Sample records for radio astronomy project

  1. Radio Astronomy Radio astronomy

    E-print Network

    Metchev, Stanimir

    ;#12;Arecibo 300m telescope #12;Radio interferometer #12;Radio interferometer Very Large Array (VLA) (New;WestVirginia) #12;Centimeter radio astronomy HI 21cm line emission traces the distribution of atomic hydrogen. Dust: far-Infrared (60-240micron) map NASA/GSFC Atomic hydrogen (HI): 21cm emission-line Dickey & Lockman

  2. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  3. Radio Astronomy Software Defined Receiver Project

    SciTech Connect

    Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL] [ORNL; Leech, Marcus [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium] [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium; Oxley, Paul [Retired] [Retired; Flagg, Richard [Retired] [Retired; Fields, David [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes a Radio Astronomy Software Defined Receiver (RASDR) that is currently under development. RASDR is targeted for use by amateurs and small institutions where cost is a primary consideration. The receiver will operate from HF thru 2.8 GHz. Front-end components such as preamps, block down-converters and pre-select bandpass filters are outside the scope of this development and will be provided by the user. The receiver includes RF amplifiers and attenuators, synthesized LOs, quadrature down converters, dual 8 bit ADCs and a Signal Processor that provides firmware processing of the digital bit stream. RASDR will interface to a user s PC via a USB or higher speed Ethernet LAN connection. The PC will run software that provides processing of the bit stream, a graphical user interface, as well as data analysis and storage. Software should support MAC OS, Windows and Linux platforms and will focus on such radio astronomy applications as total power measurements, pulsar detection, and spectral line studies.

  4. Learning radio astronomy by doing radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquerizo Gallego, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    PARTNeR (Proyecto Académico con el Radio Telescopio de NASA en Robledo, Academic Project with the NASA Radio Telescope at Robledo) is an educational program that allows high school and undergraduate students to control a 34 meter radio telescope and conduct radio astronomical observations via the internet. High-school teachers who join the project take a course to learn about the science of radio astronomy and how to use the antenna as an educational resource. Also, teachers are provided with learning activities they can do with their students and focused on the classroom implementation of the project within an interdisciplinary framework. PARTNeR provides students with firsthand experience in radio astronomy science. Thus, remote radio astronomical observations allow students to learn with a first rate scientific equipment the basics of radio astronomy research, aiming to arouse scientific careers and positive attitudes toward science. In this contribution we show the current observational programs and some recent results.

  5. Radio Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tenenbaum, David

    This article is a Why Files short piece on how astronomers use information from radio astronomy. Contrary to popular belief, large radio telescopes are not looking for signs of life outside our solar system, but are making images of black holes, centers of galaxies, and gamma ray bursts. These phenomena cannot be seen in visible light, but emit radio waves which can be translated into images. The article discusses how this process works, and the information gathered from radio waves.

  6. (Astro)Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    . Last year: "Current and Future Radio Astronomy Projects" This year: the search for extraterrestrial intelligence? the New Jersey roots of radio astronomy? why the Iridium telecommunications satellites are evil

  7. What is Radio Astronomy?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website contains information on radio astronomy, the NRAO, how telescopes work, the history and discovery of radio astronomy, and the radio communication process. This website has activites like "Make your own Radio Image", and visual aids on topics such as: free-free emission, spectral lines, synchrotron emission, masers, and how radio communication works. The site is also a resource for blackbody radiation, the Cosmic Microwave Backround, and the mechanisms of radio wave emission.

  8. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  9. The Radio JOVE Project: An Interactive, Hands-on, Radio Astronomy Experience for Students or the General Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.

    2002-05-01

    The Radio JOVE Project is an effort to provide low cost hands-on radio astronomy experience for students or anyone interested in amateur astronomy. This can be done either by building a kit or using remote radio telescopes through the internet. The kit costs \\$125 and includes the parts and instructions for building a radio telescope capable of receiving emissions from the Sun, Jupiter, and the galactic background at a frequency of 20.1 MHz. Support structure for the antenna, tools, and a tape recorder for recording data are not included in the kit. In the life of the project more than 400 of these kits have been distributed around the world. Free software is available in the kit or through the project web site that allows your observations to be displayed and saved on a simulated chart recorder. The observations can also be sent, via the web, to others who have the same software. The participants can also interact through chat windows included in the software. If individuals do not wish to build a radio telescope the project makes available several professional telescopes through the web that can be used for observations via the software mentioned previously or software specific to the professional site. This can be done on a computer in the classroom. The sounds of the emission can also be heard through standard computer software for several of the sites. Results of the project and plans for the future (spectroscopic capability, association with Telescopes in Education) will be highlighted.

  10. CRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Luis F.

    CRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy EUROPEAN SCIENCE FOUNDATION Committee on Radio Astronomy forum for science. The ESF Expert Committee on Radio Astronomy Frequencies, CRAF, was established Astronomy Service and other passive applications. Cover: The 76-m diameter Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank

  11. Project PARAS: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuss, Kenneth; Hoffmann, Christopher; Dungan, Michael; Madden, Michael; Bendakhlia, Monia

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) scheme, would allow higher than currently available angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps and the ability to observe rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using passive phased array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150-m diameter antenna dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data are transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory panel is a novel hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and the bottom triangle. Attitude control and station keeping functions will be performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and four hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by either a photovoltaic array or a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. The total mass of the spacecraft is about 20,500 kg.

  12. Division X: Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Taylor, Russ; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Chapman, Jessica; Dubner, Gloria; Garrett, Michael; Goss, W. Miller; Torrelles, Jose M.; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Carilli, Chris; Hills, Richard; Shastri, Prajval

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of Division X in the IAU 2009GA took place in three sessions during the day of August 6, 2009. The meeting, being well attended, started with the approval for the meeting agenda. Then the triennium reports were made in the first session by the president of Division X, Ren-Dong Nan, and by the chairs of three working groups: “Historic Radio Astronomy WG” by Wayne Orchiston, “Astrophysically Important Lines WG” by Masatoshi Ohishi, and “Global VLBI WG” by Tasso Tzioumis (proxy chair appointed by Steven Tingay). Afterwards, a dozen reports from observatories and worldwide significant projects have been presented in the second session. Business meeting of “Interference Mitigation WG” was located in the third session.

  13. Radio Astronomy Fundamentals I John Simonetti

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Radio Astronomy Fundamentals I John Simonetti Spring 2012 Radio astronomy provides a very different view of the universe than optical astronomy. Radio astronomers and optical astronomers use astronomy. Radio astronomers talk about sources of radio emission. Cas A is a strong source, for example

  14. An Introduction to Radio Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard F. Burke; Francis Graham-Smith

    1996-01-01

    Radio astronomy uses unique observational techniques and offers the only way to investigate many phenomena in the Universe. This book, by two founders of the field, presents both a clear introduction to radio telescopes and techniques and a broad overview of the radio universe. In the first half of the book, we are shown clearly how radio telescopes work -

  15. National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Image Gallery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This image gallery presented by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory contains a large number of radio astronomy images and photographs of radio observatories. Each image is accompanied by descriptive text. Links provide further information.

  16. Fundamental physics with radio astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Kramer

    2010-01-01

    Radio astronomy offers a unique way to study the fundamental forces in the Universe. We utilize this exciting window to probe fundamental physics on all scales -from the forces in super-dense matter, over precision tests of general relativity, to the large-scale cosmic magnetic fields. New technology promises to further revolutionize this field -as well as the rest of astronomy and

  17. The future for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Rene P.; Hassall, Tom

    2013-12-01

    THE TRANSIENT UNIVERSE Rene P Breton and Tom Hassall argue that, while radio astronomy has always involved transient phenomena, exploration of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum has been falling behind because of the lack of data. But the advent of a new generation of radio telescopes such as LOFAR, could change that.

  18. Planetary radio astronomy from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of radio astronomy makes it possible for a remote observer to detect the presence of magnetic fields and plasmas in planetary environments. Prior to the flights of the Voyager spacecraft, radio astronomical studies of Jupiter from earth and from earth orbit had correctly predicted the strength and orientation of Jupiter's magnetic field and trapped radiation belts. The Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy investigations have now provided measurements of the complete spectrum of low frequency radio emissions from both planets. Each Voyager instrument consists of a pair of orthogonal, 10-m, electric monopole antennas which are connected to a step-tuned, superheterodyne receiver operating over the frequency range from 1.2 kHz to 40.5 MHz. The Voyager trajectory provided observations from above both the sunlit and nightside hemispheres of Jupiter. Saturn's nonthermal radio emission has been observed at frequencies as low as 3 kHz and as high as 1.2 MHz.

  19. Radio Astronomy in LSST Era

    E-print Network

    Lazio, T Joseph W; Barger, A J; Brandt, W N; Chatterjee, S; Clarke, T E; Condon, J J; Dickman, Robert L; Hunyh, M T; Jarvis, Matt J; Juric, Mario; Kassim, N E; Myers, S T; Nissanke, Samaya; Osten, Rachel; Zauderer, B A

    2014-01-01

    A community meeting on the topic of "Radio Astronomy in the LSST Era" was hosted by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA (2013 May 6--8). The focus of the workshop was on time domain radio astronomy and sky surveys. For the time domain, the extent to which radio and visible wavelength observations are required to understand several classes of transients was stressed, but there are also classes of radio transients for which no visible wavelength counterpart is yet known, providing an opportunity for discovery. From the LSST perspective, the LSST is expected to generate as many as 1 million alerts nightly, which will require even more selective specification and identification of the classes and characteristics of transients that can warrant follow up, at radio or any wavelength. The LSST will also conduct a deep survey of the sky, producing a catalog expected to contain over 38 billion objects in it. Deep radio wavelength sky surveys will also be conducted on a comparable time scale,...

  20. Radio frequency interference mitigation in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonstra, Albert-Jan

    2005-12-01

    The next generation of radio telescopes is expected to be one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the current generation. Examples of such new telescopes are the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), currently under construction in the Netherlands, and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), currently in a concept study phase. Another trend is that technological advances in the fields of electronics and communications systems have led to a vast increase in radio communication applications and systems, and also to an increasing demand for radio spectrum. These two trends, more sensitive telescopes and a much denser spectrum use, imply that radio astronomy will become more vulnerable to interference from radio transmitters. Although protection criteria exist for radio astronomy, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep the radio astronomy frequency bands free from interference. In order to mitigate interference in radio astronomical data, filtering techniques can be used. In this thesis, modern array signal processing techniques have been applied to narrow-band multichannel interference detection and excision, and to narrow-band spatial interference filtering. By investigating the subspace structure of the telescope array output covariance matrices, new results were found, such as upper limits on interference residuals after excision and spatial filtering. The effect of bandwidth, extendedness of the interfering sources, and multipath effects on the detection and spatial filter effectiveness were studied as well. The advantage of a multichannel approach over a single telescope approach was demonstrated by using experimental data from the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). As the performance of mitigation algorithms can be improved by calibration of the telescope gains and noise powers, calibration algorithms were developed. These algorithms were verified both for single and dual polarised arrays. Finally, a LOFAR interference mitigation strategy was developed.

  1. Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy Part I: The Mechanics and Physics Ronald J Maddalena August 1, 2008 #12;Outline Part I Background -- research inspirations and aspirations Vertical weather, .... Part II Results on refraction & air mass (with Jeff Paradis) Part III Results on opacity, weather

  2. Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    , but also about radio astronomy in general: + techniques: singledish telescopes, interferometry + science: planets, interstellar medium, compact objects, cosmic microwave background #12; Last lecture: student the thickness of the Milky Way's disk #4: measuring the Milky Way's rotation curve #5: millimeter interferometry

  3. The Helios radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, S.; Stone, R.

    1984-01-01

    Radio bursts traveling between the Sun and the Earth were tracked by radio astronomy experiments on Helios 1 and 2. A relatively short dipole antenna with a well-defined toroidal reception pattern was flown. The antenna spins in the ecliptic at 60.3 rpm and 2 frequencies are measured in each revolution. The signal analysis determines the strength of the signal, the direction of the source in the ecliptic, and the degree of modulation, and estimates source size. The experiments provide three-dimensional direction finding in space. They extend the radio frequency window beyond what is observable on Earth, and offer a long triangulation baseline.

  4. Broadcasting Astronomy: The Stars Meet on the Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, L.; Masiero, S.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we describe our project Tutti Dentro — Le Stelle si incontrano in Radio (Come in everybody! — The Stars meet on the Radio), an Italian radio show about astronomy and space. The format involved celebrities, young astronomers and a network of 95 FM and web radio stations during the period July 2007 - January 2009. We will explore its structure, the language and the strategies adopted, along with the technical equipment and the software for recording sessions and editing. Finally we will describe the response from celebrities, radio stations and listeners. Our results could be a useful reference for those wishing to create similar radio programmes to deliver astronomy to a wider audience.

  5. Radio Astronomy for Amateurs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Quinn

    2003-01-01

    Karl Jansky is considered the father of RADIOASTRONOMY. During the 1930s, Jansky worked for the Bell Telephone Laboratories studying the origin of static noise from thunderstorms. During the course of this work he discovered that some signals had an extraterrestrial origin. However, it was Grote Reber, a professional radio engineer and radio amateur, who carried out further investigations. In 1937...

  6. Radio Astronomy for Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, N.; Murdin, P.

    2003-04-01

    Karl Jansky is considered the father of RADIOASTRONOMY. During the 1930s, Jansky worked for the Bell Telephone Laboratories studying the origin of static noise from thunderstorms. During the course of this work he discovered that some signals had an extraterrestrial origin. However, it was Grote Reber, a professional radio engineer and radio amateur, who carried out further investigations. In 1937...

  7. The Radio Jove Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

  8. RFI Mitigation Researches and Implements in Radio Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shi-Yuan Li; Esamdin Ali; Zheng-Wen Sun

    2008-01-01

    Increasing Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is a serious problem for researches in modern radio astronomy. Various techniques to excise RFI from signals data are being tried out. In this paper, various methods of RFI excision at radio astronomy are described. RFI mitigation researches and implements in radio astronomy society are also presented. Especially, RFI mitigation researches in China radio astronomy

  9. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT NO. 305 AN ADAPTIVE INTERFERENCE CANCELING RECEIVER FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY - THEORY R. Bradley, S 3.0 Fundamentals of Adaptive Interference Cancellation 3.1 Basic Concepts 3.2 Error

  10. Radio Astronomy Fundamentals II John Simonetti

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Radio Astronomy Fundamentals II John Simonetti Spring 2010 The "signal" from an astronomical radio standard deviation. The power when pointing at a radio source might just be a little stronger TA --- the contribution to the system temperature due to the radio source you are observing

  11. The big ears of radio astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis Graham-Smith

    2002-01-01

    The special value of radio astronomy lies in the probing of extreme conditions in the universe, including the highest energies and the lowest temperatures. Radio waves can penetrate clouds of gas and dust to reveal objects in the universe and, in particular, in our Galaxy that cannot be seen by visible light. To achieve the highest resolution, radio telescopes in

  12. A Teaching Lab in Radio Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kirk R.; Cudaback, David D.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a study in which participants in a summer institute for secondary science teachers performed a series of experiments with a radio telescope. Concludes that a radio astronomy teaching facility would encourage students to use their own initiative and strategy in working with the scientific concepts involved. (MLH)

  13. Some sources of interference to radio astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Horner

    1975-01-01

    The paper reviews a number of EMI problems in radio astronomy, with particular reference to experience in the United Kingdom. The types of interference discussed are co-channel interference, band-edge interference, harmonics, and other spurious radiation from transmitters, radiation from radio receivers, and interference from noncommunications equipment (e.g., microwave ovens, industrial RF heaters).

  14. Orbiting Low Frequency Array for Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Langendoen, Koen

    either orbit the moon, whilst sampling during the Earth-radio eclipse phase, or orbit the Earth-moon L2 be implemented in moon orbit with today's technology. 1 #12;Number of satellites (or antennas) 10, scalableOrbiting Low Frequency Array for Radio Astronomy Raj Thilak Rajan ASTRON, Dwingeloo, NL rajan

  15. Grote Reber, Radio Astronomy Pioneer, Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Grote Reber, one of the earliest pioneers of radio astronomy, died in Tasmania on December 20, just two days shy of his 91st birthday. Reber was the first person to build a radio telescope dedicated to astronomy, opening up a whole new "window" on the Universe that eventually produced such landmark discoveries as quasars, pulsars and the remnant "afterglow" of the Big Bang. His self- financed experiments laid the foundation for today's advanced radio-astronomy facilities. Grote Reber Grote Reber NRAO/AUI photo "Radio astronomy has changed profoundly our understanding of the Universe and has earned the Nobel Prize for several major contributions. All radio astronomers who have followed him owe Grote Reber a deep debt for his pioneering work," said Dr. Fred Lo, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "Reber was the first to systematically study the sky by observing something other than visible light. This gave astronomy a whole new view of the Universe. The continuing importance of new ways of looking at the Universe is emphasized by this year's Nobel Prizes in physics, which recognized scientists who pioneered X-ray and neutrino observations," Lo added. Reber was a radio engineer and avid amateur "ham" radio operator in Wheaton, Illinois, in the 1930s when he read about Karl Jansky's 1932 discovery of natural radio emissions coming from outer space. As an amateur operator, Reber had won awards and communicated with other amateurs around the world, and later wrote that he had concluded "there were no more worlds to conquer" in radio. Learning of Jansky's discovery gave Reber a whole new challenge that he attacked with vigor. Analyzing the problem as an engineer, Reber concluded that what he needed was a parabolic-dish antenna, something quite uncommon in the 1930s. In 1937, using his own funds, he constructed a 31.4-foot-diameter dish antenna in his back yard. The strange contraption attracted curious attention from his neighbors and became something of a minor tourist attraction, he later recalled. Using electronics he designed and built that pushed the technical capabilities of the era, Reber succeeded in detecting "cosmic static" in 1939. In 1941, Reber produced the first radio map of the sky, based on a series of systematic observations. His radio-astronomy work continued over the next several years. Though not a professional scientist, his research results were published in a number of prestigious technical journals, including Nature, the Astrophysical Journal, the Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers and the Journal of Geophysical Research. Reber also received a number of honors normally reserved for scientists professionally trained in astronomy, including the American Astronomical Society's Henry Norris Russell Lectureship and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's Bruce Medal in 1962, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Jansky Lectureship in 1975, and the Royal Astronomical Society's Jackson-Gwilt Medal in 1983. Reber's original dish antenna now is on display at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's site in Green Bank, West Virginia, where Reber worked in the late 1950s. All of his scientific papers and records as well as his personal and scientific correspondence are held by the NRAO, and will be exhibited in the observatory's planned new library in Charlottesville, Virginia. Reber's amateur-radio callsign, W9GFZ, is held by the NRAO Amateur Radio Club. This callsign was used on the air for the first time since the 1930s on August 25, 2000, to mark the dedication of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  16. Teaching radio astronomy with Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    A simple, easy to build and portable radio telescope, called Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT), has been developed by the Radio Physics Laboratory (RPL), a radio astronomy teaching unit associated with the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (TIFR) and Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), which are two premier astronomy institutes in India. ASRT consists of off-the-shelf available Direct to Home television dishes and is easy to assemble. Our design is scalable from simple very low cost telescope to more complex yet moderately costing instrument. ASRT provides a platform for demonstrating radio physics concepts through simple hands-on experiment as well as for carrying out solar monitoring by college/University students. The presentation will highlight the concept of ASRT and the different experiments that can be carried out using it. The solar monitoring observations will be discussed along-with details of methods for calibrating these measurements. The pedagogical usefulness of ASRT in introducing undergraduatephysics students to astrophysics, measurements and analysis methods used in radio astronomy will also be discussed. Use of ASRT in the last three years in the programs of RPL, namely the annual Radio Astronomy Winter School for College students (RAWSC) and Pulsar Observing for Students (POS) is also presented. This year a new program was initiated to form a virtual group of an ASRT community, which will not only share their measurements, but also think of improving the pedagogical usefulness of ASRT by innovative experiments. This initiative is presented with the best practices drawn from our experience in using ASRT as a tool for student training in space sciences. The talk will also point out future ideas in involving a larger body of students in simple radio astronomy experiments with the ASRT, which RPL is likely to nucleate as part of its mandate.

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT ......................................................... ... 5 IF Logic Card ....................................................... ... 6 Acknowledgements

  18. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT No. 238 L/C/X BAND CRYOGENIC RECEIVER FRONT-END NO. 2 FOR HARVARD RADIO ASTRONOMY STATION, FORT DAVIS CRYOGENIC RECEIVER FRONT END NO. 2 FOR HARVARD RADIO ASTRONOMY STATION, FORT DAVIS, TEXAS George H. Behrens

  19. Radio astronomy: The Next 70-Year Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parijskij, Yu. N.

    Some attempts to predict a very distant future of radio astronomy are presented. It is not easy to foresee a list of the first priority problems which may appear, but the potential of research facilities is more predictable. It is suggested that in addition to the “dedicated for radio astronomy” facilities, the instrumentation of radio astronomy may be extended greatly by integration with the next generation “standard living” facilities, integrated via People-to-People communications through global networks and by incorporating of the “natural facilities", such as gravitational lenses, maser amplification in the ISM etc. As an example of the extreme cases of the 109 m2 class of the new generation Radio Telescopes, utilization of the personal dipole-size communication facilitiy by a SKA-type instrument and an array formed by asteroids' first “Frehnel zones” will be mentioned. The latter radio astronomy tool together with optical facilities will be extremely useful in exploration of the z>10 Universe. The reality of all predictions depend mostly on the way the Civilization will prefer to develop: “ahead, to HOMO SAPIENCE” or “back, to PRIMATES”.

  20. Strategies for Protecting Radio Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Cohen

    \\u000a Our view of the radio universe is increasingly obscured by rising levels of human-generated radio and electrical interference.\\u000a Transmissions from satellites pose a particularly serious threat since they can affect radio telescopes anywhere on Earth.\\u000a Consumer devices not intended as radio transmitters, such as computers and microwave ovens, add to the growing levels of electromagnetic\\u000a pollution. Coordinated action is needed

  1. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Socorro, NM 87801

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    National Radio Astronomy Observatory Socorro, NM 87801 ELVA Memorandum 40 Fiber Optic Cable Acceptance Tests June 7, 2002 T.Baldwin Summary Optical cable must be tested throughout the procurement fiber tests will be conducted for the underground cables alone. Therefore, a well

  2. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Socorro, NM 87801

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    National Radio Astronomy Observatory Socorro, NM 87801 EVLA Memorandum 41 Lightning Protection protection. A major concern of this type of installation is the susceptibility of the cable to lightning reliable indication of the need for lightning protection on a particular cable route is a history

  3. The early history of Radio Astronomy in Europe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Graham-Smith

    2005-01-01

    Radio astronomy developed in several European countries on the initiative and with the expertise of scientists who had been involved in radar research during World War II. This paper traces the influence of various radar techniques on the design of early radio telescopes, covering the period 1945-1955, after which time radio had become accepted as a natural discipline within astronomy.

  4. Radio astronomy receiver overview The noise temperature concept

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    of a receiver, let's look at one of the fundamental units of power commonly used in radio astronomy, noiseRadio astronomy receiver overview The noise temperature concept Before covering the basics temperature in Kelvins. The ultimate goal is to measure the strength ( ux density, S) of radio sources

  5. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report Box . . .................................................................. 7 4.4 Voltage Source Card ..............................................................................7 4. 5 Voltage Follower Card

  6. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT . · · · · · . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1 A. GPIO Buffer Card ............................................................................................................................. 3 B. ULO Decode Card· · · · · · · · · . · · ··· · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·· 8 C. GPO Card

  7. Auto-Adaptive Radio Astronomy Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratius, Victor; Lonsdale, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    Progress in the field of radio astronomy depends heavily on advances in instrumental capabilities, characterized by properties such as collecting area, resolution in the angular, spectral and temporal domains, field of view, and spatial aperture sampling. Generally, such advances in capability represent increases in the formal quantity of astronomical information that is received and processed by the instrument. The current generation of radio astronomy arrays can generate antenna voltage data at rates of Tbits per second, and forthcoming instruments will quickly expand these rates by multiple orders of magnitude. Future Exascale systems will have to make many choices on how to process subsets of big data. As human capacity will be overwhelmed at this scale, part of the discovery process will have to be handled by algorithms and machines. A key challenge will be to identify patterns of scientific significance in massive data sets and adjust instruments to become more sensitive to such patterns. As a step towards realization, we will revisit the current data collection and analysis pipelines from a fresh perspective that treats them as one system. In this system, multicore parallelism reduces big data accumulation by moving fragments of analysis and filtering closer to the data acquisition. MIT Haystack is pursuing approaches that enable future scientists to shift their interaction with bare metal instruments to steering search algorithms. Our vision is to create auto-adaptive instruments that can automatically adjust to identify and characterize interesting data patterns and properties, to optimize signal to noise ratios, and balance the search process depending on environmental changes. Bios Victor Pankratius is a principal investigator and computer scientist at MIT Haystack Observatory, where he advances new directions of computing in astronomy. Contact him at [pankrat at mit dot edu], victorpankratius.com, or Twitter @vpankratius. Colin Lonsdale is Director of the MIT Haystack Observatory, and has a 30-year background in observational radio astronomy and interferometric imaging. His email is [cjl at haystack dot mit dot edu].

  8. Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    , interferometry + science: stars, planets, interstellar medium, active galactic nuclei, cosmic microwave interferometry of an external galaxy #6: class visit to Green Bank, West Virginia, or a final project

  9. Low Frequency Radio Astronomy with the existing and future radio telescopes

    E-print Network

    Demoulin, Pascal

    Low Frequency Radio Astronomy with the existing and future radio telescopes A.A. Konovalenko;ABSTRACT. Radio astronomical investigations at low frequencies (meter-, decameter range) are very important development of the low frequency radio astronomy. This program includes the further modernization of UTR-2

  10. Astronomy 4194 Group Studies Essential Radio Astronomy Syllabus for May Term 2014 Prof. Martini Page 1 of 2

    E-print Network

    Martini, Paul

    Astronomy 4194 ­ Group Studies ­ Essential Radio Astronomy ­ Syllabus for May Term 2014 ­ Prof. Martini Page 1 of 2 Astronomy 4194 ­ Group Studies ­ Essential Radio Astronomy Syllabus for May Term 2014. Paul Martini, Dept. of Astronomy Office: 4021 McPherson Lab (4th floor), mailbox in 4055 McPherson Lab

  11. Data Intensive Radio Astronomy en route to the SKA: The Rise of Big Radio Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    Advances in both digital processing devices and in technologies to sample the focal and aperture planes of radio antennas is enabling observations of the radio sky with high spectral and spatial resolution combined with large bandwidth and field of view. As a consequence, survey mode radio astronomy generating vast amounts of data and involving globally distributed collaborations is fast becoming a primary tool for scientific advance. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will open up a new frontier in data intensive astronomy. Within the next few years SKA precursor telescopes will demonstrate new technologies and take the first major steps toward the SKA. Projects that path find the scientific journey to the SKA with these and other telescopes are currently underway and being planned. The associated exponential growth in data require us to explore new methodologies for collaborative end-to-end execution of data intensive observing programs.

  12. Cubesat Missions for Low Frequency Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    2013-01-01

    There have been many concepts and several mission proposals for low frequency radio interferometers in space during the past two decades. Most of these idea are based on multiple small spacecraft, each acting as one antenna element in a three-dimensional array. The science goals for single cubesats or arrays operating at frequencies near and below Earth's ionosphere cutoff span a wide range research areas from solar and planetary observations to galactic and extragalactic astronomy to cosmological observations of large-scale structure evolution before the epoch of reionization. Recently several groups have realized that the rapid progress in the capabilities of cubesats make them a logical basis for such mission concepts. A workshop on cubesat-based low frequency radio astronomy missions was held at the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) at Caltech during July 2012. This paper will summarize the discussions and conclusions from that workshop. These include a number of future mission ideas based on cubesat technologies, as well as recommendations for near-term technology demonstrations that would reduce risk for many of the potential missions. Portions of this work were carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Support from the JPL Center for Academic Partnerships and KISS is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. JPL Big Data Technologies for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.; D'Addario, L. R.; De Jong, E. M.; Mattmann, C. A.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Thompson, D. R.; Wagstaff, K.

    2014-04-01

    During the past three years the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been working on several technologies to deal with big data challenges facing next-generation radio arrays, among other applications. This program has focused on the following four areas: 1) We are investigating high-level ASIC architectures that reduce power consumption for cross-correlation of data from large interferometer arrays by one to two orders of magnitude. The cost of operations for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which may be dominated by the cost of power for data processing, is a serious concern. A large improvement in correlator power efficiency could have a major positive impact. 2) Data-adaptive algorithms (machine learning) for real-time detection and classification of fast transient signals in high volume data streams are being developed and demonstrated. Studies of the dynamic universe, particularly searches for fast (<< 1 second) transient events, require that data be analyzed rapidly and with robust RFI rejection. JPL, in collaboration with the International Center for Radio Astronomy Research in Australia, has developed a fast transient search system for eventual deployment on ASKAP. In addition, a real-time transient detection experiment is now running continuously and commensally on NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array. 3) Scalable frameworks for data archiving, mining, and distribution are being applied to radio astronomy. A set of powerful open-source Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) tools is now available through Apache. OODT was developed at JPL for Earth science data archives, but it is proving to be useful for radio astronomy, planetary science, health care, Earth climate, and other large-scale archives. 4) We are creating automated, event-driven data visualization tools that can be used to extract information from a wide range of complex data sets. Visualization of complex data can be improved through algorithms that detect events or features of interest and autonomously generate images or video to display those features. This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Olfar orbiting low frequency antenna for radio astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Bentum; Albert Jan Boonstra

    2009-01-01

    New interesting astronomical science drivers for very low frequency radio astronomy have emerged, ranging from studies of the astronomical dark ages, the epoch of reionization, exoplanets, to ultra-high energy cosmic rays. However, astronomical observations with Earth-bound radio telescopes at very low frequencies are hampered by the ionospheric plasma, which scatters impinging celestial radio waves. This effect is larger at lower

  15. Astronomy research at the Aerospace Corporation. [research projects - NASA programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulikas, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    This report reviews the astronomy research carried out at The Aerospace Corporation during 1974. The report describes the activities of the San Fernando Observatory, the research in millimeter wave radio astronomy as well as the space astronomy research.

  16. The Future Suffa International Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojaev, A. S.; Shanin, G. I.

    Suffa International Radio Astronomy Observatory (SIRAO), part of the Earth-Space VLBI system, contains a single-dish telescope with main reflector D=70m, two removable sub-reflectors of D=5m and D=3m and focal ratio F/D=0.3. The telescope covers wavelengths from 0.9mm-920mm in 9 bands. A waveguide will allow changes in observing wavelengths by rapid replacement of receivers located at the Vertex cabin. Adaptive optics will control the surface of the main mirror (1188 trapezoid panels, made from surface-profiled plates by a special technology which produces an rms accuracy of 50 microns) Each panel's position in the paraboloid coordinate system will be defined by a measuring device that provides data for calculations of the deformation field, with consecutive correction of the surface by special drives. SIRAO will be on the Suffa (Supha) plateau, altitude 2300m, in a national park near Samarkand and Jizzak. Seeing conditions are ideal for the cm-mm range; averaged annual transmission coefficients at the zenith being 0.90-0.98 for wavelengths 3.1mm and 5.8mm, and about 0.60 for 1.36mm. SIRAO will make simultaneous observations with space-based radio telescopes, make independent centimeter, millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths; and participate in ground-based interferometric campaigns.

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT are performed in one degree steps. Data points should be no father apart than 10 0 to minimize interpolation

  18. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT PROCEDURES FEDAL-In Card - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 66 FEDAL-MP Card - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 69 FEDAL Output Card Tests - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 73 FEDAL Chassis

  19. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT Generator" ............................................ 48 Card 2: "Digital Integrators" ...................................... ... 50 Drawing 2.567-2: "Digital Back-End Integrators" .................... ... 51 Card 3: "Analog Output

  20. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report ........................................................................................10 3.1 Monitor Card ........ ..................................... 13 3.2 Bias Card ... ............................................ 14 3.3 Sensor Card ................... ........................... 14 4.0 Performance

  1. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT) ............... 15 5 Control Card 1 .. .. . . . (Slot 3) 16 6 Control Card 2 . . (Slot 4) .......................17 7 Control Card 3 . . (Slot 5) .......................18 8 Memory Control . . . . . . . (Slot 6

  2. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT .......... · ........... . .. . .. . o . 27 Sterling Mount IC Card ..... . ............ ..... op... .. o 28 32 35 Input Bus Select Card ......... ..................... . . Focus (Pol) Error Integrator Card .. . . ................... . . 38 37 ................. · 39 Focus (Pol

  3. Grote Reber (1911-2003): A Radio Astronomy Pioneer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, K. I.

    2005-01-01

    A forceful personality and self-confidence led Grote Reber to a series of remarkable discoveries in radio astronomy, and later to a wide variety of research in many other fields of science and technology. Although he worked primarily as an amateur, independently of the scientific establishment, Reber was ultimately recognized with many of the major prizes in astronomy.

  4. Seeking Graduate & Undergraduate Students I'm seeking students to participate in a variety of projects. All of these pertain to ongoing research in radio astronomy; in

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    emission known as "fast radio bursts" (FRBs): ­ L-band receiver upgrade [RF design] ­ Optimization of GPU] ­ Enhanced system monitoring & control [web design] LASA ("L-Band Array of Small Arrays"): Developing a new a real-time C-language project using COTS boards] ­ L-band "pilot telescope" using a 3-m dish

  5. The University Radio Observatories: Centers for Scientific, Technical and Educational Innovation for Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    based radio observatories have made fundamental contributions to the understanding of the universeThe University Radio Observatories: Centers for Scientific, Technical and Educational Innovation for Radio Astronomy Mark H. Heyer (FCRAO/UMass), Lee G. Mundy (CARMA/U.Maryland), Thomas H. Phillips (CSO

  6. Statistical radio astronomy of the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariiskii, Yu. N.; Berlin, A. B.; Bursov, N. N.; Nizhel'skii, N. A.; Semenova, T. A.; Temirova, A. V.; Tsybulev, P. G.

    2015-06-01

    The exponential development of radio-astronomy methods (sensitivity, resolution, depth of surveys, etc) has led to the need for new methods aimed at distinguishing weak signals in the midst of numerous background signals, as has long been the case for radio astronomy at meter wavelengths. Centimeter-wavelength data accumulated with existing radio telescopes (such as the RATAN-600 reflector—the largest radio telescope in Russia) are presented, and expected problems for major new radio telescopes of the 21st century, such as the Square Kilometer Array, are discussed. The effectiveness of using certain tested methods to derive astrophysically important results through reasonable statistical processing of large datasets is shown. In experiments conducted with RATAN-600, these methods lead to an enhancement in sensitivity by an order of magnitude compared with the sensitivity of a resolving element.

  7. IAU DIVISION X, XII / COMMISSION 40, 41 / WORKING GROUP on HISTORICAL RADIO ASTRONOMY

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    IAU DIVISION X, XII / COMMISSION 40, 41 / WORKING GROUP on HISTORICAL RADIO ASTRONOMY CHAIR Kenneth. Introduction The IAU Working Group on Historical Radio Astronomy (WGHRA) was formed at the 2003 General Assembly of the IAU as a Joint Working Group of Commissions 40 (Radio Astronomy) and 41 (History

  8. Olfar, orbiting low frequency antennas for radio astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Bentum; Chris Verhoeven; Albert-Jan Boonstra

    2009-01-01

    New interesting astronomical science drivers for very low frequency radio astronomy have emerged, ranging from studies of the astronomical dark ages, the epoch of reionization, exoplanets, to ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Huge efforts are currently made to establish low frequency Earthbound instruments, since today’s technology is able to support this. However, astronomical observations with Earth-bound radio telescopes at very low

  9. Radio astronomy in Africa: the case of Ghana

    E-print Network

    Asabere, Bernard Duah; Horellou, Cathy; Winkler, Hartmut; Jarrett, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    South Africa has played a leading role in radio astronomy in Africa with the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO). It continues to make strides with the current seven-dish MeerKAT precursor array (KAT-7), leading to the 64-dish MeerKAT and the giant Square Kilometer Array (SKA), which will be used for transformational radio astronomy research. Ghana, an African partner to the SKA, has been mentored by South Africa over the past six years and will soon emerge in the field of radio astronomy. The country will soon have a science-quality 32m dish converted from a redundant satellite communication antenna. Initially, it will be fitted with 5 GHz and 6.7 GHz receivers to be followed later by a 1.4 - 1.7 GHz receiver. The telescope is being designed for use as a single dish observatory and for participation in the developing African Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Network (AVN) and the European VLBI Network. Ghana is earmarked to host a remote station during a possible SKA Phase 2. The loca...

  10. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE facility at the NRAO Green Bank observatory has the test antenna mounted on the receive table, which sweeps by setting the amplifier *Based on 5638 PC plug in card, from Industrial Computer Source. This particular

  11. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report-18 Shield Red m-19 Yellow n -20 Shield e Op Amp (Green) (N. T. Cal Sig - 7 (Yellow) Attn.) LO Sig (Card 3) (Blue) (Switch) (White) Det Sig (Card 2) (Oran

  12. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT Card............................... (See EDIR 294)......................... A22 Receiver Control Card ....................................................................................... A29 #12;1.0 General This report documents the receiver system of the Green Bank USNO 20 meter

  13. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report. At present these delays are achieved with coaxial cables, which take four equipment racks to house 20 22 Freq. (MHz) 24 Figure 2. Performance of a 1 ms delay line shown above to illustrate the effect

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report No. 142 AUTOMATIC NOISE FIGURE METER FRONT-END Richard L. Fleming MAY 1974 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;AUTOMATIC NOISE FIGURE METER FRONT-END Richard L. Fleming TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 .0 Introduction

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    Title: Author: Date: NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS. Fisher F. Crews CV ER Library IR Library M. Balister N. Bailey L. D'Addario N. Horner A. R. Kerr C the past score of years, the microwave literature, particularly the IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory

  16. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK) WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    No. 216 DESIGNS OF 300-1000 MHz UPPER SIDEBAND CONVERTERS ALBERT WU JULY 1981 BER OF COPIES: 150 #12;NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY DESIGNS OF 300-1000 MHz UPPER SIDEBAND CONVERTERS Albert Wu relationships given in the Manley and Rowe matrix, but the end resul t will be described by an equation

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    No. 252 ADIOS CONTROL PROGRAM DOUGLAS C. HALL NOVEMBER 1934 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;ADIOS CONTROL PROGRAM Douglas C. Hall I. Introduction The analog-digital, input-output system (ADIOS) is a powerful Astronomy Observatory. A general purpose program for controlling the ADIOS module is described herein

  18. An Introduction to Radio Astronomy: Second Edition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard F. Burke; Francis Graham-Smith

    2002-01-01

    New highlights include aperture synthesis, Very Long Baseline Interferometry, and the further exploitation of molecular spectral lines. A new chapter is devoted to the fundamentals of a review of radio observations of our Milky Way galaxy, stars, pulsars, radio galaxies, quasars, and the cosmic microwave background. Reviews of Fourier Transform theory, celestial co-ordinate systems and a historical outline of the

  19. Interference Mitigation In Radio Astronomy and

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    given task to find sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) to transatlantic radio communications And may also have been the first to grapple with RFI... Oh no... RFI !!! #12;1967: While studying that they have discovered a pulsar! Sometimes interference is...something new But, most RFI is just

  20. ASTRONOMY 8300 FALL 2012 Planetary Nebula Project

    E-print Network

    Crenshaw, Michael

    project to analyze the UV/optical spectrum of a planetary nebula (PN) observed by the Hubble SpaceASTRONOMY 8300 ­ FALL 2012 Planetary Nebula Project Due 11/29/12 at 11:00 AM This is a research. The distance to this PN has been estimated to be 4750 pc. To analyze the spectrum, get into IUE IDL (see

  1. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  2. Problems and Projects from Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    Describes activities to stimulate school astronomy programs. Topics include: counting stars; the Earth's centripetal force; defining astronomical time; three types of sundials; perceptions of star brightness; sunspots and solar radiation; stellar spectroscopy; number-crunching and the molecular structure of the atmosphere; the Earth-Moon common…

  3. Current New Zealand Activities in Radio Astronomy: Building Capacity in Engineering & Science for the Square Kilometre Array

    E-print Network

    Johnston-Hollitt, M; Hollitt, C P; Jones, N; Motleno, T C

    2010-01-01

    We present an update on the NZ-wide advances in the field of Radio Astronomy and Radio Engineering with a particular focus on contributions, not thus reported elsewhere, which hope to either directly or indirectly contribute to New Zealand's engagement with the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. We discuss the status of the SKA project in New Zealand with particular reference to activities of the New Zealand Square Kilometre Array Research and Development Consortium.

  4. Developments in Coherent Amplifiers and Miniaturized Receivers for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kieran; Readhead, A. C.; Reeves, R.; Gawande, R.; Kooi, J.; Gaier, T.; Lawrence, C. R.; Kangaslahti, P.; Samoska, L.; Varonen, M.; Lai, R.; Sarkozy, S.; Church, S. E.; Sieth, M.; Devaraj, K.; Voll, P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of InP HEMT amplifiers have produced a breakthrough in the cryogenic noise performance of these devices. Caltech's Cahill Radio Astronomy Lab (CRAL), JPL and Northrop Grumman (NGAS) are working to produce new amplifiers which can exploit this improved performance for radio astronomy. In parallel, these new amplifiers are being integrated into a family of miniaturized modular receivers which have wide application as focal plane arrays. Such arrays will have a major impact on a diverse range of scientific goals, such as measurement of integrated CO from the Epoch of Reionization, efficient spectroscopic and continuum mapping of Galactic emission and measurement of the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background. We report on these developments and prospects for the future.

  5. Radio broadcasting: an attractive way of broadcasting astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosoia, C.

    2008-06-01

    Astronomy is full of beautiful skyscapes, shining stars and huge planets. The vast majority of them can be transformed into tactile images and complemented by audio descriptions. These translations of visual information into raised lines, shapes and textures can be felt with the fingertips instead of viewed with the eyes. In this way, the beauties of the Universe enter the universe of blind and visually impaired people. Happily, we all have radio broadcasting as an important source of information and entertainment. Science radio programmes can bring the real music of the spheres (as Pythagoras once suggested) to the audience.

  6. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Low-Noise 4.8 GHz Cooled GaAs FET Amplifier R. D. Norrod and R. J. Simon I 8 GaAs FET Model 1. 18 S l , and S 22 plotted from manufacturer's data for the MGF 1412 and from Model 1. 19 1 0 GaAs FET Model 2 with resistors added in series with the gate-source and gate

  7. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    . Introduction In the 100-1000 GHz frequency range, where RF amplifiers are not available, superheterodyne radio No, 253 PROTOTYPE 2-4 GHz, LOW-NOISE, BALANCED AMPLIFIER -- DESIGN AND TESTS WYMAN WILLIAMS DECEMBER Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figures The Balanced Amplifier Configuration . The FET Model

  8. Voyager planetary radio astronomy at Neptune

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James W. Warwick; David R. Evans; Gerard R. Peltzer; Robert G. Peltzer; Joseph H. Romig; Constance B. Sawyer; Anthony C. Riddle; Andrea E. Schweitzer; Michael D. Desch; Michael L. Kaiser; W. M. Farrell; T. D. Carr; I. de Pater; D. H. Staelin; S. Gulkis; R. L. Poynter; A. Boischot; F. Genova; Y. Leblanc; A. Lecacheux; B. M. Pedersen; P. Zarka

    1989-01-01

    Detection of very intense short radio bursts from Neptune was possible as early as 30 days before closest approach and at least 22 days after closest approach. The bursts lay at frequencies in the range 100 to 1300 kilohertz, were narrowband and strongly polarized, and presumably originated in southern polar regions of the planet. Episodes of smooth emissions in the

  9. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  10. The Radio Jove Project: Citizen Science Contributes to Jupiter Decametric Radio Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.; Higgins, C. A.; Sky, J.; Cecconi, B.; Garcia, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Radio Jove Project is a hands-on educational activity in which students, teachers, and the general public build a simple radio telescope, usually from a kit, to observe single frequency decameter wavelength radio emissions from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and the Earth. Regular monitoring of Jupiter and solar radio storms is typical, and Radio Jove amateur observations have improved in their scientific utility. Some observers have upgraded their equipment to make spectroscopic observations in the frequency band from 15-30 MHz. These observations can be particularly useful when made in conjunction with professional telescopes such as the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), the Nancay Decametric Array, the Ukrainian UTR-2 Radio Telescope, etc. The coming Juno mission to Jupiter will observe the radio emissions while in orbit at Jupiter and will benefit from the Earth-based perspective provided by frequent monitoring of the emissions. With these goals in mind work is now underway to provide simple methods of archiving the Radio Jove observations for use by the amateur and professional radio science community in scientifically useful and easily analyzed formats. The data will be ingested to both Radio Jove specific databases and to archives containing a variety of "waves" data. Methods are being developed to assure the scientific validity of contributed data such as certification of the observers. Amateur scientists have made overwhelming contributions to optical astronomy and we believe the same is possible within the radio astronomy community as well.

  11. Monitoring Radio Frequency Interference: The Quiet Skies Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, S.; Gear, C.; Maddalena, R. J.; Heatherly, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Quiet Skies Project is a result of the Research Experience for Teacher (RET) program during the summer of 2004. Teachers were involved in discovering the relationship between radio frequency interference (RFI) and radio astronomy observations. S. Rapp participated in astronomy observations with the Green Bank Telescope in order to characterize RFI issues at radio observatories and worked closely with the Green Bank Interference Protection Group. This work included such tasks as mitigation of locally-generated RFI from power poles and running radiation propagation studies for transmitters within the National Radio Quiet Zone. A curriculum was created to allow high school students to participate in a research effort to determine RFI levels in their communities. The aim of the project is to promote student awareness of radio astronomy and radio frequency interference through an inquiry-based science curriculum. It is hoped that the project will go national by 2007. A prototype RFI detector was created and tested at four wavelengths; 850, 900, 1425, and 1675 MHz. High school students used a beta version of the RFI detector to explore the occurrence of RFI at their schools and in their communities. The student goals of the Quiet Skies Project are to: Measure interference levels at their schools and in their communities; Reduce and transmit their data to an NRAO data base; Use online spectrum allocation data, and local information to determine possible causes of interference in their area; Analyze the complex trade-offs between radio astronomy's need for quiet skies, and other commercial, and non-commercial uses of the spectrum and share their insights with others. This work was funded by the NSF-RET program and a grant from the NASA-IDEAS program

  12. Presented at "RFI2004: Workshop on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy"; Penticton, Canada, 16-18 July 2004

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Presented at "RFI2004: Workshop on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy Driel ICSU Scientific Committee on Frequency Allocations for Radio Astronomy and Space Science (IUCAF the radio frequency bands allocated for astronomical use. Radio telescopes are very sensitive, and their far

  13. RASDR: Benchtop Demonstration of SDR for Radio Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL] [ORNL; Oxley, Paul [Retired] [Retired; Fields, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Kurtz, Dr. Stan [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM)] [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Leech, Marcus [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium] [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium

    2012-01-01

    The Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers (SARA) members present the benchtop version of RASDR, a Software Defined Radio (SDR) that is optimized for Radio Astronomy. RASDR has the potential to be a common digital receiver interface useful to many SARA members. This document describes the RASDR 0.0 , which provides digitized radio data to a backend computer through a USB 2.0 interface. A primary component of RASDR is the Lime Microsystems Femtocell chip which tunes from a 0.4-4 GHz center frequency with several selectable bandwidths from 0.75 MHz to 14 MHz. A second component is a board with a Complex Programmable Logic Device (CPLD) chip that connects to the Femtocell and provides two USB connections to the backend computer. A third component is an analog balanced mixer up conversion section. Together these three components enable RASDR to tune from 0.015 MHz thru 3.8GHz of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum. We will demonstrate and discuss capabilities of the breadboard system and SARA members will be able to operate the unit hands-on throughout the workshop.

  14. AMANDA ANN KEPLEY MAIL: National Radio Astronomy Observatory OFFICE: +1-304-456-2808

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    AMANDA ANN KEPLEY MAIL: National Radio Astronomy Observatory OFFICE: +1-304-456-2808 P.O. Box 2 CELL: +1-434-260-1066 Green Bank, WV 24944-0002 FAX: +1-304-456-2229 WEBSITE: http Grant 2012 National Radio Astronomy Observatory Foreign Telescope Fund Grant 2009, 2010 Green Bank

  15. 8 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL n VOLUME 21, NUMBER 1, 2014 InsIghts Into the UnIverse: Astronomy wIth hAystAck's rAdIo telescope

    E-print Network

    Williams, Brian C.

    wIth hAystAck's rAdIo telescope Insights into the Universe: Astronomy with Haystack's Radio Telescope game-changing tech- nology for radio science, and to apply it to the study of our planet, its space projects. The observatory is operated under an agreement with the Northeast Radio Observatory Corporation

  16. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Astronomy: The Visible and Invisible Universe

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Astronomy: The Visible and Invisible Universe #12;The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation

  17. Site selection for a radio astronomy observatory in Turkey: atmospherical, meteorological, and radio frequency analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küçük, Ibrahim; Üler, Ipek; Öz, ?ükriye; Onay, Sedat; Özdemir, Ali R?za; Gül?en, Mehmet; Sar?kaya, Mikail; Dag˜Tekin, Nazl? Derya; Özeren, Ferhat Fikri

    2012-03-01

    Selecting the future site for a large Turkish radio telescope is a key issue. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is now in the stage of construction at a site near Karaman City, in Turkey. A single-dish parabolic radio antenna of 30-40 m will be installed near a building that will contain offices, laboratories, and living accommodations. After a systematic survey of atmospheric, meteorological, and radio frequency interference (RFI) analyses, site selection studies were performed in a predetermined location in Turkey during 2007 and 2008. In this paper, we described the experimental procedure and the RFI measurements on our potential candidate's sites in Turkey, covering the frequency band from 1 to 40 GHz.

  18. Embracing the Wave: Using the Very Small Radio Telescope to Teach Students about Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Needles, M. M.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Doherty, M.; Minnigh, S.; Arndt, M. B.; Pratap, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT) is a low-cost educational tool appropriate for laboratory demonstrations of the nature of radio waves and the principles of interferometry for use in both high school and undergraduate physics/astronomy classes. The system consists of small direct broadcast antenna dishes and other commercially available parts and can be assembled for under $500. Complete teaching units have been developed and tested by high school physics teachers to demonstrate radio wave transmission and exponential absorption though materials (Beer's law), the polarization of electromagnetic waves (Malus' law), the inverse square law, and interferometry. These units can be used to explore the properties of electromagnetic waves, including similarities and differences between radio and visible light, while challenging students' misconceptions about a wavelength regime that is important to both astronomy and everyday life. In addition, the VSRT can be used as a radio astronomical interferometer to measure the diameter of the Sun at 12 GHz. Full details, including a parts list, comprehensive assembly instructions, informational memos, teaching units, software, and conformance to national and Massachusetts educational standards, are available on the web at http://www.haystack.mit.edu/edu/undergrad/VSRT/index.html . Development of the VSRT at MIT Haystack Observatory is made possible through funding provided by the National Science Foundation.

  19. Astronomy Education in Morocco - New Project for Implementing Astronomy in High Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darhmaoui, H.; Loudiyi, K.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy education in Morocco, like in many developing countries, is not well developed and lacks the very basics in terms of resources, facilities and research. In 2004, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) signed an agreement of collaboration with Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane to support the continued, long-term development of astronomy and astrophysics in Morocco. This is within the IAU program "Teaching for Astronomy Development" (TAD). The initial focus of the program concentrated exclusively on the University's Bachelor of Science degree program. Within this program, and during two years, we were successful in providing adequate astronomy training to our physics faculty and few of our engineering students. We also offered our students and community general astronomy background through courses, invited talks and extra curricular activities. The project is now evolving towards a wider scope and seeks promoting astronomy education at the high school level. It is based on modules from the Hands on Universe (HOU) interactive astronomy program. Moroccan students will engage in doing observational astronomy from their PCs. They will have access to a world wide network of telescopes and will interact with their peers abroad. Through implementing astronomy education at this lower age, we foresee an increasing interest among our youth not only in astronomy but also in physics, mathematics, and technology. The limited astronomy resources, the lack of teachers experience in the field and the language barrier are amongst the difficulties that we'll be facing in achieving the objectives of this new program.

  20. Matched wideband low-noise amplifiers for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, S; Bardin, J; Mani, H; Jones, G

    2009-04-01

    Two packaged low noise amplifiers for the 0.3-4 GHz frequency range are described. The amplifiers can be operated at temperatures of 300-4 K and achieve noise temperatures in the 5 K range (<0.1 dB noise figure) at 15 K physical temperature. One amplifier utilizes commercially available, plastic-packaged SiGe transistors for first and second stages; the second amplifier is identical except it utilizes an experimental chip transistor as the first stage. Both amplifiers use resistive feedback to provide input reflection coefficient S11<-10 dB over a decade bandwidth with gain over 30 dB. The amplifiers can be used as rf amplifiers in very low noise radio astronomy systems or as i.f. amplifiers following superconducting mixers operating in the millimeter and submillimeter frequency range. PMID:19405681

  1. User friendly database for Neptune planetary radio astronomy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David R.

    1993-07-01

    Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) data from the Voyager Neptune encounter were cleaned and reformatted in a variety of formats. Most of these formats are new and have been specifically designed to provide easy access and use of the data without the need to understand esoteric characteristics of the PRA instrument or the Voyager spacecraft. Several data sets were submitted to the Planetary Data System (PDS) and have either appeared already on peer reviewed CDROM's or are in the process of being reviewed for inclusion in forthcoming CD-ROM's. Many of the data sets are also available online electronically through computer networks; it is anticipated that as time permits, the PDS will make all the data sets that were a part of this contract available both online and on CD-ROM's.

  2. Genome Radio Project: Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The process of conducting background research for the programs of the Genome Radio Project is continuing. The most developed of the program ``backgrounders`` have been reviewed by series and program advisors from various fields. Preliminary and background interviews have been conducted with dozens of potential program participants and advisors. Structurally, efforts are being directed toward developing and formalizing the project and series advisor relationships so that the best use can be made of those experts who have offered to assist the project in its presentation of program content. The library of research materials has been expanded considerably, creating a useful resource library for the producers.

  3. Jansky and Reber: Two Remarkable Stories in Early Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. T., III

    1996-05-01

    Extraterrestrial radio waves were first detected in 1931-32 by Karl Jansky at the Bell Telephone Labs in New Jersey while he was investigating sources of interference to recently opened, trans-Atlantic shortwave (20 MHz) radiotelephone circuits. At this time Jansky was only a few years beyond his physics degree from the University of Wisconsin, where his father was a professor of engineering. Jansky studied this "star noise" off and on until 1935, establishing that the emission came from the direction of the Milky Way and the galactic center, but did not pursue it in any further detail. The only other person to make a significant contribution to the nascent subject before World War II was Grote Reber, an electrical engineer who worked for several different radio firms in Chicago. After reading Jansky's articles, in 1937 Reber decided to build a 30-ft diameter dish antenna in the backyard of his suburban home in Wheaton, Illinois. By 1939 he had detected the Jansky radiation, which he called "cosmic noise", at 160 MHz and he comenced a long term program of mapping it in detail (with a 12 degree beam). Reber became a well-known figure to the astronomers at the University of Chicago and Yerkes Observatory (Struve, Greenstein, Kuiper, Henyey, Keenan) as he sought to learn astronomy and convince the staff that this cosmic noise was of importance. Struve, editor of the "Astrophysical Journal", was finally persuaded to publish Reber's articles. During and just after the war Reber extended his work to 480 MHz. He then sought funds to move his dish to a quieter locale and to build a second, much larger dish, but neither of these plans came to fruition. It is ironic that the remarkable contributions of these two pioneers to the field that would eventually become known as "radio astronomy" (a term only introduced in the late 1940s) had little influence on the spectacular growth of the field in the decade after World War II. The great bulk of the important work was done in England and Australia, where it grew wholly independently out of wartime radar labs. Reasons for the lag in the US, largely due to the effects of military funding and the strong community of (optical) astronomers, will be discussed.

  4. Under the Radar: The First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller Goss, W.

    2012-05-01

    Under the Radar, the First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott W. Miller Goss, NRAO Socorro NM Ruby Payne-Scott (1912-1981) was an eminent Australian scientist who made major contributions to the WWII radar effort (CSIR) from 1941 to 1945. In late 1945, she pioneered radio astronomy efforts at Dover Heights in Sydney, Australia at a beautiful cliff top overlooking the Tasman Sea. Again at Dover Heights, Payne-Scott carried out the first interferometry in radio astronomy using an Australian Army radar antenna as a radio telescope at sun-rise, 26 January 1946. She continued these ground breaking activities until 1951. Ruby Payne-Scott played a major role in discovering and elucidating the properties of Type III bursts from the sun, the most common of the five classes of transient phenomena from the solar corona. These bursts are one of the most intensively studied forms of radio emission in all of astronomy. She is also one of the inventors of aperture synthesis in radio astronomy. I examine her career at the University of Sydney and her conflicts with the CSIR hierarchy concerning the rights of women in the work place, specifically equal wages and the lack of permanent status for married women. I also explore her membership in the Communist Party of Australia as well as her partially released Australian Scientific Intelligence Organization file. Payne-Scott’s role as a major participant in the flourishing radio astronomy research of the post war era remains a remarkable story. She had a number of strong collaborations with the pioneers of early radio astronomy in Australia: Pawsey, Mills, Christiansen, Bolton and Little. I am currently working on a popular version of the Payne-Scott story; “Making Waves, The Story of Ruby Payne-Scott: Australian Pioneer Radio Astronomer” will be published in 2013 by Springer in the Astronomers’ Universe Series.

  5. Thunderstorms and ground-based radio noise as observed by radio astronomy Explorer 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. A.; Herman, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) data were analyzed to determine the frequency dependence of HF terrestrial radio noise power. RAE observations of individual thunderstorms, mid-ocean areas, and specific geographic regions for which concommitant ground based measurements are available indicate that noise power is a monotonically decreasing function of frequency which conforms to expectations over the geographic locations and time periods investigated. In all cases investigated, active thunderstorm regions emit slightly higher power as contrasted to RAE observations of the region during meteorologically quiet periods. Noise levels are some 15 db higher than predicted values over mid-ocean, while in locations where ground based measurements are available a maximum deviation of 5 db occurs. Worldwide contour mapping of the noise power at 6000 km for five individual months and four observing frequencies, examples of which are given, indicate high noise levels over continental land masses with corresponding lower levels over ocean regions.

  6. Junior professor (W1) in radio astronomy The Faculty of Physics at Bielefeld University invites applications for a junior

    E-print Network

    Moeller, Ralf

    of fundamental physics but potentially also cosmic magnetic fields, cosmic rays, extragalactic radio sourcesJunior professor (W1) in radio astronomy The Faculty of Physics at Bielefeld University invites applications for a junior professorship (W1) in radio astronomy, starting on June 1, 2012. The successful

  7. A Calibrated Digital Sideband Separating Spectrometer for Radio Astronomy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Ricardo; Mena, Patricio; Reyes, Nicolás; Rodriguez, Rafael; Bronfman, Leonardo

    2013-03-01

    Dual sideband (2SB) receivers are well suited for the spectral observation of complex astronomical signals over a wide frequency range. They are extensively used in radio astronomy, their main advantages being to avoid spectral confusion and to diminish effective system temperature by a factor 2 with respect to double sideband (DSB) receivers. Using available millimeter-wave analog technology, wideband 2SB receivers generally obtain sideband rejection ratios (SRR) of 10--15 dB, insufficient for a number of astronomical applications. We report here the design and implementation of an FPGA-based sideband separating FFT spectrometer. A 4 GHz analog front end was built to test the design and measure sideband rejection. The setup uses a 2SB front end architecture, except that the mixer outputs are directly digitized before the IF hybrid, using two 8 bit ADCs sampling at 1 GSPS. The IF hybrid is implemented on the FPGA together with a set of calibration vectors that, properly chosen, compensate for the analog front end amplitude and phase imbalances. The calibrated receiver exhibits a sideband rejection ratio in excess of 40 dB for the entire 2 GHz RF bandwidth.

  8. In memoriam: Grote Reber 1911-2002 founder of radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peratt, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    Grote Reber, amateur radio operator W9GFZ, died December 20, 2002 in Tasmania. He would have been 91 years old on December 22nd. Reber is acknowledged as the Father of Radio Astronomy and the inventor of the first true radio telescope. With the advent of space satellites, his greatest legacy may well be his invention of the parabolic dish, designed to receive nonterrestrial electromagnetic radiation, a concept that has revolutionized worldwide communication.

  9. Development of an Experimental Phased Array Feed System and Algorithms for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landon, Jonathan C.

    Phased array feeds (PAFs) are a promising new technology for astronomical radio telescopes. While PAFs have been used in other fields, the demanding sensitivity and calibration requirements in astronomy present unique new challenges. This dissertation presents some of the first astronomical PAF results demonstrating the lowest noise temperature and highest sensitivity at the time (66 Kelvin and 3.3 m^2/K, respectively), obtained using a narrowband (425 kHz bandwidth)prototype array of 19 linear co-polarized L-band dipoles mounted at the focus of the Green Bank 20 Meter Telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia. Results include spectral line detection of hydroxyl (OH) sources W49N and W3OH, and some of the first radio camera images made using a PAF, including an image of the Cygnus X region. A novel array Y-factor technique for measuring the isotropic noise response of the array is shown along with experimental measurements for this PAF. Statistically optimal beamformers (Maximum SNR and MVDR) are used throughout the work. Radio-frequency interference (RFI) mitigation is demonstrated experimentally using spatial cancelation with the PAF. Improved RFI mitigation is achieved in the challenging cases of low interference-to-noise ratio (INR) and moving interference by combining subspace projection (SP) beamforming with a polynomial model to track a rank 1 subspace. Limiting factors in SP are investigated including sample estimation error, subspace smearing, noise bias, and spectral scooping; each of these factors is overcome with the polynomial model and prewhitening. Numerical optimization leads to the polynomial subspace projection (PSP) method, and least-squares fitting to the series of dominant eigenvectors over a series of short term integrations (STIs) leads to the eigenvector polynomial subspace projection (EPSP) method. Expressions for the gradient, Hessian, and Jacobian are given for use in numerical optimization. Results are given for simulated and experimental data, demonstrating deeper beampattern nulls by 6 to 30dB. To increase the system bandwidth toward the hundreds of MHz bandwidth required by astronomers for a fully science-ready instrument, an FPGA digital backend is introduced using a 64-input analog-to-digital converter running at 50 Msamp/sec and the ROACH processing board developed at the University of California, Berkeley. International efforts to develop digital back ends for large antenna arrays are considered, and a road map is proposed for development of a hardware correlator/beamformer at BYU using three ROACH boards communicating over 10 gigabit Ethernet.

  10. Cosmic Noise: The Pioneers of Early Radio Astronomy and Their Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Woodruff T., III

    2012-01-01

    Extraterrestrial radio waves (the galactic background), often referred to as "cosmic noise", were first detected accidentally by Karl Jansky at a frequency of 20 MHz in 1932, with significant followup by Grote Reber. Yet after World War II it was England and Australia that dominated the field. An entirely different sky from that of visual astronomy was revealed by the discoveries of solar noise, "radio stars” (discrete sources such as Cas A, Tau A, Cyg A, Cen A and Vir A), galactic noise, lunar and meteor radar experiments, the detection of the 21 cm hydrogen line, and eventually optical identifications such as the Crab Nebula and M87. Key players included wartime radar experts such as Stanley Hey (the British Army's Operational Research Group), Martin Ryle (Cambridge University), Bernard Lovell (Jodrell Bank) and Joe Pawsey (Radiophysics Lab, Sydney). Younger leaders also emerged such as Graham Smith, Tony Hewish, John Davies, "Chris" Christiansen, Bernie Mills, Paul Wild, and John Bolton. Some optical astronomers (Jan Oort, Henk van de Hulst, Jesse Greenstein, Rudolph Minkowski, and Walter Baade) were also extremely supportive. By the end of the postwar decade, radio astronomy was firmly established within the gamut of astronomy, although very few of its practitioners had been trained as astronomers. I will also trace the technical and social aspects of this wholly new type of astronomy, with special attention on military and national influences. I argue that radio astronomy represents one of the key developments in twentieth century astronomy not only because of its own discoveries, but also its pathfinding for the further opening the electromagnetic spectrum. This study is based on exhaustive archival research and over one hundred interviews with pioneering radio astronomers. Full details are available in the book "Cosmic Noise: A History of Early Radio Astronomy" (Cambridge Univ. Pr.).

  11. Adventures in Radio Astronomy Instrumentation and Signal Processing

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    using radio telescopes. Modern radio telescopes have significant digital signal processing demands of spectrometers for enabling improved pulsar2 sci- ence on the Allen Telescope Array, the Hartebeesthoek Radio Observatory telescope, the Nan¸cay Radio Telescope, and the Parkes Radio Telescope. We also present work

  12. Adventures in Radio Astronomy Instrumentation and Signal Processing

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    - tizing and processing analogue astronomical signals collected using radio telescopes. Modern radio pulsar2 sci- ence on the Allen Telescope Array, the Hartebeesthoek Radio Observatory telescope, the Nan¸cay Radio Telescope, and the Parkes Radio Telescope. We also present work that we conducted

  13. Background radio-frequency radiation and its impact on radio astronomy Michelle C. Storey, Bruce MacA Thomas and John M. Sarkissian

    E-print Network

    Sarkissian, John M.

    1 Background radio-frequency radiation and its impact on radio astronomy Michelle C. Storey, Bruce 1710 Email:mstorey@atnf.csiro.au Abstract: The use of radio-frequency telecommunications equipment is dramatically increasing, and one consequence is that background levels of radio-frequency radiation

  14. The Birth and Development of Radio Astronomy Studies of the Sun at the Siberian Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere and Radio-Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smol'kov, G. Y.

    The history of the organisation of the Department of Radio Astronomy at the Siberian Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere and Radio-Wave Propagation (SibIZMIRAN) is described, together with the principles behind the construction of the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope and the results of observations of the solar radio emission at decimetre wavelengths using this telescope.

  15. Space-based Aperture Array For Ultra-Long Wavelength Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Rajan, Raj Thilak; Bentum, Mark; Klein-Wolt, Marc; Belien, Frederik; Arts, Michel; Saks, Noah; van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen the rise of various radio astronomy arrays, particularly for low-frequency observations below 100MHz. These developments have been primarily driven by interesting and fundamental scientific questions, such as studying the dark ages and epoch of re-ionization, by detecting the highly red-shifted 21cm line emission. However, Earth-based radio astronomy below frequencies of 30MHz is severely restricted due to man-made interference, ionospheric distortion and almost complete non-transparency of the ionosphere below 10MHz. Therefore, this narrow spectral band remains possibly the last unexplored frequency range in radio astronomy. A straightforward solution to study the universe at these frequencies is to deploy a space-based antenna array far away from Earths' ionosphere. Various studies in the past were principally limited by technology and computing resources, however current processing and communication trends indicate otherwise. We briefly present the achievable science cases, and dis...

  16. Investigation on the Frequency Allocation for Radio Astronomy at the L Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Z. Z.; Umar, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Rosli, Z.; Asanok, K.; Gasiprong, N.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the frequency allocation reserved for radio astronomy in the L band set by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), which is between 1400 and 1427 MHz, is reviewed. We argue that the nearby frequencies are still very important for radio astronomers on the ground by investigating radio objects (H i sources) around 1300-1500 MHz. The L-band window is separated into a group of four windows, namely 1400-1427 MHz (window A), 1380-1400 MHz (window B), 1350-1380 MHz (window C), and 1300-1350 MHz (window D). These windows are selected according to their redshifts from a rest frequency for hydrogen spectral line at 1420.4057 MHz. Radio objects up to z ? 0.1 or frequency down to 1300 MHz are examined. We argue that since window B has important radio objects within the four windows, this window should also be given to radio astronomy. They are galaxies, spiral galaxies, and galaxy clusters. This underlines the significance of window B for radio astronomers on the ground. By investigating the severeness of radio frequency interference (RFI) within these windows, we have determined that window B still has significant, consistent RFI. The main RFI sources in the four windows have also been identified. We also found that the Department of Civil Aviation of Malaysia is assigned a frequency range of 1215-1427 MHz, which is transmitted within the four windows and inside the protected frequency for radio astronomy. We also investigated the RFI in the four windows on proposed sites of future radio astronomy observatories in Malaysia and Thailand and found the two best sites as Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI) and Ubon Ratchathani, respectively. It has also been determined that RFI in window B increases with population density.

  17. OLFAR: the orbiting low frequency array, how a cube sat swarm becomes a novel radio astronomy instrument in space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Bentum; Arjan Meijerink; Albert-Jan Boonstra; Chris Verhoeven; Veen van der Alle-Jan

    2010-01-01

    To study the physical processes in the Universe, observations are done at various wavelengths, from Gamma rays to optical and radio frequencies. At this moment research at low frequencies is one of the major topics in radio astronomy. Several Earth-based radio telescopes are being built and will be operational very soon (for instance the LOFAR radio telescope in the Netherlands

  18. The Radio Language Arts Project: adapting the radio mathematics model.

    PubMed

    Christensen, P R

    1985-01-01

    Kenya's Radio Language Arts Project, directed by the Academy for Educational Development in cooperation with the Kenya Institute of Education in 1980-85, sought to teach English to rural school children in grades 1-3 through use of an intensive, radio-based instructional system. Daily 1/2 hour lessons are broadcast throughout the school year and supported by teachers and print materials. The project further was aimed at testing the feasibility of adaptation of the successful Nicaraguan Radio Math Project to a new subject area. Difficulties were encountered in articulating a language curriculum with the precision required for a media-based instructional system. Also a challenge was defining the acceptable regional standard for pronunciation and grammar; British English was finally selected. An important modification of the Radio Math model concerned the role of the teacher. While Radio Math sought to reduce the teacher's responsibilities during the broadcast, Radio Language Arts teachers played an important instructional role during the English lesson broadcasts by providing translation and checks on work. Evaluations of the Radio language Arts Project suggest significant gains in speaking, listening, and reading skills as well as high levels of satisfaction on the part of parents and teachers. PMID:12341671

  19. Improvements to Host Country Radio Astronomy at Robledo: Another antenna, a new receiver, a new backend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, J. R.; García-Miró, G.

    2013-05-01

    NASA hosts three complexes worldwide built for spacecraft tracking, whose sensitive antennas are suitable for radio astronomy. Since more than a decade, INTA has managed guaranteed Spanish time at the complex located in Robledo de Chavela, in the frame of the Host Country Radio Astronomy (HCRA) program. Until now, the vast majority of the scientific results were achieved using a K-band (18 to 26 GHz) receiver, attached to the 70m antenna, and a narrow-band autocorrelator. In the recent years, we have undertaken two large instrumental projects: (1) the incorporation of a second antenna (34m in diameter), working in Q-band (38 to 50 GHz); and (2) the design and construction of a wideband backend, which may operate with both the Q- and K-band receivers, providing instantaneous bandwidths from 100 MHz to 6 GHz, and resolutions from 6 to 200 kHz. The new wideband backend is expanding the HCRA possibilities due its bandwidth, versatility, spectral resolution and stability of the baselines. Its IF processor splits each of the two circular-polarization signals, and downconverts them to four base-band channels, 1.5 GHz width. Two different frequencies may be tuned independently. Digitalisation is done through FPGA-based FFT spectrometers, which may be independently configured. Once end-to-end assembled, the commissioning of the new backend was done using the 34m antenna in Q-band. We report the main characteristics of both the antenna recently incorporated to HCRA, and the wideband backend.

  20. Frontiers of Astronomy with the World's Largest Radio Telescope

    E-print Network

    and instrumentation roadmap that takes into account developments in electromagnetic and non-photonic astronomy and FORMATION & EVOLUTION PRECISION ASTROMETRY & HIGH RESOLUTION CONTEXTS TRANSIENTS & SETI NEAR-EARTH OBJECTS

  1. A Low-Frequency Distributed Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy in Space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert-Jan Boonstra; Noah Saks; Heino Falcke; Marc Klein-Wolt; Ark Bentum; Raj Thilak Rajan; Ir. Stefan J. Wijnholds; Michel Arts; Kees van-T Klooster; Frederik Belien

    2010-01-01

    The frequency band below 30 MHz is one of the last unexplored bands in radio astronomy. This band is well suited for studying the early cosmos at high hydrogen redshifts, the so-called dark ages, extragalactic surveys, (extra) solar planetary bursts, and high energy particle physics. In addition, space research such as space weather tomography, are also areas of scientific interest.

  2. Fundamental experiments of radio astronomy by the paraboloidal antenna of 3.3 m diameter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Sato; S. Kuji; T. Hara; M. Fujishita; K. Horiai; K. Iwadate; T. Tsubokawa; Y. Tamura; S. Takano; S. Tsuruta; K. Asari

    1987-01-01

    The 3.3 m diameter paraboloidal antenna was moved at early 1985 for fundamental experiments of radio astronomy at the International Latitude Observatory of Mizusawa. The antenna was originally manufactured for the telecomunication experiments at 4 GHz. The authors fitted up a new feed horn of 8 GHz-band for their experiments. The driving system was renewed as suitable for astronomical use

  3. Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. Circular Polarization of Radio Emission from Relativistic Jets

    E-print Network

    Falcke, Heino

    their footprints in the linear and circular polarized radiation of the source. An important factor is also, the circular polarization and the jet direction determine the magnetic poles of the system which is stable overAstronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. . . . Circular Polarization of Radio Emission from

  4. A Generic Digital Beam Former Platform for Phased Arrays in Radio Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald de Wild

    In radio astronomy, weak signals from distant celestial sources are interfering with nearby wireless communication systems. Beam forming plays an essential role in mitigating these signals, before they can pass to the actual image processing steps. One of the system concepts proposed for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is the two-dimensional phased array. One of the reasons for ASTRON exploring

  5. PARTNeR: Radio astromony for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco, C.; Vaquerizo, J. A.

    2008-06-01

    PARTNeR stands for Proyecto Academico con el Radiotelescopio de NASA en Robledo (the Academic Project with NASA's radio telescope at Robledo), and allows students to perform radio astronomy observations. High school and university students can access the PARTNeR radio telescope via the internet. The students can operate the antenna from their own school or university and perform radio astronomy observations.

  6. Plasma Diagnostics of the Interstellar Medium with Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Haverkorn, Marijke

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the degree to which radio propagation measurements diagnose conditions in the ionized gas of the interstellar medium (ISM). The "signal generators" of the radio waves of interest are extragalactic radio sources (quasars and radio galaxies), as well as Galactic sources, primarily pulsars. The polarized synchrotron radiation of the Galactic non-thermal radiation also serves to probe the ISM, including space between the emitting regions and the solar system. Radio propagation measurements provide unique information on turbulence in the ISM as well as the mean plasma properties such as density and magnetic field strength. Radio propagation observations can provide input to the major contemporary questions on the nature of ISM turbulence, such as its dissipation mechanisms and the processes responsible for generating the turbulence on large spatial scales. Measurements of the large scale Galactic magnetic field via Faraday rotation provide unique observational input to theories of the generation of the ...

  7. Plasma Diagnostics of the Interstellar Medium with Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke; Spangler, Steven R.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the degree to which radio propagation measurements diagnose conditions in the ionized gas of the interstellar medium (ISM). The "signal generators" of the radio waves of interest are extragalactic radio sources (quasars and radio galaxies), as well as Galactic sources, primarily pulsars. The polarized synchrotron radiation of the Galactic non-thermal radiation also serves to probe the ISM, including space between the emitting regions and the solar system. Radio propagation measurements provide unique information on turbulence in the ISM as well as the mean plasma properties such as density and magnetic field strength. Radio propagation observations can provide input to the major contemporary questions on the nature of ISM turbulence, such as its dissipation mechanisms and the processes responsible for generating the turbulence on large spatial scales. Measurements of the large scale Galactic magnetic field via Faraday rotation provide unique observational input to theories of the generation of the Galactic field.

  8. Plasma Diagnostics of the Interstellar Medium with Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke; Spangler, Steven R.

    We discuss the degree to which radio propagation measurements diagnose conditions in the ionized gas of the interstellar medium (ISM). The "signal generators" of the radio waves of interest are extragalactic radio sources (quasars and radio galaxies), as well as Galactic sources, primarily pulsars. The polarized synchrotron radiation of the Galactic non-thermal radiation also serves to probe the ISM, including space between the emitting regions and the solar system. Radio propagation measurements provide unique information on turbulence in the ISM as well as the mean plasma properties such as density and magnetic field strength. Radio propagation observations can provide input to the major contemporary questions on the nature of ISM turbulence, such as its dissipation mechanisms and the processes responsible for generating the turbulence on large spatial scales. Measurements of the large scale Galactic magnetic field via Faraday rotation provide unique observational input to theories of the generation of the Galactic field.

  9. RESOLVE: Bayesian algorithm for aperture synthesis imaging in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junklewitz, H.; Bell, M. A.; Ensslin, T.

    2015-05-01

    RESOLVE is a Bayesian inference algorithm for image reconstruction in radio interferometry. It is optimized for extended and diffuse sources. Features include parameter-free Bayesian reconstruction of radio continuum data with a focus on extended and weak diffuse sources, reconstruction with uncertainty propagation dependent on measurement noise, and estimation of the spatial correlation structure of the radio astronomical source. RESOLVE provides full support for measurement sets and includes a simulation tool (if uv-coverage is provided).

  10. Highlighting the History of Japanese Radio Astronomy. 2: Koichi Shimoda and the 1948 Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoda, Koichi; Orchiston, Wayne; Akabane, Kenji; Ishiguro, Masato

    2013-07-01

    Just two years after Dicke carried out the first radio observations of a solar eclipse, a young Japanese physics graduate, Koichi Shimoda, attempted to observe 3,000 MHz emission during the 9 May 1948 partial solar eclipse. In so doing he unwittingly became the 'founding father' of Japanese radio astronomy. In this paper as our mark of respect for him, we list Shimoda as the lead author of the paper so that his observations can finally be placed on record for the international radio astronomical community.

  11. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    as they are relevant to radio astronomical problems. II. Basic Considerations Microwave signals passing through affect radio astronomical interferometer observations in two ways. In the first place, source signals arriving at the two antennas of an interferometer may suffer uncorrelated delays prior to arrival at each

  12. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANKJ WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    No. 161 MICROWAVE OVEN RADIO FREQUENCY EMISSIONS JAMES L. DOLAN JULY 1975 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;MICROWAVE OVEN RADIO FRE SIJENCY EMISSIONS James L. Dolan Introduction On June 17, 1975, power density measurements were made on two privately- owned microwave ovens. Both units utilized magnetrons operating

  13. The Inwood Astronomy Project: Ready for IYA 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilling Kendall, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The Inwood Astronomy Project begins its mission of "100 Nights of Astronomy", an outreach program for the IYA 2009 in New York City. While the city lights may at first glance be a major deterrent to amateur and educational night-sky viewing, the author describes numerous community-based initiatives designed to fit into a racially and ethnically diverse neighborhood of Northern Manhattan and the Bronx, which all give a deeper understanding and appreciation of and for the night sky. The author presents ways for professional astronomers to use their light-polluted cities and towns for the same purpose.

  14. Design, Environmental and Sustainability Constraints of new African Observatories: The example of the Mozambique Radio Astronomy Observatory

    E-print Network

    Barbosa, Domingos; Ribeiro, Valerio A R M; Loots, Anita; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L; Gaylard, Michael; van Ardenne, Arnold; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Bergano, Miguel; Amador, Jose Carlos; Maia, Rodrigo; Melo, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The Mozambique Radio Astronomy Observatory (MRAO) will be a first milestone towards development of radioastronomy in Mozambique. Development of MRAO will constitute a preparation step towards participation in the upcoming Africa VLBI Network and the Square Kilometer Array project. The MRAO first antenna is planned to serve as a capacitation and training facility and will be installed after the conversion of a 7-meter telecom dish in South Africa. Therefore, this first radiotelescope design has to comply with local spectral and environmental constraints. Furthermore, power availability and long term sustainability with potential inclusion of solar power and control of Radio Frequency Interference are analyzed. Here we outline some of the design, environmental and power sustainability constraints.

  15. The Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project: Watch Out FCI!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilik, Michael; Deming, Grace L.; Hufnagel, Beth

    2002-04-01

    With funding from the NSF, a multidisciplinary team at the University of New Mexico transformed “Astro 101” from a mostly descriptive to a highly-focused conceptual course based on cognitive models of adult learning. By 1996, we had developed a mature implementation, which required alternative assessment tools. One of these, an Astronomy Diagnostic Test version 1 (ADT), was based on misconceptions research in astronomy, and demonstrated large and robust gains with hundreds of participants at UNM. To improve the ADT and expand its use, we formed the Consortium for Astronomy Education Research (CAER) to develop ADT version 2, which was released in June 1999. With additional NSF funding, we kicked off the ADT National Project, which has so far included over 5000 students in the pretest and almost 4000 in the posttest. I will present selected results from ADT 1 and 2, which now has a database almost as extensive as that of the Force Concept Inventory (FCI).

  16. Cyclostationary approaches for spatial RFI mitigation in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellbourg, Grégory; Weber, Rodolphe; Capdessus, Cécile; Boonstra, Albert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Radio astronomical observations are increasingly corrupted by radio frequency interferences (RFIs), and real time filtering algorithms are becoming essential. In this article, it is shown how spatial processing techniques can limit the impact of the incoming RFIs for phased array radio telescopes. The proposed approaches are based on estimation of the RFI spatial signature. It requires the diagonalization of either the classic correlation matrix or the cyclic correlation matrix of the array. Different diagonalization techniques are compared. Then, RFI detection and RFI filtering techniques are illustrated through simulations on data acquired with the Low Frequency Array Radio telescope, LOFAR. The originality of the study is the use of the cyclostationarity property, in order to improve the spatial separation between cosmic sources and RFIs.

  17. A New Approach to Interference Excision in Radio Astronomy: Real-Time Adaptive Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnbaum, Cecilia; Bradley, Richard F.

    1998-11-01

    Every year, an increasing amount of radio-frequency (RF) spectrum in the VHF, UHF, and microwave bands is being utilized to support new commercial and military ventures, and all have the potential to interfere with radio astronomy observations. Such services already cause problems for radio astronomy even in very remote observing sites, and the potential for this form of light pollution to grow is alarming. Preventive measures to eliminate interference through FCC legislation and ITU agreements can be effective; however, many times this approach is inadequate and interference excision at the receiver is necessary. Conventional techniques such as RF filters, RF shielding, and postprocessing of data have been only somewhat successful, but none has been sufficient. Adaptive interference cancellation is a real-time approach to interference excision that has not been used before in radio astronomy. We describe here, for the first time, adaptive interference cancellation in the context of radio astronomy instrumentation, and we present initial results for our prototype receiver. In the 1960s, analog adaptive interference cancelers were developed that obtain a high degree of cancellation in problems of radio communications and radar. However, analog systems lack the dynamic range, noised performance, and versatility required by radio astronomy. The concept of digital adaptive interference cancellation was introduced in the mid-1960s as a way to reduce unwanted noise in low-frequency (audio) systems. Examples of such systems include the canceling of maternal ECG in fetal electrocardiography and the reduction of engine noise in the passenger compartments of automobiles. These audio-frequency applications require bandwidths of only a few tens of kilohertz. Only recently has high-speed digital filter technology made high dynamic range adaptive canceling possible in a bandwidth as large as a few megahertz, finally opening the door to application in radio astronomy. We have built a prototype adaptive canceler that consists of two receivers: the primary channel (input from the main beam of the telescope) and a separate reference channel. The primary channel receives the desired astronomical signal corrupted by RFI (radio-frequency interference) coming in the sidelobes of the main beam. A separate reference antenna is designed to receive only the RFI. The reference channel input is processed using a digital adaptive filter and then subtracted from the primary channel input, producing the system output. The weighting coefficients of the digital filter are adjusted by way of an algorithm that minimizes, in a least-squares sense, the power output of the system. Through an adaptive-iterative process, the canceler locks onto the RFI, and the filter adjusts itself to minimize the effect of the RFI at the system output. We have designed the adaptive canceler with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 40 MHz. This prototype system will ultimately be functional with a variety of radio astronomy receivers in the microwave band. We have also built a prototype receiver centered at 100 MHz (in the FM broadcast band) to test the adaptive canceler with actual interferers, which are well characterized. The initial laboratory tests of the adaptive canceler are encouraging, with attenuation of strong frequency-modulated (FM) interference to 72 dB (a factor of more than 10 million), which is at the performance limit of our measurements. We also consider requirements of the system and the RFI environment for effective adaptive canceling.

  18. The history of early low frequency radio astronomy in Australia. 2: Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Martin; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce; Wielebinski, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Significant contributions to low frequency radio astronomy were made in the Australian state of Tasmania after the arrival of Grote Reber in 1954. Initially, Reber teamed with Graeme Ellis, who was then working with the Ionospheric Prediction Service, and they carried out observations as low as 0.52 MHz during the 1955 period of exceptionally low sunspot activity. In the early 1960s, Reber established a 2.085 MHz array in the southern central region of the State and used this to make the first map of the southern sky at this frequency. In addition, in the 1960s the University of Tasmania constructed several low frequency arrays near Hobart, including a 609m × 609m array designed for operation between about 2 MHz and 20 MHz. In this paper we present an overview of the history of low frequency radio astronomy in Tasmania.

  19. The radio astronomy explorer satellite, a low-frequency observatory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.; Alexander, J. K.; Stone, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    The RAE-1 is the first spacecraft designed exclusively for radio astronomical studies. It is a small, but relatively complex, observatory including two 229-meter antennas, several radiometer systems covering a frequency range of 0.2 to 9.2 MHz, and a variety of supporting experiments such as antenna impedance probes and TV cameras to monitor antenna shape. Since its launch in July, 1968, RAE-1 has sent back some 10 billion data bits per year on measurements of long-wavelength radio phenomena in the magnetosphere, the solar corona, and the Galaxy. In this paper we describe the design, calibration, and performance of the RAE-1 experiments in detail.

  20. The history of early low frequency radio astronomy in Australia. 1: The CSIRO Division of Radiophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne; George, Martin; Slee, Bruce; Wielebinski, Richard

    2015-03-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s Australia was a world leader in the specialised field of low frequency radio astronomy, with two geographically-distinct areas of activity. One was in the Sydney region and the other in the island of Tasmania to the south of the Australian mainland. Research in the Sydney region began in 1949 through the CSIRO's Division of Radiophysics, and initially was carried out at the Hornsby Valley field station before later transferring to the Fleurs field station. In this paper we summarise the low frequency radio telescopes and research programs associated with the historic Hornsby Valley and Fleurs sites.

  1. Radio Astronomy at the Centre for High Performance Computing in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherine Cress; UWC Simulation Team

    2014-04-01

    I will present results on galaxy evolution and cosmology which we obtained using the supercomputing facilities at the CHPC. These include cosmological-scale N-body simulations modelling neutral hydrogen as well as the study of the clustering of radio galaxies to probe the relationship between dark and luminous matter in the universe. I will also discuss the various roles that the CHPC is playing in Astronomy in SA, including the provision of HPC for a variety of Astronomical applications, the provision of storage for radio data, our educational programs and our participation in planning for the SKA.

  2. Reference antenna-based subspace tracking for RFI mitigation in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellbourg, G.; Chippendale, A. P.; Kesteven, M. J.; Jeffs, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Interference mitigation is becoming necessary to make radio astronomy work in bands that are heavily used to support our modern lives. It is becoming particularly difficult to work at frequencies between 1100 MHz and 1300 MHz that are rapidly filling up with satellite navigation signals. Antenna array radio telescopes present the possibility of applying spatial Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) mitigation. Spatial filtering techniques for RFI mitigation have been introduced to radio astronomy in the last decades. The success of these techniques relies on accurately estimating the RFI spatial signature (or RFI subspace). The use of a reference antenna steering at the RFI sources provides a good estimation of the RFI subspace when correlated with an array radio telescope. However, predicting the evolution of this subspace with time is necessary in a multiple RFI scenario, when only a single RFI source can be monitored at a time with the reference antenna. This paper introduces a subspace tracking approach, based on the power method applied to covariance data. The RFI spatial signature estimates provided by the reference antenna are used to initialize the power method to support a faster convergence. Practical examples are shown, applying the method to real data from a single 188 element phased array feed designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope.

  3. Planetary Radio Astronomy: The 60 Years from Burke and Franklin to ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    2014-11-01

    For nearly 60 years, radio astronomy has played a major role in the characterization and monitoring of thermal structure, composition, and temporal changes of the planets and small bodies in our solar system. At this, the 60th anniversary of the initial detection of radio emission by a planet, the role radio astronomy has played in the early characterization of solar system objects, in raising basic scientific questions and motivating planetary exploration missions, and in providing insight into the structure and temporal variations of planets is explored. The evolution of the instrumentation capabilities from crude total-power, or bolometric measurements averaged over an entire planetary disk to today's instrumentation providing radio images of planets and comets with high spectral resolution is also discussed. Major developments such as precise total-power calibration, ultra-large apertures, microwave and millimeter-wave array technology, and supporting laboratory spectroscopy have played major roles in enhancing the effectiveness of radio astronomical observations. The newest generation instruments such as the upgraded Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and the Altacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) now usher in a whole new level of capability in observation of solar system objects.

  4. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    that will eventually replace the standard vacuum tube version now seeing wide use at the Observatory. So far, the work of sub systems, such as the gain modulator, intermediate frequency amplifier, audio amplifier, switch-base transistor) was selected for all radio frequency circuits. The audio and phase detector circuits are not so

  5. Jansky and Reber: Two Remarkable Stories in Early Radio Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. T. Sullivan III

    1996-01-01

    Extraterrestrial radio waves were first detected in 1931-32 by Karl Jansky at the Bell Telephone Labs in New Jersey while he was investigating sources of interference to recently opened, trans-Atlantic shortwave (20 MHz) radiotelephone circuits. At this time Jansky was only a few years beyond his physics degree from the University of Wisconsin, where his father was a professor of

  6. A KALMANTRACKERBASED BAYESIAN DETECTOR FOR RADAR INTERFERENCE IN RADIO ASTRONOMY

    E-print Network

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    the noise floor, impulsive aircraft echoes weak enough to make detection difficult may still cause sig corrupted data. This paper presents a new algorithm which improves aircraft echo detection by using a Kalman 960 to 1400 MHz. These signals may dramatically disturb radio astronomical observations, and have been

  7. Radio Continuum Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Justin L.; Baart, Eddie E.

    1995-08-01

    The Rhodes University radio astronomy group has been involved in radio continuum mapping of southern extended radio sources since 1976. We describe the various mapping projects undertaken with the HartRAO telescope, particularly the Rhodes/HartRAO 2300 MHz all-sky survey, and speculate on future projects.

  8. Technology for Wide Bandwidth Transient Radio Astronomy Observations

    E-print Network

    Weinreb, Sander

    ? Hankins & Eilek, "Radio Emission Signatures in the Crab Pulsar." ApJ 670:693-701, Nov 2007 #12;Another GHz RF in 22 ­ 40 GHz First LO 22 GHz Second LO 21 ­ 23 GHz Filter Upconversion Mixer Downconversion Pattern Measurements -300 -200 -100 0 100 200 300 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 PolXCas A @5.23 GHz mdeg dB el Xel

  9. A Fast Reduction Method of Survey Data in Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngung

    2001-04-01

    We present a fast reduction method of survey data obtained using a single-dish radio telescope. Along with a brief review of classical method, a new method of identification and elimination of negative and positive bad channels are introduced using cloud identification code and several IRAF(Image Reduction and Analysis Facility) tasks relating statistics. Removing of several ripple patterns using Fourier Transform is also discussed. It is found that BACKGROUND task within IRAF is very efficient for fitting and subtraction of baseline with varying functions. Cloud identification method along with the possibility of its application for analysis of cloud structure is described, and future data reduction method is discussed.

  10. Building information models for astronomy projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño, Javier; Murga, Gaizka; Campo, Ramón; Eletxigerra, Iñigo; Ampuero, Pedro

    2012-09-01

    A Building Information Model is a digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a building. BIMs represent the geometrical characteristics of the Building, but also properties like bills of quantities, definition of COTS components, status of material in the different stages of the project, project economic data, etc. The BIM methodology, which is well established in the Architecture Engineering and Construction (AEC) domain for conventional buildings, has been brought one step forward in its application for Astronomical/Scientific facilities. In these facilities steel/concrete structures have high dynamic and seismic requirements, M&E installations are complex and there is a large amount of special equipment and mechanisms involved as a fundamental part of the facility. The detail design definition is typically implemented by different design teams in specialized design software packages. In order to allow the coordinated work of different engineering teams, the overall model, and its associated engineering database, is progressively integrated using a coordination and roaming software which can be used before starting construction phase for checking interferences, planning the construction sequence, studying maintenance operation, reporting to the project office, etc. This integrated design & construction approach will allow to efficiently plan construction sequence (4D). This is a powerful tool to study and analyze in detail alternative construction sequences and ideally coordinate the work of different construction teams. In addition engineering, construction and operational database can be linked to the virtual model (6D), what gives to the end users a invaluable tool for the lifecycle management, as all the facility information can be easily accessed, added or replaced. This paper presents the BIM methodology as implemented by IDOM with the E-ELT and ATST Enclosures as application examples.

  11. Thinking Big for 25 Years: Astronomy Camp Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; McCarthy, D. W.; Benecchi, S. D.; Henry, T. J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Kulesa, C.; Oey, M. S.; Regester, J.; Schlingman, W. M.; Camp Staff, Astronomy

    2013-01-01

    Astronomy Camp is a deep immersion educational adventure for teenagers and adults in southern Arizona that is entering its 25th year of existence. The Camp Director (McCarthy) is the winner of the 2012 AAS Education Prize. A general overview of the program is given in an accompanying contribution (McCarthy et al.). In this presentation we describe some of the research projects conducted by Astronomy Camp participants over the years. Many of the Camps contain a strong project-oriented emphasis, which reaches its pinnacle in the Advanced Camps for teenagers. High school students from around the world participate in a microcosm of the full arc of astronomy research. They plan their own projects before the start of Camp, and the staff provide a series of "key projects." Early in the Camp the students submit observing proposals to utilize time on telescopes. (The block of observing time is secured in advance by the staff.) The participants collect, reduce and analyze astronomical data with the help of staff, and they present the results to their peers on the last night of Camp, all in a span of eight days. The Camps provide research grade telescopes and instruments, in addition to amateur telescopes. Some of the Camps occur on Kitt Peak, where we use an ensemble of telescopes: the 2.3-meter (University of Arizona) with a spectrograph; the WIYN 0.9-meter; the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope; and the 12-meter millimeter wave telescope. Additionally the Camp has one night on the 10-meter Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham. Campers use these resources to study stars, galaxies, AGN, transiting planets, molecular clouds, etc. Some of the camper-initiated projects have led to very high level performances in prestigious international competitions, such as the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. The key projects often contribute to published astronomical research (e.g., Benecchi et al. 2010, Icarus, 207, 978). Many former Campers have received Ph.D. degrees in astronomy and other sciences and are now faculty members, a current Hubble Fellow, the PI of a facility class instrument on an 11-meter telescope (SALT), etc.

  12. Results from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, G. L.

    2001-12-01

    During 2000 and 2001, the validity and reliability of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test Version 2.0 (ADT 2.0) were formally investigated through the Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project. The ADT 2.0 was administered as a pre-test to 5346 students and as a post-test to 3842 students. Student test results were collected from 97 classes that ranged in size from 4 to 320 students with 30 states represented. The 68 professors participating in the ADT National Project taught classes at universities (54%), 4-year colleges (27%), and 2-year colleges (19%). The database was analyzed for reliability at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. A pre-test value for Cronbach's alpha of 0.65 and post-test value of 0.76 demonstrate an acceptable degree of internal consistency. The average score for the 44 participating professors who completed the ADT as experts was 98%. Face and content validity were established by combining results from the experts with feedback from 60 student interviews. Student results from the National Project yielded an average score of 32.4% for the pre-test and 47.3% for the post-test. There is a gender discrepancy in favor of males that persists in both the pre-test (11% points) and the post-test (12% points) scores. The variations across geographic distribution and institution types were not significant. In addition to the 21 content items, the ADT 2.0 has 12 student background questions enabling instructors to have a better understanding of who takes introductory astronomy. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation through grants REC-0089239 (GD) and DGE-9714489 (BH).

  13. Radio astronomy with the European Lunar Lander: Opening up the last unexplored frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein Wolt, Marc; Aminaei, Amin; Zarka, Philippe; Schrader, Jan-Rutger; Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Falcke, Heino

    2012-12-01

    The Moon is a unique location in our solar system and provides important information regarding the exposure to free space that is essential for future human space exploration to mars and beyond. The active broadband (100 kHz-100 MHz) tripole antenna now envisaged to be placed on the European Lunar Lander located at the Lunar South Pole allows for sensitive measurements of the exosphere and ionosphere, and their interaction with the Earths magnetosphere, solar particles, wind and CMEs and studies of radio communication on the Moon, that are essential for future lunar human and science exploration. In addition, the Lunar South Pole provides an excellent opportunity for radio astronomy. Placing a single radio antenna in an eternally dark crater or behind a mountain at the South (or North) pole would potentially provide perfect shielding from man-made radio interference (RFI), absence of ionospheric distortions, and high temperature and antenna gain stability that allows detection of the 21 cm wave emission from pristine hydrogen formed after the Big Bang and into the period where the first stars formed. A detection of the 21 cm line from the Moon at these frequencies would allow for the first time a clue on the distribution and evolution on mass in the early universe between the Epoch of Recombination and Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Next to providing a cosmological breakthrough, a single lunar radio antenna would allow for studies of the effect of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the solar wind at distances close to Earth (space weather) and would open up the study of low frequency radio events (flares and pulses) from planets such as Jupiter and Saturn, which are known to emit bright (kJy-MJy) radio emission below 30 MHz (Jester and Falcke, 2009). Finally, a single radio antenna on the lunar lander would pave the way for a future large lunar radio interferometer; not only will it demonstrate the possibilities for lunar radio science and open up the last unexplored radio regime, but it will also allow a determination of the limitations of lunar radio science by measuring the local radio background noise.

  14. PARAS program: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakubowski, Antoni K.; Haynes, David A.; Nuss, Ken; Hoffmann, Chris; Madden, Michael; Dungan, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBLI) scheme, would allow higher (than currently available) angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps, and the ability of observing rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using a passive phases array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150 meter diameter dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data is transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory pane is a hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and bottom triangle. Attitude control and stationkeeping functions are performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and six hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by a nuclear reactor. The total mass of the spacecraft is 22,060 kg.

  15. Radar interference blanking in radio astronomy using a Kalman tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Jeffs, B. D.; Fisher, J. R.

    2005-06-01

    Radio astronomical observations of highly Doppler shifted spectral lines of neutral hydrogen and the hydroxyl molecule must often be made at frequencies allocated to pulsed air surveillance radar in the 1215-1350 MHz frequency range. The Green Bank telescope (GBT) and many other observatories must deal with these terrestrial signals. Even when strong radar fixed clutter echoes are removed, there are still weaker aircraft echoes present which can corrupt the data. We present an algorithm which improves aircraft echo blanking using a Kalman filter tracker to follow the path of a sequence of echoes observed on successive radar antenna sweeps. Aircraft tracks can be used to predict regions (in bearing and range) for the next expected echoes, even before they are detected. These data can then be blanked in real time without waiting for the pulse peak to arrive. Additionally, we briefly suggest an approach for a new Bayesian algorithm which combines tracker and pulse detector operations to enable more sensitive weak pulse detection. Examples are presented for Kalman tracking and radar transmission blanking using real observations at the GBT.

  16. PARAS program: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubowski, Antoni K.; Haynes, David A.; Nuss, Ken; Hoffmann, Chris; Madden, Michael; Dungan, Michael

    1992-06-01

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBLI) scheme, would allow higher (than currently available) angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps, and the ability of observing rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using a passive phases array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150 meter diameter dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data is transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory pane is a hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and bottom triangle. Attitude control and stationkeeping functions are performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and six hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by a nuclear reactor. The total mass of the spacecraft is 22,060 kg.

  17. Ambient and Cryogenic, Decade Bandwidth, Low Noise Receiving System for Radio Astronomy Using Sinuous Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawande, Rohit Sudhir

    Traditionally, radio astronomy receivers have been limited to bandwidths less than an octave, and as a result multiple feeds and receivers are necessary to observe over a wide bandwidth. Next generation of instruments for radio astronomy will benefit greatly from reflector antenna feeds that demonstrate very wide instantaneous bandwidth, and exhibit low noise behavior. There is an increasing interest in wideband systems from both the cost and science point of view. A wideband feed will allow simultaneous observations or sweeps over a decade or more bandwidth. Instantaneous wide bandwidth is necessary for detection of short duration pulses. Future telescopes like square kilometer array (SKA), consisting of 2000 to 3000 coherently connected antennas and covering a frequency range of 70 MHz to 30 GHz, will need decade bandwidth single pixel feeds (SPFs) along with integrated LNAs to achieve the scientific objectives in a cost effective way. This dissertation focuses on the design and measurement of a novel decade bandwidth sinuous-type, dual linear polarized, fixed phase center, low loss feed with an integrated LNA. A decade bandwidth, low noise amplifier is specially designed for noise match to the higher terminal impedance encountered by this antenna yielding an improved sensitivity over what is possible with conventional 50 O amplifiers. The self-complementary, frequency independent nature of the planar sinuous geometry results in a nearly constant beam pattern and fixed phase center over more than a 10:1 operating frequency range. In order to eliminate the back-lobe response over such a wide frequency range, we have projected the sinuous pattern onto a cone, and a ground plane is placed directly behind the cone's apex. This inverted, conical geometry assures wide bandwidth operation by locating each sinuous resonator a quarter wavelength above the ground plane. The presence of a ground plane near a self complementary antenna destroys the self complementary nature of the composite structure resulting in frequency dependent impedance variations. We demonstrate, using simulations and measurements, how the return loss can be improved by modifying the sinuous geometry. The feed-LNA combination is characterized for important properties such as return loss, system noise, far field beam patterns including cross-polarization over a wide frequency range. The system is developed as a feed for a parabolic reflector. The overall system performance is calculated in terms of the A/Tsys ratio. A cryogenic version would have a direct impact on specialized observing applications requiring large instantaneous bandwidths with high sensitivity. A novel cryogenic implementation of this system is demonstrated using a Stirling cycle, one-stage refrigerator. The cryocooler offers advantages like low cost, light weight, small size, low power consumption, and does not require routine maintenance. The higher antenna input impedance and a balanced feeding method for the sinuous antenna offers a unique set of challenges when developing a cryogenic system.

  18. A Wide-Band, Active Antenna System for Long Wavelength Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Brian C.; Paravastu-Dalal, Nagini; Stewart, Kenneth P.; Erickson, William C.; Ray, Paul S.; Kassim, Namir E.; Burns, Steve; Clarke, Tracy; Schmitt, Henrique; Craig, Joe; Hartman, Jake; Weiler, Kurt W.

    2012-10-01

    We describe an ""active"" antenna system for HF/VHF (long wavelength) radio astronomy that has been successfully deployed 256-fold as the first station (LWA1) of the planned Long Wavelength Array. The antenna system, consisting of crossed dipoles, an active balun/preamp, a support structure, and a ground screen has been shown to successfully operate over at least the band from 20 MHz (15 m wavelength) to 80 MHz (3.75 m wavelength) with a noise figure that is at least 6 dB better than the Galactic background emission-noise temperature over that band. Thus, we met the goal to design and construct a compact, inexpensive, rugged, and easily assembled antenna system that can be deployed many-fold to form numerous large individual ""stations"" for the purpose of building a large, long wavelength synthesis array telescope for radio astronomical and ionospheric observations.

  19. Cryogenic Hybrid Coupler for Ultra-Low-Noise Radio Astronomy Balanced Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malo-Gomez, Inmaculada; Gallego-Puyol, Juan Daniel; Diez-Gonzalez, Carmen; Lopez-Fernandez, Isaac; Briso-Rodriguez, César

    2009-12-01

    Modern heterodyne ultra low noise receivers used for radio astronomy have evolved to provide very wide instantaneous bandwidth. Some of the configurations used in present cryogenic front-ends, such as sideband separating mixers and balanced amplifiers, require 90?? hybrids as a part of the intermediate frequency (IF) circuitry. A very common choice for the band of operation of these hybrids is 4-12-GHz band. There are devices commercially available covering this band with good ambient temperature characteristics, but their cryogenic performance degrades to unacceptable levels. This paper describes the design, construction and measurement of a multioctave stripline hybrid for the 4-12 GHz band specially conceived to operate satisfactorily when cooled down to 15 K (-258 C). The materials and mechanical construction have been carefully selected and the result is a very compact, reliable and low thermal mass device, capable to withstand extreme thermal cycling. The coupling and reflection characteristics of the prototype show very low temperature dependence. The utility of the hybrid developed is demonstrated in a cryogenic balanced amplifier. The noise temperature obtained using this configuration (6 K) shows clear advantage (about 33%) over the classical isolator-amplifier combination normally used in heterodyne radio astronomy receivers. Besides, a superior insensitivity of the amplifier's noise performance to the input termination mismatch is obtained.

  20. The Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey

    E-print Network

    J. M. Jackson; J. M. Rathborne; R. Y. Shah; R. Simon; T. M. Bania; D. P. Clemens; E. T. Chambers; A. M. Johnson; M. Dormody; R. Lavoie; M. Heyer

    2006-02-07

    The Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey is a new survey of Galactic 13CO (1-0) emission. The survey used the SEQUOIA multi pixel array on the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 14 m telescope to cover a longitude range of l = 18 deg-55.7 deg and a latitude range of |b| 40 deg. At the velocity resolution of 0.21 km/s, the typical rms sensitivity is sigma(TA*)~0.13 K. The survey comprises a total of 1,993,522 spectra. We show integrated intensity images (zeroth moment maps), channel maps, position-velocity diagrams, and an average spectrum of the completed survey dataset. We also discuss the telescope and instrumental parameters, the observing modes, the data reduction processes, and the emission and noise characteristics of the dataset. The Galactic Ring Survey data are available to the community at www.bu.edu/galacticring or in DVD form by request.

  1. Ingenuity and initiative in Australian radio astronomy: the Dover Heights "hole-in-the-ground" antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce

    2002-06-01

    During the 1950s staff from the CSIRO's Division of Radiophysics based at the Dover Heights field station employed ingenuity and initiative in response to a lack of funding and support for a new radio telescope. In order to obtain the requisite aperture for the resolution sought they spent their own time excavating a 21.9-m parabolic depression in the sand at the field station, and when the viability of this prototype transit instrument was established its diameter was increased to 24.4 m, making this the largest radio telescope in Australia at the time. Operating at 400 MHz, this instrument was employed to map the galactic centre region and in a search for new discrete sources. It also was used to investigate polarization in the plane of the Galaxy, and in an unsuccessful search for the newly-proposed deuterium line. Today the Dover Heights "hole-in-the-ground" antenna lies buried beneath Rodney Reserve, and there is little at this public playing field to remind visitors of the important contributions made by this radio telescope, and others at this site, during the formative years of Australian radio astronomy.

  2. Radio astronomy with the Lunar Lander: opening up the last unexplored frequency regime

    E-print Network

    Wolt, Marc Klein; Zarka, Philippe; Schrader, Jan-Rutger; Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Falcke, Heino

    2012-01-01

    The active broadband (1 kHz-100 MHz) tripole antenna now envisaged to be placed on the European Lunar Lander located at the Lunar South Pole allows for sensitive measurements of the exosphere and ionosphere, and their interaction with the Earths magnetosphere, solar particles, wind and CMEs and studies of radio communication on the moon, that are essential for future lunar human and science exploration. In addition, the lunar South pole provides an excellent opportunity for radio astronomy. Placing a single radio antenna in an eternally dark crater or behind a mountain at the south (or north) pole would potentially provide perfect shielding from man-made radio interference (RFI), absence of ionospheric distortions, and high temperature and antenna gain stability that allows detection of the 21 cm wave emission from pristine hydrogen formed after the big bang and into the period where the first stars formed. A detection of the 21 cm line from the moon at these frequencies would allow for the first time a clue ...

  3. Bringing Science into Schools through Astronomy. Project ASTRO, Tucson

    E-print Network

    Barban, C; Barban, Caroline; Dole, Herve

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience in bringing science into US and French classrooms. We participated in the US scientific educational program Project ASTRO. It is based on a partnership between a school teacher and an astronomer. They together design and realize simple and interesting scientific activities for the children to learn and enjoy science. We present four hands-on activities we realized in a 4th-grade class (10 yr-old kids) in Tucson (USA) in 2002-2003. Among the covered topics were: the Solar System, the Sun (helioseismology) and the Galaxies. We also present a similar experience done in two classrooms in 2005, in Chatenay-Malabry (France) in partnership with an amateur astronomy association (Aphelie). This is a pleasant and rewarding activity, extremely well appreciated by the children and the school teachers. It furthermore promotes already at a young age the excitement of science, and provides concrete examples of the scientific methodology.

  4. Bringing science into schools through astronomy. Project ASTRO, Tucson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barban, C.; Dole, H.

    2005-11-01

    We report our experience in bringing science into US and French classrooms. We participated in the US scientific educational program Project ASTRO. It is based on a partnership between a school teacher and an astronomer. They together design and realize simple and interesting scientific activities for the children to learn and enjoy science. We present four hands-on activities we realized in a 4th-grade class (10 yr-old kids) in Tucson (USA) in 2002-2003. Among the covered topics were: the Solar System, the Sun (helioseismology) and the Galaxies. We also present a similar experience done in two classrooms in 2005, in Chatenay-Malabry (France) in partnership with an amateur astronomy association (Aphélie), and discuss future activities. This is a pleasant and rewarding activity, extremely well appreciated by the children and the school teachers. It furthermore promotes already at a young age the excitement of science, and provides concrete examples of the scientific methodology.

  5. Bringing Science into Schools through Astronomy. Project ASTRO, Tucson

    E-print Network

    Caroline Barban; Herve Dole

    2005-08-19

    We report our experience in bringing science into US and French classrooms. We participated in the US scientific educational program Project ASTRO. It is based on a partnership between a school teacher and an astronomer. They together design and realize simple and interesting scientific activities for the children to learn and enjoy science. We present four hands-on activities we realized in a 4th-grade class (10 yr-old kids) in Tucson (USA) in 2002-2003. Among the covered topics were: the Solar System, the Sun (helioseismology) and the Galaxies. We also present a similar experience done in two classrooms in 2005, in Chatenay-Malabry (France) in partnership with an amateur astronomy association (Aphelie). This is a pleasant and rewarding activity, extremely well appreciated by the children and the school teachers. It furthermore promotes already at a young age the excitement of science, and provides concrete examples of the scientific methodology.

  6. Federal Communications Commission US311 Radio astronomy observations may be made in the bands 13501400 MHz and 49504990 MHz

    E-print Network

    Bower, Geoffrey

    in the mobile­satellite service. Communications of mobile ­satellite system stations not participating in the GMDSS. Account shall be taken of the priority of safety­related communications in the mobile­satelliteFederal Communications Commission 162 US311 Radio astronomy observations may be made in the bands

  7. Unformatted Digital Fiber-Optic Data Transmission for Radio Astronomy Front-Ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Matthew A.; Fisher, J. Richard; Castro, Jason J.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of a prototype integrated receiver front-end that combines all conversions from RF to baseband, from analog to digital, and from copper to fiber into one compact assembly, with the necessary gain and stability suitable for radio astronomy applications. The emphasis in this article is on a novel digital data link over optical fiber which requires no formatting in the front-end, greatly reducing the complexity, bulk, and power consumption of digital electronics inside the antenna, facilitating its integration with the analog components, and minimizing the self-generated radio-frequency interference (RFI) which could leak into the signal path. Management of the serial data link is performed entirely in the back-end based on the statistical properties of signals with a strong random noise component. In this way, the full benefits of precision and stability afforded by conventional digital data transmission are realized with far less overhead at the focal plane of a radio telescope.

  8. Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Medina, Philip

    This unit introduces students to some general concepts of astronomy. Topics include geocentric versus heliocentric theories of the solar system and how they explain the sun's movements, sidereal days versus solar days, and why we have seasons. There is also discussion of Kepler's laws of orbital motion, the phases of the Moon, how eclipses occur, and how tides are produced. A vocabulary list and downloadable, printable student worksheets are provided.

  9. Seeing the Sky: 100 Projects, Activities, and Explorations in Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaaf, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen astronomy activities are presented including classroom procedures and questions. Topics include different investigations of the moon, planets, stars, sunsets, light pollution, and rainbows and halos. Additional information on measurements used for observations in astronomy, and rainbow characteristics is included. (CW)

  10. An Experimental setup to develop RFI mitigation techniques for radio astronomy

    E-print Network

    Priya, K J

    2006-01-01

    Increasing levels of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) are a problem for research in radio astronomy. Various techniques to suppress RFI and extract astronomical signals from data affected by interference are being tried out. However, extracting weak astronomical signals in the spectral region affected by RFI remains a technological challenge. In this paper, we describe the construction of an experimental setup at the Raman Research Institute (RRI), Bangalore, India for research in RFI mitigation. We also present some results of tests done on the data collected using this setup. The experimental setup makes use of the 1.42 GHz receiver system of the 10.4 m telescope at RRI. A new reference antenna, its receiver system and a backend for recording digitized voltage together with the 1.42 GHz receiver system form the experimental setup. We present the results of the characterization of the experimental setup. An off-line adaptive filter was successfully implemented and tested using the data obtained with the ex...

  11. An Experimental setup to develop RFI mitigation techniques for radio astronomy

    E-print Network

    K. Jeeva Priya; D. Anish Roshi

    2006-02-13

    Increasing levels of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) are a problem for research in radio astronomy. Various techniques to suppress RFI and extract astronomical signals from data affected by interference are being tried out. However, extracting weak astronomical signals in the spectral region affected by RFI remains a technological challenge. In this paper, we describe the construction of an experimental setup at the Raman Research Institute (RRI), Bangalore, India for research in RFI mitigation. We also present some results of tests done on the data collected using this setup. The experimental setup makes use of the 1.42 GHz receiver system of the 10.4 m telescope at RRI. A new reference antenna, its receiver system and a backend for recording digitized voltage together with the 1.42 GHz receiver system form the experimental setup. We present the results of the characterization of the experimental setup. An off-line adaptive filter was successfully implemented and tested using the data obtained with the experimental setup.

  12. Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Cazier

    2009-10-09

    Let's explore the universe together. First we'll be learning about stars: what they are and how they are formed. Then we'll explore different websites to learn about other parts of our solar system Write 5 new things you learn about stars from EACH of these sites: How Stars Work A Star s Story Now explore the rest of the universe. Write 3 new things you learn from EACH of these sites: Astronomy Kidastronomy NASA Planetary Tour StarChild Finished and unsure what to do? Go back to each of these websites and check out the games about ...

  13. Popularization of Astronomy under Cooperation between Students and Educators in Japan: the TENPLA project (1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, M.; Takanashi, N.; Kamegai, K.; Tsukada, K.

    2006-08-01

    We present the concepts and products of the Tenpla project, a unique activity in popularization of astronomy under cooperation between students of astronomy and educators in Japan. The goal of the project is to show the true, latest and exciting results of astronomy, and to let more people be familiar with and find pleasure in astronomy, as they enjoy sports and fine arts. Our mailing list has about 200 participants, including 80 university students. The members share information and exchange views on various educational activities. Derived from the discussions, we have proposed some innovative materials for popularization of astronomy. Our "Astronomical Toilet Paper (ATP)" is a novel tool which enables public people to get close to astronomy. We have also developed a typing game "Sora-Uchi" and a Japanese card game "Astro-Karuta". These products have won a lot of coverage in the mass media and this helps to awake people's interest in astronomy. In this paper, we show the details of our projects and responses of the public.

  14. Effective correlator for RadioAstron project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Sergey

    This paper presents the implementation of programme FX-correlator for Very Long Baseline Interferometry, adapted for the project "RadioAstron". Software correlator implemented for heterogeneous computing systems using graphics accelerators. It is shown that for the task interferometry implementation of the graphics hardware has a high efficiency. The host processor of heterogeneous computing system, performs the function of forming the data flow for graphics accelerators, the number of which corresponds to the number of frequency channels. So, for the Radioastron project, such channels is seven. Each accelerator is perform correlation matrix for all bases for a single frequency channel. Initial data is converted to the floating-point format, is correction for the corresponding delay function and computes the entire correlation matrix simultaneously. Calculation of the correlation matrix is performed using the sliding Fourier transform. Thus, thanks to the compliance of a solved problem for architecture graphics accelerators, managed to get a performance for one processor platform Kepler, which corresponds to the performance of this task, the computing cluster platforms Intel on four nodes. This task successfully scaled not only on a large number of graphics accelerators, but also on a large number of nodes with multiple accelerators.

  15. Finding the Forest Amid the Trees: Tools for Evaluating Astronomy Education and Public Outreach Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Janelle M.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2004-01-01

    The effective evaluation of educational projects is becoming increasingly important to funding agencies and to the individuals and organizations involved in the projects. This brief "how-to" guide provides an introductory description of the purpose and basic ideas of project evaluation, and uses authentic examples from four different astronomy and…

  16. Cryogenic evaluation of a 30–50 GHz 0.15-?m MHEMT low noise amplifier for radio astronomy applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shou-Hsien Weng; Hong-Yeh Chang; Chau-Ching Chiong; Ming-Tang Chen

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenic evaluation of a 30–50 GHz 0.15-?m InGaAs metamorphic high electron mobility transistor (MHEMT) low noise amplifier (LNA) for radio astronomy applications is presented in this paper. For the on-wafer measurement, the LNA exhibits a bandwidth of 23 GHz with a small signal gain of 20.4 dB. For the cryogenic measurement, the LNA is further assembled in a packaged module.

  17. A Collision of Interests - Protecting Radio Astronomy from Interference in a Free-Market Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanden Bout, P. A.

    2004-05-01

    The protection of radio astronomy (RA) from radio frequency interference (RFI) is becoming increasingly difficult. Established mechanisms for the management of spectrum in the United States and throughout the world have provided a degree of protection from RFI by assigning certain bands to RA on an exclusive or shared use basis. Explosive growth in commercial spectrum use has created spectrum crowding outside the RA bands, especially at lower frequencies below 3 GHz. Constellations of low-earth-orbit satellites are a particular problem to RA in that they always have transmitters above the horizon and these transmitters can spill unwanted emissions into the RA bands from their adjacent operating bands. The desire to study the early Universe presents a new challenge for RA with respect to RFI. The RA protected bands were selected for frequencies of important spectral lines. For objects in the distant, redshifted Universe, these lines can appear at all frequencies below the rest frequency and observations may be needed where the RA bands offer no protection. The growing needs of RA occur at the same time that commercial demand for spectrum is driving the Federal Communications Commission and the International Telecommuncations Union to consider entirely new approaches to spectrum management. These approaches would favor intensive commercial use of spectrum over scientific use in that decisions would be largely based on economic and efficient use considerations. It has even been proposed by some proponents of change in spectrum management policy that the entire spectrum be sold to the highest bidders in one global auction. While this is unlikely to happen, it is indicative of the climate in which RA spectrum managers currently work.

  18. ESO Signs Largest-Ever European Industrial Contract For Ground-Based Astronomy Project ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-12-01

    ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, announced today that it has signed a contract with the consortium led by Alcatel Alenia Space and composed also of European Industrial Engineering (Italy) and MT Aerospace (Germany), to supply 25 antennas for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project, along with an option for another seven antennas. The contract, worth 147 million euros, covers the design, manufacture, transport and on-site integration of the antennas. It is the largest contract ever signed in ground-based astronomy in Europe. The ALMA antennas present difficult technical challenges, since the antenna surface accuracy must be within 25 microns, the pointing accuracy within 0.6 arc seconds, and the antennas must be able to be moved between various stations on the ALMA site. This is especially remarkable since the antennas will be located outdoor in all weather conditions, without any protection. Moreover, the ALMA antennas can be pointed directly at the Sun. ALMA will have a collecting area of more than 5,600 square meters, allowing for unprecedented measurements of extremely faint objects. The signing ceremony took place on December 6, 2005 at ESO Headquarters in Garching, Germany. "This contract represents a major milestone. It allows us to move forward, together with our American and Japanese colleagues, in this very ambitious and unique project," said ESO's Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky. "By building ALMA, we are giving European astronomers access to the world's leading submillimetre facility at the beginning of the next decade, thereby fulfilling Europe's desire to play a major role in this field of fundamental research." Pascale Sourisse, Chairman and CEO of Alcatel Alenia Space, said: "We would like to thank ESO for trusting us to take on this new challenge. We are bringing to the table not only our recognized expertise in antenna development, but also our long-standing experience in coordinating consortiums in charge of complex, high-performance ground systems." ALMA is an international astronomy facility. It is a partnership between Europe, North America and Japan, in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. The European contribution is funded by ESO and Spain, with the construction and operations being managed by ESO. A matching contribution is being made by the USA and Canada, who will also provide 25 antennas. Japan will provide additional antennas, thus making this a truly worldwide endeavour. ALMA will be located on the 5,000m high Llano de Chajnantor site in the Atacama Desert of Northern Chile. ALMA will consist of a giant array of 12-m antennas separated by baselines of up to 18 km and is expected to start partial operation by 2010-2011. The excellent site, the most sensitive receivers developed so far, and the large number of antennas will allow ALMA to have a sensitivity that is many times better than any other comparable instrument. "ALMA will bring to sub-millimetre astronomy the aperture synthesis techniques of radio astronomy, enabling precision imaging to be done on sub-arcsecond angular scales, and will nicely complement the ESO VLT/VLTI observatory", said Dr. Hans Rykaczewski, the ALMA European Project Manager. Millimetre-wave astronomy is the study of the universe in the spectral region between what is traditionally considered radio waves and infrared radiation. In this realm, ALMA will study the evolution of galaxies, including very early stages, gather crucial data on the formation of stars, proto-planetary discs, and planets, and provide new insights on the familiar objects of our own solar system. A prototype antenna had already been built by Alcatel Alenia Space and European Industrial Engineering and thoroughly tested along with prototypes antennas from Vertex/LSI and Mitsubishi at the ALMA Antenna Test Facility located at the Very Large Array site in Socorro, New Mexico. For more information on the ALMA project, please go to http://www.eso.org/projects/alma/.

  19. The Spectrum of Citizen Science Projects in Astronomy and Space Science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. H. Méndez; B. Day; P. L. Gay; S. H. Jacoby; M. J. Raddick; C. E. Walker; S. M. Pompea

    2010-01-01

    Citizen science projects are gaining in popularity and are seen by some as a paradigm shift that will benefit participants, extend scientific research, and improve public understanding of how science is done. All projects engage nonspecialists in observations, measurements, or classifications that further some aspect of scientific activity. In astronomy and space science, there is a range of involvement from

  20. Pulsar Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew G. Lyne; Francis Graham-Smith

    2005-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1967, pulsars have assumed a central role in astronomy and astrophysics, offering an opportunity to explore theoretical physics under extreme conditions. Pulsar Astronomy provides an ideal introductory account for those entering the field, and an invaluable reference for established researchers. Now thoroughly revised for its third edition, it covers research over wavelengths ranging from radio through

  1. Publications of the Radio Astronomy and Plasma Physics Group (RAG and RAPP) Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich

    E-print Network

    Bursts Bulletin American Astron.Soc. D.G.Wentzel 11, 4412 (1979) A.O.Benz Solar Type I Radio Bursts: IAU Symp.Nr.86, Radiophysics D.G.Wentzel An Ion­Acoustic Wave Model of the Sun (eds.M.R.Kundu and T

  2. Publications of the Radio Astronomy and Plasma Physics Group (RAG and RAPP) Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich

    E-print Network

    Bursts Bulletin American Astron.Soc. D.G.Wentzel 11, 4412 (1979) A.O.Benz Solar Type I Radio Bursts: IAU Symp.Nr.86, Radiophysics D.G.Wentzel An Ion-Acoustic Wave Model of the Sun (eds.M.R.Kundu and T

  3. Test results of radio interferometer with zero base in the RadioAstron project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    In preparation for the launch of a space telescope for ground tests within the ground-space RadioAstron project, procedures and methods are developed in order to carry out tests under the zero base interferometer mode, which will make it possible to measure complex parameters of the onboard arm of the space-ground very-long-baseline radio interferometer that determine its basic parameter, i.e., sensitivity.

  4. Student Projects for the Introductory Astronomy Course Using the Hubble Data Archive and Related Resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. English

    1999-01-01

    Many students in the introductory course lack understanding about how astronomy is done at big observatories and about how scientific investigations are carried out in general. This presentation outlines the latest steps in an ongoing effort at Gardner-Webb University to build research projects into the course that develop an appreciation and understanding of the latest astronomical research and the methods

  5. The Quiet Skies Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Steve Rapp

    2008-10-01

    To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and radio frequency interference (RFI), an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project--the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)--encourages students to collect and analyze RFI data and develop conclusions as a team.

  6. The Eclipsing Radio Emission of the Precataclysmic Binary Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Academia Sinica,

    E-print Network

    White, Stephen

    The Eclipsing Radio Emission of the Precataclysmic Binary V471 Tau Jeremy Lim Institute confirming the presence of eclipses in the centime­ ter radio emission of the eclipsing binary V471 Tau eclipse per orbit: in all we observed one near--complete radio eclipse, the ingress phase of two other

  7. The Harvard Radio Meteor Project Meteor Velocity Distribution Reappraised

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. Taylor

    1995-01-01

    The relative distribution of atmospheric encounter speeds at constant mass for observations made as part of the Harvard Radio Meteor Project synodic year observations has been recalculated using a cumulative mass index, ? = 1.1 ± 0.1, and the mass velocity relation from F. Verniani (1973, J. Geophys. Res. 78, 8429-8462), ? = 4.23 ± 0.07. A discrepency in the

  8. FARM RADIO FORUM PROJECT-GHANA, 1964-65.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ABELL, HELEN C.

    IN 1964-65 THE GOVERNMENT OF GHANA, IN COOPERATION WITH UNESCO AND THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA, CARRIED ON THE FARM RADIO FORUM PILOT PROJECT IN 80 VILLAGES IN GHANA TO TRANSMIT INFORMATION AND STIMULATE RURAL SELF-HELP ACTIVITIES. IN 20 VILLAGES ONE FORUM LISTENING GROUP WAS ORGANIZED, 20 VILLAGES HAD TWO LISTENING GROUPS, 20 CONTROL VILLAGES WERE…

  9. The MARIACHI Project: Mixed Apparatus for Radio Investigation of Atmospheric Cosmic Rays of High Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, M. D.; Takai, H.; Warasia, R.; Sundermier, J.

    2005-12-01

    Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays are nuclei that have been accelerated to kinetic energies in excess of 1020 eV. Where do they come from? How are they produced? Are they survivors of the early universe? Are they remnants of supernovas? MARIACHI, a unique collaboration between scientists, physics teachers and students, is an innovative technique that allows us to detect and study them. The Experiment MARIACHI is a unique research experiment that seeks the detection of extreme energy cosmic rays (EECRs), with E >1020 eV. It is an exciting project with many aspects: Research: It investigates an unconventional way of detecting EECRs based upon a method successfully used to detect meteors entering the upper atmosphere. The method was developed by planetary astronomers listening to radio signals reflected off the ionization trail. MARIACHI seeks to listen to TV signals reflected off the ionization trail of an EECR. The unique experiment topology will also permit the study of meteors, exotic forms of lightning, and atmospheric science. Computing and Technology: It uses radio detection stations, along with mini shower arrays hooked up to GPS clocks. Teachers and students build the arrays. It implements the Internet and the GRID as means of communication, data transfer, data processing, and for hosting a public educational outreach web site. Outreach and Education: It is an open research project with the active participation of a wide audience of astronomers, physicists, college professors, high school teachers and students. Groups representing high schools, community colleges and universities all collaborate in the project. The excitement of a real experiment motivates the science and technology classroom, and incorporates several high school physical science topics along with material from other disciplines such as astronomy, electronics, radio, optics.

  10. Discovering astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of basic astronomical knowledge is presented with attention to the structure and dynamics of the stars and planets. Also dealt with are techniques of astronomical measurement, e.g., stellar spectrometry, radio astronomy, star catalogs, etc. Basic physical principles as they pertain to astronomy are reviewed, including the nature of light, gravitation, and electromagnetism. Finally, stellar evolution and cosmology are discussed with reference to the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe.

  11. 20 Active Galactic Nuclei Part 1 Radio Astronomy of the 1940's

    E-print Network

    Sitko, Michael L.

    , especially the strongest ones, seemed to be confined to the plane of the MWG, and were presumed Narrow-Line Radio Galaxy (NLRG) Broad-Line Radio Galaxy (BLRG) BL Lac object OJ 287 at minimum light to the large degree of brightening that occurs when material with large Lorentz factors approaches the observer

  12. A Radio Astronomy Correlator Optimized for the XILINX VIRTEX-4 SX FPGA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ludovico De Souza; John D. Bunton; Duncan Campbell-wilson; Roger J. Cappallo; Bart Kincaid

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a correlator that is optimized for the Xilinx Virtex-4 SX FPGA, and its application in the SKAMP radio telescope at the Molonglo Radio Observatory. The digital backend of the SKAMP telescope consists of more than 800 Virtex-4 FPGAs. Correlation is performed between each and every pairing of antenna inputs, so the SKAMP telescope, with its 384 inputs,

  13. HIGH PERFORMANCE RECEIVER FOR RFI MITIGATION IN RADIO ASTRONOMY : APPLICATION AT DECAMETER WAVELENGTHS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent Clerc; Rodolphe Weber; Laurent Denis; Carlo Rosolen

    As a consequence of the development of telecom - munications radio astronomers have to deal with an increasing number of unworkable observations polluted by man -made radio interferences. Thus, a lot of efforts are made to develop specific mitigation techniques. However, it appears that algorithm efficiency is r elated to the quality of the acquisitions. The first objective of this

  14. COMPARISON BETWEEN TWO CYCLOSTATIONARY DETECTORS FOR RFI MITIGATION IN RADIO ASTRONOMY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stéphanie Bretteil; Rodolphe Weber

    2004-01-01

    Radio astronomers have to observe some celestial emissions at frequencies allocated to an increasing number of active users of the spectrum. This paper presents a scheme for re- moving efficiently cyclostationary radio frequency interfer- ences (RFI) from astronomical data. Two cyclostationary detectors are compared and computer simulations are used to describe the applicability of these methods.

  15. A Voyage through the Radio Universe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Timothy Spuck

    2004-10-01

    The Radio Astronomy Research Team from from Oil City Area Senior High School (OCHS) in Oil City, Pennsylvania, embarked on a special project titled "Mapping the Universe" at the start of the 2000 school year. For the project, students analyzed data from the Arecibo Radio Telescope, which is the world's largest single dish radio telescope, in an effort to learn more about distant galaxies. Students used the information they gathered to calculate the Hubble constant--an accomplishment usually achieved by professional astronomers.

  16. Bringing science into schools through astronomy. Project ASTRO, Tucson

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caroline Barban; Herve Dole

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience in bringing science into US and French classrooms. We participated in the US scientific educational program Project ASTRO. It is based on a partnership between a school teacher and an astronomer. They together design and realize simple and interesting scientific activities for the children to learn and enjoy science. We present four hands-on activities we realized

  17. The Ilgarijiri Project: A collaboration between Aboriginal communities and radio astronomers in the Murchison Region of Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, John

    2014-07-01

    The international radio astronomy initiative known as the Square Kilometre Array is a cutting-edge science project, aimed atdramatically expanding our vision and understanding of the Universe. The $2billion+ international project is being shared between Southern Africa and Australia. The Australian component, centred in the Murchison region of Western Australia, is based upon collaboration with Aboriginal communities. A collaborative project called "Ilgarijiri- Things Belonging to the Sky" shared scientific and Aboriginal knowledge of the night sky. Through a series of collaborative meetings and knowledge sharing, the Ilgarijiri project developed and showcased Aboriginal knowledge of the night sky, via an international touring Aboriginal art exhibition, in Australia, South Africa, the USA and Europe. The Aboriginal art exhibition presents Aboriginal stories relating to the night sky, which prominently feature the 'Seven Sisters' and the 'Emu', as well as the collaborative experience with radio astronomers. The success of the Ilgarijiri collaborative project is based upon several principles, which can help to inform and guide future cultural collaborative projects.

  18. Detailed Studies of Radio Power Selection Effects, Projections Effects, and Redshift Evolution of Key Parameters of Classical Double Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lin

    1997-12-01

    A sample of about 20 classical double radio sources with redshifts between zero and two was compiled to study the properties of powerful FRII sources and their gaseous environments. A detailed investigation of radio power selection effects suggests that these selection effects are unlikely to be significant for most of the derived parameters, such as the ambient gas density and characteristic size of a source. Projection effects are also studied in detail. It is found that projection effects typically do not have a significant impact on derived properties for sources with projection angles greater than about 60(deg) , measured with respect to the line of sight to the observer. At small projection angle, parameters such as the ambient gas density and the luminosity in directed kinetic energy of the jet (i.e. the beam power) are sensitive to projection effects, while parameters such as the lobe width and the radio spectral index are rather insensitive. Comparisons between radio galaxies and radio loud quasars suggest that the average projection angle of the radio loud quasars in the sample studied is likely to be greater than about 35(deg) to 40(deg) . A careful study of Cygnus A suggests that its projection angle is probably greater than about 40(deg) to 55(deg) , consistent with independent estimates. The data also suggest that the low-redshift radio loud quasars in the sample have lower radio surface brightness and lower non-thermal pressure than radio galaxies; the difference is so large, it can not be explained by projection effects. The beam power, the density, temperature and thermal pressure of the ambient gas, and the gravitational mass of the surrounding cluster are also estimated for each source in the sample. The redshift evolution of these parameters are discussed. One interesting result is that, for radio loud quasars, the beam power is strongly correlated with the optical luminosity of the quasar.

  19. A Review of High School Level Astronomy Student Research Projects Over the Last Two Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M. T.; Hollow, R.; Rebull, L. M.; Danaia, L.; McKinnon, D. H.

    2014-09-01

    Since the early 1990s with the arrival of a variety of new technologies, the capacity for authentic astronomical research at the high school level has skyrocketed. This potential, however, has not realised the bright-eyed hopes and dreams of the early pioneers who expected to revolutionise science education through the use of telescopes and other astronomical instrumentation in the classroom. In this paper, a general history and analysis of these attempts is presented. We define what we classify as an Astronomy Research in the Classroom (ARiC) project and note the major dimensions on which these projects differ before describing the 22 major student research projects active since the early 1990s. This is followed by a discussion of the major issues identified that affected the success of these projects and provide suggestions for similar attempts in the future.

  20. Characterizing Interference in Radio Astronomy Observations through Active and Unsupervised Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doran, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the process of observing signals from astronomical sources, radio astronomers must mitigate the effects of manmade radio sources such as cell phones, satellites, aircraft, and observatory equipment. Radio frequency interference (RFI) often occurs as short bursts (< 1 ms) across a broad range of frequencies, and can be confused with signals from sources of interest such as pulsars. With ever-increasing volumes of data being produced by observatories, automated strategies are required to detect, classify, and characterize these short "transient" RFI events. We investigate an active learning approach in which an astronomer labels events that are most confusing to a classifier, minimizing the human effort required for classification. We also explore the use of unsupervised clustering techniques, which automatically group events into classes without user input. We apply these techniques to data from the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey to characterize several million detected RFI events from over a thousand hours of observation.

  1. Analysis of the Capability and Limitations of Relativistic Gravity Measurements Using Radio Astronomy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Counselman, C. C., III

    1975-01-01

    The uses of radar observations of planets and very-long-baseline radio interferometric observations of extragalactic objects to test theories of gravitation are described in detail with special emphasis on sources of error. The accuracy achievable in these tests with data already obtained, can be summarized in terms of: retardation of signal propagation (radar), deflection of radio waves (interferometry), advance of planetary perihelia (radar), gravitational quadrupole moment of sun (radar), and time variation of gravitational constant (radar). The analyses completed to date have yielded no significant disagreement with the predictions of general relativity.

  2. Infrared Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NASA's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) provides the Infrared Astronomy Website as one of its outreach programs. Infrared Astronomy, or "the detection and study of the infrared radiation (heat energy) emitted from objects in the Universe," is described and placed in context in the sections Discovery of Infrared, What is Infrared, Infrared Astronomy, Background, and the Infrared Universe. For current information, see the News & Discoveries, Active/ Future Projects, and Activities sections; past and current projects supported by IPAC are featured in the Infrared Gallery. The site targets a broad audience and is geared towards many learning levels.

  3. On the estimate and assessment of the ionospheric effects affecting low frequency radio astronomy measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Biagio Forte; Marcio Aquino

    2011-01-01

    The development of the LOw Frequency telescopes ARray (LOFAR) has posed a serious issue on the calibration of those measurements in the presence of the Earth’s ionosphere. The purpose of measuring at radio frequencies as low as VHF exposes LOFAR to a number of ionospheric phenomena, capable of deteriorating the accuracy of the measurements and subsequently of the sky imaging.

  4. Creation and development of the software complex for scheduling observations in the RadioAstron project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, V. E.

    2015-05-01

    In preparation for launching the space radio telescope as a component of the ground-space radio interferometer (the RadioAstron project) software was developed for scheduling observations of radio sources. A set of instruments was produced for solving various tasks of modeling the space mission in the context of radio interferometry with super-long bases when a radio telescope is launched into space. The software structure and applications are described that allow scheduling observations of sources by means of a ground-space radio interferometer.

  5. M.S. Astronomy Program M.S. in Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Hemmers, Oliver

    M.S. Astronomy Program M.S. in Astronomy Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences 1 for later reference. 1. understanding of a variety of fields of physics and astronomy at the graduate level 2*. performance of an astronomy research project suitable for a masters thesis 3*. ability

  6. Clustering-based Filtering to Detect Isolated and Intermittent Pulses in Radio Astronomy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri; Tang, B.; Lazio, T. J.; Spolaor, S.

    2013-01-01

    Radio-emitting neutron stars (pulsars) produce a series of periodic pulses at radio frequencies. Dispersion, caused by propagation through the interstellar medium, delays signals at lower frequencies more than higher frequencies. This well understood effect can be reversed though de-dispersion at the appropriate dispersion measure (DM). The periodic nature of a pulsar provides multiple samples of signals at the same DM, increasing the reliability of any candidate detection. However, existing methods for pulsar detection are ineffective for many pulse-emitting phenomena now being discovered. Sources exhibit a wide range of pulse repetition rates, from highly regular canonical pulsars to intermittent and nulling pulsars to rotating radio transients (RRATs) that may emit only a few pulses per hour. Other source types may emit only a few pulses, or even only a single pulse. We seek to broaden the scope of radio signal analysis to enable the detection of isolated and intermittent pulses. Without a requirement that detected sources be periodic, we find that a typical de-dispersion search yields results that are often dominated by spurious detections from radio frequency interference (RFI). These occur across the DM range, so filtering out DM-0 signals is insufficient. We employ DBSCAN data clustering to identify groups within the de-dispersion results, using information for each candidate about time, DM, SNR, and pulse width. DBSCAN is a density-based clustering algorithm that offers two advantages over other clustering methods: 1) the number of clusters need not to be specified, and 2) there is no model of expected cluster shape (such as the Gaussian assumption behind EM clustering). Each data cluster can be selectively masked or investigated to facilitate the process of sifting through hundreds of thousands of detections to focus on those of true interest. Using data obtained by the Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), we show how this approach can help separate RFI from difficult to find single and intermittent pulses.

  7. Radio telescopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Findlay

    1964-01-01

    A radio telescope is used in radio astronomy to measure the intensity of the radiation received from various parts of the sky. Such a telescope must be able both to detect and to locate faint radio sources of small angular size, and also to measure the brightness distribution across extended radio sources or over large sky areas. Ideally the telescope

  8. Low noise, 0.4-3 GHz cryogenic receiver for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawande, R.; Bradley, R.; Langston, G.

    2014-10-01

    We present the design and measurement of a radio telescope receiver front end cooled to 100 K physical temperature, and working over 400 MHz to 3 GHz frequency band. The system uses a frequency independent feed developed for operation as a feed for parabola using sinuous elements and integrated with an ultra-wideband low noise amplifier. The ambient temperature system is tested on the 43 m radio telescope in Green Bank, WV and the system verification results on the sky are presented. The cryogenic receiver is developed using a Stirling cycle, one stage cryocooler. The measured far field patterns and the system noise less than 80 K over a 5:1 bandwidth are presented.

  9. Research Projects and Undergraduate Retention at the University of Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker-LaFollette, Amanda; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Towner, A. P.; McGraw, A. M.; Biddle, L. I.; Robertson, A.; Turner, J.; Smith, C.

    2013-06-01

    The University of Arizona’s Astronomy Club utilizes its access to the many telescopes in and around Tucson, Arizona, to allow students to fully participate in a variety of research projects. Three current projects - the exoplanet project, the radio astronomy project, and the Kepler project - all work to give undergraduates who are interested in astronomy the opportunity to explore practical astronomy outside the classroom and in a peer-supported environment. The exoplanet project strives to teach students about the research process, including observing exoplanet transits on the Steward Observatory 61” Kuiper telescope on Mt. Bigelow in Tucson, AZ, reducing the data into lightcurves with the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF), modeling the lightcurves using the Interactive Data Language (IDL), and writing and publishing a professional paper, and does it all with no faculty involvement. The radio astronomy project is designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with a professor on a radio astronomy research project, and to learn about the research process, including observing molecules in molecular clouds using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12-meter radio telescope on Kitt Peak in Arizona. The Kepler project is a new project designed in part to facilitate graduate-undergraduate interaction in the Astronomy Department, and in part to allow students (both graduate and undergraduate) to participate in star-spot cycle research using data from the Kepler Mission. All of these research projects and structures provide students with unique access to telescopes, peer mentoring, networking, and understanding the entire process of astronomical research.

  10. Observations of electron gyroharmonic waves and the structure of the Io torus. [jupiter 1 spacecraft radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, T. J.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Hubbard, R. F.; Pedersen, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    Narrow-banded emissions were observed by the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment on the Voyager 1 spacecraft as it traversed the Io plasma torus. These waves occur between harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency and are the Jovian analogue of electrostatic emissions observed and theoretically studied for the terrestrial magnetosphere. The observed frequencies always include the component near the upper hybrid resonant frequency, (fuhr) but the distribution of the other observed emissions varies in a systematic way with position in the torus. A refined model of the electron density variation, based on identification of the fuhr line, is included. Spectra of the observed waves are analyzed in terms of the linear instability of an electron distribution function consisting of isotropic cold electrons and hot losscone electrons. The positioning of the observed auxiliary harmonics with respect to fuhr is shown to be an indicator of the cold to hot temperature ratio. It is concluded that this ratio increases systematically by an overall factor of perhaps 4 or 5 between the inner and outer portions of the torus.

  11. A scientific program for infrared, submillimeter and radio astronomy from space: A report by the Management Operations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Important and fundamental scientific progress can be attained through space observations in the wavelengths longward of 1 micron. The formation of galaxies, stars, and planets, the origin of quasars and the nature of active galactic nuclei, the large scale structure of the Universe, and the problem of the missing mass, are among the major scientific issues that can be addressed by these observations. Significant advances in many areas of astrophysics can be made over the next 20 years by implementing the outlined program. This program combines large observatories with smaller projects to create an overall scheme that emphasized complementarity and synergy, advanced technology, community support and development, and the training of the next generation of scientists. Key aspects of the program include: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility; the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy; a robust program of small missions; and the creation of the technology base for future major observatories.

  12. Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a fact sheet describing the GAVRT program. This educational program uses a 34-meter antenna for classroom radio astronomy observations via the Internet. The GAVRT Project introduces students in elementary through high school grades to the process of science with the goal of improving science literacy among American students.

  13. The Quiet Skies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Steve

    2008-01-01

    To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and radio frequency interference (RFI), an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project--the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space…

  14. Analog-to-digital converter based on RSFQ technology for radio astronomy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Motohiro; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Shoji, Akira

    2001-12-01

    We are developing an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) based on rapid single-flux quantum technology for radio-astronomic spectroscopy applications where very wide bandwidth is required and relatively small resolution is sufficient. The ADC consists of periodic-flash comparators, a demultiplexer and output drivers; and is sufficiently simple to be implemented on a single chip using a conventional 2-3 ?m Nb trilayer technology. A 2-bit ADC has been designed for operation at 16 GHz of the sampling frequency. All the subsystems of the ADC have been fabricated using standard 1.6 kA cm-2 Nb/AlOx/Nb technology and have been successfully tested.

  15. The NASA Space Place: A Plethora of Games, Projects, and Fun Facts for Celebrating Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, N. J.; Fisher, D. K.

    2008-12-01

    The Space Place is a unique NASA education and public outreach program. It includes a NASA website (spaceplace.nasa.gov) in English and Spanish that targets elementary age children with appealing, content- rich STEM material on space science, Earth science, and technology. The site features science and/or technology content related to, so far, over 40 NASA missions. This overall program, as well as special efforts planned for IYA2009, strongly support many of the objectives of IYA. Some of these are: 1. Stimulate interest in astronomy and science, especially among young people and in audiences not normally reached. 2. Increase scientific awareness. 3. Support and improve formal and informal science education. 4. Provide a contemporary image of science and scientists. 5. Facilitate new astronomy education networks and strengthen existing ones. 6. Improve the gender-balanced representation of scientists at all levels and promote greater involvement of underrepresented groups. The Space Place program has cultivated a large network of community partners (Obj. 5), including museums, libraries, and planetariums, as well as a large network of avocational astronomy societies. We send the community partners monthly mailings of the latest NASA materials for their "NASA Space Place" display boards (Obj. 1, 2, 3, 5). The astronomy societies receive original articles with the latest "insider" news on NASA missions for publication in their newsletters or on their websites (Obj. 2, 5). Through these leveraged partnerships, we reach a large audience of children; parents; formal and informal educators; rural, minority, and otherwise underserved audiences (Obj. 1, 6); and avocational astronomers, many of whom work with children and the general public in the classroom or at special events (Obj. 2, 3). Supporting Obj. 4, are the "Space Place Live" cartoon "talk show" episodes, spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/live. For IYA 2009, we will specifically prepare our partners to plan and carry out activities to tie in with the IYA April topic, Galaxies and the Distant Universe. The infrared Spitzer Space Telescope, as well as the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) spacecraft are strongly represented on The Space Place web site, with interactive games, images, and crafts that explore the wonders of and latest discoveries about galaxies. In addition, in our mailings and other partner communications throughout the year, we will feature special activities and projects on spaceplace.nasa.gov, and suggest ways to use these resources in IYA-related events.

  16. Deformation effects of the Effelsberg 100 m Radio Telescope

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith Pietzner; Axel Nothnagel

    2010-01-01

    The 100 m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy at Effelsberg has been used for geodetic VLBI in Europe since 1991. It had been built about 30 years ago with the premise that the main reflector follows a homologous deformation when being tilted to varying elevations. Through this specification, it was projected that the reflector always has a

  17. Project 8: Using Radio Frequencies to Measure the Neutrino Mass

    E-print Network

    N. S. Oblath

    2011-10-10

    It is well known that the neutrino masses affect the shape of the energy spectrum of tritium beta-decay electrons. However, experiments have yet to measure that distortion. The Project 8 experiment proposes to measure the spectral distortion in a novel way: using radio-frequency techniques to detect and measure the energies of the beta-decay electrons. We plan on measuring the radiation created from the cyclotron motion of the electrons in a strong magnetic field. I will report on the status of a prototype that is designed to demonstrate single-electron detection at energies near the tritium endpoint, 18.6 keV. I will also discuss the possibilities for scaling up to a neutrino-mass experiment.

  18. Two Eyes, 3D: A New Project to Study Stereoscopy in Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Aaron; SubbaRao, M.; Wyatt, R.

    2012-01-01

    "Two Eyes, 3D" is a 3-year NSF funded research project to study the educational impacts of using stereoscopic representations in informal settings. The project funds two experimental studies. The first is focused on how children perceive various spatial qualities of scientific objects displayed in static 2D and 3D formats. The second is focused on how adults perceive various spatial qualities of scientific objects and processes displayed in 2D and 3D movie formats. As part of the project, two brief high-definition films about variable stars will be developed. Both studies will be mixed-method and look at prior spatial ability and other demographic variables as covariates. The project is run by the American Association of Variable Star Observers, Boston Museum of Science and the Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum with consulting from the California Academy of Sciences. Early pilot results will be presented. All films will be released into the public domain, as will the assessment software designed to run on tablet computers (iOS or Android).

  19. Astronomy CATS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissenden, Gina; Prather, Edward E.; Impey, Chris

    2012-08-01

    The Center for Astronomy Education's (CAE's) NSF-funded Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program is a grassroots multi-institutional effort to increase the capacity for astronomy education research and improve science literacy in the United States.Our primary target population is the 500,000 college students who each year enroll in an introductory general education (a breadth requirement for non-science majors) Earth, Astronomy, and Space Science (EASS) course (Fraknoi 2001, AGI 2006).An equally important population for our efforts is the individuals who are, or will be, teaching these students. In this chapter, we will briefly discuss the goals of CAE and CATS, the varied personnel that make up the CATS collective, the diverse projects we've undertaken, and the many challenges we have had to work through to make CATS a success.

  20. Detailed Studies of Projection Effects, Radio Power Selection Effects, and Key Physical Parameters of Classical Double Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lin

    1998-11-01

    A sample of classical double radio sources with redshifts between zero and two was compiled to study the properties of these sources and their gaseous environments. A detailed theoretical investigation of projection effects shows that different derived parameters have different sensitivities to the projection angle /theta, but in general, projection effects are not significant for ?sbsp~>60o. Several potential diagnoses of the projection angle are provided by the theoretical studies. Results obtained using one of these methods suggest that the projection angle of Cygnus A is greater than ~40o to 55o, consistent with independent estimates; and the projection angles of other sources in the sample are likely to be greater than 30o to 40o. This is consistent with independent results obtained here by comparing radio galaxies with radio-loud quasars. The data also suggest that low-redshift radio-loud quasars have lower radio surface brightness and non-thermal pressure than radio galaxies, which cannot be explained by pure projection effects. Detailed studies of radio power selection effects suggest that these selection effects are unlikely to be significant for most derived parameters, such as the ambient gas density of the radio source. Results on several key parameters of FRII sources are presented. Studies of the beam power suggest that it remains roughly constant over a source's lifetime. An increase of the beam power with redshift is observed, and it appears that radio power is not an accurate measure of the beam power. Thermal pressures typical of clusters of galaxies are found for the gaseous environments of the FRII sources, which would lead to an appreciable amount of microwave diminution from some of these clusters. The data hint of different pressure gradients at high and low redshift, which may be explained by an increase of cluster core radius with redshift. Preliminary results on the gravitational mass of the surrounding cluster are presented. The redshift evolution of the cluster mass is not well determined. However, the current data do not indicate significant negative evolution of the cluster mass, contrary to what is expected in a high density universe.

  1. Society News: Monica Grady awarded CBE; Grubb Parsons Lecture 2012; Join the RAS; Astronomy on radio for kids; New Fellows; Peter D Hingley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-08-01

    RAS Fellow Prof. Monica Grady has been made a Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE), in recognition of her services to space science. The RAS sponsors the annual Grubb Parsons Lecture, which this year took place on 6 June at the University of Durham. If you are a professional astronomer, geophysicist, or similar, a student studying these disciplines, or simply someone with a serious interest in them, we urge you to apply for membership of the RAS. Outreach is an important activity for the RAS. We recently supported an astronomy series called Deep Space High on the digital radio channel Fun Kids.

  2. Dark Skies Awareness Cornerstone Project for the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.; Iya Dark Skies Awareness Working Group

    2010-12-01

    Programs that were part of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) Dark Skies Awareness (DSA) Cornerstone Project have been successfully implemented around the world to promote social awareness of the effects of light pollution on public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, nightscape aesthetics and especially astronomy. In developing the programs, DSA Cornerstone Project found that to influence cultural change effectively — to make people literally look up and see the light — we must make children a main focus, use approaches that offer involvement on many levels, from cursory to committed, and offer involvement via many venues. We must make the programs and resources as turn-key as possible, especially for educators — and provide ways to visualize the problem with simple, easily grasped demonstrations. The programs spanned a wide range; from new media technology for the younger generation, to an event in the arts, to various types of educational materials, to the promotion of dark skies communities, to national and international events and to global citizen science programs. The DSA Cornerstone Project is continuing most all of these programs beyond IYA2009. The International Dark-Sky Association as well as the Starlight Initiative is endorsing and helping to continue with some of the most successful programs from the DSA. The GLOBE at Night campaign is adding a research component that examines light pollution’s affects on wildlife. Dark Skies Rangers activities are being implemented in Europe through the Galileo Teacher Training Program. The new “One Star at a Time” will engage people to protect the night sky through personal pledges and registration of public stargazing areas or StarParks, like the newest one in Italy. The Starlight Initiative’s World Night in Defence of the Starlight will take place on the Vernal Equinox. DSA will again oversee the Dark Skies portion of Global Astronomy Month, in which the International Dark Sky Week will be celebrated. DSA will be collaborating with Belgium’s “Night of Darkness” to endeavor to make that lights out event a more global event. DSA will endeavor to support dark skies education worldwide, as in Northern Ireland. DSA will seek to expand light pollution prevention campaigns like Austria’s. People whose homes meet the criteria of good lighting are invited to put a sticker from Austria’s biggest newspaper in their front window to show their support. DSA also seeks to collaborate with the IAU Office for Astronomy Development. The presentation will focus on the DSA programs during IYA and the sustainability of the DSA programs after IYA, as well as the expansion to other programs worldwide, with particular emphasis in communicating dark skies awareness with the public and its educational value in attracting young people to study science and technology. See www.darkskiesawareness.org for more information on the programs.

  3. The PULSE@Parkes Project: a New Observing Technique for Long-Term Pulsar Monitoring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Hobbs; R. Hollow; D. Champion; J. Khoo; D. Yardley; M. Carr; M. Keith; F. Jenet; S. Amy; M. Burgay; S. Burke-Spolaor; J. Chapman; L. Danaia; B. Homewood; A. Kovacevic; M. Mao; D. McKinnon; M. Mulcahy; S. Oslowski; W. van Straten

    2009-01-01

    The PULSE@Parkes project has been designed to monitor the rotation of radio pulsars over time spans of days to years. The observations are obtained using the Parkes 64-m and 12-m radio telescopes by Australian and international high school students. These students learn the basis of radio astronomy and undertake small projects with their observations. The data are fully calibrated and

  4. Managing a big ground-based astronomy project: the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Gary H.

    2008-07-01

    TMT is a big science project and its scale is greater than previous ground-based optical/infrared telescope projects. This paper will describe the ideal "linear" project and how the TMT project departs from that ideal. The paper will describe the needed adaptations to successfully manage real world complexities. The progression from science requirements to a reference design, the development of a product-oriented Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and an organization that parallels the WBS, the implementation of system engineering, requirements definition and the progression through Conceptual Design to Preliminary Design will be summarized. The development of a detailed cost estimate structured by the WBS, and the methodology of risk analysis to estimate contingency fund requirements will be summarized. Designing the project schedule defines the construction plan and, together with the cost model, provides the basis for executing the project guided by an earned value performance measurement system.

  5. *** TITLE *** Reports on Astronomy 2009-2012

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    *** TITLE *** Reports on Astronomy 2009-2012 ***NAME OF EDITORS*** c 2012 International on HISTORICAL RADIO ASTRONOMY CHAIR Kenneth Kellermann VICE-CHAIR Wayne Orchiston BOARD Rod Davies Leonid TRIENNIAL REPORT 2009-2012 1. Introduction The IAU Working Group on Historical Radio Astronomy (WGHRA

  6. Investigation of onboard quantum time scale for orbital flight of a space radio telescope (the RadioAstron project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Results of observing the operation of instrumentation of the ground-space complex of the Radio-Astron project during space flight conditions of the radio observatory are presented. The technology of quality evaluation of the data received from the space radio telescope (SRT) is considered. The dependence of readings of the onboard frame counter on SRT radial velocity and distance is determined. Technology of constructing a model of the ground-space atomic clocks and onboard quantum time scale based on the results of radio astronomic observations is tested. The method of measurement of the coherent cumulative navigation delay using the onboard quantum time scale is considered. The results of observation of the effect of relativistic and kinematic time dilation onboard the SRT are presented.

  7. A Radio Sky Surveys Project with the Allen Telescope Array Response to the Request for Information Part 2

    E-print Network

    Bower, Geoffrey

    A Radio Sky Surveys Project with the Allen Telescope Array Response to the Request for Information Stairs (University of British Columbia), Dan Stinebring (Oberlin College) #12;Radio Sky Surveys Project 1 1 Executive Summary We describe here the Radio Sky Surveys Project (RSSP): a set of surveys

  8. NSF Internships in Public Science Education: Sensing the Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, L.; Boltuch, D.; Fultz, C.; Buck, S.; Smith, T.; Harris, R.; Moffett, D.; LaFratta, M.; Walsh, L.; Castelaz, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    The intent of the "Sensing the Radio Sky" project is to teach high school students the concepts and relevance of radio astronomy through presentations in STARLAB portable planetariums. The two year project began in the summer of 2004. A total of twelve interns and four faculty mentors from Furman University and UNCA have participated at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute to develop the Radio Sky project. The project united physics and multimedia majors and allowed these students to apply their knowledge of different disciplines to a common goal. One component of the project is the development and production of a cylinder to be displayed in portable STARLAB planetariums. The cylinder gives a thorough view of the Milky Way and of several other celestial sources in radio wavelengths, yet these images are difficult to perceive without prior knowledge of radio astronomy. Consequently, the Radio Sky team created a multimedia presentation to accompany the cylinder. This multimedia component contains six informative lessons on radio astronomy assembled by the physics interns and numerous illustrations and animations created by the multimedia interns. The cylinder and multimedia components complement each other and provide a unique, thorough, and highly intelligible perspective on radio astronomy. The project is near completion and the final draft will be sent to Learning Technologies, Inc., for marketing to owners of STARLAB planetariums throughout the world. The development of the Radio Sky project has also provided a template for potential similar projects that examine our universe in different wavelengths, such as gamma ray, x-ray, and infrared. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  9. A Detailed Investigation of Projection Effects Relevant to the Study of Powerful Classical Double Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lin; Daly, Ruth A.

    1998-05-01

    A detailed investigation of projection effects involved in the study of classical double sources is presented here. Theoretical calculations of the way projection effects enter empirically determined parameters are studied. It is shown that some parameters, such as the lobe width, are rather insensitive to the projection angle, while other parameters, such as the ambient gas density, are more sensitive. The deviation of the observed value from the true value of any given parameter is usually not significant when the projection angle is greater than about 60° and is significant only at very small projection angle, at which the symmetry axis of the source is pointing close to the line of sight to the observer. Applications of the theoretical model to a sample of classical double radio sources yield the following principal results: 1. A comparison between the radio-loud quasars and the radio galaxies in the sample suggests that their average projection angles are very similar. The average projection angle of the radio-loud quasars in the sample is greater than 35°-40° at the 3 ? level, assuming that the average projection angle of radio galaxies is 70° or above. 2. On average, the low-redshift radio-loud quasars in the sample have much lower lobe surface brightness and lower nonthermal pressure than the low-redshift radio galaxies, a result which cannot be explained by projection effects. This is consistent with the fact that the radio-loud quasars appear to be ``fatter'' than the radio galaxies, as previously noted by Leahy, Muxlow, & Stephens. 3. The study of departures of the magnetic field strength from that estimated using the minimum-energy conditions suggests that the projection angle of Cygnus A is greater than about 40° (at 3 ?) to 55° (at 2 ?), in agreement with the independent results of Sorathia et al. These departures also indicate that the projection angles of most of the sources in the sample, including galaxies and quasars, are likely to be greater than about 30° (at 3 ?) to 40° (at 2 ?). This result does not depend on any assumptions about the average projection angle of radio galaxies and is consistent with result 1 stated above. Thus, it is very unlikely that projection significantly affects key parameters, such as the ambient gas temperature and density, for the sources studied here.

  10. African Astronomy and the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Gordon

    2010-02-01

    We highlight the growth of astronomy across Africa and the effect of hosting the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will have on this growth. From the construction of a new 25m radio telescope in Nigeria, to new university astronomy programmes in Kenya, the HESS in Namibia and the Mauritian Radio Telescope, to the world class projects being developed in South Africa (Southern African Large Telescope and Karoo Array Telescope) astronomy is re-emerging across the continent. The SKA will represent the pinnacle of technological advancement in astronomy when constructed; requiring ultra high speed data transmission lines over 3000 km baselines and the World's fastest computer for correlation purposes. The investment alone to build the SKA on African soil will be of great economic benefit to its people, but the required network connectivity will significantly drive commercial expansion far beyond the initial value of the SKA investment. The most important consequence of hosting the SKA in Africa would be the impact on Human Capital Development (HCD) on the continent. Major HCD projects already underway producing excellent results will be presented. )

  11. Solving stellar astronomy problems in the orbital stellar stereoscopic observatory project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubey, M. S.; Kouprianov, V. V.; L'vov, V. N.; Markelov, S. V.; Bakholdin, A. V.; Tsukanova, G. I.

    We propose to establish an Orbital Stellar Stereoscopic Observatory consisting of two identically equipped spacecrafts in the vicinity of two Lagrangian libration points, L4 and L5, of the ``Sun -- Earth + Moon barycenter'' system. The stereoscopic baseline length is B ? 259.111 million km (86.4% of the Earth orbit diameter). Each of the two Tsukanova-Korsch three-mirror astrographs has an aperture of 1 m and focal length of 30 m; the focal-plane CCD array is 350 mm in diameter. The expected astrometric accuracy is ± 0.0007 arcsec in a single measurement. Each frame in the scientific program is captured synchronously by the two astrographs, allowing to obtain instantaneous parallaxes of stars as far as up to 5 kpc, along with spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of point and extended sources in the Tholen filter system (Zellner et al. 1985) extended to 12--14 bands, including the integral one. We expect the project to provide a large amount of important information for stellar astronomy and for various studies of Galactic objects.

  12. Student Projects for the Introductory Astronomy Course Using the Hubble Data Archive and Related Resources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, T.

    1999-12-01

    Many students in the introductory course lack understanding about how astronomy is done at big observatories and about how scientific investigations are carried out in general. This presentation outlines the latest steps in an ongoing effort at Gardner-Webb University to build research projects into the course that develop an appreciation and understanding of the latest astronomical research and the methods of doing science. A significant percentage of students come into the course with the misconception that the Hubble Space Telescope somehow travels to remote destinations around the universe taking snapshots. To address this problem, they are asked to develop proposals to use Hubble to observe objects of their choice. Students make use of HST proposal abstracts, images, and other information available through the online data archive, along with press releases, tutorials, and other resources at the STScI web site to develop their proposals. Despite some initial reluctance from the students to wade into the technical information in the Data Archive, the assignment has been generally successful thus far. Students leave the course with a good working knowledge of the operation of Hubble, and a few ideas developed by the students are now being implemented by real observers using HST.

  13. The EUREKA Gandalf project: monitoring and self-tuning techniques for heterogeneous radio access networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Stuckmann; Z. Altman; H. Dubreil; A. Ortega; R. Barco; M. Toril; M. Fernandez; M. Barry; S. McGrath; Geoff Blyth; Puneet Saidha; Lars Moltsen Nielsen

    2005-01-01

    The introduction and evolution of third-generation (3G) mobile radio systems leads to a heterogeneous radio access network landscape. Network management becomes crucial to guarantee optimum cooperation between network sub-systems. This paper summarizes the objectives and first solution ideas of the European project Gandalf, which has been accepted in the framework of the EUREKA\\/CELTIC initiative. The aim of the Gandalf project

  14. Air Shower Measurements with Radio Antennas: The LOPES Project

    SciTech Connect

    Haungs, Andreas [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-01-24

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and calibrate radio pulses from Extensive Air Showers. LOPES is designed as a digital radio interferometer using high bandwidths and fast data processing and profits from the reconstructed air shower observables of KASCADE-Grande. First results of the LOPES experiment are very promising for a future large scale application of the technique to detect cosmic rays of highest energies.

  15. Fundamental reference frames and radio astrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T.-Q. Xu; Z.-X. Li

    1987-01-01

    The importance of a fundamental reference frame, its present situation and progress, the significance and the role of radio astronomy in establishing and improving a fundamental reference frame, the progress of radio astronomy reference system etc. are discussed.

  16. Radio Observations of Rapidly Rotating F--M Dwarf Stars in the Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Academia Sinica,

    E-print Network

    White, Stephen

    Radio Observations of Rapidly Rotating F--M Dwarf Stars in the Pleiades Jeremy Lim Institute very rapidly rotating late­ type dwarf stars in the Pleiades open cluster, distributed in spectral: evolution ­ stars: flare ­ stars: late­ type 1. INTRODUCTION The radio emission of active late­type dwarf

  17. The U.S. Program for the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009): Outcomes, Lessons Learned, and Legacy Projects (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbell, D.

    2009-12-01

    The United States conducted an active and wide-ranging program for IYA2009, thanks largely to support from the American Astronomical Society, the National Science Foundation, and NASA. The U.S. effort included leadership of several international “cornerstone” projects, including the Galileoscope telescope kit, the “From Earth to the Universe” image exhibition, Dark-Skies Awareness, and a variety of creative New Media activities, such as a daily podcast (“365 Days of Astronomy”) and a virtual island in Second Life. In addition, U.S. astronomy educators and outreach professionals played major roles in IYA2009 cornerstone projects designed to promote greater gender equity in astronomy (“She is An Astronomer”); to provide the best astronomy resources for formal education (the Galileo Teacher Training Program); and to conduct global weekend-long celebrations of astronomy involving star parties, several live Webcasts, and special events (“100 Hours of Astronomy” and “Galilean Nights”). NASA led special projects to provide large astronomy images to science centers across the nation, and sent comprehensive exhibits on the major themes of modern astronomy to dozens of libraries in small and medium-sized cities, based on competitive proposals for community impact (“Visions of the Universe”). Underpinning all of these efforts was a variety of methods for informing and engaging the large community of U.S. amateur astronomers, and active communication with our colleagues in Canada, Puerto Rico and Mexico. This talk will review the outcomes and major success stories from the year, discuss several lessons learned that could be useful for pending efforts such as the 2011 International Year of Chemistry, and provide a look ahead for IYA2009 projects and resources that are expected to continue to be active in 2010 and beyond.

  18. MPS Internships in Public Science Education: Sensing the Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Melvin; Castelaz, M. W.; Moffett, D.; Walsh, L.; LaFratta, M.

    2006-12-01

    The intent of the “Sensing the Radio Sky” program is to teach high school students the concepts and relevance of radio astronomy through presentations in STARLAB portable planetariums. The two year program began in the summer of 2004 and was completed in December 2006. The program involved a team of 12 undergraduate physics and multimedia majors and four faculty mentors from Furman University, University of North Carolina-Asheville and Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). One component of the program is the development and production of a projection cylinder for the portable STARLAB planetariums. The cylinder gives a thorough view of the Milky Way and of several other celestial sources in radio wavelengths, yet these images are difficult to perceive without prior knowledge of radio astronomy. Consequently, the Radio Sky team created a multimedia presentation to accompany the cylinder. This multimedia component contains six informative lessons on radio astronomy assembled by the physics interns and numerous illustrations and animations created by the multimedia interns. The cylinder and multimedia components complement each other and provide a unique, thorough, and highly intelligible perspective on radio astronomy. The final draft is complete and will be sent to Learning Technologies, Inc., for marketing to owners of STARLAB planetariums throughout the world. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  19. Transactions IAU, Volume XXVIIIA Reports on Astronomy 2009-2012

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    Transactions IAU, Volume XXVIIIA Reports on Astronomy 2009-2012 Ian Corbett, ed. c 2012 GROUP ON HISTORICAL RADIO ASTRONOMY CHAIR Kenneth Kellermann VICE-CHAIR Wayne Orchiston BOARD Rod Davies Woerden TRIENNIAL REPORT 2009-2012 1. Introduction The IAU Working Group on Historical Radio Astronomy

  20. Stereoscopic 3D Projections with MITAKA An Important Tool to Get People Interested in Astronomy and Space Science in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Nemoto; Shoichi, Itoh; Hidehiko, Agata; Mario, Zegarra; Jose, Ishitsuka; Edwin, Choque; Adita, Quispe; Tsunehiko, Kato

    2014-02-01

    National Astronomical Observatory of Japan has developed space simulation software "Mitaka". By using Mitaka on two PCs and two projectors with polarizing filter, and look through polarized glasses, we can enjoy space travel in three dimensions. Any one can download Mitaka from anywhere in the world by Internet. But, it has been prepared only Japanese and English versions now. We improved a Mitaka Spanish version, and now we are making projections for local people. The experience of the universe in three dimensions is a very memorable for people, and it has become an opportunity to get interested in astronomy and space sciences. A 40 people capacity room, next o to our Planetarium, has been conditioned for 3D projections; also a portable system is available. Due to success of this new outreach system more 3D show rooms will be implemented within the country.

  1. ASTRONOMY 104: UNDERGRADUATE ASTRONOMY SEMINAR

    E-print Network

    1 ASTRONOMY 104: UNDERGRADUATE ASTRONOMY SEMINAR SYLLABUS Unique Number 47750 Class Meetings together with fellow astronomy majors, and those in other majors who are keen on astronomy. We hope to discuss present and future pathways to success in and around astronomy, and to share with you some

  2. The Australia Telescope Project - A progress report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Brooks

    1987-01-01

    A development status report is presented for the Australia Telescope advanced radio astronomy facility, which will operate in the 300 MHz-115 GHz range and produce radio images of the sky on many different angular scales. The engineering tasks of the project encompass six 22 m-diameter fully steerable radio telescope structures at one extreme and custom-built VLSI chips at the other.

  3. Working Papers: Astronomy and Astrophysics Panel Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Beichman, Charles A.; Canizares, Claude; Cronin, James; Heeschen, David; Houck, James; Hunten, Donald; Mckee, Christopher F.; Noyes, Robert; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1991-01-01

    The papers of the panels appointed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics survey Committee are compiled. These papers were advisory to the survey committee and represent the opinions of the members of each panel in the context of their individual charges. The following subject areas are covered: radio astronomy, infrared astronomy, optical/IR from ground, UV-optical from space, interferometry, high energy from space, particle astrophysics, theory and laboratory astrophysics, solar astronomy, planetary astronomy, computing and data processing, policy opportunities, benefits to the nation from astronomy and astrophysics, status of the profession, and science opportunities.

  4. Engineering design of an unmanned lunar radio observatory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Drean; M. A. Caylor; D. U. Choi; C. R. Edelsohn; J. G. Gurley; F. A. Hagen; P. B. Landecker; G. W. Su; M. L. Tillman; C. R. Wassgren

    1992-01-01

    The study derives principal technology challenges and requirements for unmanned lunar exploration missions on the basis of candidate missions to telerobotically place a radio observatory - Astronomy Lunar Low Frequency Array (ALLFA) - on the farside of the moon. Highlights of the detailed ALLFA engineering design are presented, including all phases of the project from launch to data retrieval. The

  5. Elementary astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, J.

    2006-08-01

    In developing nations such as Mexico, basic science education has scarcely improved. There are multiple reasons for this problem; they include poor teacher training and curricula that are not challenging for students. I shall suggest ways in which astronomy can be used to improve basic education, it is so attractive that it can be employed to teach how to read and write, learn a second language, mathematics, physics, as well as geography. If third world nations do not teach science in an adequate way, they will be in serious problems when they will try to achieve a better standard of living for their population. I shall also address informal education, it is by this means that most adults learn and keep up to date with subjects that are not their specialty. If we provide good outreach programs in developing nations we can aid adult training; astronomy is ideal since it is particularly multidisciplinary. In particular radio and television programs are useful for popularization since they reach such wide audiences.

  6. Gravitational Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaprakash, B. Suryanarayana

    This chapter is about opening the gravitational window to observe the Universe. Although the weakest of all known forces, gravity plays a dominant role in forming stars and galaxies, shaping the large-scale structure, and driving the expansion of the Universe. Gravity has so far played a passive role in our understanding. We only witness its influence indirectly by observing its effect on star light (Doppler effect, cosmological redshift, gravitational lensing, etc.). However, we are at a momentous period that could soon transform our picture of the Universe by opening the gravitational window for observational astronomy. Gravitational waves have already been critical for understanding how neutron star binaries evolve [1] [2]. However, we have not directly observed the waves themselves. This will change before the end of this decade when several different methods of observing gravitational waves will reach sensitivity levels at which we should finally begin to unravel some of the deepest questions in astronomy, cosmology, and fundamental physics. The chapter by van den Broeck will deal with the two latter topics. In this chapter, we will discuss what gravitational waves are (Sect. 26.2), how they interact with matter (Sect. 26.3), on-going and future projects aimed at detecting cosmic gravitational waves (Sect. 26.4), expected and speculative astronomical sources, and a list of open problems on which gravitational astronomy could shed some light (Sect. 26.5).

  7. Astronomy for Development in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauduit, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will look briefly at efforts to stimulate astronomy across Africa and will broadly summarize the current status of astronomy on the continent. It will also aim to address the question of how astronomy can be used for African development - something that has always been a key driver of efforts to grow the field in this region. The establishment of the IAU's Office of Astronomy for Development, which has a global mandate, has provided additional support and opportunity for the many role players across the African continent. These individuals had already organised themselves in order to grow the field of astronomy across all areas from outreach to education to research. Some of these activities built on work done by the IAU's Commission 46 (Astronomy Education and Development) while other activities stemmed from the International Year of Astronomy 2009, specifically the "Developing Astronomy Globally" Cornerstone Project.

  8. The non-coplanar baselines effect in radio interferometry: The W-Projection algorithm

    E-print Network

    T. J. Cornwell; K. Golap; S. Bhatnagar

    2008-07-25

    We consider a troublesome form of non-isoplanatism in synthesis radio telescopes: non-coplanar baselines. We present a novel interpretation of the non-coplanar baselines effect as being due to differential Fresnel diffraction in the neighborhood of the array antennas. We have developed a new algorithm to deal with this effect. Our new algorithm, which we call "W-projection", has markedly superior performance compared to existing algorithms. At roughly equivalent levels of accuracy, W-projection can be up to an order of magnitude faster than the corresponding facet-based algorithms. Furthermore, the precision of result is not tightly coupled to computing time. W-projection has important consequences for the design and operation of the new generation of radio telescopes operating at centimeter and longer wavelengths.

  9. Planetary astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, David; Hunten, Donald; Ahearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Black, David; Brown, Robert A.; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Cochran, Anita L.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Depater, Imke

    1991-01-01

    The authors profile the field of astronomy, identify some of the key scientific questions that can be addressed during the decade of the 1990's, and recommend several facilities that are critically important for answering these questions. Scientific opportunities for the 1990' are discussed. Areas discussed include protoplanetary disks, an inventory of the solar system, primitive material in the solar system, the dynamics of planetary atmospheres, planetary rings and ring dynamics, the composition and structure of the atmospheres of giant planets, the volcanoes of IO, and the mineralogy of the Martian surface. Critical technology developments, proposed projects and facilities, and recommendations for research and facilities are discussed.

  10. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project - Gen-4 and Gen-5 Radio Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS project, has partnered with Rockwell Collins to develop a concept Control and Non-Payload Communication (CNPC) system prototype radio, operating on recently allocated UAS frequency spectrum bands. This prototype radio is being used to validate initial proposed performance requirements for UAS control communications. This presentation will give an overview of the current plans for the prototype radio development.

  11. Undergraduate Research in the University of Arizona Astronomy Club

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Ian; Towner, A. P.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; Turner, J.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Pearson, K.

    2014-01-01

    Participation in research as an undergraduate is an invaluable learning experience that leads to successful post-undergrad studies. Because of this, the University of Arizona Astronomy Club strives to provide multiple opportunities for its members to get involved in research as early as possible. Areas of research covered by our projects include exoplanet research, stellar cycles, and radio observations. These projects cover exoplanet parameterization, the utilization of Kepler data, and various star-formation studies, respectively. Participation in our projects builds stronger data-collecting and reduction skills, while also leading to tangible achievements such poster presentations at AAS, ASP, and DPS, and published papers in astronomical journals.

  12. Summary of interference measurements at selected radio observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, Jill C.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from a series of RF interference (RFI) observations conducted during 1989 and 1990 at selected radio astronomy observatories in order to choose a site for the SETI, where the local and orbital RFI would be as benign as possible for observations of weak electromagnetic signals. These observatories included the DSS13 at Goldstone (California), the Arecibo Observatory (Puerto Rico), the Algonquin Radio Observatory in Ottawa (Canada), the Ohio State University Radio Observatory in Columbus (Ohio), and the NRAO in Green Bank (West Virginia). The observations characterize the RFI environment at these sites from 1 to 10 GHz, using radio astronomy antennas, feeds, and receivers; SETI signal processors; and stand-alone equipment built specifically for this purpose. The results served as part of the basis for the selection (by the NASA SETI Microwave Observing Project) of NRAO as the site of choice for SETI observations.

  13. PARTNeR: A Tool for Outreach and Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Juan Ángel Vaquerizo; Fuertes, Carmen Blasco

    PARTNeR is an acronym for Proyecto Académico con el Radio Telescopio de NASA en Robledo (Academic Project with the NASA Radio Telescope at Robledo). It is intended for general Astronomy outreach and, in particular, radioastronomy, throughout Spanish educational centres. To satisfy this target, a new educational material has been developed in 2007 to help not only teachers but also students. This material supports cross curricular programs and provides with the possibility of including Astronomy in related subjects like Physics, Chemistry, Technology, Mathematics or even English language. In this paper, the material that has been developed will be shown in detail and how it can be adapted to the disciplines from 4th year ESO (Enseñanza Secundaria Obligatoria-Compulsory Secondary Education) to High School. The pedagogic results obtained for the first year it has been implemented with students in classrooms will also be presented.

  14. Resources for College Libraries: Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, J. E.

    2007-10-01

    Most of us have built library collections of books to serve researchers -- graduate students and post-doctoral researchers in astronomy and astrophysics, and the Core List of Astronomy Books project, coordinated by Liz Bryson, exemplifies our collaborative efforts to identify the best books available at the research level. As the editor of the astronomy section of the Resources for College Libraries: A Core List for the Undergraduate Curriculum project, I have tried to ascertain what books college-age students of astronomy are actually reading (or should be reading!). To aid in this endeavor, I have obtained astronomy course reserve lists from colleagues at several U.S. colleges and universities, and regularly obtain lists of the astronomy books currently charged out to undergraduates at Princeton. I shall describe the RCL project, some of the book usage data I collected, and finally, give a brief update on the status of the Astrophysics Library at Princeton.

  15. Big Computing in Astronomy: Perspectives and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratius, Victor

    2014-06-01

    Hardware progress in recent years has led to astronomical instruments gathering large volumes of data. In radio astronomy for instance, the current generation of antenna arrays produces data at Tbits per second, and forthcoming instruments will expand these rates much further. As instruments are increasingly becoming software-based, astronomers will get more exposed to computer science. This talk therefore outlines key challenges that arise at the intersection of computer science and astronomy and presents perspectives on how both communities can collaborate to overcome these challenges.Major problems are emerging due to increases in data rates that are much larger than in storage and transmission capacity, as well as humans being cognitively overwhelmed when attempting to opportunistically scan through Big Data. As a consequence, the generation of scientific insight will become more dependent on automation and algorithmic instrument control. Intelligent data reduction will have to be considered across the entire acquisition pipeline. In this context, the presentation will outline the enabling role of machine learning and parallel computing.BioVictor Pankratius is a computer scientist who joined MIT Haystack Observatory following his passion for astronomy. He is currently leading efforts to advance astronomy through cutting-edge computer science and parallel computing. Victor is also involved in projects such as ALMA Phasing to enhance the ALMA Observatory with Very-Long Baseline Interferometry capabilities, the Event Horizon Telescope, as well as in the Radio Array of Portable Interferometric Detectors (RAPID) to create an analysis environment using parallel computing in the cloud. He has an extensive track record of research in parallel multicore systems and software engineering, with contributions to auto-tuning, debugging, and empirical experiments studying programmers. Victor has worked with major industry partners such as Intel, Sun Labs, and Oracle. He holds a distinguished doctorate and a Habilitation degree in Computer Science from the University of Karlsruhe. Contact him at pankrat@mit.edu, victorpankratius.com, or Twitter @vpankratius.

  16. The FOSTER Project: Teacher Enrichment Through Participation in NASA's Airborne Astronomy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Hull, G.; Gillespie, C., Jr.; DeVore, E.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's airborne astronomy program offers a unique opportunity for K-12 science teacher enrichment and for NASA to reach out and serve the educational community. Learning from a combination of summer workshops, curriculum supplement materials, training in Internet skills and ultimately flying on NASA's C-141 airborne observatory, the teachers are able to share the excitement of scientific discovery with their students and convey that excitement from first hand experience rather than just from reading about science in a textbook. This year the program has expanded to include teachers from the eleven western states served by NASA Ames Research Center's Educational Programs Office as well as teachers from communities from around the country where the scientist who fly on the observatory reside. Through teacher workshops and inservice presentations, the FOSTER (Flight Opportunities for Science Teacher EnRichment) teachers are sharing the resources and experiences with many hundreds of other teachers. Ultimately, the students are learning first hand about the excitement of science, the scientific method in practice, the team work involved, the relevance of science to their daily lives and the importance of a firm foundation in math and science in today's technologically oriented world.

  17. ASTRONOMY 1

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    dramsden

    2012-03-26

    Basic astronomy, focus on our solar system. You will start by taking a journey through our solar system by studying the planets. Click any link to blast off! planets for kids nine planets for kids astronomy nasa ...

  18. Planetary Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1998-01-01

    This 1-year project was an augmentation grant to my NASA Planetary Astronomy grant. With the awarded funding, we accomplished the following tasks: (1) Conducted two NVK imaging runs in conjunction with the ILAW (International Lunar Atmosphere Week) Observing Campaigns in 1995 and 1997. In the first run, we obtained repeated imaging sequences of lunar Na D-line emission to better quantify the temporal variations detected in earlier runs. In the second run we obtained extremely high resolution (R=960.000) Na line profiles using the 4m AAT in Australia. These data are being analyzed under our new 3-year Planetary Astronomy grant. (2) Reduced, analyzed, and published our March 1995 spectroscopic dataset to detect (or set stringent upper limits on) Rb. Cs, Mg. Al. Fe, Ba, Ba. OH, and several other species. These results were reported in a talk at the LPSC and in two papers: (1) A Spectroscopic Survey of Metallic Abundances in the Lunar Atmosphere. and (2) A Search for Magnesium in the Lunar Atmosphere. Both reprints are attached. Wrote up an extensive, invited Reviews of Geophysics review article on advances in the study of the lunar atmosphere. This 70-page article, which is expected to appear in print in 1999, is also attached.

  19. Department of Astronomy Course code Course title Instructor Course Description

    E-print Network

    Sano, Masaki

    the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillieter Array (ALMA) and instruments of cosmic microwave background (CMB. 1. Basics of Radio Astronomy 2. Radiative Transfer 3. Radio Antenna 4. Instruments I. Heterodyne

  20. Radio frequency interference protection of communications between the Deep Space Network and deep space flight projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing density of electrical and electronic circuits in Deep Space Station systems for computation, control, and numerous related functions has combined with the extension of system performance requirements calling for higher speed circuitry along with broader bandwidths. This has progressively increased the number of potential sources of radio frequency interference inside the stations. Also, the extension of spectrum usage both in power and frequency as well as the greater density of usage at all frequencies for national and international satellite communications, space research, Earth resource operations and defense, and particularly the huge expansion of airborne electronic warfare and electronic countermeasures operations in the Mojave area have greatly increased the potential number and severity of radio frequency interference incidents. The various facets of this problem and the efforts to eliminate or minimize the impact of interference on Deep Space Network support of deep space flight projects are described.

  1. Seattle Area High School Astronomy Projects: 4 local teachers present their work with students.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Eric C.

    2006-12-01

    4 Seattle area high school teachers will present work with students as part of the opening session of High School Teacher Day. Vince San Pietro of Shorecrest HS will discuss a project involving teachers and students in characterizing RR Lyrae candidate stars using the University of Washington’s Manastash Ridge Observatory. Rebecca Fowler of Skyline HS will present her work with student teams in the Team America rocketry contest. Phil Cooper, also of Skyline, will talk about a telescope making project. And Eric Muhs of Roosevelt HS, will show a student-built, free-floating, self-orienting robot that flew aboard NASA’s zero gravity airplane last May.

  2. Crowdfunding Astronomy Outreach Projects: Lessons learned from the UNAWE crowdfunding campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, A. J., Heenatigala, T.; Russo, P.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, crowdfunding has become a popular method of funding new technology or entertainment products, or artistic projects. The idea is that people or projects ask for many small donations from individuals who support the proposed work, rather than a large amount from a single source. Crowdfunding is usually done via an online portal or platform which handles the financial transactions involved. The Universe Awareness (UNAWE) programme decided to undertake a Kickstarter1 crowdfunding campaign centring on the resource Universe in a Box. In this article we present the lessons learned and best practices from that campaign.

  3. Crowdfunding Astronomy Outreach Projects: Lessons Learned from the UNAWE Crowdfunding Campaign

    E-print Network

    Ashton, Abi J; Heenatigala, Thilina

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, crowdfunding has become a popular method of funding new technology or entertainment products, or artistic projects. The idea is that people or projects ask for many small donations from individuals who support the proposed work, rather than a large amount from a single source. Crowdfunding is usually done via an online portal or platform which handles the financial transactions involved. The Universe Awareness (UNAWE) programme decided to undertake a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign centring on the resource Universe in a Box2. In this article we present the lessons learned and best practices from that campaign.

  4. A new Main Injector radio frequency system for 2.3 MW Project X operations

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, J.; Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    For Project X Fermilab Main Injector will be required to provide up to 2.3 MW to a neutrino production target at energies between 60 and 120 GeV. To accomplish the above power levels 3 times the current beam intensity will need to be accelerated. In addition the injection energy of Main Injector will need to be as low as 6 GeV. The current 30 year old Main Injector radio frequency system will not be able to provide the required power and a new system will be required. The specifications of the new system will be described.

  5. Seeing the Deep Sky: Telescopic Astronomy Projects Beyond the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Fred

    1992-03-01

    Packed with a vast array of telescopic projects involving different kind of stars, star clusters, nebulae and galaxies which lie beyond our solar system. Takes a look at stars of diverse chemical or atomic ``brew'', old and new, tiny or vast, dense or tenuous; the ways in which they behave and much more.

  6. Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    telescopes, interferometry + science: stars, planets, interstellar medium, active galactic nuclei, cosmic microwave background #12; Last lecture: student choice April 30th = last day of class: Prof. Baker?) #5: millimeter interferometry of an external galaxy #6: class visit to Green Bank, West Virginia

  7. System definition phase and acquisition phase project plan for Small Astronomy Satellite SAS-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The objective of the SAS-D project is to conduct spectral distribution studies of celestial ultraviolet sources using an Explorer-class spacecraft launched by a Delta vehicle into a geosynchronous orbit in the last half of 1975. The telescope system is intended for use by guest astronomers for a major portion of the total observing time. The concept of the overall system, designed to resemble functionally the operation of a ground-based observatory, should maximize the usefulness of the instrument to the astronomical community by limiting the amount of special instruction needed to use the spaceborne telescope. The SAS-D mission will obtain information on what stars, nebulae, and galaxies are and how they develop.

  8. Astronomy Development in Nigeria: Challenges and Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okwe Chibueze, James

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria evidently has huge potentials to develop a strong astronomy community. Much of the strength lies in the great number of intelligent students with the potential of becoming good astronomers. Sadly, astronomy development in Nigeria has stagnated in the past decades owing to poor funding and/or indifferent attitude of the funding bodies, research-unfriendly environment, and non-existence of facilities. Currently, efforts toward fuelling advancement in astronomy are focused on building 'critical mass', establishing collaborations with universities/astronomy institutes outside Nigeria, converting out-of-use communication antennas into radio telescopes, and acquiring out-of-use telescopes for educational and low-level research purposes.

  9. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  10. Astronomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Darrel; Wentzel, Donat G.

    1973-01-01

    Describes exhibits, invited talks, discussions, and references of a Conference on Demonstrations for Classroom Use in Astronomy,'' and informs of the establishment of a Task Group on Education in Astronomy designed for the purpose of providing a focus for both college and high school teachers. (CC)

  11. A Radio Sky Surveys Project with the Allen Telescope Array: Supplemental Information Geoffrey C. Bower (UC Berkeley) for the RSSP collaboration

    E-print Network

    Bower, Geoffrey

    A Radio Sky Surveys Project with the Allen Telescope Array: Supplemental Information Geoffrey C. The RSSP is a 5-year survey project that requires an expanded ATA. Key science motivations for expansion to 256 antennas are: 1) large field of view transient surveys for radio supernovae and orphan gamma

  12. Some radio meteor news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rault, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Radio meteor observing for astronomy purposes is still alive, despite the fact that traditional TV transmitters used for decades tend to disappear. Radio observers are now starting to develop their own dedicated transmitters, and are using new kinds of transmitters, such as military and radio-navigation systems to continue their studies. Encouraging results are also obtained in the aeronomy/geophysics domain when searching for evidence of modifications of the Earth/ionosphere waveguide by discrete ionized meteor trails.

  13. Radio-T.V. Repair; Glossary of Key Words. Vocational Reading Power Project, Title III, E.S.E.A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boadway, Edwin

    The glossary is one of twenty in various subject areas of vocational education designed to assist the student in vocabulary mastery for particular vocational education courses. They are part of the Vocational Reading Power Project, Title III, E.S.E.A. This glossary is for a course in radio-television repair. It is divided into two parts: one…

  14. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Mechanical Shock Sensors for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) Project

    SciTech Connect

    P. E. Klingsporn

    2005-11-14

    This document lists the requirements for the fiber optic mechanical shock sensor for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) project and provides detailed process steps for fabricating, testing, and assembling the fiber shock sensors for delivery to Los Alamos.

  15. Visualising Astronomy: "Other Worlds"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, R.

    2009-02-01

    The infrastructures that are built and used for astronomical research are financed by - and therefore must be justified to - our society. Astronomy has an innate appeal for people of all ages, partly because it concerns the fascinating, great questions "of life, the Universe and everything" and partly because much of the data obtained with telescopes can be presented as objects of stunning beauty. These are key facts when considering communicating astronomy with the public. This native advantage that astronomy has over many other sciences does not, however, relieve us of the obligation to explain what we are doing to the public at large. There are many reasons for doing this. They range from attracting bright young people into the subject to fuel future research endeavours to convincing decision-takers to allocate large sums of money to finance increasingly expensive and ambitious projects.

  16. BIMA Optical Pointing Project. I. The STV Video Camera

    E-print Network

    BIMA Optical Pointing Project. I. The STV Video Camera Jonathan Swift UC Berkeley Radio Astronomy system at BIMA. The specifications of the STV video camera mounted on the optical pointing telescopes of the Hat Creek interferometer are shown. The sensitivity of the system has been empirically determined (m

  17. The Astronomy Encyclopedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Patrick

    2002-11-01

    With more than 3,000 alphabetically arranged entries and 500 stunning color and black-and-white photographs, star maps, and diagrams, The Astronomy Encyclopedia covers everything that the general enthusiast--and the more serious researcher--would want to know about planets, stars, galaxies, and our universe. Here is concise, reliable information on the whole field of astronomy, ranging from adaptive optics and cold dark matter, to Islamic astronomy and the lens defect known as vignetting. It includes a host of major articles on the cornerstones of astronomical investigation, such as the Milky Way, the sun and the planets, optical and radio telescopes, stars, black holes, astrophysics, observatories, astronomical photography, space programs, the constellations, and famous astronomers. And there are concise entries on planetary features and satellites, asteroids, observational techniques, comets, satellite launchers, meteors, and subjects as diverse as life in the Universe and the structure of meteorites. Scores of tables list the brightest stars in the major constellations, annual meteor showers, major variable stars, dwarf stars, energy production processes in the Sun, and other relevant data. More than 100 astronomers from leading universities and observatories around the world, each an expert in their own particular field, wrote and reviewed the entries to ensure their authority. Readers can thus be assured that the Encyclopedia provides the most up-to-date and reliable information available. Under the general editorship of Patrick Moore, one of the world's best-known and most trusted voices on astronomy, The Astronomy Encyclopedia is an authoritative and strikingly attractive roadmap for exploring the last great frontier of the world in which we live.

  18. Astronomy: Project Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, P. Sean

    This book presents classroom activities and reading materials. The activities use a hands-on approach and address the standards. Each features both a student section and a teacher guide. Eleven activities include: (1) "It's Only a Paper Moon"; (2) "Time Traveler"; (3) "Solar System Scale"; (4) "Hello Out There!"; (5) "How Far to the Star?"; (6)…

  19. Astronomy Links

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Herzler, Roger

    The mission of the Astronomy Links Web site is to provide an index of thebest astronomy and space related Web sites found around the world on theInternet. As a service of the AstroPages.com and run by Roger Herzler, the page gives those interested a wealth of resources related to astronomy including a site search engine as well as organized andinformative browsing features. The main page contains over twenty categoriesincluding astrophysics, observatories, satellites, the solar system, telescopes,and history. Each of these contain subcategories and individual linksthat contain a description, the date it was added, the number of times thesite has been clicked, and even a rating. Other features of the welldesigned site include astronomy news, popular and new site categories, andmuch more. [JAB

  20. Astronomy Camp = IYA x 22: 22 Years of International Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; McCarthy, D. W.; Camp Staff, Astronomy

    2010-01-01

    Do you remember childhood dreams of being an astronomer, or the ravenous desire for ever larger glass and better equipment as an amateur astronomer? What if your child or the person down the street could live that dream for a weekend or a week? The University of Arizona Astronomy Camp continues to substantiate those dreams after more than two decades in existence. Astronomy Camp is an immersion hands-on field experience in astronomy, ranging from two to eight nights, occurring a few times per year. Participants span an age range from elementary students to octogenarians. The three basic offerings include adult camps, a beginning Camp for teenagers, and an advanced teen Camp. Several variants of the basic Camp model have evolved, including an ongoing decade long series of specialized Camps for Girl Scout leaders from across the country, funded by the NIRCam instrument development program for the James Webb Space Telescope. The advanced teen Camp is a microcosm of the entire research arc: the participants propose projects, spend the week collecting and analyzing data using research grade CCDs, infrared arrays, and radio/sub-millimeter telescopes, and finish with a presentation of the results. This past summer the Camps moved to Kitt Peak National Observatory for the first time, providing access to a vast and diverse collection of research instruments, including the 0.9-meter WIYN and 2.3-meter Bok telescopes, the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope, and the 12-meter ARO radio telescope. Education research into the Camp's impact indicates that reasons for its appeal to youth include a learner-centered and personal approach with a fun attitude toward learning, authentic scientific inquiry led by mentors who are real scientists, a peer group with common interests in science and engineering, and the emotional appeal of spending time on a dark "sky island" devoted to the exploration of nature.

  1. Islamic AstronomyIslamic Astronomy Topics covered

    E-print Network

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    Islamic AstronomyIslamic Astronomy #12;Topics covered ·· Islamic calendarIslamic calendar ·· types importance in the structure ofof kaabakaaba ·· problems in Islamic astronomyproblems in Islamic astronomy ·· solutions to problems by astronomerssolutions to problems by astronomers ·· Observatories in Islamic

  2. Astronomy in Australia - A Brief Historical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffleit, Dorrit

    2000-08-01

    An astronomical event, the transit of Venus at Tahiti in 1769, led to the discovery of Eastern Australia by Captain James Cook and its colonization by the English in 1788. Beginning that very year, an observatory was erected, and ever since, Australia has played significant roles throughout the history of astronomy. Now the modern optical observatories at Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring have become important and friendly centers of international cooperation in research. In modern radio astronomy, Australia has been an outstanding pioneer.

  3. Minoan Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Mary; Henriksson, Göran

    Of the three great cultures of the ancient eastern Mediterranean — the Babylonian, Egyptian, and Minoan — we have considerable knowledge of the astronomy of the first two through their documents (see relevant sections of this Handbook). Very little written material, however, has survived from Minoan Crete, but the evidence of other impressive archaeological discoveries implies that the inhabitants were on a par with their neighbors and had made similar advances in astronomy. In lieu of written sources, we have used the methods of archaeoastronomy to recover as much as possible about Minoan astronomy. In short, these are measuring the orientations of walls and their opposite horizons at a representative selection of monuments, analyzing the measurements statistically, and comparing the results with digital reconstruction of the positions of significant celestial bodies for the time when the walls were built.

  4. Astronomy in Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, Patricia

    Since the installation of the Observatorio Cagigal in Caracas, astronomy in Venezuela has developed steadily, and, in the last few decades, has been strong. Both theoretical and observational astronomy now flourish in Venezuela. A research group, Grupo de Astrofísica (GA) at the Universidad de Los Andes (ULA) in Mérida, started with few members but now has increased its numbers and undergone many transformations, promoting the creation of the Grupo de Astrofísica Teórica (CAT), and with other collaborators initiated the creation of a graduate study program (that offers master's and doctor's degrees) in the Postgrado de Física Fundamental of ULA. With the financial support of domestic Science Foundations such as CONICIT, CDCHT, Fundacite, and individual and collective grants, many research projects have been started and many others are planned. Venezuelan astronomy has benefitted from the interest of researchers in other countries, who have helped to improve our scientific output and instrumentation. With the important collaboration of national and foreign institutions, astronomy is becoming one of the strongest disciplines of the next decade in Venezuela.

  5. Astronomy Video Contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, John

    2008-05-01

    One of Galileo's staunchest supporters during his lifetime was Johannes Kepler, Imperial Mathematician to the Holy Roman Emperor. Johannes Kepler will be in St. Louis to personally offer a tribute to Galileo. Set Galileo's astronomy discoveries to music and you get the newest song by the well known acappella group, THE CHROMATICS. The song, entitled "Shoulders of Giants” was written specifically for IYA-2009 and will be debuted at this conference. The song will also be used as a base to create a music video by synchronizing a person's own images to the song's lyrics and tempo. Thousands of people already do this for fun and post their videos on YOU TUBE and other sites. The ASTRONOMY VIDEO CONTEST will be launched as a vehicle to excite, enthuse and educate people about astronomy and science. It will be an annual event administered by the Johannes Kepler Project and will continue to foster the goals of IYA-2009 for years to come. The Astronomy Video poster will contain all the basic information about the contest including: categories, rules, prizes, web address for more info and how to download the new song, "Shoulders of Giants.”

  6. Astronomy Video Contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, John

    2008-05-01

    During Galileo's lifetime his staunchest supporter was Johannes Kepler, Imperial Mathematician to the Holy Roman Emperor. Johannes Kepler will be in St. Louis to personally offer a tribute to Galileo. Set Galileo's astronomy discoveries to music and you get the newest song by the well known acappella group, THE CHROMATICS. The song, entitled "Shoulders of Giants” was written specifically for IYA-2009 and will be debuted at this conference. The song will also be used as a base to create a music video by synchronizing a person's own images to the song's lyrics and tempo. Thousands of people already do this for fun and post their videos on YOU TUBE and other sites. The ASTRONOMY VIDEO CONTEST will be launched as a vehicle to excite, enthuse and educate people about astronomy and science. It will be an annual event administered by the Johannes Kepler Project and will continue to foster the goals of IYA-2009 for years to come. During this presentation the basic categories, rules, and prizes for the Astronomy Video Contest will be covered and finally the new song "Shoulders of Giants” by THE CHROMATICS will be unveiled

  7. Early Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Hugh

    The earliest investigations that we can relate to what is now science are observations of the sky: Astronomy. The earliest written records of every civilization we know of - from China, Egypt, the Tigris-Euphrates and Indus valleys, Central America, the Andes, and so forth - all contain at least some astronomical texts. There are in addition monuments and artifacts that show a clear interest in astronomy, such as Stonehenge and rock paintings, from cultures that left no written records. The interest in celestial phenomena contributed to the development of Babylonian arithmetic and Greek geometry.

  8. Reports of planetary astronomy - 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahe, Jurgen (editor)

    1993-01-01

    This publication provides information about currently funded scientific research projects conducted in the Planetary Astronomy Program during 1991, and consists of two main sections. The first section gives a summary of research objectives, past accomplishments, and projected future investigations, as submitted by each principal investigator. In the second section, recent scientifically significant accomplishments within the Program are highlighted.

  9. The Radio Communication Project in Nepal: A Culture-Centered Approach to Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutta, Mohan Jyoti; Basnyat, Iccha

    2008-01-01

    Considerable research has been conducted on the topic of entertainment-education (EE), the method of using entertainment platforms such as popular music, radio, and television programming to diffuse information, attitudes, and behaviors via role modeling. A significant portion of the recently published EE literature has used the case of the Radio

  10. THE ASTRONOMY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY

    E-print Network

    THE ASTRONOMY MAJOR DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY DARTMOUTH COLLEGE September(2013(( #12;The Department of Physics and Astronomy website: http: //www.dartmouth.edu/~physics Upcoming colloquia://dartmouth.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2013/orc If you are thinking of majoring in astronomy, and have any questions, please contact any

  11. THE ASTRONOMY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY

    E-print Network

    THE ASTRONOMY MAJOR DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY DARTMOUTH COLLEGE September 2013 #12;The Department of Physics and Astronomy website: http: //www.dartmouth.edu/~physics Upcoming, and Courses: http://dartmouth.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2013/orc If you are thinking of majoring in astronomy

  12. Introducing Astronomy Related Research into Non-Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Douglas

    The concern over the insufficient number of students choosing to enter the science and engineering fields has been discussed and documented for years. While historically addressed at the national level, many states are now recognizing that the lack of a highly-skilled technical workforce within their states' borders has a significant effect on their economic health. Astronomy, as a science field, is no exception. Articles appear periodically in the most popular astronomy magazines asking the question, "Where are the young astronomers?" Astronomy courses at the community college level are normally restricted to introductory astronomy I and II level classes that introduce the student to the basics of the night sky and astronomy. The vast majority of these courses is geared toward the non-science major and is considered by many students to be easy and watered down courses in comparison to typical physics and related science courses. A majority of students who enroll in these classes are not considering majors in science or astronomy since they believe that science is "boring and won't produce any type of career for them." Is there any way to attract students? This paper discusses an approach being undertaken at the Estrella Mountain Community College to introduce students in selected mathematics courses to aspects of astronomy related research to demonstrate that science is anything but boring. Basic statistical techniques and understanding of geometry are applied to a large virgin data set containing the magnitudes and phase characteristics of sets of variable stars. The students' work consisted of developing and presenting a project that explored analyzing selected aspects of the variable star data set. The description of the data set, the approach the students took for research projects, and results from a survey conducted at semester's end to determine if student's interest and appreciation of astronomy was affected are presented. Using the data set provided, the students were provided the opportunity for original research and discoveries.

  13. Astronomy Adventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Astronomy Adventures." Contents are organized into the following sections: (1)…

  14. Astronomy Quizzes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Arny, Thomas

    This website contains a collection of quizzes from a wide range of topics. Subjects covered include historical astronomy, astronomical units and scales, telescopes, planetary geology, the sun, stellar evolution, cosmology, and life in the universe. These quizzes have five to ten multiple choice questions each. Quizzes are graded automatically and the student is told which answers are correct and incorrect.

  15. Pulsar astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Lyne; F. Graham-Smith

    1990-01-01

    This book on pulsar astronomy is an ideal introductory account for those entering the field. It introduces the circumstances of the discovery and gives an overview of pulsar astrophysics. An important feature of this book is the inclusion of an up-to-date catalogue of all known pulsars.

  16. Service Learning in Introductory Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orleski, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Service learning is a method of instruction where the students in a course use the course's content in a service project. The service is included as a portion of the students' course grades. During the fall semester 2010, service learning was incorporated into the Introduction to Astronomy course at Misericordia University. The class had eight students and the service project centered on hosting astronomy observations for fifth- and sixth-grade students from two nearby elementary schools. The astronomy students operated telescopes, pointed out constellations, and spoke to the audience members about the objects they were observing. Since service learning requires a minimum number of hours the students must log over the course of fulfilling the service project, the students planned alternative activities in case the weather did not allow the observations to be held. A key part of service learning is for the students to reflect on the service experience and how it influenced their learning of the course material.

  17. Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope System Theory of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, George R.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this learning module is to enable learners to describe how the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) system functions in support of Apple Valley Science and Technology Center's (AVSTC) client schools' radio astronomy activities.

  18. Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-12-03

    This fact sheet describes the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) program. This educational program uses a 34-meter antenna for classroom radio astronomy observations via the Internet. It introduces students from elementary school through high school to the process of science with the goal of improving science literacy among American students.

  19. The Astronomy Spacelab Payloads Study: Executive volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The progress of the Astronomy Spacelab Payloads Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center is reported. Astronomical research in space, using the Spacelab in conjunction with the Space Shuttle, is described. The various fields of solar astronomy or solar physics, ultraviolet and optical astronomy, and high energy astrophysics are among the topics discussed. These fields include scientific studies of the sun and its dynamical processes, of the stars in wavelength regions not accessible to ground based observations, and the exciting new fields of X-ray, gamma ray, and particle astronomy.

  20. Radio and Optical Telescopes for School Students and Professional Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosmer, Laura; Langston, G.; Heatherly, S.; Towner, A. P.; Ford, J.; Simon, R. S.; White, S.; O'Neil, K. L.; Haipslip, J.; Reichart, D.

    2013-01-01

    The NRAO 20m telescope is now on-line as a part of UNC's Skynet worldwide telescope network. The NRAO is completing integration of radio astronomy tools with the Skynet web interface. We present the web interface and astronomy projects that allow students and astronomers from all over the country to become Radio Astronomers. The 20 meter radio telescope at NRAO in Green Bank, WV is dedicated to public education and also is part of an experiment in public funding for astronomy. The telescope has a fantastic new web-based interface, with priority queuing, accommodating priority for paying customers and enabling free use of otherwise unused time. This revival included many software and hardware improvements including automatic calibration and improved time integration resulting in improved data processing, and a new ultra high resolution spectrometer. This new spectrometer is optimized for very narrow spectral lines, which will allow astronomers to study complex molecules and very cold regions of space in remarkable detail. In accordance with focusing on broader impacts, many public outreach and high school education activities have been completed with many confirmed future activities. The 20 meter is now a fully automated, powerful tool capable of professional grade results available to anyone in the world. Drop by our poster and try out real-time telescope control!

  1. Experimental Astronomy (2004) 17: 261267 C Springer 2005 RFI MITIGATION AND THE SKA

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental Astronomy (2004) 17: 261­267 C Springer 2005 RFI MITIGATION AND THE SKA STEVEN W 18 August 2004; accepted 1 November 2004) Abstract. Radio frequency interference (RFI) has plagued in Radio Astronomy (RFI2004) was held in Penticton, BC, Canada in July 2004 in order to consider

  2. Astronomy in School Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Brian

    1979-01-01

    Presents a report about astronomy education in the United Kingdom. Some of the views about astronomy activities in schools and the importance of teaching astronomy and space science in British schools are included. (HM)

  3. Community Participation, Cultural Discourse, and Health Education Projects in Developing Areas: The Case of the Radio Communication Project in Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, J. Gary

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author comments on the article by Dutta and Basnyat (see EJ802883) that provides an insightful and comprehensive critique of a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) entertainment-education program, The Radio Communication Program (RCP) in Nepal, which has been reported to be highly participatory. Despite…

  4. Astronomy Lessons

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collection of astronomy lesson plans and experiments from across the internet was developed by Reach Out, a center linking University of Michigan and community mentors with children and teens. Topics covered include comets, the Sun, sunspots, the aurora, craters, galaxies, moons, star properties, Moon phases, and meteors. Each lesson plan gives credit to the developer, and contains all the information necessary for applying the lesson in a classroom setting.

  5. Astronomy Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collection of animations introduces students to planetary motions, gravitational effects, and the scale of astronomical distances. Students can view visualizations of Earth's changing seasons, circumpolar motion, and the celestial equator and ecliptic plane. Animations on gravity explain how satellites orbit, the motions of comets and meteor storms, and gravitational 'warping'. Other animations explain how Earth's tides are produced, how astronomical distances are calculated, the use of spectra in astronomy, and the lifecycles of stars.

  6. Astronomy Workshop

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Douglas P. Hamilton

    The Astronomy Workshop from the University of Maryland features interactives, animations, calculators, and other online computer-assisted learning tools enabling middle-school and older students to investigate the solar system and the universe. Units allow students to investigate astronomical distances and the size of objects in the universe; examine what might happen if objects collide; investigate orbital mechanics; visualize the distribution and motions of objects in the solar system; and many other topics.

  7. Astronomy sortie missions definition study. Volume 2, book 1: Astronomy sortie program technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The work performed to arrive at a baseline astronomy sortie mission concept is summarized. The material includes: (1) definition of the telescopes and arrays; (2) preliminary definition of mission and systems; (3) identification, definition, and evaluation of alternative sortie programs; (4) the recommended astronomy sortie program; and (5) the astronomy sortie program concept that was approved as a baseline for the remainder of the project.

  8. Humanising Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, S.

    2008-06-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an international programme that aims to expose underprivileged children (in the age group 4-10) to the inspirational aspects of astronomy. We are currently at the stage of developing materials that will be utilised in a diverse range of environments. This paper explores UNAWE's particular approach to developing tools which includes not only indigenous and folkloric astronomical knowledge, but also the culture of transmission of such knowledge. A specific understanding and explanation of the Universe, the Sun, Moon and stars is present in every culture and can be found contained in its history, legends and belief systems. By consciously embracing different ways of knowing the Universe and not uniquely the rational model, UNAWE places the humanising potential of astronomy at the centre of its purpose. Whilst inspiring curiosity, pride and a sense of ownership in one's own cultural identity, such an approach also exposes children to the diversity of other peoples and their cultures as well as the unifying aspects of our common scientific heritage. The means of creating and delivering the astronomy programme are as relevant to the desired educational outcomes as the content. The challenge in the design of materials is to communicate this stimulating message to the very young. Respect for alternative values systems, the need for dialogue and community participation, and where possible the production of materials using local resources is emphasised. This paper touches recent experiences liaising with communities in India, South Africa, Tunisia, Venezuela and Colombia.

  9. Cosmic Radio Series Brings Celestial Science Down to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    A new series of short radio programs designed to bring the space-age science of radio astronomy down to Earth is being launched by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and Allegheny Mountain Radio. The series, called Cosmic Radio, covers topics ranging from exciting recent scientific discoveries to how radio telescopes help explore the Universe, to the fascinating history of radio astronomy. "The discoveries and history of radio astronomy include many exciting stories, and Cosmic Radio will bring those stories to listeners across the country," said Sue Ann Heatherly, the NRAO Education Officer in Green Bank, West Virginia, and co-producer of the series. Gibbs Kinderman, of Allegheny Mountain Radio, the other co-producer, added, "The subject matter is fascinating, and we did a lot of work making the complex topics comprehensible even to a science dummy like me." Cosmic Radio includes 26 self-contained radio programs, each 2.5 minutes in length, explaining some aspect of radio astronomy. Produced with funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the programs are available to all radio stations at no cost. The programs have been provided on CD to more than 500 NPR-affiliated stations, and will be available through a Web site that will be updated with a new program each week.

  10. Final report for the Chautauqua Radio Workshop Project. July 1, 1980-October 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Renz, B.

    1982-01-25

    Energy conservation education must reach millions of Americans in order to see any real and immediate decrease in energy consumption. Since our society gets much of its information from the media, this seems like a most effective vehicle for disseminating energy conservation information to the American Public. Radio is listened to by the vast majority of Americans each day of their lives. Radio as a communications medium is an extremely cost effective method of mass communication and education, and is perceived as a personal medium which has great potential to affect a change in the daily energy consumption habits of the public. Call-in radio programs centering around energy conservation are an effective method of presenting informative, energy education programming that provide instantaneous access for listener/consumer participation. The linking of available telephone and radio technology (via call-in radio shows) allows people all over the US, including remote rural areas, access to the latest energy conservation information and renewable energy technolgy.

  11. The AMiBA Project Patrick KOCH, Pablo ALTAMIRANO, Chia-Hao CHANG, Shu-Hao CHANG, Su-Wei

    E-print Network

    Koch, Patrick

    , Australia 1. Introduction The Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is a forefront radio interferometer for research in cosmology. The project is led by the Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy interferometer array of up to 19 elements, AMiBA is designed to have full polarization capabilities, sampling

  12. Handbook of space astronomy and astrophysics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin V. Zombeck

    1982-01-01

    Tables, graphs, maps, diagrams, and formulas summarizing data and illustrating relationships of interest to space astronomers and astrophysicists are complied in handbook form. General data such as physical and solar-system constants, cosmological parameters, unit conversions, numerical constants, mathematical formulas, and symbols are given in a preliminary section. Individual chapters are devoted to astronomy (A) and astrophysics, radio A, IR A,

  13. CASA: Common Astronomy Software Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert I.; CASA Team

    2010-01-01

    CASA is a suite of tools for radio data calibration and imaging with an iPython interface. It is freely available to the general community, and is being developed with the primary goal of supporting the data post-processing needs of the next generation of radio astronomical telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array and the Expanded Very Large Array. The 3.0 release (December 2009) is the first non-beta one, and has several new features which will be highlighted. The consortium of developers is led by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, and includes the European Southern Observatory, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, ASTRON, and the Australia Telescope National Facility.

  14. In Brief: Launch of astronomy year 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-01-01

    The International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009) will involve 135 nations and thousands of events around the world. In addition to opening ceremonies in Paris on 15-16 January and in many other countries during January and February, other planned events include the Cosmic Diary project about the daily lives of full-time astronomers; the 365 Days of Astronomy project to publish one podcast per day during the entire year; and the 100 Hours of Astronomy project on 2-5 April, which includes the goal of having as many people as possible look through a telescope. Also, the Dark Skies Awareness project will help to raise awareness of light pollution. The International Astronomical Union and the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization launched IYA2009 under the theme, ``The universe, yours to discover.'' For more information, visit http://www.astronomy2009.org.

  15. Radio observations of the Milky Way from the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chy?y, Krzysztof T.

    2014-12-01

    We present the project to introduce the first European network of radio telescopes for education. It enables pupils to detect spectral line emission of neutral hydrogen in the Milky Way at a wavelength of 21 cm. Any classroom connected to Internet via any web-browser can remotely control one of the radio-telescopes, observe and analyse obtained spectra: derive the Milky-Way rotation curve and recognise spiral arms in hydrogen distribution. Doing exercises pupils, guided by their teachers, learn the basics of radio astronomy research, use scientific method to explore and interpret the attained spectral data. A range of attractive educational materials are prepared to help in disseminating the scientific knowledge in the classroom and demonstrate the modern information technology.

  16. Local area networking in a radio quiet environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edwin L. Childers; Gareth Hunt; Joseph J. Brandt

    2002-01-01

    The Green Bank facility of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory is spread out over 2,700 acres in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia. Good communication has always been needed between the radio telescopes and the control buildings. The National Radio Quiet Zone helps protect the Green Bank site from radio transmissions that interfere with the astronomical signals. Due to stringent

  17. Using a Satellite Swarm for building a Space-based Radio Telescope for Low Frequencies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Bentum; A. J. Boonstra; C. J. M. Verhoeven; A. J. van der Veen; E. K. A. Gill; N. Saks; H. Falcke; M. Klein-Wolt; R. T. Rajan; S. J. Wijnholds; M. Arts; K. van't Klooster; F. Beliün; A. Meijerink; B. Monna; J. Rotteveel; M. A. Boer; E. Bongers; E. Boom; E. van Tuijl; A. van Staveren

    2010-01-01

    In radio astronomy, as in astronomy in general, a wide range of frequencies is observed as each spectral band offers a unique window to study astrophysical phenomena. In the recent years, new observatories have been designed and built at the extreme limits of the radio spectrum. For the low frequencies several Earth-based radio telescopes are constructed at this moment. In

  18. RadioSource.NET: Case-Study of a Collaborative Land-Grant Internet Audio Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohar, Kathleen; Wood, Ashley M.; Ramirez, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    Provides a case study of RadioSource.NET, an Internet broadcasting venture developed collaboratively by land-grant university communication departments to share resources, increase online distribution, and promote access to agricultural and natural and life science research. Describes planning, marketing, and implementation processes. (Contains 18…

  19. Health education through interactive radio: a child-to-child project in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Fryer, M L

    1991-01-01

    In developing countries it is common for older children to assume much of the responsibility for care of their younger siblings. Based on this observation, the "child-to-child" approach to health education targets these older children as a means of improving child health. As the initial phase in the development of a radio health curriculum in Bolivia, a module on diarrheal disease was developed and field-tested among fourth- and fifth-grade students in Cochabamba. The module consists of 10 interactive radio lessons in which the students respond orally to drill and practice, sing songs, or write key concepts in their notebooks. Following the 25-minute radio broadcast, the teacher conducts a 20-minute session that focuses on application and practice of the new behaviors. The module includes lessons on personal hygiene, water and oral rehydration, home sanitation, and nutrition. The field evaluation revealed the need for modifications in the teachers' role and greater attention to teacher training. Students responded enthusiastically and achieved significant knowledge gains as a result of the program. Plans are underway to expand the radio health program. PMID:2037503

  20. Radio frequency interference protection of communications between the Deep Space Network and deep space flight projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. H. Johnston

    1981-01-01

    The increasing density of electrical and electronic circuits in Deep Space Station systems for computation, control, and numerous related functions has combined with the extension of system performance requirements calling for higher speed circuitry along with broader bandwidths. This has progressively increased the number of potential sources of radio frequency interference inside the stations. Also, the extension of spectrum usage

  1. Big data challenges for large radio arrays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dayton L. Jones; Kiri Wagstaff; David R. Thompson; Larry D'Addario; Robert Navarro; Chris Mattmann; Walid Majid; Joseph Lazio; Robert Preston; Umaa Rebbapragada

    2012-01-01

    Future large radio astronomy arrays, particularly the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to generate data at rates far higher than can be analyzed or stored affordably with current practices. This is, by definition, a \\

  2. CyberSKA Radio Imaging Metadata and VO Compliance Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Rosolowsky, E.; Dowler, P.

    2013-10-01

    The CyberSKA project has written a specification for the metadata encapsulation of radio astronomy data products pursuant to insertion into the VO-compliant Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM) database hosted by the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC). This specification accommodates radio FITS Image and UV Visibility data, as well as pure CASA Tables Imaging and Visibility Measurement Sets. To extract and engineer radio metadata, we have authored two software packages: metaData (v0.5.0) and mddb (v1.3). Together, these Python packages can convert all the above stated data format types into concise FITS-like header files, engineer the metadata to conform to the CAOM data model, and then insert these engineered data into the CADC database, which subsequently becomes published through the Canadian Virtual Observatory. The metaData and mddb packages have, for the first time, published ALMA imaging data on VO services. Our ongoing work aims to integrate visibility data from ALMA and the SKA into VO services and to enable user-submitted radio data to move seamlessly into the Virtual Observatory.

  3. Development and Use of Astronomy-Like Devices for UFO Monitoring: A Research Project for the Study of UFO Physics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Teodorani

    1994-01-01

    A research project aimed at studying unidentified atmospheric `nocturnal lights' in world areas of recurrence is presented. In such a context targets are considered and treated on a par with celestial and\\/or atmospheric objects having no fixed coordinates. Such a project involves the use of a battery of 20 mini-telescopes which can be interchangeable with wide-field lenses. Both types of

  4. The Ohio State Univ. , Department of Astronomy. [Annual astronomy report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report covers the period from September 1, 1990 through August 31, 1991. The status of the astronomy department personnel, Columbus Project (world's largest optical/infrared telescope on a single mount), and instrumentation is discussed. Research progress is reported in stellar astronomy (single stars, binary stars, novae, and stars of the galactic bulge), nebulae and interstellar matter (helium abundances, emission nebulae, and reflection nebulae), extragalactic astronomy (stars in resolved galaxies, stellar content of nuclear bulges, interacting and starburst galaxies, active galaxies, and quasi-stellar objects), cosmology/theoretical astrophysics (big bang nucleosynthesis, nucleosynthesis in the early galaxy, experimental nuclear astrophysics, and large-scale structure), and atomic physics. A list of published papers is provided.

  5. Infrared Space Astronomy in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Gernot

    After an introduction to the principle goals of the German Space Science program, the description of the community competence and the elements of the program participation both in ESA and in international cooperation, an overview will be given on the German role in infrared to mm astronomy airborne and space observatories. In particular, the German instrument contributions to the large projects ISO, SOFIA, Herschel and Planck will be briefly described. The areas and institutions of special experience will be outlined, demonstrating the strong German role in this field of astronomy.

  6. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-print Network

    F. Halzen

    2004-02-03

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of $10^{20}$ and $10^{13}$ eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by super-EeV neutrinos.

  7. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-print Network

    F. Halzen

    2005-01-26

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by neutrinos with energies similar to those of the highest energy cosmic rays.

  8. Radio loud far-infrared galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, Arjun; Vanbreugel, Wil; Shields, Joseph C.

    1990-01-01

    The first results are presented of a multiwavelength study of Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) galaxies with excess radio emission. The sample was selected by cross correlating the IRAS Faint Source Survey, and the Point Source Catalogue with the Texas radio survey. Recent optical (imaging and spectroscopic) and radio (VLA) observations are discussed. These observations will be used to investigate possible connections between radio galaxy activity, star formation and galaxy interactions.

  9. Encyclopedia of the History of Astronomy and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leverington, David

    2013-06-01

    Preface; Part I. General Astronomy: 1. Ancient (pre-telescopy) astronomy; 2. Period overviews; 3. International Astronomical Union; Part II. The Solar System: 4. Overview - the Solar System; 5. Sun, Earth, and Moon; 6. Inner Solar System; 7. Giant planets; 8. Smaller objects; 9. Exoplanets; Part III. Stars: 10. Stars considered individually; 11. Stars considered as a group; 12. Types of stars; Part IV. Galaxies and Cosmology: 13. Milky Way; 14. Other galaxies and cosmology; Part V. General Astronomical Tools and Techniques (After 1600); Part VI. Optical Telescopes and Observatories: 15. Overview - optical telescopes and observatories; 16. Optical observatories; Part VII. Radio Telescopes, Observatories and Radar: 17. Overview - radio telescopes and observatories; 18. Early radio astronomy and observatories; 19. Later radio observatories; Part VIII. Other Ground-Based Observatories; Part IX. Solar System Exploration Spacecraft: 20. Overview - Solar System exploration spacecraft; 21. Individual Solar System spacecraft; Part X. Selected Observatory Spacecraft: 22. Overview - spacecraft observatories; 23. Individual spacecraft observatories; Name index; Subject index.

  10. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.

    2010-08-01

    Bring telescopes to where the people are! Music and Astronomy Under the Stars is a three-year NASA-funded astronomy outreach program at community parks during and after music concerts and outdoor family events—such as a Halloween Stars-Spooky Garden Walk. While there have been many astronomy outreach activities and telescope observations at city sidewalks and parks, this program targets a completely different audience: music lovers who are attending summer concerts held in community parks. These music lovers who may never have visited a science museum, planetarium, or star party are exposed to telescope observations and astronomy information with no additional travel costs. Music and Astronomy Under the Stars increased awareness, engagement, and interest in astronomy at classical, pop, rock, and ethnic music concerts. This program includes solar observing before the concerts, telescope observations including a live image projection system, an astronomical video presentation, and astronomy banners/posters. Approximately 500-16,000 people attended each event and 25% to 50% of the people at each event participated in the astronomy program. This program also reached underrepresented and underserved groups (women, minorities, older adults). The target audience (Nassau and Suffolk Counties, New York) is 2,900,000 people, which is larger than combined population of Atlanta, Boston, Denver, Minneapolis, and San Francisco. Although eleven events were planned in 2009, two were canceled due to rain and our largest event, the NY Philharmonic in the Park (attended by 67,000 people in 2008), was cancelled for financial reasons. Our largest event in 2009 was the Tanglewood Music Festival, Lenox MA, attended by 16,000 people where over 5000 people participated in astronomy activities. The Amateur Observers' Society of New York assisted with the NY concerts and the Springfield STARS astronomy club assisted at Tanglewood. In 2009 over 15,000 people participated in astronomy activities at these events which were attended by approximately 50,000 people.

  11. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy in the International Year of Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Norris, Ray

    1 Australian Aboriginal Astronomy in the International Year of Astronomy Ray P. Norris CSIRO Astronomy & Space Science, NSW, Australia Warawara Dept. The International year of Astronomy seemed an excellent opportunity to tell the wider

  12. 1RadioNet First Software Forum, Jodrell Bank 01Mar05 Algorthmic Issues from the

    E-print Network

    Myers, Steven T.

    for Astronomical Research ­ PHAROS: Phased Arrays for Reflector Observing Systems #12;3RadioNet First Software1RadioNet First Software Forum, Jodrell Bank ­ 01Mar05 Algorthmic Issues from the First RadioNet Software Forum ­ a synthesis Steven T. Myers National Radio Astronomy Observatory Socorro, NM #12;2Radio

  13. A Small Radio Telescope for Instructional Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, S. R.; Wurster, J. E.; Nellermoe, B. L.

    1996-12-01

    Radio astronomers nowadays have a number of excellent instruments to choose from for their research projects, such as the VLA, VLBA, Arecibo,etc. However, these instruments do not readily furnish the opportunity for student instruction in the technical aspects of radio astronomy that was available twenty five years ago or more. Such experience can in part be provided by small dedicated telescopes at universities. Such a radiotelescope has been installed at the University of Iowa. A commercial 4.5 meter satellite TV antenna has been modified to work as a radiotelescope. The radio telescope operates as a transit instrument, with computer control of elevation pointing. Working receivers exist at 5.0 and 1.4 GHz. Components exist for construction of receivers at 610 MHz and 15.0 GHz. Observations to date have been made of the Sun, Moon, Crab Nebula, and galactic HI. We have recently installed a mechanical switch in the 5 GHz front end, built switching electronics, and written a Labview virtual instrument to provide a Dicke radiometer. In the immediate future we plan to use this instrument to repeat the determination of the 5.0 GHz radio phase function of the Moon. Our presentation will include information on commercial sources of critical components for the system, such as low loss RF cables, low insertion loss mechanical switches, low noise amplifiers, etc.

  14. Teaching and Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay; Percy, John

    2005-12-01

    Preface; Part I. Astronomy in the Curriculum Around the World: Preface; 1. Why astronomy is useful and should be included in the school curriculum John R. Percy; 2. Astronomy and mathematics education Rosa M. Ros; 3. Astronomy in the curriculum around the world; 4. Engaging gifted science students through astronomy Robert Hollow; 5. Poster highlights: astronomy in the curriculum around the world; Part II. Astronomy Education Research: Preface; 6. Astronomy education research down under John M. Broadfoot and Ian S. Ginns; 7. A contemporary review of K-16 astronomy education research Janelle M. Bailey and Timothy F. Slater; 8. Implementing astronomy education research Leonarda Fucili; 9. The Astronomy Education Review: report on a new journal Sidney C. Wolff and Andrew Fraknoi; 10. Poster highlights: astronomy education research; Part III. Educating Students: Preface; 11. Textbooks for K-12 astronomy Jay M. Pasachoff; 12. Distance/internet astronomy education David H. McKinnon; 13. Educating students with robotic telescopes - open discussion; 14. Poster highlights - educating students; Part IV. Educating teachers: Preface; 15. Pre-service astronomy education of teachers Mary Kay Hemenway; 16. In-service education of teachers Michèle Gerbaldi; 17. Poster highlights: educating teachers; Part V. Astronomy and Pseudoscience: Preface; 18. Astronomy, pseudoscience and rational thinking Jayant V. Narlikar; 19. Astronomical pseudosciences in North America John R. Percy and Jay M. Pasachoff; Part VI. Astronomy and Culture: Preface; 20. Teaching astronomy in other cultures: archeoastronomy Julieta Fierro; 21. Poster highlights: astronomy and culture; Part VII. Astronomy in Developing Countries: Preface; 22. Astronomy Curriculum for developing countries Case Rijsdijk; 23. Science education resources for the developing countries James C. White II; Part VIII. Public Outreach in Astronomy: Preface; 24. What makes informal education programs successful? Nahide Craig and Isabel Hawkins; 25. The role of science centers and planetariums Nick Lomb; 26. Science education for the new century - a European perspective Claus Madsen; 27. Communicating astronomy to the public Charles Blue; 28. Poster highlights: public outreach in astronomy; Part IX. The Education Programs of the IAU: Preface; 29. A short overview of astronomical education carried out by the IAU Syuzo Isobe; Part X. Discussion; Index.

  15. Teaching and Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay; Percy, John

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Part I. Astronomy in the Curriculum Around the World: Preface; 1. Why astronomy is useful and should be included in the school curriculum John R. Percy; 2. Astronomy and mathematics education Rosa M. Ros; 3. Astronomy in the curriculum around the world; 4. Engaging gifted science students through astronomy Robert Hollow; 5. Poster highlights: astronomy in the curriculum around the world; Part II. Astronomy Education Research: Preface; 6. Astronomy education research down under John M. Broadfoot and Ian S. Ginns; 7. A contemporary review of K-16 astronomy education research Janelle M. Bailey and Timothy F. Slater; 8. Implementing astronomy education research Leonarda Fucili; 9. The Astronomy Education Review: report on a new journal Sidney C. Wolff and Andrew Fraknoi; 10. Poster highlights: astronomy education research; Part III. Educating Students: Preface; 11. Textbooks for K-12 astronomy Jay M. Pasachoff; 12. Distance/internet astronomy education David H. McKinnon; 13. Educating students with robotic telescopes - open discussion; 14. Poster highlights - educating students; Part IV. Educating teachers: Preface; 15. Pre-service astronomy education of teachers Mary Kay Hemenway; 16. In-service education of teachers Michèle Gerbaldi; 17. Poster highlights: educating teachers; Part V. Astronomy and Pseudoscience: Preface; 18. Astronomy, pseudoscience and rational thinking Jayant V. Narlikar; 19. Astronomical pseudosciences in North America John R. Percy and Jay M. Pasachoff; Part VI. Astronomy and Culture: Preface; 20. Teaching astronomy in other cultures: archeoastronomy Julieta Fierro; 21. Poster highlights: astronomy and culture; Part VII. Astronomy in Developing Countries: Preface; 22. Astronomy Curriculum for developing countries Case Rijsdijk; 23. Science education resources for the developing countries James C. White II; Part VIII. Public Outreach in Astronomy: Preface; 24. What makes informal education programs successful? Nahide Craig and Isabel Hawkins; 25. The role of science centers and planetariums Nick Lomb; 26. Science education for the new century - a European perspective Claus Madsen; 27. Communicating astronomy to the public Charles Blue; 28. Poster highlights: public outreach in astronomy; Part IX. The Education Programs of the IAU: Preface; 29. A short overview of astronomical education carried out by the IAU Syuzo Isobe; Part X. Discussion; Index.

  16. PROPOSED PORTHOLE FOR ASTRONOMY MAJORS Information for Astronomy Majors

    E-print Network

    Richardson Jr., James E.

    PROPOSED PORTHOLE FOR ASTRONOMY MAJORS Information for Astronomy Majors The Astronomy Major sciences such as Astronomy, Physics, or Engineering. (Link to details on Astrophysics Concentration) The General Astronomy Concentration is intended for students who do not plan on research careers in astronomy

  17. Nontechnical Astronomy Books of 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercury, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 126 reviews. Categories include amateur astronomy, children's books, computers and astronomy, cosmic rays, cosmology, education in astronomy, galaxies, general astronomy, history of astronomy, life in the universe, physics and astronomy, pseudoscience, quasars and active galaxies, reference, solar system, space exploration, stars and…

  18. OLFAR - orbiting low frequency array; using a satellite swarm for building a space-based radio telescope for low frequencies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Bentum; A. J. Boonstra; C. J. M. Verhoeven; Veen van der A. J; E. K. A. Gill; N. Saks; H. Falcke; M. Klein-Wolt; R. T. Rajan; S. J. Wijnholds; M. Arts; Klooster van't K; F. Beliën; A. Meijerink; B. Monna; J. Rotteveel; M. A. Boer; E. Bongers; E. Boom; Tuijl van E; Staveren van A

    2010-01-01

    In radio astronomy, as in astronomy in general, a wide range of frequencies is observed as each spectral band offers a unique window to study astrophysical phenomena. In the recent years, new observatories have been designed and built at the extreme limits of the radio spectrum. For the low frequencies several Earth-based radio telescopes are constructed at this moment. In

  19. Evolving Best Practices in Online Astronomy Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryhill, K. J.; Brandt, K.; Slater, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    As online education continues to mature, we have gained an understanding of some best (and worst) practices in teaching introductory astronomy to non-science majors at a distance. There are strategies that can improve the delivery of instruction, attrition rates, student interaction, and understanding/assessment of the astronomy content in the online environment. Strategies include the use of citizen science projects to engage students with authentic data and research.

  20. Upgrade of the radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher for the HIE-ISOLDE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, Carla; Giles, Tim

    2013-12-01

    The upgrade to the ISOLDE facility, HIE-ISOLDE, will include an upgrade to the RFQCB (radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher), the focus of which will be fixing the problems of alignment with the current machine, improving the integrity of the vacuum system, stabilizing the internal gas pressure, and the changes associated with a new position. The beam passage inside the RFQCB has been simulated with an independent code to highlight the importance of the internal gas pressure, to motivate design changes in the new RFQCB and to explain ways to improve the performance of the current machine. The suspected misalignment of ISCOOL has been quantified, and, using a simulation of ions passing through the external injection electrodes, the effect of the misalignment on machine acceptance has been detailed. Plans for the future RFQCB test stand and HIE-ISOLDE installation have been outlined.

  1. Observatory Publishes Memoir of Pioneer Radio Astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-07-01

    One of the pioneers of radio astronomy tells her story of the formative years of that science in a memoir published by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Dr. Nan Dieter Conklin's book, Two Paths to Heaven's Gate, recounts her experiences making important scientific discoveries in an era when astronomy's "vision" was first extending beyond the light discernable to human eyes. Book Cover CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Conklin's story is remarkable not only because of her impressive scientific achievements, but also "because she was a woman who nevertheless pursued and succeeded in science -- the first U.S. woman whose Ph.D. thesis was based on her own radio astronomy research and the first U.S. woman to publish original radio astronomy research in a refereed journal -- and because she lived and worked with the degenerative disease multiple sclerosis," according to Claire Hooker of the University of Toronto. In the memoir, Conklin recounts her career and life from the awakening stirred by her first astronomy course at Goucher College in Baltimore, to junior research jobs in Washington, D.C., to graduate school at Harvard and ultimately to the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley. In addition to providing an insider's view of the process of scientific discovery, Conklin also gives the reader a fascinating look at a scientific community and social structure that, though only a half-century removed from the present, was vastly different from today's. Along the way, Conklin candidly reveals the person behind the science -- the person who dealt with the joys and tragedies of life while remaining dedicated to unlocking the secrets of the Universe. "Nan was and remains an inspiration to myself and hundreds of others in the field, both for her scientific acumen and for her ability to overcome extraordinary personal challenges," said Miller Goss of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. Astronomy Links

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Teitelbaum

    2010-11-18

    Here are some links to Astronomy applets, animations, and movies. Celestial and Terrestrial Motions Sky and telescope Interactive Sky Chart Rotating Sky Explorer Ecliptic (Zodiac) Simulator Seasonal Solar Motions Antarctica Time Lapse: A Year on Ice Aurora Australis: The Southern Lights [Daylight Hours Explorer Season as viewed from Space Animation Sun Position and Season animation Paths of the Sun Seasons and Ecliptic Simulator Sun s Rays Simulator Sun Motions Simulator Time-Lapse Seasons Simulator Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion Kepler s 1st and 2nd laws Applet Orbit Applet Planetary Orbit Simulator Gravity Simulator Moon Phases and Satellite Motions Lunar and Solar Eclipse Information Moon Phase Animation What Causes Tides Lunar Phase Quizzer Eclipse Shadow Simulator Moon Phases and the Horizon Diagram Synodic Lag The Solar System Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Images Planetary Photo Journal Planetary Configuration Simulator Geocentric Retrograde Motion Animation Epicycle / Orbit Applet Gravity Simulator Ptolemaic Orbit of Mars The Universe Virtual Reality Milky Way Panorama Interactive H-R Diagram Element Absorption and Emision Lines Doppler Shift Demonstrator Lookback Time Simulator Other: SpaceWeather.com ...

  3. The SERENDIP piggyback SETI project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Bowyer, S.; Werthimer, D.; Donnelly, C.; Herrick, W.

    1992-01-01

    The SERENDIP project is an ongoing program of monitoring and processing broadband radio signals acquired by existing radio astronomy observatories. SERENDIP operates in a piggyback mode: it makes use of whatever observing plan (sequence of frequencies, sky coordinates, and polarizations) is under way at its host observatory. Moreover, the SERENDIP data acquisition system, once installed, operates autonomously. This approach makes it possible to obtain large amounts of high quality observing time in a manner that is economical and that does not adversely affect ongoing radio astronomy survey work. The SERENDIP II system has been installed at the NRAO 300-foot telescope at Green Bank, West Virginia, and has operated there for several thousand hours. In this report, we summarize our findings from these observations and describe the present status of the project. Two key elements of SERENDIP are the automated data acquisition system that uses adaptive thresholds and logs only statistically significant peaks in the real-time power spectra, and the subsequent off-line analysis programs that identify and reject a variety of interference signals. Several specific correlations have been identified that offer promise. At present, the development and testing of these interference rejection algorithms is the main thrust of our work.

  4. Gravitational wave astronomy with the SKA

    E-print Network

    Janssen, G H; McLaughlin, M; Bassa, C G; Deller, A T; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Mingarelli, C M F; Rosado, P A; Sanidas, S; Sesana, A; Shao, L; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Verbiest, J P W

    2015-01-01

    On a time scale of years to decades, gravitational wave (GW) astronomy will become a reality. Low frequency (nanoHz) GWs are detectable through long-term timing observations of the most stable pulsars. Radio observatories worldwide are currently carrying out observing programmes to detect GWs, with data sets being shared through the International Pulsar Timing Array project. One of the most likely sources of low frequency GWs are supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs), detectable as a background due to a large number of binaries, or as continuous or burst emission from individual sources. No GW signal has yet been detected, but stringent constraints are already being placed on galaxy evolution models. The SKA will bring this research to fruition. In this chapter, we describe how timing observations using SKA1 will contribute to detecting GWs, or can confirm a detection if a first signal already has been identified when SKA1 commences observations. We describe how SKA observations will identify the source(s...

  5. Astronomy in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobouti, Y.

    2006-08-01

    Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan, Iran In spite of her renowned pivotal role in the advancement of astronomy on the world scale during 9th to 15th centuries, Iran's rekindled interest in modern astronomy is a recent happening. Serious attempts to introduce astronomy into university curricula and to develop it into a respectable and worthwhile field of research began in the mid 60's. The pioneer was Shiraz University. It should be credited for the first few dozens of astronomy- and astrophysics- related research papers in international journals, for training the first half a dozen of professional astronomers and for creating the Biruni Observatory. Here, I take this opportunity to acknowledge the valuable advice of Bob Koch and Ed Guinan, then of the University of Pennsylvania, in the course of the establishment of this observatory. At present the astronomical community of Iran consists of about 65 professionals, half university faculty members and half MS and PhD students. The yearly scientific contribution of its members has, in the past three years, averaged to about 15 papers in reputable international journals, and presently has a healthy growth rate. Among the existing observational facilities, Biruni Observatory with its 51 cm Cassegrain, CCD cameras, photometers and other smaller educational telescopes, is by far the most active place. Tusi Observatory of Tabriz University has 60 and 40 cm Cassegrains, and a small solar telescope. A number of smaller observing facilities exist in Meshed, Zanjan, Tehran, Babol and other places. The Astronomical Society of Iran (ASI), though some 30 years old, has expanded and institutionalized its activities since early 1990's. ASI sets up seasonal schools for novices, organizes annual colloquia and seminars for professionals and supports a huge body of amateur astronomers from among high school and university students. Over twenty of ASI members are also members of IAU and take active part in its events. In the past five years, astronomers of Iran have staged an intensive campaign to have a National Observatory of their Own (NOI). Initial planning is for one 2 m telescope and appropriate measuring devices. The project is approved and will be funded by the government in the course of five years. The site selection for NOI, however, is already in its third year and has been and is being generously funded by the government. Last, but not least, Nojum, the only astronomical monthly magazine of the Middle East, is presently in its fifteenth year. It has a good readership among both professionals and amateurs of Farsi speaking communities within the country and abroad. .

  6. The Radio Transient Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, J.

    Radio transients are known on time scales from nanoseconds to years, from sources in the Galaxy and beyond, and with either coherent or incoherent emission mechanisms. Observations of this wide variety of sources are relevant to many of the highest profile questions in astronomy and astrophysics. As illustrations of the breadth of the radio transient sky, both coherent and incoherent radio emission has long been known from stars and stellar remnants and has informed topics ranging from stellar evolution to Galactic structure to relativistic jet dynamics to tests of fundamental physics. Coherent radio emission is now also known from brown dwarfs, and there are active programs to find similar emissions from extrasolar planets. Outside of the Galaxy, incoherent radio counterparts to supernovae, tidal disruption events, and gamma-ray bursts is well known and have contributed to topics such as understanding the cosmic star formation rate and the formation of relativistic jets. Excitingly, coherent radio bursts that appear to be at cosmological distances were recently discovered. I provide a survey of the radio transient sky, illustrating both how radio transients are part of the Hot-Wired Sky and are likely to help drive the Hot-Wiring. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. Physics & Astronomy Degree options

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    148 Physics & Astronomy Degree options BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Astrophysics Physics MPhys AND HL7 in Mathematics Physics and Astronomy (Gateway and International Gateway) Entry For UK students. Physics&Astronomy Subject enquiries Dr Kenny Wood E: physics@st-andrews.ac.uk Features * The nature

  8. The Design of the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) for the Study of Radio Transients and Student Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenet, Fredrick; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Ford, A.; Garcia, A.; Hinojosa, J.; Longoria, C.; Lunsford, G.; Mata, A.; Miller, R. B.; Reser, J.; Rivera, J.; Stovall, K.; Creighton, T. D.; Hicks, B.; Price, R. H.; Taylor, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    The Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey (Astro2010) identified transient science and time-domain studies as one of the most promising discovery areas of the coming decade. The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a new distributed radio array designed specifically to search for and to study transient radio phenomena in the 5-88 MHz frequency range. LoFASM consists of four stations, each made up of 12 cross dipole-antennas. The stations were constructed by undergraduates at the University of Texas at Brownsville's Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy. LoFASM utilizes the same antennas and front-end electronics developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) project by the Naval Research Laboratory. The stations are located at Port Mansfield, Texas, the LWA North Arm site of the LWA1 Radio Observatory in New Mexico, the Green Bank Radio Observatory, West Virginia, and NASA's Goldstone tracking center in California. Having the stations in these geographically distinct regions allows for the immediate discrimination between bonafide astronomical transient events and radio frequency interference. In this presentation, we will give an overview of LoFASM's design and capabilities as well as the project's primary scientific objectives

  9. Interactive Materials In The Teaching Of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macêdo, J. A.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Science. The following steps were to be taken: i) analysis of the pedagogical projects (PPC) of the licenciates at the IFNMG, research locus of its Campus Januária; ii) analysis of students' preconceptions about astronomy and digital technologies, identified by the application of an initial questionnaire; iii) preparation of the course taking into account the students' previous knowledge; iv) application of the education proposal developed under part-time presence modality, using various interactive tools; v) application and analysis of the final questionnaire. The test was conducted with the qualitative and quantitative methodology, combined with a content analysis. The results indicated that in the IFNMG only the licenciate-course in physics includes astronomy content diluted in various subjects of the curriculum; the rates of students prior knowledge in relation to astronomy was low; an evidence of meaningful learning of the concepts related to astronomy, and of viability of resource use involving digital technologies in the Teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options of future teachers and meet their training needs.

  10. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  11. COMPRESSED SENSING FOR RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING: REVIEW AND FUTURE DIRECTION

    E-print Network

    McEwen, Jason

    , radio interferom- etry will continue to play a fundamental role in astronomy. The extension of CSCOMPRESSED SENSING FOR RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING: REVIEW AND FUTURE DIRECTION Jason D. McEwen1 Department of Radiology & Medical Informatics, University of Geneva (UniGE), Switzerland ABSTRACT Radio

  12. Network for Astronomy School Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, Susana E.; Ros, R. M.; Garcia, B.

    2014-01-01

    The Network for Astronomy School Education Project (NASE) was developed in response to the IAU's most recent 10 Years Strategic Plan to increase the efforts of the IAU in schools. NASE's mission is to stimulate teaching astronomy in schools, through professional development of primary and secondary school science teachers in developing and emerging countries. NASE's organizational principle is to build capacity by providing courses for three years in cooperation with a Local Organizing Committee (Local NASE Group). The Local NASE Group consists of 6-8 local university professors and education professional who will promote astronomy activities and organize future courses in subsequent years in their region of their country. NASE philosophy is to introduce low-tech astronomy, and has thus developed an a suite of activities that can be carried out with inexpensive, quotidian materials. Supporting these activities is a text for teachers, plus a complete set of instructional materials for each topic. These materials are available in English and Spanish, with future editions available in Chinese and Portuguese. We describe and discuss NASE activities in Central and South America from 2009 to the present.

  13. Gravity-Wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishchuk, Leonid Petrovich

    The article concerns astronomical phenomena , related with discovery of gravitational waves of various nature: 1) primordial (relic) gravitational waves, analogous to MWBR 2) gravitational waves due to giant collisions in the Universe between 2a) Macroscopic black Holes in the centers of Galaxies 2b) Tidal disruption of neutron stars by Black holes 2c) deformations of the space-time by stellar mass Black Holes moving near giant Black Holes in the centers of Galaxies 2d) Supernovae phenomena 2e) accretion phenomena on Black Holes and Neutron stars. The Earth based interferometric technics (LIGO Project) to detect gravitational waves is described as well as the perspectiva for a space Laser Interferometric Antena (LISA)is discussed. The article represents a modified text of the Plenary talk "Gravity-Wave astronomy" given at the XI International gravitational Conference (July 1986, Stockholm, Sweden).

  14. Using large radio telescopes at decametre wavelengths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Lecacheux; A. A. Konovalenko; H. O. Rucker

    2004-01-01

    With the aim of evaluating the actual possibilities of doing, from the ground, sensitive radio astronomy at decametre wavelengths (particularly below ?50MHz), an extensive program of radio observations was carried out, in 1999–2002, by using digital spectral and waveform analysers (DSP) of new generation, connected to several of the largest, decametre radio telescopes in the world (i.e., the UTR-2 and

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    No. 224 IMPROVED SOFTWARE FOR CONTROLLING THE ADIOS MODULE L. R. DIADDARIO JANUARY 1982 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;IMPROVED SOFTWARE FOR CONTROLLING THE ADIOS MODULE Table of Contents I. Introduction Language Subroutines Wiring Change Required in ADIOS Module BASIC Subroutines . . . . . Free-Run Mode

  16. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    IN I APPLE II+ CPU ADIOS A/D Fig. 1. Test configuration The phase comparator output drives the A input of an ADIOS integrating AID converter which is described in NRAO EDIR #212. The A/D conversion is accomplished;schematic shown in Figure 2. The toggle switches on the ADIOS front panel must be set at +/- and 10 volts

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE) VA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    ADIOS-INITB . · . . . .· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · . . 9 ADIOS TEST . · ·. ·. . . . . 9 . . . .· · · · · · · · · · · . . 9 LITTLE SMITH · · · · · · · · * · · · · · · . . 9 I/O Programs ADIOS-INITB . · . . . .· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · . . 9 ADIOS TEST . · ·. ·. . . . . 9· . · · . · CCS CLOCK SET

  18. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Charlottesville, VA 22903

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    subreflector cannot be increased. If the existing subreflector were to be made larger to improve the L-band of the subreflector is an indirect compromise to future L-band performance. 4. System performance at ALL bands to the current 75 MHz and 327 MHz feeds increase the system noise temperature at L-band by ten percent [2

  19. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE) VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    of errors encountered in both procedures are given for an example of a cryogenic L-band amplifier with 25 d with Noise Sources 2.1 Changes in Noise Diode Impedance in "Off" and "On" State The L-band measurement system

  20. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    /16/2011 I. Introduction Every student of microwave engineering learns very early how to analyze high-order modes are a common occurrence, especially in cryogenic components with high Q be blamed on the need for advanced CAD tools to analyze them, for relatively simple closed-form solutions

  1. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    -DTL-3922/67C standard and most of its higher-frequency variants. As there are currently no standard. Furthermore, for frequencies above 325 GHz there are no universally supported waveguide standards at present: UG-383, UG-385, UG-387). The current version of the Military Specification is MIL-DTL-3922/67C. Above

  2. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    III DETECTOR1 Program . 17 Appendix IV Noise Analysis 26 Figures Figure 1 Block Diagram of Test of a Detector and Amplifier 13 Figure 8Examples of Noise Tests of Operational Amplifiers 14 #12;automated test and it is the noise level which then limits the detector; i.e. the input power range sufficiently lo SQUARE

  3. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, WV

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    windows. The detrimental baseline effects can be mitigated by using microwave absorber to smooth....................................................................................................21 6.1 Effective Horn Temperature two minor errors from the original: The absorber part number is HR10, and the Kerr calculation of mode

  4. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    semiconductor such as carbon at low temperatures. Thus carbon in terminations, attenuators, and absorber resistance and attenuation can, of course, be measured with extreme accuracy and temperature effects upon No. 223 CRYOGENIC PERFORMANCE OF MICROWAVE TERMINATIONS, ATTENUATORS, ABSORBERS, AND COAXIAL CABLE S

  5. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    of the transistor . The Pucel noise theory for GaAs MESFET's is modified to apply to the HEMT. Good agreement No. 257 THE NOISE PROPERTIES OF HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS T. M. BROOKES DECEMBER 1984 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;The Noise Properties of High Electron Mobility Transistors T. M. BROOKES November 1, 1984

  6. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    . · · · · Summary of Noise Performance of GaAs FET s at 8.4 · · · · · . .GHz and 12.5K . . . · · · · · Noise · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · . . . . 31 #12;X-BAND NOISE PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIALLY-AVAILABLE GaAs FET's AT ROOM AND CRYOGENIC OF COMMERCIALLY-AVAILABLE GaAs FET's AT ROOM AND CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES Marian W. Pospieszalski TABLE OF CONTENTS

  7. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE) VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    of Commercial GaAs FET's at 8.4 GHz. . . . . . · · · · · · · · · ·. · . 2 A. Introductory Remarks No. 254 LOW-NOISE, 8.0-8.8 GHz, COOLED, GASFET AMPLIFIER M. POSPIESZALSKI DECEMBER 1984 NUMBER OF COPIES: 130 #12;LOW-NOISE, 8.0-8.8 GHz, COOLED GASFET AMPLIFIER M. Pospieszalski Table of Contents I

  8. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia 22903

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    bandwidth is examined for three circuits: (i) parallel RC, (ii) parallel RC with series L, and (iii be well described by the parallel RC circuit shown in Fig. 1(a). This is true of Schottky diodes and SIS) parallel RCL with series L. The broadband matching theories of Bode (1945) and Fano (1950) are used

  9. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    of the photodetectors. The cold load is in a styrofoam dewar with a plastic lining to prevent leakage. It contains load (dipped in liquid nitrogen) in front of the feed horn. Part of the styrofoam has been cut away and adjacent to the wheel support. A channel is cut in the styrofoam to allow the nitrogen gas which is boiling

  10. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    No. 163 WIRE LIST PROGRAM FOR INTEGRATED CIRCUIT- WIRE WRAP BOARDS JAMES JAFOLLA, ARTHUR M. SHALLOWAY-integrated circuit-wire wrap card. The program specifically applies to NRAO type D13520M1 (or CDP201) and D13520M2 prepunched IBM cards or CRT terminal input, and obtain a wiring list for the wire wrap card as seen from

  11. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    ). Connecting a bias cable between the bias box and dewar could then be fatal, depending on the order in which leakage, and possible long-term contamination of refrigerator helium supplies. A He leak detector. The possibility of contamination of the refrigerator by the vapor pressure of the G-10 material is not known

  12. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY SOCORRO, NEW MEXICO

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    on the transporter. The second set of axles were made out of a higher quality 4140 steel. This second set of axles the stress riser and also lowers the material cost by approximately $600 per axle. The new axle design also reduces the stress riser at the shoulder fillet by making the diameter transition much more gradual

  13. (Astro)Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    telescopes, interferometry + science: stars, planets, interstellar medium, active galactic nuclei, cosmic microwave background #12; Last lecture: student choice May 2nd = last day of class: I will lecture #5: millimeter interferometry of an external galaxy #6: class visit to Green Bank, West Virginia

  14. (Astro)Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    , cosmic microwave background #12; Labs Six labs planned, of which at least four will use the Small: measuring the Milky Way's rotation curve #5: millimeter interferometry of an external galaxy #6: class visit

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    out using broadband sources, such as cold loads, which inject noise into both signal channels. A method has · been devised to do this involving narrow passband, low insertion loss, filters and are sharp enough to reject the image channel by at least 20 dB. The insertion of such a filter between

  16. Author (s): NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    . Brockway J. Coe R. Norrod S. White G. Behrens R. Fisher F. Crews #12;A partial block diagram of the M, there is appreciable discharge of the 5000 pF capacitor. The time constant is around 8 ps. The test I made on the op the discharge time constant and reduce the voltage offset. The recharge time constant is 50 us. If the voltage

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    transmission lines) connected to the structure, and hence there is a well defined set of electromagnetic modes is transferred to MMICAD via a Touchstone file. This appears not to be documented in the HFSS or MMICAD manuals designed to mate directly with the ports of the structure, i.e., with the same size and shape of waveguide

  18. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    Specification 2 Topology of Elements: R-L-C's, Ideal and Lossy Transmission Lines, Transformers, Controlled for the electronics research division at NRAO. It is designed to run on the HP 9845A desktop computer which has;CONTENTS Page User's Manual for FARANT Introduction 1 Conventions 1 User's Commands 2 Frequency

  19. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    . · · · . · · · · · · . . · · · · 8 3.2 Two-Port Elements: R-L-C's, Ideal and Lossy Transmission Lines, Transformers, Controlled was developed as an aid in microwave circuit design for the Electronics Research Division at NRAO and instruction in microwave circuit design methods. #12;A COMPUTER-AIDED ANALYSIS ROUTINE INCLUDING OPTIMIZATION

  20. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    .L. Ostertag, "On the Fields in a Conical Horn Having an Arbitrary Wall Impedance," IEEE Trans. Ant. and Propag the operational bandwidth. Unless delta-n is sufficiently large it is impossible to effectively launch, UK, 1984, p. 9. Johnson, R. C. Antenna Engineering Handbook,, 3rd ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1993, p

  1. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    .L. Ostertag, "On the Fields in a Conical Horn Having an Arbitrary Wall Impedance," IEEE Trans. Ant. and Propag the operational bandwidth. Unless delta-n is sufficiently large it is impossible to effectively launch. Johnson, R. C. Antenna Engineering Handbook,, 3rd ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1993, p. (12-21). BW= 4

  2. JOHN W. ARCHER NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    ;2 INTRODUCTION Sources of millimeter wavelength power for heterodyne receiver local oscillator applications provide adequate output power for local oscillator applications in mm-wave heterodyne receivers operating at frequencies in the 100 - 260 GHz range. The paper commences with a brief outline of the basic microwave

  3. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    sted for which data is to be stored. It also asks for a file name and a file header (a string up to 36 data files. The program prompts for a given file name. 3) READ FILE HEADER This option allows inspection of data file headers which contain Fmin, Fm _ -ax 7 Fstep 4) DISPLAY FILE This option allows

  4. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    circuits such as amplifiers and oscillators is a method of separating r.f. and d.c. for the purpose that the design procedure #12;Zo 'THICKNESS: h DIELECTRIC CONST: E r ZooZoo Zo - z oe oo 2 Zo 0 0 FIG 1 D.C. BLOCK for the odd-mode coupling impedance Zoo and the even-mode coupling impedance Z oe . For microstrip, only one

  5. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    /clipper carriers. Figures 3 and 4 are the layout of the analog card. A data sheet for the mux is included. Address multiplexer CAF-H2B is included. Figures 9 and 10 are the layout for the digital card. A wire list-37 1111 1U1 11111111121 MOM EA2 21111 11 MEM C 3-2 ga1111 1 I EMI D D3 Cc:2 ic TYPE OF IC SIGNAL

  6. Ph.D. Astronomy Program Ph.D. in Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Ph.D. Astronomy Program Ph.D. in Astronomy Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences 1 physics at the graduate level 4. understand observational astronomy techniques 5. understand astrophysics strong background of knowledge and expertise in physics and astronomy #12;2. Curriculum Alignment

  7. Deterministic RF ing in phased arrays for the next generation of radio telescopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bart Smolders; Grant Hampson

    2002-01-01

    A requirement of the next generation of radio telescopes for astronomy is the ability to cope with the forever increasing problem of radio-frequency interference (RFI). Unlike conventional fixed parabolic receivers, currently used in astronomy, the application of phased-array beamforming techniques opens up the possibility to spatially RFI in the RF domain, prior to signal digitization. This paper presents results from

  8. eRadio : empowerment through community Web radio

    E-print Network

    Gomez-Monroy, Carla, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    The eRadio project proposes to be an effective aid to increase interaction and reduce alienation among the members of dispersed communities by using a holistic approach to participatory and interactive web radio-production, ...

  9. Astronomy, Lund, 24 February, 2011 Twisting of Light around Spinning Black Holes

    E-print Network

    Astronomy, Lund, 24 February, 2011 Twisting of Light around Spinning Black Holes and other uses with contributions from Fabrizio Tamburini Department of Astronomy, University of Padova, Italy and LOFAR/LOIS project members Uppsala and elsewhere #12;Astronomy, Lund, February, 2011 Very readable paper on POAM

  10. Robert Nemiroff: Communicating Astronomy 365 Days a Year

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Pullen; P. Russo

    2010-01-01

    Few astronomy communication projects are as well known or as widely disseminated as the Astronomy Picture of the Day (or APOD for short). Since its creation in 1995, it has popularised thousands of images and helped to explain the cosmos through informative captions. Impressively, the site shows no signs of slowing down and has amassed many loyal supporters. This success

  11. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT OF ASTRONOMY

    E-print Network

    Jefferys, William

    UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT OF ASTRONOMY The UniversiTy of Texas aT aUsTin Astronomy is one richness of the universe. Join this adventure by exploring the astronomy program at the University of Texas at Austin. The Department of Astronomy at UT Austin is one of the top ten astronomy research programs

  12. Astronomy from the chair - the application of the Internet in promoting of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomic, Zoran

    2014-05-01

    Internet and modern communication technologies are an indispensable part of modern life. The use of the Internet makes it possible to enhance the education and expand opportunities for acquiring new knowledge. One example is Astronomy, where today thanks to the Internet, we can control telescopes that are distant from us and listen to lectures from Universities in other countries. "Astronomy from the chair" is the name for a concept where amateur astronomers can deal with astronomy from their homes using the Internet. The concept can be divided into four sections depending on the content being offered: Robotic Observatory, Virtual Observatory, Online astronomy broadcasting and Online courses. Robotic observatory is defined as an astronomical instrument and detection system that enables efficient observation without the need of a person's physical intervention. Virtual Observatory is defined as a collection of databases and software tools that use the Internet as a platform for scientific research. Online astronomy broadcasting is part of concept "Astronomy from the chair" which gives users the opportunity to get directly involved in astronomical observation organized by an amateur astronomer from somewhere in the world. Online courses are groups of sites and organizations that provide the opportunity to amateur astronomers to attend lectures, save and watch video materials from lectures, do homework, communicate with other seminar participants and in that way become familiar with the various areas of Astronomy. This paper discusses a new concept that describes how the Internet can be applied in modern education. In this paper will be described projects that allows a large number of astronomy lovers to do their own research without the need to own a large and expensive set of astronomical equipment (Virtual Telescope from Italy, Observatory "Night Hawk" from Serbia and project "Astronomy from an armchair" at Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics in Nis), to help professional astronomers in research of galaxies, extrasolar systems, Moon etc. without the need of owning the official certificate in Astronomy (Planet Hunters, Moon Zoo) and the possibility to attend online courses in Astronomy (Introduction to Astronomy from the site Coursera). In the end, will be discussion about economic analysis of using robotic observatory in contemporary education and the implementation of research projects, rather than Institutions to invest huge amounts of funds in the purchase and maintenance of the same astronomical equipment.

  13. Project 8: Using Radio-Frequency Techniques to Measure Neutrino Mass

    E-print Network

    N. S. Oblath; for the Project 8 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Project 8 experiment aims to measure the neutrino mass using tritium beta decays. Beta-decay electron energies will be measured with a novel technique: as the electrons travel in a uniform magnetic field their cyclotron radiation will be detected. The frequency of each electron's cyclotron radiation is inversely proportional to its total relativistic energy; therefore, by observing the cyclotron radiation we can make a precise measurement of the electron energies. The advantages of this technique include scalability, excellent energy resolution, and low backgrounds. The collaboration is using a prototype experiment to study the feasibility of the technique with a $^{83m}$Kr source. Demonstrating the ability to see the 17.8 keV and 30.2 keV conversion electrons from $^{83m}$Kr will show that it may be possible to measure tritium beta-decay electron energies ($Q \\approx 18.6$ keV) with their cyclotron radiation. Progress on the prototype, analysis and signal-extraction techniques, and an estimate of the potential future of the experiment will be discussed.

  14. Astronomical Book Trek: Astronomy Books of 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1983-01-01

    Provided in two separate annotated lists are technical and nontechnical astronomy books. Categories in the latter group include: general astronomy; astronomy textbooks; amateur astronomy; astronomy history; life on other worlds; astrophysics; the solar system; space exploration; and the sun. (JN)

  15. Astronomy in Hawaii: Telescopes, Research, and Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. K.

    2012-08-01

    Since early Polynesian way-finding combined observations of sky and ocean and allowed voyagers to locate and se ttle the far-flung islands of the Pacific, astronomy has impacted the islands of Hawaii. The Twentieth Century saw telescope development on both Haleakala on Maui and Mauna Kea on Hawaii Island. These complexes have developed libraries and information services to support and enhance their research. The University of Hawaii established the Institute for Astronomy (IfA). The IfA Library serves researchers and instrument developers at each of its three locations. Canada-France-Ha waii Telescope, the Joint Astronomy Center, the W. M. Keck Observatory, Gemini Northern Telescope and Subaru Telescope have each developed library services to respond to their unique needs. The librarians at these organizations have formed Astronomy Libraries of HAwaii (A LOHA) to share resources. As electronic research has developed, each library has responded to capitalize on these new capabilities. In coming years, projects such as the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope on Maui and the Thirty Meter Telescope on Hawaii Island have the promise of enlarging our understanding of the Universe. Astronomy libraries in Hawaii will con tinue to enhance their expertise to match the evolution of astronomy technologies and maximize research impact.

  16. A new design project of the line feed structure for large spherical radio telescope and its nonlinear dynamic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Y. Duan

    1999-01-01

    A new design of the line feed structure for a large spherical radio telescope (LSRT) is presented in this paper. Integrated mechanical, electronic, optic and automatic control technologies are employed to make considerable improvement upon the Arecibo spherical radio telescope in Puerto Rico, U.S.A. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of the suspended cable system was carried out with some sensible results that

  17. Ancient Astronomy: The World

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Penprase, Bryan

    This website contains the history and ethnology of astronomy. It contains an interactive atlas of the world which allows the learner to choose the area they wish to learn more about, a glossary, a timeline of the major events in the history of Astronomy, and also a collection of information and activities for educators and students. The website also offers a bibliography of the many people who contributed to astronomy and cosmology and myths from around the world.

  18. The Astronomy Workshop

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. P. Hamilton; M. L. Asbury

    2000-01-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http:\\/\\/janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested in large university survey courses, as well as smaller classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. It has also been used in High School and Junior

  19. The Eratosthenes Project: the reproduction of a historical experiment as a resource for the inclusion of Astronomy concepts in High School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus Santos, Antônio José; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Teixeira de Araújo, Mauro Sérgio

    2012-12-01

    This investigation was about an educational approach based on the History of Science and experimentation involving scientific concepts in the area of Astronomy, highlighting the reproduction of the original experiment performed by Eratosthenes in the third century B.C., designed to measure the Earth radius. It was found that the realized activities contributed significantly to the success of High School students from two public schools of Sergipe - the State College State Secretary Francisco Rosa Santos in Aracaju, Sergipe and the Federal Institute, campus of São Cristov - since these activities had aroused the students' interest for the construction of new scientific knowledge, and they improved their comprehension of some aspects related to Science and Astronomy in particular, as its empirical character and its historical development, therefore immersed in a specific social, economic and cultural context. The approach allowed for a greater involvement of participating students and it improved student-teacher relationship. The evaluations identified that a significant learning of the discussed concepts involving Physics and Astronomy had occurred, such as latitude, longitude, equinox, solstice, midday sun, among other concepts treated in an interdisciplinary manner with other disciplines such as Geography, History and Mathematics.

  20. Early Physics and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Olaf

    1993-03-01

    Preface; 1. Science before the Greeks; 2. The new concept of nature; 3. Plato and Greek mathematics; 4. Aristotle and the knowledge of Nature; 5. Practical astronomy; 6. Early Greek cosmology; 7. Mathematical astronomy; 8. The foundation of statics; 9. Dynamics in antiquity; 10. The conception of light and sound; 11. The structure of material substances; 12. Properties of matter and chemical change; 13. The transmission of Greek science; 14. Experimental physics in the Middle Ages; 15. The development of statics; 16. The establishment of kinematics; 17. Force and motion in the Middle Ages; 18. Mediaeval astronomy; 19. The change called Renaissance; 20. The reform of astronomy; Bibliography; Index.

  1. Random time series in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Simon

    2013-02-13

    Progress in astronomy comes from interpreting the signals encoded in the light received from distant objects: the distribution of light over the sky (images), over photon wavelength (spectrum), over polarization angle and over time (usually called light curves by astronomers). In the time domain, we see transient events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts and other powerful explosions; we see periodic phenomena such as the orbits of planets around nearby stars, radio pulsars and pulsations of stars in nearby galaxies; and we see persistent aperiodic variations ('noise') from powerful systems such as accreting black holes. I review just a few of the recent and future challenges in the burgeoning area of time domain astrophysics, with particular attention to persistently variable sources, the recovery of reliable noise power spectra from sparsely sampled time series, higher order properties of accreting black holes, and time delays and correlations in multi-variate time series. PMID:23277606

  2. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  3. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  4. A Basic Astronomy Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    This bibliography lists the most useful and scientifically accurate astronomy books published in the 1980s for beginners and students. The books are categorized under the topics of: (1) astronomy in general; (2) solar system as a whole; (3) planets; (4) asteroids, comets, and meteorites; (5) the sun; (6) stars and their evolution; (7) mikly way…

  5. Infrared astronomy - an assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Allen

    1977-01-01

    An outline history of infrared astronomy is provided, taking into account the discovery of infrared radiation by Herschel in 1800 and the development of PbS and Ge:Ga detectors. Suitable locations and telescopes for infrared observatories are considered and the conduction of sky surveys is discussed. A description is presented of the results obtained with the aid of infrared astronomy in

  6. Indian Astronomy: History of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    From the time of A macronryabhat under dota (ca AD 500) there appeared in India a series of Sanskrit treatises on astronomy. Written always in verse, and normally accompanied by prose commentaries, these served to create an Indian tradition of mathematical astronomy which continued into the 18th century. There are as well texts from earlier centuries, grouped under the name Jyotishaveda macronn d...

  7. 1985 Astronomy Education Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AAPT Announcer, 1986

    1986-01-01

    This bibliography deals with astronomy education at all grade levels. Twelve major journals are identified and articles are specified under these categories. Miscellaneous sources are also included. This list was compiled by the American Association of Physics Teachers Astronomy Education Committee. (ML)

  8. Amateur Radio Satellite Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, David P.

    The Amateur Radio Satellite Communications project had, as its goal, the assembly of an amateur radio satellite station in a high school physics classroom. Specific objectives were to provide: (1) a special source of interest as a motivator for attracting students and building public relations; (2) a center of interest as a motivator for the study…

  9. International Year of Astronomy: Join the yearlong astronomy party

    E-print Network

    Pedersen, Tom

    International Year of Astronomy: Join the yearlong astronomy party To mark the 400th anniversary are having a yearlong party.The InternationalYear of Astronomy is organized by the United Nations Educational!feature local and regional events such as public telescope viewings and public lectures, astronomy-themed plays

  10. Compact survey of X-ray astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Gursky, H.

    1983-01-01

    The development of X-ray astronomy began in 1962. At that time the sun was known to be a strong and variable X-ray source and the general features of the radio sky were known. The first significant cosmic X-ray results were obtained from an Aerobee sounding rocket flown on June 12, 1962. The first small satellite dedicated to X-ray astronomy was SAS-1, renamed Uhuru. The results from this satellite firmly established X-ray astronomy as a substantial discipline. A number of strong galactic sources were found to be pulsing in X-rays with short periods. A number of other small satellites, American and European, were launched in the years following the launch of Uhuru. The latest stage of X-ray astronomy began with HEAO-B, renamed The Einstein Observatory after its launch. An X-ray focussing optics was used to produce genuine images of fields in the sky. Attention is given to the characteristics of neutron stars, common stars, clusters of galaxies, the diffuse X-ray background, and future prospects. 14 references.

  11. Naming asteroids for the popularisation of astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, O. A.

    2008-06-01

    We give a detailed description of how the naming of asteroids was used as a prize in competitions run by educational institutions and museums. There were two events, one in Venezuela and one in Brazil, which used this as an attractive alternative method for the popularisation of astronomy. The first competition, named Bautizo Espacial (Space Baptism), consisted of scientific stories written by high school students. The second, called Grande Desafio (Big Challenge), was a competition where teams of students were challenged to design and build prototype equipment to fight forest fires. Nationally, both events received wide publicity through newspapers, radio, TV and web pages, reaching many people in both countries. As part of both the events, several activities promoting the public knowledge of astronomy were held. The asteroids that were named in these competitions are just some of the many discovered in a search programme developed by the Group of Theoretical Astrophysics of University of Los Andes in Mérida, Venezuela (Grupo de Astrofisica Teórica de la Universidad de Los Andes) as a mainstream research programme. Finally, Asteroids for the Popularisation of Astronomy has been formally proposed to the IAU as a worldwide programme during the celebration of the International Year of Astronomy in 2009 (IYA2009).

  12. An Assessment of Slacker Astronomy Outreach Results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Price; P. L. Gay; T. Searle; G. Brissenden

    2005-01-01

    Slacker Astronomy is a weekly podcast covering recent astronomical news in a humorous, irreverent manner while respecting the intelligence of the audience. This is a new approach to astronomical outreach both technically and stylistically. Using the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) and the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) needs analysis survey system, we have have conducted an in-depth project to determine

  13. Ivan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 1 Very High Energy

    E-print Network

    Harrison, Thomas

    Binary systems Active Galactic Nuclei ............ #12;Ivan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 8 Rapidly -ray production in the jets ...stopping the proliferation of classes and subclasses of AGN's quasars, Seyfert galaxies (types I and II), radio-quiet or radio-loud galaxies, Faranoff- Riley galaxies (types I

  14. Passage and Behavior of Radio-Tagged Adult Pacific Lamprey (Entosphenus tridentata) at the Willamette Falls Project, Oregon, 2005-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Magie, Robert J.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    We used radio telemetry to monitor passage and describe behavior characteristics of adult Pacific lampreys, Entosphenus tridentata, during their upstream migration at the Willamette Falls Project (Project) on the Willamette River near Portland, Oregon. Our objectives were to document: (1) specific routes of passage at the dam and falls; (2) duration of passage through different routes; and (3) overall passage success. During the spring through autumn of 2005 and 2006, fish were captured in a trap located in the fishway at the Project or collected by hand from the falls, surgically implanted with a radio tag, and released 2 kilometers downstream of the Project. We radio tagged 136 lampreys in 2005 and 107 in 2006. In both years, more than 90 percent of the fish returned to the Project with a median travel time of 7-9 hours. Most fish were first detected at the Project from about 20:00-23:00 hours. In 2005, 43 fish (35 percent) successfully passed through the fishway of the Project, which has four separate entrances and three distinct passage channels or legs that converge at one exit. Prior to the installation of flashboards around the perimeter of the falls in July, lampreys used all three legs of the fishway to pass the Project. After flashboards were installed, only fishway leg 1 was used. The peak of passage occurred in August. No fish passed over the falls, but 13 percent of the lampreys that traveled to the Project ascended at least partway up the falls. In 2006, 24 fish (23 percent) passed the Project, again primarily using fishway leg 1. Most fish passed prior to June 9 when the powerhouse was shut down due to construction. Although 19 lampreys ascended the falls, only 2 passed through this route in late June and early July. Flashboards were not installed in 2006. For both years, the time it took for fish to pass through the fishway depended on which leg they used - the median passage time was at least 4-5 hours in fishway legs 2 and 3 and ranged from 23 to 74 hours in fishway leg 1. Many fish resided in the tailrace for times ranging from a few hours to almost a year and eventually left the Project and moved downstream. Collectively, our results indicate that passage of radio-tagged upstream migrating Pacific lamprey at the Willamette Falls Project is relatively poor compared to passage success of these fish at dams on the Columbia River. Factors contributing to the low passage of lampreys at the Project may include low flows and water levels at fishway entrances, impediments in the fishways, delayed tagging effects, changing environmental and operational conditions, a learned aversion to a fishway, difficult passage over the falls, or not all lamprey are destined to migrate upstream of the falls.

  15. MATLAB package for astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofek, Eran O.

    2014-07-01

    The MATLAB package for astronomy and astrophysics is a collection of software tools and modular functions for astronomy and astrophysics, written in the MATLAB environment. It includes over 700 MATLAB functions and a few tens of data files and astronomical catalogs. The scripts cover a wide range of subjects including: astronomical image processing, ds9 control, astronomical spectra, optics and diffraction phenomena, catalog retrieval and searches, celestial maps and projections, Solar System ephemerides, planar and spherical geometry, time and coordinates conversion and manipulation, cosmology, gravitational lensing, function fitting, general utilities, plotting utilities, statistics, and time series analysis.

  16. An Assessment of Slacker Astronomy Outreach Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A.; Gay, P. L.; Searle, T.; Brissenden, G.

    2005-12-01

    Slacker Astronomy is a weekly podcast covering recent astronomical news in a humorous, irreverent manner while respecting the intelligence of the audience. This is a new approach to astronomical outreach both technically and stylistically. Using the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) and the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) needs analysis survey system, we have have conducted an in-depth project to determine whether this new style is effective and what audience needs are outstanding. Slacker Astronomy currently has around 11,000 weekly listeners and was founded in February, 2005. Recordings and scripts are available to the public under the Creative Commons license at www.slackerastronomy.org.

  17. Robotic Astronomy. Proceedings of the 3rd Potsdam Thinkshop on Robotic Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Hessman, F. V.

    2004-10-01

    From July 12-15, 2004, the third Potsdam Thinkshop was held in the Hotel Dorint ``Sanssouci'' in Potsdam, Germany on the topic of ROBOTIC ASTRONOMY. Its aim was to bring together astronomers and technicians from any field in astronomy to review the current status of robotic telescope projects and to discuss the future science cases for such installations. Part of the ``Thinkshop'' concept of this meeting was to jointly think about new scientific projects tailored to the unique capabilities of modern robotic telescopes, small and large.

  18. Imaging Optics Laboratory for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angione, R. J.; Eriksen, J. E.; Leach, R. W.

    1994-12-01

    Our objective was to develop a course that would teach upper division science students the techniques of detection and analysis of light found in modern astronomy. Specifically, we wanted to bring the observatory into the classroom by using the same kinds of detectors, such as CCD's, and analysis, such as IRAF, that one would find in the real world. We developed ten projects to be done individually by the students, and designed measurement and analysis techniques used in photoelectric photometry, CCD direct imaging, spectroscopy, and optics. The students responded very well to this project oriented, hands-on approach used in the class. This project was funded by NSF-ILI Grant NSF USE-9152246.

  19. Gravitational Waves and Time Domain Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Nissanke, Samaya; Williams, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe will open in roughly five years, when Advanced LIGO and Virgo achieve the first detections of high frequency gravitational waves, most likely coming from compact binary mergers. Electromagnetic follow-up of these triggers, using radio, optical, and high energy telescopes, promises exciting opportunities in multi-messenger time domain astronomy. In the decade, space-based observations of low frequency gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers, and their electromagnetic counterparts, will open up further vistas for discovery. This two-part workshop featured brief presentations and stimulating discussions on the challenges and opportunities presented by gravitational wave astronomy. Highlights from the workshop, with the emphasis on strategies for electromagnetic follow-up, are presented in this report.

  20. The IYA 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppelman, Michael; Gay, P. L.; Atkinson, N.; Flateau, D.; Lakdawalla, E.

    2009-01-01

    The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is a community project that brings the voices of the global astronomy community to the public over the Internet. We are publishing 1 podcast per day, 5 to 10 minutes in duration, for all 365 days of 2009. The podcast is made available through an RSS feed. The podcast episodes are recorded and listened to by people around the world. Topics covered include astronomy inspired art and literature, historic discoveries, spacecraft, IYA events as well as interviews and discussions about the science of astronomy. Some podcasts have a specific topic or theme based on The 365 Days of Astronomy Calendar, a daily calendar of astronomical events, themes and ideas created by the IYA. Although all the episodes will have a common intro and outtro that ties into the overall theme, each episode is completely different. Are you willing to contribute to the 365 Days of Astronomy podcast?We are looking for individuals, schools, companies and clubs to provide 5 - 10 minutes of audio for our daily podcast. Our goal is to encourage people to sign up for a particular day (or days) of 2009. We have a calendar of astronomical events to give ideas but the podcasts can be about virtually any astronomical topic. We are seeking a wide range of contributions, from simple concepts or how-tos to more in-depth discussions of complex concepts. We are expecting a wide range of contributions, from simple at-home "first light” podcasts to highly polished and professional recordings. We hope to sign up a wide range of participants including professional astronomers, K-12 classrooms, college students, science bloggers, podcasters and media companies. Visit 365DaysOfAstronomy.org for more information.

  1. National Academy of Sciences Recommends Continued Support of ALMA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-05-01

    A distinguished panel of scientists today announced their support for the continued funding of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Project at a press conference given by the National Academy of Sciences. The ALMA Project is an international partnership between U.S. and European astronomy organizations to build a complete imaging telescope that will produce astronomical images at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. The U.S. partner is the National Science Foundation, through Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI), led by Dr. Riccardo Giacconi, and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "We are delighted at this show of continued support from our peers in the scientific community," said Dr. Robert Brown, ALMA U.S. Project Director and Deputy Director of NRAO. "The endorsement adds momentum to the recent strides we've made toward the building of this important telescope." In 1998, the National Research Council, the working arm of the National Academy of Sciences, charged the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee to "survey the field of space- and ground-based astronomy and astrophysics" and to "recommend priorities for the most important new initiatives of the decade 2000-2010." In a report released today, the committee wrote that it "re-affirms the recommendations of the 1991 Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee by endorsing the completion of . . . the Millimeter Array (MMA, now part of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array)." In the 1991 report "The Decade of Discovery," a previous committee chose the Millimeter Array as one of the most important projects of the decade 1990-2000. Early last year, the National Science Foundation signed a Memorandum of Understanding with a consortium of European organizations that effectively merged the MMA Project with the European Large Southern Array project. The combined project was christened the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. ALMA, expected to consist of 64 antennas with 12-meter diameter dishes, will be built at a high-altitude, extremely dry mountain site in Chile's Atacama desert. The array is scheduled to be completed sometime in this decade. Millimeter-wave astronomy studies the universe in the spectral region where most of its energy lies, between the long-wavelength radio waves and the shorter-wavelength infrared waves. In this realm, ALMA will study the structure of the early universe and the evolution of galaxies; gather crucial data on the formation of stars, protoplanetary disks, and planets; and provide new insights on the familiar objects of our own solar system. "Most of the photons in the Universe lie in the millimeter wavelength regime; among existing or planned instruments only ALMA can image the sources of these photons with the crispness required to understand the events of galaxy, star and planet formation which launched them into space," said NRAO's Dr. Alwyn Wootten, U.S. ALMA Project Scientist. ALMA is an international partnership between the United States (National Science Foundation) and Europe. European participants include the European Southern Observatory, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France), the Max-Planck Gesellschaft (Germany), the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy, the United Kingdom Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, the Oficina de Ciencia Y Tecnologia/Instituto Geografico Nacional (Spain), and the Swedish Natural Science Research Council. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. Astronomy New Media Outreach & Research: Moving Beyond IYA 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    In January 2009 we entered a brave new world of online astronomy content distribution. From our first gasp of bandwidth through to today, we have worked to reach people one tweet, podcast, blogpost, and Second Life adventure at a time. Driven by our desire to get astronomy content to the world in all the online places that people go to work, socialize, and play, we have created a suite of applications that we now look to carry into the future. In this talk, we outline all the projects we created: Astronomy2009 Island in Second Life, the 365 Days of Astronomy podcast, the OverTwitter project, and more. We are hoping to carry these projects into the future and invite you to join us in building an online legacy of IYA. We will present basic audience statistics and preliminary feedback from online surveys. We also present continuation plans and introduce Astrosphere New Media, our new home for new media beyond IYA.

  3. American RadioWorks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Radio documentaries have been around almost since the beginning of regularly scheduled radio programming, but not all are created equal (or with great aplomb), and the American Radio Works is certainly one of the finer documentary production units in the field. Based at Minnesota Public Radio in St. Paul, Minnesota, Radio Works' primary themes include public affairs documentaries on major social and economic issues, investigative reporting, and the Living History series, which seeks to document the 20th century American experience "through the lives of those who witnessed it." The web-browsing public will be glad to know that all of the radio projects are available online here, and can be listened to in their entirety. Visitors can listen to close to 40 of their productions, including their most recent production which deals with the extensive phone conversations recorded by Presidents Johnson, Kennedy, and Nixon during their terms in the White House

  4. IYA2009USA: Cultural Astronomy and Storytelling Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita; IYA2009

    2009-01-01

    Cultural astronomy focuses on human's relationship with the sky using the disciplinary tools of anthropology, archeology, folklore, history, and folklore - not all at the same time. The USA is one of the few nations that include cultural astronomy and storytelling under its International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) activities. The working group focuses on indigenous sky knowledge; celestial stories, activities to explore the links between astronomy and culture; and on astronomers: their achievements and their academic culture. This presentation is an overview of the IYA2009USA Cultural Astronomy and Storytelling working group. Included will be our website, our goals, our projects, our outreach and dissemination strategies, and how we uniquely contribute to IYA2009.

  5. Astronomy at the Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roten, Robert; Constantin, A.; Christensen, E.; Dick, E.; Lapolla, J.; Nutter, A.; Corcoran, J.; DiDomenico, N.; Eskridge, B.; Saikin, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present here an energetic grass-roots outreach program run entirely by undergraduate physics and astronomy majors at James Madison University. Our "Team Awestronomy" takes Astronomy out to the Market, literally. Once a month, for eight months during the academic year, the group sets up a “scientific corner” at the Harrisonburg Farmers Market, offering people the chance to meet with astrophysicists (in the making) and discuss science. Our group members wear t-shirts with simple messages like “Ask me about the Sun,” “...about Black Holes and Mega-Masers” or “...about Big Bang” that initiate the dialog. We help our audience with observations of solar activity through our department’s Coronado telescope equipped with a safe H-alpha filter, sunspotters, and the incredibly simple yet durable and accurate handheld (Project Star) spectrometers, and invite them to the free Saturday Planetarium shows and the star parties hosted by our department on the JMU campus. The team is also prepared with a suite of fun activities aimed particularly at K-5 kids, e.g., building (and eating, after investigating out-gassing properties of) ”dirty comets,” making craters (in pans with flour or sand) and testing how different types of impactors (pebbles, ping-pong balls or even crumpled aluminum foil) affect crater formation, and demonstrations of shock wave created in supernova explosions. The main goals of this outreach program are: 1) to illustrate to people of all ages that science is a fun, creative, and exciting process; 2) to empower people to be curious and to ask questions; 3) to demonstrate that science is a viable career path chosen by many diverse individuals; and 4) to nurture a sense of wonder and awe for the Universe. While this outreach program is aimed at a very general audience, of an extremely wide range, we expect to produce a significant impact on K-12 students in general and in particular on the home-schooled kids. There is a relatively high fraction 20%) of home-schooled children in Harrisonburg/Rockingham County. We present a variety of methods by which we assess the success and impact of this program to the community.

  6. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    1999-09-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Scale of the Universe: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Scientific Notation: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  7. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    2000-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: ANIMATED ORBITS OF PLANETS AND MOONS: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. SOLAR SYSTEM COLLISIONS: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. SCIENTIFIC NOTATION: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. ORBITAL SIMULATIONS: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. ASTRONOMY WORKSHOP BULLETIN BOARD: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  8. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.; Proctor, A.

    2001-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed, and maintained at the University of Maryland, for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 91 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of the explosion, crater size, magnitude of the planetquake generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Planetary and Satellite Data Calculators: These tools allow the user to easily calculate physical data for all of the planets or satellites simultaneously, making comparison very easy. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by the National Science Foundation.

  9. Astronomy Landscape in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemaungani, Takalani

    2015-01-01

    The vision for astronomy in Africa is embedded in the African Space Policy of the African Union in early 2014. The vision is about positioning Africa as an emerging hub for astronomy sciences and facilities. Africa recognized the need to take advantage of its natural resource, the geographical advantage of the clear southern skies and pristine sites for astronomy. The Pan African University (PAU) initiative also presents an opportunity as a post-graduate training and research network of university nodes in five regions of Africa and supported by the African Union. The Southern African node based in South Africa concentrates on space sciences which also includes astronomy. The PAU aims to provide the opportunity for advanced graduate training and postgraduate research to high-performing African students. Objectives also include promoting mobility of students and teachers and harmonizing programs and degrees.A number of astronomy initiatives have burgeoned in the Southern African region and these include the Southern Africa Largest Optical Telescope (SALT), HESS (High Energy Stereoscopic System), the SKA (Square Kilometre Array) and the AVN (African Very Long Baseline Interferometer Network). There is a growing appetite for astronomy sciences in Africa. In East Africa, the astronomy community is well organized and is growing - the East African Astronomical society (EAAS) held its successful fourth annual conference since 2010 on 30 June to 04 July 2014 at the University of Rwanda. Centred around the 'Role of Astronomy in Socio-Economic Transformation,' this conference aimed at strengthening capacity building in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Space Science in general, while providing a forum for astronomers from the region to train young and upcoming scientists.

  10. Teaching Astronomy with Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Carmen; Impey, Chris David; Wenger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Students today are expected to have access to computers and the Internet. Students young and old, in school and out of school, are interested in learning about astronomy, and have computers to use for this. Teach Astronomy is a website with a comprehensive digital astronomy textbook freely available to students and educators. In addition to the textbook, there are astronomy Wikipedia articles, image archives from Astronomy Picture of the Day and AstroPix, and video lectures covering all topics of astronomy. Teach Astronomy has a unique search tool called the wikimap that can be used to search through all of the resources on the site. Astronomy: State of the Art (ASOTA) is a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Over 18,000 students have enrolled over the past year and half. This MOOC has been presented in various forms. First, only to students on the web, with content released weekly on host site Udemy. Then to university students who met formally in the classroom for educational activities, but were also expected to watch lectures online on their own time. Presently, it is available online for students to go at their own pace. In the future it will be available in an extended format on a new host site, Coursera. ASOTA instructors use social media to interact with students. Students ask questions via the course host site, Udemy. Live question and answer sessions are conducted using Google Hangouts on Air, and interesting and relevant astronomy news, or supplementary educational content is shared via the ASOTA Facebook page. Teaching on the Internet may seem impersonal and impractical, but by learning to use all of these tools, instructors have the ability to interact with students, and keep them engaged.

  11. Sky Survey Provides New Radio View of Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-10-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) have overcome longstanding technical hurdles to map the sky at little-explored radio frequencies that may provide a tantalizing look deep into the early Universe. The scientists have released images and data covering half of the sky visible from the VLA, and hope to complete their survey within a year. Radio Galaxies A "rogues' gallery" of radio galaxy types seen in the VLSS. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on Image for Graphics Page) The VLA Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) is producing sky images made at an observing frequency of 74 MHz, a far lower frequency than used for most current radio-astronomy research. "Because of the Earth's ionosphere, such a low frequency has proven very difficult for high-quality imaging, and it is only in the past few years that we have developed the techniques that make a project like the VLSS possible," said Rick Perley, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Because the high-quality VLSS images will give astronomers a look at the Universe through what essentially is a new "window," they expect the images to reveal some rare and important objects. "We expect to find very distant radio galaxies -- galaxies spewing jets of material at nearly light speed and powered by supermassive black holes," said Joseph Lazio of the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC. "By determining just how distant these radio galaxies are, we will learn how early the black holes formed in the history of the Universe," he added. Another tantalizing possibility is that the low-frequency images may reveal "halos" and "relics" produced by collisions of galaxies in clusters. If the halos and relics are found in the distant, and thus early, Universe, it will give scientists important clues about the timetable for formation of large-scale structure. In addition, the astronomers hope that the VLSS images may show previously-undiscovered pulsars -- superdense, spinning neutron stars. Massive planets -- "super Jupiters" circling stars beyond the Sun -- also might reveal themselves through bursts of radio emission at the frequency of this survey, the astronomers speculated. Images from the survey are being made available to other scientists as soon as they are completed. The survey will use some 800 hours of VLA observing time. The newly-released images and data are available via the NRAO Web site. "By doing this survey and making the results available, we are bringing low-frequency radio data, previously quite difficult to produce, to all astronomers in a simple and easy manner," Perley said. "We also expect that this survey will spur additional research into objects that scientists find puzzling or interesting," Perley saidd. "We really will have to wait for years to know the full scientific benefit of this survey," he said. In addition to Perley and Lazio, the VLSS team includes James Condon and William Cotton of NRAO; Aaron Cohen and Wendy Lane of the National Research Council and the Naval Research Laboratory; Namir Kassim of the Naval Research Laboratory; and William Erickson of the University of Maryland and University of Tasmania. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  12. Bakersfield College: Astronomy Notes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nick Strobel, from Bakersfield College, created this website to provide educational materials for the introductory astronomy course he teaches. Users can find a seventeen chapter online textbook, equipped with fantastic astronomy images and numerous review questions. The site offers a description of angular momentum; a mathematics review; tables of astronomy constants, physical constants, planets, and stars; and a glossary. Students can benefit by reading the study guide, which addresses ways to improve study habits and exam scores. Be sure to read Mr. Strobel's Copyright Notice prior to utilizing the resources avaiable here.

  13. Teaching Astronomy Using Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang; Brown, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    A recent paper in this journal1 presented a set of innovative uses of video analysis for introductory physics using Tracker. In addition, numerous other papers have described how video analysis can be a meaningful part of introductory courses.2-4 Yet despite this, there are few resources for using video analysis in introductory astronomy classes. In this paper we describe the use of Tracker in introductory astronomy to analyze a ``video'' consisting of a series of still images of star fields and sunspots. Because astronomy focuses on concepts unfamiliar to most students, the visualization that video analysis provides can be especially valuable.

  14. Astronomy Java Applets

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Scharein, Robert Glenn, 1959-

    These interactive astronomy java applets were created for astronomy students at the University of British Columbia. They cover topics dealing with the solar system and demonstrate the phases of the inner planets, retrograde motion, Kepler's Laws, cratering and solar eclipses. Applets on stellar astronomy include: fusion in the sun, the Big Bang, extrasolar planets, black holes, the H-R diagram, binary stars, parallax, the Doppler Effect, and black body radiation. The last set of simulations deal with telescopes. They demonstrate Snell's Law, electrostatics, and properties of lenses and mirrors.

  15. Mathematical Astronomy in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plofker, Kim

    Astronomy in South Asia's Sanskrit tradition, apparently originating in simple calendric computations regulating the timing of ancient ritual practices, expanded over the course of two or three millennia to include detailed spherical models, an endless variety of astrological systems, and academic mathematics in general. Assimilating various technical models, methods, and genres from the astronomy of neighboring cultures, Indian astronomers created new forms that were in turn borrowed by their foreign counterparts. Always recognizably related to the main themes of Eurasian geocentric mathematical astronomy, Indian astral science nonetheless maintained its culturally distinct character until Keplerian heliocentrism and Newtonian mechanics replaced it in colonial South Asia's academic mainstream.

  16. The Unified Astronomy Thesaurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, A.; Gray, N.; Erdmann, C.; Biemesderfer, C.; Frey, K.; Soles, J.

    2014-05-01

    The Unified Astronomy Thesaurus (UAT) is an open, interoperable and community-supported thesaurus which unifies the existing divergent and isolated Astronomy & Astrophysics vocabularies into a single high-quality, freely-available open thesaurus formalizing astronomical concepts and their inter-relationships. The UAT builds upon the existing IAU Thesaurus with major contributions from the astronomy portions of the thesauri developed by the Institute of Physics Publishing, the American Institute of Physics, and SPIE. We describe the effort behind the creation of the UAT and the process through which we plan to maintain the document updated through broad community participation.

  17. Astronomy in Ukraine

    E-print Network

    Ya. V. Pavlenko; I. B. Vavilova; T. Kostiuk

    2005-12-16

    The current and prospective status of astronomical research in Ukraine is discussed. A brief history of astronomical research in Ukraine is presented and the system organizing scientific activity is described, including astronomy education, institutions and staff, awarding higher degrees/titles, government involvement, budgetary investments and international cooperation. Individuals contributing significantly to the field of astronomy and their accomplishments are mentioned. Major astronomical facilities, their capabilities, and their instrumentation are described. In terms of the number of institutions and personnel engaged in astronomy, and of past accomplishments, Ukraine ranks among major nations of Europe. Current difficulties associated with political, economic and technological changes are addressed and goals for future research activities presented.

  18. Big Data Challenges for Large Radio Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Wagstaff, Kiri; Thompson, David; D'Addario, Larry; Navarro, Robert; Mattmann, Chris; Majid, Walid; Lazio, Joseph; Preston, Robert; Rebbapragada, Umaa

    2012-01-01

    Future large radio astronomy arrays, particularly the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to generate data at rates far higher than can be analyzed or stored affordably with current practices. This is, by definition, a "big data" problem, and requires an end-to-end solution if future radio arrays are to reach their full scientific potential. Similar data processing, transport, storage, and management challenges face next-generation facilities in many other fields.

  19. International Heliophysical Year and Astronomy and Space Science Activities in Arab States: Concentration on United Arab Emirates and Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Naimiy, Hamid M. K.; Al-Douri, Ala A. J.

    2008-12-01

    This paper summarizes International Heliophysical Year (IHY), astronomy and space sciences (ASS) activities in many Arab countries with the concentration on Iraq and UAE. The level and type of these activities differ in each country. -The paper shows also the current activities on topics related to IHY in different countries, following are suggested future Astronomy and Space Science (ASS) plans in some of these countries: -UAE Research Centre for Solar Physics, Astronomy and Space Sciences: A proposal under consideration for building a Solar Physics and Space Research Centre that may contain: Solar, radio and optical observatories, and Very Low Frequency (VLF) Receiver for remote sensing the Ionosphere on UAE region. The proposed research project will facilitate the establishment and conduct of VLF observations in the United Arab Emirate (UAE) as a part of Asia sector, thus providing a basis for comparison to facilitate global extrapolations and conclusions. -Iraqi National Astronomical Observatory (INAO): The Kurdistan Government/Universities planning to rebuilt INAO which has been destroyed during the two wars. Proposed suggestion is to build a 5-6 meters optical telescope and small solar telescope on the tope of Korek Mountain, which has excellent observing conditions.

  20. People in Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This biographical index provides short descriptions of the lives and achievements of prominent astronomers, physicists, mathematicians, and other persons who have made contributions to astronomy. Links to related persons and topics are embedded in the text.

  1. Women in Astronomy Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, Meg

    2000-04-01

    For more than a century women have played a key role in astronomy, making major discoveries that advanced the field. Today there are many examples of women astronomers leading new fields and making fundamental contributions to understanding the Universe. Yet women remain a small fraction of practicing (academic) astronomers. Only 5% of the full professors in astronomy are women, even though at least 10% of astronomy Ph.D.s have gone to women over the last 100 years (and the fraction is now approaching 25%). These and other statistics for women in astronomy, including those from the recent survey by the American Astronomical Society, suggest mechanisms are in place to help men advance beyond their representation in the talent pool. To ensure equity of opportunity and to strengthen science by drawing on the largest possible talent base, similar mechanisms might allow talented women astronomers to meet with comparable success.

  2. The Astronomy Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The wonder and mystery associated with distant objects in space has fascinated humans for millennia, and young people today remain eager to learn about the world of astronomy. Introducing the various concepts and processes associated with this branch of science in the classroom can be daunting, so educators and the curious public will be glad to learn of the existence of The Astronomy Center website. Sponsored by the American Astronomical Society, the American Association of Physics Teachers, and the National Science Digital Library, the site is a clearinghouse of digital resources that can serve as teaching aids, or as just a way to learn more about the world of astronomy. The siteâ??s homepage includes an "Astronomy News" area, complete with links to relevant news stories (such as discoveries of newly discovered space objects) and a feature that allows users to browse resources by type (such as labs or simulations) or topic.

  3. Center for Astronomy Education

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-09-14

    The focus of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Astronomy Education is simple, yet important: it is "dedicated to the professional development of introductory astronomy instructors." To that end, this website provides articles from guest bloggers, educational materials, and an array of high-quality resources. On the homepage, visitors can view sections that include Teaching Strategies, Publications, and Seeing the Universe. The Teaching Strategies area includes guest posts from college level astronomy instructors, while the archive includes posts focused on classroom assessment, curriculum, and goals. Moving on, the Seeing the Universe area includes an archive of images that can be used in the astronomy classroom. One of the best overall resources in the Teaching Strategies section is "You Don't Have to Do it from Scratch," which teaches instructors how to use conventional PowerPoint lectures more effectively. Finally, visitors can connect with the Center via Facebook and other social media sites.

  4. Astronomy, Astrology, and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Dorian Gieseler

    Astronomy and astrology were combined with medicine for thousands of years. Beginning in Mesopotamia in the second millennium BCE and continuing into the eighteenth century, medical practitioners used astronomy/astrology as an important part of diagnosis and prescription. Throughout this time frame, scientists cited the similarities between medicine and astrology, in addition to combining the two in practice. Hippocrates and Galen based medical theories on the relationship between heavenly bodies and human bodies. In an enduring cultural phenomenon, parts of the body as well as diseases were linked to zodiac signs and planets. In Renaissance universities, astronomy and astrology were studied by students of medicine. History records a long tradition of astrologer-physicians. This chapter covers the topic of astronomy, astrology, and medicine from the Old Babylonian period to the Enlightenment.

  5. Popularising astronomy in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafreshi, Babak A.

    2011-06-01

    The interest to astronomy has incredibly risen in the younger generation of Iranians during the last two decades. By the end of the devastating war with Iraq, science popularisation activities started again in Iran and with only a handful of astronomers and few dozens of serious amateur astronomers in the whole country in late 1980s now there are thousands of amateur astronomers (60% female on average) and over 100 professional astronomers propelling the fun and science of astronomy in the society.

  6. Astronomy for international development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George

    2011-06-01

    This review deals with the importance of astronomy for international development a nd capacity building. I shall summarize the present global state of astronomical research and education and describe current global astronomy education and development programs being carried out by the IAU and others. A decadal strategic plan will be described that envisages a substantial increase in IAU education and development activities during the next decade.

  7. NASA thesaurus: Astronomy vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A terminology of descriptors used by the NASA Scientific and Technical information effort to index documents in the area of astronomy is presented. The terms are listed in hierarchical format derived from the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus Volume 1 -- Hierarchical Listing. Over 1600 terms are included. In addition to astronomy, space sciences covered include astrophysics, cosmology, lunar flight and exploration, meteors and meteorites, celestial mechanics, planetary flight and exploration, and planetary science.

  8. Astronomy and Mathematics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    There are many European countries where Astronomy does not appear as a specific course on the secondary school. In these cases Astronomy content can be introduced by means of other subjects. There are some astronomical topics within the subject of Physics but this talk concerns introducing Astronomy in Mathematics classes. Teaching Astronomy through Mathematics would result in more exposure than through Physics as Mathematics is more prevalent in the curriculum. Generally it is not easy to motivate students in Mathematics but they are motivated to find out more about the universe and Astronomy current events than appears in the media. This situation can be an excellent introduction to several mathematics topics. The teachers in secondary and high school can use this idea in order to present more attractive mathematics courses. In particular some different examples will be offered regarding * Angles and spherical coordinates considering star traces * Logarithms and visual magnitudes * Plane trigonometry related orbital movements * Spherical trigonometry in connection with ecliptic obliquity * Conic curves related to sundial at several latitudes Some students do not enjoy studying Mathematics but they can be attracted by practical situations using Applied Mathematics: Astronomy is always very attractive to teenagers.

  9. Using multiple beams to identify radio frequency interference in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Harp

    2005-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a multiuser instrument and will perform simultaneous radio astronomy and radio search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) observations. It is a multibeam instrument, with 16 independently steerable dual-polarization beams at four different tunings. Here we describe a new method for identifying radio frequency interference (RFI) that leverages the unique attributes of the ATA. Given four

  10. GAIN ESTIMATION METHODS FOR POLARIZED RADIO TELESCOPE ARRAYS A.J. Boonstra

    E-print Network

    van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    GAIN ESTIMATION METHODS FOR POLARIZED RADIO TELESCOPE ARRAYS A.J. Boonstra 1¡ and A.J. van der@cas.et.tudelft.nl In radio telescope arrays, the complex receiver gains and sensor noise powers are initially unknown phase. 1. INTRODUCTION In interferometric radio astronomy, the telescope array complex receiver gains

  11. Signal Processing Tools for Radio Alle-Jan van der Veen and Stefan J. Wijnholds

    E-print Network

    Langendoen, Koen

    Radio astronomy is known for its very large telescope dishes, but is currently making a transition, the aperture of a radio telescope has to be 5 to 6 orders of magni- tude larger than that of an optical telescope to provide the same resolution. This implies that the aperture of a radio telescope should have

  12. The National Centre for Radio Astrophysics Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune University Campus, Pune 411007

    E-print Network

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    The National Centre for Radio Astrophysics Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune University as fundamental physics. Of course, research here is centred on low frequency radio astronomy, an area where Campus, Pune ­ 411007 http://www.ncra.tifr.res.in Welcome to the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics

  13. WestVirginia's NationalRadio

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) site. Your personal guide will introduce you to the fascinating astronomers are learning about the universe. Admission to our exhibit hall is free and kid-friendly. Browse; reservations required. Guests will gather under a planetarium balloon for a fascinating look at the night sky

  14. Cool Cosmos: Infrared Astronomy Tutorial

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NASA IPAC/CALTECH

    This Web site includes the following sections: Discovery of Infrared; What is Infrared?; Infrared Astronomy; Atmospheric Windows; Near, Mid & Far Infrared; IR Astronomy Timeline; Background & Technology; The Infrared Universe; Infrared Spectroscopy; News & Discoveries; and Images & Videos.

  15. Astronomy 101 Student Demographics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, G. L.; Hufnagel, B.; Snyder, K. L.; Miller, E. A.

    2001-05-01

    From 1999 to 2001, the Astronomy Diagnostic Test Version 2.0 (ADT 2.0) was administered to undergraduates taking introductory astronomy for non-science majors (Astronomy 101) across the United States. A national database has been established using the results from the ADT 2.0 taken as a pretest by more than 5000 students. The 33-question multiple choice test contains 12 student background questions that can be used to create a profile of student enrollments in Astronomy 101. Students who take introductory astronomy reflect undergraduate national trends of gender, choice of major, and ethnic background. Specific questions on course expectations reveal that these students are less confident of their abilities in science than in mathematics. Mathematics background is evenly split between those who have completed only high school level topics (algebra and geometry) and those who have completed college level topics (pre-calculus and calculus). Class demographics aid in the design of effective teaching strategies for successful learning. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation through grants REC-0089239 and DGE-9714489.

  16. Radio Telescopes "Save the Day," Produce Data on Titan's Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    In what some scientists termed "a surprising, almost miraculous turnabout," radio telescopes, including major facilities of the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), have provided data needed to measure the winds encountered by the Huygens spacecraft as it descended through the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan last month -- measurements feared lost because of a communication error between Huygens and its "mother ship" Cassini. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) A global network of radio telescopes, including the NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia and eight of the ten antennas of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), recorded the radio signal from Huygens during its descent on January 14. Measurements of the frequency shift caused by the craft's motion, called Doppler shift, are giving planetary scientists their first direct information about Titan's winds. "When we began working with our international partners on this project, we thought our telescopes would be adding to the wind data produced by the two spacecraft themselves. Now, with the ground-based telescopes providing the only information about Titan's winds, we are extremely proud that our facilities are making such a key contribution to our understanding of this fascinating planetary body," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, Director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). Early analysis of the radio-telescope data shows that Titan's wind flows from west to east, in the direction of the moon's rotation, at all altitudes. The highest wind speed, nearly 270 mph, was measured at an altitude of about 75 miles. Winds are weak near Titan's surface and increase in speed slowly up to an altitude of about 37 miles, where the spacecraft encountered highly-variable winds that scientists think indicate a region of vertical wind shear. The ground-based Doppler measurements were carried out and processed jointly by scientists from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL, USA), and the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE, The Netherlands) working within an international Doppler Wind Experiment team. The GBT made the first detection of Huygens' radio signal during the descent, and gave flight controllers and scientists the first indication that the spacecraft's parachute had deployed and that it was "alive" after entering Titan's atmosphere. The radio-telescope measurements also indicated changes in Huygens' speed when it exchanged parachutes and when it landed on Titan's surface. The original plan for gauging Titan's winds called for measuring the Doppler shift in the probe's signal frequency both by Cassini and by ground-based radio telescopes in the U.S., Australia, Japan and China. Cassini was best positioned to gain information on the east-west component of the winds, and the ground-based telescopes were positioned to help learn about the north-south wind component. Unfortunately, the communications error lost all the wind data from Cassini. The VLBA The VLBA CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for VLBA gallery) "I've never felt such exhilarating highs and dispiriting lows than those experienced when we first detected the signal from the GBT, indicating 'all's well,' and then discovering that we had no signal at the operations center, indicating 'all's lost.' The truth, as we have now determined, lies somewhat closer to the former than the latter." said Michael Bird of the University of Bonn. In addition to measuring the motion-generated frequency shift of Huygens' radio signal, radio telescopes also were used to make extremely precise measurements of the probe's position (to within three-quarters of a mile, or one kilometer) during its descent. This experiment used the VLBA antennas, along with others employing the technique of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Combination of the Doppler and VLBI data will eventually provide a three-dimensional record of motion

  17. An exemplary developing astronomy movement in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Sudeep

    2015-03-01

    Astronomy and space science education had been given least importance by Nepalese government in the past. The modern astronomy movement is believed to have started when an official observation programme of Haley's comet was organized by Royal Nepal Academy of Science and Technology (RONAST) in 1986. Following the huge pressure from the scientific community, the Nepal government (Kingdom of Nepal at that time) established B.P. Koirala Memorial Planetarium, Observatory and Science Museum Development Board in 1992. Initiatives of the project started with observatory set up and the development of astrophysics syllabus for university students. Astrophysics is included as an elective paper in the Physics masters course. The lead astrophysicist of Nepal Dr. Binil Aryal is running a research group in Tribhuvan University since 2005 which has a significant number of international publications. The developing government initiatives and achievements will be discussed. In 2007, a group of astronomy enthusiastic students along with amateurs working independently in past established Nepal Astronomical Society (NASO), which surprisingly increased the amateur activities and inspired other amateur groups to revive. During IYA 2009, more than 80 outreach and observation events were organized solely by NASO. NASO was able to collaborate with many international programmes and projects like GHOU/GTTP, EurAstro, AWB, UNAWE, SGAC, Star Peace, TWAN etc during and beyond IYA2009. Currently Nepal is recognized as the most eventful country of outreach and astronomy education among the amateur community. The success story of the astronomy movement and the local difficulties while organizing the events will be explained.

  18. Interference Cancellation Using an Array Feed Design for Radio Telescopes ChodHansen, Karl F.Wornick,'andBrion D.Jcffs

    E-print Network

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    Interference Cancellation Using an Array Feed Design for Radio Telescopes ChodHansen, Karl F.Introduction Radio frequency intcrfcrcnce (WI) is a growing problem far radio astronomers. Major sources with a single reflector. Outside of radio astronomy, array feeds are used to compensate for reflector

  19. Radio quite site qualification for the Brasilian Southern Space Observatory by monitoring the low frequency 10-240 MHz Eletromagnetic Spectrum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guilherme Simon da Rosa; Nelson Jorge Schuch; Cassio Espindola Antunes; Natanael Gomes

    2008-01-01

    The monitoring of the level of the radio interference in the Site of the Brazilian Southern Space Observatory - SSO\\/CRS\\/CIE\\/INPE - MCT, (29S, 53W), São Martinho da Serra, RS, in south a of Brazil, aims to gather spectral data for the Observatory's Site qualification as a radio quite site for installation of Radio Astronomy instrumentation, free of radio noise. The

  20. PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY ANNUAL REVIEW

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Samantha

    PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY ANNUAL REVIEW UCL DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 2008 #12;Cover image and Contracts 27 Publications 31 Staff 40 Contents #12;PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY ANNUAL REVIEW 2008 1 Introduction Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). The results arrived using a new scoring system which makes them harder

  1. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY

    E-print Network

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY DARTMOUTH COLLEGE GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012-13 #12;2 TABLE .....................................................................27 #12;3 SECTION I PRACTICAL MATTERS 1. WELCOME AND OVERVIEW The Department of Physics and Astronomy with some undergraduate courses. The course requirements for physics and astronomy students are given

  2. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY

    E-print Network

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY DARTMOUTH COLLEGE GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK 2014-15 #12;2 TABLE .....................................................................28 #12;3 SECTION I PRACTICAL MATTERS 1. WELCOME AND OVERVIEW The Department of Physics and Astronomy undergraduate courses. The course requirements for physics and astronomy students are given in Section II-1

  3. Astronomy Education Review

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-03-09

    The Astronomy Education Review (AER) is a web-based journal for "everyone who works in astronomy and space science education." AER is published by the American Astronomical Society, and each edition contains papers, reviews of research, and short articles on innovative work in the field. The journal began in 2001, and visitors can search through the past articles by keyword or volume. On the homepage, it's a great idea to start by scanning through the 10 Most Recent Additions to AER area. Here, users will find pieces like "Astronomy Apps for Mobile Devices" and "Using Smartphone Camera Technology to Explore Stellar Parallax: Method, Results, and Reactions." Along the top of the homepage, visitors can use the Browse tab, look over the About section, or read throughout the Features. This last area contains links to their RSS feed and a place to subscribe for alerts about new items from the AER.

  4. Astronomy Librarian - Quo Vadis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerstrom, Jill; Grothkopf, Uta

    "You don't look like a librarian" is a phrase we often hear in the astronomy department or observatory library. Astronomy librarians are a breed apart, and are taking on new and non-traditional roles as information technology evolves. This talk will explore the future of librarians and librarianship through the lens of some of the recent talks given at the sixth "Libraries and Information Services in Astronomy" conference held in Pune, India in February 2010. We will explore the librarian's universe, illustrating how librarians use new technologies to perform such tasks as bibliometrics, how we are re-fashioning our library spaces in an increasingly digital world and how we are confronting the brave new world of Open Access, to name but a few topics.

  5. Historical aspects of gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekantan, B. V.

    2002-03-01

    Over the entire 20th century, Cosmic Rays proved to be the watershed of fundamental knowledge from which poured out several streams that made us familiar with aspects of the universe that could never have been known through optical and radio astronomies alone. Cosmic ray interaction studies opened up the field of elementary particles and high energy physical processes. Gamma-ray astronomy enabled us to study celestial environments characterised by the dominance of high energy particles and their interactions with matter, magnetic and electric fields in the neighbourhood of these special environments. While neutrino astronomy is still in its infancy, it has the potential of becoming the most exciting field of study in the current century. Gamma-ray astronomy has had a chequered career. In the early part of the 20th century, Millikan proposed that cosmic rays are merely gamma rays. This was disproved by Compton, through the establishment of the latitude effect. The soviet astrophysicist Shklovskii pointed out at the III International conference on cosmic rays held at Guanjuato, Mexico, the possibility of supernova remants like the Crab Nebula being sources of TeV gamma rays. This was based on his realisation that the high degree of polarized light from the Crab could be due to Synchrotron emission by TeV energy electrons spiralling round the filamentary magnetic fields of the nebula. He argued that the same mechanism that accelerated electrons could also accelerate the protons which through their interaction with the surrounding matter generate pi-zero measons that would immediately decay into gamma rays. However, the efforts by the soviet experimentalists, who used the night air cerenkov technique for detection of the TeV gamma rays, proved negative; only upper limits could be set on the fluxew of TeV gamma rays from several of the SN-remnants; the negative results were first reported at the 7th ICRC held at Jaipur, India in 1963. High energy gamma ray astronomy had a remarkable revival with the discovery of Pulsars in 1967 and their identification with Neutron stars. The field has thrived since then has been extended even to the PeV range. Beginning with 1965, gamma ray astronomy in the energy range MeV to tens of GeV has also been successfully pursued with ballons, and satellites. The most perplexing in this energy range has been the discovery of the Gamma ray bursts. In the keynote address the historical aspects of this field will be covered with some references to the work in India.

  6. LOWFREQUENCY RADIO COUNTERPART THE XMM LARGESCALE STRUCTURE SURVEY ttgering,

    E-print Network

    Best, Philip

    radio sources influence fundamental physical properties as linear and radio power? What is connectionLOW­FREQUENCY RADIO COUNTERPART THE XMM LARGE­SCALE STRUCTURE SURVEY Cohen, Ë? ttgering, 3 N. E location properties extragalactic radio sources, XMM­LSS project includes a low­frequency radio survey

  7. Philippine Astronomy Convention 2009 Abstract: IYA 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divinagracia, P. P.

    2009-03-01

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 is a global effort initiated by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to help the citizens of the world rediscover their place in the Universe through the day and nighttime sky and, thereby, engage a personal sense of wonder and discovery. The vision of the IYA celebration is for everyone to realize the impact of astronomy and other fundamental sciences on our daily lives, and understand how scientific knowledge can contribute to a more equitable and peaceful society. Various global projects were initiated to help achieve the goals of the IYA 2009. An opening ceremony was held last January 15 to 16, 2009 at the UNESCO Headquarters at Paris, France to mark the beginning of the IYA celebrations. Attendance for the said ceremony was by invitation only. In the Philippines, Dr. Cynthia Celebre, Chief of the Space Sciences and Astronomy Section of the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration, and the Single Point of Contact in the Philippines for the IYA, and I, as the student representative of the Philippines, were invited to attend the opening ceremony. We also participated in a symposium with the theme "The Role of Astronomy in Society and Culture" which was also held at the UNESCO Headquarters at Paris, France last January 19 to 23 this year.

  8. KidsAstronomy.com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    KidsAstronomy.com was created by astronomy buff and elementary school teacher Hiram Bertoch. Her goal of creating a kid friendly Web site that is balanced between text and tech was definitely achieved. Interactive, visually pleasant, and content rich, the site provides kids a great learning resource that is fun to explore. One of the activities "How Big is the Universe" shows a picture of a man in the grass and lets you zoom out by powers of ten to finally see the whole universe. Teachers will also find the site useful with its free lesson plans, worksheets, and additional educational links.

  9. Babylonian Mathematical Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossendrijver, Mathieu

    The earliest known form of mathematical astronomy of the ancient world was developed in Babylonia in the 5th century BCE. It was used for predicting a wide range of phenomena of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets. After a brief discussion of the material evidence and historical context of Babylonian mathematical astronomy, its main concepts and methods are illustrated on the basis of a tablet with computed data for Jupiter. Finally, the past, present, and future directions of research are briefly addressed.

  10. Cosmic Ray Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Paul Sommers; Stefan Westerhoff

    2008-02-09

    Cosmic ray astronomy attempts to identify and study the sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. It is unique in its reliance on charged particles as the information carriers. While no discrete source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays has been identified so far, a new generation of detectors is acquiring the huge exposure that is needed at the highest energies, where deflection by magnetic fields is minimized and the background from distant sources is eliminated by pion photoproduction. In this paper, we summarize the status of cosmic ray astronomy, describing the detectors and the analysis techniques.

  11. Gamma-ray Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Jim Hinton

    2007-12-20

    The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

  12. The IDL astronomy user's library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    IDL (Interactive Data Language) is a commercial programming, plotting, and image display language, which is widely used in astronomy. The IDL Astronomy User's Library is a central repository of over 400 astronomy-related IDL procedures accessible via anonymous FTP. The author will overview the use of IDL within the astronomical community and discuss recent enhancements at the IDL astronomy library. These enhancements include a fairly complete I/O package for FITS images and tables, an image deconvolution package and an image mosaic package, and access to IDL Open Windows/Motif widgets interface. The IDL Astronomy Library is funded by NASA through the Astrophysics Software and Research Aids Program.

  13. The LOFAR radio environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, A. R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Zaroubi, S.; van Diepen, G.; Martinez-Ruby, O.; Labropoulos, P.; Brentjens, M. A.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Harker, G.; Jeli?, V.; Kazemi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mellema, G.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R. F.; Schaye, J.; Vedantham, H.; Veligatla, V.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H.; Conway, J.; de Vos, M.; Dettmar, R. J.; Eisloeffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Frieswijk, W.; Gerbers, M.; Griessmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Koopman, Y.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKean, J.; Meulman, H.; Mevius, M.; Mol, J. D.; Nijboer, R.; Noordam, J.; Norden, M.; Paas, H.; Pandey, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Rafferty, D.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Schoenmakers, A. P.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; van Ardenne, A.; van Cappellen, W.; van Duin, A. P.; van Haarlem, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; van Weeren, R. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wise, M.; Wucknitz, O.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: This paper discusses the spectral occupancy for performing radio astronomy with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), with a focus on imaging observations. Methods: We have analysed the radio-frequency interference (RFI) situation in two 24-h surveys with Dutch LOFAR stations, covering 30-78 MHz with low-band antennas and 115-163 MHz with high-band antennas. This is a subset of the full frequency range of LOFAR. The surveys have been observed with a 0.76 kHz/1 s resolution. Results: We measured the RFI occupancy in the low and high frequency sets to be 1.8% and 3.2% respectively. These values are found to be representative values for the LOFAR radio environment. Between day and night, there is no significant difference in the radio environment. We find that lowering the current observational time and frequency resolutions of LOFAR results in a slight loss of flagging accuracy. At LOFAR's nominal resolution of 0.76 kHz and 1 s, the false-positives rate is about 0.5%. This rate increases approximately linearly when decreasing the data frequency resolution. Conclusions: Currently, by using an automated RFI detection strategy, the LOFAR radio environment poses no perceivable problems for sensitive observing. It remains to be seen if this is still true for very deep observations that integrate over tens of nights, but the situation looks promising. Reasons for the low impact of RFI are the high spectral and time resolution of LOFAR; accurate detection methods; strong filters and high receiver linearity; and the proximity of the antennas to the ground. We discuss some strategies that can be used once low-level RFI starts to become apparent. It is important that the frequency range of LOFAR remains free of broadband interference, such as DAB stations and windmills.

  14. Using a Satellite Swarm for building a Space-based Radio Telescope for Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentum, Mark; Boonstra, A. J.; Verhoeven, C. J. M.; van der Veen, A. J.; Gill, E. K. A.; Saks, N.; Falcke, H.; Klein-Wolt, M.; Rajan, R. T.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Arts, M.; van't Klooster, K.; Beliün, F.; Meijerink, A.; Monna, B.; Rotteveel, J.; Boer, M. A.; Bongers, E.; Boom, E.; van Tuijl, E.; van Staveren, A.

    In radio astronomy, as in astronomy in general, a wide range of frequencies is observed as each spectral band offers a unique window to study astrophysical phenomena. In the recent years, new observatories have been designed and built at the extreme limits of the radio spectrum. For the low frequencies several Earth-based radio telescopes are constructed at this moment. In the Netherlands, the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) is being constructed at this moment and will be operational later this year. LOFAR observes the sky between 30 and 240 MHz. Observing at even lower frequencies is very interesting, but, due to the influence of the Earth's ionosphere this is not possible from Earth. Thus, the only option to observe low frequencies is a telescope in space. In the past several studies have been conducted on a low-frequency space-based radio tele-scope. In the recent ESA project Distributed Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy in Space (DARIS), such a mission was studied in detail. The study focused on a moderate-size three-dimensional satellite constellation operating as a coherent large-aperture synthesis array. The DARIS project is presented in a separate conference contribution. In the DARIS project the focus was on technology available at this moment, with an outlook and technological development plan/roadmap to be exploited for the future. Using current-day technologies, a space-based low-frequency array would be bulky and, thus, costly. A logical next step would be to investigate possibilities to miniaturize the electronics and use very small satellites, perhaps even nano satellites with masses between 1-10 kg to build the radio tele-scope. The approach is to use a swarm of satellites to establish a virtual telescope to perform the astronomical task. This is investigated in the NWO/STW-funded OLFAR (Orbiting Low Frequency Array) project. The OLFAR radio telescope will be composed of an antenna array based on satellites deployed at a location where the Earth's interference is limited, and where the satellites can be maintained in a three-dimensional configuration with a maximum diameter of 100 km. A Moon orbit could be suitable option. Each individual satellite will consist of deployable antennas. The sky signals will be amplified using an integrated ultra-low power direct sampling receiver and digitizer. Using digital fil-tering, any subband within the LNA passband can be selected. The data will be distributed over the available nodes in space. On-board signal processing will filter the data, invoke RFI mitigation algorithms (if necessary), and finally, correlate the data in a phased array mode. If more satellites are available, they will automatically join the array. The final correlated or beam-formed data will be sent to Earth as part of the telemetry data using a radio link. As the satellites will be far away from Earth, communication to and from Earth will require diversity communication schemes, using all the individual satellites together. In this paper, the design parameters for the satellites and the swarm will be discussed and status of the OLFAR project will be reported. Details will be given about the system and the signals that are expected.

  15. The PockeQube T-LogoQube: a Prototype Approach for Future Spaced Based Astronomy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Aaron; Zack, Kevin; Jernigan, J. Garrett; Twiggs, Bob James; Cominsky, Lynn R.; Malphrus, Benjamin K.; Silverman, B. S; McNeil, S.; Roach-Barrette, W.

    2014-06-01

    T-LogoQube is a first generation 3P (size 5 cm x 5 cm x 15 cm) ~500 gram PocketQube which flies instrumentation. The project is a collaboration between undergraduate universities Morehead State (MSU) in Kentucky and Sonoma State (SSU) in California. The purpose of this project is to develop a platform for future space-based science experiments including astronomy. This first 3P satellite is one of the smallest, stand-alone satellites to send both a radio beacons and instrumentation telemetry. T-LogoQube successfully reached orbit on November 21 in a sun synchronous polar low-earth orbit. A Russian DNEPR-1 rocket from Dombarovsky Cosmodrome at Yasny, Russia carried an Italian micro-satellite calledUnisat-5 which actually released the T-LogoQube satellite into space. Flight software is written in the programming language microLogo (ulogo) which makes this satellite a platform for future spaced-based astronomy experiments. The T-LogoQube team is comprised of about fifty people (professional mentors, faculty, and students).

  16. Astronomy as a Hobby

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Peston

    \\u000a It is said that Astronomy is the oldest of the sciences. For thousands of years civilisations have looked up at the sky, the\\u000a Sun, the Moon and the Planets and tried to link their destinies to them. Huge stone observatories were built to predict the\\u000a movements of the Sun, Moon and the Stars.

  17. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald A. Lubowich

    2007-01-01

    Astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients are an effective way to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students - and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented. In this poster I describe edible demonstrations I have created to simulate the expansion of the

  18. Adaptive Optics in Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jay J. McCarthy

    The field of adaptive optics (AO) has developed as a means to correct for the phase disturbances of an optical signal by understanding the medium through which it passes. This paper is intended to be a brief introduction to the field of adaptive optics with an emphasis the role of AO in astronomy. T e l e s c o

  19. Teaching Astronomy Using Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang; Brown, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal presented a set of innovative uses of video analysis for introductory physics using Tracker. In addition, numerous other papers have described how video analysis can be a meaningful part of introductory courses. Yet despite this, there are few resources for using video analysis in introductory astronomy classes. In…

  20. Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Series of three pioneering NASA scientific satellites, launched 1970-75. SAS-1, also known as UHURU (Freedom), was the first dedicated x-ray astronomy satellite. SAS-2 was the first satellite to detect gamma rays, and it discovered the enigmatic Geminga source. SAS-3 also carried x-ray experiments....

  1. The International Astronomy Olympiad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Michael G.

    2011-06-01

    The International Astronomy Olympiad (IAO) is an annual scientific-educating event for students of the junior high-school classes, aged 14-18 years. The Euro-Asian Astronomical Society founded the IAO in 1996. The Olympiad includes an intellectual competition between these students. The style of the problems is aimed at developping the imagination, creativity and independent thinking.

  2. Neutrino Astronomy Scott Wilbur

    E-print Network

    Golwala, Sunil

    V protons, which should be created with neutrinos, have been seen Can be used to observe possible dark Particle Physics Extremely long baseline for neutrino oscillation studies Dark Matter Searches Many dark Detector Picture from AMANDA II Web Site: http://www.amanda.uci.edu #12;Advantages of Neutrino Astronomy

  3. The Future of Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Jesse L.

    1973-01-01

    Presents a summary of the Reports of the Panels'' published by the Astronomy Survey Committee of the National Academy of Sciences in 1973, involving aspects of cosmology, quasars, exploding galaxies, stars, stellar evolution, solar system, organic molecules, life, and interstellar communication. Included are recommendations for scientific…

  4. Frequency allocations for passive use of the radio spectrum to make scientific studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stull, M. A.; Alexander, G.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the legal implications of frequency allocations for passive use of the radio spectrum, which refer to receive-only radio services. Such receive-only services refer to the reception of radio signals generated by nonhuman agencies as in radio astronomy or in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Juridical interpretations of the public interest and of necessity are applied to these passive services.

  5. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    2000-10-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested in large university survey courses, as well as smaller classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. It has also been used in High School and Junior High School science classes. Below are some tools in the Astronomy Workshop. Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Planetary Calculators (New!): Calculate a simple formula, e.g. the escape velocity, simultaneously for all planets and moons in the Solar System. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Build Your Own Solar System (New!): Choose the masses of up to four planets, and their orbital sizes and shapes, and explore the prospects for life in your creation. Astronomical Distances: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  6. Is It Working? Distractor Analysis Results from the Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST) Assessment Instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephanie Slater

    2009-01-01

    The Test Of Astronomy STandards (TOAST) assessment instrument is a multiple-choice survey tightly aligned to the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's National Science Education Standards. Researchers from the Cognition in Astronomy, Physics and Earth

  7. StarTeach Astronomy Education: Building a Comprehensive Educational Outreach Program for K-12 Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Welser; D. H. Bennum

    2000-01-01

    The StarTeach project is a unique tool designed to generate excitement and enthusiasm about astronomy for elementary, middle, and high school students. The program was created out of the realization that astronomy is a subject with the potential to introduce children to many other branches of science, such as physics, chemistry, and geology. The development of StarTeach involves three main

  8. Conceptual Astronomy Knowledge among Amateur Astronomers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret L. Berendsen

    2005-01-01

    Amateur astronomers regularly serve as informal astronomy educators for their communities. This research inquires into the level of knowledge of basic astronomy concepts among amateur astronomers and examines factors related to amateur astronomy that affect that knowledge. Using the concept questions from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test Version 2, an online survey was developed as an assessment. In particular, astronomy club

  9. Status of astronomy in Rwanda and volunteer work at Kigali Institute of Education (KIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povi?, M.; Nkundabakura, P.; Uwamahoro, J.

    2015-03-01

    Until 2009, astronomy was undeveloped in Rwanda, without astronomy courses at universities and schools, astronomical facilities, or any outreach programmes. With the international year of astronomy in 2009, Dr. Pheneas Nkundabakura and Dr. Jean Uwamahoro from the KIE Maths-Physics department, both graduates from the South African NASSP Programme (http://www.star.ac.za), started a program of implementing the astronomical knowledge at schools and universities. During the same year 2009, IAU donated 100 galileoscopes for the secondary schools, and several astronomy workshops were organised for the teachers. IAU donated also 5 laptops to help students and lecturers to learn and use astronomy software. With this, KIE students have now a possibility to choose astronomy/space science for their undergraduate final year research projects. Moreover, there is an ongoing effort to look for further collaboration towards establishing the first astronomical facility (observatory) in the country.

  10. Astronomy and the limits of vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1993-01-01

    Celestial visibility is the study of the limits of observability of objects in the sky, with application to deducing the truth about historical events or to the derivation of astronomical information of modern utility. This study is based on what is seen by ordinary humans, either in their everyday lives or at times of historical events. The results of such studies have more relevance to non-scientists than does any other area of astronomy. Celestial visibility is a young discipline in the sense that the number of interesting applications with simple solutions outnumber the solved problems; it is a broad interdisciplinary field that involves work with astronomy, meteorology, optics, physics, physiology, history, and archeology. Each of these disciplines contribute specialized mathematical formulations which quantify the many processes that affect light as it leaves a source, traverses the atmosphere, and is detected by the human eye. These formulas can then be combined as appropriate to create mathematical models for the visibility of the source under the conditions of interest. These model results can then be applied a wide variety of problems arising in history, astronomy, archeology, meteorological optics, and archeoastronomy. This review also presents a dozen suggestions for observing projects, many of which can be directly taken for individual study, for classroom projects, or for professional research.

  11. Using the Teach Astronomy Website to Enrich Introductory Astronomy Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Impey, C. D.; Patikkal, A.; Austin, C. L.

    2013-04-01

    This year we implemented Teach Astronomy as a free online resource to be used as a teaching tool for non-science major astronomy courses and for a general audience interested in the subject. The comprehensive astronomy content of the website includes: an introductory text book, encyclopedia articles, images, two to three minute topical video clips, podcasts, and news articles. Teach Astronomy utilizes a novel technology to cluster, display, and navigate search results, called a Wikimap. We will present an overview of how Teach Astronomy works and how instructors can use it as an effective teaching tool in the classroom. Additionally, we will gather feedback from science instructors on how to improve the features and functionality of the website, as well as develop new assignment ideas using Teach Astronomy.

  12. Robert Nemiroff: Communicating Astronomy 365 Days a Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, L.; Russo, P.

    2010-06-01

    Few astronomy communication projects are as well known or as widely disseminated as the Astronomy Picture of the Day (or APOD for short). Since its creation in 1995, it has popularised thousands of images and helped to explain the cosmos through informative captions. Impressively, the site shows no signs of slowing down and has amassed many loyal supporters. This success can be attributed to the two astronomers behind the project: Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell. CAPjournal has interviewed Robert to discover his view of APOD, and the lesser known issues that surround it.

  13. Multicultural Astronomy Learning Using Sunrise and Sunset Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massalha, T.

    2008-06-01

    Effective learning mixed with enjoyable activities needs a suitable environment different from the normal curriculum that we (the teachers) and the students are familiar with. On this note, Astronomy activities are attractive and involving. We believe that there is always room to propose educational projects that are implemented outside the classroom walls. In this conference, we will give practical examples of Astronomy Peace Projects that were implemented in middle schools (for Jews, Christians, Moslems and Druzes) in Israel, during the 2002-2007 school years.

  14. Firefighters' Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Public Technology Inc. asked for NASA assistance to devise the original firefighter's radio. Good short-range radio communications are essential during a fire to coordinate hose lines, rescue victims, and otherwise increase efficiency. Useful firefighting tool is lower cost, more rugged short range two-way radio. Inductorless electronic circuit replaced inductances and coils in radio circuits with combination of transistors and other low-cost components. Substitution promises reduced circuit size and cost. Enhanced electrical performance made radio more durable and improved maintainability by incorporating modular construction.

  15. The IAU Office of Astronomy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauduit, Jean-Christophe; Govender, K.

    2014-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU), the largest body of professional astronomers in the world, has set up the Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) in partnership with the South African National Research Foundation (NRF). The OAD is located at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) in Cape Town. Its mission is to realise the IAU's Strategic Plan, which aims to use astronomy as a tool for development. It focuses on the following three main areas: "Universities and Research", "Children and Schools" and "Public Outreach". Eighteen projects worldwide have been funded for 2013 and are currently under way. More will be starting in 2014. The OAD is also setting up regional nodes and language expertise centres around the world. This presentation will describe the ongoing activities of the OAD and plans for the future.

  16. June 18, 2013 1 Department of Astronomy

    E-print Network

    June 18, 2013 1 Department of Astronomy Harvard University _________________________________________________________________________________________ Harvard College Observatory 60 Garden Street, MS 46, Cambridge, MA 02138 SpecialAppointmentsintheFASDepartmentofAstronomy Harvard'sprograminastrophysicsisgreatlyenhancedbythealliancebetweentheHarvard Astronomy

  17. Capturing Public Interest in Astronomy through Art and Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Sabraw, J.; Salgado, J. F.; Statler, T.; Summers, F.

    2008-11-01

    This is a summary of our 90-minute International Year of Astronomy (IYA) symposium workshop about engaging greater public interest in astronomy during the International Year of Astronomy 2009 through art and music. The session focused on: (i) plans for visually interesting and challenging astronomy presentations to connect with an audience at venues such as museums, concert halls, etc that might be apprehensive about science but open to creative experiences; (ii) the nuts-and-bolts of turning creative ideas into exhibits or visualizations; (iii) balancing scientific accuracy with artistic license; and (iv) how scientists, Education and Public Outreach (EPO) professionals, artists, musicians et al. can bridge the ``two cultures''---starting and sustaining multi-disciplinary collaborations, articulating expectations, and building synergy. The presenters shared with the EPO community some of the astronomy-art projects and resources that we have been developing for the IYA through a variety of collaborations. Our portfolios include state-of-the-art astronomy visualizations and tools, music videos and podcasts that highlight stunning images from NASA's Great Observatories; a video suite of astronomical images that can accompany live performances of Holst's The Planets and Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition; and SCALE, a multicomponent traveling art installation including the largest pastel drawing of the Milky Way.

  18. Capturing Public Interest in Astronomy through Art and Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mangala; Sabraw, J.; Salgado, J. F.; Statler, T. S.; Summers, F.

    2008-05-01

    Our 90-minute interactive panel and brainstorming session is about engaging greater public interest in astronomy during IYA 2009 through art and music. This session will focus on: (i) plans for visually interesting and challenging astronomy presentations (examples below) to connect with an audience at venues such as museums, concert halls, etc. that might be apprehensive about science but open to creative experiences (ii) ways to capitalize on interest generated through the arts to inspire lifelong appreciation of astronomy (iii) the nuts-and-bolts of turning creative ideas into exhibits or visualizations (iv) balancing scientific accuracy with artistic license (v) ways to publicize and disseminate programs at the interface of astronomy and the fine arts; and (vi) how scientists, E/PO professionals, artists, musicians et al. can bridge the "two cultures" - starting and sustaining multi-disciplinary collaborations, articulating expectations, and building synergy. The presenters will share with the E/PO community some of the astronomy-art projects and resources that we have been developing for the IYA through a variety of collaborations. Our portfolios include state-of-the-art astronomy visualizations and tools, music videos and podcasts that highlight stunning images from NASA's Great Observatories; a video suite of Solar System images that can accompany live performances of Holst's The Planets; and SCALE: a multicomponent traveling art installation including the largest pastel drawing of the Milky Way.

  19. Astronomy Training Module

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a lesson about the survival of humans in space. Learners will predict how human survival requirements are met by characteristics of our solar system and planet. They engage in an online Astronomy Training module in which they make changes to the astronomical conditions of our solar system and observe the effects of these changes on Earth. They then draw conclusions about which astronomical conditions are necessary to support human survival. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson 2 in the Astro-Venture Astronomy Unit. The lessons are designed for educators to use in conjunction with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

  20. Quia Astronomy Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Quia is short for Quintessential Instructional Archive. This site offers a collection of astronomy-based computer activities and quizzes developed by educators for students. Games include concentration (memory), word searches, matching, and flash cards. Topics covered include the nine planets, constellations, stellar evolution, moons, the Messier catalog, and general solar system and astronomical body facts. More tools are available with a subscription to Quia