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1

The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

2010-01-01

2

The Radio JOVE Project: Inexpensive Radio Astronomy for the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio JOVE is an interactive, hands-on educational activity for learning the scientific method through the medium of radio astronomy observations of Jupiter and the sun. Students build a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive non-profit kit (about \\$125) and use it to record data, analyze the data, and share the results with others. Alternatively, for no cost, the students can record and analyze data from remote radio telescopes connected to the Web. The project is a useful adjunct to activities in optical astronomy since students should recognize that we learn about the Universe through more than just the optical spectrum. In addition to supplementing knowledge of Jupiter and the sun, the project teaches about charged particles and magnetic fields. Building of the kit is also a mini-course in electronics. The Radio JOVE website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) contains science information, instruction manuals, observing guides, software, and education resources for students and teachers.

Thieman, J. R.; Higgins, C. A.; Pine, W.

2000-12-01

3

Project CLEA: Radio Astronomy of Pulsars  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This software for Windows, from Project CLEA -- Contemporary Laboratory Experiences In Astronomy, presents students with a radio telescope. The default operating characteristics (beam width, receiver noise, steerability) can be set by the instructor. Students can point the telescope at a source in the sky, viewing the output of the radio receiver on a graphic display that resembles a digital oscilloscope. The student manual describes exercises in which students acquaint themselves with the operation of the radio telescope, measure the signals from several pulsars at various frequencies, learn about pulsar signals, and then estimate the distance to the pulsar. The site includes student and instructor manuals as well as a pre- and posttest. The software is available for Windows only.

4

Radio Astronomy Radio astronomy  

E-print Network

Effelsberg 100m telescope (Germany) Green Bank 100m telescope (National Radio Astronomy ObservatoryExperiment -10m (Chile, Europe) #12;Submillimeter radio astronomy #12;Size of telescope Snow sweep at Nobeyama 45;#12;Arecibo 300m telescope #12;Radio interferometer #12;Radio interferometer Very Large Array (VLA) (New

Metchev, Stanimir

5

Radio Astronomy Software Defined Receiver Project  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes a Radio Astronomy Software Defined Receiver (RASDR) that is currently under development. RASDR is targeted for use by amateurs and small institutions where cost is a primary consideration. The receiver will operate from HF thru 2.8 GHz. Front-end components such as preamps, block down-converters and pre-select bandpass filters are outside the scope of this development and will be provided by the user. The receiver includes RF amplifiers and attenuators, synthesized LOs, quadrature down converters, dual 8 bit ADCs and a Signal Processor that provides firmware processing of the digital bit stream. RASDR will interface to a user s PC via a USB or higher speed Ethernet LAN connection. The PC will run software that provides processing of the bit stream, a graphical user interface, as well as data analysis and storage. Software should support MAC OS, Windows and Linux platforms and will focus on such radio astronomy applications as total power measurements, pulsar detection, and spectral line studies.

Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL] [ORNL; Leech, Marcus [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium] [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium; Oxley, Paul [Retired] [Retired; Flagg, Richard [Retired] [Retired; Fields, David [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01

6

The IAU Early Japanese Radio Astronomy Project: A Progress Report  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Japan was one of those nations that make an early start in radio astronomy, when solar observations began at both the Tokyo Astronomical Observatory (TAO) and at Osaka University in 1949. The research at the TAO accelerated during the 1950s and 1960s under the capable direction of Professor Hatanaka, while an equally-vibrant program was developed independently at Toyokawa by Professor Tanaka from Nagoya University. In this paper, after briefly describing the Osaka University initiative we will outline the instruments developed at Toyokawa and Mitaka, review the research programs carried out with them and introduce the scientific staff who played so important a role in the early development of Japanese radio astronomy. Following the success of the WG's Early French Radio Astronomy Project (seven papers were published), an ambitious IAU project to systematically document early developments in Japanese radio astronomy and publish the results in a series of research papers in the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage was launched in December 2010. Further research visits to Tokyo were made by the second author in 2011 and 2012, and two papers have now been completed and a start made on a third.

Ishiguro, Masato; Orchiston, Wayne; Akabane, Kenji; Stewart, Ron

2012-09-01

7

Radio Astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article is a Why Files short piece on how astronomers use information from radio astronomy. Contrary to popular belief, large radio telescopes are not looking for signs of life outside our solar system, but are making images of black holes, centers of galaxies, and gamma ray bursts. These phenomena cannot be seen in visible light, but emit radio waves which can be translated into images. The article discusses how this process works, and the information gathered from radio waves.

Tenenbaum, David

8

(Astro)Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

. Last year: "Current and Future Radio Astronomy Projects" This year: the search for extraterrestrial intelligence? the New Jersey roots of radio astronomy? why the Iridium telecommunications satellites are evil

Baker, Andrew J.

9

Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

10

South African SKA Project Postgraduate Scholarship Programme Postgraduate Projects for 2013 1. Radio Astronomy Science  

E-print Network

or equivalent. Knowledge and interest in theoretical astrophysics, cosmology, electrodynamics and radiation of radio halos in galaxy clusters is still unknown and is one of the hot topics in radio astronomy today with the MSc or equivalent. Knowledge and interest in theoretical astrophysics, cosmology, electrodynamics

Jarrett, Thomas H.

11

CRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

CRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy EUROPEAN SCIENCE FOUNDATION Committee on Radio Astronomy forum for science. The ESF Expert Committee on Radio Astronomy Frequencies, CRAF, was established Astronomy Service and other passive applications. Cover: The 76-m diameter Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank

Rodriguez, Luis F.

12

Pulsars in a Box: A Radio Astronomy Exercise for Windows from PROJECT CLEA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The latest astronomy laboratory exercise from PROJECT CLEA, "Radio Astronomy of Pulsars", is designed for use in introductory astronomy classes, but contains options and features that make it usable by upperclass astronomy students as well. The heart of the exercise is a simulated radio telescope, whose aperture, location, and beamwidth can be set by the instructor. It is steered by pushing buttons, but instead of seeing a star field on the field monitor,students see a projection of the sky showing, with a colored dot,where the beam is pointing. Large LED-like readouts display time and telescope coordinates. The telescope can be operated in either a tracking or transit mode. Using the telescope, students point to several pulsars suggested by the write-up (from an on-line catalog of over 500). Students can then use a multi-channel tunable receiver, with multiple oscilloscope displays, to view the incoming signal vs. time. The signal received is a combination of random receiver and background noise plus the pulsar signal (if it is in the beam) Receivers are tunable from 400 to 1400 MHz, and both the time and frequency behavior of signals can be studied. By measuring the dispersion delay at a number of different frequencies, students can determine the pulsar's distance. Data can be stored, displayed, and printed using a versatile measuring window. Though we provide a manual for a 2-3 hour lab exercise involving dispersion measures, the database and receivers can be used for a wide variety of other exercises, for instance the measurement of pulsar spin-down rates. We welcome suggestions for improvements and applications.

Marschall, L. A.; Snyder, G. A.; Good, R. F.; Hayden, M. B.; Cooper, P. R.

1996-12-01

13

Radio astronomy receivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general survey of the principles of radio astronomy receivers is presented. System noise temperature, the sensitivity of different receiver types, and the calibration of receivers are studied. A total-power receiver is analyzed as a basic radio telescope receiver and the results are used to obtain the performance of other receiver types such as the Dicke receiver, Graham's receiver, correlation

M. Tiuri

1964-01-01

14

Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) is located in the Gauteng Province of South Africa, 60 km NW of Johannesburg. It is one of four national research facilities operated by the National Research Foundation. The Observatory was established in 1975 at the former NASA Deep Space Station 51, which was founded in 1961 to support unmanned US space probes to the Moon and planets, a...

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

15

Radio Astronomy in Serbia: A Short Review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this lecture, I presented a short review of: 1. the brief history of development of radio astronomy in Serbia, and 2. the present state of research and university teaching in Serbia on this interesting and modern field of astronomy. Since 1970's, the continuum observations at the lowest radio frequencies (e.g. 38 MHz) and the Galactic radio loops have been represented the topics of main research interest for the first radio astronomer in Serbia, prof. dr Jelena Milogradov-Turin. In 1983, she introduced Radio astronomy as two semester course at 4th year of studies at Department of astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade. In this moment we have radio astronomy group with 5 (mainly younger) researchers from Department of Astronomy and Belgrade Astronomical Observatory. The main fields of research interest are, as a part of tradition, the Galactic radio loops and additionally, the hydrodynamic and radio evolution of supernova remnants. Our future projects will be connected with radio evolution of nova remnants and planetary nebulae.

Urosevic, D.

16

Radio Astronomy Fundamentals I John Simonetti  

E-print Network

Radio Astronomy Fundamentals I John Simonetti Spring 2012 Radio astronomy provides a very different view of the universe than optical astronomy. Radio astronomers and optical astronomers use astronomy. Radio astronomers talk about sources of radio emission. Cas A is a strong source, for example

Ellingson, Steven W.

17

Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy course number = 01:750:343 web page = http will be on reserve in SERC, and an online "Essential Radio Astronomy" course taught at the University of Virginia, or programs that you write yourself. #12; Course meetings Lectures: Serin 401, once a week, M 10

Baker, Andrew J.

18

Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy course number = 01:750:343 web page = http Radio Astronomy" course taught at the University of Virginia is linked from our main web page. Pre do numbercrunching with Excel or programs that you write. #12; Course meetings Lectures: Serin

Baker, Andrew J.

19

Basics of Radio Astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online workbook is used for training teachers and volunteers who wish to operate the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope. The students in this district operate the telescope from the Apple Valley location. Also, students and teachers across the country can register to operate the telescope from their own classrooms. This workbook can also be used as a resource for information on how radio telescopes work, the fundamentals of the electromagnetic spectrum, thermal and non-thermal radiation, 21-cm hydrogen line, Kirchhoff's laws of spectral analysis, the Doppler effect, coordinate systems, and the SETI project.

Fisher, Diane

2004-07-16

20

Synthesis imaging in radio astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent advances in techniques and instrumentation for radio synthesis imaging in astronomy are discussed in a collection of review essays. Topics addressed include coherence in radio astronomy, the interferometer in practice, primary antenna elements, cross correlators, calibration and editing, sensitivity, deconvolution, self-calibration, error recognition, and image analysis. Consideration is given to wide-field imaging (bandwidth and time-average smearing, noncoplanar arrays, and

Richard A. Perley; Frederic R. Schwab; Alan H. Bridle

1989-01-01

21

National Radio Astronomy Observatory Dark Energy  

E-print Network

National Radio Astronomy Observatory Dark Energy: Constraints from Astronomy, Answers from Physics? Jim Condon #12;National Radio Astronomy Observatory UVa/NRAO DE Lunch Talk 2005 Nov. 30 Constraining expected for a quantum vacuum (Weinberg 1989, Rev Mod Phys, 61, 1) #12;National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Groppi, Christopher

22

Expanding radio astronomy in Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Organisation announced in May 2012 that its members had agreed on a dual site solution for the SKA [1]. South Africa's bid for hosting the SKA has caused a ramp up of radio astronomy in Africa. To develop technology towards the SKA, the South African SKA Project (SKA SA) built a protoype radio telescope in 2007, followed in 2010 the seven antenna Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7). Next is the 64 antenna MeerKAT, which will merge into SKA Phase 1 in Africa. As SKA Phase 2 is intended to add a high resolution capability with baselines out to 3000 km, the SKA SA brought in partner countries in Africa to host outstations. South Africa has been working with the partners to build capacity to operate the SKA and to benefit from it. The SA Department of Science and Technology (DST) developed a proposal to establish radio telescopes in the partner countries to provide hands-on learning and a capability for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) research. Redundant 30 m class satellite antennas are being incorporated in this project.

Gaylard, M. J.

2013-04-01

23

An Introduction to Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. The nature of the radio signal; 3. Signals, noise, radiometers and spectrometers; 4. Single-aperture radio telescopes; 5. The two-element interferometer; 6. Aperture synthesis; 7. Radiation, propagation and absorption of radio waves; 8. The local universe; 9. The interstellar medium; 10. Galactic dynamics; 11. Stars; 12. Pulsars; 13. Radio galaxies and quasars; 14. Cosmology fundamentals; 15. The angular structure of the CMB; 16. Cosmology: discrete radio sources and gravitational lensing; 17. The future of radio astronomy; Appendixes; References; Index.

Burke, Bernard F.; Graham-Smith, Francis

2014-02-01

24

Radio Frequency Interference and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio frequency interference (RFI) and radio astronomy have been closely linked since the emergence of radio astronomy as a scientific discipline in the 1930s. Even before the official establishment of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, protection against contemporary and future radio noise levels was seen as crucial to ensure success of any new observatory. My talk will examine the various local, regional, national, and international efforts enacted to protect NRAO and other American radio astronomy sites from RFI.

Smith, Sierra

2014-01-01

25

The future for radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

THE TRANSIENT UNIVERSE Rene P Breton and Tom Hassall argue that, while radio astronomy has always involved transient phenomena, exploration of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum has been falling behind because of the lack of data. But the advent of a new generation of radio telescopes such as LOFAR, could change that.

Breton, Rene P.; Hassall, Tom

2013-12-01

26

National Radio Astronomy Observatory Electronics Division Technical Note No. 219  

E-print Network

1 National Radio Astronomy Observatory Electronics Division Technical Note No. 219 Measurements of Automotive Radar Emissions received by a Radio Astronomy Observatory Darrel Emerson (National Radio Astronomy upon radio astronomy observations, measurements sponsored by the National Science Foundation were

Groppi, Christopher

27

National Radio Astronomy Observatory The radio emission (orange) detected  

E-print Network

NRAO National Radio Astronomy Observatory #12;The radio emission (orange) detected by the NRAO Very located in New Mexico. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) enables cutting-edge research in the study of the Universe using radio astronomy techniques, attracts and trains future scientists

Groppi, Christopher

28

Planetary radio astronomy from Voyager  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technique of radio astronomy makes it possible for a remote observer to detect the presence of magnetic fields and plasmas in planetary environments. Prior to the flights of the Voyager spacecraft, radio astronomical studies of Jupiter from earth and from earth orbit had correctly predicted the strength and orientation of Jupiter's magnetic field and trapped radiation belts. The Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy investigations have now provided measurements of the complete spectrum of low frequency radio emissions from both planets. Each Voyager instrument consists of a pair of orthogonal, 10-m, electric monopole antennas which are connected to a step-tuned, superheterodyne receiver operating over the frequency range from 1.2 kHz to 40.5 MHz. The Voyager trajectory provided observations from above both the sunlit and nightside hemispheres of Jupiter. Saturn's nonthermal radio emission has been observed at frequencies as low as 3 kHz and as high as 1.2 MHz.

Alexander, J. K.

1983-01-01

29

National Radio Astronomy Observatory Dark Energy  

E-print Network

National Radio Astronomy Observatory Dark Energy: Constraints from the Hubble Constant Jim Condon, 43, 625 #12;National Radio Astronomy Observatory UVa/NRAO DE Lunch Talk 2006 Jan. 25 What.086·1019 km H0 1.36 · 1010 years #12;National Radio Astronomy Observatory UVa/NRAO DE Lunch Talk 2006 Jan. 25

Groppi, Christopher

30

National Radio Astronomy Observatory Associated Universities, Inc.  

E-print Network

National Radio Astronomy Observatory Associated Universities, Inc. OUTSIDE OBSERVER TRAVEL: ________________________________________ Travel office East: Travel office West: Fiscal Office Fiscal Office National Radio Astronomy Observatory National Radio Astronomy Observatory P.O. Box 2 P.O. Box O 1 Green Bank, WV 24944-0002 Socorro, NM 87801

Groppi, Christopher

31

Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy Part I: The Mechanics and Physics Ronald J Maddalena August 1, 2008 #12;Outline Part I Background -- research inspirations and aspirations Vertical weather, .... Part II Results on refraction & air mass (with Jeff Paradis) Part III Results on opacity, weather

Groppi, Christopher

32

Interference problems in radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of vulnerability of radio astronomy as a passive service where no signal is transmitted by man are discussed; since a passive service cannot interfere with an active service, the conflict is due to active usage of bands allocated to passive services. The problem is divided into global, regional, and local problems, indicating the scale on which they have an impact on radio astronomy. It is noted that on a local scale as well as on regional and global scales, there is a pressure to allocate additional frequencies to new forms of TV and other types of services. Active solutions investigated at a number of radio observatories are presented, including frequency monitoring, receiver modifications, and software methods for cleaning the data from interfering signals.

Spoelstra, T. A. Th.

33

47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2.107 Section...Radio Frequencies 2.107 Radio astronomy station notification. (a) Pursuant...Geneva, 1982), operators of radio astronomy stations desiring international...

2013-10-01

34

47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2.107 Section...Radio Frequencies 2.107 Radio astronomy station notification. (a) Pursuant...Geneva, 1982), operators of radio astronomy stations desiring international...

2014-10-01

35

47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2.107 Section...Radio Frequencies 2.107 Radio astronomy station notification. (a) Pursuant...Geneva, 1982), operators of radio astronomy stations desiring international...

2011-10-01

36

47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2.107 Section...Radio Frequencies 2.107 Radio astronomy station notification. (a) Pursuant...Geneva, 1982), operators of radio astronomy stations desiring international...

2012-10-01

37

47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2.107 Section...Radio Frequencies 2.107 Radio astronomy station notification. (a) Pursuant...Geneva, 1982), operators of radio astronomy stations desiring international...

2010-10-01

38

Radio Frequency Interference: Radio Astronomy's Biggest Enemy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As technology progresses, the demand for the usage of the electromagnetic spectrum increases with it. The development is so fast and prolific that clean band space for passive users such as Radio Astronomy is becoming ever so scarce. Even though, several spectral bands have been protected for Radio Astronomy by Federal Communication Commission (in the USA) under the recommendations of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), pressure for making more spectral space commercially usable is extreme. Although these commercial usages make our modern living at all possible, often the extreme vulnerability of passive users are are not fully appreciated, resulting in unwanted emissions (RFI) in the Radio Astronomy Bands. Another source of RFI is the fact that many of the electronic devices used in the observatories themselves generate radio waves. If proper precautions are not taken, these can be received back through the Radio Telescope itself. This problem is referred to as internal RFI. The focus of this paper is the search and diminution of internal RFI in the Arecibo Observatory in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Using a simple setup of a log-periodic antenna and a Spectrum Analyzer, spectra spanning a frequency range of 100 - 1800 MHZ were recorded in some areas of the Observatory and the new Visitor Center (AOVEF). The measurements disclosed sources of radio emission among some of the digital electronic equipment in the Equipment room and a few displays in the AOVEF. Most prominent of these was a 2.5 MHz comb spanning the entire range of the measurements emitted from the SRENDIP and AOFTM machines. The respective groups were informed and corrective shielding & isolations were implemented immediately. In AOVEF, three displays, some audio-visual equipment, and video/digital cameras used by the visitors were found to be "leaky". In future, the use of such cameras will be prohibited and the exhibits will be screened appropriately.

Acevedo, F.; Ghosh, Tapasi

1997-12-01

39

RadioNet: Advanced Radio Astronomy in Europe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

RadioNet, an Integrated Infrastructure Initiative (I3), has brought together 20 of "Europe's leading astronomy facilities to produce a focused, coherent and integrated project that will significantly enhance the quality and quantity of science performed by European astronomers." After learning about the Initiative's many objectives, users can find brief summaries of the program's integration of astronomy pursuits in the areas of transnational access, joint research activities, and networking activities. The website presents press releases, upcoming and past events, and information on engineering, software, and Atacama Large (sub)-Millimeter Array (ALMA) forums. Users can also find out about the individual collaborators research activities through the external links.

40

Utrecht and Galactic Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Important roles in early Dutch Galactic radio astronomy were played by several Utrecht astronomers: Van de Hulst, Minnaert and Houtgast. The poster announcing the conference contained a number of pictures referring to scientific achievements of the Astronomical Institute Utrecht. One of these (Figure 1) appears to show the spiral structure of our Galaxy. Detailed comparison with the famous H I map (Figure 2), published by Oort, Kerr, and Westerhout (1958) in their paper The Galactic System as a Spiral Nebula, indicates that both are based on the same data. However, the OKW map resulted from work done at Kootwijk, Leiden and Sydney. What claim does Utrecht have to this pinnacle of early Galactic Radio Astronomy? Let us trace the history behind this H I map, as sketched in more detail by Van Woerden & Strom (2006).

van Woerden, H.

2013-01-01

41

Submillimeter receivers for radio astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The state of development of receivers for submillimeter-wave radio astronomy is reviewed. Bolometers for continuum observation, hot-electron mixer receivers for narrowband spectral line observation, and heterodyne receivers, both Schottky diode and superconducting tunnel junction, are presented. At the lower frequency end of the submillimeter band, standard waveguide techniques, scaled from millimeter wavelengths, prevail. At wavelengths shorter than about 0.5 mm,

Raymond Blundell; CHEUK-YU EDWARD TONG

1992-01-01

42

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history and facilities of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) are surveyed. The interferometer (near Green Bank, West Virginia) consists of three 85-foot antennas movable along a 2700-meter baseline, integrated with a 45-foot telescope 35 km distant. Simultaneous observations at 3.7 and 11.1 cm are possible. The 300-foot meridian-transit telescope, operating at 11 cm and longer wavelengths, has been

J. W. Findlay

1974-01-01

43

The Radio JOVE Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio JOVE is an interactive educational activity which brings the radio sounds of Jupiter and the Sun to students, teachers, and the general public. This is accomplished through the construction of a simple radio telescope kit and the use of a real-time radio observatory on the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/) will contain science information, instruction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for students and teachers. Our target audience is high school science classes, but subjects can be tailored to college undergraduate physics and astronomy courses or even to middle school science classes. The goals of the project are: 1) Educate people about planetary and solar radio astronomy, space physics, and the scientific method 2) Provide teachers and students with a hands-on radio astronomy exercise as a science curriculum support activity by building and using a simple radio telescope receiver/antenna kit 3) Create the first ever online radio observatory which provides real-time data for those with internet access 4) Allow interactions among participating schools by facilitating exchanges of ideas, data, and observing experiences. Our current funding will allow us to impact 100 schools by partially subsidizing their participation in the program. We expect to expand well beyond this number as publicity and general interest increase. Additional schools are welcome to fully participate, but we will not be able to subsidize their kit purchases. We hope to make a wide impact among the schools by advertising through appropriate newsletters, space grant consortia, the INSPIRE project (http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire/), electronic links, and science and education meetings. We would like to acknoledge support from the NASA/GSFC Director's Discretionary Fund, the STScI IDEAS grant program and the NASA/GSFC Space Science Data Operations Office.

Garcia, L.; Thieman, J.; Higgins, C.

1999-09-01

44

The Radio Jove Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

Thieman, J. R.

2010-01-01

45

EVLA Memo 57 A Time Standard for Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

George Henckel Adam Moritz Aaron Prager #12;Abstract The National Radio Astronomy Observatory?................................................................................3 3.2. The National Radio Astronomy ObservatoryEVLA Memo 57 A Time Standard for Radio Astronomy The New Mexico Array Final Report New Mexico

Groppi, Christopher

46

(Astro)Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

(Astro)Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy astrophysics course number = 01 will be on reserve in the physics library, and an online "Essential Radio Astronomy" course taught at the University. Other: a scientific calculator; access to a computer that can do numbercrunching with Excel or programs

Baker, Andrew J.

47

Voyager planetary radio astronomy studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analysis of nonthermal radio emission data obtained by the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) spectrometers on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft was performed. This PRA data provided unique insights into the radio emission characteristics of the outer planets because of PRA's unique spectral response below the terrestrial ionospheric plasma frequency and its unprecedented proximity to the source. Of those results which were documented or published, this final report surveys only the highlights and cites references for more complete discussions. Unpublished results for Uranus, Neptune, and theoretical Ionian current distributions are presented at greater length. The most important conclusion to be drawn from these observations is that banded spectral emission is common to the radio emission below 1-2 MHz observed from all four Jovian planets. In every case multiple spectral features evolve on time scales of seconds to minutes. To the extent these features drift in frequency, they appear never to cross one another. The Neptunian spectral features appear to drift little or not at all, their evolution consisting principally of waxing and waning. Since other evidence strongly suggests that most or all of this radio emission is occurring near the local magnetospheric electron cyclotron frequency, this implies that this emission preferentially occurs at certain continually changing planetary radii. It remains unknown why certain radii might be favored, unless radial electric field components or other means serve to differentiate radially the magnetospheric plasma density, particle energy vectors, or particle coherence. Calculation of the spatial distribution and intensity of the Io-generated magnetospheric currents are also presented; these currents may be limited principally by wave impedance and local field strengths.

Staelin, David H.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

1993-01-01

48

Python Ephemeris Module for Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An extension of the Python pyephem module was developed for Deep Space Network (DSN) radio astronomy. The class DSS( ) provides the geodetic coordinates of the DSN stations as well as other properties such as antenna diameter. The class Quasar( ) provides positional data for the sources in the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array (NRAO VLA) Calibrator Handbook and flux estimates based the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) Database or the VLA Calibrator Handbook. Flux calibration data are also available for the bright planets. Class Pulsar( ) provides the data from the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) Pulsar Catalogue in Python format.

Kuiper, T. B.

2013-05-01

49

Multichannel Interference Mitigation Techniques in Radio Astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radio-astronomical observations are increasingly corrupted by radio frequency interference, and on-line detection and filtering algorithms are becoming essential. To facilitate the introduction of such techniques into radio astronomy, we formulate the astronomical problem in an array signal processing language and give an introduction to some elementary algorithms from that field. We consider two topics in detail: interference detection by rank

Amir Leshem; Alle-Jan van der Veen; Albert-Jan Boonstra

2000-01-01

50

The Astronomy Genealogy Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Astronomy Genealogy Project, to be known as AstroGen, will list as many as possible of the world's astronomers with their academic parents (aka thesis advisors) and enable the reader to trace both academic ancestors and descendants. It will be very similar to the highly successful Mathematics Genealogy Project (MGP), available at http://genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu. The MGP, which has been in operation since 1996, now contains the names of about 170,000 "mathematicians." These include many physicists and astronomers, as well as practitioners of related sciences. Mitchel Keller, the director of the MGP, has generously shared the software used in that project, and the American Astronomical Society (AAS) will host AstroGen, a project of the Historical Astronomy Division, on its website. We expect to start seeking entries soon, depending on the availability of computational assistance from the AAS IT department. We are seeking volunteers to help run the project. If you are interested, please contact me at joe.tenn@sonoma.edu.

Tenn, Joseph S.

2014-01-01

51

Astronomy Science Fair Projects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

``Extrasolar Planet Transit", ``Lightcurve of a Variable Star", and ``Retrograde Motion of Mars" are some of the titles of high school students' projects entered in the Hawaii State Science Fair. TOPS (Toward Other Planetary Systems) teachers who participated in the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy summer outreach program under the direction of professor Karen J. Meech mentored their students. After attending the 3-week National Science Foundation Institute for several summers since 1999, these teachers in the summer of 2003 were trained to do observing plans to obtain images from telescopes, use image processing software MIRA for photometry, and produce light curves of variable stars and extrasolar planet transits. Others used the software ``Astrometrica" to do astrometry of Kuiper Belt Objects. Using Compaq laptop computers on long term loan, our teachers mentored students for astronomy projects during the 2003-2004 school year. These students made observing plans for images from the 31inch Lowell Telescope in Arizona and/or from the 2.2m University of Hawaii Telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. Learning about filters, exposure time, magnitude, frequency of taking CCD images, and ephemeris required many iterations between students, teachers, and astronomers and graduate students who were assisting. Poor weather conditions and other frustrations exposed the students to the realities of research. However, they were rewarded with projects that impressed the judges and that will be described.

Pittichov, J.; Kadooka, M.-A.; Meech, K. J.

2004-12-01

52

Planetary radio astronomy experiment for Voyager missions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The planetary radio astronomy experiment will measure radio spectra of planetary emissions in the range 1.2 kHz to 40.5 MHz. These emissions result from wave-particle-plasma interactions in the magnetospheres and ionospheres of the planets. At Jupiter, they are strongly modulated by the Galilean satellite Io.

J. W. Warwick; J. B. Pearce; R. G. Peltzer; A. C. Riddle

1977-01-01

53

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory \\/NRAO  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper gives a brief discussion of the organization, operations, and physical facilities of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Deer Creek Valley, West Virginia. The telescopes at NRAO include an 85-ft equatorial telescope, a 300-foot transit telescope (the largest movable radio telescope in the world), a 140-foot equatorial telescope (also the largest of its kind), a calibration horn

W. R. Oref

1979-01-01

54

A Teaching Lab in Radio Astronomy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a study in which participants in a summer institute for secondary science teachers performed a series of experiments with a radio telescope. Concludes that a radio astronomy teaching facility would encourage students to use their own initiative and strategy in working with the scientific concepts involved. (MLH)

Smith, Kirk R.; Cudaback, David D.

1976-01-01

55

Grote Reber, Radio Astronomy Pioneer, Dies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Grote Reber, one of the earliest pioneers of radio astronomy, died in Tasmania on December 20, just two days shy of his 91st birthday. Reber was the first person to build a radio telescope dedicated to astronomy, opening up a whole new "window" on the Universe that eventually produced such landmark discoveries as quasars, pulsars and the remnant "afterglow" of the Big Bang. His self- financed experiments laid the foundation for today's advanced radio-astronomy facilities. Grote Reber Grote Reber NRAO/AUI photo "Radio astronomy has changed profoundly our understanding of the Universe and has earned the Nobel Prize for several major contributions. All radio astronomers who have followed him owe Grote Reber a deep debt for his pioneering work," said Dr. Fred Lo, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "Reber was the first to systematically study the sky by observing something other than visible light. This gave astronomy a whole new view of the Universe. The continuing importance of new ways of looking at the Universe is emphasized by this year's Nobel Prizes in physics, which recognized scientists who pioneered X-ray and neutrino observations," Lo added. Reber was a radio engineer and avid amateur "ham" radio operator in Wheaton, Illinois, in the 1930s when he read about Karl Jansky's 1932 discovery of natural radio emissions coming from outer space. As an amateur operator, Reber had won awards and communicated with other amateurs around the world, and later wrote that he had concluded "there were no more worlds to conquer" in radio. Learning of Jansky's discovery gave Reber a whole new challenge that he attacked with vigor. Analyzing the problem as an engineer, Reber concluded that what he needed was a parabolic-dish antenna, something quite uncommon in the 1930s. In 1937, using his own funds, he constructed a 31.4-foot-diameter dish antenna in his back yard. The strange contraption attracted curious attention from his neighbors and became something of a minor tourist attraction, he later recalled. Using electronics he designed and built that pushed the technical capabilities of the era, Reber succeeded in detecting "cosmic static" in 1939. In 1941, Reber produced the first radio map of the sky, based on a series of systematic observations. His radio-astronomy work continued over the next several years. Though not a professional scientist, his research results were published in a number of prestigious technical journals, including Nature, the Astrophysical Journal, the Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers and the Journal of Geophysical Research. Reber also received a number of honors normally reserved for scientists professionally trained in astronomy, including the American Astronomical Society's Henry Norris Russell Lectureship and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's Bruce Medal in 1962, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Jansky Lectureship in 1975, and the Royal Astronomical Society's Jackson-Gwilt Medal in 1983. Reber's original dish antenna now is on display at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's site in Green Bank, West Virginia, where Reber worked in the late 1950s. All of his scientific papers and records as well as his personal and scientific correspondence are held by the NRAO, and will be exhibited in the observatory's planned new library in Charlottesville, Virginia. Reber's amateur-radio callsign, W9GFZ, is held by the NRAO Amateur Radio Club. This callsign was used on the air for the first time since the 1930s on August 25, 2000, to mark the dedication of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

2002-12-01

56

"Radio Astronomy, Whatever That May Be." The Marginalization of Early Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Today we see radio astronomy as a fully-integrated part of astronomy; it is now just one of several available wavelength regimes and many astrophysicists who use radio data are not radio astronomers themselves. At the beginning, it was very different. Between 1946 and 1960, radio astronomy emerged as an important speciality but it was an area little understood by mainstream astronomers. Radio astronomers rarely published in astronomical journals, gave papers at astronomical conferences or were accorded much notice. The pioneers in the field were not astronomers themselves and had little in common with astronomers. In this paper I note the various ways in which radio astronomy was alienated from the mainstream in its first decade and some of the reasons this alienation occurred. I will also speculate on when and how the integration began to occur.

Jarrell, Richard

2005-01-01

57

Teaching radio astronomy with Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple, easy to build and portable radio telescope, called Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT), has been developed by the Radio Physics Laboratory (RPL), a radio astronomy teaching unit associated with the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (TIFR) and Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), which are two premier astronomy institutes in India. ASRT consists of off-the-shelf available Direct to Home television dishes and is easy to assemble. Our design is scalable from simple very low cost telescope to more complex yet moderately costing instrument. ASRT provides a platform for demonstrating radio physics concepts through simple hands-on experiment as well as for carrying out solar monitoring by college/University students. The presentation will highlight the concept of ASRT and the different experiments that can be carried out using it. The solar monitoring observations will be discussed along-with details of methods for calibrating these measurements. The pedagogical usefulness of ASRT in introducing undergraduatephysics students to astrophysics, measurements and analysis methods used in radio astronomy will also be discussed. Use of ASRT in the last three years in the programs of RPL, namely the annual Radio Astronomy Winter School for College students (RAWSC) and Pulsar Observing for Students (POS) is also presented. This year a new program was initiated to form a virtual group of an ASRT community, which will not only share their measurements, but also think of improving the pedagogical usefulness of ASRT by innovative experiments. This initiative is presented with the best practices drawn from our experience in using ASRT as a tool for student training in space sciences. The talk will also point out future ideas in involving a larger body of students in simple radio astronomy experiments with the ASRT, which RPL is likely to nucleate as part of its mandate.

Joshi, Bhal Chandra

58

A KALMANTRACKERBASED BAYESIAN DETECTOR FOR RADAR INTERFERENCE IN RADIO ASTRONOMY  

E-print Network

. Richard Fisher National Radio Astronomy Observatory P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 rfisher observatories . However, the induced pollution is impulsive and transient, so for radio astronomy observationA KALMAN­TRACKER­BASED BAYESIAN DETECTOR FOR RADAR INTERFERENCE IN RADIO ASTRONOMY Weizhen Dong

Wirthlin, Michael J.

59

Very Large Array, National Radio Astronomy Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Very Large Array (VLA), 80 km west of Socorro, NM, is one of the world's premier radio-astronomy facilities, offering researchers a unique combination of resolving power, sensitivity and observational flexibility. Dedicated in 1980, the VLA includes 27 25 m diameter dish antennas, arranged in a `Y' pattern, that work together as a single aperture-synthesis interferometric imaging system....

P. Murdin

2000-01-01

60

A Virtual Tour of the Radio Astronomy Process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the summer of 2000, two teachers working on a Masters of Science Teaching Degree at New Mexico Tech and participating in the Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program sponsored by the National Science Foundation, spent eight weeks as interns researching and working on projects at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) which will directly benefit students in their classrooms and also impact other science educators. One of the products of the interships is a set of web pages for NRAO's web page educational section. The purpose of these web pages is to familiarize students, teachers, and other people with the process that a radio astronomer goes through to do radio astronomy science. A virtual web tour was created of this process. This required interviewing radio astronomers and other professionals involved with this process at the NRAO (e.g. engineers, data analysts, and operations people), and synthesizing the interviews into a descriptive, visual-based set of web pages. These pages do meet the National as well as New Mexico Standards and Benchmarks for Science Education. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. The NSF's RET program is gratefully acknowledged.

Conrad, S. B.; Finley, D. G.; Claussen, M. J.; Ulvestad, J. S.

2000-12-01

61

Meeting of the Radio Astronomy group, Cambridge, 2001 May 19  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A meeting of the Radio Astronomy group was held at the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge on Saturday 2001 May 19. The meeting was to have been held at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, Cambridge, but due to foot and mouth restrictions the venue had to be changed. The last meeting of the Radio Astronomy Section had been held at MRAO in 1968. After informal conversations as the astronomers assembled lectures were given by university research staff on the latest developments in professional radio astronomy.

Brown, G.

2001-10-01

62

Curriculum Vitae Casey J. Law Radio Astronomy Lab  

E-print Network

Curriculum Vitae ­ Casey J. Law Radio Astronomy Lab University of California Hearst Field Annex ­ B://astro.berkeley.edu/claw 1 Education Northwestern University, Ph.D., Astrophysics (2007) Boston University, M.A., Astronomy: Radio Astronomy Lab Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Berkeley. Worked with Geoff Bower, Don Backer, and Carl

Militzer, Burkhard

63

Scott M. Ransom National Radio Astronomy Observatory / Univ. of Virginia  

E-print Network

Scott M. Ransom Astronomer National Radio Astronomy Observatory / Univ. of Virginia Scott is a tenured astronomer with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Charlottesville, VA where he studies all things "pulsar". He is also a Research Professor with the Astronomy Department

Groppi, Christopher

64

The interferometer in radio astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A theory is developed for the response of a two-element radio interferometer to a partially coherent field, without restriction as to bandwidth or antenna properties. It is shown that for a completely incoherent source the narrow-band interferometer output is a component of the Fourier transform of the source brightness, which can therefore be mapped by repeated interferometer observations. A partially

N. C. Mathur

1968-01-01

65

Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 1?? , Radar Interference Blanking in Radio Astronomy using  

E-print Network

University, Provo, UT, USA J. R. Fisher National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank Observatory, WV, USARadio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 1?? , Radar Interference Blanking in Radio Astronomy and transient, so for radio astronomy observation, one solution is to "time-blank" by simply not includ- ing

Wirthlin, Michael J.

66

Bayesian Detection of Radar Interference in Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

@ee.byu.edu, wzhdong@hotmail.com) and J. Richard Fisher National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road1 Bayesian Detection of Radar Interference in Radio Astronomy Brian D. Jeffs, Weizhen Lazarte (GBT) and other radio observatories are often made in frequency bands allocated to aviation pulsed

Wirthlin, Michael J.

67

Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 1 near Saturn  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy experiment detected two distinct kinds of radio emissions from Saturn. The first, Saturn kilometric radiation, is strongly polarized, bursty, tightly correlated with Saturn's rotation, and exhibits complex dynamic spectral features somewhat reminiscent of those in Jupiter's radio emission. It appears in radio frequencies below about 1.2 megahertz. The second kind of radio emission, Saturn

J. W. Warwick; J. B. Pearce; D. R. Evans; T. D. Carr; J. J. Schauble; J. K. Alexander; M. L. Kaiser; M. D. Desch; M. Pedersen; A. Lecacheux; G. Daigne; A. Boischot; C. H. Barrow

1981-01-01

68

The beginnings of Australian radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The early stages of Australian radio astronomy, especially the first decade after World War II, are described in detail. These include the transition of the CSIRO Radiophysics Laboratory, under the leadership of Joseph Pawsey and Taffy Bowen, from a wartime laboratory in 1945 to, by 1950, the largest and one of the two most important radio astronomy groups in the world (with the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University). The initial solar investigations are described, including discovery of the hot corona and development of the sea-cliff interferometer. During this same period painstaking `radio star' observations by John Bolton and colleagues led to the first suggested optical identifications of Taurus-A (the Crab Nebula), Centaurus-A (NGC 5128), and Virgo-A (M87). The factors that led to the extraordinary early success of the Radiophysics Laboratory are analyzed in detail, followed by discussion of how the situation changed significantly in the second decade of 1955-1965. Finally, the development of major Australian instruments, from the Parkes Radio Telescope (1961) to the Australia Telescope (1988), is briefly presented.

Sullivan, Woodruff T.

2005-06-01

69

International Agreement Will Advance Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two of the world's leading astronomical institutions have formalized an agreement to cooperate on joint efforts for the technical and scientific advancement of radio astronomy. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in the United States and the Max-Planck Institute for Radioastronomy (MPIfR) in Germany concluded a Memorandum of Understanding outlining planned collaborative efforts to enhance the capabilities of each other's telescopes and to expand their cooperation in scientific research. The VLBA The VLBA CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF In the first project pursued under this agreement, the MPIfR will contribute $299,000 to upgrade the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array's (VLBA) capability to receive radio emissions at a frequency of 22 GHz. This improvement will enhance the VLBA's scientific productivity and will be particularly important for cutting-edge research in cosmology and enigmatic cosmic objects such as gamma-ray blazars. "This agreement follows many years of cooperation between our institutions and recognizes the importance of international collaboration for the future of astronomical research," said Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. "Our two institutions have many common research goals, and joining forces to keep all our telescopes at the forefront of technology will be highly beneficial for the science," said Anton Zensus, Director at MPIfR. In addition to the VLBA, the NRAO operates the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico and the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The MPIfR operates the 100-meter Effelsberg Radio Telescope in Germany and the 12-meter APEX submillimeter telescope in 5100 m altitude in the Cilean Atacama desert (together with the European Southern Observatory and the Swedish Onsala Space Observatory). With the 100-meter telescope, it is part of the VLBA network in providing transatlantic baselines. Both institutions are members of a global network of telescopes (the Global VLBI Network) that uses simultaneous observations to produce extremely high-resolution images, and another network (the High Sensitivity Array) that uses the same technique with large telescopes to observe particularly faint celestial objects. With this technique, NRAO telescopes work with MPIfR's Effelsberg telescope to produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those from the Hubble Space Telescope. Both institutions also are part of the international collaboration building the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile and of the international planning effort to build a Square Kilometer Array. The VLBA is a system of ten antennas, each with a dish 25 meters in diameter. From Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii to St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the VLBA spans more than 8000 kilometers. Under the new agreement, the two institutions will continue their previous observational collaborations, and in addition will share resources to improve the technical capabilities of each other's telescopes, particularly at short wavelengths, They also will collaborate in the peer-reviewed process each uses to allocate observing time, and agree to mutually maintain an "open skies" policy allowing open access to each other's telescopes on a peer-reviewed basis. The agreement notes the report of the U.S. National Science Foundation's (NSF) Senior Review committee, which called upon the NRAO to seek partners to contribute to the operation of the VLBA. The MPIfR affirms its strong interest in maintaining the VLBA's unique scientific capabilities, and its monetary contribution toward the 22 GHz upgrade of the VLBA is a solid sign of that commitment. "The VLBA provides the greatest resolving power of any instrument in astronomy, and the MPIfR's contribution to enhancing its capabilities is an important validation of the VLBA's importance to frontier astrophysics," Lo said. The joint VLBA project calls for the MPIfR to fund the receiving-system upgrades and the NRAO to perform the work. The project is scheduled to be complete, with all 10 VLBA an

2007-12-01

70

47 CFR 5.91 - Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. 5.91 Section 5... Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In order to minimize...harmful interference at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory site located at...

2010-10-01

71

47 CFR 73.1030 - Notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...interference at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory site located at Green...Interference Office, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O...20-day period from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory for itself, or...

2014-10-01

72

47 CFR 5.91 - Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. 5.91 Section...Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In order to...interference at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory site located at...

2014-10-01

73

47 CFR 5.91 - Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. 5.91 Section...Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In order to...interference at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory site located at...

2013-10-01

74

47 CFR 5.91 - Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. 5.91 Section...Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In order to...interference at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory site located at...

2011-10-01

75

47 CFR 5.91 - Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. 5.91 Section...Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In order to...interference at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory site located at...

2012-10-01

76

The Importance of Site Selection for Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio sources are very weak since this object travel very far from outer space. Radio astronomy studies are limited due to radio frequency interference (RFI) that is made by man. If the harassment is not stopped, it will provide critical problems in their radio astronomy scientists research. The purpose of this study is to provide RFI map Peninsular Malaysia with a minimum mapping techniques RFI interference. RFI mapping technique using GIS is proposed as a tool in mapping techniques. Decision-making process for the selection requires gathering information from a variety of parameters. These factors affecting the selection process are also taken account. In this study, various factors or parameters involved such as availability of telecommunications transmission (including radio and television), rainfall, water line and human activity. This study will benefit radio astronomy research especially in the RFI profile in Malaysia. Keywords: Radio Astronomy, Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), RFI mapping technique : GIS.

Umar, Roslan; Zainal Abidin, Zamri; Abidin Ibrahim, Zainol

2014-10-01

77

Teaching Astronomy at Columbus State University using Small Radio Telescopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy is inherently fascinating to students but dark skies and good weather are not often scheduled during the school day. Radio telescopes provide an all-weather, all-day opportunity for astronomical observations. Columbus State University (CSU) has installed two Small Radio Telescopes for use by undergraduate students to pursue extra-curricular research in introductory astronomy. These telescopes are relatively affordable and are designed to be remotely operated through a Windows, Linux, or Macintosh environment. They are capable of diffraction-limited observations of the Sun and galactic Hydrogen in the L-band. A comprehensive website of projects suitable for high-school students and undergraduates is maintained by a group at MIT. This website ensures users are not left to explore the telescopes abilities blindly. Students with varied interests learn about the nature of science by using an instrument that doesnt lend itself to pretty pictures. Radio telescopes also provide a slight engineering flavor drawing in students who might not otherwise be interested in astronomy. This poster will provide a summary of installation, calibration, and future plans, and will share some observations by undergraduates at CSU.

Webster, Zodiac T.

2006-12-01

78

The History of Radio Astronomy and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory: Evolution Toward Big Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to examine the sequence of events that led to the establishment of the NRAO, the construction and development of instrumentation and the contributions and discovery events and to relate the significance of these events to the evolution of the sciences of radio astronomy and cosmology. After an overview of the resources, a brief discussion

Benjamin Kevin Malphrus

1990-01-01

79

Astronomy 4194 Group Studies Essential Radio Astronomy Syllabus for May Term 2014 Prof. Martini Page 1 of 2  

E-print Network

Astronomy 4194 ­ Group Studies ­ Essential Radio Astronomy ­ Syllabus for May Term 2014 ­ Prof. Martini Page 1 of 2 Astronomy 4194 ­ Group Studies ­ Essential Radio Astronomy Syllabus for May Term 2014. Paul Martini, Dept. of Astronomy Office: 4021 McPherson Lab (4th floor), mailbox in 4055 McPherson Lab

Martini, Paul

80

Astronomy Education Project for Guangdong High Schools  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Guangdong province is an active area in China for astronomy education and popularization. The current status and problems of astronomy education in high schools are reviewed. To tackle these problems, an astronomy education project for high school teachers and students was initiated by Guangzhou University in 2013. The purpose and key points of the projects are introduced in this paper.

Pi, F. P.; Guan, K. Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, H. G.; Liu, Y.; Fan, J. H.

2014-11-01

81

A new signal processing platform for radio astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context: We describe the concept, construction, and testing of TasPGA, a new, versatile digital signal processing device designed for radio astronomy applications. Aims: A minimalist design philosophy was used to develop a general-purpose radio astronomy instrument based on field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology. The design emphasises reliability and flexibility, facilitating the rapid development of new FPGA firmware for a

A. W. Hotan

2008-01-01

82

Radio Astronomy in Malaysia: Current Status and Outreach Activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we will present the current status of radio astronomical research and outreach in Malaysia. We will also present a short history of our research group, which is currently the only radio astronomical facility in Malaysia. Our group is called the Radio Cosmology Research Lab and was established in 2005 by Dr Zamri Zainal Abidin and Prof Dr Zainol Abidin Ibrahim. We will discuss the future plans for this group including our keen interest in being part of a more global network of radio astronomers. We are already an active member of the South-East Asia Astronomy Network (SEAAN) and aims to have a radio astronomical facility in order to join the Global Very Long Baseline Interferometer (VLBI) as well becoming a research hub for the future Square Kilometer Array (SKA) project. We will also present some of the scientific goals of our group including providing a platform for radio astronomers to be able to do observations of weak and high red-shifted radio objects such as galaxy clusters and supernovae.

Hashim, N.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Ibrahim, U. F. S. U.; Umar, R.; Hassan, M. S. R.; Rosli, Z.; Hamidi, Z. S.; Ibrahim, Z. A.

2011-12-01

83

Radio astronomy image enhancement in the presence of phase errors using genetic algorithms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern radio astronomy interferometric telescopes use Earth rotation aperture synthesis imaging techniques. New projects for radio telescopes include hundreds and thousands of elements and presume multibeam and snapshot imaging. Each element, or base station, in its turn is a phase-array antenna. Phase instabilities due to instrumentation and atmospheric phase variations can ruin the synthesized image. There is a need to

Peter Fridman

2001-01-01

84

Highlighting the History of Japanese Radio Astronomy: 1: An Introduction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Japan was one of a number of nations that made important contributions in the fledgling field of radio astronomy in the years immediately following WWII. In this paper we discuss the invention of the Yagi-Uda antenna and the detection of solar radio emission in 1938, before reviewing radio astronomical developments that occurred between 1948 and 1961 in Osaka, Nagoya, Tokyo and Hiraiso. In order to place these early Japanese experiments in a national and international context we briefly review the world-wide development of radio astronomy in the immediate post-War years before discussing the growth of optical astronomy in Japan at this time.

Ishiguro, Masato; Orchiston, Wayne; Akabane, Kenji; Kaifu, Norio; Hayashi, Masa; Nakamura, Tsuko; Stewart, Ronald; Yokoo, Hiromitsu

2012-11-01

85

JPL Big Data Technologies for Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the past three years the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been working on several technologies to deal with big data challenges facing next-generation radio arrays, among other applications. This program has focused on the following four areas: 1) We are investigating high-level ASIC architectures that reduce power consumption for cross-correlation of data from large interferometer arrays by one to two orders of magnitude. The cost of operations for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which may be dominated by the cost of power for data processing, is a serious concern. A large improvement in correlator power efficiency could have a major positive impact. 2) Data-adaptive algorithms (machine learning) for real-time detection and classification of fast transient signals in high volume data streams are being developed and demonstrated. Studies of the dynamic universe, particularly searches for fast (<< 1 second) transient events, require that data be analyzed rapidly and with robust RFI rejection. JPL, in collaboration with the International Center for Radio Astronomy Research in Australia, has developed a fast transient search system for eventual deployment on ASKAP. In addition, a real-time transient detection experiment is now running continuously and commensally on NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array. 3) Scalable frameworks for data archiving, mining, and distribution are being applied to radio astronomy. A set of powerful open-source Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) tools is now available through Apache. OODT was developed at JPL for Earth science data archives, but it is proving to be useful for radio astronomy, planetary science, health care, Earth climate, and other large-scale archives. 4) We are creating automated, event-driven data visualization tools that can be used to extract information from a wide range of complex data sets. Visualization of complex data can be improved through algorithms that detect events or features of interest and autonomously generate images or video to display those features. This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Jones, Dayton L.; D'Addario, L. R.; De Jong, E. M.; Mattmann, C. A.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Thompson, D. R.; Wagstaff, K.

2014-04-01

86

IAU DIVISION X, XII / COMMISSION 40, 41 / WORKING GROUP on HISTORICAL RADIO ASTRONOMY  

E-print Network

Radio Astronomy Observatory initiated the first Archives de voted exclusively to radio astronomy- institutional collaborations. As the national facility for radio astronomy, the Archives also includesIAU DIVISION X, XII / COMMISSION 40, 41 / WORKING GROUP on HISTORICAL RADIO ASTRONOMY CHAIR Kenneth

Groppi, Christopher

87

Astronomy research at the Aerospace Corporation. [research projects - NASA programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report reviews the astronomy research carried out at The Aerospace Corporation during 1974. The report describes the activities of the San Fernando Observatory, the research in millimeter wave radio astronomy as well as the space astronomy research.

Paulikas, G. A.

1974-01-01

88

The Deep Space Network: An instrument for radio astronomy research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Deep Space Network operates and maintains the Earth-based two-way communications link for unmanned spacecraft exploring the solar system. It is NASA's policy to also make the Network's facilities available for radio astronomy observations. The Network's microwave communication systems and facilities are being continually upgraded. This revised document, first published in 1982, describes the Network's current radio astronomy capabilities and future capabilities that will be made available by the ongoing Network upgrade. The Bibliography, which includes published papers and articles resulting from radio astronomy observations conducted with Network facilities, has been updated to include papers to May 1987.

Renzetti, N. A.; Levy, G. S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Walken, P. R.; Chandlee, R. C.

1988-01-01

89

Noise Levels at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The measurements which have been made of the field strengths of radio signals received at the Green Bank site of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory are described. The site is relatively free from interference and the measures which are being adopted to preserve its radio quietness are discussed.

J. W. Findlay

1958-01-01

90

Radio Astronomy Imagery for Education and Public Outreach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) has initiated an Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program to improve its capability to process radio-wavelength astronomical data into compelling visual imagery and to make such imagery readily accessible and widely available to scientists, students, teachers, the general public, the media, and EPO professionals. This imagery initiative is exploring radio data visualization techniques and

M. T. Adams; D. G. Finley; A. Gianopoulos; P. Smiley; W. Saxton; J. M. Uson

2005-01-01

91

Spectrum control procedures for the national radio astronomy observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Green Bank site for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Sugar Grove site for the Naval Radio Research Laboratory (NRRL) were located fairly close together with the hope that both could share in the locally relatively low radio noise environment that existed when the installations were first built. The procederes which have been followed to maintain, as

JAMES L. DOLAN

1973-01-01

92

A Sustainable approach to large ICT Science based infrastructures; the case for Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

Large sensor-based infrastructures for radio astronomy will be among the most intensive data-driven projects in the world, facing very high power demands. The geographically wide distribution of these infrastructures and their associated processing High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities require Green Information and Communications Technologies (ICT). A combination is needed of low power computing, efficient data storage, local data services, Smart Grid power management, and inclusion of Renewable Energies. Here we outline the major characteristics and innovation approaches to address power efficiency and long-term power sustainability for radio astronomy projects, focusing on Green ICT for science.

Barbosa, Domingos; Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Aguiar, Rui; van Ardenne, Arnold; de Santander-Vela, Juande; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes

2014-01-01

93

National Astronomy Education Projects: A Catalog  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a list of projects and programs involved with astronomy education with a national availability of services and resources. This includes information about workshops for training teachers of astronomy, programs for students, awards and grants, newsletters, curriculum materials and miscellaneous projects.

Fraknoi, Andrew; Lalor, Shannon; Taddune, Nicole

2008-09-24

94

Low Frequency Radio Astronomy with the existing and future radio telescopes  

E-print Network

Low Frequency Radio Astronomy with the existing and future radio telescopes A.A. Konovalenko radio telescope and also the creation of new large telescope of 10 ­ 70 MHz frequency range, Emmen, "Astrophisycs in the LOFAR era") #12;#12;#12;The low-frequency radio telescopes in Europe LOFAR

Demoulin, Pascal

95

A Radio Station Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a radio program in an English-as-a-Foreign-Language classroom in Israel. Classrooms of English students listen carefully to daily broadcasts, waiting to solve the brain teaser. Personal messages and catchy music follow the program. The project has encouraged students to use English actively and purposefully. Evaluation of the broadcasts

Geva, Edna

2002-01-01

96

Using Group Research Projects to Stimulate Undergraduate Astronomy Major Learning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of Arizona Astronomy Club has been working on two large group research projects since 2009. One research project is a transiting extrasolar planet project that is fully student led and run. We observed the transiting exoplanets, TrES-3b and TrES-4b, with the 1.55 meter Kupier Telescope in near-UV and optical filters in order to detect any asymmetries between filters. The second project is a radio astronomy survey utilizing the Arizona Radio Observatory 12m telescope on Kitt Peak to study molecular gas in cold cores identified by the Planck all sky survey. This project provides a unique opportunity for a large group of students to get hands-on experience observing with a world-class radio observatory. These projects involve students in every single step of the process including: proposal writing to obtain telescope time on various Southern Arizona telescopes, observing at these telescopes, data reduction and analysis, managing large data sets, and presenting results at scientific meetings and in journal publications. The primary goal of these projects is to involve students in cutting-edge research early on in their undergraduate studies. The projects are designed to be continuous long term projects so that new students can easily join. As of January 2012 the extrasolar planet project became an official independent study class. New students learn from the more experienced students on the projects creating a learner-centered environment.

McGraw, Allison M.; Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Turner, J. D.; Shirley, Y. L.; Walker-LaFollette, A. M.; Robertson, A. N.; Carleton, T. M.; Smart, B. M.; Towner, A. P. M.; Wallace, S. C.; Smith, C. W.; Small, L. C.; Daugherty, M. J.; Guvenen, B. C.; Crawford, B. E.; Austin, C. L.; Schlingman, W. M.

2012-05-01

97

Sixty Years in radio astronomy: A tribute to Bruce Slee  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bruce Slee is one of the pioneers of radio astronomy. After recording solar emission during World War II, he joined what was then the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research's Division of Radiophysics in Sydney, Australia, and went on to make important contributions to Solar System, Galactic and extra-galactic astronomy. Since his retirement, in 1989, he has continued his research as an Honorary Fellow of the Australia Telescope National Facility. Now in his early 80s, Bruce Slee is one of the few radio astronomy pioneers of the 1940s who is still actively contributing to astrophysics. This issue of the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage (JAH2), and the two that will follow it, are a tribute to this quietly-spoken scientist and his remarkable 60-year involvement in radio astronomy.

Orchiston, Wayne

2005-06-01

98

Communicating radio astronomy with the public: Another point of view  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio waves cannot be sensed directly, but they are used in daily life by almost everybody. Even so, the majority of the general public do not even know that celestial bodies emit radio waves. Presenting invisible radiation to a general audience with little or no background knowledge in physics is a difficult task. In addition, much important technology now commonplace in many other scientific fields was pioneered by radio observatories in their efforts to detect and process radio signals from the Universe. Radio astronomy outreach does not have such a well-established background as optical astronomy outreach. In order to make radio astronomy accessible to the public, it is necessary either to add more scientific detail or to find a different way of communicating. In this paper we present examples from our work at the Visitor Centre "Marcello Ceccarelli", which is part of the Medicina Radio Observatory, operated by the Institute of Radio Astronomy (IRA) in Bologna, which in turn is part of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF).

Varano, S.

2008-06-01

99

47 CFR 73.6027 - Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...Notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...

2011-10-01

100

47 CFR 73.6027 - Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...Notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...

2014-10-01

101

47 CFR 73.6027 - Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...Notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...

2013-10-01

102

47 CFR 73.6027 - Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...Notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...

2012-10-01

103

47 CFR 73.6027 - Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...Notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...

2010-10-01

104

An automatic radio interference monitor for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) operates the Very Large Array (VLA) Radio Observatory on the Plains of San Augustin in New Mexico, and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) with 10 antenna locations from Hawaii to St. Croix. Harmful radio frequency interference (RFI) is a growing problem for the VLA and the VLBA, and for that matter, all Earth-based

C. C. Janes; R. A. Jones; W. D. Brundage

1995-01-01

105

Enhancing Astronomy Major Learning Through Group Research Projects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of Arizona Astronomy Club has been using group research projects to enhance the learning experience of undergraduates in astronomy and related fields. Students work on two projects that employ a peer-mentoring system so they can learn crucial skills and concepts necessary in research environments. Students work on a transiting exoplanet project using the 1.55-meter Kuiper Telescope on Mt. Bigelow in Southern Arizona to collect near-UV and optical wavelength data. The goal of the project is to refine planetary parameters and to attempt to detect exoplanet magnetic fields by searching for near-UV light curve asymmetries. The other project is a survey that utilizes the 12-meter Arizona Radio Observatory on Kitt Peak to search for the spectroscopic signature of infall in nearby starless cores. These are unique projects because students are involved throughout the entire research process, including writing proposals for telescope time, observing at the telescopes, data reduction and analysis, writing papers for publication in journals, and presenting research at scientific conferences. Exoplanet project members are able to receive independent study credit for participating in the research, which helps keep the project on track. Both projects allow students to work on professional research and prepare for several astronomy courses early in their academic career. They also encourage teamwork and mentor-style peer teaching, and can help students identify their own research projects as they expand their knowledge.

McGraw, Allison M.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Turner, J.; Shirley, Y. L.; Walker-Lafollette, A.; Scott, A.; Guvenen, B.; Raphael, B.; Sanford, B.; Smart, B.; Nguyen, C.; Jones, C.; Smith, C.; Cates, I.; Romine, J.; Cook, K.; Pearson, K.; Biddle, L.; Small, L.; Donnels, M.; Nieberding, M.; Kwon, M.; Thompson, R.; De La Rosa, R.; Hofmann, R.; Tombleson, R.; Smith, T.; Towner, A. P.; Wallace, S.

2013-01-01

106

Sub-arcsecond radio astronomy. Proceedings.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contents: I. Galactic astronomy. 1. Stars. 2. The Galactic Center. 3. Masers and molecules. 4. Plasma effects. II. Extragalactic astronomy. 1. Gravitational lenses. 2. Compact structure in AGN. 3. Intermediate scale structure. 4. AGN at other wavelengths. 5. Mildly active galaxies. 6. Theory and jet simulation. III. Cosmology. IV. Astrometry. V. Instruments and techniques.

Davis, R. J.; Booth, R. S.

107

Sub-arcsecond radio astronomy. Proceedings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contents: I. Galactic astronomy. 1. Stars. 2. The Galactic Center. 3. Masers and molecules. 4. Plasma effects. II. Extragalactic astronomy. 1. Gravitational lenses. 2. Compact structure in AGN. 3. Intermediate scale structure. 4. AGN at other wavelengths. 5. Mildly active galaxies. 6. Theory and jet simulation. III. Cosmology. IV. Astrometry. V. Instruments and techniques.

R. J. Davis; R. S. Booth

1993-01-01

108

Interference Mitigation In Radio Astronomy and  

E-print Network

radio telescope (in his backyard!) and makes the first sky maps #12;First Sky Maps at Radio Frequencies? A typical major radio telescope costs on the order of US$20,000 per day to operate Post-observation editing radio telescopes, so telescope time has value that transcends simple dollar estimates In summary: Real

Ellingson, Steven W.

109

Status of the Sardinia Radio Telescope project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the status of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) project, a new general purpose, fully steerable 64 m diameter parabolic radiotelescope capable to operate with high efficiency in the 0.3-116 GHz frequency range. The instrument is the result of a scientific and technical collaboration among three Structures of the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF): the Institute of Radio Astronomy of Bologna, the Cagliari Astronomy Observatory (in Sardinia,) and the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Florence. Funding agencies are the Italian Ministry of Education and Scientific Research, the Sardinia Regional Government, and the Italian Space Agency (ASI,) that has recently rejoined the project. The telescope site is about 35 km North of Cagliari. The radio telescope has a shaped Gregorian optical configuration with a 7.9 m diameter secondary mirror and supplementary Beam-WaveGuide (BWG) mirrors. With four possible focal positions (primary, Gregorian, and two BWGs), SRT will be able to allocate up to 20 remotely controllable receivers. One of the most advanced technical features of the SRT is the active surface: the primary mirror will be composed by 1008 panels supported by electromechanical actuators digitally controlled to compensate for gravitational deformations. With the completion of the foundation on spring 2006 the SRT project entered its final construction phase. This paper reports on the latest advances on the SRT project.

Tofani, Gianni; Alvito, Gianni; Ambrosini, Roberto; Bolli, Pietro; Bortolotti, Claudio; Bruca, Loredana; Buffa, Franco; Cattani, Alessandro; Comoretto, Gianni; Cremonini, Andrea; Cresci, Luca; D'Amico, Nichi; Deiana, Gian Luigi; Fara, Antonietta; Feretti, Luigina; Fiocchi, Franco; Flamini, Enrico; Fusi Pecci, Flavio; Grueff, Gavril; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Maccaferri, Andrea; Mantovani, Franco; Mariotti, Sergio; Migoni, Carlo; Messina, Filippo; Monari, Jader; Morsiani, Marco; Murgia, Matteo; Musmeci, Jos; Nanni, Mauro; Natale, Vincenzo; Navarrini, Alessandro; Negusini, Monia; Nesti, Renzo; Olmi, Luca; Orfei, Alessandro; Orlati, Andrea; Palla, Francesco; Panella, Dario; Pernechele, Claudio; Pilloni, Salvatore; Pisanu, Tonino; Poddighe, Antonio; Poloni, Marco; Poma, Angelo; Poppi, Sergio; Porceddu, Ignazio; Prandoni, Isabella; Roda, Juri; Roma, Mauro; Sarti, Pierguido; Scalambra, Alessandro; Schillir, Francesco; Tarchi, Andrea; Vargiu, Gian Paolo; Zacchiroli, Giampaolo

2008-07-01

110

A Collaborative Astronomy Project Between Multimedia and Physics Undergraduate Majors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the summer of 2004, faculty and undergraduate multimedia and physics interns from the University of North Carolina at Asheville and nearby Furman University joined together at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute to develop a new education and public outreach program of radio astronomy by utilizing the StarLab portable planetarium system. The program consists of three components: the StarLab cylinder for projection of the radio sky; display of a pulsar on the radio sky; and teaching and learning materials accessible through the Internet and CD-ROM. The multimedia and physics interns worked together to articulate and communicate aspects of their disciplines as they related to the development of the cylinder, the depiction of the pulsars and pulsar projector, and classroom activities for teachers and students. As a result, the cylinder shows both the radio sky and illustrates five distinct types of radio sources. The cylinder is augmented further through the use of an audio-visual pulsar projector, which emits pulses with sound for the audio-visually challenged. The activities present teachers with lesson plans related to radio astronomy topics. We discuss the unique development by this team needed to accomplish the program's first year goals. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

Castelaz, M. W.; Walsh, L.; LaFratta, M.; Moffett, D. A.

2004-12-01

111

National Radio Astronomy Observatory P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Rd, Socorro, NM 87801, USA  

E-print Network

National Radio Astronomy Observatory P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Rd, Socorro, NM 87801, USA Astro., Astro 2010 position paper, The Impact of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory) for scientific for radio astronomy. This is one of five papers outlining for the Program Prioritization Panel a series

Ellingson, Steven W.

112

National Radio Astronomy Observatory 22 May 2008 US SKA Consortium Meeting, DC  

E-print Network

National Radio Astronomy Observatory 22 May 2008 ­ US SKA Consortium Meeting, DC The Role of NRAO in SKA Fred Lo #12;National Radio Astronomy Observatory 22 May 2008 ­ US SKA Consortium Role of NRAO;National Radio Astronomy Observatory 22 May 2008 ­ US SKA Consortium Relationship with community

Groppi, Christopher

113

AMANDA ANN KEPLEY MAIL: National Radio Astronomy Observatory OFFICE: +1-304-456-2808  

E-print Network

AMANDA ANN KEPLEY MAIL: National Radio Astronomy Observatory OFFICE: +1-304-456-2808 P Grant 2012 National Radio Astronomy Observatory Foreign Telescope Fund Grant 2009, 2010 Green Bank Knapp Jansky Award 2006 RESEARCH EMPLOYMENT National Radio Astronomy Observatory Postdoctoral Fellow 9

Groppi, Christopher

114

To: Fred Lo, Director, National Radio Astronomy Observatory From: NRAO Users Committee 2004,  

E-print Network

To: Fred Lo, Director, National Radio Astronomy Observatory From: NRAO Users Committee 2004, John The Users Committee of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory met on May 24-25, 2004, in Charlottesville facilities and support of the highest quality to the US radio astronomy community. The committee commends

Groppi, Christopher

115

RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORYNAT IONA TI TLE: VANE TYPE POLARIZATION CONVERTER  

E-print Network

RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORYNAT IONA TI TLE: VANE TYPE POLARIZATION CONVERTER AUTHOR (S) C1 BROCKWAY perpendicular to vanes Propagation direction #12;= c= 1)(2. 2 2. Phase Shift (1)1_ = d = (w/vc) d (radians) (1 spacing so v > v c ). = radian frequency. = propagation constant (Pi- (P11 E Acp = wd (l/vc - 1/v). Acp

Groppi, Christopher

116

Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 2 near Jupiter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment to Jupiter has confirmed and extended to higher zenomagnetic latitudes results from the identical experiment carried by Voyager 1. The kilometric emissions discovered by Voyager 1 often extended to 1 megahertz or higher on Voyager 2 and often consisted of negatively, or less frequently, positively drifting narrowband bursts. On the basis of tentative

J. W. Warwick; J. B. Pearce; A. C. Riddle; J. K. Alexander; M. D. Desch; M. L. Kaiser; J. R. Thieman; T. D. Carr; S. Gulkis; A. Boischot; Y. LEBLANC; B. M. PEDERSEN; D. H. STAELIN

1979-01-01

117

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA  

E-print Network

on the outside of the vertex cabin (see Figure 2). The air handler houses the cooling coil, the 15 kW heaterNATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT. COOLING COIL SCR PROPORTIONAL CONTROLER ) --110-40- CONDITIONED AIR THERMISTOR SENSORS 15 K W IN VERTEX

Groppi, Christopher

118

A Radio Astronomy Curriculum for the Middle School Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the summer of 2000, two teachers working on a Masters of Science Teaching program at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, spent eight weeks as interns at the Array Operations Center for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, under the auspices of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program. The

J. Davis; D. G. Finley

2000-01-01

119

Starting with Nothing: Archives at National Radio Astronomy Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Founded in 1956, National Radio Astronomy Observatory had no Archivist or Archives program until mid-2003, when the new Archivist, working less than half time, began building the collection. Our institutional records were scattered between multiple storage areas at NRAO sites in four different states, and no one knew what we had. Personal papers of pioneers and participants in the development

E. N. Bouton

2007-01-01

120

Using many-core hardware to correlate radio astronomy signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recent development in radio astronomy is to replace traditional dishes withmany small antennas. The signals are combined toform one large, virtual telescope. The enormous data streams are cross- correlated to filter out noise. This is especially challenging, since the computational demands grow quadratically with the number of data streams. Moreover, the correlator is not only computationally intensive, but also

Rob V. Van Nieuwpoort; John W. Romein

2009-01-01

121

The Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope: Construction and Forty Years of Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Effelsberg 100-m dish represents a major breakthrough in the technology of radio telescope construction. Using new methods of computation a big step in the direction of improved surface accuracy for large structures was achieved. In conjunction with the decision to build the 100-m radio telescope the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (MPG) founded the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn. The MPIfR grew out of the Bonn University Astronomy Department to become one of the leading institutes for radio astronomy in the world. This new institute received strong support from the MPG in the form of new positions and operating funds. As a result, the 100-m radio telescope could be quickly opened up for astronomical observations. The technical divisions provided state-of-the-art receivers and astronomical software. Teams of astronomical researchers made inroads in several important directions of astronomical research. Over the years virtually all the observing methods of radio astronomy were implemented at Effelsberg. In later years the MPIfR became involved in mm, sub-mm and infrared astronomy research. However, the 100-m radio telescope remained the `work horse' of the Institute. The Effelsberg Radio Telescope will celebrate its 40th anniversary of operations in May 2011 and is still going strong. The observations with the 100-m radio telescope have resulted in thousands of publications. It has served several generations of radio astronomers and has given hundreds of students the opportunity to complete doctoral degrees. The 100-m radio telescope has been upgraded continuously, is in excellent condition and can look to a further period as an important research instrument.

Wielebinski, Richard; Junkes, Norbert; Grahl, Berndt H.

2011-03-01

122

Problems and Projects from Astronomy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes activities to stimulate school astronomy programs. Topics include: counting stars; the Earth's centripetal force; defining astronomical time; three types of sundials; perceptions of star brightness; sunspots and solar radiation; stellar spectroscopy; number-crunching and the molecular structure of the atmosphere; the Earth-Moon common

Mills, H. R.

1991-01-01

123

Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

1988-01-01

124

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA  

E-print Network

astronomy receivers are constructed using a cryogenically cooled mixer as the first stage, followed by a low of the mixers constructed at NRAO is the L-band cooled FET amplifier reported by Weinreb, Fenstermacher to quadrature 3 dB hybrids, as shown in Figure 1. In this configuration, reflections from the input (output

Groppi, Christopher

125

A new signal processing platform for radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context: We describe the concept, construction, and testing of TasPGA, a new, versatile digital signal processing device designed for radio astronomy applications. Aims: A minimalist design philosophy was used to develop a general-purpose radio astronomy instrument based on field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology. The design emphasises reliability and flexibility, facilitating the rapid development of new FPGA firmware for a wide range of experiments. Methods: Hardware and firmware for TasPGA were designed using software provided by Altium Ltd. and Xilinx Inc. We tested the instrument by implementing a Fourier transform spectrometer capable of dividing 100 MHz of bandwidth into 16 384 channels. Results: We present data taken with a TasPGA spectrometer at the Mt. Pleasant radio observatory, including the spectra of two astronomical methanol masers.

Hotan, A. W.

2008-07-01

126

Bernard Mills and Australian radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bernard Mills, in conversation with Ragbir Bhathal, recalls how he became an astronomer by accident after the second world war, devised the Mills Cross radio telescope as a way to get a good instrument on the cheap, and what happened when he questioned the methods of Cambridge radio astronomers at the time of Martin Ryle's 2C catalogue.

Bhathal, Ragbir

2012-04-01

127

The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

2013-05-01

128

An outside view of Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy is in a golden age of discovery of the new, with a growing appreciation from astrophysics that physics has studied so far an almost insignificant fraction of reality. This golden age is enabled by technology, with next generation technologies approaching the Giga-euro/dollar investment level. This forces a strategic view of relative strengths in the past, and strategies for future developments. Some of these may transcend traditional wavelength classifications.

Gilmore, G.

129

SparseRI: A Compressed Sensing Framework for Aperture Synthesis Imaging in Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA 4 National RadioSparseRI: A Compressed Sensing Framework for Aperture Synthesis Imaging in Radio Astronomy S Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801, USA #12;­ 2 ­ itself to be reconstructed. Since the size

Magnor, Marcus

130

Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, 12(3), 249-253 (2009). THE IAU HISTORIC RADIO ASTRONOMY WORKING GROUP.  

E-print Network

astronomers who are active in the history of radio astronomy field or sympathetic to it. 2 National initiative of Commissions 40 (Radio Astronomy) and 41 (History of Astronomy), in order to: · assemble of these instruments; · maintain an on-going bibliography of public- cations on the history of radio astronomy

Groppi, Christopher

131

Multielement system design in astronomy and radio science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This book deals with multielement systems representing a set of interdependent identical elements of a comparatively small size. Such systems are widely used in various fields of astronomy and radio science, their classical examples being radio telescopes, optical and radio interferometers, orbital X-ray and gamma-ray telescopes, and phased antenna arrays for radio communication and radar facilities. Here the problems of the optimal arrangement of elements of such systems are investigated to provide their high-performance characteristics such as resolution, sensitivity, and robustness to the statistically inhomogeneous propagation medium. The distinctive feature of the book is the use of the combinatorial approach to system optimization that proves especially useful for systems with a very large number of elements. The book is addressed to research physicists and engineers who are concerned with the development of astronomical instruments and large antenna arrays, and to graduate students learning about these subjects.

Kopilovich, Lazarus E.; Sodin, Leonid G.

132

Voyager planetary radio astronomy at Neptune  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detection of very intense short radio bursts from Neptune was possible as early as 30 days before closest approach and at least 22 days after closest approach. The bursts lay at frequencies in the range 100 to 1300 kilohertz, were narrowband and strongly polarized, and presumably originated in southern polar regions of the planet. Episodes of smooth emissions in the

James W. Warwick; David R. Evans; Gerard R. Peltzer; Robert G. Peltzer; Joseph H. Romig; Constance B. Sawyer; Anthony C. Riddle; Andrea E. Schweitzer; Michael D. Desch; Michael L. Kaiser; W. M. Farrell; T. D. Carr; I. de Pater; D. H. Staelin; S. Gulkis; R. L. Poynter; A. Boischot; F. Genova; Y. Leblanc; A. Lecacheux; B. M. Pedersen; P. Zarka

1989-01-01

133

Radio broadcasting: an attractive way of broadcasting astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy is full of beautiful skyscapes, shining stars and huge planets. The vast majority of them can be transformed into tactile images and complemented by audio descriptions. These translations of visual information into raised lines, shapes and textures can be felt with the fingertips instead of viewed with the eyes. In this way, the beauties of the Universe enter the universe of blind and visually impaired people. Happily, we all have radio broadcasting as an important source of information and entertainment. Science radio programmes can bring the real music of the spheres (as Pythagoras once suggested) to the audience.

Mosoia, C.

2008-06-01

134

Correlating Radio Astronomy Signals with Many-Core Hardware  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recent development in radio astronomy is to replace traditional dishes with many small antennas. The signals are combined\\u000a to form one large, virtual telescope. The enormous data streams are cross-correlated to filter out noise. This is especially\\u000a challenging, since the computational demands grow quadratically with the number of data streams. Moreover, the correlator\\u000a is not only computationally intensive, but

Rob V. van Nieuwpoort; John W. Romein

2011-01-01

135

A New Approach to Interference Excision in Radio Astronomy: Real-Time Adaptive Cancellation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Every year, an increasing amount of radio-frequency (RF) spectrum in the VHF, UHF, and microwave bands is being utilized to support new commercial and military ventures, and all have the potential to interfere with radio astronomy observations. Such services already cause problems for radio astronomy even in very remote observing sites, and the potential for this form of light pollution

Cecilia Barnbaum; Richard F. Bradley

1998-01-01

136

Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

1992-01-01

137

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Astronomy: The Visible and Invisible Universe  

E-print Network

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated Universe #12;The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, no matter how long... #12;The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science

Groppi, Christopher

138

Planetary radio astronomy: Earth, giant planets, and beyond  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The magnetospheric phenomenon of non-thermal radio emission is known since the serendipitous discovery of Jupiter as radio planet in 1955, opening the new field of "Planetary Radio Astronomy". Continuous ground-based observations and, in particular, space-borne measurements have meanwhile produced a comprehensive picture of a fascinating research area. Space missions as the Voyagers to the Giant Planets, specifically Voyager 2 further to Uranus and Neptune, Galileo orbiting Jupiter, and now Cassini in orbit around Saturn since July 2004, provide a huge amount of radio data, well embedded in other experiments monitoring space plasmas and magnetic fields. The present paper as a condensation of a presentation at the Kleinheubacher Tagung 2013 in honour of the 100th anniversary of Prof. Karl Rawer, provides an introduction into the generation mechanism of non-thermal planetary radio waves and highlights some new features of planetary radio emission detected in the recent past. As one of the most sophisticated spacecraft, Cassini, now in space for more than 16 years and still in excellent health, enabled for the first time a seasonal overview of the magnetospheric variations and their implications for the generation of radio emission. Presently most puzzling is the seasonally variable rotational modulation of Saturn kilometric radio emission (SKR) as seen by Cassini, compared with early Voyager observations. The cyclotron maser instability is the fundamental mechanism under which generation and sufficient amplification of non-thermal radio emission is most likely. Considering these physical processes, further theoretical investigations have been started to investigate the conditions and possibilities of non-thermal radio emission from exoplanets, from potential radio planets in extrasolar systems.

Rucker, H. O.; Panchenko, M.; Weber, C.

2014-11-01

139

Reflections on the Radio Astronomy Explorer program of the 1960s and 70s  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) program of the late 1960s and early 1970s is, to date, the only totally dedicated radio astronomy mission to have flown. However, only some of the prelaunch goals were achieved due to the unexpectedly high levels of interference from the earth in the form of both naturally occurring and man-made noise. Some important lessons in receiver design were learned which could and should be applied to any future radio astronomy missions.

Kaiser, M. L.

1990-01-01

140

The large synthesis radio telescopes of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is noted that large radio telescope arrays such as the Very Large Array and Very Long Baseline Array at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory challenge the state of the art of microwave technology in many areas. Examples include the design of optimized sparse arrays and the design and the economic construction of high-performance, frequency-flexible antennas, reliable low-noise receivers, and

P. J. Napier

1992-01-01

141

Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, 15(3), 255-257 (2012). IAU HISTORIC RADIO ASTRONOMY WORKING GROUP  

E-print Network

site. In 2003, the National Radio Astronomy Observa- tory initiated the first Archives devoted of publications on the history of radio astronomy; and d) monitor other develop- ments relating to the history of radio astronomy (in- cluding the deaths of pioneering radio astronomers). The HRA WG is now an Inter

Groppi, Christopher

142

The birthplace of planetary radio astronomy: The Seneca, Maryland observatory 50 years after Burke and Franklin's Jupiter radio emission discovery.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Burke and Franklin's discovery of radio emissions from Jupiter in 1955 effectively marked the birth of the field of planetary radio astronomy. The discovery was made near Seneca, Maryland using the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism/Carnegie Institution of Washington's Mills Cross Array. Fifty years later there is very little evidence of this 96-acre X-shaped array of dipoles still in existence, nor evidence of any of the other antennas used at this site. The site, now known as the McKee Besher Wildlife Management Area, is owned by the State of Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Radio Jove, a NASA/GSFC education and public outreach project, will recognize the 50th anniversary of this discovery through an historic reenactment using their receiver and dual-dipole array system. Our search through the DTM/CIW archives, our visit to the site to look for evidence of this array, and other efforts at commemorating this anniversary will be described.

Garcia, L. N.; Thieman, J. R.; Higgins, C. A.

2004-12-01

143

Acousto-optic spectrometer for radio astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent developments in acousto-optic techniques and in photodetector arrays have made feasible a new type of RF spectrometer, offering the advantages of wide bandwidth, high resolution, large number of channels in compact, lightweight, energy efficient, and relatively low cost systems. Such a system employs an acousto-optic diffraction cell which serves the key role of converting RF signals to ultrasonic traveling-waves modulating the optical index of the cell. The cell is illuminated across its aperture by a monochromatic laser beam. A fraction of the light is diffracted by the acoustic waves. A focusing lens follows the cell and essentially performs a Fourier transform of the RF signal into a far-field intensity pattern. CSIRO in Australia and the Tokyo Astronomical Observatory in Japan have taken the lead in using acousto-optic techniques in astronomical applications. The first practical device was successfully made at CSIRO for obtaining dynamical spectrographs of solar radio emission.

Chin, G.; Buhl, D.; Florez, J. M.

1980-01-01

144

Electronic Multi-beam Radio Astronomy Concept: Embrace a Demonstrator for the European SKA Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ASTRON has demonstrated the capabilities of a 4 m2, dense phased array antenna (Bij de Vaate et al., 2002) for radio astronomy, as part of the Thousand Element Array project (ThEA). Although it proved the principle, a definitive answer related to the viability of the dense phased array approach for the SKA could not be given, due to the limited collecting area of the array considered. A larger demonstrator has therefore been defined, known as Electronic Multi-Beam Radio Astronomy Concept, EMBRACE, which will have an area of 625 m2, operate in the band 0.4 1.550 GHz and have at least two independent and steerable beams. With this collecting area EMBRACE can function as a radio astronomy instrument whose sensitivity is comparable to that of a 25-m diameter dish. The collecting area also represents a significant percentage area (10%) of an individual SKA station. This paper presents the plans for the realisation of the EMBRACE demonstrator.

Ardenne, A.; Wilkinson, P. N.; Patel, P. D.; Vaate, J. G. Bij

2004-06-01

145

RASDR: Benchtop Demonstration of SDR for Radio Astronomy  

SciTech Connect

The Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers (SARA) members present the benchtop version of RASDR, a Software Defined Radio (SDR) that is optimized for Radio Astronomy. RASDR has the potential to be a common digital receiver interface useful to many SARA members. This document describes the RASDR 0.0 , which provides digitized radio data to a backend computer through a USB 2.0 interface. A primary component of RASDR is the Lime Microsystems Femtocell chip which tunes from a 0.4-4 GHz center frequency with several selectable bandwidths from 0.75 MHz to 14 MHz. A second component is a board with a Complex Programmable Logic Device (CPLD) chip that connects to the Femtocell and provides two USB connections to the backend computer. A third component is an analog balanced mixer up conversion section. Together these three components enable RASDR to tune from 0.015 MHz thru 3.8GHz of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum. We will demonstrate and discuss capabilities of the breadboard system and SARA members will be able to operate the unit hands-on throughout the workshop.

Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL] [ORNL; Oxley, Paul [Retired] [Retired; Fields, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Kurtz, Dr. Stan [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM)] [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Leech, Marcus [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium] [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium

2012-01-01

146

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY P.O. BOX 2, GREEN BANK, WV 24944  

E-print Network

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY P.O. BOX 2, GREEN BANK, WV 24944 PHONE: 304-456-2209 FAX: 304-456-2200 EMAIL: sheather@nrao.edu The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science, Observatory staff have developed an easy way for you to tell your community about your visit to the NRAO . It

Groppi, Christopher

147

8 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL n VOLUME 21, NUMBER 1, 2014 InsIghts Into the UnIverse: Astronomy wIth hAystAck's rAdIo telescope  

E-print Network

wIth hAystAck's rAdIo telescope Insights into the Universe: Astronomy with Haystack's Radio Telescope game-changing tech- nology for radio science, and to apply it to the study of our planet, its space projects. The observatory is operated under an agreement with the Northeast Radio Observatory Corporation

Williams, Brian C.

148

Tonantzintla's Observatory Astronomy Teaching Laboratory project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last two years the National Observatory at Tonantzintla Puebla, Mxico (OAN Tonantzintla), has been undergoing several facilities upgrades in order to bring to the observatory suitable conditions to operate as a modern Observational Astronomy Teaching Laboratory. In this paper, we present the management, requirement definition and project advances. We made a quantitative diagnosis about of the functionality of the Tonantzintla Observatory (mainly based in the 1m f/15 telescope) to take aim to educational objectives. Through this project we are taking the steps to correct, to actualize and to optimize the observatory astronomical instrumentation according to modern techniques of observation. We present the design and the first actions in order to get a better and efficient use of the main astronomical instrumentation, as well as, the telescope itself, for the undergraduate, postgraduate levels Observacional Astronomy students and outreach publics programs for elementary school. The project includes the development of software and hardware components based in as a common framework for the project management. The Observatory is located at 150 km away from the headquarters at the Instituto de Astronoma, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico (IAUNAM), and one of the goals is use this infrastructure for a Remote Observatory System.

Garfias, F.; Bernal, A.; Martnez, L. A.; Snchez, L.; Hernndez, H.; Langarica, R.; Iriarte, A.; Pea, J. H.; Tinoco, S.; ngeles, F.

2008-07-01

149

Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, 8(1), 65-69 (2005). THE IAU HISTORIC RADIO ASTRONOMY WORKING GROUP.  

E-print Network

. Recollections of "Tucson Oper- ations". The Millimeter-Wave Observatory of the National Radio Astronomy was formed at the 2003 General Assembly of the IAU as a joint initiative of Commissions 40 (Radio Astronomy of publications on the history of radio astronomy; and · monitor other developments relating to the history

Groppi, Christopher

150

Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, 7: 53-56 (2004) The IAU Historic Radio Astronomy Working Group.  

E-print Network

Kellermann National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd., Charlotteville, VA 22903-2475, U.S.A. EJournal of Astronomical History and Heritage, 7: 53-56 (2004) The IAU Historic Radio Astronomy of publications on the history of radio astronomy; (4) monitoring other developments relating to the history

Groppi, Christopher

151

Federal Communications Commission US311 Radio astronomy observations may be made in the bands 13501400 MHz and 49504990 MHz  

E-print Network

and between longitudes 65° 10' W and 68° 00' W. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, New Mexico. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, West Virginia Rectangle between latitudes 37° 30' N: National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Very Long Baseline Array Stations Latitude (North) Longitude (West

Bower, Geoffrey

152

Trans-Pacific Astronomy Experiment Project Status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Trans-Pacific Astronomy Experiment is Phase 2 of the Trans-Pacific High Data Rate Satcom Experiments following the Trans-Pacific High Definition Video Experiment. It is a part of the Global Information Infrastructure-Global Interoperability for Broadband Networks Project (GII-GIBN). Provides global information infrastructure involving broadband satellites and terrestrial networks and access to information by anyone, anywhere, at any time. Collaboration of government, industry, and academic organizations demonstrate the use of broadband satellite links in a global information infrastructure with emphasis on astronomical observations, collaborative discussions and distance learning.

Hsu, Eddie

2000-01-01

153

Stellar Radio Astronomy. Probing Stellar Atmospheres from Protostars to Giants  

E-print Network

Radio astronomy has provided evidence for the presence of ionized atmospheres around almost all classes of non-degenerate stars. Magnetically confined coronae dominate in the cool half of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Their radio emission is predominantly of non-thermal origin and has been identified as gyrosynchrotron radiation from mildly relativistic electrons, apart from some coherent emission mechanisms. Ionized winds are found in hot stars and in red giants. They are detected through their thermal, optically thick radiation, but synchrotron emission has been found in many systems as well. The latter is emitted presumably by shock-accelerated electrons in weak magnetic fields in the outer wind regions. Radio emission is also frequently detected in pre-main sequence stars and protostars, and has recently been discovered in brown dwarfs. This review summarizes the radio view of the atmospheres of non-degenerate stars, focusing on energy release physics in cool coronal stars, wind phenomenology in hot stars and cool giants, and emission observed from young and forming stars.

Manuel Guedel

2002-07-03

154

Molecules in Space: A Chemistry lab using Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of a laboratory exercise developed with the support of the NSF Research Experiences for Teachers program at MIT Haystack Observatory. The exercise takes the students beyond the traditional test tubes of a chemistry laboratory into the interstellar medium, where the same principles that they study about in the classroom are found to hold. It also utilizes the true multi-disciplinary nature of radio astronomy and allows the students to realize how much can be learnt by studying the universe at various wavelengths. The astronomical chemistry laboratory is presented wherein students from Chelmsford High School in Massachusetts operate the 37-m telescope at Haystack Observatory via the internet to observe radio signals from galactic chemicals. The laboratory is designed to be the means by which students witness physical evidence for molecular and orbital shapes by observing the radio emission from rotating dipoles. The laboratory described is a lynch pin activity for an integrated unit that moves from the valance shell electron configurations through molecular and orbital geometry to an understanding that many physical and chemical properties of chemicals are ultimately dependent upon the shape/geometry and consequently, dipole of the molecule. Students are expected to interpret and evaluate the nature of molecular dipoles and account for the diversity of rotational spectra using their conceptual knowledge of bonding orbital theory and their knowledge of the electronic atom. Flexibility in the lab allows students to identify individual chemicals by cross referencing radio emission from the galactic sources they have chosen against a prepared catalogue listing or by choosing to "listen" for specific chemicals at exact frequencies. A teacher resource manual containing information and data on a variety of daytime galactic source and individual chemical flux densities of molecular candidates has been prepared. Collaborative exercises and activities, and associated unit topics have also been developed.

Lekberg, M. J.; Pratap, P.

2000-12-01

155

Gordon James Stanley and the Early Development of Radio Astronomy in Australia and the United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following the end of the Second World War, the CSIRO Radiophysics Laboratory applied the expertise and surplus radar equipment acquired during the war to problems of astronomy. Gordon Stanley was among the first group of scientists and engineers to work in the exciting new field of radio astronomy. Like many of his contemporaries, he had a strong background in radio and electronics but none in astronomy. At the Radiophysics Laboratory, and later at Caltech, Stanley developed innovative new radio telescopes and sophisticated instrumentation which resulted in important new discoveries that changed, in a fundamental way, our understanding of the Universe. He was one of those who played a key role in the early development of radio astronomy both in Australia and the United States.

Kellermann, Ken I.; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce

156

Research on Haystack radiometer, 20-24 GHz maser, and radio astronomy programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the first half of 1973, the Haystack antenna was utilized 76% of the time. Of this useful time, 72% was devoted to radio astronomy observing, 5% was spent on radar-related research and 23% went into maintenance and system improvements. Twenty-eight new radio astronomy programs were accepted, eight of which were completed during the period. One new radar program, topographic observations of Mars, was started in June and will be completed early in 1974. Fourteen programs continued from the previous period were also defined as complete. As of 1 July, 28 ratio observing programs were in a continuing status on the Haystack books. Four radar projects were also continuing. The 20-24 GHz maser development described in the preceding report progressed very well during an on-antenna test phase which began early in the year, but which terminated unfortunately in June with the complete loss of gain in the maser. Investigation of this problem is in progress. During this on-antenna test phase, the most sensitive water vapor observing capability which has yet become available was demonstrated.

1973-01-01

157

Moon-based Very Long-Wavelength Radio Astronomy Facility: science drives and technological challenges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific laboratories at manned and un-manned Moon bases are top priorities for the next wave of exploratory missions. Environmental conditions on the Moon are beneficial for various types of experimental research. Very Long Wavelength radio Astronomy (VLWA) is among the most attractive scientific disciplines for the suit of Moon-based laboratories. Space science has revolutionised astronomy by opening up several hitherto inaccessible windows in the spectrum. The opening of each new spectral window has resulted in unexpected discoveries and made it possible to obtain a comprehensive picture of physical processes in celestial sources. One of the last remaining unexplored regions of the spectrum is at the lowest radio frequencies. Radio emission below 15 MHz (wavelengths longer than 20 m) is inaccessible from the Earth surface due to absorption and scattering in the ionosphere. Unique new science areas for VLWA studies include: (i)Investigation of radio sky at so far inaccessible regime of electromagnetic radiation; (ii) Cosmological "experiments" with "fossil" relativistic electrons; (iii) Investigation of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays via VLWA emission from particle interactions with the Moon; (iv) Solar system "weather", including coronal mass ejections, (v) Searches for Jupiter-like exoplanets. In addition to the astrophysical tasks mentioned above, the VLWA facility on the Moon can be implemented as a Wide Area Network, as pioneered by the Earth-based Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). This allows the inclusion of other sensors, such as seismic detectors to conduct selenological studies. The LOFAR is being constructed in the Netherlands. It will operate in the frequency range 20 - 220 MHz. Several other projects will aim at addressing cosmological problems by studying the Universe at the range of frequencies below 100 MHz. These and other new radio astronomy facilities will lay the scientific and technological ground for VLWA in space. We will present a multi-step approach toward creating a permanent VLWA observatory on the Moon. Its first phase would include a demonstrator to be deployed as a small-scale scientific payload onboard one of the lunar missions of the next decade. A concept of an affordable fullscale observatory will be presented in the context of a long-term Moon exploration programme.

Gurvits, Leonid

158

The Telescope Program for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief account is given of the initiation of the feasibility study on the establishment and operation of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The principal research facilities will be the radio telescopes, and a series of such telescopes have been proposed. The desired performance characteristics are reviewed. A 140-foot steerable paraboloid on an equatorial mount

R. M. Emberson; N. L. Ashton

1958-01-01

159

A Low-Frequency Distributed Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy in Space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The frequency band below 30 MHz is one of the last unexplored bands in radio astronomy. This band is well suited for studying the early cosmos at high hydrogen redshifts, the so-called dark ages, extragalactic surveys, (extra) solar planetary bursts, and high energy particle physics. In addition, space research such as space weather tomography, are also areas of scientific interest. Due to ionospheric scintillation (below 30MHz) and its opaqueness (below 15MHz), earth-bound radio astronomy observations in these bands are either severely limited in sensitivity and spatial resolution or entirely impossible. A radio telescope in space obviously would not be hampered by the Earth's ionosphere. In the past, several (limited) studies have been conducted to explore possibilities for such an array in space. These studies considered aperture synthesis arrays in space, at the back-side of the Moon, or a satellite constellation operating in a coherent mode. In 2009 an ESA project, Distributed Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy in Space (DARIS), set out to investigate the space-based radio telescope concept. The focus of this feasibility study is on a moderate size three-dimensional satellite constellation operating as a coherent large aperture synthesis array. This aperture synthesis array would consist of 5 to 50 antennas (satellites) having a maximum separation of 100 km. This study considers the main aspects of such a distributed system in more detail than previous studies. This conference contribution aims at presenting an overview of the DARIS project and at discussing the main results. The project selected extra-galactic surveys and the search for transient radio sources as the best suited science cases within the DARIS concept, and it investigated the scientific and technical requirements for such an array. Several antenna concepts were considered and simulated. An active antenna dipole array concept would be well suited, and a moderate 5 m tip-tip antenna system would lead to a sky noise limited system. Multiple digital signal processing scenarios were considered. Ultimately, although a distributed signal processing approach would be fa-vorable in terms of reliability and scalability, for complexity reasons the project has chosen to have several (5 to 50) identical receiving nodes, and one centralized processing node i.e. the correlator. Analysis has shown that with current technologies, one MHz bandwidth can be processed with full duty cycle. The limiting factor is the inter-satellite link bandwidth. Several deployment locations, such as Moon orbit, Earth-Moon L2, and dynamic Solar orbits were investigated. Each of those locations has its pro's and con's such as interference levels from the Earth (which drive the number of sampling bits), relative speed-vectors of the satellite nodes (influencing maximum correlator integration times, and the need for orbit maintenance), and achievable down-link bandwidth to Earth. Two preferred deployment location were selected: Moon orbit and dynamic Solar orbit. The main advantage of the Moon orbit is that the syn-thetic aperture is filled more rapidly, making it more suitable for transient science than the dynamic Solar orbit. The project also studied the relation between the three-dimensional satellite configuration, the deployment location and the quality of the sky maps. The conclusion is that for the science cases under consideration, sufficient independent aperture sampling points can be obtained in a 1 MHz limited band (with 1 kHz channels) by using bandwidth synthesis. It is expected that, as a result, up to about one million astronomical sources can be detected in a five year duration mission.

Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Saks, Noah; Falcke, Heino; Klein-Wolt, Marc; Bentum, Ark; Thilak Rajan, Raj; Wijnholds, Ir. Stefan J.; Arts, Michel; van-T Klooster, Kees; Belien, Frederik

160

Radio Synthesis Imaging - A High Performance Computing and Communications Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Science Foundation has funded a five-year High Performance Computing and Communications project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) for the direct implementation of several of the computing recommendations of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee (the "Bahcall report"). This paper is a summary of the project goals and a progress report. The project will implement a prototype of the next generation of astronomical telescope systems - remotely located telescopes connected by high-speed networks to very high performance, scalable architecture computers and on-line data archives, which are accessed by astronomers over Gbit/sec networks. Specifically, a data link has been installed between the BIMA millimeter-wave synthesis array at Hat Creek, California and NCSA at Urbana, Illinois for real-time transmission of data to NCSA. Data are automatically archived, and may be browsed and retrieved by astronomers using the NCSA Mosaic software. In addition, an on-line digital library of processed images will be established. BIMA data will be processed on a very high performance distributed computing system, with I/O, user interface, and most of the software system running on the NCSA Convex C3880 supercomputer or Silicon Graphics Onyx workstations connected by HiPPI to the high performance, massively parallel Thinking Machines Corporation CM-5. The very computationally intensive algorithms for calibration and imaging of radio synthesis array observations will be optimized for the CM-5 and new algorithms which utilize the massively parallel architecture will be developed. Code running simultaneously on the distributed computers will communicate using the Data Transport Mechanism developed by NCSA. The project will also use the BLANCA Gbit/s testbed network between Urbana and Madison, Wisconsin to connect an Onyx workstation in the University of Wisconsin Astronomy Department to the NCSA CM-5, for development of long-distance distributed computing. Finally, the project is developing 2D and 3D visualization software as part of the international AIPS++ project. This research and development project is being carried out by a team of experts in radio astronomy, algorithm development for massively parallel architectures, high-speed networking, database management, and Thinking Machines Corporation personnel. The development of this complete software, distributed computing, and data archive and library solution to the radio astronomy computing problem will advance our expertise in high performance computing and communications technology and the application of these techniques to astronomical data processing.

Crutcher, Richard M.

161

The Radio Language Arts Project: adapting the radio mathematics model.  

PubMed

Kenya's Radio Language Arts Project, directed by the Academy for Educational Development in cooperation with the Kenya Institute of Education in 1980-85, sought to teach English to rural school children in grades 1-3 through use of an intensive, radio-based instructional system. Daily 1/2 hour lessons are broadcast throughout the school year and supported by teachers and print materials. The project further was aimed at testing the feasibility of adaptation of the successful Nicaraguan Radio Math Project to a new subject area. Difficulties were encountered in articulating a language curriculum with the precision required for a media-based instructional system. Also a challenge was defining the acceptable regional standard for pronunciation and grammar; British English was finally selected. An important modification of the Radio Math model concerned the role of the teacher. While Radio Math sought to reduce the teacher's responsibilities during the broadcast, Radio Language Arts teachers played an important instructional role during the English lesson broadcasts by providing translation and checks on work. Evaluations of the Radio language Arts Project suggest significant gains in speaking, listening, and reading skills as well as high levels of satisfaction on the part of parents and teachers. PMID:12341671

Christensen, P R

1985-01-01

162

Development of an Experimental Phased Array Feed System and Algorithms for Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phased array feeds (PAFs) are a promising new technology for astronomical radio telescopes. While PAFs have been used in other fields, the demanding sensitivity and calibration requirements in astronomy present unique new challenges. This dissertation presents some of the first astronomical PAF results demonstrating the lowest noise temperature and highest sensitivity at the time (66 Kelvin and 3.3 m^2/K, respectively), obtained using a narrowband (425 kHz bandwidth)prototype array of 19 linear co-polarized L-band dipoles mounted at the focus of the Green Bank 20 Meter Telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia. Results include spectral line detection of hydroxyl (OH) sources W49N and W3OH, and some of the first radio camera images made using a PAF, including an image of the Cygnus X region. A novel array Y-factor technique for measuring the isotropic noise response of the array is shown along with experimental measurements for this PAF. Statistically optimal beamformers (Maximum SNR and MVDR) are used throughout the work. Radio-frequency interference (RFI) mitigation is demonstrated experimentally using spatial cancelation with the PAF. Improved RFI mitigation is achieved in the challenging cases of low interference-to-noise ratio (INR) and moving interference by combining subspace projection (SP) beamforming with a polynomial model to track a rank 1 subspace. Limiting factors in SP are investigated including sample estimation error, subspace smearing, noise bias, and spectral scooping; each of these factors is overcome with the polynomial model and prewhitening. Numerical optimization leads to the polynomial subspace projection (PSP) method, and least-squares fitting to the series of dominant eigenvectors over a series of short term integrations (STIs) leads to the eigenvector polynomial subspace projection (EPSP) method. Expressions for the gradient, Hessian, and Jacobian are given for use in numerical optimization. Results are given for simulated and experimental data, demonstrating deeper beampattern nulls by 6 to 30dB. To increase the system bandwidth toward the hundreds of MHz bandwidth required by astronomers for a fully science-ready instrument, an FPGA digital backend is introduced using a 64-input analog-to-digital converter running at 50 Msamp/sec and the ROACH processing board developed at the University of California, Berkeley. International efforts to develop digital back ends for large antenna arrays are considered, and a road map is proposed for development of a hardware correlator/beamformer at BYU using three ROACH boards communicating over 10 gigabit Ethernet.

Landon, Jonathan C.

163

Adventures in Radio Astronomy Instrumentation and Signal Processing  

E-print Network

using radio telescopes. Modern radio telescopes have significant digital signal processing demands of spectrometers for enabling improved pulsar2 sci- ence on the Allen Telescope Array, the Hartebeesthoek Radio Observatory telescope, the Nan¸cay Radio Telescope, and the Parkes Radio Telescope. We also present work

Masci, Frank

164

Adventures in Radio Astronomy Instrumentation and Signal Processing  

E-print Network

- tizing and processing analogue astronomical signals collected using radio telescopes. Modern radio pulsar2 sci- ence on the Allen Telescope Array, the Hartebeesthoek Radio Observatory telescope, the Nan¸cay Radio Telescope, and the Parkes Radio Telescope. We also present work that we conducted

California at Berkeley, University of

165

Infrared Submillimeter and Radio Astronomy Research and Analysis Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This program entitled "Infrared Submillimeter and Radio Astronomy Research and Analysis Program" with NASA-Ames Research Center (ARC) was proposed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) to cover three years. Due to funding constraints only the first year installment of $18,436 was funded, but this funding was spread out over two years to try to maximize the benefit to the program. During the tenure of this contact, the investigators at the SAO, Drs. Wesley A. Traub and Nathaniel P. Carleton, worked with the investigators at ARC, Drs. Jesse Bregman and Fred Wittebom, on the following three main areas: 1. Rapid scanning SAO and ARC collaborated on purchasing and constructing a Rapid Scan Platform for the delay arm of the Infrared-Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) interferometer on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. The Rapid Scan Platform was tested and improved by the addition of stiffening plates which eliminated a very small but noticeable bending of the metal platform at the micro-meter level. 2. Star tracking Bregman and Wittebom conducted a study of the IOTA CCD-based star tracker system, by constructing a device to simulate star motion having a specified frequency and amplitude of motion, and by examining the response of the tracker to this simulated star input. 3. Fringe tracking. ARC, and in particular Dr. Robert Mah, developed a fringe-packet tracking algorithm, based on data that Bregman and Witteborn obtained on IOTA. The algorithm was tested in the laboratory at ARC, and found to work well for both strong and weak fringes.

Traub, Wesley A.

2000-01-01

166

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. January 1, 2010  

E-print Network

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation Opportunity Non-Discrimination and Harassment Statement The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is committed discriminatory practices, including sexual harassment. The Observatory will take affirmative action to ensure

Groppi, Christopher

167

Surfing Long Waves of the Universe... ...The National Radio Astronomy Observatory in the 21st Century  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN 2006, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) passed the 50-year point in its service to the astronomical community\\u000a and now looks forward to an exciting future as one of the worlds premier resources for answering the key questions that challenge\\u000a 21st-century astronomy and physics. Todays world-class suite of NRAO telescopes provides unique and powerful capabilities\\u000a for frontier research. Combined

David Finley

168

Investigation on the Frequency Allocation for Radio Astronomy at the L Band  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the frequency allocation reserved for radio astronomy in the L band set by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), which is between 1400 and 1427 MHz, is reviewed. We argue that the nearby frequencies are still very important for radio astronomers on the ground by investigating radio objects (H i sources) around 1300-1500 MHz. The L-band window is separated into a group of four windows, namely 1400-1427 MHz (window A), 1380-1400 MHz (window B), 1350-1380 MHz (window C), and 1300-1350 MHz (window D). These windows are selected according to their redshifts from a rest frequency for hydrogen spectral line at 1420.4057 MHz. Radio objects up to z ? 0.1 or frequency down to 1300 MHz are examined. We argue that since window B has important radio objects within the four windows, this window should also be given to radio astronomy. They are galaxies, spiral galaxies, and galaxy clusters. This underlines the significance of window B for radio astronomers on the ground. By investigating the severeness of radio frequency interference (RFI) within these windows, we have determined that window B still has significant, consistent RFI. The main RFI sources in the four windows have also been identified. We also found that the Department of Civil Aviation of Malaysia is assigned a frequency range of 1215-1427 MHz, which is transmitted within the four windows and inside the protected frequency for radio astronomy. We also investigated the RFI in the four windows on proposed sites of future radio astronomy observatories in Malaysia and Thailand and found the two best sites as Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI) and Ubon Ratchathani, respectively. It has also been determined that RFI in window B increases with population density.

Abidin, Z. Z.; Umar, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Rosli, Z.; Asanok, K.; Gasiprong, N.

2013-09-01

169

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. January 1, 2010  

E-print Network

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation Plan Veteran Non-Discrimination Statement It is the policy of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Furthermore, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory will solicit the cooperation and support of all

Groppi, Christopher

170

The Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project: Online Labs for Introductory Level Astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project site provides high quality applets simulating important astrophysical phenomena such as eclipsing binaries, stellar evolution on the H-R diagram, lunar phases, planetary orbits, planetary motion, and planetary obliquity. Instructions, simulations, and explorations are provided for both the student and instructor including assessment.

Lee, Kevin M.

2004-12-23

171

The NRAO Green Bank Site is a unique resource for Radio Astronomy. We are located in the National Radio Quiet Zone (NRQZ) which provides protection from permanent, fixed, licensed transmitter services. Our location,  

E-print Network

· National Radio Astronomy Observatory Continuted on back #12;In Zone 1, the "ground zero" of our instrumentsThe NRAO Green Bank Site is a unique resource for Radio Astronomy. We are located in the National to protect observations. Additionally, the West Virginia Radio Astronomy Zoning Act allows us to prohibit

Groppi, Christopher

172

Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy observations near Jupiter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results are reported from the first low frequency radio receiver to be transported into the Jupiter magnetosphere. Dramatic new information was obtained both because Voyager was near or in Jupiter's radio emission sources and also because it was outside the relatively dense solar wind plasma of the inner solar system. Extensive radio arcs, from above 30 MHz to about 1

J. W. Warwick; J. B. Pearce; A. C. Riddle; J. K. Alexander; M. D. Desch; M. L. Kaiser; J. R. Thieman; T. B. Carr; S. Gulkis; A. Boischot; C. C. Harvey; B. M. Pedersen

1979-01-01

173

SOFIA Project: SOFIA-Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A viewgraph presentation on the SOFIA project is shown. The topics include: 1) Aircraft Information; 2) Major Components of SOFIA; 3) Aircraft External View; 4) Airborne Observatory Layout; 5) Telescope Assembly; 6) Uncoated Primary Mirror; 7) Airborne Astronomy; 8) Requirements & Specifications; 9) Technical Challenges; 10) Observatory Operation; and 11) SOFIA Flight Test.

Tseng, Ting

2007-01-01

174

Supporting the Outdoor Classroom: An Archaeo-Astronomy Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Field trips and the outdoor classroom are a vital part of many areas of education. Ideally, the content should be taught within a realistic environment rather than just by providing a single field trip at the end of a course. The archaeo-astronomy project located at Nottingham Trent University envisages the development of a virtual environment

Brown, Daniel; Francis, Robert; Alder, Andy

2013-01-01

175

Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project: Planetary Orbit Simulator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation illustrates the physics of planetary orbits. The user can control the size and orbital path of the orbit. Each of Kepler's three laws and aspects of Newton's Law are each demonstrated. Velocity and acceleration vectors can be displayed, as well as the axes of the orbit. Instructor resources are available including student manuals, assessment materials, and a list of the assumptions used. This resource is part of a larger collection of online labs for introductory astronomy.See Related Materials for a link to the full collection.

Lee, Kevin M.

2007-12-20

176

A Low-Frequency Distributed Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy in Space  

Microsoft Academic Search

The frequency band below 30 MHz is one of the last unexplored bands in radio astronomy. This band is well suited for studying the early cosmos at high hydrogen redshifts, the so-called dark ages, extragalactic surveys, (extra) solar planetary bursts, and high energy particle physics. In addition, space research such as space weather tomography, are also areas of scientific interest.

Albert-Jan Boonstra; Noah Saks; Heino Falcke; Marc Klein-Wolt; Ark Bentum; Raj Thilak Rajan; Ir. Stefan J. Wijnholds; Michel Arts; Kees van-T Klooster; Frederik Belien

2010-01-01

177

Tectonic motion site survey of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, West Virginia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A geological and geophysical site survey was made of the area around the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) to determine whether there are at present local tectonic movements that could introduce significant errors to Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) geodetic measurements. The site survey consisted of a literature search, photogeologic mapping with Landsat and Skylab photographs, a field reconnaissance, and

W. J. Webster Jr.; R. J. Allenby; L. K. Hutton; P. D. Lowman Jr.; H. A. Tiedemann

1979-01-01

178

The Inwood Astronomy Project: Ready for IYA 2009  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Inwood Astronomy Project begins its mission of "100 Nights of Astronomy", an outreach program for the IYA 2009 in New York City. While the city lights may at first glance be a major deterrent to amateur and educational night-sky viewing, the author describes numerous community-based initiatives designed to fit into a racially and ethnically diverse neighborhood of Northern Manhattan and the Bronx, which all give a deeper understanding and appreciation of and for the night sky. The author presents ways for professional astronomers to use their light-polluted cities and towns for the same purpose.

Shilling Kendall, Jason

2009-01-01

179

Outer planets grand tours: Planetary radio astronomy team report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Requirements related to scientific observations of planetary radio emissions during outer planets grand tours are discussed. Observations at low frequencies where non-thermal cooperative plasma phenomena play a major role are considered for determining dynamical processes and magnetic fields near a planet. Magnetic field measurements by spacecraft magnetometers, and by radio receivers in their harmonic modes are proposed for interpretation of planetary radio emission.

Warwick, J. W.

1972-01-01

180

New Mexico Fiber-Optic Link Marks Giant Leap Toward Future of Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SOCORRO, NM -- Scientists and engineers at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) have made a giant leap toward the future of radio astronomy by successfully utilizing the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in conjunction with an antenna of the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) using the longest fiber-optic data link ever demonstrated in radio astronomy. The 65-mile fiber link will allow scientists to use the two National Science Foundation (NSF) facilities together in real time, and is the first step toward expanding the VLA to include eight proposed new radio-telescope antennas throughout New Mexico. LEFT: Miller Goss, NRAO's director of VLA/VLBA Operations, unveils graphic showing success of the Pie Town-VLA fiber link. The project, funded by the NSF and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), which operates NRAO for the NSF, links the VLA and the VLBA antenna in Pie Town, NM, using a Western New Mexico Telephone Co. fiber-optic cable. The successful hookup was announced at a ceremony that also marked the 10th anniversary of NRAO's Operations Center in Socorro. "Linking the Pie Town antenna to the VLA quadruples the VLA's ability to make detailed images of astronomical objects," said Paul Vanden Bout, NRAO's Director. "This alone makes the link an advance for science, but its greater importance is that it clearly demonstrates the technology for improving the VLA's capabilities even more in the future." "Clearly, the big skies and wide open spaces in New Mexico create near perfect conditions for the incredible astronomical assets located in our state. This new fiber-optic link paves the way for multiplying the already breathtaking scientific capabilities of the VLA," Senator Pete Domenici (R-NM) said. The VLA is a system of 27 radio-telescope antennas distributed over the high desert west of Socorro, NM, in the shape of a giant "Y." Made famous in movies, commercials and numerous published photos, the VLA has been one of the most productive and versatile astronomical observatories in the world since its dedication in 1980. The VLBA is a continent-wide system of 10 radio telescopes distributed across the continental United States, Hawaii and St. Croix in the Caribbean. In both the VLA and VLBA, the cosmic radio waves received by each antenna are combined with those received from every other antenna in the system to produce images with extremely great resolving power, or ability to see fine detail. The more widely separated the antennas, the greater the resolving power. The greatest separation between antennas of the VLA is 20 miles; in the VLBA, 5,000 miles. If your eyes could see the same level of detail as the VLA, you could, at the distance from New York to Los Angeles, make out an object the size of a small car. With the resolving power of the VLBA, you could read the owner's manual. The VLBA can make images hundreds of times more detailed than those available from the Hubble Space Telescope. However, because of the way in which such multi-antenna radio telescopes, called interferometers, work, there is a gap between the levels of detail obtainable with the VLA and the VLBA. Linking the VLA to the VLBA Pie Town antenna is the first step toward filling in that gap and allowing astronomers to see all scales of structure -- small, medium-sized, and large -- in objects such as stars, galaxies and quasars. Additional antennas, distributed throughout New Mexico, would fully fill that gap. Adding the new antennas to the VLA "would provide the capability to image astronomical objects on all spatial scales, from the very largest to the very smallest. The combination of the VLA and VLBA then would be the only single instrument in astronomy covering such a range of spatial scales, and thus a tool of great and unique value to science," said Vanden Bout. LEFT: NRAO Director Paul Vanden Bout, left, speaks with U.S. Senator Pete Domenici, right, following the ceremony at the Array Operations Center in Socorro Dec. 15. Nobel Laureate Robert Wilson is in the ba

1998-12-01

181

The Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project: Watch Out FCI!  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With funding from the NSF, a multidisciplinary team at the University of New Mexico transformed Astro 101 from a mostly descriptive to a highly-focused conceptual course based on cognitive models of adult learning. By 1996, we had developed a mature implementation, which required alternative assessment tools. One of these, an Astronomy Diagnostic Test version 1 (ADT), was based on misconceptions research in astronomy, and demonstrated large and robust gains with hundreds of participants at UNM. To improve the ADT and expand its use, we formed the Consortium for Astronomy Education Research (CAER) to develop ADT version 2, which was released in June 1999. With additional NSF funding, we kicked off the ADT National Project, which has so far included over 5000 students in the pretest and almost 4000 in the posttest. I will present selected results from ADT 1 and 2, which now has a database almost as extensive as that of the Force Concept Inventory (FCI).

Zeilik, Michael; Deming, Grace L.; Hufnagel, Beth

2002-04-01

182

Astro-Venture Astronomy Unit: Final Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson about habitable planets. Learners will discuss what they know about the astronomical conditions of the planets they have found in earlier lessons and what they still need to know in order to determine if they are habitable to humans. They research possible methods for answering these questions and write a proposal on how and why their planet should be further researched. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson 14, the concluding lesson, in the Astro-Venture Astronomy Unit. The lessons are designed for educators to use in conjunction with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

183

Instrumental and Observational Studies in Radio Astronomy, Low Noise Amplifier Design and Methanol Maser Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

``Radio astronomy is the study of the universe by observing electromagnetic radiation after it has been amplified. The use of amplifiers that preserve the oscillatory character of radiation - the phase information - is the mark of Radio astronomy.'' Thus, the development of low noise amplifiers for microwave and millimeter wavelengths is a major part of Radio astronomy as important as the observations themselves. This technical report involves those two aspects of Radio astronomy, the observational and technical aspects. In the first part, observations of methanol masers in massive star forming regions using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) are presented. The second part concerns the realization of low noise amplifiers using in a radio camera. Recent observations have confirmed that the methanol masers are powerful tools for probing the regions of massive star formation. The methanol masers fall in two distinct classes related to their location in the star forming regions. Class I methanol masers are observed offset far away from the UC HII region emission peak. They are certainly collisionally pumped and may occur in the interface between high velocity gas outflows and the ambient molecular material. Class II methanol masers coincide with the UC HII region emission. They may be radiatively pumped by FIR radiation from the dust grains and reside either in spherical layers surrounding the UC HII regions or in circumstellar discs. The maser spots are usually compact (~1-10 AU) and lie in region of physical conditions n(H)~104-108 cm-3 and T=100-1000 K. CH3OH may be produced by hydrogenation of CO on the surface of the icy mantles of the dust grains . The methanol is then injected in the molecular gas by evaporation of the ice (n(H)=106 cm-3, T=100-300 K). In this report we present VLBI observations of 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol masers in the star forming regions NGC7538, W75N and S252. Our results show the existence of two groups of masers in NGC7538. The first group exhibits a linear velocity gradient and forms a line in our VLBI map which is consistent with a rotating disc of masers seen edge-on around a massive star. The second group of masers are blueshifted with respect to the first group and lie in a conical region south of the inferred disc. We argue that these masers probably arise in an outflow emerging approximately perpendicularly to the disc. We find that the maser positions at 6.7 and 12.2 GHz are coincident and those of the second group correspond approximately to the absolute positions of NH3, H2CO and OH masers associated with the radio-continuum and infrared source NGC7538-IRS1. In addition we find similar evidence for circumstellar discs of masers in W75N and S252. For these three sources associated with ultra compact HII regions, from the linear velocity gradients and assuming that the central protostars are massive, we derive that the radii of the circumstellar discs are in the range 300-1200 AU which is typical of protoplanetary discs. In the second part, we present the design and realization of 4 GHz cryogenic low noise amplifiers used as IF amplifiers in a radio-camera receiver (SISYFOS project) which will be installed in the Onsala 20m millimeter wave telescope. The requirements of the SISYFOS project at cryogenic temperature are a minimum gain of 25 dB and noise equivalent temperature less than 10 K over the frequency range 3.4-4.6 GHz. Because of its low noise and high gain properties, the MGF4310E series super low noise HEMT from Mitsubishi have been selected to satisfy these requirements. We show that a very simple input design using a high impedance series line viewed as a series inductor provides good matching over a broad bandwidth while ensuring the stability of the amplifier. The minimum noise equivalent temperature and gain of the amplifier measured at cryogenic ambient temperature over the specified bandwidth are 7 K and 28 dB respectively.

Minier, V.

1998-10-01

184

Astronomy Remote Observing Research Projects of US High School Students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to address the challenging climate for promoting astronomy education in the high schools we have used astronomy projects to give students authentic research experiences in order to encourage their pursuit of science and technology careers. Initially, we conducted teacher workshops to develop a cadre of teachers who have been instrumental in recruiting students to work on projects. Once identified, these students have been motivated to conduct astronomy research projects with appropriate guidance. Some have worked on these projects during non-school hours and others through a research course. The goal has been for students to meet the objectives of inquiry-based learning, a major US National Science Standard. Case studies will be described using event-based learning with the NASA Deep Impact mission. Hawaii students became active participants investigating comet properties through the NASA Deep Impact mission. The Deep Impact Education and Public Outreach group developed materials which were used by our students. After learning how to use image processing software, these students obtained Comet 9P/ Tempel 1 images in real time from the remote observing Faulkes Telescope North located on Haleakala, Maui for their projects. Besides conducting event-based projects which are time critical, Oregon students have worked on galaxies and sunspots projects. For variable star research, they used images obtained from the remote observing offline mode of Lowell Telescope located in Flagstaff, Arizona. Essential to these projects has been consistent follow-up required for honing skills in observing, image processing, analysis, and communication of project results through Science Fair entries. Key to our success has been the network of professional and amateur astronomers and educators collaborating in a multiplicity of ways to mentor our students. This work-in-progress and process will be shared on how to inspire students to pursue careers in science and technology with these projects.

Kadooka, M.; Meech, K. J.

2006-08-01

185

New Book Recounts Exciting, Colorful History Of Radio Astronomy in Green Bank, West Virginia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new book published by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) tells the story of the founding and early years of the Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. But it was Fun: the first forty years of radio astronomy at Green Bank, is not a formal history, but rather a scrapbook of early memos, recollections, anecdotes and reports. But it was Fun... is liberally illustrated with archival photographs. It includes historical and scientific papers from symposia held in 1987 and 1995 to celebrate the birthdays of two of the radio telescopes at the Observatory. Book cover The National Radio Astronomy Observatory was formed in 1956 after the National Science Foundation decided to establish an observatory in the eastern United States for the study of faint radio signals from distant objects in the Universe. But it was Fun... reprints early memos from the group of scientists who searched the mountains for a suitable site -- an area free from radio transmitters and other sources of radio interference -- "in a valley surrounded by as many ranges of high mountains in as many directions as possible," which was "at least 50 miles distant from any city or other concentration of people." The committee settled on Green Bank, a small village in West Virginia, and the book documents the struggles that followed to create a world-class scientific facility in an isolated area more accustomed to cows than computers. Groundbreaking at the Observatory, then a patchwork of farms and fields, took place in October 1957, only a few days after the launch of Sputnik by the Soviet Union. A year later, Green Bank's first telescope was dedicated, and the book contains a transcription of speeches given at that ceremony, when the Cold War, the space race and America's scientific stature were issues of the hour. The centerpiece of the new Observatory was to be a highly-precise radio telescope 140 feet in diameter, but it was expected that it would soon be surpassed by dishes of much greater size. The book reprints internal memos, reports, and recollections of astronomers who were there, as the initial elation turned to frustration when the 140 Foot Telescope project became mired in technical difficulties, plans for larger dishes were put on hold, and the scientific staff of the fledgling Observatory struggled to create a National Observatory with inadequate equipment in a very remote location. Articles by David Heeschen and John Findlay tell the story of the creation of the 300 Foot Telescope, at that time the largest in the world, which went from initial concept to full operation in only 23 months, and began a rich life of research that put the NRAO on the world scientific map. The 300 Foot Telescope was originally intended to be an interim instrument, but as documented in the book, demand for its use was so high that it was kept in operation long after its initial planned retirement, with regular upgrades and new generations of electronics. The sudden collapse of the 300 Foot Telescope on a calm evening after 26 years of operation shocked the astronomical community. But it was Fun... features dramatic first-hand accounts by the people who were there that night: the telescope operator who found himself under a falling structure; the Observatory staff who at first could not believe what happened, and those who worked during the night and into the next day to secure the area, preserve information on what happened, and deal with the rush of publicity. The book includes extensive photographs and the Executive Summary Report of the panel which was commissioned to investigate the collapse and its implication for the design of other large radio telescopes. But it was Fun... will appeal to a variety of audiences. Historians of science will be interested in the articles by David Heeschen, Gerald Tape, and Hugh van Horn, on the evolution of the concept of a National Observatory, and the difficulties of putting the concepts into practice in Green Bank. Those interested in astronomical discovery will find fascinating and highly personal a

2007-07-01

186

Broadband beamforming of dense aperture array (DAA) and focal plane array (FPA) signals using 3D spatio-temporal filters for applications in aperture synthesis radio astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that 3D spatio-temporal filters have potential applications in aperture synthesis radio astronomy for the broadband-beamforming\\u000a of the array of signals that is received from dense aperture arrays (DAAs) and also from focal plane arrays (FPAs). In particular,\\u000a we consider possible applications for the planned Square Kilometer Array (SKA) project where broadband beamforming is required\\u000a at the front-end

Thushara K. Gunaratne; Len T. Bruton

2011-01-01

187

Present State of Projects at Zentrum fr Astronomie Heidelberg  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper serves as an update of the information given at LISA V about the projects undertaken at the Zentrum fr Astronomie. The preservation project at the Landessternwarte Heidelberg-Knigstuhl, since then, has scanned about 65% of the plates in the Bruce archive while the scanning at ARI is complete with the 344 Palomar plates. Recording the bibliographies has finished up to vol. 31 of the Astronomischer Jahresbericht, and we have scanned all 18 reels of microfilm of the Bibliography of Astronomy, 1881-1898.' Reexamination of the 1960-PLS survey plates with modern techniques yielded 46,216 measured positions of 5,127 Minor Planets which is an increase by a factor of about 2.5.

Burkhardt, G.

2010-10-01

188

Radio Astronomy at the Centre for High Performance Computing in South Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I will present results on galaxy evolution and cosmology which we obtained using the supercomputing facilities at the CHPC. These include cosmological-scale N-body simulations modelling neutral hydrogen as well as the study of the clustering of radio galaxies to probe the relationship between dark and luminous matter in the universe. I will also discuss the various roles that the CHPC is playing in Astronomy in SA, including the provision of HPC for a variety of Astronomical applications, the provision of storage for radio data, our educational programs and our participation in planning for the SKA.

Catherine Cress; UWC Simulation Team

2014-04-01

189

The Evolution of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory into a User Based Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NRAO was conceived in the mid 1950s as a state-of-the-art facility to allow the United States to compete in the exciting radio astronomy discoveries then taking place in the U.K., the Netherlands and Australia. Otto Struve, the first NRAO director in Green Bank, was chosen to lead the Observatory research program. During Struve's tenure as director, nearly all of

Kenneth I. Kellerman; E. Bouton

2006-01-01

190

Molecular Clouds in the Boston University--Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Boston University--Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (BU-FCRAO) Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) is a new survey of 13CO (1--0) emission covering Galactic longitudes 18 deg < l < 55.7 deg and Galactic latitudes |b| < 1 deg. Using the SEQUOIA array on the FCRAO 14m telescope, the GRS fully sampled the 13CO Galactic emission (46 arcsec angular resolution on a

A. M. Johnson; J. M. Rathborne; J. M. Jackson; R. Y. Shah; R. Simon

2005-01-01

191

Reference antenna-based subspace tracking for RFI mitigation in radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interference mitigation is becoming necessary to make radio astronomy work in bands that are heavily used to support our modern lives. It is becoming particularly difficult to work at frequencies between 1100 MHz and 1300 MHz that are rapidly filling up with satellite navigation signals. Antenna array radio telescopes present the possibility of applying spatial Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) mitigation. Spatial filtering techniques for RFI mitigation have been introduced to radio astronomy in the last decades. The success of these techniques relies on accurately estimating the RFI spatial signature (or RFI subspace). The use of a reference antenna steering at the RFI sources provides a good estimation of the RFI subspace when correlated with an array radio telescope. However, predicting the evolution of this subspace with time is necessary in a multiple RFI scenario, when only a single RFI source can be monitored at a time with the reference antenna. This paper introduces a subspace tracking approach, based on the power method applied to covariance data. The RFI spatial signature estimates provided by the reference antenna are used to initialize the power method to support a faster convergence. Practical examples are shown, applying the method to real data from a single 188 element phased array feed designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope.

Hellbourg, G.; Chippendale, A. P.; Kesteven, M. J.; Jeffs, B. D.

2014-12-01

192

Astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page contains links to one pagers on historical instruments of astronomy with photos of the following : Astronomy Slides, Celestial Globe, Cometarium, Globe, Gregorian Telescope, Kepler's Laws Demonstration, Orrery, Planetarium, Planisphere, Stereoscopic Pictures of the Moon, Tellurian, and Transit.

2000-01-01

193

Building information models for astronomy projects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Building Information Model is a digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a building. BIMs represent the geometrical characteristics of the Building, but also properties like bills of quantities, definition of COTS components, status of material in the different stages of the project, project economic data, etc. The BIM methodology, which is well established in the Architecture Engineering and Construction (AEC) domain for conventional buildings, has been brought one step forward in its application for Astronomical/Scientific facilities. In these facilities steel/concrete structures have high dynamic and seismic requirements, M&E installations are complex and there is a large amount of special equipment and mechanisms involved as a fundamental part of the facility. The detail design definition is typically implemented by different design teams in specialized design software packages. In order to allow the coordinated work of different engineering teams, the overall model, and its associated engineering database, is progressively integrated using a coordination and roaming software which can be used before starting construction phase for checking interferences, planning the construction sequence, studying maintenance operation, reporting to the project office, etc. This integrated design & construction approach will allow to efficiently plan construction sequence (4D). This is a powerful tool to study and analyze in detail alternative construction sequences and ideally coordinate the work of different construction teams. In addition engineering, construction and operational database can be linked to the virtual model (6D), what gives to the end users a invaluable tool for the lifecycle management, as all the facility information can be easily accessed, added or replaced. This paper presents the BIM methodology as implemented by IDOM with the E-ELT and ATST Enclosures as application examples.

Ario, Javier; Murga, Gaizka; Campo, Ramn; Eletxigerra, Iigo; Ampuero, Pedro

2012-09-01

194

Applications of Microwave Photonics in Radio Astronomy and Space Communication  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of narrow band vs wide band signals is given. Topics discussed included signal transmission, reference distribution and photonic antenna metrology. Examples of VLA, ALMA, ATA and DSN arrays are given. . Arrays of small antennas have become more cost-effective than large antennas for achieving large total aperture or gain, both for astronomy and for communication. It is concluded that emerging applications involving arrays of many antennas require low-cost optical communication of both wide bandwidth and narrow bandwidth; development of round-trip correction schemes enables timing precision; and free-space laser beams with microwave modulation allow structural metrology with approx 100 micrometer precision over distances of 200 meters.

D'Addario, Larry R.; Shillue, William P.

2006-01-01

195

A very low frequency radio astronomy observatory on the Moon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Because of terrestrial ionospheric absorption, very little is known of the radio sky beyond 10 m wavelength. An extremely simple, low cost very low frequency radio telescope is proposed, consisting of a large array of short wires laid on the lunar surface, each wire equipped with an amplifier and a digitizer, and connected to a common computer. The telescope could do simultaneous multifrequency observations of much of the visible sky with high resolution in the 10 to 100 m wavelength range, and with lower resolution in the 100 to 1000 m range. It would explore structure and spectra of galactic and extragalactic point sources, objects, and clouds, and would produce detailed quasi-three-dimensional mapping of interstellar matter within several thousand parsecs of the Sun.

Douglas, James N.; Smith, Harlan J.

1988-01-01

196

Scalable desktop visualisation of very large radio astronomy data cubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observation data from radio telescopes is typically stored in three (or higher) dimensional data cubes, the resolution, coverage and size of which continues to grow as ever larger radio telescopes come online. The Square Kilometre Array, tabled to be the largest radio telescope in the world, will generate multi-terabyte data cubes - several orders of magnitude larger than the current norm. Despite this imminent data deluge, scalable approaches to file access in Astronomical visualisation software are rare: most current software packages cannot read astronomical data cubes that do not fit into computer system memory, or else provide access only at a serious performance cost. In addition, there is little support for interactive exploration of 3D data. We describe a scalable, hierarchical approach to 3D visualisation of very large spectral data cubes to enable rapid visualisation of large data files on standard desktop hardware. Our hierarchical approach, embodied in the AstroVis prototype, aims to provide a means of viewing large datasets that do not fit into system memory. The focus is on rapid initial response: our system initially rapidly presents a reduced, coarse-grained 3D view of the data cube selected, which is gradually refined. The user may select sub-regions of the cube to be explored in more detail, or extracted for use in applications that do not support large files. We thus shift the focus from data analysis informed by narrow slices of detailed information, to analysis informed by overview information, with details on demand. Our hierarchical solution to the rendering of large data cubes reduces the overall time to complete file reading, provides user feedback during file processing and is memory efficient. This solution does not require high performance computing hardware and can be implemented on any platform supporting the OpenGL rendering library.

Perkins, Simon; Questiaux, Jacques; Finniss, Stephen; Tyler, Robin; Blyth, Sarah; Kuttel, Michelle M.

2014-07-01

197

Fast pulsars, strange stars: An opportunity in radio astronomy  

SciTech Connect

The world's data on radio pulsars is not expected to represent the underlying pulsar population because of a search bias against detection of short periods, especially below 1 ms. Yet pulsars in increasing numbers with periods right down to this limit have been discovered suggesting that there may be even shorter ones. If pulsars with periods below 1/2 ms were found, the conclusion that the confined hadronic phase of nucleons and nuclei is only metastable would be almost inescapable. The plausible ground state in that event is the deconfined phase of (3-flavor) strange-quark-matter. From the QCD energy scale this is as likely a ground state as the confined phase. We show that strange matter as the ground state is not ruled out by any known fact, and most especially not by the fact that the universe is in the confined phase. 136 refs.

Glendenning, N.K.

1990-07-15

198

Astronomy Beat: A New Project to Record and Present the "Behind the Scenes" Story of Astronomical Projects and Programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on a relatively new project at the ASP that captures the spirit of astronomy research and astronomy outreach projects while the key players are still alive. Every two weeks, the Society publishes an "Astronomy Beat" column, explaining new developments and new ideas. At first, only members of the ASP can see them, but with time, more of the columns are being made available on the Web and through the educational programs of the Society.

Manning, J.; Fraknoi, A.; Proudfit, L.

2012-08-01

199

Kothmale Community Radio Interorg Project: True Community Radio or Feel-Good Propaganda?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Kothmale Community Radio and Interorg project in Sri Lanka has been hailed as an example of how a community radio initiative should function in a developing nation. However, there is some question about whether the Kothmale Community Interorg Project is a true community radio initiative that empowers local communities to access ICT services

Harvey-Carter, Liz

2009-01-01

200

NASA IDEAS EPO Support of the School of Galactic Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) was awarded a STScI IDEAS Program grant to develop the School of Galactic Radio Astronomy (SGRA). SGRA enhances education of science, mathematics, and technology of students in grades 8-12. The purpose of SGRA is to teach the basics of scientific inquiry, which includes methodology, critical thinking, and communication of the results. To facilitate the excitement of science and discovery, teachers and students use the PARI 4.6m ``Smiley" radio telescope via the Internet. The IDEAS grant supported the development of the science curriculum and labs that use the 4.6m radio telescope, teacher workshops, and high speed internet service necessary for remote access to the radio telescope. Partnerships with Brevard High School , Furman University, and the University of North Carolina-Asheville have proven important to the success of the program. In addition, the IDEAS grant was important in our success in acquiring grants from the foundations at Z. Smith Reynolds and Progress Energy, a AAS Small Grant, and a STScI HST/EPO award to further enhance and continue the SGRA Program. More than 100 teachers are now involved in SGRA. To increase awareness of SGRA, we have presented the program at meetings of the AAS, North Carolina Science Teachers Association, the North Carolina Science Museum, and Pisgah Forest Institute summer workshops. Our experience in writing and carrying out the program, along with the NASA components in the program, teachers' comments, and lessons learned, will be presented. We are extremely grateful to the IDEAS Grant Program for helping PARI initiate and develop an exciting program of hands-on Internet radio astronomy from high school classrooms.

Castelaz, M.; Daugherty, J.; Moffett, D.; Case, J.

2005-05-01

201

Ambient and Cryogenic, Decade Bandwidth, Low Noise Receiving System for Radio Astronomy Using Sinuous Antenna  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traditionally, radio astronomy receivers have been limited to bandwidths less than an octave, and as a result multiple feeds and receivers are necessary to observe over a wide bandwidth. Next generation of instruments for radio astronomy will benefit greatly from reflector antenna feeds that demonstrate very wide instantaneous bandwidth, and exhibit low noise behavior. There is an increasing interest in wideband systems from both the cost and science point of view. A wideband feed will allow simultaneous observations or sweeps over a decade or more bandwidth. Instantaneous wide bandwidth is necessary for detection of short duration pulses. Future telescopes like square kilometer array (SKA), consisting of 2000 to 3000 coherently connected antennas and covering a frequency range of 70 MHz to 30 GHz, will need decade bandwidth single pixel feeds (SPFs) along with integrated LNAs to achieve the scientific objectives in a cost effective way. This dissertation focuses on the design and measurement of a novel decade bandwidth sinuous-type, dual linear polarized, fixed phase center, low loss feed with an integrated LNA. A decade bandwidth, low noise amplifier is specially designed for noise match to the higher terminal impedance encountered by this antenna yielding an improved sensitivity over what is possible with conventional 50 O amplifiers. The self-complementary, frequency independent nature of the planar sinuous geometry results in a nearly constant beam pattern and fixed phase center over more than a 10:1 operating frequency range. In order to eliminate the back-lobe response over such a wide frequency range, we have projected the sinuous pattern onto a cone, and a ground plane is placed directly behind the cone's apex. This inverted, conical geometry assures wide bandwidth operation by locating each sinuous resonator a quarter wavelength above the ground plane. The presence of a ground plane near a self complementary antenna destroys the self complementary nature of the composite structure resulting in frequency dependent impedance variations. We demonstrate, using simulations and measurements, how the return loss can be improved by modifying the sinuous geometry. The feed-LNA combination is characterized for important properties such as return loss, system noise, far field beam patterns including cross-polarization over a wide frequency range. The system is developed as a feed for a parabolic reflector. The overall system performance is calculated in terms of the A/Tsys ratio. A cryogenic version would have a direct impact on specialized observing applications requiring large instantaneous bandwidths with high sensitivity. A novel cryogenic implementation of this system is demonstrated using a Stirling cycle, one-stage refrigerator. The cryocooler offers advantages like low cost, light weight, small size, low power consumption, and does not require routine maintenance. The higher antenna input impedance and a balanced feeding method for the sinuous antenna offers a unique set of challenges when developing a cryogenic system.

Gawande, Rohit Sudhir

202

Astronomy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics

Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

203

Tectonic motion site survey of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, West Virginia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A geological and geophysical site survey was made of the area around the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) to determine whether there are at present local tectonic movements that could introduce significant errors to Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) geodetic measurements. The site survey consisted of a literature search, photogeologic mapping with Landsat and Skylab photographs, a field reconnaissance, and installation of a seismometer at the NRAO. It is concluded that local tectonic movement will not contribute significantly to VLBI errors. It is recommended that similar site surveys be made of all locations used for VLBI or laser ranging.

Webster, W. J., Jr.; Allenby, R. J.; Hutton, L. K.; Lowman, P. D., Jr.; Tiedemann, H. A.

1979-01-01

204

Popularization of Astronomy under Cooperation between Students and Educators in Japan: the TENPLA project (2)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tenpla project is a Japanese unique activity in popularization of astronomy under cooperation between students of astronomy, young astronomers, and social education facilities such as science museums (see also poster by M. Hiramatsu). In this paper, we report our individual activities for public in detail. Our aim is to provide bridges between astronomy and public, especially people who are unfamiliar with astronomy, directly by students and young astronomers at many scene of life such as in schools, cafs, or hospitals. Examples of our activities are as follows (1) Learning astronomy with local people, by local people, for local people. (2) Science cafs about astronomy at book stores, small restaurants and local airport. (3) Traveling lecture of astronomy for hospitalized children.

Kamegai, K.; Hiramatsu, M.; Takanashi, N.; Tsukada, K.

2006-08-01

205

The impact of JPEG2000 lossy compression on the scientific quality of radio astronomy imagery  

E-print Network

The sheer volume of data anticipated to be captured by future radio telescopes, such as, The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and its precursors present new data challenges, including the cost and technical feasibility of data transport and storage. Image and data compression are going to be important techniques to reduce the data size. We provide a quantitative analysis of the effects of JPEG2000's lossy wavelet image compression algorithm on the quality of the radio astronomy imagery data. This analysis is completed by evaluating the completeness, soundness and source parameterisation of the Duchamp source finder using compressed data. Here we found the JPEG2000 image compression has the potential to denoise image cubes, however this effect is only significant at high compression rates where the accuracy of source parameterisation is decreased.

Peters, Sean M

2014-01-01

206

DEPARTMENT OF ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS Special Astronomy Seminar  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS Special Astronomy Seminar October 13, 2011 Speaker : Mayukh) Abstract Black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) are widely observed sources in the X-ray and radio astronomy

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

207

The PACA Project : Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy (PACA) project is the next stage of evolution of the paradigm developed for the observational campaign of C/2012 S1 or C/ISON. Four different phases of collaboration are identified, and illustrate the integration of scientific investigations with amateur astronomer community via observations, and models; and the rapid dissemination of the results via a multitude of social media for rapid global access. The success of the paradigm shift in scientific research is now implemented in other comet observing campaigns. Both communities (scientific and amateur astronomers) benefit from these collective, collaborative partnerships; while outreach is the instantaneous deliverable that provides both a framework for future data analyses and the dissemination of the results. While PACA identifies a collaborative approach to pro-am collaborations, given the volume of data generated for each campaign, new ways of rapid data analysis, mining access and storage are needed.

Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

2014-04-01

208

Bringing Science into Schools through Astronomy. Project ASTRO, Tucson  

E-print Network

We report our experience in bringing science into US and French classrooms. We participated in the US scientific educational program Project ASTRO. It is based on a partnership between a school teacher and an astronomer. They together design and realize simple and interesting scientific activities for the children to learn and enjoy science. We present four hands-on activities we realized in a 4th-grade class (10 yr-old kids) in Tucson (USA) in 2002-2003. Among the covered topics were: the Solar System, the Sun (helioseismology) and the Galaxies. We also present a similar experience done in two classrooms in 2005, in Chatenay-Malabry (France) in partnership with an amateur astronomy association (Aphelie). This is a pleasant and rewarding activity, extremely well appreciated by the children and the school teachers. It furthermore promotes already at a young age the excitement of science, and provides concrete examples of the scientific methodology.

Caroline Barban; Herve Dole

2005-08-19

209

Canadian Astronomy Education: A Project by the Canadian Astronomical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Canadian Astronomical Society offers educational astronomy materials for teachers, students, youth organizations, and professional and amateur astronomers. Educators can find astronomy curriculum expectations for Canada, a list of science centers and observatories, activity ideas, lesson plans, star charts, and much more. The website features an informative biography of the astronomer of the month. Students can find an interactive tour of the universe and great tips to help them learn astronomy as well as information about astronomy careers, clubs, and science fairs. Novice astronomers can obtain guides about buying telescopes and observing. This high-quality site is sure to have appealing materials for all individuals interested in astronomy.

210

International Symposium on Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Radio Astronomy, Granada, Spain, September 11-14, 1984, Proceedings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various papers on millimeter and submillimeter wave radio astronomy are presented. The topics discussed include: the Nobeyama 45 m telescope, analysis of the time constants in the thermal model for the UK-NL millimeter wave telescope, new generation CFRP sub-mm telescope, the UA/MPIfR submillimeter telescope, telescope testing by radio holography, millimeter and submillimeter interferometry, the Caltech millimeter wave interferometer, the Nobeyama millimeter-wave interferometer, the IRAM interferometer, the SAO submillimeter telescope array project, at VLBI at 90 GHz. Also addressed are: superconducting and Schottky mixers, Caltech SIS receivers, IRAM SIS receivers, SIS mixer development at NRAO, a 2K closed cycle cryogenerator, phase-locked 65-115 GHz Gunn oscillator, bolometer systems developed at MPIfR, current far-infrared spectrometers, acoustooptical spectrometers, far-infrared heterodyne spectroscopy, spiral arm structure of molecular gas in M51, millimeter-wavelength interferometry of Orion-KL, density structure of molecular cloud cores, star formation in dense cores in nearby dark clouds, and extragalactic hot spots at mm wavelengths.

211

Background radio-frequency radiation and its impact on radio astronomy Michelle C. Storey, Bruce MacA Thomas and John M. Sarkissian  

E-print Network

. Inland Australia possesses areas that are still relatively radio-quiet compared to the rest of the world-quiet reserve exist in inland Australia. 1. Spectrum use and astronomy Recent satellite pictures have for example http://www.darksky.org/ida/images.html). This light obscures the night sky for many urban dwellers

Sarkissian, John M.

212

Terrestrial Interference Effects on Space-Based Low Frequency Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio astronomy observations in the HF (1-30 MHz) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum could result in new insights into astrophysical processes. However, this particular part of the spectrum is mostly inaccessible from the ground due to the effects of the Earth's ionosphere. One solution is to observe from Earth orbit, thereby avoiding most of the absorption and phase distortions from the ionosphere. However, in the 1-30 MHz band of interest, the ionosphere is neither a perfect reflector nor is it a perfect transmission medium. Terrestrial signals leak through and increase the background radio noise or introduce spurious signals into the measurements, making the detection of faint sources difficult. All terrestrial HF communications signals, especially over-the-horizon radar, are potential interferers to low frequency radio astronomy. Ideally, radio telescopes on the moon's far side would provide a perfectly shielded environment, but at much greater cost and difficulty than a similar system in Earth orbit. We are investigating methods of predicting signal strengths at the top of the ionosphere with respect to time, frequency, and solar behavior. Existing ionospheric models provide a description of the general, global state of the ionosphere. This information is used as an input to our ray-tracing software to predict the likelihood of leakage through the ionosphere. Sources are distributed in frequency, ray launch angles, and geographic location. Because of the ionosphere, rays can be focussed (increasing the interference intensity) or defocussed (decreasing the interference intensity). Plots of the ray paths from potential interferers, showing the focussing or defocussing effects will be presented. The collective effect of a number of widely separated interferers is to potentially increase the noise at the satellite location. The ultimate goal of this research is to determine if there exist temporal and frequency windows, where the radio leakage is on the order of the cosmic background noise, that permit high-resolution low-sensitivity radio astronomical measurements from Earth orbit. The final model should to be able to predict those times using solar and geophysical parameters.

Basart, J. P.; McCoy, M.

1994-05-01

213

Radio astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A K-band reflected-wave ruby maser was used on the 64-meter (DSS-43) antenna at the Tidbinbilla Tracking Station, near Canberra, Australia. Spectral line observations were carried out near 22 GHz for water vapor sources and near 24 GHz for ammonia sources. The water vapor observations were made in the direction of known southern OH and H2O maser sources. All of the previously detected water line sources examined were detected. In addition, two new water vapor maser sources were discovered, G301.1+1.1and G308.9+0.1. The spectrum of G301.0+1.1 is presented six ammonia sources were found: G291.3-0.7, G305.4+0.2, G322.2+0.6, G327.3-0.5, G333.6-0.2, and G268.4-0.8. Spectra of two of these sources, G291.3-0.7 (RCW 57) and G305.4+0.2, are presented. Both show clearly the presence of the quadrupole splitting satellite lines that will allow the determination of NH3 optical depths in these clouds.

Shaffer, R. D.; Mccluskey, J. T.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M.; Kuiper, T.

1981-01-01

214

Project CLEA - The Moons of Jupiter: Understanding the Kepler's Laws in Astronomy 101  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report results on a study of impact of Project CLEA - Contemporary Laboratory Experiences in Astronomy software on students' understanding of the Kepler's Third Law. The study was conducted at the University of Missouri among 26 non-science major students enrolled in an introductory astronomy course. There were 16 female and 15 male students participants between age of 18 and

Lanika Ruzhitskaya; A. Speck

2008-01-01

215

Matched wideband low-noise amplifiers for radio astronomy S. Weinreb, J. Bardin, H. Mani, and G. Jones  

E-print Network

Matched wideband low-noise amplifiers for radio astronomy S. Weinreb, J. Bardin, H. Mani, and G low noise amplifiers for the 0.3­4 GHz frequency range are described. The amplifiers can be operated temperature. One amplifier utilizes commercially available, plastic-packaged SiGe transistors for first

Weinreb, Sander

216

Observations of noise bands associated with the upper hybrid resonance by the Imp 6 radio astronomy experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intense noise bands occurring near the upper hybrid resonanace ; frequency have been observed with the Imp 6 GSFC radio astronomy experiment in ; the plasmasphere. The identification of the upper hybrid resonance provides an ; accurate measure of the local electron density and allows the observed noise data ; to be fit to the scale of characteristic frequencies

Stephen R. Mosier; Michael L. Kaiser; L. W. Brown

1973-01-01

217

Estimate of Interference from the Aeronautical Mobile Services of the Cities of Glendale and Pasadena to Goldstone Radio Astronomy Stations at 4.9 Gigahertz  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently allocated the 4.9-GHz band to public safety telecommunications services. Radio Astronomy Services (RAS) also has been using this frequency. NASA will primarily use Deep Space Station 28 (DSS 28) at Goldstone, California, for radio astronomy services that are sensitive to radio-frequency interference (RFI). This study is to determine the RFI potential of airborne transmission from two cities to radio astronomy sites in Goldstone. Propagation losses over the terrain between both cities and Goldstone are estimated using the Trans-Horizon Interference Propagation Loss (THIPL) software recently developed at JPL and high-resolution terrain data. The necessary coordination area for protecting the Goldstone radio astronomy station has been defined based on the minimum propagation loss required. Study results and suggestions for modification to the airborne areas proposed by both cities' police departments are presented.

Ho, C.; Sue, M.; Manshadi, F.

2006-05-01

218

ASTRONOMY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR A UNIT ON ASTRONOMY ESTABLISHES (1) UNDERSTANDINGS AND ATTITUDES, (2) SKILLS, AND (3) CONCEPTS TO BE GAINED IN THE STUDY. THE OVERVIEW EXPLAINS THE ORGANIZATION AND OBJECTIVES OF THE UNIT. TOPICAL DIVISIONS ARE (1) THE EARTH, (2) THE MOON, (3) THE SUN, (4) THE SOLAR SYSTEM, (5) THE STARS, (6) THE UNIVERSE, AND (7) SPACE

Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

219

National Radio Astronomy Observatory: The early history and development of the observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia, are reviewed.  

PubMed

The existence of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and the researches already accomplished there are the result of the foresight and wisdom of United States scientists, the National Science Board, and the Congress, who joined forces to make possible this new national asset. Continued effort will be needed td insure that the observatory will always have the finest possible research instruments and that the site will be a haven of radio quiet. Visiting scientists in some instances may wish to bring equipment with them for studying special problems. Within its means, the observatory will provide supporting facilities, including receivers and other electronic devices, computers, laboratories and shops, and housing. Scientists interested in more details concerning arrangements for visitors should direct their inquiries to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P. O. Box 2, Green Bank, West Virginia. PMID:17753091

Emberson, R M

1959-11-13

220

Making an International Impact: A Joint International Astronomy Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early in 2010, a group of year 11 students (age 15-16) studying GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) Astronomy at The Radclyffe School, Oldham, in the UK, teamed up with a similar age group from Tianyi High School, Wuxi City, in China, to undertake a joint astronomy investigation. This article outlines the outcome of the first stage

Scott, Robert; Shen, Xinrong; Mulley, Ian

2012-01-01

221

Seeing the Sky: 100 Projects, Activities, and Explorations in Astronomy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourteen astronomy activities are presented including classroom procedures and questions. Topics include different investigations of the moon, planets, stars, sunsets, light pollution, and rainbows and halos. Additional information on measurements used for observations in astronomy, and rainbow characteristics is included. (CW)

Schaaf, Fred

1990-01-01

222

The radio astronomy experiment on Helios A and B /E 5c/. [using dipole antenna-preamplifier-radiometer system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center radio astronomy experiment on Helios, identified as Experiment 5c, has sixteen observing frequencies over the range of 26.5 to 3000 kHz. The antenna consists of two extendible 15-m booms, forming an electric dipole, two high-impedance preamplifiers located at the root of the booms, and the 16-channel radiometer. Important information about propagation conditions, such as absorption, scattering and refraction, are expected from observations of radio emission regions at distances between 1 and 0,3 AU.

Weber, R. R.

1975-01-01

223

A Radio Sky Surveys Project with the Allen Telescope Array Contact Author: Geoffrey C. Bower, UC Berkeley, gbower@astro.berkeley.edu  

E-print Network

Space Flight Center), Paul Demorest (National Radio Astronomy Observatory), Rob Ferdman (CNRS, France (University of Virginia), David Nice (Bryn Mawr College), Scott Ransom (National Radio Astronomy Observatory Heiles, Casey Law, Jack Welch (UC Berkeley Radio Astronomy Laboratory), Peter Backus, Samantha Blair

Bower, Geoffrey

224

A Collision of Interests - Protecting Radio Astronomy from Interference in a Free-Market Environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The protection of radio astronomy (RA) from radio frequency interference (RFI) is becoming increasingly difficult. Established mechanisms for the management of spectrum in the United States and throughout the world have provided a degree of protection from RFI by assigning certain bands to RA on an exclusive or shared use basis. Explosive growth in commercial spectrum use has created spectrum crowding outside the RA bands, especially at lower frequencies below 3 GHz. Constellations of low-earth-orbit satellites are a particular problem to RA in that they always have transmitters above the horizon and these transmitters can spill unwanted emissions into the RA bands from their adjacent operating bands. The desire to study the early Universe presents a new challenge for RA with respect to RFI. The RA protected bands were selected for frequencies of important spectral lines. For objects in the distant, redshifted Universe, these lines can appear at all frequencies below the rest frequency and observations may be needed where the RA bands offer no protection. The growing needs of RA occur at the same time that commercial demand for spectrum is driving the Federal Communications Commission and the International Telecommuncations Union to consider entirely new approaches to spectrum management. These approaches would favor intensive commercial use of spectrum over scientific use in that decisions would be largely based on economic and efficient use considerations. It has even been proposed by some proponents of change in spectrum management policy that the entire spectrum be sold to the highest bidders in one global auction. While this is unlikely to happen, it is indicative of the climate in which RA spectrum managers currently work.

Vanden Bout, P. A.

2004-05-01

225

ESO Signs Largest-Ever European Industrial Contract For Ground-Based Astronomy Project ALMA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, announced today that it has signed a contract with the consortium led by Alcatel Alenia Space and composed also of European Industrial Engineering (Italy) and MT Aerospace (Germany), to supply 25 antennas for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project, along with an option for another seven antennas. The contract, worth 147 million euros, covers the design, manufacture, transport and on-site integration of the antennas. It is the largest contract ever signed in ground-based astronomy in Europe. The ALMA antennas present difficult technical challenges, since the antenna surface accuracy must be within 25 microns, the pointing accuracy within 0.6 arc seconds, and the antennas must be able to be moved between various stations on the ALMA site. This is especially remarkable since the antennas will be located outdoor in all weather conditions, without any protection. Moreover, the ALMA antennas can be pointed directly at the Sun. ALMA will have a collecting area of more than 5,600 square meters, allowing for unprecedented measurements of extremely faint objects. The signing ceremony took place on December 6, 2005 at ESO Headquarters in Garching, Germany. "This contract represents a major milestone. It allows us to move forward, together with our American and Japanese colleagues, in this very ambitious and unique project," said ESO's Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky. "By building ALMA, we are giving European astronomers access to the world's leading submillimetre facility at the beginning of the next decade, thereby fulfilling Europe's desire to play a major role in this field of fundamental research." Pascale Sourisse, Chairman and CEO of Alcatel Alenia Space, said: "We would like to thank ESO for trusting us to take on this new challenge. We are bringing to the table not only our recognized expertise in antenna development, but also our long-standing experience in coordinating consortiums in charge of complex, high-performance ground systems." ALMA is an international astronomy facility. It is a partnership between Europe, North America and Japan, in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. The European contribution is funded by ESO and Spain, with the construction and operations being managed by ESO. A matching contribution is being made by the USA and Canada, who will also provide 25 antennas. Japan will provide additional antennas, thus making this a truly worldwide endeavour. ALMA will be located on the 5,000m high Llano de Chajnantor site in the Atacama Desert of Northern Chile. ALMA will consist of a giant array of 12-m antennas separated by baselines of up to 18 km and is expected to start partial operation by 2010-2011. The excellent site, the most sensitive receivers developed so far, and the large number of antennas will allow ALMA to have a sensitivity that is many times better than any other comparable instrument. "ALMA will bring to sub-millimetre astronomy the aperture synthesis techniques of radio astronomy, enabling precision imaging to be done on sub-arcsecond angular scales, and will nicely complement the ESO VLT/VLTI observatory", said Dr. Hans Rykaczewski, the ALMA European Project Manager. Millimetre-wave astronomy is the study of the universe in the spectral region between what is traditionally considered radio waves and infrared radiation. In this realm, ALMA will study the evolution of galaxies, including very early stages, gather crucial data on the formation of stars, proto-planetary discs, and planets, and provide new insights on the familiar objects of our own solar system. A prototype antenna had already been built by Alcatel Alenia Space and European Industrial Engineering and thoroughly tested along with prototypes antennas from Vertex/LSI and Mitsubishi at the ALMA Antenna Test Facility located at the Very Large Array site in Socorro, New Mexico. For more information on the ALMA project, please go to http://www.eso.org/projects/alma/.

2005-12-01

226

Detection of dust impacts by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) instrument detected large numbers of dust particles during the Voyager 2 encounter with Neptune. The signatures of these impacts are analyzed in some detail. The major conclusions are described. PRA detects impacts from all over the spacecraft body, not just the PRA antennas. The signatures of individual impacts last substantially longer than was expected from complementary Plasma Wave Subsystem (PWS) data acquired by another Voyager experiment. The signatures of individual impacts demonstrate very rapid fluctuations in signal strength, so fast that the data are limited by the speed of response of the instrument. The PRA detects events at a rate consistently lower than does the Plasma Wave subsystem. Even so, the impact rate is so great near the inbound crossing of the ring plane that no reliable estimate of impact rate can be made for this period. The data are consistent with the presence of electrons accelerated by ions within an expanding plasma cloud from the point of impact. An ancillary conclusion is that the anomalous appearance of data acquired at 900 kHz appears to be due to an error in processing the PRA data prior to their delivery rather than due to overload of the PRA instrument.

Evans, David R.

1993-01-01

227

Radio Telescopes Extend Astronomy's Best "Yardstick," Provide Vital Tool for Unraveling Dark Energy Mystery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio astronomers have directly measured the distance to a faraway galaxy, providing a valuable "yardstick" for calibrating large astronomical distances and demonstrating a vital method that could help determine the elusive nature of the mysterious Dark Energy that pervades the Universe. Galaxy UGC 3789 Visible-light image of UGC 3789 CREDIT: STScI "We measured a direct, geometric distance to the galaxy, independent of the complications and assumptions inherent in other techniques. The measurement highlights a valuable method that can be used to determine the local expansion rate of the Universe, which is essential in our quest to find the nature of Dark Energy," said James Braatz, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), who presented the work to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Pasadena, California. Braatz and his colleagues used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), and the Effelsberg Radio Telescope of the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy (MPIfR) in Germany to determine that a galaxy dubbed UGC 3789 is 160 million light-years from Earth. To do this, they precisely measured both the linear and angular size of a disk of material orbiting the galaxy's central black hole. Water molecules in the disk act as masers to amplify, or strengthen, radio waves the way lasers amplify light waves. The observation is a key element of a major effort to measure the expansion rate of the Universe, known as the Hubble Constant, with greatly improved precision. That effort, cosmologists say, is the best way to narrow down possible explanations for the nature of Dark Energy. "The new measurement is important because it demonstrates a one-step, geometric technique for measuring distances to galaxies far enough to infer the expansion rate of the Universe," said Braatz. The GBT Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF The VLBA Very Long Baseline Array CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Dark Energy was discovered in 1998 with the observation that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. It constitutes 70 percent of the matter and energy in the Universe, but its nature remains unknown. Determining its nature is one of the most important problems in astrophysics. "Measuring precise distances is one of the oldest problems in astronomy, and applying a relatively new radio-astronomy technique to this old problem is vital to solving one of the greatest challenges of 21st Century astrophysics," said team member Mark Reid of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). The work on UGC 3789 follows a landmark measurement done with the VLBA in 1999, in which the distance to the galaxy NGC 4258 -- 23 million light-years -- was directly measured by observing water masers in a disk of material orbiting its central black hole. That measurement allowed refinement of other, indirect distance-measuring techniques using variable stars as "standard candles." The measurement to UGC 3789 adds a new milepost seven times more distant than NGC 4258, which itself is too close to measure the Hubble Constant directly. The speed at which NGC 4258 is receding from the Milky Way can be influenced by local effects. "UGC 3789 is far enough that the speed at which it is moving away from the Milky Way is more indicative of the expansion of the Universe," said team member Elizabeth Humphreys of the CfA. Following the achievement with NGC 4258, astronomers used the highly-sensitive GBT to search for other galaxies with similar water-molecule masers in disks orbiting their central black holes. Once candidates were found, astronomers then used the VLBA and the GBT together with the Effelsberg telescope to make images of the disks and measure their detailed rotational structure, needed for the distance measurements. This effort requires multi-year observations of each galaxy. UGC 3789 is the first galaxy in the program to yield such a precise distance. Team member Cheng-Yu Kuo of the University of V

2009-06-01

228

Science Sampler: Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project involved thousands of student scientists across the nation in the collection and analysis of astronomical data using a 34-meter radio telescope. These students contributed to the work of the world's foremost authorities on space science when they forwarded their information to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) scientists. The JPL scientists used the information to expand their studies of Jupiter, Uranus, and variable quasars.

Dave MacLaren

2003-05-01

229

Radar astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radar Astronomy is a new and growing branch of Astronomy. Although it seems that radio echo studies must be confined to the solar system, they can play an important part in developing our understanding of the Sun and the planets. At the present time these objects are barely detectable by radar techniques and much of the work has been concerned

J. V. Evans

1960-01-01

230

The General Education Astronomy Source (GEAS) Project: Extending the Reach of Astronomy Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a set of NASA and NSF sponsored resources to aid in teaching astronomy remotely and in the classroom at the college level, with usage results for pilot groups of students. Our goal is to increase the accessibility of general education science coursework to underserved populations nationwide. Our materials are available for use without charge, and we are actively looking for pilot instructors. Primary components of our program include an interactive online tutorial program with over 12,000 questions, an instructor review interface, a set of hands-on and imaging- and spectra-driven laboratory exercises, including video tutorials, and interviews with diverse individuals working in STEM fields to help combat stereotypes. We discuss learning strategies often employed by students without substantial scientific training and suggest ways to incorporate them into a framework based on the scientific method and techniques for data analysis, and we compare cohorts of in-class and distance-education students.

Vogt, N. P.; Muise, A. S.

2014-07-01

231

Europe and US to Collaborate on the Design and Development of a Giant Radio Telescope Project in Chile  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High Goals for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Representatives from the U.S. and Europe signed an agreement today in Washington to continue collaboration on the first phase of a giant new telescope project. The telescope will image the Universe with unprecedented sensitivity and sharpness at millimeter wavelengths (between the radio and infrared spectral regions). It will be a major step for astronomy, making it possible to study the origins of galaxies, stars and planets. This project is a prime example of a truly global project, an essential development in view of the ever-increasing complexity and cost of front-line astronomical facilities. The U.S. side of the project is run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) , operated by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF). The European side of the project is a collaboration between the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) , the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (MPG) , the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy (NFRA) and Nederlandse Onderzoekschool Voor Astronomie (NOVA) , and the United Kingdom Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC). The Europe-U.S. agreement signed today may be formally extended in the very near future to include Japan, following an already existing tripartite declaration of intent. Dr. Robert Eisenstein, NSF's Assistant Director Mathematical and Physical Sciences, called the project "a path-breaking international partnership that will open far-reaching opportunities for astronomical observations. This array would enable astronomers to explore the detailed processes through which the stars and planets form and give us a vastly improved understanding of the formation of the first galaxies in the very early universe." Eisenstein welcomed the collaboration with Europe and Japan's interest in becoming a major partner. Speaking on behalf of the European Signatories, Prof. Riccardo Giacconi, Director General of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , one of the signatories to the new astronomy project, described the new project as "absolutely fantastic and farsighted - a major ground-based astronomical observatory for the 21st century. It will open up a key region of the electromagnetic spectrum to study the very early universe and the interstellar clouds where the stars and planets are born". The new telescope will be located in the Atacama desert of northern Chile, and has been given the name ALMA, for "Atacama Large Millimeter Array". This land has been given in concession to CONICYT (The Chilean National Commission for Science and Technology) last year by the "Ministerio de Bienes Nacionales" (Ministry of National Assets). It has also been declared a national reserve for science by President Frei because of its unique capabilities for astronomical research. ALMA will be a revolutionary telescope, operating at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths and comprised of an array of individual antennas each 12 meters in diameter that work together to make precision images of astronomical objects. The goal of the ALMA Project is an array of 64 antennas that can be positioned as needed over an area 10 km in diameter so as to give the array a zoom-lens capability. Dr. Paul Vanden Bout, Director of the U.S. National Radio Astronomy Observatory , emphasized the technical capabilities needed for the array: "The ALMA Project involves development of a variety of fundamental technologies including amplification of faint cosmic signals using superconducting receivers and ultrafast digital data processing, technologies that will enhance many related areas of scientific research". This MOU commits the Signatories to collaborate in a three-year Design and Development Phase 1 for a joint project. In the U.S., an amount of US $26 million has been approved for this phase, and in Europe, DM 28 million (15 million EURO). Two prototype 12-meter antennas will be cons

1999-06-01

232

Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project: Hertzsprung-Russel Diagram Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation explores the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and those topics necessary to understand the diagram. These topics include the different kinds of spectrum, spectral classification, and luminosity class. This module provides a fairly in-depth tutorial in reading HR diagrams. The user can change the temperature and lumonisity of the star and see how its position changes on the HR diagram. Instructor resources are available including student manuals, assessment materials, and a list of the assumptions used. This is part of a collection of astronomy applets.

Lee, Kevin M.

2008-08-21

233

Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project: Eclipsing Binary Stars Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation demonstrates how information about stars which can not be directly observed can be inferred from a special class of binary stars eclipsing binaries. The simulation shows two stars orbiting each other. As one star is eclipsed the corresponding decrease in flux is displayed on a graph. The user can control the system orientation, stellar properties and the speed of the simulation. Instructor resources are available including student manuals, assessment materials, and a list of the assumptions used. This is part of a collection of astronomy applets.

Lee, Kevin M.

2008-08-21

234

Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project: Motions of the Sun Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation reviews some of the material from Basic Coordinates and Seasons Module and The Rotating Sky Module and adds information to put all the pieces together for a more complete description of the motions of the sun culminating in the the Paths of the Sun Simulator. Computation of meridional altitude and stellar visibility are also introduced. The user can change the date, latitude and speed of the orbit. Instructor resources are available including student manuals, assessment materials, and a list of the assumptions used. This is part of a collection of astronomy applets.

Lee, Kevin M.

2008-08-21

235

Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project: Basic Coordinates and Seasons Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation-based teaching module illustrates three different, but related concepts. Terrestrial coordinates and the celestial equatorial coordinate system are covered and are used to explore the motion of the sun and how it relates to seasons. There are interactive maps that display terrestrial and celestial equatorial coordinates. Users can change the point location on the map and view coordinates from different reference points. The third component of this package explores Earth's seasons and the ecliptic as the earth orbits the sun. This module is part of a larger collection of simulation-based labs for introductory astronomy.

Lee, Kevin M.

2008-09-19

236

A lunar radio experiment with the Parkes radio telescope for the LUNASKA project  

E-print Network

We describe an experiment using the Parkes radio telescope in the 1.2-1.5 GHz frequency range as part of the LUNASKA project, to search for nanosecond-scale pulses from particle cascades in the Moon, which may be triggered by ultra-high-energy astroparticles. Through the combination of a highly sensitive multi-beam radio receiver, a purpose-built backend and sophisticated signal-processing techniques, we achieve sensitivity to radio pulses with a threshold electric field strength of 0.0053 $\\mu$V/m/MHz, lower than previous experiments by a factor of three. We observe no pulses in excess of this threshold in observations with an effective duration of 127 hours. The techniques we employ, including compensating for the phase, dispersion and spectrum of the expected pulse, are relevant for future lunar radio experiments.

Bray, J D; Roberts, P; Reynolds, J E; James, C W; Phillips, C J; Protheroe, R J; McFadden, R A; Aartsen, M G

2014-01-01

237

CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: The Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center: yesterday, today, and tomorrow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of Russian (formerly Soviet) radio astronomy is indissolubly linked with the P N Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Russian Academy of Sciences. From the late 1940s, the institute conducted most of its radio astronomy research in the Crimea, at stations or on field trips; in the late 1950s, the center of gravity of research moved to the southern Moscow region, where one of the largest radio astronomy observatories in the country and in the world was developed within less than twenty years. The observatory unique instrumentation system is briefly reviewed in a historical perspective. Key research areas and some major achievements are outlined, and the prospects of the observatory as (currently) part of the LPI Astro Space Center are examined.

Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D.

2009-11-01

238

The Quiet Skies Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and radio frequency interference (RFI), an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project--the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)--encourages students to collect and analyze RFI data and develop conclusions as a team.

Steve Rapp

2008-10-01

239

Managing Astronomy Research Data: Case Studies of Big and Small Research Projects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy data management refers to all actions taken upon data over the course of the entire research process. It includes activities involving the collection, organization, analysis, release, storage, archiving, preservation, and curation of research data. Astronomers have cultivated data management tools, infrastructures, and local practices to ensure the use and future reuse of their data. However, new sky surveys will soon amass petabytes of data requiring new data management strategies.The goal of this dissertation, to be completed in 2015, is to identify and understand data management practices and the infrastructure and expertise required to support best practices. This will benefit the astronomy community in efforts toward an integrated scholarly communication framework.This dissertation employs qualitative, social science research methods (including interviews, observations, and document analysis) to conduct case studies of data management practices, covering the entire data lifecycle, amongst three populations: Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) collaboration team members; Individual and small-group users of SDSS data; and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) collaboration team members. I have been observing the collection, release, and archiving of data by the SDSS collaboration, the data practices of individuals and small groups using SDSS data in journal articles, and the LSST collaborations planning and building of infrastructure to produce data.Preliminary results demonstrate that current data management practices in astronomy are complex, situational, and heterogeneous. Astronomers often have different management repertoires for working on sky surveys and for their own data collections, varying their data practices as they move between projects. The multitude of practices complicates coordinated efforts to maintain data.While astronomy expertise proves critical to managing astronomy data in the short, medium, and long term, the larger astronomy data workforce encompasses a greater breadth of educational backgrounds. Results show that teams of individuals with distinct expertise are key to ensuring the long-term preservation and usability of astronomy datasets.

Sands, Ashley E.

2015-01-01

240

The Harvard Radio Meteor Project Meteor Velocity Distribution Reappraised  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relative distribution of atmospheric encounter speeds at constant mass for observations made as part of the Harvard Radio Meteor Project synodic year observations has been recalculated using a cumulative mass index, ? = 1.1 0.1, and the mass velocity relation from F. Verniani (1973, J. Geophys. Res. 78, 8429-8462), ? = 4.23 0.07. A discrepency in the

A. D. Taylor

1995-01-01

241

A Planetary System Exploration Project for Introductory Astronomy and Astrobiology Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I have created three-part projects for the introductory astronomy and astrobiology courses at Westfield State University which simulate the exploration of a fictional planetary system. The introductory astronomy project is an initial reconnaissance of the system by a robotic spacecraft, culminating in close flybys of two or three planets. The astrobiology project is a follow-up mission concluding with the landing of a roving lander on a planet or moon. Student responses in earlier parts of each project can be used to determine which planets are targeted for closer study in later parts. Highly realistic views of the planets from space and from their surfaces can be created using programs such as Celestia and Terragen; images and video returned by the spacecraft are thus a highlight of the project. Although designed around the particular needs and mechanics of the introductory astronomy and astrobiology courses for non-majors at WSU, these projects could be adapted for use in courses at many different levels.

Rees, Richard F.

2015-01-01

242

Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project: Hydrogen Energy Levels Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This digital lab introduces the concept of how quantum mechanics and light relate with respect to the Hydrogen atom. The module revolves around the Hydrogen Atom Simulator, a Bohr model version of a idealized hydrogen atom as it interacts with photons of various wavelengths. Watch the electron jump to higher energy levels as it absorbs photons, then emit photon(s) and drop back to a lower level. Students can drag the electron between levels and shoot photons of different wavelength/frequency at the atom. The module also includes an instructor's manual, student guide, worksheets, and background information requisite to understanding the concepts. The Thermal Distribution histogram gives a temperature dependent plot of occupied states for many, many atoms. This is part of a collection of astronomy applets.

Lee, Kevin M.

2012-01-26

243

Using an Observatory Project to Develop Professional Communication in Astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a comprehensive project using the Highland Road Park Observatory camera. This project encompasses the formal portions for both written and spoken communication, and carries 55% of the course credit.

Dr. Robert Hynes, Assistant Professor, Physics & Astronomy, Louisiana State University

244

Radio Astronomy Data Model for Single-Dish Multiple-Feed Telescopes, and Robledo Archive Architecture  

E-print Network

All the effort that the astrophysical community has put into the development of the Virtual Observatory (VO) has surpassed the non-return point: the VO is a reality today, and an initiative that will self-sustain, and to which all archival projects must adhere. We have started the design of the scientific archive for the DSS-63 70-m antenna at NASA's DSN station in Robledo de Chavela (Madrid). Here we show how we can use all VO proposed data models to build a VO-compliant single-dish, multiple-feed, radio astronomical archive data model (RADAMS) suitable for the archival needs of the antenna. We also propose an exhaustive list of Universal Content Descriptors (UCDs) and FITS keywords for all relevant metadata. We will further refine this data model with the experience that we will gain from that implementation.

J. D. Santander-Vela; E. Garcia; J. F. Gomez; L. Verdes-Montenegro; S. Leon; R. Gutierrez; C. Rodrigo; O. Morata; E. Solano; O. Suarez

2008-10-02

245

The Eclipsing Radio Emission of the Precataclysmic Binary Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Academia Sinica,  

E-print Network

The Eclipsing Radio Emission of the Precataclysmic Binary V471 Tau Jeremy Lim Institute confirming the presence of eclipses in the centime­ ter radio emission of the eclipsing binary V471 Tau eclipse per orbit: in all we observed one near--complete radio eclipse, the ingress phase of two other

White, Stephen

246

De-mystifying earned value management for ground based astronomy projects, large and small  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The scale and complexity of today's ground based astronomy projects have justifiably required Principal Investigator's and their project teams to adopt more disciplined management processes and tools in order to achieve timely and accurate quantification of the progress and relative health of their projects. Earned Value Management (EVM) is one such tool. Developed decades ago and used extensively in the defense and construction industries, and now a requirement of NASA projects greater than $20M; EVM has gained a foothold in ground-based astronomy projects. The intent of this paper is to de-mystify EVM by discussing the fundamentals of project management, explaining how EVM fits with existing principles, and describing key concepts every project can use to implement their own EVM system. This paper also discusses pitfalls to avoid during implementation and obstacles to its success. The authors report on their organization's most recent experience implementing EVM for the GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) project. G-CLEF is a fiber-fed, optical echelle spectrograph that has been selected as a first light instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), planned for construction at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert region.

Norton, Timothy; Brennan, Patricia; Mueller, Mark

2014-08-01

247

Astronomy Looks Different When You Listen to It.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the use of a radio telescope to arouse new interest among students. The article partitions into the following sections: (1) Radio Astronomy--Which Level; (2) First Steps: The Site--The Antenna; (3) The Electronics: Do It Yourself, or Store Bought; (4) Field Test: Music of the Spheres; (5) Getting Started: Entry Level Projects; and (6)

Jones, Richard C.

1994-01-01

248

The Contribution of the Division of Radiophysics Murraybank Field Station to International Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the 1950s Australia was one of the world's foremost astronomical nations owing primarily to the work of the dynamic radio astronomy group within the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation's Division of Radiophysics. Most of the observations were made at the network of field stations maintained by the Division in or near Sydney, and one of these field stations was Murraybank in the north-western suburbs of Sydney. GVaucouleursDe1954The Magellanic Clouds and the GalaxyThe Observatory7423311954Obs....74...23DDe Vaucouleurs, G., 1954a. The Magellanic Clouds and the Galaxy. The Observatory, 74, 23-31. GVaucouleursDe1954The Magellanic Clouds and the Galaxy, IIThe Observatory741581641954Obs....74..158DDe Vaucouleurs, G., 1954b. The Magellanic Clouds and the Galaxy, II. The Observatory, 74, 158-164. GVaucouleursDe1961Classification and radial velocities of bright southern galaxiesMemoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society6869871961MmRAS..68...69DDe Vaucouleurs, G., 1961. Classification and radial velocities of bright southern galaxies. Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society, 68, 69-87. JDeane2006Vacuum Tube SupercomputerSydneyScience Foundation for Physics and the Australian Computer Museum SocietyDeane, J., 2006. Vacuum Tube Supercomputer. Sydney, Science Foundation for Physics and the Australian Computer Museum Society. NHDeiter1965Neutral

Wendt, Harry; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce

249

The Ilgarijiri Project: A collaboration between Aboriginal communities and radio astronomers in the Murchison Region of Western Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The international radio astronomy initiative known as the Square Kilometre Array is a cutting-edge science project, aimed atdramatically expanding our vision and understanding of the Universe. The $2billion+ international project is being shared between Southern Africa and Australia. The Australian component, centred in the Murchison region of Western Australia, is based upon collaboration with Aboriginal communities. A collaborative project called "Ilgarijiri- Things Belonging to the Sky" shared scientific and Aboriginal knowledge of the night sky. Through a series of collaborative meetings and knowledge sharing, the Ilgarijiri project developed and showcased Aboriginal knowledge of the night sky, via an international touring Aboriginal art exhibition, in Australia, South Africa, the USA and Europe. The Aboriginal art exhibition presents Aboriginal stories relating to the night sky, which prominently feature the 'Seven Sisters' and the 'Emu', as well as the collaborative experience with radio astronomers. The success of the Ilgarijiri collaborative project is based upon several principles, which can help to inform and guide future cultural collaborative projects.

Goldsmith, John

2014-07-01

250

Discovering astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of basic astronomical knowledge is presented with attention to the structure and dynamics of the stars and planets. Also dealt with are techniques of astronomical measurement, e.g., stellar spectrometry, radio astronomy, star catalogs, etc. Basic physical principles as they pertain to astronomy are reviewed, including the nature of light, gravitation, and electromagnetism. Finally, stellar evolution and cosmology are discussed with reference to the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe.

Chapman, R. D.

1978-01-01

251

The SKA Mid-frequency All-sky Continuum Survey: Discovering the unexpected and transforming radio-astronomy  

E-print Network

We show that, in addition to specific science goals, there is a strong case for conducting an all-sky (i.e. the visible 3-pi steradians) SKA continuum survey which does not fit neatly into conventional science cases. History shows that the greatest scientific impact of most major telescopes (e.g., HST, VLA) lies beyond the original goals used to justify the telescope. The design of the telescope therefore needs to maximise the ultimate scientific productivity, in addition to achieving the specific science goals. In this chapter, we show that an all-sky continuum survey is likely to achieve transformational science in two specific respects: (1) Discovering the unexpected (2) Transforming radio-astronomy from niche to mainstream

Norris, Ray P; Brown, Michael; Carretti, Ettore; Kapinska, Anna D; Prandoni, Isabella; Rudnick, Lawrence; Seymour, Nick

2014-01-01

252

A Voyage through the Radio Universe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Radio Astronomy Research Team from from Oil City Area Senior High School (OCHS) in Oil City, Pennsylvania, embarked on a special project titled "Mapping the Universe" at the start of the 2000 school year. For the project, students analyzed data from the Arecibo Radio Telescope, which is the world's largest single dish radio telescope, in an effort to learn more about distant galaxies. Students used the information they gathered to calculate the Hubble constant--an accomplishment usually achieved by professional astronomers.

Spuck, Timothy

2004-10-01

253

Project CLEA - The Moons of Jupiter: Understanding the Kepler's Laws in Astronomy 101  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report results on a study of impact of Project CLEA - Contemporary Laboratory Experiences in Astronomy software on students understanding of the Kepler's Third Law. The study was conducted at the University of Missouri among 26 non-science major students enrolled in an introductory astronomy course. There were 16 female and 15 male students participants between age of 18 and 24. The study was designed to find out whether students had different attitudes toward the simulation: its visual design and its intuitiveness and easiness to use. The study tested whether these attitudes reflected on the students learning outcomes of the discussed astronomy topic. To measure students computer proficiency and how comfortable they were using computers they were given a computer attitude inventory. The participants took a pretest and a posttest designed by the Project CLEA developers for the Moons of Jupiter module. The students also filled out a questionnaire where they reflected on their experience of using the software. Two weeks later the research participants took a final astronomy course examination which included a question on the Kepler's Third Law. Our research shows that students who indicated that they liked the simulation performed better on the posttest.. At the same time, we found that there was no relationship between the students attitude towards the simulation and their performance on the final exam. Students, who used CLEA simulation regardless of their attitudes towards it, significantly outperformed their classmates during the final exam on the Kepler's third law question. It is also interesting to note that students performed better on five out of six posttest questions - there was no change on a question involved mathematical application of the Kepler's Third Law formula.

Ruzhitskaya, Lanika; Speck, A.

2008-05-01

254

National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center: Arecibo Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 305m radio telescope at the Arecibo Observatory "is the largest single-dish radio telescope on our planet and is available to the global scientific community for astronomical observation at wavelengths between 6 m and 3 m." Researchers can search WAPP data and information about past, present, and future projects at the Observatory. The extensive website provides numerous data reduction packages and file formats. Users can find extensive materials on the planetary studies, space and atmospheric science, and astronomy occurring at the observatory. Students and educators can learn about Arecibo's summer program. The News link is filled with fascinating new accomplishments, employment opportunities, and upcoming astronomy talks and seminars.

255

A Review of High School Level Astronomy Student Research Projects Over the Last Two Decades  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the early 1990s with the arrival of a variety of new technologies, the capacity for authentic astronomical research at the high school level has skyrocketed. This potential, however, has not realised the bright-eyed hopes and dreams of the early pioneers who expected to revolutionise science education through the use of telescopes and other astronomical instrumentation in the classroom. In this paper, a general history and analysis of these attempts is presented. We define what we classify as an Astronomy Research in the Classroom (ARiC) project and note the major dimensions on which these projects differ before describing the 22 major student research projects active since the early 1990s. This is followed by a discussion of the major issues identified that affected the success of these projects and provide suggestions for similar attempts in the future.

Fitzgerald, M. T.; Hollow, R.; Rebull, L. M.; Danaia, L.; McKinnon, D. H.

2014-09-01

256

A 5 Giga Samples Per Second 8-Bit Analog to Digital Printed Circuit Board for Radio Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have designed, manufactured, and characterized an 8-bit 5 Giga samples per second (Gsps) ADC printed circuit board assembly (PCBA). An e2v EV8AQ160 ADC chip was used in the design and the board is plug compatible with the field programmable gate array (FPGA) board developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) community. Astronomical interference fringes were demonstrated across a single baseline pair of antennas using two ADC boards on the Yuan Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) telescope. Several radio interferometers are using this board for bandwidth expansion, such as Submillimeter Array; also, several experimental telescopes are building new spectrometers using the same board. The ADC boards were attached directly to the Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware (ROACH-2) FPGA board for processing of the digital output signals. This ADC board provides the capability of digitizing radio frequency signals from DC to 2 GHz (3 dB bandwidth), and to an extended bandwidth of 2.5 GHz (5 dB) with derated performance. The following worst-case performance parameters were obtained over 2 GHz: spur free dynamic range (SFDR) of 44 dB, signal-to-noise and distortion (SINAD) of 35 dB, and effective number of bits (ENOB) of 5.5.

Jiang, Homin; Liu, Howard; Guzzino, Kim; Kubo, Derek; Li, Chao-Te; Chang, Ray; Chen, Ming-Tang

2014-09-01

257

Characterizing Interference in Radio Astronomy Observations through Active and Unsupervised Learning  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the process of observing signals from astronomical sources, radio astronomers must mitigate the effects of manmade radio sources such as cell phones, satellites, aircraft, and observatory equipment. Radio frequency interference (RFI) often occurs as short bursts (< 1 ms) across a broad range of frequencies, and can be confused with signals from sources of interest such as pulsars. With ever-increasing volumes of data being produced by observatories, automated strategies are required to detect, classify, and characterize these short "transient" RFI events. We investigate an active learning approach in which an astronomer labels events that are most confusing to a classifier, minimizing the human effort required for classification. We also explore the use of unsupervised clustering techniques, which automatically group events into classes without user input. We apply these techniques to data from the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey to characterize several million detected RFI events from over a thousand hours of observation.

Doran, G.

2013-01-01

258

Conveying astronomy to the public  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Year of Astronomy offers us a unique chance to carry out outreach projects in great scale and, to think about new ways to improve our efforts. In this paper I present a few considerations on my activity as a popularisation person. I address its importance and I will emphasize on radio, television and public lectures. I also stress certain ingredients I believe popularisation must include; it must be interesting, diverse, simple, pertinent, and be peer reviewed.

Fierro, Julieta

2011-06-01

259

Analysis of the Capability and Limitations of Relativistic Gravity Measurements Using Radio Astronomy Methods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The uses of radar observations of planets and very-long-baseline radio interferometric observations of extragalactic objects to test theories of gravitation are described in detail with special emphasis on sources of error. The accuracy achievable in these tests with data already obtained, can be summarized in terms of: retardation of signal propagation (radar), deflection of radio waves (interferometry), advance of planetary perihelia (radar), gravitational quadrupole moment of sun (radar), and time variation of gravitational constant (radar). The analyses completed to date have yielded no significant disagreement with the predictions of general relativity.

Shapiro, I. I.; Counselman, C. C., III

1975-01-01

260

Recent solar radio astronomy at centimeter wavelengths: the temporal variability of the 10. 7-cm flux  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies made by means of high-resolution radio telescopes indicate that solar centrimetric emission contains contributions from many different sources and involves more than one radiation mechanism. Two emission components have been identified: bright, compact sources and weaker, diffuse emission which is distributed over the plage and surrounding areas of enhanced magnetic field. There is evidence for the occurrence of weaker

K. F. Tapping

1987-01-01

261

NAIC/NRAO School on Single Dish Radio Astronomy ASP Conference Series, Vol. , 2001  

E-print Network

the telescope observe a point source (i.e. a source which is considerably smaller than the beam size) which has, Arecibo, PR 00612; koneil@naic.edu Abstract. Calibrating telescope data is one of the most important is to calibrate radio telescope data in the centimeter wavelength regime. This includes a discussion of the var

O'Neil, Karen

262

Infrared Astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NASA's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) provides the Infrared Astronomy Website as one of its outreach programs. Infrared Astronomy, or "the detection and study of the infrared radiation (heat energy) emitted from objects in the Universe," is described and placed in context in the sections Discovery of Infrared, What is Infrared, Infrared Astronomy, Background, and the Infrared Universe. For current information, see the News & Discoveries, Active/ Future Projects, and Activities sections; past and current projects supported by IPAC are featured in the Infrared Gallery. The site targets a broad audience and is geared towards many learning levels.

263

Radio telescopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A radio telescope is used in radio astronomy to measure the intensity of the radiation received from various parts of the sky. Such a telescope must be able both to detect and to locate faint radio sources of small angular size, and also to measure the brightness distribution across extended radio sources or over large sky areas. Ideally the telescope

J. Findlay

1964-01-01

264

Research Projects and Undergraduate Retention at the University of Arizona  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of Arizonas Astronomy Club utilizes its access to the many telescopes in and around Tucson, Arizona, to allow students to fully participate in a variety of research projects. Three current projects - the exoplanet project, the radio astronomy project, and the Kepler project - all work to give undergraduates who are interested in astronomy the opportunity to explore practical astronomy outside the classroom and in a peer-supported environment. The exoplanet project strives to teach students about the research process, including observing exoplanet transits on the Steward Observatory 61 Kuiper telescope on Mt. Bigelow in Tucson, AZ, reducing the data into lightcurves with the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF), modeling the lightcurves using the Interactive Data Language (IDL), and writing and publishing a professional paper, and does it all with no faculty involvement. The radio astronomy project is designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with a professor on a radio astronomy research project, and to learn about the research process, including observing molecules in molecular clouds using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12-meter radio telescope on Kitt Peak in Arizona. The Kepler project is a new project designed in part to facilitate graduate-undergraduate interaction in the Astronomy Department, and in part to allow students (both graduate and undergraduate) to participate in star-spot cycle research using data from the Kepler Mission. All of these research projects and structures provide students with unique access to telescopes, peer mentoring, networking, and understanding the entire process of astronomical research.

Walker-LaFollette, Amanda; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Towner, A. P.; McGraw, A. M.; Biddle, L. I.; Robertson, A.; Turner, J.; Smith, C.

2013-06-01

265

M.S. Astronomy Program M.S. in Astronomy  

E-print Network

M.S. Astronomy Program M.S. in Astronomy Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences 1 for later reference. 1. understanding of a variety of fields of physics and astronomy at the graduate level 2*. performance of an astronomy research project suitable for a masters thesis 3*. ability

Hemmers, Oliver

266

The application of compressive sampling to radio astronomy II: Faraday rotation measure synthesis  

E-print Network

Faraday rotation measure (RM) synthesis is an important tool to study and analyze galactic and extra-galactic magnetic fields. Since there is a Fourier relation between the Faraday dispersion function and the polarized radio emission, full reconstruction of the dispersion function requires knowledge of the polarized radio emission at both positive and negative square wavelengths $\\lambda^2$. However, one can only make observations for $\\lambda^2 > 0$. Furthermore observations are possible only for a limited range of wavelengths. Thus reconstructing the Faraday dispersion function from these limited measurements is ill-conditioned. In this paper, we propose three new reconstruction algorithms for RM synthesis based upon compressive sensing/sampling (CS). These algorithms are designed to be appropriate for Faraday thin sources only, thick sources only, and mixed sources respectively. Both visual and numerical results show that the new RM synthesis methods provide superior reconstructions of both magnitude and p...

Li, Feng; Cornwell, Tim J; de Hoog, Frank

2011-01-01

267

Low noise, 0.4-3 GHz cryogenic receiver for radio astronomy.  

PubMed

We present the design and measurement of a radio telescope receiver front end cooled to 100 K physical temperature, and working over 400 MHz to 3 GHz frequency band. The system uses a frequency independent feed developed for operation as a feed for parabola using sinuous elements and integrated with an ultra-wideband low noise amplifier. The ambient temperature system is tested on the 43 m radio telescope in Green Bank, WV and the system verification results on the sky are presented. The cryogenic receiver is developed using a Stirling cycle, one stage cryocooler. The measured far field patterns and the system noise less than 80 K over a 5:1 bandwidth are presented. PMID:25362437

Gawande, R; Bradley, R; Langston, G

2014-10-01

268

The application of compressive sampling to radio astronomy. II. Faraday rotation measure synthesis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Faraday rotation measure (RM) synthesis is an important tool to study and analyze galactic and extra-galactic magnetic fields. Since there is a Fourier relation between the Faraday dispersion function and the polarized radio emission, full reconstruction of the dispersion function requires knowledge of the polarized radio emission at both positive and negative square wavelengths ?2. However, one can only make observations for ?2 > 0. Furthermore observations are possible only for a limited range of wavelengths. Thus reconstructing the Faraday dispersion function from these limited measurements is ill-conditioned. In this paper, we propose three new reconstruction algorithms for RM synthesis based upon compressive sensing/sampling (CS). These algorithms are designed to be appropriate for Faraday thin sources only, thick sources only, and mixed sources respectively. Both visual and numerical results show that the new RM synthesis methods provide superior reconstructions of both magnitude and phase information than RM-CLEAN.

Li, F.; Brown, S.; Cornwell, T. J.; de Hoog, F.

2011-07-01

269

Low noise, 0.4-3 GHz cryogenic receiver for radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the design and measurement of a radio telescope receiver front end cooled to 100 K physical temperature, and working over 400 MHz to 3 GHz frequency band. The system uses a frequency independent feed developed for operation as a feed for parabola using sinuous elements and integrated with an ultra-wideband low noise amplifier. The ambient temperature system is tested on the 43 m radio telescope in Green Bank, WV and the system verification results on the sky are presented. The cryogenic receiver is developed using a Stirling cycle, one stage cryocooler. The measured far field patterns and the system noise less than 80 K over a 5:1 bandwidth are presented.

Gawande, R.; Bradley, R.; Langston, G.

2014-10-01

270

*** TITLE *** Reports on Astronomy 2009-2012  

E-print Network

be transformed into a parking lot in support of the ATST. In 2003, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory on HISTORICAL RADIO ASTRONOMY CHAIR Kenneth Kellermann VICE-CHAIR Wayne Orchiston BOARD Rod Davies Leonid TRIENNIAL REPORT 2009-2012 1. Introduction The IAU Working Group on Historical Radio Astronomy (WGHRA

Groppi, Christopher

271

Application of Field System-FS9 and a PC to Antenna Control Unit interface in Radio Astronomy in Peru  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are in the process to transform a 32m antenna in Peru, used for telecommunications, into a Radio Telescope to perform Radio Astronomy in Peru. The 32m antenna of Peru constructed by NEC was used for telecommunications with communications satellites at 6 GHz for transmission, and 4 GHz for reception. In collaboration of National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) Japan, and National Observatory of Japan we developed an Antenna Control System for the 32m antenna in Peru. It is based on the Field System FS9, software released by NASA for VLBI station, and an interface to link PC within FS9 software (PC-FS9) and Antenna Control Unit (ACU) of the 32 meters antenna. The PC-FS9 controls the antenna, commands are translated by interface into control signals compatibles with the ACU using: an I/O digital card with two 20bits ports to read azimuth and elevation angles, one 16bits port for reading status of ACU, one 24bits port to send pulses to start or stop operations of antenna, two channels are analogic outputs to drive the azimuth and elevation motors of the antenna, a LCD display to show the status of interface and error messages, and one serial port for communications with PC-FS9,. The first experiment of the control system was made with 11m parabolic antenna of Kashima Space Research Center (NICT), where we tested the right working of the routines implemented for de FS9 software, and simulations was made with looped data between output and input of the interface, both test were done successfully. With this scientific instrument we will be able to contribute with researching of astrophysics. We expect to into a near future to work at 6.7GHz to study Methanol masers, and higher frequencies with some improvements of the surface of the dish.

Vidal, E. V. S.; Ishitsuka, J. I. I.; Koyama, K. Y.

2006-08-01

272

The Quiet Skies Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and radio frequency interference (RFI), an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project--the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space

Rapp, Steve

2008-01-01

273

A scientific program for infrared, submillimeter and radio astronomy from space: A report by the Management Operations Working Group  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Important and fundamental scientific progress can be attained through space observations in the wavelengths longward of 1 micron. The formation of galaxies, stars, and planets, the origin of quasars and the nature of active galactic nuclei, the large scale structure of the Universe, and the problem of the missing mass, are among the major scientific issues that can be addressed by these observations. Significant advances in many areas of astrophysics can be made over the next 20 years by implementing the outlined program. This program combines large observatories with smaller projects to create an overall scheme that emphasized complementarity and synergy, advanced technology, community support and development, and the training of the next generation of scientists. Key aspects of the program include: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility; the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy; a robust program of small missions; and the creation of the technology base for future major observatories.

1989-01-01

274

Space-qualified wideband and ultrawideband acousto-optical spectrometers for millimeter and submillimeter radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Acousto-optical techniques are particularly well suited for wide band spectroscopy in astrophysical and geophysical applications using millimeter and sub-millimeter heterodyne radiometers aboard spacecraft. An illustration is given by the 1 GHz AOS built for the ODIN, sub-millimeter telescope in Earth's orbit. We describe the spectrometer, including the IF down converter, AO processor, data acquisition and pre- processing sub-systems. The used technology, space qualification of the critical components as well as relevant environmental and electrical results are presented. The acousto-optical technique can also be used for compact, ultra wide band spectrometers (2000 to 4000 channels over 4 GHz bandwidth or more). Scientific applications include sub- millimeter missions in Astronomy (FIRST) as well in Geophysics (Microwave Limb Sounding programs). Performances obtained on prototypes built in Meudon Observatory are presented and the characteristics achievable for near future systems are analyzed. They fit well with the presently retained design of the heterodyne (HET) instrument on FIRST, based on a font-end system made of a four band, dual polarization receiver, allowing for full frequency coverage from 480 to 1250 MHz.

Lecacheux, Alain; Rosolen, Carlo; Michet, Daniel; Clerc, V.

1998-07-01

275

Controller-area-network bus control and monitor system for a radio astronomy interferometer.  

PubMed

We describe the design and implementation of a controller-area-network bus (CANbus) monitor and control system for a millimeter wave interferometer. The Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) is a 15-antenna connected-element interferometer for astronomical imaging, created by the merger of two university observatories. Its new control system relies on a central computer supervising a variety of subsystem computers, many of which control distributed intelligent nodes over CANbus. Subsystems are located in the control building and in individual antennas and communicate with the central computer via Ethernet. Each of the CAN modules has a very specific function, such as reading an antenna encoder or tuning an oscillator. Hardware for the modules was based on a core design including a commercial CANbus-enabled single-board computer and some standard circuitry for interfacing to peripherals. Hardware elements were added or changed as necessary for the specific module types. Similarly, a base set of embedded code was implemented for essential common functions such as CAN message handling and time keeping and extended to implement the required functionality for the different hardware. Using a standard CAN messaging protocol designed to fit the requirements of CARMA and a well-defined interface to the high-level software allowed separate development of high-level code and embedded code with minimal integration problems. Over 30 module types have been implemented and successfully deployed in CARMA, which is now delivering excellent new science data. PMID:17902962

Woody, David P; Wiitala, Bradley; Scott, Stephen L; Lamb, James W; Lawrence, Ronald P; Giovanine, Curt; Fredsti, Sancar J; Beard, Andrew; Pryke, Clem; Loh, Michael; Greer, Christopher H; Cartwright, John K; Gutierrez-Kraybill, Colby; Bolatto, Alberto D; Muchovej, Stephen J C

2007-09-01

276

Breaking the I\\/O Bottleneck at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)  

Microsoft Academic Search

this paper discusses our approach and the current NRAO environmentin more detail and then presents the details of phase one of the project, including a brief discussion of thefile structure chosen, a sketch of the implementation and performance results and observations. The finalsection presents our future plans for the remainder of the project and beyond.4

John F. Karpovich; Andrew S. Grimshaw; James C. French

277

Solar maximum mission: Ground support programs at the Harvard Radio Astronomy Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of the spectral characteristics of solar radio bursts were made with new dynamic spectrum analyzers of high sensitivity and high reliability, over the frequency range 25-580 MHz. The observations also covered the maximum period of the current solar cycle and the period of international cooperative programs designated as the Solar Maximum Year. Radio data on shock waves generated by solar flares were combined with optical data on coronal transients, taken with equipment on the SMM and other satellites, and then incorporated into computer models for the outward passage of fast-mode MHD shocks through the solar corona. The MHD models are non-linear, time-dependent and for the most recent models, quasi-three-dimensional. They examine the global response of the corona for different types of input pulses (thermal, magnetic, etc.) and for different magnetic topologies (for example, open and closed fields). Data on coronal shocks and high-velocity material ejected from solar flares have been interpreted in terms of a model consisting of three main velocity regimes.

Maxwell, A.

1983-01-01

278

The Radio Sky in the STARLAB  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The STARLAB is a portable planetarium created, produced, and distributed by Learning Technologies, Ltd. Upon entering the STARLAB, images are projected onto the ceiling of the planetarium's dome using custom, interchangeable projection cylinders mounted on top of an ultrabright point light source. The STARLAB is ideal for teaching students about astronomy since it may be easily transported to schools across the nation. In order to take advantage of this powerful teaching tool, one of the foremost priorities of the Sensing the Radio Sky project was the development a projection cylinder that would visually interpret the quantitative data taken with radio telescopes and present that information in a form that students could understand and appreciate. The final version of the cylinder demonstrates a variety of topics relevant to an understanding of radio astronomy. When using the Radio Sky cylinder in the STARLAB, teachers may discuss the differences between optical and radio astronomy such as the structure of the Milky Way Galaxy, different sources of electromagnetic radiation, and important radio sources within and outside of the Galaxy. In addition, the flexibility of the cylinder's design allows for a variety of educational activities to be conducted within the STARLAB, all complemented by the Radio Sky cylinder's unique presentation of the Galaxy in radio wavelengths. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

Fultz, C.; Smith, T.; Buck, S.; Harris, R.; Boltuch, D.; Hund, L.; Moffett, D.; Walsh, L.; LaFratta, M.; Castelaz, M. W.

2005-12-01

279

The STARE Project: A Search for Transient Astronomical Radio Emission  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many astronomical objects are known to produce transient radio emission, including the Sun, Jupiter, flare stars, and supernovae. Other phenomena are expected to produce transient radio emission as well; gamma-ray bursts are obvious candidates. Although other attempts have been made to detect transient radio emission, to our knowledge no search has had both the sensitivity and sufficient sky coverage to

C. A. Katz; J. N. Hewitt; C. B. Moore; J. D. Ellithorpe

1994-01-01

280

INSPIRE: A VLF Radio Project for High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 1988 the Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionospheric Radio Experiment, or INSPIRE, has given students the opportunity to build research-quality VLF radio receivers and make observations of both natural and stimulated radio waves in the atmosphere. Any high school science class is eligible to join the INSPIRE volunteer observing network and

Marshall, Jill A.; Pine, Bill; Taylor, William W. L.

2007-01-01

281

Two Eyes, 3D: A New Project to Study Stereoscopy in Astronomy Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"Two Eyes, 3D" is a 3-year NSF funded research project to study the educational impacts of using stereoscopic representations in informal settings. The project funds two experimental studies. The first is focused on how children perceive various spatial qualities of scientific objects displayed in static 2D and 3D formats. The second is focused on how adults perceive various spatial qualities of scientific objects and processes displayed in 2D and 3D movie formats. As part of the project, two brief high-definition films about variable stars will be developed. Both studies will be mixed-method and look at prior spatial ability and other demographic variables as covariates. The project is run by the American Association of Variable Star Observers, Boston Museum of Science and the Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum with consulting from the California Academy of Sciences. Early pilot results will be presented. All films will be released into the public domain, as will the assessment software designed to run on tablet computers (iOS or Android).

Price, Aaron; SubbaRao, M.; Wyatt, R.

2012-01-01

282

Observations of Cygnus X-3 at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

THE radio outbursts1 of Cygnus X-3 have been observed at several frequencies since September 4, 1972. We have made measurements of the flux density variations at 5.0, 2.7 and 1.4 GHz, and the position and an upper limit to the angular size at 5 GHz; in addition the HI absorption spectrum has been determined and upper limits have been placed on the flux densities at 150 and 81.5 MHz. The instruments used were the Five-Kilometre (5 GHz), One-Mile (2.7 and 5 GHz) and Half-Mile (1.4 GHz) telescopes, the 4C antenna (150 MHz) and the 4 acre array (81.5 MHz).

Branson, N. J. B. A.; Martin, A. H. M.; Pooley, G. G.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Shakeshaft, J. R.; Slingo, A.; Warner, P. J.

1972-10-01

283

VLA observations of stellar planetary nebulae. [using Very Large Array at National Radio Astronomy Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coordinates, dimensions, 4885-MHz flux densities, and brightness temperatures of K3-2, NGC 6833, Ps 1, II 5117, Me 2-2, Hb 12, Vy 1-1, and M1-5 are reported. In two other cases, H3-29 and H3-75, confused extended structure was detected in which the nebula could not be identified with certainty. He 2-467, M1-2, and Peterson's H-alpha object in M15 were also included in the observations but not detected with an upper limit of less than 10 mJy. The observations are compared with some of the previous optical and radio data, such as log S(H-beta). Distances are computed from the present data with standard assumptions. Corresponding linear radii range below 0.1 pc, among the smallest in previous distributions of radius.

Johnson, H. M.; Balick, B.; Thompson, A. R.

1979-01-01

284

Peta-Flop Real Time Radio Astronomy Signal Processing Instrumentation and the CASPER Collaboration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I will briefly describe next generation radio telescopes, such as HERA and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), which will require 1E15 to 1E17 operations per second of real time processing. I'll present some of the new architectures we've used to develop a variety of heterogeneous FPGA-GPU-CPU based signal processing systems for such telescopes, including spectrometers, correlators, and beam formers. I will also describe the CASPER collaboration, which has developed architectures, open source programming tools, libraries and reference designs that make it relatively easy to develop a variety of scalable, upgradeable, fault tolerant, low power, real time digital signal processing instrumentation. CASPER utilizes commercial 10Gbit and 40 Gbit ethernet switches to interconnect open source general purpose field programmable gate array (FPGA) boards with GPUs and software modules. CASPER collaborators at hundreds of universities, government labs and observatories have used these techniques to rapidly develop and deploy a variety of correlators, beamformers, spectrometers, pulsar/transient machines, and VLBI instrumentation. CASPER instrumentation is also utilized in physics, medicine, genomics and engineering. Open source source hardware, software, libraries, tools, tutorials, reference designs, information about workshops, and how to join the collaboration are available at http://casper.berkeley.edu

Werthimer, Dan

2014-04-01

285

Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale from 22 to 43 GHz using Planck  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Planck mission detected hundreds of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Since Planck's calibration is absolute, based on the satellite's annual motion around the Sun, and since its beams are well-characterized at the sub-percent levels, Planck's flux density measurements are absolute to percent-level accuracy. We have made coordinated Planck, VLA and ATCA observations of ~60 strong, unresolved sources in order to compare Planck's absolute calibration to that used by these two interferometers at 22, 28 and 43 GHz. The flux densities of the sources used to calibrate the VLA observations are taken from Perley and Butler (2013), which is fundamentally based on models of the planet Mars calibrated via WMAP observations. The flux densities of the sources used to calibrate the ATCA observations are based on models of the planet Uranus. Despite the scatter introduced by the variability of many of the sources, the three flux density scales are determined to agree to 1-2% accuracy.

Butler, Bryan J.; Partridge, R. Bruce; Perley, Richard A.; Stevens, Jamie B.; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Rocha, Graca; Walter, Ben Z.; Zacchei, Andrea

2015-01-01

286

ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Type III radio bursts observed by Ulysses pole to pole,  

E-print Network

Abstract. We consider 555 type III bursts observed by Ulysses and/or Wind while Ulysses traversed a large range of longitude and latitude. We find: 1) The percentage of bursts seen by both spacecraft was 59.5%. It was higher, about 80%, when Ulysses was to the south and east of the Sun as seen from Wind. It decreased to about 50 % when Ulysses was near the ecliptic behind the Sun, and it remained near 50 % as Ulysses moved to the north and west. 2) The distribution of low frequency cutoffs flo of type III radiation is very similar for bursts seen by Ulysses and those seen by Wind, whereas the distribution of the in-situ plasma frequency fp at the two spacecraft is very different. Many bursts descend to close to fp ? 30 kHz at Wind but few descend to the lower fp ? 10 kHz at Ulysses. We confirm earlier findings that flo is rarely lower than about 20 kHz. 3) Statistically, the low frequency limit depends strongly on the burst intensity, being about four times lower for strong bursts than for weak bursts. We consider three hypotheses for the close relation between intensity and flo: proximity of the burst source to one spacecraft or the other, directivity and propagation effects, and density and speed of the fast electron stream. We conclude that, while the first two may be important for some bursts, for many others the character of the electron stream is the dominant factor in establishing both the burst intensity and the lowest frequency attained. Key words: Sun: radio radiation activity corona 1.

Simultaneously Wind; Y. Leblanc; G. A. Dulk; S. Hoang; J. -l. Bougeret; P. A. Robinson

1996-01-01

287

Fast gain calibration in radio astronomy using alternating direction implicit methods: Analysis and applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. Modern radio astronomical arrays have (or will have) more than one order of magnitude more receivers than classical synthesis arrays, such as the VLA and the WSRT. This makes gain calibration a computationally demanding task. Several alternating direction implicit (ADI) approaches have therefore been proposed that reduce numerical complexity for this task from 𝒪(P3) to 𝒪(P2), where P is the number of receive paths to be calibrated Aims: We present an ADI method, show that it converges to the optimal solution, and assess its numerical, computational and statistical performance. We also discuss its suitability for application in self-calibration and report on its successful application in LOFAR standard pipelines. Methods: Convergence is proved by rigorous mathematical analysis using a contraction mapping. Its numerical, algorithmic, and statistical performance, as well as its suitability for application in self-calibration, are assessed using simulations. Results: Our simulations confirm the 𝒪(P2) complexity and excellent numerical and computational properties of the algorithm. They also confirm that the algorithm performs at or close to the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB, lower bound on the variance of estimated parameters). We find that the algorithm is suitable for application in self-calibration and discuss how it can be included. We demonstrate an order-of-magnitude speed improvement in calibration over traditional methods on actual LOFAR data. Conclusions: In this paper, we demonstrate that ADI methods are a valid and computationally more efficient alternative to traditional gain calibration methods and we report on its successful application in a number of actual data reduction pipelines.

Salvini, Stefano; Wijnholds, Stefan J.

2014-11-01

288

Society News: Monica Grady awarded CBE; Grubb Parsons Lecture 2012; Join the RAS; Astronomy on radio for kids; New Fellows; Peter D Hingley  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

RAS Fellow Prof. Monica Grady has been made a Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE), in recognition of her services to space science. The RAS sponsors the annual Grubb Parsons Lecture, which this year took place on 6 June at the University of Durham. If you are a professional astronomer, geophysicist, or similar, a student studying these disciplines, or simply someone with a serious interest in them, we urge you to apply for membership of the RAS. Outreach is an important activity for the RAS. We recently supported an astronomy series called Deep Space High on the digital radio channel Fun Kids.

2012-08-01

289

FM Radio; An Oral Communication Project for Migrants in Palm Beach County.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report gives a full description of the broadcasting and operation of WHRS-FM, a FM radio station established by federal grant to serve migrant workers and their children in Palm Beach County, Florida. The goal of the project was to evaluate FM radio as a solution to the serious economic and educational problem of communicating with the

Early, L. F.

290

Climate Monitoring With CHAMP Radio Occultation Data: The CHAMPCLIM Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radio occultation (RO) technique is based on a satellite-to-satellite limb sounding concept using microwave signals to probe the Earth's atmosphere. The propagation of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals is influenced by the atmospheric refractivity field resulting in slowing and bending of the signal. The atmospheric phase delay as the principle observable is measured with millimetric accuracy. It is the basis for high-quality retrievals of atmospheric key variables, particularly of temperature profiles. Highest temperature accuracies of <~1~K are obtained in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The long-term stability, self-calibrated nature, all-weather capability, high vertical resolution, global coverage, and high accuracy of RO data suggests them as a promising tool for global short- and long-term monitoring of atmospheric temperature change. The German/US research satellite CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload for geoscientific research) continuously records RO profiles since March 2002. The mission is expected to last at least until 2007, thus CHAMP RO data provide the first opportunity to create real RO based climatologies on a longer term. CHAMPCLIM is a joint project of the Institute for Geophysics, Astrophysics, and Meteorology (IGAM) in Graz and the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) in Potsdam. It aims at exploiting the CHAMP RO data in the best possible manner for climate research. For this purpose, all CHAMP RO profiles provided by GFZ on excess phase level are currently processed at IGAM to obtain atmospheric profiles of refractivity, geopotential height, and dry temperature. The IGAM retrieval scheme is tailored to minimizing biases and yields a new atmospheric data set especially tuned for monitoring climate variability and change. The retrieved atmospheric profiles (150-160 profiles/day) are used to create climatologies on a monthly, seasonal, and annual basis. After focus on optimizing the RO data processing for climate applications and validation of the retrieval results using various reference data sources (now continued as "background" activity), the main emphasis is currently on the setup of a pre-operational system, processing of the complete 2002-2004 data, and on the creation of global climatologies including error estimates. After an overview on the status of the CHAMPCLIM project, we will focus on dry temperature climatologies from seasons within spring (MAM) 2002 to winter (DJF) 2003/2004, obtained by averaging-and-binning. Our results show that useful dry temperature climatologies resolving horizontal scales >~1000~km can be obtained even with data from a single RO receiver. RO based climatologies have the potential to improve modern operational climatologies, especially in regions where the data coverage and/or the vertical resolution and accuracy of RO data is superior to traditional data sources.

Foelsche, U.; Gobiet, A.; Steiner, A. K.; Kirchengast, G.; Borsche, M.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J.

2004-12-01

291

The birth of high-energy neutrino astronomy: A personal history of the DUMAND project  

SciTech Connect

DUMAND is a project to build a Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detector offshore near the island of Hawaii. At present under construction, it hopes to inaugurate the field of high-energy neutrino astronomy. Potential sources of high-energy neutrinos are listed, and estimates of neutrino intensity given. The paper is concerned with the physics, technology, and history of the project, which started informally in 1973. It survived through a series of summer conferences until it was funded as a feasibility study in 1979 and established in the Hawaii DUMAND Center, at the University of Hawaii. Over a dozen collaborating groups have contributed to the successful construction and operation of DUMAND I, the SPS or Short Prototype String, which established the benign character of the ocean environment and demonstrated its suitability for DUMAND II, a 216-phototube array now under construction. DUMAND II, recently funded, will have more than 20 times the area of any existing detector and a mass of almost 2 million tons; this size is minimal for the intensities and cross sections anticipated. The project became feasible---both technically and financially---through important technical advances in data transmission via fiber optics, high-speed computer technology, special photomultiplier tubes made by Hamamatsu and Philips, remotely controlled undersea vehicles with manipulative abilities, and many deep-sea electronic and oceanographic components. It is supported by an international collaboration with 15 collaborating institutions in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. It is scheduled to install a three-string test array (TRIAD) by late 1992, and the complete nine-string array is scheduled for operation in late 1993.

Roberts, A. (Hawaii DUMAND Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States))

1992-01-01

292

The Green Bank Solar Radio Burst Spectrometer  

E-print Network

National Radio Astronomy Observatory Technology Center 1180 Boxwood Estate Rd, Charlottesville, VA 22903 S at the Green Bank Site of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in the National Radio Quiet Zone, where Radio Astronomy Observatory 520 Edgemont Rd, Charlottesville, VA 22903 R. A. Bradley & E. Mastrantonio

White, Stephen

293

Astronomy Communication  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomers communicate all the time, with colleagues of course, but also with managers and administrators, with decision makers and takers, with social representatives, with the news media, and with the society at large. Education is naturally part of the process. Astronomy communication must take into account several specificities: the astronomy community is rather compact and well organized world-wide; astronomy has penetrated the general public remarkably well with an extensive network of associations and organizations of aficionados all over the world. Also, as a result of the huge amount of data accumulated and by necessity for their extensive international collaborations, astronomers have pioneered the development of distributed resources, electronic communications and networks coupled to advanced methodologies and technologies, often much before they become of common world-wide usage. This book is filling up a gap in the astronomy-related literature by providing a set of chapters not only of direct interest to astronomy communication, but also well beyond it. The experts contributing to this book have done their best to write in a way understandable to readers not necessarily hyperspecialized in astronomy nor in communication techniques while providing specific detailed information, as well as plenty of pointers and bibliographic elements. This book will be very useful for researchers, teachers, editors, publishers, librarians, computer scientists, sociologists of science, research planners and strategists, project managers, public-relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related organizations, as well as for students aiming at a career in astronomy or related space science. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1345-0

Heck, A.; Madsen, C.

2003-07-01

294

Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechamisms and propagation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as it flew by Neptune. The study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, and ray tracing to determine the possible source mechanisms and locations of the radiation, including the narrowband bursty and smooth components of the Neptune radio emission.

Menietti, J. Douglas

1994-01-01

295

Recycling for radio astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Melvin Hoare, Steve Rawlings and the CUGA consortium look forward to the potential offered by recycling the 30 m class antennas at Goonhilly Earth Station in Cornwall, including a new deep-space tracking facility, research and training, and the possibility of enhancing the e-MERLIN array.

Hoare, Melvin

2012-02-01

296

Automated radio astronomy operations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The improvements in using a computer to drive a DSN 64-meter antenna are described. The development is used to simplify operation, improve antenna safety, reduce antenna wear, present the abuse of antenna by misoperation, increase quantity and quality of data gathered, and give users a greater choice of automatic operations.

Livermore, R. W.

1978-01-01

297

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY  

E-print Network

which event the results could be hazardous). Radiation cooling of the mylar film by the cold innards electrical loss. To prevent this, the mylar can be dried by air from a small fan. This report describes to reduce radiative cooling of the plastic film and radiative warming of the cold contents of the dewar

Groppi, Christopher

298

The Sardinia Radio Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the status of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) project, a new general purpose, fully steerable 64 m diameter parabolic radio telescope under construction in Sardinia. The instrument is funded by Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR), by the Sardinia Regional Government (RAS), and by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and it is charge to three research structures of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF): the Institute of Radio Astronomy of Bologna, the Cagliari Astronomical Observatory (in Sardinia), and the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Florence. The radio telescope has a shaped Gregorian optical configuration with a 8 m diameter secondary mirror and additional Beam-Wave Guide (BWG) mirrors. One of the most challenging feature of SRT is the active surface of the primary reflector which provides good efficiency up to about 100 GHz. This paper reports on the most recent advances of the construction.

D'Amico, Nichi

2011-08-01

299

MARTHA PATRICIA HAYNES Goldwin Smith Professor of Astronomy, Cornell University  

E-print Network

scientist, National Radio Astronomy Observatory responsible for daily operations at rural telescope site scientist, National Radio Astronomy Observatory 1997 visiting scientist, European Southern Observatory 1998 with National Science Foundation for operation of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and for $29M design

Richardson Jr., James E.

300

Transactions IAU, Volume XXVIIIA Reports on Astronomy 2009-2012  

E-print Network

site on 11 May 2011. In 2003, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory initiated the first Archives de its participation in multi- institutional collaborations. As the national facility for radio astronomy GROUP ON HISTORICAL RADIO ASTRONOMY CHAIR Kenneth Kellermann VICE-CHAIR Wayne Orchiston BOARD Rod Davies

Groppi, Christopher

301

African Astronomy and the Square Kilometre Array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We highlight the growth of astronomy across Africa and the effect of hosting the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will have on this growth. From the construction of a new 25m radio telescope in Nigeria, to new university astronomy programmes in Kenya, the HESS in Namibia and the Mauritian Radio Telescope, to the world class projects being developed in South Africa (Southern African Large Telescope and Karoo Array Telescope) astronomy is re-emerging across the continent. The SKA will represent the pinnacle of technological advancement in astronomy when constructed; requiring ultra high speed data transmission lines over 3000 km baselines and the World's fastest computer for correlation purposes. The investment alone to build the SKA on African soil will be of great economic benefit to its people, but the required network connectivity will significantly drive commercial expansion far beyond the initial value of the SKA investment. The most important consequence of hosting the SKA in Africa would be the impact on Human Capital Development (HCD) on the continent. Major HCD projects already underway producing excellent results will be presented. )

MacLeod, Gordon

2010-02-01

302

Information Content in Radio Waves: Student Investigations in Radio Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe an inquiry-based instructional unit on information content in radio waves, created in the summer of 2013 as part of a MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This topic is current and highly relevant, addressing science and technical aspects from radio astronomy, geodesy, and atmospheric research areas as well as Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Projects and activities range from simple classroom demonstrations and group investigations, to long term research projects incorporating data acquisition from both student-built instrumentation as well as online databases. Each of the core lessons is applied to one of the primary research centers at Haystack through an inquiry project that builds on previously developed units through the MIT Haystack RET program. In radio astronomy, students investigate the application of a simple and inexpensive software defined radio chip (RTL-SDR) for use in systems implementing a small and very small radio telescope (SRT and VSRT). Both of these systems allow students to explore fundamental principles of radio waves and interferometry as applied to radio astronomy. In ionospheric research, students track solar storms from the initial coronal mass ejection (using Solar Dynamics Observatory images) to the resulting variability in total electron density concentrations using data from the community standard Madrigal distributed database system maintained by MIT Haystack. Finally, students get to explore very long-baseline interferometry as it is used in geodetic studies by measuring crustal plate displacements over time. Alignment to NextGen standards is provided for each lesson and activity with emphasis on HS-PS4 'Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer'.

Jacobs, K.; Scaduto, T.

2013-12-01

303

A Voyage through the Radio Universe  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each year, professionals and amateurs alike make significant contributions to the field of astronomy. High school students can also conduct astronomy research. Since 1992, the Radio Astronomy Research Team from Oil City Area Senior High School (OCHS) in Oil City, Pennsylvania, has traveled each year to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Spuck, Timothy

2004-01-01

304

A Cryogenic Ultra-Low-Noise MMIC-based LNA with a discrete First Stage Transistor Suitable for Radio Astronomy Applications  

E-print Network

In this paper a new design of MMIC based LNA is outlined. This design uses a discrete 100-nm InP HEMT placed in front of an existing InP MMIC LNA to lower the overall noise temperature of the LNA. This new approach known as the Transistor in front of MMIC (T+MMIC) LNA, possesses a gain in excess of 40dB and an average noise temperature of 9.4K compared to 14.5K for the equivalent MMIC-only LNA measured across a 27-33GHz bandwidth at a physical temperature of 8K. A simple ADS model offering further insights into the operation of the LNA is also presented and a potential radio astronomy application is discussed

McCulloch, Mark A; Piccirillo, Lucio

2013-01-01

305

Radio Observations of Rapidly Rotating F--M Dwarf Stars in the Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Academia Sinica,  

E-print Network

Radio Observations of Rapidly Rotating F--M Dwarf Stars in the Pleiades Jeremy Lim Institute very rapidly rotating late­ type dwarf stars in the Pleiades open cluster, distributed in spectral: evolution ­ stars: flare ­ stars: late­ type 1. INTRODUCTION The radio emission of active late­type dwarf

White, Stephen

306

Multiwavelength Astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from NASA's Infrared Astrophysics Data Center explains how the universe can be observed using the entire electromagnetic spectrum. There is an introduction to using light in astronomy; information on and images taken from different areas of the electromagnetic spectrum of objects in the solar system, the Milky Way galaxy and beyond; and a table of radiation types, their characteristic temperatures, and objects emitting this type of radiation. The tutorial explains how observations are made using X-rays, gamma rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, infrared wavelengths, and radio wavelengths. There is a section on why telescopes are sent to space and a multiwavelength gallery.

Linda Hermans-Killam

307

W Projection: A New Algorithm for Wide Field Imaging with Radio Synthesis Arrays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a novel interpretation of the non-coplanar baselines effect in synthesis radio telescopes as being due to differential Fresnel diffraction in the neighborhood of the array antennas, and a new algorithm to deal with this effect. Our new algorithm, which we call ``w projection'', has markedly superior performance compared to existing algorithms. At roughly equivalent levels of accuracy, w-projection can be up to an order of magnitude faster than the corresponding facet-based algorithms.

Cornwell, T. J.; Golap, K.; Bhatnagar, S.

2005-12-01

308

The role of the atmosphere in satellite geodesy, radio astronomy and other applications of trans-atmospheric propagation of radio waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of the atmosphere on radio waves relevant to technological applications is investigated theoretically, and the associated errors are classified and defined. Range errors are defined as the length of the phase path minus the geometric distance, and range errors are divided into those related to the troposphere and those related to the ionosphere. Ground-path error and group delay

R. Leitinger

1990-01-01

309

Strategies for Creating Cornerstone Education Projects for the International Year of Astronomy 2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

The General Assembly of the United Nations has designated 2009 as the International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009), a year-long global education program to commemorates the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first astronomical observations through a telescope. IYA2009 has an importance well beyond what can be accomplished in just one year. The main goal is to use this year to build sustainable,

S. M. Pompea; D. Isbell

2008-01-01

310

South Africa's new radio telescope reveals giant outbursts from binary star system May 16th, 2013 in Space & Earth / Astronomy  

E-print Network

(double) star system. Two stars orbit each other every 16.5 days in an elliptical orbit. The small white (double) star system. Two stars orbit each other every 16.5 days in an elliptical orbit. The small #12South Africa's new radio telescope reveals giant outbursts from binary star system May 16th, 2013

Jarrett, Thomas H.

311

The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope project and its early science opportunities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science (NAOC), has started building the largest antenna in the world. Known as FAST, the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope is a Chinese mega-science project funded by the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC). FAST also represents part of Chinese contribution to the international efforts to build the square kilometer array (SKA). Upon its finishing around September of 2016, FAST will be the most sensitive single-dish radio telescope in the low frequency radio bands between 70 MHz and 3 GHz. The design specifications of FAST, its expected capabilities, and its main scientific aspirations were described in an overview paper by Nan et al. (2011). In this paper, we briefly review the design and the key science goals of FAST, speculate the likely limitations at the initial stages of FAST operation, and discuss the opportunities for astronomical discoveries in the so-called early science phase.

Li, Di; Nan, Rendong; Pan, Zhichen

2013-03-01

312

ASTRONOMY 104: UNDERGRADUATE ASTRONOMY SEMINAR  

E-print Network

1 ASTRONOMY 104: UNDERGRADUATE ASTRONOMY SEMINAR SYLLABUS Unique Number 47750 Class Meetings together with fellow astronomy majors, and those in other majors who are keen on astronomy. We hope to discuss present and future pathways to success in and around astronomy, and to share with you some

313

Putting The "Yee-Hah!" In Astronomy Outreach: Professional Development Through The ASP "Sky Rangers" Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Astronomical Society of the Pacific is conducting a NASA-funded professional development program to help increase astronomy education and outreach capacity at national parks, nature centers, and other outdoor and environmental centers--venues that still have a dark night sky as a natural resource and a yen to interpret it for their visitors. Through online workshops and on-site workshops at national parks, the ASP staff, working in conjunction with partners from the National Park Service, National Association for Interpretation, and the Association of Science and Technology Centers, provides materials and training focusing on the sky. Participants become part of ASP's "Astronomy from the Ground Up" informational education community of practice, with ongoing options to hone their new skills. The presenter will report on early progress and lessons learned, as well as future plans, as the ASP and its partners work to help wilderness and nature interpreters put a little more "yee-hah!" in their visitor presentations aimed at the sky.

Manning, Jim; Gurton, S.; Hurst, A.

2010-05-01

314

The Noncoplanar Baselines Effect in Radio Interferometry: The W-Projection Algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider a troublesome form of nonisoplanatism in synthesis radio telescopes: noncoplanar baselines. We present a novel interpretation of the noncoplanar baselines effect as being due to differential Fresnel diffraction in the neighborhood of the array antennas. We have developed a new algorithm to deal with this effect. Our new algorithm, which we call ldquoW-projectionrdquo, has markedly superior performance compared to existing algorithms. At roughly equivalent levels of accuracy, W-projection can be up to an order of magnitude faster than the corresponding facet-based algorithms. Furthermore, the precision of result is not tightly coupled to computing time. W-projection has important consequences for the design and operation of the new generation of radio telescopes operating at centimeter and longer wavelengths

Cornwell, T. J.; Golap, K.; Bhatnagar, S.

2008-11-01

315

Elementary astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In developing nations such as Mexico, basic science education has scarcely improved. There are multiple reasons for this problem; they include poor teacher training and curricula that are not challenging for students. I shall suggest ways in which astronomy can be used to improve basic education, it is so attractive that it can be employed to teach how to read and write, learn a second language, mathematics, physics, as well as geography. If third world nations do not teach science in an adequate way, they will be in serious problems when they will try to achieve a better standard of living for their population. I shall also address informal education, it is by this means that most adults learn and keep up to date with subjects that are not their specialty. If we provide good outreach programs in developing nations we can aid adult training; astronomy is ideal since it is particularly multidisciplinary. In particular radio and television programs are useful for popularization since they reach such wide audiences.

Fierro, J.

2006-08-01

316

2012 REU Project Abstracts Identifying Fluids for Tuning and Cooling Radio Frequency Devices Operating in the X-Band  

E-print Network

2012 REU Project Abstracts Identifying Fluids for Tuning and Cooling Radio Frequency Devices Franklin The objective is to identify fluids with potential to be used as heat transfer mediums and tuning materials in micrometer-sized radio frequency devices. Fluids used in these types of devices must exhibit

Minnesota, University of

317

The Role of the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project in Promoting Scientific Efficacy among Middle and High School Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effects on student scientific efficacy after participation in the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project. In the GAVRT program, students use computers to record extremely faint radio waves collected by the telescope and analyze real data. Scientific efficacy is a type of self-knowledge a person uses to

Ibe, Mary; Deutscher, Rebecca

318

Multilayer and grazing incidence X-ray\\/EUV optics for astronomy and projection lithography; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 19-22, 1992  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present volume on multilayer and grazing incidence X-ray\\/EUV optics for astronomy and projection lithography discusses AXAF grazing incidence mirrors, the theory and high throughput optics of grazing incidence optics, multilayer mirror fabrication and characterization, and multilayer optics for X-ray projection lithography. Attention is given to the VETA-I X-ray detection system, a motion detection system for AXAF X-ray ground testing,

Richard B. Hoover; Arthur B. C. Walker Jr.

1993-01-01

319

Infrared astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The decade of 1990's presents an opportunity to address fundamental astrophysical issues through observations at IR wavelengths made possible by technological and scientific advances during the last decade. The major elements of recommended program are: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the IR Optimized 8-m Telescope (IRO), a detector and instrumentation program, the SubMilliMeter Mission (SMMM), the 2 Microns All Sky Survey (2MASS), a sound infrastructure, and technology development programs. Also presented are: perspective, science opportunities, technical overview, project recommendations, future directions, and infrastructure.

Gillett, Frederick; Houck, James; Bally, John; Becklin, Eric; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Draine, Bruce; Frogel, Jay; Gatley, Ian; Gehrz, Robert; Hildebrand, Roger

1991-01-01

320

Planetary astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The authors profile the field of astronomy, identify some of the key scientific questions that can be addressed during the decade of the 1990's, and recommend several facilities that are critically important for answering these questions. Scientific opportunities for the 1990' are discussed. Areas discussed include protoplanetary disks, an inventory of the solar system, primitive material in the solar system, the dynamics of planetary atmospheres, planetary rings and ring dynamics, the composition and structure of the atmospheres of giant planets, the volcanoes of IO, and the mineralogy of the Martian surface. Critical technology developments, proposed projects and facilities, and recommendations for research and facilities are discussed.

Morrison, David; Hunten, Donald; Ahearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Black, David; Brown, Robert A.; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Cochran, Anita L.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Depater, Imke

1991-01-01

321

Experimental Astronomy (2004) 17: 261267 C Springer 2005 RFI MITIGATION AND THE SKA  

E-print Network

Experimental Astronomy (2004) 17: 261­267 C Springer 2005 RFI MITIGATION AND THE SKA STEVEN W radio astronomy from its inception. The Workshop on the Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy (RFI2004) was held in Penticton, BC, Canada in July 2004 in order to consider

Ellingson, Steven W.

322

Summary of interference measurements at selected radio observatories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented from a series of RF interference (RFI) observations conducted during 1989 and 1990 at selected radio astronomy observatories in order to choose a site for the SETI, where the local and orbital RFI would be as benign as possible for observations of weak electromagnetic signals. These observatories included the DSS13 at Goldstone (California), the Arecibo Observatory (Puerto Rico), the Algonquin Radio Observatory in Ottawa (Canada), the Ohio State University Radio Observatory in Columbus (Ohio), and the NRAO in Green Bank (West Virginia). The observations characterize the RFI environment at these sites from 1 to 10 GHz, using radio astronomy antennas, feeds, and receivers; SETI signal processors; and stand-alone equipment built specifically for this purpose. The results served as part of the basis for the selection (by the NASA SETI Microwave Observing Project) of NRAO as the site of choice for SETI observations.

Tarter, Jill C.

1990-01-01

323

A Radio Transient 0.1 pc from Sagittarius A* Geoffrey C. Bower1  

E-print Network

60208; doug- roberts,zadeh@northwestern.edu 4 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903; bcotton@nrao.edu 5 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801; mgoss-rays: binaries 1 Astronomy Department & Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720

Bower, Geoffrey

324

Undergraduate Research in the University of Arizona Astronomy Club  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Participation in research as an undergraduate is an invaluable learning experience that leads to successful post-undergrad studies. Because of this, the University of Arizona Astronomy Club strives to provide multiple opportunities for its members to get involved in research as early as possible. Areas of research covered by our projects include exoplanet research, stellar cycles, and radio observations. These projects cover exoplanet parameterization, the utilization of Kepler data, and various star-formation studies, respectively. Participation in our projects builds stronger data-collecting and reduction skills, while also leading to tangible achievements such poster presentations at AAS, ASP, and DPS, and published papers in astronomical journals.

Cates, Ian; Towner, A. P.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; Turner, J.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Pearson, K.

2014-01-01

325

A Group Sparsity Imaging Algorithm for Transient Radio Sources Stephan Wengera  

E-print Network

Braunschweig, Germany b National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801, USA Abstract RadioA Group Sparsity Imaging Algorithm for Transient Radio Sources Stephan Wengera , Urvashi Raub. Keywords: radio interferometry, compressed sensing, sparse recovery 1. Introduction Radio interferometers

Magnor, Marcus

326

4918 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 51, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2013 Radio Frequencies: Policy and Management  

E-print Network

. I. Kellermann and A. R. Thompson are with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory is operated a summary of this framework for radio scientists and engineers. Index Terms--Radio astronomy, radioBoer is with the Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of Cali- fornia at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA (e

Long, David G.

327

Astronomy Across Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

African astronomy is growing rapidly. The Southern African Large Telescope is the largest optical telescope in the southern hemisphere, MeerKat and the Square Kilometer Array will revolutionize radio astronomy in the coming decade, and Namibia hosts HESS II, the worlds largest gamma-ray telescope. A growing community of observational and theoretical astronomers utilizes these multi-wavelength observational facilities. The largest concentrations of researchers are in southern Africa, but the community is now expanding across the continent. Substantial resources are being invested in developing the next generation of African astronomers. The African Astronomical Society was formed in 2011 to foster and coordinate the growth of the science in Africa. The IAU has located its global Office of Astronomy for Development in South Africa, with the mandate to find innovative ways of using astronomy to promote social and educational development around the world. African astronomy offers abundant opportunities for collaborative research with colleagues from across the globe. This special session will introduce many of the aspects of African astronomy to the US community, with the aim of engendering new partnerships and strengthening existing ones.

Williams, Ted

2014-01-01

328

A new Main Injector radio frequency system for 2.3 MW Project X operations  

SciTech Connect

For Project X Fermilab Main Injector will be required to provide up to 2.3 MW to a neutrino production target at energies between 60 and 120 GeV. To accomplish the above power levels 3 times the current beam intensity will need to be accelerated. In addition the injection energy of Main Injector will need to be as low as 6 GeV. The current 30 year old Main Injector radio frequency system will not be able to provide the required power and a new system will be required. The specifications of the new system will be described.

Dey, J.; Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01

329

Astronomy in the Marketplace  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an activity about cultural references to astronomy. Learners will create a list of products that have been named after astronomical objects, which the class discusses. As a homework project, they can search local stores or media for additional astronomical references. This is Activity M-3 of Universe at Your Fingertips 2.0: A Collection of Activities and Resources for Teaching Astronomy DVD-ROM, which is available for purchase.

2013-04-30

330

Big Computing in Astronomy: Perspectives and Challenges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hardware progress in recent years has led to astronomical instruments gathering large volumes of data. In radio astronomy for instance, the current generation of antenna arrays produces data at Tbits per second, and forthcoming instruments will expand these rates much further. As instruments are increasingly becoming software-based, astronomers will get more exposed to computer science. This talk therefore outlines key challenges that arise at the intersection of computer science and astronomy and presents perspectives on how both communities can collaborate to overcome these challenges.Major problems are emerging due to increases in data rates that are much larger than in storage and transmission capacity, as well as humans being cognitively overwhelmed when attempting to opportunistically scan through Big Data. As a consequence, the generation of scientific insight will become more dependent on automation and algorithmic instrument control. Intelligent data reduction will have to be considered across the entire acquisition pipeline. In this context, the presentation will outline the enabling role of machine learning and parallel computing.BioVictor Pankratius is a computer scientist who joined MIT Haystack Observatory following his passion for astronomy. He is currently leading efforts to advance astronomy through cutting-edge computer science and parallel computing. Victor is also involved in projects such as ALMA Phasing to enhance the ALMA Observatory with Very-Long Baseline Interferometry capabilities, the Event Horizon Telescope, as well as in the Radio Array of Portable Interferometric Detectors (RAPID) to create an analysis environment using parallel computing in the cloud. He has an extensive track record of research in parallel multicore systems and software engineering, with contributions to auto-tuning, debugging, and empirical experiments studying programmers. Victor has worked with major industry partners such as Intel, Sun Labs, and Oracle. He holds a distinguished doctorate and a Habilitation degree in Computer Science from the University of Karlsruhe. Contact him at pankrat@mit.edu, victorpankratius.com, or Twitter @vpankratius.

Pankratius, Victor

2014-06-01

331

Developing Astronomy in Cuba  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction Beginning from a brief historical introduction the up to day situation is presented and the topics relevant to Astronomy development analyzed from the view point of a person actually working in Astrophysics. Arising from national needs, Astronomical Calculations is the only "native-born" branch of astronomy in Cuba. Cuba was an observational platform capable to provide the Soviet Union with the 24 hours solar patrol needed by its Space Agency System to protect the men in orbit. This was the beginning of a very fruitful development of solar research in Cuba. Russia installed the instruments, trained the people to operate them, and gives the academic environment to develop the scientific work in solar physics, space weather, and related topics. What about Stellar Astronomy? The Cuban astro-climate is not good to develop an observational base. We are trying to develop stellar astronomy in collaboration with institutions capable to provide both, the academic and technical environment; but to continue developing Stellar Astronomy we need to influence the public opinion and convince people they need groups working in Astronomy. How to do that? Publishing. Giving conferences talking about OUR work, not only like spectators of the science. Showing science is culture in modern times. Showing projects in Astronomy can be cheap. This is very important! Astronomy is not a luxury. Real possibilities I consider the Virtual Observatory concept the more appropriate in the near future, but it is necessary to have a connectivity level that is not commonly provided in Cuba, and to train the people. Concluding remarks From my experience "engagement" is the key word for Astronomy development in developing countries. Astronomy can not be developed without an appropriate academic environment, and we have not it. It is not "only" about financial resources, it is about "real collaboration" with a mature partner and common research goals.

Rodriguez Taboada, R. E.

2006-08-01

332

Izera projects. With astronomy into a forest. T.Mrozek, S. Kolomaoski, P. Suchan,  

E-print Network

Izera Projects: overview Primary goals: -scaled model of the Solar System -gnomon and sundial ­ tourist, 2010 #12;Gnomon and sundial the Gnomon: stone pillar (2 - 2.5 m) ­ from Strzegom quarry #12;Gnomon and sundial Mounted: May 9th, 2009 the Sundial: due to the orientation of the building two sundials were

Mrozek, Tomasz

333

The Morehead State University 18 Meter Radio Telescope Project: Involving Undergraduates in Observational Astrophysics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Space Science Center at Morehead State University is in the process of developing a large aperture (18-21 meter) cm-wave radio telescope, the Morehead Radio Telescope (MRT). The telescope will be located in the mountainous region of Eastern Kentucky. The instrument will serve as a research instrument and active laboratory for undergraduate astronomy, physics, pre-engineering, and computer science students. The antenna system will be engaged in science programs (in astrophysics) and in satellite mission support services (telemetry, tracking, and control). The benefits to students are based upon a hands-on approach to learning concepts in astrophysics and engineering. Additionally, there are still research contributions that small aperture centimeter-wave instruments can make including long-term observations of microvariability in AGNs, observations of transient events, and surveys. The MRT will operate three receiver systems including an L-band receiver (1.4-1.7 GHz) covering the "water hole", an S-band receiver (2.2-2.4 GHz) and a Ku-band receiver (11.2- 12.7 GHz) for continuum observations and satellite telemetry. The technical specifications for the instrument have been developed and an RFP has been issued inviting antenna vendors to submit proposals. The reflector will have a surface accuracy of 0.020 inches RMS over the entire surface, which will support relatively high frequency (Ku-band) observations. The antenna system will be full-motion and have a slew speed of 2 deg per second and an acceleration of 2 deg per second2. The HI and OH spatial distribution associated with cosmic phenomena will be investigated as well as dynamics and kinematics (particularly in HI) by observing over a range of frequencies (up to 2.5 MHz) with a 2048-channel back-end spectrometer, providing up to 1 KHz frequency resolution. The sensitivity and versatility of the telescope design will facilitate investigation of a wide variety of cosmic phenomena. The MRT is funded by assistance from the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the SBA.

Malphrus, B. K.; Combs, M. S.; Kruth, J.

2002-12-01

334

Developments in Level Five Modules in Theoretical Physics for Session 2013-14 For a number of years the School has been running 60-credit MPhys project modules for astronomy  

E-print Network

the School has been running 60-credit MPhys project modules for astronomy and for experimental physics" in the research experience. Students can commit full time to their research project without needing to put time aside for study on a lecture module. This is now to be extended to the MPhys Theoretical Physics project

Greenaway, Alan

335

Multimessenger Astronomy  

E-print Network

Multimessenger astronomy incorporating gravitational radiation is a new and exciting field that will potentially provide significant results and exciting challenges in the near future. With advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors (LCGT, LIGO, Virgo) we will have the opportunity to investigate sources of gravitational waves that are also expected to be observable through other messengers, such as electromagnetic (gamma-rays, x-rays, optical, radio) and/or neutrino emission. The LIGO-Virgo interferometer network has already been used for multimessenger searches for gravitational radiation that have produced insights on cosmic events. The simultaneous observation of electromagnetic and/or neutrino emission could be important evidence in the first direct detection of gravitational radiation. Knowledge of event time, source sky location, and the expected frequency range of the signal enhances our ability to search for the gravitational radiation signatures with an amplitude closer to the noise floor of the detector. Presented here is a summary of the status of LIGO-Virgo multimessenger detection efforts, along with a discussion of questions that might be resolved using the data from advanced or third generation gravitational wave detector networks.

N. L. Christensen; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration

2011-05-30

336

Astronomy 111 Introduction to Astronomy  

E-print Network

: 1. Tools of Astronomy: The Physics and History of Astronomy; Energy; Light; Spectra 2. Planets of the semester will be on conceptual understanding. (Astronomy 100, offered Spring 2013, is an alternative course, and Energy) and the processes that govern them; and · Understand how science works, and how we know what we

Lowenthal, James D.

337

Early Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The earliest investigations that can be called scientific are concerned with the sky: they are the beginnings of astronomy. Many early civilizations produced astronomical texts, and several cultures that left no written records left monuments and artifacts-ranging from rock paintings to Stonehenge-that show a clear interest in astronomy. Civilizations in China, Mesopotamia, India and Greece had highly developed astronomies, and the astronomy of the Mayas was by no means negligible. Greek astronomy, as developed by the medieval Arab philosophers, evolved into the astronomy of Copernicus. This displaced the earth from the central stationary position that almost all earlier astronomies had assumed. Soon thereafter, in the first decades of the seventeenth century, Kepler found the true shape of the planetary orbits and Galileo introduced the telescope for astronomical observations.

Thurston, Hugh

338

Vision for Astronomy in South Africa and partnership with the US  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2002 National Research and Development Strategy identified astronomy as a national geographic advantage. This identification was based on the historical investments in optical and, to a lesser extent, radio astronomy up to that point and the realisation that the conditions prevailing in Sutherland were among the best in the world. Since then a number of astronomy initiatives have burgeoned in the Southern African region and these include the HESS, SKA and the AVN. Currently, investments in astronomy are by far the biggest investments being made by the Department of Science and Technology (DST). South Africas involvement in modern astronomy dates back to 1685 when a French Astronomer, Guy Tachard, setup an observatory at the southern tip of Africa to decipher the star charts of the extreme southern sky. In 1820, a permanent observatory - the Royal Observatory - was established outside of Cape Town and astronomy has been practised continuously since then. By the late 1980s, it became clear that for South African astronomers and astrophysicists to continue conducting first class research, the acquisition of a much larger, powerful and sophisticated telescope would be necessary. This provided the impetus for a new vision to construct the largest single optical telescope in the Southern Hemisphere, eventually known as the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). Within the last decade, the African appetite for radio astronomy initiatives has increased exponentially. This has largely been spurred by the African bid to host the SKA project and the need for African countries to work in close partnership that consequently resulted in a successful bid to co-host the SKA project and the subsequent need to ensure its effective implementation. This partnership, and the interactions related thereto, has effectively enhanced awareness around the requirements for hosting radio astronomy instrumentation and the associated benefits that could be derived in making such commitments. Consequently, there have been concerted efforts in support of various radio astronomy initiatives that sit at the cusp of the continents ambitions for the hosting of the SKA.

Nemaungani, Takalani

2014-01-01

339

Reports of planetary astronomy, 1991  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A collection is presented of summaries designed to provide information about scientific research projects conducted in the Planetary Astronomy Program in 1990 and 1991, and to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned scientists and interested persons in universities, government, and industry. Highlights of recent accomplishments in planetary astronomy are included.

1991-01-01

340

IAC-02-IAA.2.3.01 Dishing up the Data: the role of Australian space tracking and radio astronomy facilities in the  

E-print Network

.Sarkissian@csiro.au Abstract The recent Australian film, The Dish, highlighted the role played by the Parkes Radio Telescope's major radio telescope facilities was being established at Parkes, in western New South Wales. This 64 Radio Telescope has been contracted by NASA on many occasions to support interplanetary spacecraft

Sarkissian, John M.

341

Astron. Astrophys. 357, L45--L48 (2000) ASTRONOMY ASTROPHYSICS  

E-print Network

­Planck­Institut f? ur Radioastronomie, Auf dem H? ugel 69, 53121 Bonn, Germany 2 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801­0387, USA 3 University of Michigan, Astronomy Department, Ann Arbor, MI 48109­1090, USA 4 Mets? ahovi Radio Observatory, Metsahovintie, 02540 Kylm? al? a, Finland

Brunthaler, Andreas

342

National Radio Astronomy Observatory (1)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Just one hundred years ago, J.C. Bose described to the Royal Institution in London his research carried out in Calcutta at millimeter wavelengths. He used waveguides, horn antennas, dielectric lenses, various polarizers and even semiconductors at frequencies as high as 60 GHz; much of his original equipment is still in existence, now at the Bose Institute in Calcutta. Some concepts

Jagadis Chandra Bose; D. T. Emerson

2003-01-01

343

The Radio Transient Sky  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transient radio sources are necessarily compact and usually are the locations of explosive or dynamic events, therefore offering unique opportunities for probing fundamental physics and astrophysics. In addition, short-duration transients are powerful probes of intervening media owing to dispersion, scattering, and Faraday rotation that modify the signals. While radio astronomy has an impressive record obtaining high time resolution, usually it

J. Lazio; P. S. Ray; S. Ellingson; S. Close; P. Crane; S. D. Hyman; B. A. Jacoby; W. Junor; N. E. Kassim; S. R. Kulkarni; Y. M. Pihlstrom; G. B. Taylor; D. Werthimer

2006-01-01

344

Bad Astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Philip Plait, a professor at the physics and astronomy department at Sonoma State University, explores many popular myths and misconceptions about astronomy at this amusing and educational website. Students and educators can learn which ideas promoted by television, news, movies, and the general public are false and, more importantly, why they are false. Amateur astronomers can talk with others about an array of bad astronomy topics on the Bulletin Board. The website offers information about Philip Plait's public talks and about astronomical events.

Plait, Philip

345

DID YOU KNOW? Originally the South African SKA Project had  

E-print Network

-generation telescopes such as MeerKAT, EVLA and the SKA. We are working with National Radio Astronomy Observatory in the requirements of radio astronomy and radio telescopes. Collaborations and partnerships with leading with access to cutting-edge expertise and extensive experience in radio astronomy instru- mentation

Jarrett, Thomas H.

346

Status of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)  

E-print Network

Status of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) R.D. Gehrz a, , E.E. Becklin The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), a joint US/German project, is a 2.5-m infrared by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Infrared Astronomy; Sub-millimeter astronomy; Airborne

De Buizer, James Michael

347

Astronomy Development in Nigeria: Challenges and Advances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nigeria evidently has huge potentials to develop a strong astronomy community. Much of the strength lies in the great number of intelligent students with the potential of becoming good astronomers. Sadly, astronomy development in Nigeria has stagnated in the past decades owing to poor funding and/or indifferent attitude of the funding bodies, research-unfriendly environment, and non-existence of facilities. Currently, efforts toward fuelling advancement in astronomy are focused on building critical mass, establishing collaborations with universities/astronomy institutes outside Nigeria, converting out-of-use communication antennas into radio telescopes, and acquiring out-of-use telescopes for educational and low-level research purposes.

Okwe Chibueze, James

2015-01-01

348

Astronomy Program for Young Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An account of a teacher's experience in presenting astronomy to 12 to 15 year olds in a summer science program is presented. Observations of planets, meteors, and the sun are the major projects which are discussed. (SA)

Levy, David H.

1979-01-01

349

DATA REDUCTION OF HYPERSPECTRAL RADIO-ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES FOR GALAXY CLUSTER SEGMENTATION  

E-print Network

as in the infrared on wide and remote objects. Whereas good quality spectroscopic data cubes are a relatively new phenomenon in optical astronomy, they are commonly used for more than twenty years in radio astronomy- tant for whole astronomy. 1.1. Radio-lines observation Data cubes from radio line observations contain

350

Multiwavelength Observations of the Second Largest Known FRII Radio Galaxy, NVSS 2146+82  

E-print Network

H. Bridle National Radio Astronomy Observatory3 Steven R. Majewski4 & Craig L. Sarazin Department upper limits on 1NOAO WIYN Queue Investigator 2National Radio Astronomy Observatory Jansky Pre-Doctoral Fellow 3The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation

Bridle, Alan

351

National Radio Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) "operates powerful, advanced radio telescopes spanning the western hemisphere." The website is nicely divided into information for the general public, astronomers, and teachers and students. Users can learn all about NRAO's many telescopes located throughout the United States. Researchers can find out about meetings, conferences, software resources, and surveys. Amateur radio astronomers can find links describing how to build antennas and interferometers. Everyone will enjoy the numerous images of astronomical phenomena and NRAO's telescopes and facilities.

352

Astronomy Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Astronomy Today has a great many articles on all subjects relevant to space and our Universe. The site touches on topics like amateur astronomy, telescope advice, string theory and quantum gravity. This site offers information about the planets, space exploration, constellations, meteors, comets, cosmology, and much more. The information is very clear cut and easy to understand.

Delehanty, Marc

2005-06-07

353

Primary Astronomy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics

Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

354

Intermediate Astronomy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics

Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

355

Richard Conn Henry is a Professor in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics & Astronomy, at The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, USA,  

E-print Network

, observational astronomy, radio astronomy, ultraviolet astronomy, and X-ray astronomy; and one book, "AtlasRichard Conn Henry is a Professor in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics & Astronomy on investigation of the origin of the cosmic diffuse ultraviolet background radiation: is there a dark matter

356

HIGH SENSITIVITY SIDEBAND-SEPARATING RECEIVERS FOR MILLIMETER ASTRONOMY: ACHIEVING THE ULTIMATE IN ASTROPHYSICAL SPECTROSCOPY  

E-print Network

, AZ, 85721; and A. R. KERR, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA. High resolution of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), new receiver architecture has been developed and put in use. RIELAND, R. W. FREUND, Arizona Radio Observatory, and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson

Ziurys, Lucy M.

357

Astronomy in Iraq  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The history of modern Iraqi astronomy is reviewed. During the early 1970's Iraqi astronomy witnessed significant growth through the introduction of the subject at university level and extensively within the school curriculum. In addition, astronomy was popularised in the media, a large planetarium was built in Baghdad, plus a smaller one in Basra. Late 1970 witnessed the construction of the Iraqi National Observatory at Mount Korek in Iraqi Kurdistan. The core facilities of the Observatory included 3.5-meter and 1.25-meter optical telescopes, and a 30-meter radio telescope for millimetre wavelength astronomy. The Iraqi Astronomical Society was founded and Iraq joined the IAU in 1976. During the regime of Saddam Hussain in the 1980's, the Observatory was attacked by Iranian artillery during the Iraq-Iran war, and then again during the second Gulf war by the US air force. Years of sanctions during the 1990's left Iraq cut off from the rest of the international scientific community. Subscriptions to astronomical journals were halted and travel to conferences abroad was virtually non-existent. Most senior astronomers left the country for one reason or another. Support from expatriate Iraqi astronomers existed (and still exists) however, this is not sufficient. Recent changes in Iraq, and the fall of Saddam's regime, has meant that scientific communication with the outside world has resumed to a limited degree. The Ministry of Higher Education in Baghdad, Baghdad University and the Iraqi National Academy of Science, have all played active roles in re-establishing Iraqi astronomy and re-building the damaged Observatory at Mount Korek. More importantly the University of Sallahudin in Erbil, capital of Iraqi Kurdistan, has taken particular interest in astronomy and the Observatory. Organized visits to the universities, and also to the Observatory, have given us a first-hand assessment of the scale of the damage to the Observatory, as well as the needs of astronomy teaching and research. Joint supervision for postgraduate level research was organized between local and Iraqi expatriate astronomers. The IAU was among the first international organizations to offer assistance. Many observatories worldwide have also given support. Plans will be proposed for re-building the Observatory, supporting teaching and research, and establishing an institute for astronomy in Erbil, together with further suggestions on how the international astronomical community can assist Iraqi astronomers.

Alsabti, A. W.

2006-08-01

358

New horizons in astronomy.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Besides the study of astronomy itself, other topics included cover the geological and biological developments on earth and basic physics of matter, heat, and light. Optical and radio telescopes are discussed, as well as photographic and photoelectric means of detection. The immediate solar system is described by topics on the properties and atmospheres of the inner and outer planets, the sun's energy, sunspots, and the solar spectrum. Stars both on and off the main sequence are discussed in terms of distances, intrinsic properties, lifetimes and evolution. The Milky Way is compared to other galaxies in size, star population and structure, and the different galaxy shapes are pictured. Topics of most recent interest are covered by results of the lunar explorations, new concepts of Mars, and problems of space travel. Problems of modern astronomy include pulsars, neutron stars, and quasars.

Brandt, J. C.; Maran, S. P.

1972-01-01

359

Signal Processing for Phased Array Feeds in Radio Astronomical Telescopes  

E-print Network

@ee.byu.edu), except : National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475, rfisher the earliest days of radio astronomy (RA), detecting faint deep space sources has pushed available technologySignal Processing for Phased Array Feeds in Radio Astronomical Telescopes Brian D. Jeffs, Senior

Wirthlin, Michael J.

360

PART 1: Astronomy and Society Monday, 10 June 2013  

E-print Network

PART 1: Astronomy and Society Monday, 10 June 2013 09h00 Registration 09h30 10' Welcome Session 1 and their importance for astronomy Ron Ekers 11h00 Tea/coffee Break Session 2: Why should society fund big science projects and big astronomy projects in particular? 11h30 30' The benefits of basic research in general

Galis, Frietson

361

NASE Training Courses in Astronomy for Teachers throughout the World  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Network for Astronomy School Education, NASE, is a project that is organizing courses for teachers throughout the entire world. The main objective of the project is to prepare secondary and primary school teachers in astronomy. Students love to know more about astronomy and teachers have the opportunity to observe the sky that every school has

Ros, Rosa M.

2012-01-01

362

The Radio Communication Project in Nepal: A Culture-Centered Approach to Participation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considerable research has been conducted on the topic of entertainment-education (EE), the method of using entertainment platforms such as popular music, radio, and television programming to diffuse information, attitudes, and behaviors via role modeling. A significant portion of the recently published EE literature has used the case of the Radio

Dutta, Mohan Jyoti; Basnyat, Iccha

2008-01-01

363

Ultraviolet Astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ultraviolet (UV) astronomy is the study of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by celestial bodies in the UV wavelength range, a portion of the spectrum simultaneously shielded by our own atmosphere and beyond the sensory limits of our sight....

L. Buson

2003-01-01

364

Status of the Radio Ice Cherenkov Experiment (RICE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radio Ice Cherenkov Experiment (RICE) is designed to detect ultrahigh energy (?100 TeV) neutrinos from astrophysical sources. RICE will consist of an array of compact radio (100 to 1000 MHz) receivers buried in ice at the South Pole. The objective is an array of greater than one cubic kilometer effective volume, complementary to TeV optical neutrino telescopes. The effective volume using the radio technique increases faster with energy than the optical technique, making the method more efficient at PeV energies. During the 1995-96 and 1996-97 austral summers, a pilot experiment consisting of several receivers and transmitters was deployed in bore holes drilled for the AMANDA project, at depths of 141 to 260 m. This was the first in situ test of radio receivers in deep ice for neutrino astronomy.

Allen, C.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Frichter, G.; Juett, A.; Karle, A.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; McKay, D.; Miller, T. C.; Piccirillo, L.; Ralston, J.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Spiczak, G. M.

1998-09-01

365

Astron. Astrophys. 357, 507--514 (2000) ASTRONOMY ASTROPHYSICS  

E-print Network

on multi­wavelength monitoring programs. Radio emission in REXRBs is normally highly variable and of non emission of radio loud X­ray binaries J.M. Paredes 1 , J. Mart?? � 2 , M. Peracaula 3,1 , G. Pooley 4, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, T2N IN4, Canada 4 Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, Cavendish

Paredes, Josep M.

366

Welcome to the World of Multiwavelength Astronomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Visitors can read and view imagery that explains how additional information can be revealed about celestial objects when they are imaged in multiple wavelengths or in wavelengths outside the visible range. Using the example of the Crab Nebula, this description shows that radio, ultraviolet, and X-ray astronomy reveal additional details of its structure and composition when compared with optical astronomy alone. Links to a glossary of terms are embedded in the text.

367

Community Participation, Cultural Discourse, and Health Education Projects in Developing Areas: The Case of the Radio Communication Project in Nepal  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author comments on the article by Dutta and Basnyat (see EJ802883) that provides an insightful and comprehensive critique of a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) entertainment-education program, The Radio Communication Program (RCP) in Nepal, which has been reported to be highly participatory. Despite

Linn, J. Gary

2008-01-01

368

Minoan Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Of the three great cultures of the ancient eastern Mediterranean the Babylonian, Egyptian, and Minoan we have considerable knowledge of the astronomy of the first two through their documents (see relevant sections of this Handbook). Very little written material, however, has survived from Minoan Crete, but the evidence of other impressive archaeological discoveries implies that the inhabitants were on a par with their neighbors and had made similar advances in astronomy. In lieu of written sources, we have used the methods of archaeoastronomy to recover as much as possible about Minoan astronomy. In short, these are measuring the orientations of walls and their opposite horizons at a representative selection of monuments, analyzing the measurements statistically, and comparing the results with digital reconstruction of the positions of significant celestial bodies for the time when the walls were built.

Blomberg, Mary; Henriksson, Gran

369

College Astronomy Teaching Excellence Workshops  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the education and public outreach efforts of the NASA JPL Navigator, SIRTF Mission and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, astronomy educators affiliated with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona are conducting a series of two- and three-day teaching excellence workshops for college faculty. These workshops are being held in conjunction with professional society meetings, such as the American Astronomical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers, and through the infrastructure of the National Science Foundation's Summer Chautauqua Workshop program. This three-day, interactive teaching excellence workshop focuses on dilemmas astronomy teachers face and develop practical solutions for the troubling issues in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. After reviewing the latest research about how students learn, participants define and set measurable student learning goals and objectives for students in their astronomy courses and construct effective course syllabi reflecting the ASTRO 101 goals publicized by the AAS. To improve instruction, participants learn how to create productive learning environments by using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, computer-based laboratories, and observational projects. Participants also learn how to write more effective multiple-choice tests and implement authentic assessment strategies including portfolio assessment, performance tasks, and concept maps. Texts provided at the workshop are: (i) Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching, Slater and Adams, Prentice Hall, 2002; (ii) Great Ideas for Teaching Astronomy, Pompea, Brooks Cole, 2000; and (iii) Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy, Adams, Prather, & Slater, Prentice Hall, 2002.

Slater, T. F.; Bennett, M.; Greene, W. M.; Pompea, S.; Prather, E. E.

2003-12-01

370

Multilayer and grazing incidence X-ray/EUV optics for astronomy and projection lithography; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 19-22, 1992  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present volume on multilayer and grazing incidence X-ray/EUV optics for astronomy and projection lithography discusses AXAF grazing incidence mirrors, the theory and high throughput optics of grazing incidence optics, multilayer mirror fabrication and characterization, and multilayer optics for X-ray projection lithography. Attention is given to the VETA-I X-ray detection system, a motion detection system for AXAF X-ray ground testing, image analysis of the AXAF VETA-I X-ray mirror, and optical constants from mirror reflectivities measured at synchrotrons. Topics discussed include the application of aberration theory to calculate encircled energy of Wolter I-II telescopes, W/C multilayers deposited on plastic films, nonspecular X-ray scattering from Si/Mo multilayers, and multilayer thin-film design as FUV polarizers. Also discussed are thin-film filter lifetesting results in the EUV, chromospheric and coronal observations with multilayer optics, present and future requirements of soft X-ray projection lithography, and the imaging Schwarzschild multilayer X-ray microscope.

Hoover, Richard B.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

1993-01-01

371

Reports of planetary astronomy - 1991  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This publication provides information about currently funded scientific research projects conducted in the Planetary Astronomy Program during 1991, and consists of two main sections. The first section gives a summary of research objectives, past accomplishments, and projected future investigations, as submitted by each principal investigator. In the second section, recent scientifically significant accomplishments within the Program are highlighted.

Rahe, Jurgen (editor)

1993-01-01

372

Astronomy Video Contest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of Galileo's staunchest supporters during his lifetime was Johannes Kepler, Imperial Mathematician to the Holy Roman Emperor. Johannes Kepler will be in St. Louis to personally offer a tribute to Galileo. Set Galileo's astronomy discoveries to music and you get the newest song by the well known acappella group, THE CHROMATICS. The song, entitled "Shoulders of Giants was written specifically for IYA-2009 and will be debuted at this conference. The song will also be used as a base to create a music video by synchronizing a person's own images to the song's lyrics and tempo. Thousands of people already do this for fun and post their videos on YOU TUBE and other sites. The ASTRONOMY VIDEO CONTEST will be launched as a vehicle to excite, enthuse and educate people about astronomy and science. It will be an annual event administered by the Johannes Kepler Project and will continue to foster the goals of IYA-2009 for years to come. The Astronomy Video poster will contain all the basic information about the contest including: categories, rules, prizes, web address for more info and how to download the new song, "Shoulders of Giants.

McFarland, John

2008-05-01

373

Astronomy Video Contest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During Galileo's lifetime his staunchest supporter was Johannes Kepler, Imperial Mathematician to the Holy Roman Emperor. Johannes Kepler will be in St. Louis to personally offer a tribute to Galileo. Set Galileo's astronomy discoveries to music and you get the newest song by the well known acappella group, THE CHROMATICS. The song, entitled "Shoulders of Giants was written specifically for IYA-2009 and will be debuted at this conference. The song will also be used as a base to create a music video by synchronizing a person's own images to the song's lyrics and tempo. Thousands of people already do this for fun and post their videos on YOU TUBE and other sites. The ASTRONOMY VIDEO CONTEST will be launched as a vehicle to excite, enthuse and educate people about astronomy and science. It will be an annual event administered by the Johannes Kepler Project and will continue to foster the goals of IYA-2009 for years to come. During this presentation the basic categories, rules, and prizes for the Astronomy Video Contest will be covered and finally the new song "Shoulders of Giants by THE CHROMATICS will be unveiled

McFarland, John

2008-05-01

374

On gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryPhotons in the visible range form the basis of astronomy. They move in straight lines, which preserves source information,\\u000a but they arise only very indirectly from nuclear or high-energy processes. Cosmic-ray particles, on the other hand, arise\\u000a directly from high-energy processes in astronomical objects of various classes, but carry no information about source direction.\\u000a Radio emissions are still more complex

P. Morrison

1958-01-01

375

Quiz 3 review Astronomy 1161  

E-print Network

waves have a wavelength , a frequency f and a speed c. 2. f = c. In a vacuum, light always travels: 4000-7000 °A 5. Infrared: 7000 °A- 1 mm 6. Microwaves: 1 mm - 0.1 m 7. Radio waves: > 0.1 m · How doesQuiz 3 review Astronomy 1161 1 Light · Explain the properties of light using the wave model. 1. All

Pradhan, Anil

376

Astronomy 362: Observational Astronomy University of Montana  

E-print Network

Astronomy 362: Observational Astronomy University of Montana Fall 2010 T/Th 2:10 ­ 3:30 pm CHCB 227://www.physics.umt.edu/~nate/astr362/ Course Description Observational astronomy relies heavily on application of advanced technology astronomy is dominated by the CCD and related pixel array detectors: digital devices with unprecedented

Vonessen, Nikolaus

377

Service Learning in Introductory Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Service learning is a method of instruction where the students in a course use the course's content in a service project. The service is included as a portion of the students' course grades. During the fall semester 2010, service learning was incorporated into the Introduction to Astronomy course at Misericordia University. The class had eight students and the service project centered on hosting astronomy observations for fifth- and sixth-grade students from two nearby elementary schools. The astronomy students operated telescopes, pointed out constellations, and spoke to the audience members about the objects they were observing. Since service learning requires a minimum number of hours the students must log over the course of fulfilling the service project, the students planned alternative activities in case the weather did not allow the observations to be held. A key part of service learning is for the students to reflect on the service experience and how it influenced their learning of the course material.

Orleski, Michael

2013-12-01

378

The effects of a satellite power system on ground-based astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of power transmission from the solar power satellite and of radiation from the ground based rectennas on radio astronomy, radar astronomy, and optical astronomy are discussed. Interference sources, acceptable signal and noise levels, and conflicting site requirements for observatories and rectennas are considered.

Thompson, A. R.

1980-01-01

379

Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 1?? , RFI Identi cation and Mitigation Using Simultaneous  

E-print Network

14853 S. Chatterjee National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 T. J Observatory, Westford, MA 01886 J. M. Cordes Astronomy Department and NAIC, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY mitigation is a critically important issue in radio astronomy using existing instruments as well

Ellingson, Steven W.

380

Radio and Optical Telescopes for School Students and Professional Astronomers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NRAO 20m telescope is now on-line as a part of UNC's Skynet worldwide telescope network. The NRAO is completing integration of radio astronomy tools with the Skynet web interface. We present the web interface and astronomy projects that allow students and astronomers from all over the country to become Radio Astronomers. The 20 meter radio telescope at NRAO in Green Bank, WV is dedicated to public education and also is part of an experiment in public funding for astronomy. The telescope has a fantastic new web-based interface, with priority queuing, accommodating priority for paying customers and enabling free use of otherwise unused time. This revival included many software and hardware improvements including automatic calibration and improved time integration resulting in improved data processing, and a new ultra high resolution spectrometer. This new spectrometer is optimized for very narrow spectral lines, which will allow astronomers to study complex molecules and very cold regions of space in remarkable detail. In accordance with focusing on broader impacts, many public outreach and high school education activities have been completed with many confirmed future activities. The 20 meter is now a fully automated, powerful tool capable of professional grade results available to anyone in the world. Drop by our poster and try out real-time telescope control!

Hosmer, Laura; Langston, G.; Heatherly, S.; Towner, A. P.; Ford, J.; Simon, R. S.; White, S.; O'Neil, K. L.; Haipslip, J.; Reichart, D.

2013-01-01

381

Astronomy Books  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This reference list has 11 kid-friendly books on a wide range of astronomy topics. For each title, the publisher and publication date are included along with author name. The list includes engaging stories, field guides and other reference books.

382

Astronomy Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of activities and references for teaching astronomy. The activities (which include objectives, list of materials needed, and procedures) focus on: observing the Big Dipper and locating the North Star; examining the Big Dipper's stars; making and using an astrolabe; examining retograde motion of Mars; measuring the Sun's

Greenstone, Sid

383

Civic Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The founding of the Dudley Observatory at Albany, N.Y., in 1852 was a milestone in humanity's age-old quest to understand the heavens. As the best equipped astronomical observatory in the U.S. led by the first American to hold a Ph.D. in astronomy, Benjamin Apthorp Gould Jr., the observatory helped pioneer world-class astronomy in America. It also proclaimed Albany's status as a major national center of culture, knowledge and affluence. This book explores the story of the Dudley Observatory as a 150 year long episode in civic astronomy. The story ranges from a bitter civic controversy to a venture into space, from the banks of the Hudson River to the highlands of Argentina. It is a unique glimpse at a path not taken, a way of doing science once promising, now vanished. As discoveries by the Dudley Observatory's astronomers, especially its second director Lewis Boss, made significant contributions to the modern vision of our Milky Way galaxy as a rotating spiral of more than a million stars, the advance of astronomy left that little observatory behind.

Wise, George

2004-10-01

384

Infrared astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review paper is a survey of infrared astronomy up to early 1969. The techniques and photometric standards are mentioned briefly, and results cover solar, lunar, and planetary observations. Point sources and extended sources both within and beyond the Galaxy are included, ending with the problem of cosmic background radiation. It is concluded that great progress will be possible when

Ronald F. Webbink; William Q. Jeffers

1969-01-01

385

THE COMPACT, TIME-VARIABLE RADIO SOURCE PROJECTED INSIDE W3(OH): EVIDENCE FOR A PHOTOEVAPORATED DISK?  

SciTech Connect

We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the compact ({approx}0.''05), time-variable radio source projected near the center of the ultracompact H II region W3(OH). The analysis of our new data as well as of VLA archival observations confirms the variability of the source on timescales of years and for a given epoch indicates a spectral index of {alpha} = 1.3 {+-} 0.3 (S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}). This spectral index and the brightness temperature of the source ({approx}6500 K) suggest that we are most likely detecting partially optically thick free-free radiation. The radio source is probably associated with the ionizing star of W3(OH), but an interpretation in terms of an ionized stellar wind fails because the detected flux densities are orders of magnitude larger than expected. We discuss several scenarios and tentatively propose that the radio emission could arise in a static ionized atmosphere around a fossil photoevaporated disk.

Dzib, Sergio A.; Rodriguez-Garza, Carolina B.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Kurtz, Stan E.; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis A.; Lizano, Susana, E-mail: s.dzib@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radiostronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58089 (Mexico)

2013-08-01

386

GEM 1506 HEAVENLY MATHEMATICS: HIGHLIGHTS OF CULTURAL ASTRONOMY  

E-print Network

GEM 1506 ­ HEAVENLY MATHEMATICS: HIGHLIGHTS OF CULTURAL ASTRONOMY TERM PROJECT THE NEW YEAR AND THE AUSPICIOUS HOURS......17 3.1 TERMS USED IN THE ASTRONOMY OF SRI LANKA signs (though, in reality the sun does not move). With a rich history behind the astronomy of Sri Lanka

Aslaksen, Helmer

387

The Astronomy Spacelab Payloads Study: Executive volume  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The progress of the Astronomy Spacelab Payloads Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center is reported. Astronomical research in space, using the Spacelab in conjunction with the Space Shuttle, is described. The various fields of solar astronomy or solar physics, ultraviolet and optical astronomy, and high energy astrophysics are among the topics discussed. These fields include scientific studies of the sun and its dynamical processes, of the stars in wavelength regions not accessible to ground based observations, and the exciting new fields of X-ray, gamma ray, and particle astronomy.

1975-01-01

388

Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. January 23, 2002 (DOI: will be inserted by hand later)  

E-print Network

National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801, U.S.A. e-mail: julvestaAstronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. January 23, 2002 (DOI: will be inserted by hand later) Radio Sources in Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei. III. \\AGNs" in a Distance-Limited Sample

Falcke, Heino

389

Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. freqn2hp.hyper7668 c ESO 2008 November 19, 2008  

E-print Network

by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory which is a facility of the National Science Foundation op- eratedAstronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. freqn2hp.hyper7668 c ESO 2008 November 19, 2008 and bands ­ Radio lines : ISM 1. Introduction In the quest for star forming cores, kinematic studies play

390

[A chapter prepared for the book \\Information Handling in Astronomy", edited by Andre Heck, to be published by Kluwer. Completed 2000-03-08.  

E-print Network

Radio Astronomy Observatory 2 The history of the Flexible Image Transport System [FITS] is re- viewed for astronomy worldwide, the International Astronomical 1 dwells@nrao.edu 2 The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the US National Science Foun- dation operated under cooperative agreement

Wells, Donald C.

391

A Spectral Line Survey of Selected 3 Millimeter Bands toward Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory 12 Meter Radio Telescope and the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association Array. I. The Observational Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have initiated a spectral line survey, at a wavelength of 3 mm, toward the hot molecular core Sgr B2(N-LMH). This is the first spectral line survey of the Sgr B2(N) region utilizing data from both an interferometer (Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association [BIMA] array) and a single-element radio telescope (NRAO 12 m). In this survey, covering 3.6 GHz in bandwidth, we detected

D. N. Friedel; L. E. Snyder; B. E. Turner; A. Remijan

2004-01-01

392

faculty of engineering and physical sciences School of Physics and Astronomy  

E-print Network

faculty of engineering and physical sciences School of Physics and Astronomy Postgraduate Project.........................................................................................................................3 Biological Physics........................................................................................................................................... 8 Condensed Matter Physics

393

Astronomy Magazine  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Looking to get started as an amateur astronomer? Here are two sites which can help you do just that. The Astronomy Magazine site, provided by Kalmbach Publishing Company, offers a table of contents and a few articles from the print magazine as well as information regarding current sky events, latest news, getting stared as an amateur astronomer, press releases, links to other astronomical sites, and software.

394

Astronomy Workshop  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Astronomy Workshop from the University of Maryland features interactives, animations, calculators, and other online computer-assisted learning tools enabling middle-school and older students to investigate the solar system and the universe. Units allow students to investigate astronomical distances and the size of objects in the universe; examine what might happen if objects collide; investigate orbital mechanics; visualize the distribution and motions of objects in the solar system; and many other topics.

Dr. Douglas P. Hamilton

395

Astronomy Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of animations introduces students to planetary motions, gravitational effects, and the scale of astronomical distances. Students can view visualizations of Earth's changing seasons, circumpolar motion, and the celestial equator and ecliptic plane. Animations on gravity explain how satellites orbit, the motions of comets and meteor storms, and gravitational 'warping'. Other animations explain how Earth's tides are produced, how astronomical distances are calculated, the use of spectra in astronomy, and the lifecycles of stars.

396

Astronomy Animations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of animations introduces students to planetary motions, gravitational effects, and the scale of astronomical distances. Students can view visualizations of Earth's changing seasons, circumpolar motion, and the celestial equator and ecliptic plane. Animations on gravity explain how satellites orbit, the motions of comets and meteor storms, and gravitational 'warping'. Other animations explain how Earth's tides are produced, how astronomical distances are calculated, the use of spectra in astronomy, and the lifecycles of stars.

Barnbaum, Cecilia

2011-04-12

397

Astronomy Lessons  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of astronomy lesson plans and experiments from across the internet was developed by Reach Out, a center linking University of Michigan and community mentors with children and teens. Topics covered include comets, the Sun, sunspots, the aurora, craters, galaxies, moons, star properties, Moon phases, and meteors. Each lesson plan gives credit to the developer, and contains all the information necessary for applying the lesson in a classroom setting.

398

Inuit Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inuit live mainly in the treeless Arctic regions of North America, Greenland, and parts of northeastern Siberia. Their cosmology, based on shamanistic belief, constructed a view of the sky and its contents distinctively suited to their spiritual and pragmatic needs. Their astronomy, particularly for those groups living far above the Arctic Circle, reflects the unique appearance of the celestial sphere at high northerly latitudes, demonstrated most noticeably in the annual disappearance of the sun during midwinter months.

MacDonald, John

399

Astronomy sortie missions definition study. Volume 2, book 1: Astronomy sortie program technical report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work performed to arrive at a baseline astronomy sortie mission concept is summarized. The material includes: (1) definition of the telescopes and arrays; (2) preliminary definition of mission and systems; (3) identification, definition, and evaluation of alternative sortie programs; (4) the recommended astronomy sortie program; and (5) the astronomy sortie program concept that was approved as a baseline for the remainder of the project.

1972-01-01

400

Humanising Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an international programme that aims to expose underprivileged children (in the age group 4-10) to the inspirational aspects of astronomy. We are currently at the stage of developing materials that will be utilised in a diverse range of environments. This paper explores UNAWE's particular approach to developing tools which includes not only indigenous and folkloric astronomical knowledge, but also the culture of transmission of such knowledge. A specific understanding and explanation of the Universe, the Sun, Moon and stars is present in every culture and can be found contained in its history, legends and belief systems. By consciously embracing different ways of knowing the Universe and not uniquely the rational model, UNAWE places the humanising potential of astronomy at the centre of its purpose. Whilst inspiring curiosity, pride and a sense of ownership in one's own cultural identity, such an approach also exposes children to the diversity of other peoples and their cultures as well as the unifying aspects of our common scientific heritage. The means of creating and delivering the astronomy programme are as relevant to the desired educational outcomes as the content. The challenge in the design of materials is to communicate this stimulating message to the very young. Respect for alternative values systems, the need for dialogue and community participation, and where possible the production of materials using local resources is emphasised. This paper touches recent experiences liaising with communities in India, South Africa, Tunisia, Venezuela and Colombia.

Levin, S.

2008-06-01

401

Radio observations of the Milky Way from the classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the project to introduce the first European network of radio telescopes for education. It enables pupils to detect spectral line emission of neutral hydrogen in the Milky Way at a wavelength of 21 cm. Any classroom connected to Internet via any web-browser can remotely control one of the radio-telescopes, observe and analyse obtained spectra: derive the Milky-Way rotation curve and recognise spiral arms in hydrogen distribution. Doing exercises pupils, guided by their teachers, learn the basics of radio astronomy research, use scientific method to explore and interpret the attained spectral data. A range of attractive educational materials are prepared to help in disseminating the scientific knowledge in the classroom and demonstrate the modern information technology.

Chy?y, Krzysztof T.

2014-12-01

402

Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechanisms and propagation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-2412. The objective of this project is to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as if flew by Neptune. This study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, ray tracing, and modeling to determine the possible source mechanism(s) and locations of the Neptune radio emissions. We have completed four papers, which are included in the appendix. The paper 'Modeling of Whistler Ray Paths in the Magnetosphere of Neptune' investigated the propagation and dispersion of lighting-generated whistler in the magnetosphere of Neptune by using three dimensional ray tracing. The two papers 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Radio Emissions from Planetary Magnetospheres' and 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Planetary Radio Emissions' employed numerical simulations to investigate an alternate source mechanism of bursty radio emissions in addition to the cyclotron maser instability. We have also studied the possible generation of Z and whistler mode waves by the temperature anisotropic beam instability and the result was published in 'Electron Cyclotron Wave Generation by Relativistic Electrons.' Besides the aforementioned studies, we have also collaborated with members of the PRA team to investigate various aspects of the radio wave data. Two papers have been submitted for publication and the abstracts of these papers are also listed in the appendix.

Wong, H. K.

1994-01-01

403

Astronomy LITE Demonstrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Project LITE (Light Inquiry Through Experiments) is a materials, software, and curriculum development project. It focuses on light, optics, color and visual perception. According to two recent surveys of college astronomy faculty members, these are among the topics most often included in the large introductory astronomy courses. The project has aimed largely at the design and implementation of hands-on experiences for students. However, it has also included the development of lecture demonstrations that employ novel light sources and materials. In this presentation, we will show some of our new lecture demonstrations concerning geometrical and physical optics, fluorescence, phosphorescence and polarization. We have developed over 200 Flash and Java applets that can be used either by teachers in lecture settings or by students at home. They are all posted on the web at http://lite.bu.edu. For either purpose they can be downloaded directly to the user's computer or run off line. In lecture demonstrations, some of these applets can be used to control the light emitted by video projectors to produce physical effects in materials (e.g. fluorescence). Other applets can be used, for example, to demonstrate that the human percept of color does not have a simple relationship with the physical frequency of the stimulating source of light. Project LITE is supported by Grant #DUE-0125992 from the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education.

Brecher, Kenneth

2006-12-01

404

Big data challenges for large radio arrays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Future large radio astronomy arrays, particularly the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to generate data at rates far higher than can be analyzed or stored affordably with current practices. This is, by definition, a \\

Dayton L. Jones; Kiri Wagstaff; David R. Thompson; Larry D'Addario; Robert Navarro; Chris Mattmann; Walid Majid; Joseph Lazio; Robert Preston; Umaa Rebbapragada

2012-01-01

405

Service Learning in Introductory Astronomy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Service learning is a method of instruction where the students in a course use the course's content in a service project. The service is included as a portion of the students' course grades. During the fall semester 2010, service learning was incorporated into the Introduction to Astronomy course at Misericordia University. The class had

Orleski, Michael

2013-01-01

406

No Evidence for Evolution in the Far-Infrared-Radio Correlation out to z 2 in the ECDFS  

E-print Network

National Radio Astronomy Observatory, PO Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944, USA George Helou Infrared Processing Dickinson National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA Dave Frayer Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia

Norris, Ray

407

Astronomy Mission Module  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson about finding habitable planets. Learners will use an online, multimedia module to simulate the techniques that scientists might use to find a star system and planet that meet the astronomical conditions required for human habitability. Students then summarize their learning from this unit in a final project. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson 13 in the Astro-Venture Astronomy Unit. The lessons are designed for educators to use in conjunction with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

408

Early infrared astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I present a short history of infrared astronomy, from the first scientific approaches of the radiant heat in the seventeenth century to the 1970's, the time when space infrared astronomy was developing very rapidly. The beginning of millimeter and submillimeter astronomy is also covered. As the progress of infrared astronomy was strongly dependent on detectors, some details are given on their development.

Lequeux, James

2009-07-01

409

Astronomy Books of 1985.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides annotated listing of books in 16 areas: (1) amateur astromony; (2) children's books; (3) comets; (4) cosmology; (5) education in astronomy; (6) general astronomy; (7) history of astronomy; (8) life in the universe; (9) miscellaneous; (10) physics and astronomy; (11) pseudo-science; (12) space exploration; (13) stars and stellar evolution;

Mercury, 1986

1986-01-01

410

Upgrade of the radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher for the HIE-ISOLDE project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The upgrade to the ISOLDE facility, HIE-ISOLDE, will include an upgrade to the RFQCB (radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher), the focus of which will be fixing the problems of alignment with the current machine, improving the integrity of the vacuum system, stabilizing the internal gas pressure, and the changes associated with a new position. The beam passage inside the RFQCB has been simulated with an independent code to highlight the importance of the internal gas pressure, to motivate design changes in the new RFQCB and to explain ways to improve the performance of the current machine. The suspected misalignment of ISCOOL has been quantified, and, using a simulation of ions passing through the external injection electrodes, the effect of the misalignment on machine acceptance has been detailed. Plans for the future RFQCB test stand and HIE-ISOLDE installation have been outlined.

Babcock, Carla; Giles, Tim

2013-12-01

411

High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy  

E-print Network

Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by neutrinos with energies similar to those of the highest energy cosmic rays.

F. Halzen

2005-01-26

412

Education with Infrared Astronomy and Spitzer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present education and outreach results using our experiences involving the Spitzer Space Telescope project, Star Formation in High Redshift Clusters with Spitzer. The project is a collaboration between the Spitzer Science Center and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we measured star formation rates in three galaxy clusters at intermediate redshifts. Six teachers were chosen for the program, each with an interest and involvement in astronomy education. From this project, lesson plans, public outreach, lectures and demonstrations were generated which better the understanding of infrared astronomy, multiwavelength astronomy, galaxy and star formation, and cosmology. The teacher mentors are Dr. Gregory Rudnick (NOAO), Dr. Rose Finn (Siena College), and Dr. Vandana Desai (Caltech). Please see the companion posters by Emily Petroff, Zak Schroeder, and Thomas Loughran, et al, for information concerning the science results.

Hemphill, Rosa; Blackwell, J. A.; Herrold, A.; Petroff, E.

2007-12-01

413

Development and Use of Astronomy-Like Devices for UFO Monitoring: A Research Project for the Study of UFO Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A research project aimed at studying unidentified atmospheric `nocturnal lights' in world areas of recurrence is presented. In such a context targets are considered and treated on a par with celestial and/or atmospheric objects having no fixed coordinates. Such a project involves the use of a battery of 20 mini-telescopes which can be interchangeable with wide-field lenses. Both types of light collectors, which are intended to work in the near-IR, optical and near-UV ranges, are planned to be connected to detectors for CCD imaging and fast photon-counting photometry, to objective-prisms for low-resolution spectroscopy and to grism-slit spectrographs for high-resolution spectroscopy. The overall measurement instrumental platform is intended to be guided simultaneously by a radar, by an IR alarm sensor and by a laser telemetric device in order to allow physical scientists to search, point and track a given bright flying object which is characterized supposedly by random motions. Finally, physical informations which are expected to come out from data analysis are presented and discussed in detail.

Teodorani, M.

414

The Evaluation of a Public Document: The Case of FCC's Marine Radio Rules for Recreational Boaters. Document Design Project, Technical Report No. 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a collaborative effort, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Document Design Project conducted an evaluation of marine radio rules for recreational boaters that had been rewritten in plain English by FCC personnel. The revised rules were evaluated by 53 experienced boaters and 52 inexperienced boaters, who were given either the

Felker, Daniel B.; Rose, Andrew M.

415

A Master Plan for the Evaluation of the Radio Component of the Fifth Education Project for the Royal Government of Thailand.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The master plan for evaluation presented in this report was developed by a UNESCO consultant as part of an agreement between the Government of Thailand and the United Nations Development Program for a project providing technical assistance for strengthening educational radio for schools and out-of-school education. Although this plan is restricted

Bates, Tony

416

Music and Astronomy Under The Stars after 4 years and 50,000 People  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2009 my NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) program has brought astronomy to 50,000 music lovers at the National Mall (co-sponsor OSTP); Central Park Jazz, Newport Folk, Ravinia, or Tanglewood music festivals; and classical, folk, pop/rock, opera, Caribbean, or county-western concerts in parks assisted by astronomy clubs (55 events; 28parks). MAUS combines solar, optical, and radio telescope observations; live image projection; large posters/banners (From the Earth to the Universe and Visions of the Universe); videos; and hands-on activities (Night Sky Network; Harvard-Smithsonian CfA); imaging with a cell phone mount; and hand-outs(with info on science museums, astronomy clubs, and citizen science before and after the concerts or at intermission. Yo-Yo-Ma, the Chicago and Boston Symphony Orchestras, the McCoy Tyner Quartet, Ravi Coltrane, Esperanza Spalding, the Stanley Clarke Band, Phish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Deep Purple, Patti Smith, Tony Orlando, and Ronan Tynan performed at these concerts. MAUS reached underserved groups and attracted large enthusiastic crowds. Many young children participated in this family learning experience-often the first time they looked through a telescope. Lessons learned: plan early; create partnerships with parks and astronomy clubs; test equipment; have backup equipment; create professional displays; select the best location to obtain a largest number of participants; use media/www sites to promote the events; use many telescopes for multipletargets; project a live image or video; select equipment that is easy to use, store, set-up, and take down; use hands-on astronomy activities; position the displays for maximum visibility (they became teachable moments); and have educator hand-outs. While < 50% of the participants attended a science museum or took part in astronomy programs in the previous year (based on our survey), they found MAUS enjoyable and understandable; learned about astronomy; wanted to learn more; and increased their interest in science (ave. rating 4.6/5). Taking science directly to people is effective in promoting scienceeducation! Sponsor: NASA grant NNX09AD53G

Lubowich, Donald A.

2013-01-01

417

Astronomers Without Borders: A Global Astronomy Community  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomers Without Borders (AWB) brings together astronomy enthusiasts of all types - amateur astronomers, educators, professionals and "armchair" astronomers for a variety of online and physicalworld programs. The AWB web site provides social networking and a base for online programs that engage people worldwide in astronomy activities that transcend geopolitical and cultural borders. There is universal interest in astronomy, which has been present in all cultures throughout recorded history. Astronomy is also among the most accessible of sciences with the natural laboratory of the sky being available to people worldwide. There are few other interests for which people widely separated geographically can engage in activities involving the same objects. AWB builds on those advantages to bring people together. AWB also provides a platform where projects can reach a global audience. AWB also provides unique opportunities for multidisciplinary collaboration in EPO programs. Several programs including The World at Night, Global Astronomy Month and others will be described along with lessons learned.

Simmons, M.

2011-10-01

418

A Small Radio Telescope for Instructional Purposes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio astronomers nowadays have a number of excellent instruments to choose from for their research projects, such as the VLA, VLBA, Arecibo,etc. However, these instruments do not readily furnish the opportunity for student instruction in the technical aspects of radio astronomy that was available twenty five years ago or more. Such experience can in part be provided by small dedicated telescopes at universities. Such a radiotelescope has been installed at the University of Iowa. A commercial 4.5 meter satellite TV antenna has been modified to work as a radiotelescope. The radio telescope operates as a transit instrument, with computer control of elevation pointing. Working receivers exist at 5.0 and 1.4 GHz. Components exist for construction of receivers at 610 MHz and 15.0 GHz. Observations to date have been made of the Sun, Moon, Crab Nebula, and galactic HI. We have recently installed a mechanical switch in the 5 GHz front end, built switching electronics, and written a Labview virtual instrument to provide a Dicke radiometer. In the immediate future we plan to use this instrument to repeat the determination of the 5.0 GHz radio phase function of the Moon. Our presentation will include information on commercial sources of critical components for the system, such as low loss RF cables, low insertion loss mechanical switches, low noise amplifiers, etc.

Spangler, S. R.; Wurster, J. E.; Nellermoe, B. L.

1996-12-01

419

Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 366, 12651288 (2006) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2005.09916.x CENSORS: A Combined EISNVSS Survey of Radio Sources II.  

E-print Network

- ple was selected from the National Radio Astronomy Obs. Best,2 R. Rengelink2 and H. J. A. R¨ottgering2 1Institute for Astronomy, Royal Observatory Edinburgh EIS­NVSS Survey of Radio Sources (CENSORS) is a 1.4-GHz radio survey selected from the National Radio

Best, Philip

420

Successful Innovative Methods in Introducing Astronomy Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Innovating new informative methods to induce interest in students has permitted us to introduce astronomy in several universities and institutes in Mexico. As a prelude, we gave a popular course in the history of astronomy. This was very easy as astronomy seems to be the most ancient of sciences and relating the achievements of the ancient philosophers/scientists was very enlightening. Then we put up an amateur show of the sky every week (subject to climatic conditions for observability). We showed how to take photographs and make telescopic observations. We enlightened the students of the special missions of NASA and took them to museums for space exploration. We gave a popular seminar on "Astrodynamics," highlighting its importance. We gave a series of introductory talks in radio and T.V. Finally we exposed them to electronic circulars, like "Universe Today" and "World Science." The last mentioned strategy had the most electrifying effect. We may not have been successful without it, as the students began to take the matter seriously only after reading numerous electronic circulars. In this respect, these circulars are not only informative about the latest news in astronomy, but highlight the role of astronomy in the modern world. Without it, students seem to relate astronomy to astrology; it is due to this misconception that they are not attracted to astronomy. Students were hardly convinced of the need for an astronomy course, as they did not know about the scope and development of the subject. This awakened the interests of students and they themselves proposed the initiation of an elementary course in astronomy to have a feel of the subject. Later on they proposed a course on "Rocket Dynamics." We will discuss our methods and their impact in detail.

Chattejee, T. K. C.

2006-08-01

421

From Giza to the Pantheon: astronomy as a key to the architectural projects of the ancient past  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In many of the ``wonders'' of our past, information about their meaning and scope has been encoded in the form of astronomical alignments to celestial bodies. Therefore, in many cases, understanding the ideas of the ancient architects turns out to be connected with the study of the relationship of their cultures with the sky. This is the aim of archaeoastronomy, a discipline which is a quite efficacious tool in unraveling the original projects of many monuments. This issue is briefly discussed here by means of three examples taken from three completely different cultures and historical periods: the so-called ``air shafts'' of the Great Pyramid, the urban layout of the capital of the Incas, and the design of the Pantheon.

Magli, Giulio

2011-06-01

422

Music and Astronomy Under the Stars 2009  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bring telescopes to where the people are! Music and Astronomy Under the Stars is a three-year NASA-funded astronomy outreach program at community parks during and after music concerts and outdoor family eventssuch as a Halloween Stars-Spooky Garden Walk. While there have been many astronomy outreach activities and telescope observations at city sidewalks and parks, this program targets a completely different audience: music lovers who are attending summer concerts held in community parks. These music lovers who may never have visited a science museum, planetarium, or star party are exposed to telescope observations and astronomy information with no additional travel costs. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars increased awareness, engagement, and interest in astronomy at classical, pop, rock, and ethnic music concerts. This program includes solar observing before the concerts, telescope observations including a live image projection system, an astronomical video presentation, and astronomy banners/posters. Approximately 500-16,000 people attended each event and 25% to 50% of the people at each event participated in the astronomy program. This program also reached underrepresented and underserved groups (women, minorities, older adults). The target audience (Nassau and Suffolk Counties, New York) is 2,900,000 people, which is larger than combined population of Atlanta, Boston, Denver, Minneapolis, and San Francisco. Although eleven events were planned in 2009, two were canceled due to rain and our largest event, the NY Philharmonic in the Park (attended by 67,000 people in 2008), was cancelled for financial reasons. Our largest event in 2009 was the Tanglewood Music Festival, Lenox MA, attended by 16,000 people where over 5000 people participated in astronomy activities. The Amateur Observers' Society of New York assisted with the NY concerts and the Springfield STARS astronomy club assisted at Tanglewood. In 2009 over 15,000 people participated in astronomy activities at these events which were attended by approximately 50,000 people.

Lubowich, D.

2010-08-01

423

Australian Aboriginal Astronomy in the International Year of Astronomy  

E-print Network

1 Australian Aboriginal Astronomy in the International Year of Astronomy Ray P. Norris CSIRO Astronomy & Space Science, NSW, Australia Warawara Dept. The International year of Astronomy seemed an excellent opportunity to tell the wider

Norris, Ray

424

The SERENDIP piggyback SETI project.  

PubMed

The SERENDIP project is an ongoing program of monitoring and processing broadband radio signals acquired by existing radio astronomy observatories. SERENDIP operates in a piggyback mode: it makes use of whatever observing plan (sequence of frequencies, sky coordinates, and polarizations) is under way at its host observatory. Moreover, the SERENDIP data acquisition system, once installed, operates autonomously. This approach makes it possible to obtain large amounts of high quality observing time in a manner that is economical and that does not adversely affect ongoing radio astronomy survey work. The SERENDIP II system has been installed at the NRAO 300-foot telescope at Green Bank, West Virginia, and has operated there for several thousand hours. In this report, we summarize our findings from these observations and describe the present status of the project. Two key elements of SERENDIP are the automated data acquisition system that uses adaptive thresholds and logs only statistically significant peaks in the real-time power spectra, and the subsequent off-line analysis programs that identify and reject a variety of interference signals. Several specific correlations have been identified that offer promise. At present, the development and testing of these interference rejection algorithms is the main thrust of our work. PMID:11537162

Lampton, M; Bowyer, S; Werthimer, D; Donnelly, C; Herrick, W

1992-01-01

425

Optical and Radio Emission from the Galactic Supernova Remnant HB 3 (G132.6+1.5)  

E-print Network

Observer, Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatories, operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National, Case Western Reserve University. 2 Also the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg

426

Teaching and Learning Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preface; Part I. Astronomy in the Curriculum Around the World: Preface; 1. Why astronomy is useful and should be included in the school curriculum John R. Percy; 2. Astronomy and mathematics education Rosa M. Ros; 3. Astronomy in the curriculum around the world; 4. Engaging gifted science students through astronomy Robert Hollow; 5. Poster highlights: astronomy in the curriculum around the world; Part II. Astronomy Education Research: Preface; 6. Astronomy education research down under John M. Broadfoot and Ian S. Ginns; 7. A contemporary review of K-16 astronomy education research Janelle M. Bailey and Timothy F. Slater; 8. Implementing astronomy education research Leonarda Fucili; 9. The Astronomy Education Review: report on a new journal Sidney C. Wolff and Andrew Fraknoi; 10. Poster highlights: astronomy education research; Part III. Educating Students: Preface; 11. Textbooks for K-12 astronomy Jay M. Pasachoff; 12. Distance/internet astronomy education David H. McKinnon; 13. Educating students with robotic telescopes - open discussion; 14. Poster highlights - educating students; Part IV. Educating teachers: Preface; 15. Pre-service astronomy education of teachers Mary Kay Hemenway; 16. In-service education of teachers Michle Gerbaldi; 17. Poster highlights: educating teachers; Part V. Astronomy and Pseudoscience: Preface; 18. Astronomy, pseudoscience and rational thinking Jayant V. Narlikar; 19. Astronomical pseudosciences in North America John R. Percy and Jay M. Pasachoff; Part VI. Astronomy and Culture: Preface; 20. Teaching astronomy in other cultures: archeoastronomy Julieta Fierro; 21. Poster highlights: astronomy and culture; Part VII. Astronomy in Developing Countries: Preface; 22. Astronomy Curriculum for developing countries Case Rijsdijk; 23. Science education resources for the developing countries James C. White II; Part VIII. Public Outreach in Astronomy: Preface; 24. What makes informal education programs successful? Nahide Craig and Isabel Hawkins; 25. The role of science centers and planetariums Nick Lomb; 26. Science education for the new century - a European perspective Claus Madsen; 27. Communicating astronomy to the public Charles Blue; 28. Poster highlights: public outreach in astronomy; Part IX. The Education Programs of the IAU: Preface; 29. A short overview of astronomical education carried out by the IAU Syuzo Isobe; Part X. Discussion; Index.

Pasachoff, Jay; Percy, John

2009-07-01

427

Teaching and Learning Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preface; Part I. Astronomy in the Curriculum Around the World: Preface; 1. Why astronomy is useful and should be included in the school curriculum John R. Percy; 2. Astronomy and mathematics education Rosa M. Ros; 3. Astronomy in the curriculum around the world; 4. Engaging gifted science students through astronomy Robert Hollow; 5. Poster highlights: astronomy in the curriculum around the world; Part II. Astronomy Education Research: Preface; 6. Astronomy education research down under John M. Broadfoot and Ian S. Ginns; 7. A contemporary review of K-16 astronomy education research Janelle M. Bailey and Timothy F. Slater; 8. Implementing astronomy education research Leonarda Fucili; 9. The Astronomy Education Review: report on a new journal Sidney C. Wolff and Andrew Fraknoi; 10. Poster highlights: astronomy education research; Part III. Educating Students: Preface; 11. Textbooks for K-12 astronomy Jay M. Pasachoff; 12. Distance/internet astronomy education David H. McKinnon; 13. Educating students with robotic telescopes - open discussion; 14. Poster highlights - educating students; Part IV. Educating teachers: Preface; 15. Pre-service astronomy education of teachers Mary Kay Hemenway; 16. In-service education of teachers Michle Gerbaldi; 17. Poster highlights: educating teachers; Part V. Astronomy and Pseudoscience: Preface; 18. Astronomy, pseudoscience and rational thinking Jayant V. Narlikar; 19. Astronomical pseudosciences in North America John R. Percy and Jay M. Pasachoff; Part VI. Astronomy and Culture: Preface; 20. Teaching astronomy in other cultures: archeoastronomy Julieta Fierro; 21. Poster highlights: astronomy and culture; Part VII. Astronomy in Developing Countries: Preface; 22. Astronomy Curriculum for developing countries Case Rijsdijk; 23. Science education resources for the developing countries James C. White II; Part VIII. Public Outreach in Astronomy: Preface; 24. What makes informal education programs successful? Nahide Craig and Isabel Hawkins; 25. The role of science centers and planetariums Nick Lomb; 26. Science education for the new century - a European perspective Claus Madsen; 27. Communicating astronomy to the public Charles Blue; 28. Poster highlights: public outreach in astronomy; Part IX. The Education Programs of the IAU: Preface; 29. A short overview of astronomical education carried out by the IAU Syuzo Isobe; Part X. Discussion; Index.

Pasachoff, Jay; Percy, John

2005-12-01

428

Astropy: Community Python Software for Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Astropy Project is a community effort to develop an open source Python package of common data structures and routines for use by other, more specialized astronomy software in Python in order to foster software interoperability in the astronomical community. The project encompasses Astropy's core and affiliated" packages that adopt Astropys coding, testing and documentation standards. By doing so we aim to improve interoperability with other Python packages in astronomy, and help a broader community implement more Pythonic solutions to astronomy computing problems while minimizing duplication of effort. The project provides a template for other projects that use Astropy to reuse much of Astropys development framework without reinventing the wheel. Here we present an overview of the key features of the core package (existing and upcoming), current and planned affiliated packages, and how we manage a large open source project with a diverse community of contributors.

Greenfield, Perry; Tollerud, E. J.; Robitaille, T.; Developers, Astropy

2014-01-01

429

PROPOSED PORTHOLE FOR ASTRONOMY MAJORS Information for Astronomy Majors  

E-print Network

PROPOSED PORTHOLE FOR ASTRONOMY MAJORS Information for Astronomy Majors The Astronomy Major sciences such as Astronomy, Physics, or Engineering. (Link to details on Astrophysics Concentration) The General Astronomy Concentration is intended for students who do not plan on research careers in astronomy

Richardson Jr., James E.

430

Astronomy Education: a Challenge for Contemporary Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tales around the World give visibility to local, national and international fundamental connection that always existed between people and the night sky that means Astronomy. In this paper we discuss and analyze further the role of Astronomy Education for achieving an integrated concept of education, one that enables individuals to adapt to a rapidly changing social, economic and cultural environment, and to continue to learn throughout life. It is no longer enough to learn how to read, write and count. We also discuss and present initiatives undertaken in the context of various national, and international educational projects in Greece as best practices on how Astronomy Education can actually reinforce the Contemporary Education.

Metaxa, M.

2010-07-01

431

Saturn's variable radio period  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Latest SKR measurements by Cassini/RPWS confirm the observed, slow and regular increase of its rotational modulation period ( 10.9 hr), at the scale of about 0.5 percent over the last three years. In the meantime, similar drifts could also be found in some other observed magnetospheric phenomena (e.g. magnetic field, UV auroras, etc. . . ), indicating that the inner magnetosphere of Saturn is globally changing at the 30-year scale of its revolution around the Sun. In order to better assess the possible causes of the observed variation, the whole Cassini radio astronomy data set is reexamined, and compared to the long lasting (1991-2007) Saturn's SKR monitoring by the Ulysses/URAP radio astronomy instrument.

Lecacheux, Alain

432

A Large-Scale Jet and FR I Radio Source in a Spiral Galaxy: The Host Properties and External Environment  

E-print Network

. Yun 2 National Radio Astronomy Observatory 3 , Socorro, NM 87801 and John M. Hill Steward Observatory Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 3 The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is operA Large-Scale Jet and FR I Radio Source in a Spiral Galaxy: The Host Properties and External

433

Bringing Astronomy Directly to People Who Do Not Come to Star Parties, Science Museums, or Science Festivals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

My successful programs have included telescope observations, hands-on activities, and edible astronomy demonstrations for: outdoor concerts or music festivals; the National Mall; churches, synagogues, seminaries, or clergy conferences; the Ronald McDonald House of Long Island (New Hyde Park, NY), the Winthrop University Hospital Childrens Medical Center (Mineola, NY); the Fresh Air Fund summer camps; a Halloween star party with costumed kids looking through telescopes; a Super Bowl Star Party; the World Science Festival (NYC); the Princeton University Science and Engineering Expo; the USA Science and Engineering Festival; and the NYC Columbus Day Parade. These outreach activities have reached thousands of people including many young girls. Information was also provided about local science museums, citizen science projects, astronomy educational sites, and astronomy clubs to encourage learning after these events. In 2010 I created Astronomy Night on the National Mall (co-sponsored the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy) with the participation of astronomy clubs, Chandra X-Ray Center, STScI, NASA, NOAO, NSF and the National Air and Space Museum. Since 2009 my NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) program has brought astronomy to 50,000 music lovers who attended the Central Park Jazz, Newport Folk, Tanglewood, or Ravinia music festivals or classical, folk, rock, pop, opera, or county-western concerts in local parks assisted by astronomy clubs. MAUS is an evening, nighttime, and cloudy weather traveling astronomy program combining solar, optical, and radio telescope observations; a live image projection system; large outdoor posters and banners; videos; and hands-on activities before and after the concerts or at intermission. Yo-Yo-Ma and the Chicago Symphony or Boston Symphony Orchestras, the McCoy Tyner Quartet with Ravi Coltrane, Esperanza Spalding, the Stanley Clarke Band, Phish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Deep Purple, Patti Smith, Tony Orlando, and Ronan Tynan have performed at these concerts. MAUS attracts large enthusiastic crowds often with young children participating in this family learning experience - often the first time these children looked through a telescope.

Lubowich, Donald A.

2013-01-01

434

Observatory Publishes Memoir of Pioneer Radio Astronomer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the pioneers of radio astronomy tells her story of the formative years of that science in a memoir published by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Dr. Nan Dieter Conklin's book, Two Paths to Heaven's Gate, recounts her experiences making important scientific discoveries in an era when astronomy's "vision" was first extending beyond the light discernable to human eyes. Book Cover CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Conklin's story is remarkable not only because of her impressive scientific achievements, but also "because she was a woman who nevertheless pursued and succeeded in science -- the first U.S. woman whose Ph.D. thesis was based on her own radio astronomy research and the first U.S. woman to publish original radio astronomy research in a refereed journal -- and because she lived and worked with the degenerative disease multiple sclerosis," according to Claire Hooker of the University of Toronto. In the memoir, Conklin recounts her career and life from the awakening stirred by her first astronomy course at Goucher College in Baltimore, to junior research jobs in Washington, D.C., to graduate school at Harvard and ultimately to the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley. In addition to providing an insider's view of the process of scientific discovery, Conklin also gives the reader a fascinating look at a scientific community and social structure that, though only a half-century removed from the present, was vastly different from today's. Along the way, Conklin candidly reveals the person behind the science -- the person who dealt with the joys and tragedies of life while remaining dedicated to unlocking the secrets of the Universe. "Nan was and remains an inspiration to myself and hundreds of others in the field, both for her scientific acumen and for her ability to overcome extraordinary personal challenges," said Miller Goss of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

2006-07-01

435

Radio Telescope Gets Star Treatment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Actress Jodie Foster, who played a scientist in search of extraterrestrial life in the 1997 film Contact, narrates a new promotional film to reintroduce the public to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) renovated Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. The 24-minute film, Beyond the Visible, which will air in the VLA Visitor Center, focuses on the operation of the telescope and scientific achievements associated with it.

Showstack, Randy

2013-11-01

436

Nontechnical Astronomy Books of 1989.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are 126 reviews. Categories include amateur astronomy, children's books, computers and astronomy, cosmic rays, cosmology, education in astronomy, galaxies, general astronomy, history of astronomy, life in the universe, physics and astronomy, pseudoscience, quasars and active galaxies, reference, solar system, space exploration, stars and

Mercury, 1990

1990-01-01

437

Radio Galaxies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

Downes, Ann

1986-01-01

438

Gravitational wave astronomy with the SKA  

E-print Network

On a time scale of years to decades, gravitational wave (GW) astronomy will become a reality. Low frequency (nanoHz) GWs are detectable through long-term timing observations of the most stable pulsars. Radio observatories worldwide are currently carrying out observing programmes to detect GWs, with data sets being shared through the International Pulsar Timing Array project. One of the most likely sources of low frequency GWs are supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs), detectable as a background due to a large number of binaries, or as continuous or burst emission from individual sources. No GW signal has yet been detected, but stringent constraints are already being placed on galaxy evolution models. The SKA will bring this research to fruition. In this chapter, we describe how timing observations using SKA1 will contribute to detecting GWs, or can confirm a detection if a first signal already has been identified when SKA1 commences observations. We describe how SKA observations will identify the source(s...

Janssen, G H; McLaughlin, M; Bassa, C G; Deller, A T; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Mingarelli, C M F; Rosado, P A; Sanidas, S; Sesana, A; Shao, L; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Verbiest, J P W

2015-01-01

439

Neutrino astronomy  

SciTech Connect

Current knowledge and proposed experiments in the field of neutrino astronomy are reviewed, with particular emphasis on expected sources and existing and proposed detectors for intermediate-energy (10 to 50 MeV) and ultrahigh energy (greater than 10 GeV) neutrinos. Following a brief discussion of the counting rate obtained in the solar neutrino experiment of Davis (1978) and possible statistical sources for the discrepancy between the expected and observed rates, consideration is given to the physics of neutrino ejection in stellar gravitational collapse and sources of high-energy proton collisions giving rise to ultrahigh energy neutrinos. The capabilities of operating Cerenkov detectors at the Homestake Gold Mine, the Mt. Blanc Tunnel and in the Soviet Caucasus are considered in relation to the detection of gravitational collapse in the center of the galaxy, and it is pointed out that neutrino detectors offer a more reliable means of detecting collapses in the Galaxy than do gravitational wave detectors. The possibility of using Cerenkov detectors for ultrahigh energy neutrino detection is also indicated, and applications of large neutrino detectors such as the proposed DUMAND array to measure the lifetime of the proton are discussed.

Schramm, D.N.

1980-01-01

440

Astronomy Links  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Here are some links to Astronomy applets, animations, and movies. Celestial and Terrestrial Motions Sky and telescope Interactive Sky Chart Rotating Sky Explorer Ecliptic (Zodiac) Simulator Seasonal Solar Motions Antarctica Time Lapse: A Year on Ice Aurora Australis: The Southern Lights [Daylight Hours Explorer Season as viewed from Space Animation Sun Position and Season animation Paths of the Sun Seasons and Ecliptic Simulator Sun s Rays Simulator Sun Motions Simulator Time-Lapse Seasons Simulator Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion Kepler s 1st and 2nd laws Applet Orbit Applet Planetary Orbit Simulator Gravity Simulator Moon Phases and Satellite Motions Lunar and Solar Eclipse Information Moon Phase Animation What Causes Tides Lunar Phase Quizzer Eclipse Shadow Simulator Moon Phases and the Horizon Diagram Synodic Lag The Solar System Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Images Planetary Photo Journal Planetary Configuration Simulator Geocentric Retrograde Motion Animation Epicycle / Orbit Applet Gravity Simulator Ptolemaic Orbit of Mars The Universe Virtual Reality Milky Way Panorama Interactive H-R Diagram Element Absorption and Emision Lines Doppler Shift Demonstrator Lookback Time Simulator Other: SpaceWeather.com ...

Teitelbaum, Mr.

2010-11-18

441

Challenges in Astronomy Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy is an attractive subject for education. It deals with fascination of the unknown and the unreachable, yet is uses tools, concepts and insights from various fundamental sciences such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology. Because of this it can be well used for introducing sciences to young people and to raise their interest in further studies in that direction. It is also an interesting subject for teaching as its different aspects (observation techniques, theory, data sampling and analysis, modelling,?) offer various didactical approaches towards different levels of pupils, students and different backgrounds. And it gives great opportunities to teach and demonstrate the essence of scientific research, through tutorials and projects. In this paper we discuss some of the challenges education in general, and astronomy in particular, faces in the coming decades, given the major geophysical and technological changes that can be deducted from our present knowledge. This defines a general, but very important background in terms of educational needs at various levels, and in geographical distribution of future efforts of the astronomical community. Special emphasis will be given to creative approaches to teaching, to strategies that are successful (such as the use of tutorials with element from computer games), and to initiatives complementary to the regular educational system. The programs developed by the IAU will be briefly highlighted.

De Greve, Jean-Pierre

2010-11-01

442

IUCAF and spectrum management: working to keep our radio windows on the Universe clean  

Microsoft Academic Search

The brief of IUCAF (the Scientific Committee on Frequency Allocations for Radio Astronomy and Space Science - see www.iucaf.org) is to study and coordinate the requirements of radio frequency allocations for passive (i.e., non-emitting) radio sciences, such as radio astronomy, space research and remote sensing, in order to make these requirements known to the national and international bodies that allocate

Wim van Driel

2008-01-01

443

Interstellar Radio Communication and the Frequency Selection Problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

THE largest microwave radio telescope on Earth, at the Arecibo Observatory of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, will soon have the capability of communicating with an identical radio telescope, if such exists, anywhere in the Galaxy. But such communication assumes some previous agreement between the transmitting and receiving civilizations, or mutual discovery of the chosen radio frequency, bandpass, information

F. D. Drake; Carl Sagan

1973-01-01

444

Radio detection of Uranian lightning by Voyager 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within distances of ?600,000 km from Uranus, the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment aboard the Voyager 2 spacecraft detected impulsive (100 - 300 ms) bursts of broad-band (<=900 kHz to ?40 MHz) radio emission. This emission is very different from the uranian magnetospheric radio component, also discovered during the recent Voyager - Uranus encounter. By analogy with the Saturn electrostatic discharges

P. Zarka; B. M. Pedersen

1986-01-01

445

A Group Sparsity Imaging Algorithm for Transient Radio Sources  

E-print Network

://graphics.tu-bs.de/ Urvashi Rau National Radio Astronomy Observatory Socorro, NM 87801, USA httpA Group Sparsity Imaging Algorithm for Transient Radio Sources Stephan Wenger and Marcus Magnor://www.aoc.nrao.edu/rurvashi/ Abstract--Radio interferometers can achieve high spatial res- olution for temporally constant sources

Magnor, Marcus

446

Keeping our windows on the radio Universe clean  

Microsoft Academic Search

The radio spectrum is a finite and increasingly precious resource for astronomical research. Keep- ing the frequency bands used for radio astronomy as free as possible of unwanted Radio Fre- quency Interference (RFI) is crucial. The aim of spectrum management, one of the tools used towards achieving this goal, includes setting regulatory limits on RFI levels emitted by other spec-

Wim van Driel

447

VOEventNet: Event Messaging for Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The time domain remains one of the the least explored areas in modern astronomy. In the near future the next generation of large synoptic sky surveys (Pan-STARRs, Skymapper, LSST) will probe the time dependent nature of the sky by detecting hundreds of thousands of astronomical transients (variable stars, asteroids, GRBs, lensing events). A global event distribution and follow-up network is required to characterize the nature of these transients. For over a year the VOEventNet project has been in the process of implementing a transient event follow-up network which distributes crafted structured data packets called VOEvents. These packets have been designed to be general enough to contain metadata for transients seen at all wavelengths, yet interpretable by robotic telescope systems (which are already automatically responding with follow-up observations). The VOEventNet project currently has transient event follow-up with the Palomar 60 and 200in (Caltech), RAPTOR (LANL), PARITEL and KAIT (UCB) as well as UK telescopes. VOEventNet transient event streams are publicly available. The subscription, publication and reception of VOEvents is implimented with a number of open source software clients. The software and details of how to receive streams of events are available from http://www.voeventnet.org. Current event streams include OGLE microlensing events, SDSS Supernovae, GCN GRBs, Raptor and Palomar-Quest optical transients. In the near future, many additional streams of VOEvents will be available, including optical transients from the ESSENCE, Planet and MOA projects, as well as those from UKIRT and JCMT telescopes. We also expect that transient event alerts will be available from Solar, X-ray and Radio telescopes.

Drake, Andrew J.; Djorgovski, G.; Graham, M.; Williams, R.; Mahabal, A.; Donalek, C.; Glikman, E.; Bloom, J.; Vastrand, T.; White, R.; Rabinowitz, D.; Baltay, C.

2006-12-01

448

Introductory Astronomy Clearinghouse Labs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website from the University of Washington Department of Astronomy provides introductory astronomy activities on topics such as: fundamentals of astronomy, observing the sky, the sun, stars, stellar evolution, the H-R diagram, the Milky Way Galaxy, galaxies, and cosmology. Printable laboratory guides are available for download in Microsoft Word format.

2010-11-18

449

Trends in Space Astronomy and Cosmic Vision 2015-2025  

E-print Network

As a short introduction to the astronomy session, the response of the community to the Call for Themes issued by ESA and the specific themes selected by the Astronomy Working Group are briefly presented in connection with the four grand themes finally selected for the ESA Science Programme. They are placed in the context of the main discoveries of the past decade and the astronomy projects currently in their development or definition phase. Finally, possible strategies for their implementation are summarised.

Catherine Turon; Chris Done; Andreas Quirrenbach; Peter Schneider; Conny Aerts; Angela Bazzano; Jose Cernicharo; Paolo De Bernardis; Ariel Goobar; Thomas Henning; Rob J. Ivison; Jean-Paul Kneib; Evert Meurs; Michiel Van Der Klis; Pedro Viana; Sergio Volonte; Werner W. Zeilinger

2005-10-28

450

Starsat: A space astronomy facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary design and analyses of a versatile telescope for Spacelab missions are presented. The system is an all-reflective Korsch three-mirror telescope with excellent performance characteristics over a wide field and a broad spectral range, making it particularly suited for ultraviolet observations. The system concept is evolved around the utilization of existing hardware and designs which were developed for other astronomy space projects.

Hamilton, E. C.; Mundie, C. E.; Korsch, D.; Love, R. A.; Fuller, F. S.; Parker, J. R.; Fritz, C. G.; White, R. E.; Giudici, R. J.

1976-01-01

451

Radio jets in NGC 4151  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The relationship between the radio and optical emissions from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 is investigated by mapping the radio radiation from this source at wavelengths of 20 and 6 cm using the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Results show that the radio emission at wavelengths from 20 to 6 cm extend 10'' (950 pc) along a position angle of 72-84 degrees. This nonthermal emission is found to consist of at least six components and is similar to jets observed in other compact extragalactic radio sources. These radio jets appear to be coincident with the optical line emission region in NGC 4151 and are aligned with the position angle of the linearly polarized optical continuum emission.

Johnston, K. J.; Elvis, M.; Kjer, D.; Shen, B. S. P.

1982-01-01

452

November 20, 2012 A Volume Limited Radio Survey of Ultracool Dwarfs  

E-print Network

National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA 3 Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 4 Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 for Astronomy, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland 7 Price Center, Albert Einstein College

453

Network for Astronomy School Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Network for Astronomy School Education Project (NASE) was developed in response to the IAU's most recent 10 Years Strategic Plan to increase the efforts of the IAU in schools. NASE's mission is to stimulate teaching astronomy in schools, through professional development of primary and secondary school science teachers in developing and emerging countries. NASE's organizational principle is to build capacity by providing courses for three years in cooperation with a Local Organizing Committee (Local NASE Group). The Local NASE Group consists of 6-8 local university professors and education professional who will promote astronomy activities and organize future courses in subsequent years in their region of their country. NASE philosophy is to introduce low-tech astronomy, and has thus developed an a suite of activities that can be carried out with inexpensive, quotidian materials. Supporting these activities is a text for teachers, plus a complete set of instructional materials for each topic. These materials are available in English and Spanish, with future editions available in Chinese and Portuguese. We describe and discuss NASE activities in Central and South America from 2009 to the present.

Deustua, Susana E.; Ros, R. M.; Garcia, B.

2014-01-01

454

Tools of Radio Astronomy, 5th edition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New 5th corrected edition of the book http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009tra..book.....W in Russian, translated by O. Verkhodanov and S. Trushkin, editing S.A. Trushkin from Special astrophysical observatory RAS. This edition contains the translation of the 5th Springer edition of 2009 and new additional chapter (wrote by authors) of Solutions of the problems.

Wilson, Thomas L.; Rohlfs, Kristian; Huttemeister, Susanne

2012-12-01

455

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia  

E-print Network

= circuits using photo-etching methods developed by the Eastman Kodak Company 1 . Plating is performed in the baths listed below: Gold: (1) American Chemical and Refining Company, C-27 acid gold plate process manufactured by Ashland Chemical Corporation, Electropolish i6. 2.1 GOLD PLATING Gold is presently being

Groppi, Christopher

456

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA  

E-print Network

temperatures, variations in the circuit can be made. For example, a resistor can be put in series OF COPIES: 150 #12;This report describes a circuit for the speed control of an electronic equipment cooling speed fans. The following sections briefly describe the circuit and include schematics and graphs

Groppi, Christopher

457

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE VIRGINIA  

E-print Network

graphics and subroutine capabilities, a CRT display and paper printer, cassette storage, and a particularly;CONTENTS Page User's Manual for FARANT Introduction 1 Conventions 1 User's Commands 2 Frequency: Lumped Model of an PET 11 Detailed User Instructions The Reference Zo for S-Parameters 13 Creating

Groppi, Christopher

458

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE VIRGINIA  

E-print Network

problems, graphics, and many other individual needs. For their guidance and continuing encouragement I must and instruction in microwave circuit design methods. #12;A COMPUTER-AIDED ANALYSIS ROUTINE INCLUDING OPTIMIZATION FOR MICROWAVE CIRCUITS AND THEIR NOISE Table of Contents Page I . User s Manual for FARANT

Groppi, Christopher

459

Meter wavelength radio astronomy in Chile  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current meter-wavelength research at Maipu consists largely of a galactic survey for the southern sky, a search for secondary calibration sources, pulsar studies, a search for atmospheric pulses from Saturn, and the continuing investigation of Jovian S bursts above 30 MHz.

J. May; F. Reyes; H. Alvarez; J. Aparici; T. Carr; J. Phillips; J. Levy; G. Lebo

1986-01-01

460

NP Stokes fields for radio astronomy  

E-print Network

The spin weighted spherical harmonic (SWSH) description of angular functions typically is associated with the Newman-Penrose (NP) null tetrad formalism. Recently the SWSH description, but not the NP formalism, has been used in the study of the polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background. Here we relate this application of SWSHs to a description of electromagnetic radiation and polarization in the NP formalism. In particular we introduce NP Stokes fields that are the NP equivalent of the Stokes parameters. In addition to giving a more coherent foundation for the recent cosmological SWSH application, the NP formalism aids in the computation of the Lorentz transformation properties of polarization.

Ezra T. Newman; Richard H. Price

2010-07-25

461

Rapid Development of Radio Astronomy Instrumentation  

E-print Network

, PFBs, DDC) Implement Industry Standard Communication Protocols (10 Gb Ethernet, UDP) Platform of Custom Boards, Backplanes and Protocols Antiquated by the Time of Release Each Observatory Designs From

California at Berkeley, University of

462

National Radio Astronomy Observatory Socorro, NM 87801  

E-print Network

that these cables experience are lightning, flood damage, backhoe damage, and gopher damage. The lightning damage to replace cable due to gopher damage or armor corrosion. In a telephone conversation with a recently retired

Groppi, Christopher

463

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLEJ VIRGINIA  

E-print Network

Amplifier Without Coaxial Components · · · · · · · · . 8 Figure 5 Coaxial Components . · . · · · · · · · . 8), and a SMA to waveguide adaptor as shown in Figure 1. This configuration is designed to easily fit that better reliability would be achieved with packaged devices. 2) A coaxial geometry with a round center

Groppi, Christopher

464

Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) in Radio Astronomy  

E-print Network

-chip" memory Fast Small (~16 kB / thread block) "Off-chip" Slow Large (~GB) #12;Memory management Optimizing elements of FPGAs, GPUs, and CPUs, each with different strengths/uses: FPGA ­ High data rate; small memory

Groppi, Christopher

465

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE VIRGINIA  

E-print Network

No. 248 ANALOG-FILTER, DIGITAL-CORRELATOR HYBRID SPECTROMETER SANDER WEINREB JUNE 1984 NUMBER of the hybrid system is shown to be much lower than the cost of spectrometers which utilize either a filter Selection · · · · · 0 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · . . · · · · · · · · · B. VHF Bandpass Filter-Mixer

Groppi, Christopher

466

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia 22903  

E-print Network

amplifier applies also to balanced mixers based on quadrature hybrids. Introduction The balanced amplifier quadrature hybrids, and of a mismatched output load, but did not explore the effect of a mismatched source

Groppi, Christopher

467

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA  

E-print Network

- diode mixers, bandwidth will be limited by the ow-noise IF amplifier. At present, the amplifier utilized], [4] as 3dB hybrid is utilized. This choice is superior to a single-ended amplifier with an isolator identical, sirgle -- ended amplifiers in cascade with a 3dB hybrid was studied in detail by K. Kurokawa [2

Groppi, Christopher

468

National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Tucson  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the radioastronomy facilities funded by the US National Science Foundation, and operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Incorporated. Located in Tucson on the campus of the University of Arizona....

P. Murdin

2000-01-01

469

Conducting radio astronomy in the EMC environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The detection of electromagnetic interference (EMI) at microwave frequencies, examples of the widely varying sources of such EMI, and measures to counteract them are considered. Problems caused by computer equipment, power lines, digital clocks, automotive spark plugs, television antennas, arc welding equipment, phone systems, aircraft transmissions, and satellite equipment are described. Countermeasures include the use of braided mesh around cables, burying of incoming power lines, and replacement of defective equipment. Certain antenna radome structures are particularly helpful in countering EMI.

Waterman, P. J.

1984-02-01

470

Using large radio telescopes at decametre wavelengths  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the aim of evaluating the actual possibilities of doing, from the ground, sensitive radio astronomy at decametre wavelengths (particularly below ?50MHz), an extensive program of radio observations was carried out, in 19992002, by using digital spectral and waveform analysers (DSP) of new generation, connected to several of the largest, decametre radio telescopes in the world (i.e., the UTR-2 and

A. Lecacheux; A. A. Konovalenko; H. O. Rucker

2004-01-01

471

A new design project of the line feed structure for large spherical radio telescope and its nonlinear dynamic analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new design of the line feed structure for a large spherical radio telescope (LSRT) is presented in this paper. Integrated mechanical, electronic, optic and automatic control technologies are employed to make considerable improvement upon the Arecibo spherical radio telescope in Puerto Rico, U.S.A. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of the suspended cable system was carried out with some sensible results that

B. Y. Duan

1999-01-01

472

Science Priorities of the RadioAstron Space VLBI Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main scientific goal of the RadioAstron Space VLBI mission is study of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), Masers and other astronomical objects with unprecedented angular resolution, up to few millionths of an arc-second. The resolution achieved with RadioAstron will allow study the following phenomena and problems: * Central engine of AGN and physical processes near super massive black holes providing an acceleration of cosmic rays size, velocity and shape of emitting region in the core, spectrum, polarization and variability of emitting components; * Cosmological models, dark matter and dark energy by studying dependence of above mentioned AGN's parameters with redshift, and by observing gravitational lensing; * Structure and dynamics of star and planets forming regions in our Galaxy and in AGN by studying maser and Mega maser radio emission; * Neutron (quark?) stars and black holes in our Galaxy, their structure and dynamics by VLBI and measurements of visibility scintillations, proper motions and parallaxes; * Structure and distribution of interstellar and interplanetary plasma by fringe visibility scintillations of pulsars; The RadioAstron mission uses the satellite SPECTR (astrophysical module), developed by Lavochkin Association of Russian Aviation and Space Agency (RASA). This module will be used in several other scientific missions. The total mass of the scientific payload is about 2500 kg, of which the unfolding parabolic 10-m radio astronomy antenna's mass is about 1500 kg, and scientific package holding the receivers, power supply, synthesizers, control units, frequency standards and data transmission radio system. The mass of the whole system (satellite and scientific payload) to be carried into orbit by the powerful "Zenit-2SB"-"Fregat-2CB" launcher is about 5000 kg. The RadioAstron project is an international collaboration between RASA and ground radio telescope facilities around the world.

Langston, Glen; Kardashev, N.; International Space VLBI Collaboration

2006-12-01

473

Astronomy and Politics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relationship between astronomy and politics is a complex but important part of understanding the practice of astronomy throughout history. This chapter explores some of the ways that astronomy, astrology, and politics have interacted, placing particular focus on the way that astronomy and astrology have been used for political purposes by both people in power and people who wish to influence a ruler's policy. Also discussed are the effects that politics has had on the development of astronomy and, in particular, upon the recording and preservation of astronomical knowledge.

Steele, John M.

474

Using GPS-GLONASS-GALILEO data and IRI modeling for ionospheric calibration of radio telescopes and radio interferometers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

VHF and HF radio signals are widely used to observe the Sun and pulsars. Nowadays, large low-frequency radio astronomical arrays (LOFAR, 30-240 MHz; MIRA, 80-300 MHz) are being constructed to record radiation of pulsars at the maximum distance. registration of the solar radio emission intensity at fixed frequencies and in the spectral VHF band is very important along with other methods of monitoring of coronal mass ejections. Interpreting radio astronomical data is known to be necessary to take into account possible distortions of these signals in the Earth ionosphere. However, in contrast to modern navigation systems (Global Position System (GPS), GLObal NAvigation Satellite System (GLONASS), GALILEO), in which a very accurate reconstruction of ionosphere parameters is a built-in function, in present-day radio astronomy a retrieve of ionosphere transfer characteristics has not been appropriately worked out. This collides with increasing requirements to accuracy of the analysis of a radio emission amplitude profile and to the angular and polarizing resolution of radio telescopes of new generation (LOFAR, SKA, etc.). We have developed a method and software to calculate the ionosphere rotation measure (RM) and dispersion measure (DM). We used the ionosphere model IRI-2001, magnetic field model IGRF-10, and the ionosphere total electron content values obtained from GPS measurements. The obtained values of DM and RM were recalculated into characteristics of the phase delay, Faraday amplitude modulation, and polarization changes. We calculated ones for different levels of geomagnetic activity as well as different angular positions of radio sources. Our main idea is to use a signal of navigation satellites (GPS, GLONASS, GALILEO) as a testing signal from a "reference" source located at minimal angle distance from a source studied. Our project allows development of methods and systems of ADAPTIVE RADIO ASTRONOMY, adaptive to the non-uniform and non-stationary ionosphere, by analogy with known systems of adaptive optics intended to adapt optical telescopes to varying conditions of the optically non-uniform and non-stationary troposphere.

Afraimovich, E. L.; Yasukevich, Yu. V.

2008-12-01

475

Deterministic RF ing in phased arrays for the next generation of radio telescopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A requirement of the next generation of radio telescopes for astronomy is the ability to cope with the forever increasing problem of radio-frequency interference (RFI). Unlike conventional fixed parabolic receivers, currently used in astronomy, the application of phased-array beamforming techniques opens up the possibility to spatially RFI in the RF domain, prior to signal digitization. This paper presents results from

Bart Smolders; Grant Hampson

2002-01-01

476

David Tsiklauri, Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy  

E-print Network

David Tsiklauri, Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy astro.qmul.ac.uk/~tsiklauri 19 Sep oscillations, waves in magnetised plasmas, elements of plasma kinetics. David Tsiklauri Astronomy Unit Queen, Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy astro.qmul.ac.uk/~tsiklauri 19 Sep 2012 STFC summer school

477

Ph.D. Astronomy Program Ph.D. in Astronomy  

E-print Network

Ph.D. Astronomy Program Ph.D. in Astronomy Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences 1 physics at the graduate level 4. understand observational astronomy techniques 5. understand astrophysics strong background of knowledge and expertise in physics and astronomy #12;2. Curriculum Alignment

Hemmers, Oliver

478

Investigation of radio astronomical windows between 1 MHz and 2060 MHz in Universiti Malaya, Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

An indoor and an outdoor radio frequency survey was conducted in Universiti Malaya, Malaysia, as a test site, for the purpose of developing radio astronomy research in Malaysia. This is the first radio astronomical survey of any such done in Malaysia. Observation and analysis were done in the radio frequency spectrum between 1MHz and 2060MHz. In this paper, the experimental

Zamri Zainal Abidin; Zainol Abidin Ibrahim; Syed Bahari Ramadzan Syed Adnan; Norwati Khairul Anuar

2009-01-01

479

Investigation of radio astronomical windows between 1 MHz and 2060 MHz in Universiti Malaya, Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

An indoor and an outdoor radio frequency survey was conducted in Universiti Malaya, Malaysia, as a test site, for the purpose of developing radio astronomy research in Malaysia. This is the first radio astronomical survey of any such done in Malaysia. Observation and analysis were done in the radio frequency spectrum between 1 MHz and 2060 MHz. In this paper,

Zamri Zainal Abidin; Zainol Abidin Ibrahim; Syed Bahari Ramadzan Syed Adnan; Norwati Khairul Anuar

2009-01-01

480

The road to the Radio Synoptic SKA (RSSKA) Steven T. Myers  

E-print Network

has been proposed for a Radio Synoptic Survey Telescope (RSST) 3 . A RSST would be designed to survey the next generation of radio astronomical telescopes and arrays. One of the original drivers for the SKAThe road to the Radio Synoptic SKA (RSSKA) Steven T. Myers National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P

Myers, Steven T.