarbon precursors in order to measure the kinetics of thermal electron attachment to fluorocarbon radicals. Results are presented for CF2, CF3, C2F5,C2F3,1-C3F7, 2-C3F7, and C3F5 from 300 K to 900 K. Both the magnitude and the temperature dependences of rate coefficients as well as product branching between associative and dissociative attachment are highly system specific; however, thermal attachment to all species is inefficient, never exceeding 5% of the collision rate. The data are analyzed using a recently developed kinetic modeling approach, which uses extended Vogt-Wannier theory as a starting point, accounts for dynamic effects such as coupling between the electron and nuclear motions through empirically validated functional forms, and finally uses statistical theory to determine the fate of

  16. Unexpectedly high indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations associated with nitrous acid.

    PubMed

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Amedro, Damien; Afif, Charbel; Gligorovski, Sasho; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Schoemacker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Wortham, Henri

    2013-08-13

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere since it controls its self-oxidizing capacity. The main sources of OH radicals are the photolysis of ozone and the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO). Due to the attenuation of solar radiation in the indoor environment, the possibility of OH formation through photolytic pathways indoors has been ignored up to now. In the indoor air, the ozonolysis of alkenes has been suggested as an alternative route of OH formation. Models and indirect measurements performed up to now according to this hypothesis suggest concentrations of OH radicals on the order of 10(4)-10(5) molecules per cubic centimeter. Here, we present direct measurements of significant amounts of OH radicals of up to 1.8⋅10(6) molecules per cubic centimeter during an experimental campaign carried out in a school classroom in Marseille. This concentration is on the same order of magnitude of outdoor OH levels in the urban scenario. We also show that photolysis of HONO is an important source of OH radicals indoors under certain conditions (i.e., direct solar irradiation inside the room). Additionally, the OH concentrations were found to follow a linear dependence with the product J(HONO)⋅[HONO]. This was also supported by using a simple quasiphotostationary state model on the OH radical budget. These findings force a change in our understanding of indoor air quality because the reactivity linked to OH would involve formation of secondary species through chemical reactions that are potentially more hazardous than the primary pollutants in the indoor air. PMID:23898188

  17. Unexpectedly high indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations associated with nitrous acid

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Amedro, Damien; Afif, Charbel; Gligorovski, Sasho; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Wortham, Henri

    2013-01-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere since it controls its self-oxidizing capacity. The main sources of OH radicals are the photolysis of ozone and the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO). Due to the attenuation of solar radiation in the indoor environment, the possibility of OH formation through photolytic pathways indoors has been ignored up to now. In the indoor air, the ozonolysis of alkenes has been suggested as an alternative route of OH formation. Models and indirect measurements performed up to now according to this hypothesis suggest concentrations of OH radicals on the order of 104–105 molecules per cubic centimeter. Here, we present direct measurements of significant amounts of OH radicals of up to 1.8⋅106 molecules per cubic centimeter during an experimental campaign carried out in a school classroom in Marseille. This concentration is on the same order of magnitude of outdoor OH levels in the urban scenario. We also show that photolysis of HONO is an important source of OH radicals indoors under certain conditions (i.e., direct solar irradiation inside the room). Additionally, the OH concentrations were found to follow a linear dependence with the product J(HONO)⋅[HONO]. This was also supported by using a simple quasiphotostationary state model on the OH radical budget. These findings force a change in our understanding of indoor air quality because the reactivity linked to OH would involve formation of secondary species through chemical reactions that are potentially more hazardous than the primary pollutants in the indoor air. PMID:23898188

  18. ({radical}(13)x{radical}(13))R13.9 deg. and ({radical}(7)x{radical}(7))R19.1 deg. reconstructions of the polar SrTiO{sub 3} (111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Bruce C.; Castell, Martin R.

    2007-04-15

    Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} (111) samples are annealed in UHV at 850 deg. C for 30 min and investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). STM images show that both ({radical}(7)x{radical}(7))R19.1 deg. and ({radical}(13)x{radical}(13))R13.9 deg. reconstructions coexist on the surface. Step heights of 0.21{+-}0.02 nm on the surface are equivalent to the d{sub 111} lattice parameter, which is the distance between two adjacent, similar (111) planes in the bulk crystal. The calculated LEED pattern for this co-reconstruction corresponds to the observed LEED pattern, which resembles a six-petal flower. AES analysis indicates no detectable impurities, and shows the surface to be Ti and Sr enriched and O deficient compared to the bulk stoichiometry. This change in surface composition is proposed to provide the stability for the polar surface.

  19. Radical Puppets and the Language of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, Rikki

    2009-01-01

    Radical puppets are puppets with a social message. Radical puppets encourage creative ideas that lead toward understanding global and environmental aspects of society through the "art of the puppet," a phrase coined by American puppeteer Bill Baird (1965). There is a blending of performance and visual art in puppetry. Through radical puppetry,…

  20. Free-radical chemistry of sulfite.

    PubMed Central

    Neta, P; Huie, R E

    1985-01-01

    The free-radical chemistry of sulfite oxidation is reviewed. Chemical transformations of organic and biological molecules induced by sulfite oxidation are summarized. The kinetics of the free-radical oxidations of sulfite are discussed, as are the kinetics of the reactions of the sulfite-derived radicals SO3 and the peroxy derivative SO5 with organic compounds. PMID:3830699

  1. Gas-phase reactions of aryl radicals with 2-butyne: experimental and theoretical investigation employing the N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl radical cation.

    PubMed

    Lam, A K Y; Li, C; Khairallah, G; Kirk, B B; Blanksby, S J; Trevitt, A J; Wille, U; O'Hair, R A J; da Silva, G

    2012-02-21

    Aromatic radicals form in a variety of reacting gas-phase systems, where their molecular weight growth reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons are of considerable importance. We have investigated the ion-molecule reaction of the aromatic distonic N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl (NMP) radical cation with 2-butyne (CH(3)C≡CCH(3)) using ion trap mass spectrometry. Comparison is made to high-level ab initio energy surfaces for the reaction of NMP and for the neutral phenyl radical system. The NMP radical cation reacts rapidly with 2-butyne at ambient temperature, due to the apparent absence of any barrier. The activated vinyl radical adduct predominantly dissociates via loss of a H atom, with lesser amounts of CH(3) loss. High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry allows us to identify small quantities of the collisionally deactivated reaction adduct. Statistical reaction rate theory calculations (master equation/RRKM theory) on the NMP+2-butyne system support our experimental findings, and indicate a mechanism that predominantly involves an allylic resonance-stabilized radical formed via H atom shuttling between the aromatic ring and the C(4) side-chain, followed by cyclization and/or low-energy H atom β-scission reactions. A similar mechanism is demonstrated for the neutral phenyl radical (Ph˙)+2-butyne reaction, forming products that include 3-methylindene. The collisionally deactivated reaction adduct is predicted to be quenched in the form of a resonance-stabilized methylphenylallyl radical. Experiments using a 2,5-dichloro substituted methyl-pyridiniumyl radical cation revealed that in this case CH(3) loss from the 2-butyne adduct is favoured over H atom loss, verifying the key role of ortho H atoms, and the shuttling mechanism, in the reactions of aromatic radicals with alkynes. As well as being useful phenyl radical analogues, pyridiniumyl radical cations may form in the ionosphere of Titan, where they could undergo rapid

  2. Radical Compatibility with Nonaqueous Electrolytes and Its Impact on an All-Organic Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Walter, Eric D.; Lawrence, Chad W.; Vijayakumar, M.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Li, Bin; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-07-20

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries hold the promise to achieve higher energy density ascribed to the broader voltage window than their aqueous counterparts, but their current performance is limited by low redox material concentration, poor cell efficiency, and inferior cycling stability. We report a new nonaqueous total-organic flow battery based on high concentrations of 9-fluorenone as negative and 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1-methoxy-4-[2’-methoxyethoxy]benzene as positive redox materials. The supporting electrolytes are found to greatly affect the cycling stability of flow cells through varying chemical stabilities of the charged radical species, especially the 9-fluorenone radical anions, as confirmed by electron spin resonance. Such an electrolyte optimization sheds light on mechanistic understandings of capacity fading in flow batteries employing organic radical-based redox materials and demonstrates that rational design of supporting electrolyte is vital for stable cyclability.

  3. Imaging free radicals in organelles, cells, tissue, and in vivo with immuno-spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Mason, Ronald Paul

    2016-08-01

    The accurate and sensitive detection of biological free radicals in a reliable manner is required to define the mechanistic roles of such species in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. Most of the techniques currently available are either not appropriate to detect free radicals in cells and tissues due to sensitivity limitations (electron spin resonance, ESR) or subject to artifacts that make the validity of the results questionable (fluorescent probe-based analysis). The development of the immuno-spin trapping technique overcomes all these difficulties. This technique is based on the reaction of amino acid- and DNA base-derived radicals with the spin trap 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) to form protein- and DNA-DMPO nitroxide radical adducts, respectively. These adducts have limited stability and decay to produce the very stable macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone product. This stable product can be detected by mass spectrometry, NMR or immunochemistry by the use of anti-DMPO nitrone antibodies. The formation of macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone adducts is based on the selective reaction of free radical addition to the spin trap and is thus not subject to artifacts frequently encountered with other methods for free radical detection. The selectivity of spin trapping for free radicals in biological systems has been proven by ESR. Immuno-spin trapping is proving to be a potent, sensitive (a million times higher sensitivity than ESR), and easy (not quantum mechanical) method to detect low levels of macromolecule-derived radicals produced in vitro and in vivo. Anti-DMPO antibodies have been used to determine the distribution of free radicals in cells and tissues and even in living animals. In summary, the invention of the immuno-spin trapping technique has had a major impact on the ability to accurately and sensitively detect biological free radicals and, subsequently, on our understanding of the role of free radicals in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. PMID

  4. [Erectile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Droupy, S; Giuliano, F; Costa, P

    2009-12-01

    The concept of penile rehabilitation involves the procedures designed to improve oxygen delivery the penile erectile tissue to minimized tissue damage during the period of neural recovery following radical prostatectomy. Many basic research studies support the rationale and mechanism of the concept of penile rehabilitation, however they are few clinical studies in the literature that provide a clear medical evidence of its efficacy in patients. Waiting for new data, it is recommended to propose to the patients, following a radical prostatectomy, an active pharmacological penile rehabilitation. This rehabilitation involves counselling with the couple to have regular sexual activities, ideally 1 to 3 times a week. Penile erections could be induced by intracavernosal injections of PGE1 or improved by using PDE5 inhibitors on demand. The results of daily use of PDE5 inhibitor are conflicting and then it cannot be recommended systematically waiting for new data. The rehabilitation could be maintained for about 2 years as results improve with time. PMID:20123519

  5. Mutagenicity of Oxygen Free Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Carmella S.; Hassan, Hosni M.

    1982-05-01

    Paraquat 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride) was used as an intracellular generator of oxygen free radicals and was found to be highly mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium. It caused both base-pair substitution and frameshift mutations. Paraquat was much more toxic and mutagenic in a simple nutritionally restricted medium than in a rich complex medium. The mutagenicity of paraquat was dependent upon the presence of a supply of both electrons and oxygen. Cells containing high levels of superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) were more resistant to the toxicity and the mutagenicity of paraquat than were cells containing normal levels of this enzyme. The mutagenicity of paraquat thus appears to be due to its ability to exacerbate the intracellular production of superoxide radicals.

  6. Ethyl radical ejection during photodecomposition of butanone on TiO 2(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-10-01

    The photodecomposition of acetone and butanone were examined on the (1 1 0) surface of rutile TiO 2 using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and photon stimulated desorption (PSD). In both cases, photodecomposition was preceded by a required thermal reaction between the adsorbed ketone and coadsorbed oxygen resulting in an adsorbed diolate species. The diolate photodecomposed by ejection of an organic radical from the surface leaving behind a carboxylate species. In the acetone case, only methyl radical PSD was detected and acetate was left on the surface. In the butanone case there was a possibility of either methyl or ethyl radical ejection, with propionate or acetate left behind, respectively. However, only ethyl radical PSD was detected and the species left on the surface (acetate) was the same as in the acetone case. The preference for ethyl radical ejection is linked to the greater stability of the C-CH 3 bond in butanone over that of the C-C 2H 5 bond. Unlike in the acetone case, where the ejected methyl radicals did not participate in thermal chemistry on the TiO 2(1 1 0) surface after photoactivation of the acetone diolate, ethyl radicals photodesorbing at 100 K from butanone diolate showed preference for dehydrogenation to ethene on the surface through the influence of coadsorbed oxygen. These results reemphasize the mechanistic importance of organic radical production during photooxidation reactions on TiO 2 surface.

  7. The formation of a novel free radical metabolite from CCl4 in the perfused rat liver and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Connor, H D; Thurman, R G; Galizi, M D; Mason, R P

    1986-04-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy has been used to monitor free radicals formed during CCl4 metabolism by perfused livers from phenobarbital-treated rats. Livers were perfused simultaneously with the spin trap phenyl N-t-butylnitrone and with either 12CCl4 or 13CCl4. Perfusate samples and CHCl3:CH3OH extracts of perfusate and liver samples were analyzed for phenyl N-t-butylnitrone radical adducts of reactive free radicals. In the organic extracts, hyperfine coupling constants and 13C isotope effects observed in the ESR spectra indicated the presence of the radical adduct of the trichloromethyl radical. Surprisingly, an additional free radical signal about two orders of magnitude more intense than that of the phenyl N-t-butylnitrone/CCl.3 radical adduct was observed in the aqueous liver perfusate. This adduct was also detected by ESR in rat urine 2 h after intragastric addition of spin trap and CCl4. This radical adduct had hyperfine coupling constants and 13C isotope effects identical with the radical adduct of the carbon dioxide anion radical (CO2-.). Analysis of the pH dependence of the coupling constants yielded a pK alpha of 2.8 for the CO2-. radical adduct formed either in the perfused liver or chemically. Carbon tetrachloride is converted into CCl.3 by cytochrome P-450 through a reductive dehalogenation. The trichloromethyl free radical reacts with oxygen to form the trichloromethyl peroxyl radical, CCl3OO., which may be converted into .COCl and then trapped. This radical adduct would hydrolyze to the carboxylic acid form, which is detected spectroscopically. Alternatively, the carbon dioxide anion free radical could form through complete dechlorination and then react with the spin trap to give the CO2-. radical adduct directly. PMID:3007463

  8. Geoscientists and the Radical Middle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Addressing the great challenges facing society requires industry, government, and academia to work together. I call this overlap space, where compromises are made and real solutions determined, the Radical Middle. Radical because it can appear at times as if the loudest and most publicly influential voices lie outside of the actual solution space, content to provoke but not problem-solve. One key area where geoscientists can play a lead role in the Radical Middle is in the overlap between energy, the environment, and the economy. Globally, fossil fuels still represent 85% of the aggregate energy mix. As existing conventional oil and natural-gas reservoir production continues to slowly decline, unconventional reservoirs, led today by shale and other more expensive resources, will represent a growing part of the oil and gas production mix. Many of these unconventional reservoirs require hydraulic fracturing. The positive economic impact of hydraulic fracturing and associated natural gas and oil production on the United States economy is well documented and undeniable. Yet there are environmental concerns about fracking, and some states and nations have imposed moratoria. This energy-environment-economy space is ideal for leadership from the geosciences. Another such overlap space is the potential for geoscience leadership in relations with China, whose economy and global presence continue to expand. Although China is building major hydropower and natural-gas power plants, as well as nuclear reactors, coal is still king—with the associated environmental impacts. Carbon sequestration—onshore in brine and to enhance oil recovery, as well as offshore—could prove viable. It is vital that educated and objective geoscientists from industry, government, and academia leave their corners and work together in the Radical Middle to educate the public and develop and deliver balanced, economically sensible energy and environmental strategies.

  9. Radical Smiles Rearrangement: An Update.

    PubMed

    Allart-Simon, Ingrid; Gérard, Stéphane; Sapi, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Over the decades the Smiles rearrangement and its variants have become essential synthetic tools in modern synthetic organic chemistry. In this mini-review we summarized some very recent results of the radical version of these rearrangements. The selected examples illustrate the synthetic power of this approach, especially if it is incorporated into a domino process, for the preparation of polyfunctionalized complex molecules. PMID:27399654

  10. Electron Affinities and Electronic Structures of o-, m-, and p- Hydroxyphenoxyl Radicals: A Combined Low-Temperature Photoelectron Spectroscopic and Ab initio Calculation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Fu, Qiang; Yang, Jinlong

    2010-09-02

    Hydroxyl substituted phenoxide, o-, m-, p- HO(C6H4)O– and the corresponding neutral radicals are important species, in particularly, the p- isomer pair is directly involved in the proton-coupled electron transfer in biological photosynthetic centers. Here we report the first spectroscopic study of these species in the gas phase by means of low-temperature photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and ab initio calculations. Vibrationally resolved PES spectra were obtained at 70 K and several photon energies for each anion, directly yielding electron affinity (EA) and electronic structure information of the corresponding hydroxyphenoxyl radical. The EAs are found to vary with OH positions, from 1.990 ± 0.010 eV (p-) to 2.315 ± 0.010 (o-) and 2.330 ± 0.010 (m-). Theoretical calculations were carried out to identify the optimized molecular structures for both anions and neutral radicals. The electron binding energies and excited state energies were also calculated to compare with experimental data. Excellent agreement is found between calculations and experiments. Molecular orbital analyses indicate strong OH anti-bonding interaction with the phenoxide moiety for o- as well as p- isomers, whereas such interaction is largely missing for the m- anion. The variance of EAs among three isomers is interpreted primarily due to the interplay between two competing factors: the OH anti-bonding interaction and H-bonding stabilization (existed only in the o- anion).

  11. A radical way to burn

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1996-08-01

    By manipulating chamber geometries as well as engine cycle pressures and timing, engineers are exploiting a long-obscure technology known as activated radical combustion. Piston-driven internal combustion engines generally come in two varieties: compression-ignited diesels and spark-ignited gasoline power plants. There, is however, a third way to initiate burning of the fuel-air mixture. The technique--variously called radical ignition (RI), activated radical (AR) combustion, Toyota-Soken combustion, and active thermo-atmosphere combustion--is not exactly new, but only recently have engineers begun to exploit the process in practical power plants. These new units include a lightweight two-stroke racing-motorcycle engine, truck diesels with reduced soot output, and lean-burn spark-ignited car engines. This long-obscure combustion process is based on a range of specialized chemical kinetic and physical acoustic techniques developed over decades. Engineers manipulate fundamental combustion parameter such as chamber geometries, valving and porting configurations, and engine cycle pressures and timing to foster the formation of certain highly reactive chemical species that lower the fuel-air mixture`s flash point so that even modest compression make sit self-ignite. These chemical initiators are then retained into the next cycle to start combustion, allowing the engineer to run stably with no spark.

  12. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  13. Application of Controlled Radical Polymerization for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    CHU, DAVID S.H.; SCHELLINGER, JOAN G.; SHI, JULIE; CONVERTINE, ANTHONY J.; STAYTON, PATRICK S.; PUN, SUZIE H.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Nucleic acid-based therapeutics can potentially address otherwise untreatable genetic disorders and have significant potential for a wide range of diseases. Therapeutic gene delivery can restore protein function by replacing defunct genes to restore cellular health while RNA interference (RNAi) can mask mutated and harmful genes. Cationic polymers have been extensively studied for nucleic acid delivery applications due to their self-assembly with nucleic acids into virus-sized nanoparticles and high transfection efficiency in vitro, but toxicity and particle stability have limited their clinical applications. The advent of controlled radical polymerization has improved the quality, control and reproducibility of synthesized materials. Controlled radical polymerization yields well-defined, narrowly disperse materials of designable architectures and molecular weight, allowing study of the effects of polymer architecture and molecular weight on transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity for improved design of next-generation vectors. Robust methods such as atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), reverse addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT), and ring-opening metastasis polymerization (ROMP) have been used to engineer materials that specifically enhance extracellular stability, cellular specificity, and decrease toxicity. This Account reviews findings from structure-function studies that have elucidated key design motifs necessary for the development of effective nucleic acid vectors. In addition, polymers that are biodegradable, form supramolecular structures, target specific cells, or facilitate endosomal release are also discussed. Finally, promising materials with in vivo applications ranging from pulmonary gene delivery to DNA vaccines are described. PMID:22242774

  14. Rovibronic Variational Calculations of the Nitrate Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changala, Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, sophisticated diabatic Hamiltonians have been developed in order to understand the low-energy vibronic level structure of the nitrate radical (NO_3), which exhibits strong coupling between the ~X and doubly degenerate ~B states. Previous studies have reproduced the observed vibronic level positions up to 2000 wn~above the zero-point level, yet the rotational structure has remained uninvestigated with ab initio methods. In this talk, we present calculations of the N≥0 rovibronic structure of low-lying vibronic states of NO_3, in which complicated rovibrational and Coriolis interactions have been observed. Our results include calculations using both adiabatic and diabatic Hamiltonians, enabling a direct comparison between the two. We discuss extensions of our treatment to include spin-orbit and spin-rotation effects.

  15. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-08-06

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ≈10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  16. Synthesis of functionalized 5-substituted thiazolidine-2-thiones via adscititious xanthate-promoted radical cyclization of allyl(alkyl/aryl)dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Gao, Simiao; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Jun; Chen, Ning; Xu, Jiaxi

    2016-01-21

    Functionalized 5-substituted thiazolidine-2-thiones were synthesized efficiently from alkyl allyl(alkyl/aryl)-dithiocarbamates via radical cyclization with the corresponding S-alkyl O-ethyl xanthates as the adscititious radical precursors. The application of the adscititious radical precursors improves not only the yields, but also the efficiency in the radical cyclization reaction significantly. The current adscititious radical precursor method provides a new strategy for the achievement and improvement of some radical reactions which are hardly or difficultly realized by the traditional direct methods. PMID:26626401

  17. Comparison of fluorescence-based techniques for the quantification of particle-induced hydroxyl radicals

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Corey A; Simon, Sanford R; Schoonen, Martin AA

    2008-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species including hydroxyl radicals can cause oxidative stress and mutations. Inhaled particulate matter can trigger formation of hydroxyl radicals, which have been implicated as one of the causes of particulate-induced lung disease. The extreme reactivity of hydroxyl radicals presents challenges to their detection and quantification. Here, three fluorescein derivatives [aminophenyl fluorescamine (APF), amplex ultrared, and dichlorofluorescein (DCFH)] and two radical species, proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac have been compared for their usefulness to measure hydroxyl radicals generated in two different systems: a solution containing ferrous iron and a suspension of pyrite particles. Results APF, amplex ultrared, and DCFH react similarly to the presence of hydroxyl radicals. Proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac do not react with hydroxyl radicals directly, which reduces their sensitivity. Since both DCFH and amplex ultrared will react with reactive oxygen species other than hydroxyl radicals and another highly reactive species, peroxynitite, they lack specificity. Conclusion The most useful probe evaluated here for hydroxyl radicals formed from cell-free particle suspensions is APF due to its sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:18307787

  18. Generation of free radical intermediates from foreign compounds by neutrophil-derived oxidants.

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, B; Sohnle, P G

    1985-01-01

    A large number of foreign compounds, including many drugs, industrial pollutants, and environmental chemicals, can be oxidized under appropriate conditions to potentially toxic free radical intermediates. We evaluated the ability of the oxidants produced by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase system to generate free radical intermediates from several such compounds. Sodium hypochlorite or hypochlorous acid produced by human peripheral blood neutrophils and trapped in the form of taurine chloramine were both found to be capable of producing free radicals from chlorpromazine, aminopyrine, and phenylhydrazine. These radical intermediates were demonstrated by visible light spectroscopy and by direct electron spin resonance (for the chlorpromazine and aminopyrine radicals) or by spin-trapping (for the phenyl radical generated from phenylhydrazine). Stable oxidants produced by the neutrophils (i.e., those present in the supernatants of stimulated neutrophils in the absence of added taurine) also were found to be capable of generating free radical intermediates. The production of the oxidants and the ability of neutrophil supernatants to generate these radicals were almost completely eliminated by sodium azide, a myeloperoxidase inhibitor. We suggest that the oxidation by neutrophils of certain chemical compounds to potentially damaging electrophilic free radical forms may represent a new metabolic pathway for these substances and could be important in the processes of drug toxicity and chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:2987307

  19. Free-radical-mediated DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J

    1985-01-01

    Free-radical metabolites can be generated metabolically by a one-electron reductase-catalyzed reaction or a "peroxidase" catalyzed oxidation or by photoactivation of a wide variety of aromatic xenobiotics. Radicals may also be generated during lipid peroxidation. Some radicals can react with DNA or bind covalently or noncovalently as a dismutation product or as a dimer, trimer or polymeric product. Modification to the DNA can result in single-strand breaks, loss of template activity, and crosslinking. The binding can prevent enzymic digestion. In some cases, the radicals react with oxygen, resulting before conversion to DNA reactive oxygen species. Most radicals probably do not interact with DNA. PMID:3007090

  20. Observation of OH radicals produced by pulsed discharges on the surface of a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Seiji; Kawano, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Furuki, Takashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Ohkubo, Toshikazu; Kocik, Marek; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2011-06-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressure. OH radicals have a higher oxidation potential compared with other oxidative species such as free radical O, atomic oxygen, hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) and ozone. In this study, surface discharges on liquids (water and its solutions) were investigated experimentally. A pulsed streamer discharge was generated on the liquid surface using a point-to-plane electrode geometry. The primary generation process of OH radicals is closely related to the streamer propagation, and the subsequent secondary process after the discharge has an influence on the chemical reaction. Taking into account the timescale of these processes, we investigated the behavior of OH radicals using two different diagnostic methods. Time evolution of the ground-state OH radicals above the liquid surface after the discharge was observed by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. In order to observe the ground-state OH, an OH [A 2∑+(v' = 1) <-- X 2Π(v'' = 0)] system at 282 nm was used. As the secondary process, a portion of OH radicals diffused from gas phase to the liquid surface and dissolved in the liquid. These dissolved OH radicals were measured by a chemical probe method. Terephthalic acid was used as an OH radical trap and fluorescence of the resulting 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid was measured. This paper directly presents visualization of OH radicals over the liquid surface by means of LIF, and indirectly describes OH radicals dissolved in water by means of a chemical method.

  1. Unusual spin-trap chemistry for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with the carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, David A.; Desrosiers, Marc F.

    The reaction of the potent carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) with hydroxyl radical generated via radiolysis was studied using EPR techniques. Attempts to spin trap NDMA radical intermediates with 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) produced only unusual DBNBS radicals. One of these radicals was shown to be generated by both reaction of DBNBS with nitric oxide, and direct oxidation of DBNBS with an inorganic oxidant ( .Br -2). Another DBNBS radical was identified as a sulfite spin adduct resulting from the degradation of DBNBS by a NDMA reactive intermediate. In the absence of DBNBS, hydroxyl radical reaction with NDMA gave the dimethylnitroxide radical. Unexpectedly, addition of DBNBS to a solution containing dimethylnitroxide produced an EPR spectrum nearly identical to that of NDMA solutions with DBNBS added before radiolysis. A proposed mechanism accounting for these observations is presented.

  2. Educating Our Black Children: New Directions and Radical Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Richard, Ed.

    This collection of papers from U.S. and British contributors focuses on positive social inclusion policy and practice for black students. There are 15 chapters in five parts. Part 1, "Tackling Historical and Contemporary Education Problems," includes: (1) "Racism, Policy and the (Mis)Education of Black Children" (David Gillborn); (2) "The…

  3. Novel active stabilization technology in highly crosslinked UHMWPEs for superior stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oral, Ebru; Neils, Andrew L.; Wannomae, Keith K.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2014-12-01

    Radiation cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is the bearing of choice in joint arthroplasty. The demands on the longevity of this polymer are likely to increase with the recently advancing deterioration of the performance of alternative metal-on-metal implants. Vitamin E-stabilized, cross-linked UHMWPEs are considered the next generation of improved UHMWPE bearing surfaces for improving the oxidation resistance of the polymer. It was recently discovered that in the absence of radiation-induced free radicals, lipids absorbed into UHMWPE from the synovial fluid can initiate oxidation and result in new free radical-mediated oxidation mechanisms. In the presence of radiation-induced free radicals, it is possible for the polymer to oxidize through both existing free radicals at the time of implantation and through newly formed free radicals in vivo. Thus, we showed that reducing the radiation-induced free radicals in vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE would increase its oxidative stability and presumably lead to improved longevity. We describe mechanical annealing and warm irradiation of irradiated vitamin E blends as novel methods to eliminate 99% of radiation-induced free radicals without sacrificing crystallinity. These are significant improvements in the processing of highly cross-linked UHMWPE for joint implants with improved longevity.

  4. The Vitamin E Radical Probed by Anion Photoelectron Imaging.

    PubMed

    Anstöter, Cate S; West, Christopher W; Bull, James N; Verlet, Jan R R

    2016-07-28

    The biological antioxidant activity of vitamin E has been related to the stability of the tocopheroxyl radical. Using anion photoelectron imaging and electronic structure calculations, the four tocopheroxyl components of vitamin E have been studied in the gas phase and have yielded the adiabatic electron affinity of the α-, β/γ-, and δ-tocopheroxyl radicals. Using these values, the bond dissociation enthalpy of the O-H bond of tocopherol has been estimated and is consistent with previous studies and with the trends in biological activity. Differences in the photoelectron angular distributions have been interpreted to result from changes in the symmetry of the molecular orbitals from which the electron was detached. PMID:27367260

  5. Powering up the future: radical polymers for battery applications.

    PubMed

    Janoschka, Tobias; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2012-12-18

    Our society's dependency on portable electric energy, i.e., rechargeable batteries, which permit power consumption at any place and in any time, will eventually culminate in resource wars on limited commodities like lithium, cobalt, and rare earth metals. The substitution of conventional metals as means of electric charge storage by organic and polymeric materials, which may ultimately be derived from renewable resources, appears to be the only feasible way out. In this context, the novel class of organic radical batteries (ORBs) excelling in rate capability (i.e., charging speed) and cycling stability (>1000 cycles) sets new standards in battery research. This review examines stable nitroxide radical bearing polymers, their processing to battery systems, and their promising performance. PMID:23238940

  6. Stabilizing the Policy Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    Organizations seek stability in the policy environment, initially through direct control mechanism, but depending on risk propensity and uncertainty of the environment, through other means as well. A repertoire of seven such means are described and discussed. (Author/IRT)

  7. Theoretical study of radiative electron attachment to CN, C2H, and C4H radicals.

    PubMed

    Douguet, Nicolas; Fonseca dos Santos, S; Raoult, Maurice; Dulieu, Olivier; Orel, Ann E; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav

    2015-06-21

    A first-principle theoretical approach to study the process of radiative electron attachment is developed and applied to the negative molecular ions CN(-), C4H(-), and C2H(-). Among these anions, the first two have already been observed in the interstellar space. Cross sections and rate coefficients for formation of these ions by direct radiative electron attachment to the corresponding neutral radicals are calculated. For the CN molecule, we also considered the indirect pathway, in which the electron is initially captured through non-Born-Oppenheimer coupling into a vibrationally resonant excited state of the anion, which then stabilizes by radiative decay. We have shown that the contribution of the indirect pathway to the formation of CN(-) is negligible in comparison to the direct mechanism. The obtained rate coefficients for the direct mechanism at 30 K are 7 × 10(-16) cm(3)/s for CN(-), 7 × 10(-17) cm(3)/s for C2H(-), and 2 × 10(-16) cm(3)/s for C4H(-). These rates weakly depend on temperature between 10 K and 100 K. The validity of our calculations is verified by comparing the present theoretical results with data from recent photodetachment experiments. PMID:26093561

  8. Free radicals and activated oxygen.

    PubMed

    Famaey, J P

    1982-01-01

    Superoxide anion (0(-2)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) are products of the biological reduction of 0(2). They are very reactive and poorly tolerated within living systems and enzymes that catalytically scavenge these products have been evolved as defense mechanisms. These include superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalase and peroxidases. Large amounts of O-2 are produced by different enzymatic and non enzymatic biological processes. Large amounts of activated oxygens are produced by phagocytosing cells such as macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells. This production is associated with the bactericidal actions of these cells but it also largely contributes to exacerbate and sustain the inflammation where these cells congregate. The arachidonic acid pathway triggered by the inflammatory stimuli is also a source for these oxidizing radicals. The production of activated oxygens has been associated with the normal aging process but also with various toxic reactions (e.g. the toxicity of the herbicide paraquat, of the ionizing radiations, of certain antibiotics such as streptonigrin, etc. . . .). O-2 induces the depolymerization of hyaluronic acid which lends viscosity and lubricating properties to synovial fluids. SOD possess antiinflammatory properties and a bovine SOD, orgotein, has now been largely investigated by intramuscular and intraarticular injections in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Various antiinflammatory compounds (e.g. the salicylates) are able either to inhibit the production of these oxygen radicals or to scavenge them which seems of importance for their antiinflammatory properties. Singlet oxygen, another activated oxygen, might also play a role in the inflammatory process. PMID:6295769

  9. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key

  10. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  11. Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1993-12-01

    The author reports the application of supersonic jet flash pyrolysis to the specific preparation of a range of organic radicals, biradicals, and carbenes in a skimmed molecular beam. Each species was produced cleanly and specifically, with little or no secondary reactions by the thermal dissociation of appropriately designed and synthesized organic precursors. Photoelectron spectra of the three isomeric C{sub 3}H{sub 2} carbenes, ortho-benzyne, and the {alpha},3-dehydrotoluene biradical, were used to establish adiabatic ionization potentials for use in thermochemical determinations.

  12. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Reactions of reducing and oxidizing radicals with caffeic acid:. a pulse radiolysis and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke; Wu, Guozhong; Muroya, Yusa

    2001-01-01

    Molecular calculations coupled with pulse radiolysis studies are performed to understand the reactions of radicals with caffeic acid. From molecular calculation, we find that e aq- and ·OH tend to form adducts with caffeic acid, while N 3rad tends to abstract H from 4-hydroxyl group in benzene ring, generating a semi-quinoid radical. Based on comparison of the heat of formation, the most favorable radical attack sites and the most stable radical structures are predicted. The calculation results suggest that the stability of the electron adducts radicals < ·OH adducts of caffeic ions, in good agreement with their experimental second-order decay rate constants (2 k=(1.1±0.2)×10 9, (6.0±0.4)×10 7 and (2.0±0.2)×10 7 M -1 s -1, respectively), determined by pulse radiolysis. Molecular calculations seem to be a powerful tool to predict the stability and structures of transient radicals.

  14. Free radical generation induced by ultrasound in red wine and model wine: An EPR spin-trapping study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-An; Shen, Yuan; Fan, Xue-hui; Martín, Juan Francisco García; Wang, Xi; Song, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Direct evidence for the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl radicals by ultrasound in red wine and air-saturated model wine is presented in this paper. Free radicals are thought to be the key intermediates in the ultrasound processing of wine, but their nature has not been established yet. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrrolin N-oxide (DMPO) was used for the detection of hydroxyl free radicals and 1-hydroxylethyl free radicals. Spin adducts of hydroxyl free radicals were detected in DMPO aqueous solution after sonication while 1-hydroxylethyl free radical adducts were observed in ultrasound-processed red wine and model wine. The latter radical arose from ethanol oxidation via the hydroxyl radical generated by ultrasound in water, thus providing the first direct evidence of the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl free radical in red wine exposed to ultrasound. Finally, the effects of ultrasound frequency, ultrasound power, temperature and ultrasound exposure time were assessed on the intensity of 1-hydroxylethyl radical spin adducts in model wine. PMID:26186825

  15. Highly stable tetrathiafulvalene radical dimers in [3]catenanes

    SciTech Connect

    Spruell, Jason M.; Coskun, Ali; Friedman, Douglas C.; Forgan, Ross S.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Trabolsi, Ali; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barin, Gokhan; Paxton, Walter F.; Dey, Sanjeev K.; Olson, Mark A.; Benítez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Colvin, Michael T.; Carmielli, Raanan; Caldwell, Stuart T.; Rosair, Georgina M.; Hewage, Shanika Gunatilaka; Duclairoir, Florence; Seymour, Jennifer L.; Slawin, Alexandra M.Z.; Goddard, III, William A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Cooke, Graeme; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2010-12-03

    Two [3]catenane 'molecular flasks' have been designed to create stabilized, redox-controlled tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) dimers, enabling their spectrophotometric and structural properties to be probed in detail. The mechanically interlocked framework of the [3]catenanes creates the ideal arrangement and ultrahigh local concentration for the encircled TTF units to form stable dimers associated with their discrete oxidation states. These dimerization events represent an affinity umpolung, wherein the inversion in electronic affinity replaces the traditional TTF-bipyridinium interaction, which is over-ridden by stabilizing mixed-valence (TTF){sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}+} and radical-cation (TTF{sup {sm_bullet}+}){sub 2} states inside the 'molecular flasks.' The experimental data, collected in the solid state as well as in solution under ambient conditions, together with supporting quantum mechanical calculations, are consistent with the formation of stabilized paramagnetic mixed-valence dimers, and then diamagnetic radical-cation dimers following subsequent one-electron oxidations of the [3]catenanes.

  16. Electron relaxation of DNP free radicals BDPA and DPPH at W-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamoshi, Armin; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Song, Likai; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    The stable, spin-1/2 organic free radicals BDPA and DPPH are efficient polarizing agents for dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Despite the hydrophobic nature of these two free radicals, BDPA and DPPH can be dissolved in specialized solvents such as sulfolane or dimethyl sulfoxide. In this work, we have investigated the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 of these two DNP free radicals at W-band from 250 K down to 4 K. We have found that at high temperature above 40 K the relaxation rates of these free radicals (at optimum DNP concentration) behave closely according to the Raman process prediction. At lower temperature below 40 K, the relaxation rate slows down according to the direct process behavior. The results obtained here may elucidate the correlation between the relaxation of electrons and the efficiency of these free radicals in DNP.

  17. Direct identification of interstitial Mn in heavily p-type doped GaAs and evidence of its high thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, L. M. C.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Decoster, S.; Vantomme, A.; Silva, M. R. da; Araujo, J. P.

    2011-05-16

    We report on the lattice location of Mn in heavily p-type doped GaAs by means of {beta}{sup -} emission channeling from the decay of {sup 56}Mn. The majority of the Mn atoms substitute for Ga and up to 31% occupy the tetrahedral interstitial site with As nearest neighbors. Contrary to the general belief, we find that interstitial Mn is immobile up to 400 deg. C, with an activation energy for diffusion of 1.7-2.3 eV. Such high thermal stability of interstitial Mn has significant implications on the strategies and prospects for achieving room temperature ferromagnetism in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As.

  18. Development of sensors for direct detection of organophosphates. Part I: Immobilization, characterization and stabilization of acetylcholinesterase and organophosphate hydrolase on silica supports.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Flounders, A W; Volponi, J V; Ashley, C S; Wally, K; Schoeniger, J S

    1999-12-01

    Biosensors for organophosphates in solution may be constructed by monitoring the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or organophosphate hydrolase (OPH) immobilized to a variety of microsensor platforms. The area available for enzyme immobilization is small (< 1 mm2) for microsensors. In order to construct microsensors with increased surface area for enzyme immobilization, we used a sol-gel process to create highly porous and stable silica matrices. Surface porosity of sol-gel coated surfaces was characterized using scanning electron microscopy; pore structure was found to be very similar to that of commercially available porous silica supports. Based upon this analysis, porous and non-porous silica beads were used as model substrates of sol-gel coated and uncoated sensor surfaces. Two different covalent chemistries were used to immobilize AChE and OPH to these porous and non-porous silica beads. The first chemistry used amine-silanization of silica followed by enzyme attachment using the homobifunctional linker glutaraldehyde. The second chemistry used sulfhydryl-silanization followed by enzyme attachment using the heterobifunctional linker N-gamma-maleimidobutyryloxy succinimide ester (GMBS). Surfaces were characterized in terms of total enzyme immobilized, total and specific enzyme activity, and long term stability of enzyme activity. Amine derivitization followed by glutaraldehyde linking yielded supports with greater amounts of immobilized enzyme and activity. Use of porous supports not only yielded greater amounts of immobilized enzyme and activity, but also significantly improved long term stability of enzyme activity. Enzyme was also immobilized to sol-gel coated glass slides. The mass of immobilized enzyme increased linearly with thickness of coating. However, immobilized enzyme activity saturated at a porous silica thickness of approximately 800 nm. PMID:10641290

  19. Graphene oxide as a radical initiator: Free radical and controlled radical polymerization of sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate with graphene oxide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Voylov, Dmitry N.; Saito, Tomonori; Lokitz, Bradley S.; Uhrig, David; Wang, Yangyang; Agapov, Alexander L.; Holt, Adam P.; Bocharova, Vera; Kisliuk, Alexander; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2016-01-19

    The free radical and controlled radical polymerization of sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate using graphene oxide as a radical initiator was studied. This work demonstrates that graphene oxide can initiate radical polymerization in an aqueous solution without any additional initiator. Poly(sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate) obtained via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization had a controlled molecular weight with a very narrow polydispersity ranging between 1.01 and 1.03. Furthermore, the reduction process of graphene oxide as well as the resulting composite material properties were analyzed in detail.

  20. Electron spin resonance studies on reduction process of nitroxyl spin radicals used in molecular imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2014-04-24

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters such as signal intensity ratio, line width, g-value, hyperfine coupling constant and rotational correlation time were determined. The half life time was estimated for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. The ESR study reveals that the TEMPONE has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL. From the results, TEMPONE has long half life time and high stability compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL radical. Therefore, this study reveals that the TEMPONE radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for molecular imaging.

  1. Rate constants for the reactions of free radicals with oxygen in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Maillard, B.; Ingold, K.U.; Scaiano, J.C.

    1983-07-27

    The kinetics of the rections of several free radicals with oxygen have been examined in solution at 300 K using laser flash photolysis techniques. The reactions of resonance-stabilized radicals are only slightly slower than those of nonstabilized radicals: for example, for tert-butyl (in cyclohexane), 4.93 x 10/sup 9/; benzyl, 2.36 x 10/sup 9/ (in cyclohexane); cyclohexadienyl (in benzene), 1.64 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. The reaction of butyl-tin (n-Bu/sub 3/Sn.) radicals is unusually fast (7.5 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/), a fact that has been tentatively attributed to a relaxation of spin selection rules due to heavy atom effects. 1 table.

  2. Radical formation and radiation damage in adamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.V.; DiGregorio, S.; DiMauro, L.; Wood, D.E.

    1980-10-30

    Unequivocal samples of the 1-adamantyl (1-Ad) and 2-Ad radicals have been prepared in a matrix of adamantane (Ad) by the simultaneous deposition of atomic sodium, 1- or 2-bromoadamantane, and adamantance at 77 K. The EPR spectrum of the 1-Ad radical contrary to previous reports has a clearly resolved hyperfine structure that can be analyzed in terms of the solution parameters of Krusic et al., and the spectrum of the 2-Ad radical is identical with that previously reported by Ferrell et al. It is also shown that conditions of purification and irradiation can greatly affect the spectra obtained upon X irradiation of Ad itself. Depending upon conditions, alicyclic radicals that are primary products of ring-opening reactions or benzylic-type radicals that are probably secondary reaction products can also be obtained in addition to 1-Ad and 2-Ad radicals.

  3. [Free radicals in immunology and infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Racek, J; Holecek, V; Sedlácek, D; Panzner, P

    2001-04-01

    Free radicals contribute significantly in modification of immune processes and inflammatory reactions. They are produced by activated phagocytes which use them for killing microorganisms. Free radicals facilitate production of cytokines, which are important as modifiers of inflammatory reactions. Formation of free radicals is influenced by antioxidants which can thus modify the intensity of inflammatory reaction and immune response. The authors describe in detail the contribution of free radicals in etiology and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The role of free radicals and modifying influence of antioxidants in viral, bacterial, parasitic and mycotic diseases is described in the second part of the review. Finally, influence of free radicals and antioxidants on immunity changes in patients with malignant tumours, during aging and physical exercise is discussed. PMID:11329733

  4. Jet-cooled molecular radicals in slit supersonic discharges: Sub-Doppler infrared studies of methyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott; Anderson, David T.; Duxbury, Geoffrey; Nesbitt, David J.

    1997-10-01

    A novel high-intensity source of jet-cooled molecular radicals is described based on the combination of (i) slit supersonic expansions with (ii) pulsed electric discharges. The electrode bias configuration effectively confines the discharge to a region upstream of the supersonic expansion, which results both in efficient rotational cooling (Trot≈25 K) and high radical densities (>1014/cm3). In conjunction with direct absorption laser probe methods, this discharge source provides a general technique for high-resolution IR studies of jet-cooled radicals. Performance of the slit discharge system is demonstrated on v=1←0 rovibrational transitions in jet-cooled OH radicals, which indicate sub-Doppler linewidths (Δν≈100 MHz) when probed along the slit expansion axis. The enhanced spectral resolution of the slit discharge geometry is utilized to probe the v3=1←0 asymmetric CH stretch vibration-rotation spectra of CH3 radical. Under sub-Doppler conditions, spin-rotation splittings are fully resolved and nuclear hyperfine splittings partially resolved in all of the transitions, permitting the first measure of Fermi contact interactions [af″=-65.5(9) MHz, ɛbb″=-354(5) MHz, af'=-65(2) MHz, ɛbb'=-353(2) MHz] and therefore both the sign and magnitude of spin-polarization effects for CH3 under isolated gas-phase conditions. The results permit direct comparison with high level ab initio calculations, and highlight a clear trend in spin-polarization effects between condensed and gas-phase behavior.

  5. Free radicals in the stratosphere - A new observational technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. G.; Hazen, N. L.; Mclaren, B. E.; Rowe, S. P.; Schiller, C. M.; Schwab, M. J.; Solomon, L.; Thompson, E. E.; Weinstock, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to in situ observations of trace reactive species in the stratosphere is described. A balloon-borne system, floating 40 kilometers above the earth's surface, successfully lowered and then retracted a cluster of instruments a distance of 12 kilometers on a filament of Kevlar. This instrument cluster is capable of detecting gas-phase free radicals at the part-per-trillion level. The suspended instrument array has excellent stability and has been used to measured atomic oxygen concentrations in the stratosphere.

  6. Electro-optical Properties of Neutral and Radical Ion Thienosquaraines.

    PubMed

    Maltese, Vito; Cospito, Sante; Beneduci, Amerigo; De Simone, Bruna Clara; Russo, Nino; Chidichimo, Giuseppe; Janssen, René A J

    2016-07-11

    Thienosquaraines are an interesting class of electroactive dyes that are useful for applications in organic electronics. Herein, the redox chemistry and electrochromic response of a few newly synthesized thienosquaraines are presented. These properties are compared to those of the commercial 2,4-bis[4-(N,N-diisobutylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl]squaraine. The stability of the radical ions formed in electrochemical processes strongly affects these properties, as shown by cyclic voltammetry, in situ spectroelectrochemistry, and quantum chemical calculations. Furthermore, all of the dyes show aggregation tendency resulting in panchromatic absorption covering the whole UV/Vis spectral range. PMID:27334359

  7. On radicalizing behaviorism: A call for cultural analysis

    PubMed Central

    Malagodi, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Our culture at large continues many practices that work against the well-being of its members and its chances for survival. Our discipline has failed to realize its potential for contributing to the understanding of these practices and to the generation of solutions. This failure of realization is in part a consequence of the general failure of behavior analysts to view social and cultural analysis as a fundamental component of radical behaviorism. This omission is related to three prevailing practices of our discipline. First, radical behaviorism is characteristically defined as a “philosophy of science,” and its concerns are ordinarily restricted to certain epistemological issues. Second, theoretical extensions to social and cultural phenomena too often depend solely upon principles derived from the analysis of behavior. Third, little attention has been directed at examining the relationships that do, or that should, exist between our discipline and related sciences. These practices themselves are attributed to certain features of the history of our field. Two general remedies for this situation are suggested: first, that radical behaviorism be treated as a comprehensive world view in which epistemological, psychological, and cultural analyses constitute interdependent components; second, that principles derived from compatible social-science disciplines be incorporated into radical behaviorism. PMID:22478643

  8. Effects of disorder and motion in a radical pair magnetoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jason C. S.; Wagner-Rundell, Nicola; Rodgers, Christopher T.; Green, Nicholas J. B.; Hore, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    A critical requirement in the proposed chemical model of the avian magnetic compass is that the molecules that play host to the magnetically sensitive radical pair intermediates must be immobilized and rotationally ordered within receptor cells. Rotational disorder would cause the anisotropic responses of differently oriented radical pairs within the same cell to interfere destructively, while rapid molecular rotation would tend to average the crucial anisotropic magnetic interactions and induce electron spin relaxation, reducing the sensitivity to the direction of the geomagnetic field. So far, experimental studies have been able to shed little light on the required degree of ordering and immobilization. To address this question, computer simulations have been performed on a collection of radical pairs undergoing restricted rigid-body rotation, coherent anisotropic spin evolution, electron spin relaxation and spin-selective recombination reactions. It is shown that the ordering and motional constraints necessary for efficient magnetoreception can be simultaneously satisfied if the radical pairs are uniaxially ordered with a moderate order parameter and if their motional correlation time is longer than about a quarter of their lifetime. PMID:20007172

  9. OH-PLIF visualisation of radical farming supersonic combustion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, R. R.; Mudford, N. R.; McGuire, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental investigations employing Planar Laser-induced fluorescence visualisation of the qualitative distribution of the OH radical (OH-PLIF), coupled with surface pressure measurements, have been made of flow in a generic, nominally two-dimensional inlet-injection radical farming supersonic combustion scramjet engine model. The test flows were provided by a hypersonic shock tunnel, and covered total enthalpies corresponding to the flight Mach number range 8.7-11.8 and approximately 150 kPa dynamic pressure. The surface pressure measurements displayed radical farming behaviour, that is a series of adjacent high and low pressure regions corresponding to successive shock/expansion structures, with no significant combustion-induced pressure rise until the second structure. OH-PLIF imaging between the first two structures provides the first direct experimental evidence of significant OH radical concentrations upstream of the ignition point in this mode of scramjet operation and shows that combustion reactions were occurring in highly localised regions in a complex turbulent and poorly micromixed fuel/air mixing layer confined to the fuel injection side of the combustor.

  10. The nitrate radical: Physics, chemistry, and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, R. P.; Barnes, I.; Biggs, P.; Burrows, J. P.; Canosa-Mas, C. E.; Hjorth, J.; Le Bras, G.; Moortgat, G. K.; Perner, D.; Poulet, G.; Restelli, G.; Sidebottom, H.

    mechanism that had, at one stage, been proposed), and that the highly variable night-time tropospheric concentrations imply that NO 3 is a reactive tropospheric constituent. The inter-relation between laboratory studies and atmospheric observations, and the problems in extrapolating laboratory data to atmospheric conditions, are both explored. Initiation of night-time chemical transformations by NO 3 and the possible production of OH are considered. The available information is then brought together to see how far NO 3 is a sensitive indicator of the state of the atmosphere, and some speculations are presented about the involvement of NO 3 (or N 2O 5) in damage to trees and plants. The final section of the review suggests some issues that remain unresolved concerning the NO 3 radical which is directly or indirectly relevant to a better knowledge of the part played by the radical in the atmosphere. Amongst the requirements noted are improved data for the heat of formation of the radical, its absorption cross section in the visible region (and, especially, the temperature dependence of the cross section), and the details of its photochemistry. There is also still a need for a definitive determination of the equilibrium constant and its temperature dependence for the association with NO 2 and the reverse dissociation of N 2O 5. A series of chemical reactions deserves further investigation, especially with regard to elucidation of product channels, and overall oxidation mechanisms also need to be defined better. Future atmospheric studies that are desirable include study of basic NO 3 chemistry in the field to understand the influence of humidity on the conversion (probably on surfaces) of N 2O 5 to HNO 3, and thus on NO 3 concentrations. In addition, a study of the chemistry of NO 3 in the presence of volatile organic compounds and at elevated concentrations of the oxides of nitrogen should help in the understanding of, for example, polluted marine coasts, forests, and urban

  11. Anodic electrogenerated chemiluminescence of quantum dots: size and stabilizer matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tao; Li, Tangsong; Yuan, Lang; Liu, Shaoqin; Wang, Zhenlong

    2012-08-01

    The electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is generally believed to be independent of particle sizes or the capping agents used. Herein, we demonstrate that CdTe QDs with different sizes and stabilizers evidently exhibit different ECL behavior in aqueous solution. The ECL of CdTe QDs stabilized by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) displays two waves at potentials of about +1.17 V and +1.74 V vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively. ECL spectra confirm that the ECL of QDs is attributed to their band gap luminescence, in which the peak positions are changed with QD sizes. The ECL mechanism of CdTe QDs involves superoxide radical generation by reduction of dissolved oxygen at lower potential or water splitting at higher potential. Direct evidence for superoxide radicals in this medium was obtained via electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. In comparison, the 2-mercaptoethylamine (MEA)-capped CdTe QDs did not exhibit any ECL in air-saturated pH 7.4 PBS. Both ESR and X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) experiments revealed that amine groups in MEA-capped QDs were responsible for the absence of ECL. The reaction of an amine group with a superoxide radical leads to the quenching of ECL. The ECL quenching of MPA-capped CdTe QDs was further used to detect melamine. Under the optimum conditions, the inhibited ECL was linear with the logarithm of concentration of melamine within the concentration range of 10-9 to 10-5 M and the detection limit was found to be 6.74 × 10-10 M, which was 100-100 000 times lower than that of the most previous methods.The electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is generally believed to be independent of particle sizes or the capping agents used. Herein, we demonstrate that CdTe QDs with different sizes and stabilizers evidently exhibit different ECL behavior in aqueous solution. The ECL of CdTe QDs stabilized by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) displays two waves at potentials of about +1

  12. Electron spin resonance spectra of nitroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botek, Edith; Zarycz, Natalia; Champagne, Benoît; Sciannaméa, Valérie; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    Hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) of nitroxyl radicals were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) to address the structure of nitroxide intermediates in controlled radical polymerization. In a preliminary step, the reliability of different theoretical methods has been substantiated by comparing calculated HFCCs to experimental data for a set of acyclic and cyclic alkylnitroxyl radicals. In a second step this tested approach was applied to support experimental evidence of several nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP) reactions.

  13. Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical

    DOEpatents

    Springston, Stephen R.; Lloyd, Judith; Zheng, Jun

    2007-10-23

    A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

  14. Free-radical chemistry of sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, P.; Huie, R.E.

    1985-12-01

    The free-radical chemistry of sulfite oxidation is reviewed. Chemical transformations of organic and biological molecules induced by sulfite oxidation are summarized. The kinetics of the free-radical oxidations of sulfite are discussed, as are the kinetics of the reactions of the sulfite-derived radicals SO/sub 3/ and the peroxy derivative SO/sub 5/ with organic compounds. 98 references.

  15. Energetics of mechanical destruction of middle radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvachadze, N. G.; Tomashevskii, E. E.; Zhizhenkov, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The breaking strain of a model fragment of a middle radical in a rigid polymer matrix has been calculated. The force and energy characteristics of the destruction of the radical and the formation of double bonds have been estimated. The dissociation energy and the strength of Cβ-Cγ bonds for trans- and gaucheconformers of radicals have been determined. It has been established that the probability of breaking of the β bonds essentially depends of the conformation structure of the macroradicals.

  16. Evaporative cooling of the dipolar hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Hummon, Matthew T; Yeo, Mark; Quéméner, Goulven; Bohn, John L; Ye, Jun

    2012-12-20

    Atomic physics was revolutionized by the development of forced evaporative cooling, which led directly to the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum-degenerate Fermi gases and ultracold optical lattice simulations of condensed-matter phenomena. More recently, substantial progress has been made in the production of cold molecular gases. Their permanent electric dipole moment is expected to generate systems with varied and controllable phases, dynamics and chemistry. However, although advances have been made in both direct cooling and cold-association techniques, evaporative cooling has not been achieved so far. This is due to unfavourable ratios of elastic to inelastic scattering and impractically slow thermalization rates in the available trapped species. Here we report the observation of microwave-forced evaporative cooling of neutral hydroxyl (OH(•)) molecules loaded from a Stark-decelerated beam into an extremely high-gradient magnetic quadrupole trap. We demonstrate cooling by at least one order of magnitude in temperature, and a corresponding increase in phase-space density by three orders of magnitude, limited only by the low-temperature sensitivity of our spectroscopic thermometry technique. With evaporative cooling and a sufficiently large initial population, much colder temperatures are possible; even a quantum-degenerate gas of this dipolar radical (or anything else it can sympathetically cool) may be within reach. PMID:23257881

  17. Drugs with susceptible sites for free radical induced oxidative transformations: the case of a penicillin.

    PubMed

    Szabó, László; Tóth, Tünde; Rácz, Gergely; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2016-01-01

    Penicillins, as bactericidal antibiotics, have been widely used to treat infections for several decades. Their structure contains both aromatic and thioether moieties susceptible to free radical oxidation. The (•)OH induced oxidation mechanism of amoxicillin was investigated by pulse radiolysis techniques and by final product analysis performed after steady-state γ-irradiation. The predominant sites of the (•)OH attack are suggested to be the thioether group, initially yielding an (•)OH adduct to the sulfur, and the aromatic ring. This adduct to the sulfur converts to sulfur radical cation, which has three competitive reaction paths: (1) by deprotonation at the adjacent carbon α-(alkylthio)alkyl radicals form, which undergo disproportionation leading presumably to sulfoxide as main product; (2) via the pseudo-Kolbe mechanism it may transform to α-aminoalkyl radicals; (3) the radical cation can be stabilized through intramolecular S.˙.O bond formation. The reaction mechanism suggests the presence of a short-living and a stabilized (via hydrogen bonding) long-living (•)OH adduct to the sulfur. The three-electron bonded dimers of amoxicillin were not formed owing to steric hindrance. Thiyl radicals were also present in equilibrium with α-aminoalkyl radicals. In the presence of dissolved oxygen, aromatic ring hydroxylation occurred along with complex reactions resulting in e.g. oxidation of the methyl groups. The formation of the sulfoxide is especially effective in the presence of dissolved oxygen, under anaerobic condition, however, it is also generated owing to H2O2 and α-(alkylthio)alkyl radicals. The thioether moiety appears to be more sensitive to oxidation compared to the aromatic ring in case of amoxicillin. PMID:26431250

  18. Spin trapping of radicals in tritiated methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, A.

    1984-01-01

    The radicals in [methyl- 3H]-methanol have been detected by spin trapping with PBN. Two radicals observed in deaerated samples at 273 K are methoxy and hydroxymethyl radicals. The relative contribution of these two radicals changes with the storage time, finally only the PBNCH 2OH adduct being observed. This behaviour is hypothetically explained as resulting from the secondary reactions with a product formed in methanol by internal β-radiolysis or otherwise, whose steadily increasing concentration accelerates the decay of the PBNCH 3O adduct.

  19. Physiological aspects of free-radical reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, I; Tamura, M; Nakajima, R; Nakamura, M

    1985-01-01

    Enzymes which catalyze the formation of free radicals in vitro will catalyze similar reactions in vivo. We believe that the formation of some kinds of free radicals has definite physiological meanings in metabolism. In this sense, the enzymes forming such free radicals are concluded to be in evolutionally advanced states. Elaborated structure and function of enzymes such as horseradish peroxidase and microsomal flavoproteins support the idea. Deleterious and side reactions caused by free radicals are assumed to be minimized in vivo by localizing the reactions, but this assumption should be verified by future studies. PMID:3007098

  20. Can disordered radical pair systems provide a basis for a magnetic compass in animals?

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Erin; Ritz, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    A proposed mechanism for magnetic compasses in animals is that systems of radical pairs transduce magnetic field information to the nervous system. One can show that perfectly ordered arrays of radical pairs are sensitive to the direction of the external magnetic field and can thus operate, in principle, as a magnetic compass. Here, we investigate how disorder, inherent in biological cells, affects the ability of radical pair systems to provide directional information. We consider biologically inspired geometrical arrangements of ensembles of radical pairs with increasing amounts of disorder and calculate the effect of changing the direction of the external magnetic field on the rate of chemical signal production by radical pair systems. Using a previously established signal transduction model, we estimate the minimum number of receptors necessary to allow for detection of the change in chemical signal owing to changes in magnetic field direction. We quantify the required increase in the number of receptors to compensate for the signal attenuation through increased disorder. We find radical-pair-based compass systems to be relatively robust against disorder, suggesting several scenarios as to how a compass structure can be realized in a biological cell. PMID:19906676

  1. Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol (aqSOA) Formation By Radical Reactions: Model Studies Comparing the Role of OH Versus Organic Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Renard, P.; Reed Harris, A.; Vaida, V.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical reactions in the aqueous phase are thought to significantly contribute to ambient aerosol mass under specific conditions. Results from many laboratory studies suggest that these reactions are efficiently initiated by the OH radical and lead to high molecular weight compounds (oligomers). Recent laboratory experiments have shown that methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) can form oligomers in high yield in aqueous solutions similar to aerosol water. Additional experiments have shown that the direct photolysis of pyruvic acid can generate organic radicals that initiate similar oligomer products upon oxidation of MVK (Renard et al., submitted). Sources of the OH radical in the aerosol aqueous phase include the direct uptake from the gas phase, Fenton reactions and, to a smaller extent, direct photolyses of hydrogen peroxide and nitrate. Recent model studies imply that under many conditions, aqSOA formation might be oxidant-limited since these OH(aq) sources are not sufficient to provide a continuous OH supply. This limitation can be (partially) removed if additional radical sources in the multiphase system are considered. Exemplary, we include the direct photolysis of aqueous pyruvic acid as a proxy for possible other radical sources. Model results will be shown and consequences for aqSOA formation and processing under ambient conditions will be discussed.

  2. Gas-Phase Unimolecular Dissociation Reveals Dominant Base Property of Protonated Homocysteine Sulfinyl Radical Ions.

    PubMed

    Love-Nkansah, Chasity B; Tan, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2016-01-18

    Homocysteine sulfinyl radical ((SO⋅) Hcy) is a reactive intermediate involved during oxidative damage of DNA in the presence of high concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy). The short lifetime of (SO⋅) Hcy makes its preparation, isolation, and characterization challenging using traditional chemical measurement tools. Herein, we demonstrate the first study on mass-selected protonated (SO⋅) Hcy ions in the gas phase by investigating its unimolecular dissociation pathways from low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), stable-isotope labeling, and theoretical calculations were employed to rationalize the observed fragmentation pathways. The dominant dissociation channel of protonated (SO⋅) Hcy was a charge-directed H2 O loss from the protonated sulfinyl radical (-SO⋅) moiety, forming a thiyl radical (-S⋅), which further triggered sequential radical-directed ⋅SH loss through multiple pathways. Compared to cysteine sulfinyl radical ((SO⋅) Cys), the small structural change induced by one additional methylene group in the side chain of (SO⋅) Hcy significantly promotes its base property while reducing the radical reactivity of sulfinyl radical. This observation provides new insight into studying reactions of (SO⋅) Hcy with biomolecules, which are critical in understanding toxicity induced by high levels of Hcy in biological conditions. PMID:26531146

  3. EPR Spin Trapping of an Oxalate-Derived Free Radical in the Oxalate Decarboxylase Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Imaram, Witcha; Saylor, Benjamin T.; Centonze, Christopher P.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    EPR spin trapping experiments on bacterial oxalate decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis under turn-over conditions are described. The use of doubly 13C-labeled oxalate leads to a characteristic splitting of the observed radical adducts using the spin trap N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone linking them directly to the substrate. The radical was identified as the carbon dioxide radical anion which is a key intermediate in the hypothetical reaction mechanism of both decarboxylase and oxidase activities. X-ray crystallography had identified a flexible loop, SENS161-4, which acts as a lid to the putative active site. Site directed mutagenesis of the hinge amino acids, S161 and T165 was explored and showed increased radical trapping yields compared to the wild type. In particular, T165V shows approximately ten times higher radical yields while at the same time its decarboxylase activity was reduced by about a factor of ten. This mutant lacks a critical H-bond between T165 and R92 resulting in compromised control over its radical chemistry allowing the radical intermediate to leak into the surrounding solution. PMID:21277974

  4. Thermal stability of sulfonated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Audibert, A.; Argillier, J.F.

    1995-11-01

    Polyacrylamides which are used in oil applications i.e. polymer flooding and water based muds, are hydrolyzed versus time and temperature. This leads to a lack of tolerance towards electrolyte contamination and to a rapid degradation inducing a loss of their properties. Modifications of polyacrylamide structure have been proposed to postpone their thermal stability to higher temperatures. Monomers such as acrylamido methylpropane sulfonate (AMPS) or sulfonated styrene/maleic anhydride can be used to prevent acrylamide comonomer from hydrolysis. The aim of this work is to study under controlled conditions, i.e. anaerobic atmosphere, neutral pH, the stability of sulfonated polymers in order to distinguish between hydrolysis and radical degradation reactions. It has been observed that up to 100 C, the AMPS group is stable and protects the acrylamide function from hydrolysis up to 80%. At higher temperature, even the hydrolysis of the AMPS group occurs, giving acrylate and {beta},{beta} dimethyl taurine, with a kinetics that depends on temperature and time. Degradation in terms of molecular weight then occurs indicating that it follows a radical decarboxylation reaction. It can be limited either by the use of free radical scavenger or when the polymer is in the presence of a mineral phase such as bentonite. These results provide valuable data for the determination of the limits of use of sulfonated copolymers and guidelines for optimizing chemical structure of sulfonated polymers used in water based formulation, in particular to enhance their thermal stability.

  5. PEDOT Radical Polymer with Synergetic Redox and Electrical Properties

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of new redox polymers is being boosted by the increasing interest in the area of energy and health. The development of new polymers is needed to further advance new applications or improve the performance of actual devices such as batteries, supercapacitors, or drug delivery systems. Here we show the synthesis and characterization of a new polymer which combines the present most successful conjugated polymer backbone and the most successful redox active side group, i.e., poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), and a nitroxide stable radical. First, a derivative of the 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) molecule with side nitroxide stable radical group (TEMPO) was synthesized. The electrochemical polymerization of the PEDOT-TEMPO monomer was investigated in detail using cyclic voltammetry, potential step, and constant current methods. Monomer and polymer were characterized by NMR, FTIR, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis, cyclic voltammetry, and four-point probe conductivity. The new PEDOT-TEMPO radical polymer combines the electronic conductivity of the conjugated polythiophene backbone and redox properties of the nitroxide group. As an example of application, this redox active polymer was used as a conductive binder in lithium ion batteries. Good cycling stability with high Coulombic efficiency and increased cyclability at different rates were obtained using this polymer as a replacement of two ingredients: conductive carbon additive and polymeric binders. PMID:26877892

  6. The Influence of Zeolites on Radical Formation During Lignin Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bährle, Christian; Custodis, Victoria; Jeschke, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Vogel, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Lignin from lignocellulosic biomass is a promising source of energy, fuels, and chemicals. The conversion of the polymeric lignin to fuels and chemicals can be achieved by catalytic and noncatalytic pyrolysis. The influence of nonporous silica and zeolite catalysts, such as silicalite, HZSM5, and HUSY, on the radical and volatile product formation during lignin pyrolysis was studied by in situ high-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (HTEPR) as well as GC-MS. Higher radical concentrations were observed in the samples containing zeolite compared to the sample containing only lignin, which suggests that there is a stabilizing effect by the inorganic surfaces on the formed radical fragments. This effect was observed for nonporous silica as well as for HUSY, HZSM5, and silicalite zeolite catalysts. However, the effect is far larger for the zeolites owing to their higher specific surface area. The zeolites also showed an effect on the volatile product yield and the product distribution within the volatile phase. Although silicalite showed no effect on the product selectivity, the acidic zeolites such as HZSM5 or HUSY increased the formation of deoxygenated products such as benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX), and naphthalene. PMID:27486717

  7. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA. PMID:22125376

  8. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-04-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of narrow mental states; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without any reference external to her or him. I show that this fact imposes some severe restrictions to SIS to be incorporated into RC. In particular, I argue that only qualitative studies can comply with the requirement of narrowness. Nevertheless, I propose that quantitative works can be employed as sources of types in order to study token actual students. I use this type-token dichotomy to put forward an outline of a theory of the relation between school contents and mental contents. In this view, token mental contents regarding a given topic can be defined, and probed, only by resorting to typical school contents.

  9. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-08-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of narrow mental states; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without any reference external to her or him. I show that this fact imposes some severe restrictions to SIS to be incorporated into RC. In particular, I argue that only qualitative studies can comply with the requirement of narrowness. Nevertheless, I propose that quantitative works can be employed as sources of types in order to study token actual students. I use this type-token dichotomy to put forward an outline of a theory of the relation between school contents and mental contents. In this view, token mental contents regarding a given topic can be defined, and probed, only by resorting to typical school contents.

  10. Radical surgery in septic abortion.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, P; Ghosh, M; Ghosh, S

    1979-08-01

    At R.G. Kar Medical College Hospital, Calcutta, 10 cases of septic abortion from 1975-1977 were studied. Hysterectomies were preformed on 4 cases due to emergency situations including traumatised uterine fundus and perforated cervix, and on 6 cases after conservative treatment. Upon performing laparotomy in 9 cases, a uterine rent was detected; in 1 case there was a perforation in the posterior wall of the cervix, and in 5 cases mechanical obstructions due to internal adhesions to the uterine rent were found. 4 patients died primarily because of the patients seeking help too late. It is suggested that under high risk circumstances, laparotomy is advantageous to conservative medical management since bowel injuries and mechanical obstructions can only be detected by laparotomy. Radical surgery, however, should be undertaken before the patients general condition deteriorates to the point that the patient cannot tolerate surgical intervention. PMID:12336028

  11. Novel reactions of one-electron oxidized radicals of selenomethionine in comparison with methionine.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Sharma, A; Naumov, S; Priyadarsini, K I

    2009-05-28

    Pulse radiolysis studies on hydroxyl (*OH) radical reactions of selenomethionine (SeM), a selenium analogue of methionine, were carried out, and the resultant transient radical cations and their subsequent reactions have been reported. At pH<3, the >Se*-OH radical adducts produced on reaction of SeM with *OH radical were converted to selenium centered radical cations (Se*+M), which react with another molecule of SeM to form dimer radical cation M(Se therefore Se)M+. At pH 7, the >Se*-OH radical adducts were converted to a monomer radical of the type (Se therefore N)M+ that acquires intramolecular stability through interaction with the lone pair of the N atom and this radical is denoted as SeM*+. SeM*+ decayed by first order kinetics, and the reduction potential of the couple SeM*+/SeM was determined to be 1.21+/-0.05 V vs NHE at pH 7. SeM*+ oxidized ABTS2- and TMPD with rate constants of (2.5+/-0.1)x10(8) and (6.1+/-0.2)x10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, and reacted with hydroxide ion with a rate constant of (3.8+/-0.9)x10(5) M(-1) s(-1). SeM*+ reacts with molecular oxygen, and the rate constant for this reaction was determined to be (4.3+/-0.2)x10(8) M(-1) s(-1); similar reaction with methionine could not be observed experimentally. Like methionine radical cations, SeM*+ undergoes decarboxylation, although with lesser yield, to produce reducing 3-methyl-selenopropyl amino radicals (referred as alpha-amino radicals). The formation of these radicals was confirmed both by the estimation of the liberated CO2 and by one-electron reduction of MV2+, thionine, and PNAP. These results have been supported by quantum chemical calculations. Implications of these results in the biological role of SeM have also been briefly discussed. PMID:19408939

  12. Thioether bond formation by SPASM domain radical SAM enzymes: Cα H-atom abstraction in subtilosin A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Guillot, Alain; Lefranc, Benjamin; Vaudry, Hubert; Leprince, Jérôme; Berteau, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    AlbA is a radical SAM enzyme catalyzing the formation of three unusual thioether bonds in the antibiotic subtilosin A. We demonstrate here that AlbA catalyzes direct Cα H-atom abstraction and likely contains three essential [4Fe-4S] centers. This leads us to propose novel mechanistic perspectives for thioether bond catalysis by radical SAM enzymes. PMID:27087315

  13. Microsegregation during directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the directional solidification of alloys, solute inhomogeneities transverse to the growth direction arise due to morphological instabilities (leading to cellular or dendritic growth) and/or due to convection in the melt. In the absence of convection, the conditions for the onset of morphological instability are given by the linear stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka. For ordinary solidification rates, the predictions of linear stability analysis are similar to the constitutional supercooling criterion. However, at very rapid solidification rates, linear stability analysis predicts a vast increase in stabilization in comparison to constitutional supercooling.

  14. Peroxy radical measurements with NCAR's chemical amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Christopher; Shetter, Richard; Calvert, Jack G.

    1994-01-01

    The present NCAR instrument for HO2/RO2 measurements has been described previously. It is based on the reactions involving HO2, RO2, and HO radicals with CO and NO. Since (HO2) + (RO2) + (HO) is much greater than (HO) for most atmospheres, it is useful as a peroxy radical detector. Operation of the instrument depends on the creation of a chemical chain reaction which is initiated as HO2 and RO2 radicals in ambient air encounter added NO gas; this forms an NO2 molecule and an HO or RO radical: HO2(RO2) + NO yields HO(RO) + NO2. RO radicals react relatively efficiently with O2 to form an HO2 radical, and subsequently an HO-radical, by reaction with NO. CO gas added to the reaction chamber during part of the operating cycle, recycles the HO to HO2; HO + CO (+O2) yields HO2 + CO2. The reaction sequence may form several hundred NO2 molecules per HO2 (RO2) originally present, before chain termination occurs. The added CO is replaced by N2 addition periodically so that the chain reaction is suppressed, and a 'blank' signal resulting from NO2, O3 and possibly other NO2-forming species (non-chain processes) in ambient air is recorded. The difference between the signal with and without CO is proportional to the peroxy radical concentration. The NO2 produced is monitored using a sensitive luminol chemiluminescence detector system. In the NCAR instrument the length of the amplification chain is determined using a stable source of HO2 radicals (H2O2 thermal decomposition); the ratio of the signal seen with CO present to that with N2 present gives the sensitivity of the instrument to HO2 (molecules of NO2 formed/peroxy radical). The instrument is automated to carry out in hourly repeated cycles: (1) chain length determination; (2) NO2 calibration; and (3) linearity check on the response of signals. One minute averages of signals are normally recorded. The sensitivity of the instrument to detect peroxy radicals is in the pptv range. The present instrument has operated

  15. Effects of radical scavengers on aqueous solutions exposed to heavy-ion irradiation using the liquid microjet technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Shinji; Tsuchida, Hidetsugu; Furuya, Ryousuke; Miyahara, Kento; Majima, Takuya; Itoh, Akio

    2015-12-01

    The effects of the radical scavenger ascorbic acid on water radiolysis are studied by fast heavy-ion irradiation of aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid, using the liquid microjet technique under vacuum. To understand the reaction mechanisms of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solutions, we directly measure secondary ions emitted from solutions with different ascorbic acid concentrations. The yield of hydronium secondary ions is strongly influenced by the reaction between ascorbic acid and hydroxyl radicals. From analysis using a simple model considering chemical equilibria, we determine that the upper concentration limit of ascorbic acid with a radical scavenger effect is approximately 70 μM.

  16. Robotic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (LRN) is the actual gold-standard for the treatment of clinically localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (cT1-2 with no indications for nephron-sparing surgery). Limited evidence is currently available on the role of robotics in the field of radical nephrectomy. The aim of the current study was to provide a systematic review of the current evidence on the role of robotic radical nephrectomy (RRN) and to analyze the comparative studies between RRN and open nephrectomy (ON)/LRN. Methods A Medline search was performed between 2000–2013 with the terms “robotic radical nephrectomy”, “robot-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy”, “radical nephrectomy”. Six RRN case-series and four comparative studies between RRN and (ON)/pure or hand-assisted LRN were identified. Results Current literature produces a low level of evidence for RRN in the treatment of RCC, with only one prospective study available. Mean operative time (OT) ranges between 127.8-345 min, mean estimated blood loss (EBL) ranges between 100–273.6 ml, and mean hospital stay (HS) ranges between 1.2-4.3 days. The comparison between RRN and LRN showed no differences in the evaluated outcomes except for a longer OT for RRN as evidenced in two studies. Significantly higher direct costs and costs of the disposable instruments were also observed for RRN. The comparison between RRN and ON showed that ON is characterized by shorter OT but higher EBL, higher need of postoperative analgesics and longer HS. Conclusions No advantage of robotics over standard laparoscopy for the treatment of clinically localized RCC was evidenced. Promising preliminary results on oncologic efficacy of RRN have been published on the T3a-b disease. Fields of wider application of robotics should be researched where indications for open surgery still persist. PMID:25234265

  17. Vibrationally Driven Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction by Bromine Radical in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Shalowski, Michael A.; Crim, F. Fleming

    2013-06-01

    Previously, we have shown that preparing reactants in specific vibrational states can affect the product state distribution and branching ratios in gas phase reactions. In the solution phase, however, no vibrational mediation study has been reported to date. In this work, we present our first attempt of vibrationally mediated bimolecular reaction in solution. Hydrogen abstraction from a solvent by a bromine radical can be a good candidate to test the effect of vibrational excitation on reaction dynamics because this reaction is highly endothermic and thus we can suppress any thermally initiated reaction in our experiment. Br radical quickly forms CT (charge transfer) complex with solvent molecule once it is generated from photolysis of a bromine source. The CT complex strongly absorbs visible light, which allows us to use electronic transient absorption for tracking Br radical population. For this experiment, we photolyze bromoform solution in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent with 267 nm to generate Br radical and excite the C-H stretch overtone of DMSO with 1700 nm a few hundred femtoseconds after the photolysis. Then, we monitor the population of Br-DMSO complex with 400 nm as a function of delay time between two pump beams and probe beam. As a preliminary result, we observed the enhancement of loss of Br-DMSO complex population due to the vibrational excitation. We think that increased loss of Br-DMSO complex is attributed to more loss of Br radical that abstracts hydrogen from DMSO and it is the vibrational excitation that promotes the reaction. To make a clear conclusion, we will next utilize infrared probing to directly detect HBr product formation.

  18. Iron Metabolism Regulates p53 Signaling through Direct Heme-p53 Interaction and Modulation of p53 Localization, Stability, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia; Sheng, Xiangpeng; Chang, ZeNan; Wu, Qian; Wang, Sheng; Xuan, Zongliang; Li, Dan; Wu, Yalan; Shang, Yongjia; Kong, Xiangtao; Yu, Long; Li, Lin; Ruan, Kangchen; Hu, Hongyu; Huang, Ying; Hui, Lijian; Xie, Dong; Wang, Fudi; Hu, Ronggui

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron excess is closely associated with tumorigenesis in multiple types of human cancers, with underlying mechanisms yet unclear. Recently, iron deprivation has emerged as a major strategy for chemotherapy, but it exerts tumor suppression only on select human malignancies. Here, we report that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is downregulated during iron excess. Strikingly, the iron polyporphyrin heme binds to p53 protein, interferes with p53-DNA interactions, and triggers both nuclear export and cytosolic degradation of p53. Moreover, in a tumorigenicity assay, iron deprivation suppressed wild-type p53-dependent tumor growth, suggesting that upregulation of wild-type p53 signaling underlies the selective efficacy of iron deprivation. Our findings thus identify a direct link between iron/heme homeostasis and the regulation of p53 signaling, which not only provides mechanistic insights into iron-excess-associated tumorigenesis but may also help predict and improve outcomes in iron-deprivation-based chemotherapy. PMID:24685134

  19. Stability considerations of aspartame in the direct analysis of artificial sweeteners in water samples using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Berset, Jean-Daniel; Ochsenbein, Nicole

    2012-07-01

    A HPLC-MS/MS method is presented for the simultaneous determination of frequently used artificial sweeteners (ASs) and the main metabolite of aspartame (ASP), diketopiperazine (DKP), in environmental water samples using the direct-injection (DI) technique, thereby achieving limits of quantification (LOQ) of 10 ng L(-1). For a reliable quantification of ASP pH should be adjusted to 4.3 to prevent formation of the metabolite. Acesulfame (ACE), saccharin (SAC), cyclamate (CYC) and sucralose (SUC) were ubiquitously found in water samples. Highest concentrations up to 61 μg L(-1) of ACE were found in wastewater effluents, followed by surface water with concentrations up to 7 μg L(-1), lakes up to 600 ng L(-1) and groundwater and tap water up to 70 ng L(-1). The metabolite DKP was only detected in wastewater up to 200 ng L(-1) and at low detection frequencies. PMID:22503463

  20. [Possible significance of free oxygen radicals for reperfusion injury].

    PubMed

    Becker, B F; Massoudy, P; Permanetter, B; Raschke, P; Zahler, S

    1993-01-01

    Enhanced formation of radicals during post-ischemic reperfusion, foremost of superoxide (O2-) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals, has been directly and indirectly demonstrated in a number of tissues. However, the close chemical interrelationship of O2- and OH with other non-radical oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), makes it prudent to speak of reactive oxygen metabolites in conjunction with cell and organ dysfunction incurred by reperfusion. In the case of the heart, evidence for the causal involvement of such reactive molecular species includes (1) the increased formation of lipid peroxides, (2) the ability to mimic all facets of reperfusion injury (arrhythmias, contractile and vascular dysfunction, infarct extension) by exogenously applying reactive oxygen species, and (3) the propensity of a great variety of antioxidative and radical scavenging measures to afford cardioprotection during reperfusion. Potential sources of reactive oxygen metabolites in the reperfused heart are the mitochondrial redox-chain, endothelial enzymes such as cyclooxygenase, monoaminooxidase, NO-synthase and xanthine oxidase, and formed blood constituents (platelets, monocytes, granulocytes). According to our own results, adenosine, endogenously formed in the heart during ischemia, rapidly enhances adhesion of granulocytes introduced into the coronary system at reperfusion. Furthermore, small numbers of these cells suffice to induce contractile dysfunction in an isolated guinea pig heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury, the major mediator of damage being HOCl. The striking disparity between the enormous volume of experimental data supporting involvement of reactive oxygen metabolites in reperfusion damage and the virtual lack of clinical-therapeutic regimens employing anti-oxidative measures is largely due to a still rudimentary knowledge of the homeostatic control of formation and removal of radicals and oxidants. In particular, the inability to