Sample records for radio astronomy

  1. Radio Astronomy Radio astronomy

    E-print Network

    Metchev, Stanimir

    Effelsberg 100m telescope (Germany) Green Bank 100m telescope (National Radio Astronomy ObservatoryExperiment -10m (Chile, Europe) #12;Submillimeter radio astronomy #12;Size of telescope Snow sweep at Nobeyama 45;#12;Arecibo 300m telescope #12;Radio interferometer #12;Radio interferometer Very Large Array (VLA) (New

  2. Radio astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth I. Kellermann; David Heeschen; Donald C. Backer; Marshall H. Cohen; Michael Davis; Imke de Pater; David De Young; George A. Dulk; J. R. Fisher; W. Miller Goss

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3)

  3. Radio Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tenenbaum, David

    This article is a Why Files short piece on how astronomers use information from radio astronomy. Contrary to popular belief, large radio telescopes are not looking for signs of life outside our solar system, but are making images of black holes, centers of galaxies, and gamma ray bursts. These phenomena cannot be seen in visible light, but emit radio waves which can be translated into images. The article discusses how this process works, and the information gathered from radio waves.

  4. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  5. CRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Luis F.

    sciences, medical sciences, humanities and social sciences. The Foundation assists its Member Organisations, Programmes, Networks, EUROCORES, and ESF Research Conferences, to work on topics of common concern includingCRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy EUROPEAN SCIENCE FOUNDATION Committee on Radio Astronomy

  6. Radio astronomy at Stanford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracewell, R. N.

    2005-12-01

    Many astronomical topics were addressed by students and staff of the Stanford Radio Astronomy Institute over the course of decades, and some of the memorable milestones can be discussed here at length. These are antenna design and construction, the sunspot number series, astronomical tomography, the cosmic microwave background radiation, nulling interferometry for peering into circumstellar environments, celestial mechanics of the early Earth satellites, the extraterrestrial connection, dynamic spectra of exospheric phenomena, the versatile Hartley transform and Centaurus A. In addition to the text references, a complete list of solar publications related to the microwave spectroheliograph is appended. Further detail, and non-solar publications, are available in the annual reports published in the Astronomical Journal and Bulletin American Astronomical Society from 1961 to1980, especially the final report.

  7. Division X: Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Taylor, Russ; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Chapman, Jessica; Dubner, Gloria; Garrett, Michael; Goss, W. Miller; Torrelles, Jose M.; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Carilli, Chris; Hills, Richard; Shastri, Prajval

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of Division X in the IAU 2009GA took place in three sessions during the day of August 6, 2009. The meeting, being well attended, started with the approval for the meeting agenda. Then the triennium reports were made in the first session by the president of Division X, Ren-Dong Nan, and by the chairs of three working groups: “Historic Radio Astronomy WG” by Wayne Orchiston, “Astrophysically Important Lines WG” by Masatoshi Ohishi, and “Global VLBI WG” by Tasso Tzioumis (proxy chair appointed by Steven Tingay). Afterwards, a dozen reports from observatories and worldwide significant projects have been presented in the second session. Business meeting of “Interference Mitigation WG” was located in the third session.

  8. The future for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Rene P.; Hassall, Tom

    2013-12-01

    THE TRANSIENT UNIVERSE Rene P Breton and Tom Hassall argue that, while radio astronomy has always involved transient phenomena, exploration of this part of the electromagnetic spectrum has been falling behind because of the lack of data. But the advent of a new generation of radio telescopes such as LOFAR, could change that.

  9. Radio Astronomy Fundamentals I John Simonetti

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Radio Astronomy Fundamentals I John Simonetti Spring 2012 Radio astronomy provides a very different view of the universe than optical astronomy. Radio astronomers and optical astronomers use different terminology to describe their work. Here I present some basic concepts and terms of radio

  10. (Astro)Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    . Last year: "Current and Future Radio Astronomy Projects" This year: the search for extraterrestrial intelligence? the New Jersey roots of radio astronomy? why the Iridium telecommunications satellites are evil

  11. The development of radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, W.; Wielebinski, R.

    2002-07-01

    Following the detection of extraterrestrial radio waves in 1932 by Karl Jansky, radio astronomy developed quickly after World War II. It established itself soon as a new branch of astronomy with today's outstanding record in the detection of new phenomena in space. These have been honoured by a number of Nobel prizes. Radio astronomy largely depends on technical developments in receiver technology, antenna systems, electronics and computing power. Ever shorter wavelengths down to the submm-wavelength range became accessible, resulting in new exciting discoveries. However, now and in future care must be taken, in particular for the lower frequency range, of harmful man-made interferences, which might mask the weak signals from space. New international facilities with orders-of-magnitude higher sensitivity like ALMA and SKA are planned or under construction. Space-borne observatories like PLANCK will detect weak fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background, which will constrain cosmological models with an unprecedented accuracy.

  12. Synthesis imaging in radio astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R.A.; Schwab, F.R.; Bridle, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in techniques and instrumentation for radio synthesis imaging in astronomy are discussed in a collection of review essays. Topics addressed include coherence in radio astronomy, the interferometer in practice, primary antenna elements, cross correlators, calibration and editing, sensitivity, deconvolution, self-calibration, error recognition, and image analysis. Consideration is given to wide-field imaging (bandwidth and time-average smearing, noncoplanar arrays, and mosaicking), high-dynamic-range imaging, spectral-line imaging, VLBI, solar imaging with a synthesis telescope, synthesis imaging of spatially coherent objects, noise in images of very bright sources, synthesis observing strategies, and the design of aperture-synthesis arrays.

  13. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Associated Universities, Inc.

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    National Radio Astronomy Observatory Associated Universities, Inc. OUTSIDE OBSERVER TRAVEL: ________________________________________ Travel office East: Travel office West: Fiscal Office Fiscal Office National Radio Astronomy Observatory National Radio Astronomy Observatory P.O. Box 2 P.O. Box O 1 Green Bank, WV 24944-0002 Socorro, NM 87801

  14. Non-thermal radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekers, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation starts with Karl Jansky's discovery of cosmic radio emission in 1933 and notes the striking similarities to Hess's discovery of cosmic-rays in 1912. At first it was assumed that this radio emission was thermal but in 1939 Grote Reber discovered that it was stronger at longer wavelengths, requiring a non-thermal emission process. These discoveries had a revolutionary impact on astronomy and radio astronomy was born. The interpretation of this non-thermal radiation as synchrotron emission from high energy particles in the interstellar medium did not occur until the late 1940s but then it provided the link between radio astronomy and cosmic-ray research. Ginzburg, in particular, saw that cosmic-ray astrophysics was now possible using radio waves to trace sources of cosmic-rays. We discuss the discovery of extragalactic active galactic nuclei leading to the discovery of quasars and the first evidence for black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. We summarise the present status and future of some of the main radio telescopes used to image the non-thermal emission from external galaxies. Finally, we include a short description of the use of radio signals for the direct detection of cosmic-rays and UHE neutrinos.

  15. Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy Part I: The Mechanics and Physics Ronald J Maddalena August 1, 2008 #12;Outline Part I Background -- research inspirations and aspirations Vertical weather, .... Part II Results on refraction & air mass (with Jeff Paradis) Part III Results on opacity, weather

  16. Utrecht and Galactic Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Woerden, H.

    2013-01-01

    Important roles in early Dutch Galactic radio astronomy were played by several Utrecht astronomers: Van de Hulst, Minnaert and Houtgast. The poster announcing the conference contained a number of pictures referring to scientific achievements of the Astronomical Institute Utrecht. One of these (Figure 1) appears to show the spiral structure of our Galaxy. Detailed comparison with the famous H I map (Figure 2), published by Oort, Kerr, and Westerhout (1958) in their paper “The Galactic System as a Spiral Nebula”, indicates that both are based on the same data. However, the “OKW map” resulted from work done at Kootwijk, Leiden and Sydney. What claim does Utrecht have to this pinnacle of early Galactic Radio Astronomy? Let us trace the history behind this H I map, as sketched in more detail by Van Woerden & Strom (2006).

  17. Industrial interference and radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessner, A.

    2013-07-01

    The interferer - victim scenario is described for the case of industrial interference affecting radio astronomical observatories. The sensitivity of radio astronomical receivers and their interference limits are outlined. EMC above 30 MHz is a serious problem for Radio Astronomy. Interferer (CISPR) and victim (ITU-R RA 769) standards are not harmonised. The emissions from the interferer and their spectral characteristics are not defined sufficiently well by CISPR standards. The required minimum coupling losses (MCL) between an industrial device and radio astronomical antenna depends on device properties but is shown to exceed 140 dB in most cases. Spatial separation of a few km is insufficient on its own, the terrain must shield > 30-40 dB, additional mitigations such as extra shielding or suppression of high frequency emissions may be necessary. A case by case compatibility analysis and tailored EMC measures are required for individual installations. Aggregation of many weak rfi emitters can become serious problem. If deployment densities are high enough, the emission constraints can even exceed those for a single interferer at a short distance from the radio observatory. Compatibility studies must account not only for the single interferer but also for many widely distributed interference sources.

  18. Expanding radio astronomy in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaylard, M. J.

    2013-04-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Organisation announced in May 2012 that its members had agreed on a dual site solution for the SKA [1]. South Africa's bid for hosting the SKA has caused a ramp up of radio astronomy in Africa. To develop technology towards the SKA, the South African SKA Project (SKA SA) built a protoype radio telescope in 2007, followed in 2010 the seven antenna Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7). Next is the 64 antenna MeerKAT, which will merge into SKA Phase 1 in Africa. As SKA Phase 2 is intended to add a high resolution capability with baselines out to 3000 km, the SKA SA brought in partner countries in Africa to host outstations. South Africa has been working with the partners to build capacity to operate the SKA and to benefit from it. The SA Department of Science and Technology (DST) developed a proposal to establish radio telescopes in the partner countries to provide hands-on learning and a capability for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) research. Redundant 30 m class satellite antennas are being incorporated in this project.

  19. Python Ephemeris Module for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, T. B.

    2013-05-01

    An extension of the Python pyephem module was developed for Deep Space Network (DSN) radio astronomy. The class DSS( ) provides the geodetic coordinates of the DSN stations as well as other properties such as antenna diameter. The class Quasar( ) provides positional data for the sources in the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array (NRAO VLA) Calibrator Handbook and flux estimates based the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) Database or the VLA Calibrator Handbook. Flux calibration data are also available for the bright planets. Class Pulsar( ) provides the data from the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) Pulsar Catalogue in Python format.

  20. A Radio Astronomy Curriculum for STARLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltuch, D.; Hund, L.; Buck, S.; Fultz, C.; Smith, T.; Harris, R.; Castelaz, M. W.; Moffett, D.; LaFratta, M.; Walsh, L.

    2005-12-01

    We present elements of a curriculum that will accompany the STARLAB module "Sensing the Radio Sky" a portable planetarium program and projection of the radio sky. The curriculum will serve to familiarize high school students to a set of topics in radio astronomy. The curriculum includes lessons and activities addressing several topics related to radio astronomy and the Milky Way that consists of two main resources: a manual and a multimedia website. It is designed to accommodate a wide variety of possible uses and time constraints. The manufacturer of STARLAB, Learning Technologies, Inc. produces a short manual to accompany each presentation for the STARLAB. The "Sensing the Radio Sky" manual we have created includes the mandatory, minimum background information that students need to understand radio astronomy. It briefly discusses waves and electromagnetic radiation, similarities and differences between optical and radio astronomy, probable misconceptions about radio astronomy, how radio images are produced, synchrotron radiation in the Milky Way, and galactic coordinates. It also includes a script that presenters can choose to follow inside the STARLAB, a lesson plan for teachers, and activities for students to complete before and after the STARLAB experience that mirror the scientific method. The multimedia website includes more detailed information about electromagnetic radiation and a more detailed comparison of optical and radio astronomy. It also discusses the life cycles of stars, radiation from a variety of specific sources, and pulsars, as each relates to radio astronomy. The five highly detailed lessons are pulled together in sixth "overview lesson", intended for use by teachers who want to present more than the basic material in the manual, but do not have the classroom time to teach all five of the in-depth lessons. . We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  1. Introduction to special section on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Introduction to special section on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy presented at the Workshop on the Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy (RFI2004), Introduction to special section on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy, Radio Sci

  2. A Teaching Lab in Radio Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kirk R.; Cudaback, David D.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a study in which participants in a summer institute for secondary science teachers performed a series of experiments with a radio telescope. Concludes that a radio astronomy teaching facility would encourage students to use their own initiative and strategy in working with the scientific concepts involved. (MLH)

  3. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Electronics Division Technical Note No. 219

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    of Arizona's 12 Meter (12-M) Telescope1 1 The 12-M Telescope at Kitt Peak is operated by the Arizona Radio1 National Radio Astronomy Observatory Electronics Division Technical Note No. 219 Measurements of Automotive Radar Emissions received by a Radio Astronomy Observatory Darrel Emerson (National Radio Astronomy

  4. Grote Reber, Radio Astronomy Pioneer, Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Grote Reber, one of the earliest pioneers of radio astronomy, died in Tasmania on December 20, just two days shy of his 91st birthday. Reber was the first person to build a radio telescope dedicated to astronomy, opening up a whole new "window" on the Universe that eventually produced such landmark discoveries as quasars, pulsars and the remnant "afterglow" of the Big Bang. His self- financed experiments laid the foundation for today's advanced radio-astronomy facilities. Grote Reber Grote Reber NRAO/AUI photo "Radio astronomy has changed profoundly our understanding of the Universe and has earned the Nobel Prize for several major contributions. All radio astronomers who have followed him owe Grote Reber a deep debt for his pioneering work," said Dr. Fred Lo, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "Reber was the first to systematically study the sky by observing something other than visible light. This gave astronomy a whole new view of the Universe. The continuing importance of new ways of looking at the Universe is emphasized by this year's Nobel Prizes in physics, which recognized scientists who pioneered X-ray and neutrino observations," Lo added. Reber was a radio engineer and avid amateur "ham" radio operator in Wheaton, Illinois, in the 1930s when he read about Karl Jansky's 1932 discovery of natural radio emissions coming from outer space. As an amateur operator, Reber had won awards and communicated with other amateurs around the world, and later wrote that he had concluded "there were no more worlds to conquer" in radio. Learning of Jansky's discovery gave Reber a whole new challenge that he attacked with vigor. Analyzing the problem as an engineer, Reber concluded that what he needed was a parabolic-dish antenna, something quite uncommon in the 1930s. In 1937, using his own funds, he constructed a 31.4-foot-diameter dish antenna in his back yard. The strange contraption attracted curious attention from his neighbors and became something of a minor tourist attraction, he later recalled. Using electronics he designed and built that pushed the technical capabilities of the era, Reber succeeded in detecting "cosmic static" in 1939. In 1941, Reber produced the first radio map of the sky, based on a series of systematic observations. His radio-astronomy work continued over the next several years. Though not a professional scientist, his research results were published in a number of prestigious technical journals, including Nature, the Astrophysical Journal, the Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers and the Journal of Geophysical Research. Reber also received a number of honors normally reserved for scientists professionally trained in astronomy, including the American Astronomical Society's Henry Norris Russell Lectureship and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's Bruce Medal in 1962, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Jansky Lectureship in 1975, and the Royal Astronomical Society's Jackson-Gwilt Medal in 1983. Reber's original dish antenna now is on display at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's site in Green Bank, West Virginia, where Reber worked in the late 1950s. All of his scientific papers and records as well as his personal and scientific correspondence are held by the NRAO, and will be exhibited in the observatory's planned new library in Charlottesville, Virginia. Reber's amateur-radio callsign, W9GFZ, is held by the NRAO Amateur Radio Club. This callsign was used on the air for the first time since the 1930s on August 25, 2000, to mark the dedication of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  5. Technology Advances for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Damon Stuart

    The field of radio astronomy continues to provide fundamental contributions to the understanding of the evolution, and inner workings of, our universe. It has done so from its humble beginnings, where single antennas and receivers were used for observation, to today's focal plane arrays and interferometers. The number of receiving elements (pixels) in these instruments is quickly growing, currently approaching one hundred. For the instruments of tomorrow, the number of receiving elements will be in the thousands. Such instruments will enable researchers to peer deeper into the fabric of our universe and do so at faster survey speeds. They will provide enormous capability, both for unraveling today's mysteries as well as for the discovery of new phenomena. Among other challenges, producing the large numbers of low-noise amplifiers required for these instruments will be no easy task. The work described in this thesis advances the state of the art in three critical areas, technological advancements necessary for the future design and manufacturing of thousands of low-noise amplifiers. These areas being: the automated, cryogenic, probing of diameter100 mm indium phosphide wafers; a system for measuring the noise parameters of devices at cryogenic temperatures; and the development of low-noise, silicon germanium amplifiers for terahertz mixer receivers. The four chapters that comprise the body of this work detail the background, design, assembly, and testing involved in these contributions. Also included is a brief survey of noise parameters, the knowledge of which is fundamental to the design of low-noise amplifiers and the optimization of the system noise temperature for large, dense, interferometers.

  6. Teaching radio astronomy with Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    A simple, easy to build and portable radio telescope, called Affordable Small Radio Telescope (ASRT), has been developed by the Radio Physics Laboratory (RPL), a radio astronomy teaching unit associated with the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (TIFR) and Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), which are two premier astronomy institutes in India. ASRT consists of off-the-shelf available Direct to Home television dishes and is easy to assemble. Our design is scalable from simple very low cost telescope to more complex yet moderately costing instrument. ASRT provides a platform for demonstrating radio physics concepts through simple hands-on experiment as well as for carrying out solar monitoring by college/University students. The presentation will highlight the concept of ASRT and the different experiments that can be carried out using it. The solar monitoring observations will be discussed along-with details of methods for calibrating these measurements. The pedagogical usefulness of ASRT in introducing undergraduatephysics students to astrophysics, measurements and analysis methods used in radio astronomy will also be discussed. Use of ASRT in the last three years in the programs of RPL, namely the annual Radio Astronomy Winter School for College students (RAWSC) and Pulsar Observing for Students (POS) is also presented. This year a new program was initiated to form a virtual group of an ASRT community, which will not only share their measurements, but also think of improving the pedagogical usefulness of ASRT by innovative experiments. This initiative is presented with the best practices drawn from our experience in using ASRT as a tool for student training in space sciences. The talk will also point out future ideas in involving a larger body of students in simple radio astronomy experiments with the ASRT, which RPL is likely to nucleate as part of its mandate.

  7. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  8. 47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2...COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Allocation, Assignment, and Use of Radio Frequencies § 2.107 Radio...

  9. 47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2...COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Allocation, Assignment, and Use of Radio Frequencies § 2.107 Radio...

  10. 47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2...COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Allocation, Assignment, and Use of Radio Frequencies § 2.107 Radio...

  11. 47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2...COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Allocation, Assignment, and Use of Radio Frequencies § 2.107 Radio...

  12. 47 CFR 2.107 - Radio astronomy station notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio astronomy station notification. 2...COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Allocation, Assignment, and Use of Radio Frequencies § 2.107 Radio...

  13. Genesis of Radio Astronomy at BYU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakley, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    We are beginning a new program in state-of-the-art radio astronomy at BYU. Our first effort consists of a 4-meter radio antenna designed to image hydrogen spin-flip and maser lines within our galaxy where frequencies of interest include 1.4GHz -- 1.6GHz. We employ a unique spectrometer/correllator that may be used both independently as well as in conjunction with a 5-antenna array for imaging. Our correlator/spectrometer is based upon CASPER hardware/firmware, as used at leading edge radio astronomy sites at JPL, Harvard, Deep Space Network, et al. This instrument system, to be followed by others, establishes a foundation for physics and astronomy research and teaching using state-of-the-art methods.

  14. The IAU Early French Radio Astronomy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne; Boischot, A.; Delannoy, J.; Kundu, M.; Lequeux, J.; Pick, M.; Steinberg, J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006 an ambitious project was launched under the auspices of the IAU Working Group on Historic Radio Astronomy to document important developments in French radio astronomy from 1901 through to the 1960s, in a series of papers published, in English, in the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage. This successful project has now come to an end with the sixth and final paper in the series about to be published (and a new WG project, on the history of early Japanese radio astronomy, has just been launched). In this paper we discuss Nordmann's abortive attempt to detect solar radio emission in 1901, and the important roles played by staff from the École Normale Supérieure and the Institut d'Astrophysique in Paris during the 1940s through 60s in developing new radio astronomy instrumentation and pursuing a range of solar and non-solar research projects in Paris itself and at field stations established at Marcoussis, Nançay and the Haute Provence Observatory.

  15. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Socorro, NM 87801

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    National Radio Astronomy Observatory Socorro, NM 87801 EVLA Memorandum 41 Lightning Protection protection. A major concern of this type of installation is the susceptibility of the cable to lightning reliable indication of the need for lightning protection on a particular cable route is a history

  16. Senior Design Projects National Radio Astronomy Observatory

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    signal processing hardware #12;8 ATelescope Designed to be Enhanced Software Engineering AdvancingSenior Design Projects National Radio Astronomy Observatory Richard Prestage, John Ford, Mark Near sidelobes reduced by a factor >10 from conventional antennas Gain & Sensitivity The 100 meter

  17. Three Radio Astronomy Futures: ALMA, EVLA, SKA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    astronomical telescope #12;NRAO Technology Center Radio Astronomy technology & signal processing push state Collaboration with Canada and Mexico Implements state-of-the-art technology Correlator wideband receivers: 1, Chile #12;To AOS (43km) OSF Site (15km) Operations Support Facility & Array Operations Site #12;ALMA

  18. Tools for teaching radio-astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, P.; Radiguet, A.; Albert, B.; Batrung, M.; Caillat, M.; Gheudin, M.; Libert, Y.; Ferlet, R.; Maestrini, A.; Melchior, A.-L.; Munier, J.-M.; Rudolph, A.

    2012-12-01

    In 2011, the worldwide radiotelescope ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) has started preliminary operations. Radio-astronomy is thus entering a new golden age, a fantastic opportunity for widening formal and informal educational training and public involvement, for making a science impact on young people. The EU-HOU consortium has developed a small radiotelescope network (6 antenna) spread over Europe and directly accessible from the web via a remote control interface. These antenna are mostly dedicated to high school teachers in the context of the COMENIUS European commission Lifelong Learning Program: ``Connecting classrooms to the Milky-Way''. However, such small antenna can also be used to teach at University and introduce students to radio-astronomy principles.

  19. Spectrum quietness metrics for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, Aaron; Wormnes, Kjetil

    2013-05-01

    We review metrics to assess the radio quietness of sites used for radio astronomy. Concise metrics are needed to compare candidate sites for new telescopes, to monitor the quality of existing sites, and to design telescopes to work well at a given site. Key points of assessment are the receiver dynamic range required for the strongest interferers and the expected fraction of spectrum available for sensitive astronomical measurements. We propose three metrics: (1) total radio frequency interference power, (2) interference-to-noise power ratio and (3) timefrequency occupancy. Box plots of these metrics summarise large quantities of information, highlight expected ranges of interfering signal properties, and aid comparisons of sites and other factors of interest. We provide examples for Square Kilometre Array phase one deployment in Australia based on measurements made for the selection of this site. The Square Kilometre Array will be the largest radio telescope in the world.

  20. Radio astronomy Explorer B antenna aspect processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. H.; Novello, J.; Reeves, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    The antenna aspect system used on the Radio Astronomy Explorer B spacecraft is described. This system consists of two facsimile cameras, a data encoder, and a data processor. Emphasis is placed on the discussion of the data processor, which contains a data compressor and a source encoder. With this compression scheme a compression ratio of 8 is achieved on a typical line of camera data. These compressed data are then convolutionally encoded.

  1. RadioNet: Advanced Radio Astronomy in Europe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    RadioNet, an Integrated Infrastructure Initiative (I3), has brought together 20 of "Europe's leading astronomy facilities to produce a focused, coherent and integrated project that will significantly enhance the quality and quantity of science performed by European astronomers." After learning about the Initiative's many objectives, users can find brief summaries of the program's integration of astronomy pursuits in the areas of transnational access, joint research activities, and networking activities. The website presents press releases, upcoming and past events, and information on engineering, software, and Atacama Large (sub)-Millimeter Array (ALMA) forums. Users can also find out about the individual collaborators research activities through the external links.

  2. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 1 near Saturn

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Warwick; J. B. Pearce; D. R. Evans; T. D. Carr; J. J. Schauble; J. K. Alexander; M. L. Kaiser; M. D. Desch; M. Pedersen; A. Lecacheux; G. Daigne; A. Boischot; C. H. Barrow

    1981-01-01

    The Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy experiment detected two distinct kinds of radio emissions from Saturn. The first, Saturn kilometric radiation, is strongly polarized, bursty, tightly correlated with Saturn's rotation, and exhibits complex dynamic spectral features somewhat reminiscent of those in Jupiter's radio emission. It appears in radio frequencies below about 1.2 megahertz. The second kind of radio emission, Saturn

  3. Auto-Adaptive Radio Astronomy Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratius, Victor; Lonsdale, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    Progress in the field of radio astronomy depends heavily on advances in instrumental capabilities, characterized by properties such as collecting area, resolution in the angular, spectral and temporal domains, field of view, and spatial aperture sampling. Generally, such advances in capability represent increases in the formal quantity of astronomical information that is received and processed by the instrument. The current generation of radio astronomy arrays can generate antenna voltage data at rates of Tbits per second, and forthcoming instruments will quickly expand these rates by multiple orders of magnitude. Future Exascale systems will have to make many choices on how to process subsets of big data. As human capacity will be overwhelmed at this scale, part of the discovery process will have to be handled by algorithms and machines. A key challenge will be to identify patterns of scientific significance in massive data sets and adjust instruments to become more sensitive to such patterns. As a step towards realization, we will revisit the current data collection and analysis pipelines from a fresh perspective that treats them as one system. In this system, multicore parallelism reduces big data accumulation by moving fragments of analysis and filtering closer to the data acquisition. MIT Haystack is pursuing approaches that enable future scientists to shift their interaction with bare metal instruments to steering search algorithms. Our vision is to create auto-adaptive instruments that can automatically adjust to identify and characterize interesting data patterns and properties, to optimize signal to noise ratios, and balance the search process depending on environmental changes. Bios Victor Pankratius is a principal investigator and computer scientist at MIT Haystack Observatory, where he advances new directions of computing in astronomy. Contact him at [pankrat at mit dot edu], victorpankratius.com, or Twitter @vpankratius. Colin Lonsdale is Director of the MIT Haystack Observatory, and has a 30-year background in observational radio astronomy and interferometric imaging. His email is [cjl at haystack dot mit dot edu].

  4. Project CLEA: Radio Astronomy of Pulsars

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This software for Windows, from Project CLEA -- Contemporary Laboratory Experiences In Astronomy, presents students with a radio telescope. The default operating characteristics (beam width, receiver noise, steerability) can be set by the instructor. Students can point the telescope at a source in the sky, viewing the output of the radio receiver on a graphic display that resembles a digital oscilloscope. The student manual describes exercises in which students acquaint themselves with the operation of the radio telescope, measure the signals from several pulsars at various frequencies, learn about pulsar signals, and then estimate the distance to the pulsar. The site includes student and instructor manuals as well as a pre- and posttest. The software is available for Windows only.

  5. Relationships Between Star Size, Radio Wave Emissions, and Dust Stellar Astronomy and Radio Emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parth Sehgal; Julian Trent; Adam Susaneck; Matt Robinson

    Radio astronomy is a branch of astronomy that deals with radio emissions from celestial objects. Hydrogen is an abundant element that makes up much of the universe. Neutral Hydrogen, found in many parts of the sky, emits radio emissions at a frequency of 1420MHz as its protons fall into lower energy levels. Through the use of a radio telescope, one

  6. Adventures in Radio Astronomy Instrumentation and Signal Processing

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    #12;Abstract This thesis describes the design and implementation of several instruments for digi Antenna Radio Astronomy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.2.1 Radio Telescope Arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 ii #12;3.5 Observing Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 3

  7. The Importance of Site Selection for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Zainal Abidin, Zamri; Abidin Ibrahim, Zainol

    2014-10-01

    Radio sources are very weak since this object travel very far from outer space. Radio astronomy studies are limited due to radio frequency interference (RFI) that is made by man. If the harassment is not stopped, it will provide critical problems in their radio astronomy scientists research. The purpose of this study is to provide RFI map Peninsular Malaysia with a minimum mapping techniques RFI interference. RFI mapping technique using GIS is proposed as a tool in mapping techniques. Decision-making process for the selection requires gathering information from a variety of parameters. These factors affecting the selection process are also taken account. In this study, various factors or parameters involved such as availability of telecommunications transmission (including radio and television), rainfall, water line and human activity. This study will benefit radio astronomy research especially in the RFI profile in Malaysia. Keywords: Radio Astronomy, Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), RFI mapping technique : GIS.

  8. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Rep preformed by the Standard Receiver Section of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West panel PA1102HG 1.42 2 Cambion handles 1252-1 1.82 1 Cinch barrier strip 5-141-Y .68 1 Gremar connector

  9. BROAD BAND ANTENNA ARRAYS AND NOISE COUPLING FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Zoya

    Zoya Popovi´c In radio astronomy radio telescopes that use large spherical or parabolic reflector, which makes the antennas expensive to build and maintain. A next generation radio telescope that uses. There are several advantages to a phased array radio telescope, as well as some potential difficulties that arise

  10. Radio Astronomy Software Defined Receiver Project

    SciTech Connect

    Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL] [ORNL; Leech, Marcus [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium] [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium; Oxley, Paul [Retired] [Retired; Flagg, Richard [Retired] [Retired; Fields, David [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes a Radio Astronomy Software Defined Receiver (RASDR) that is currently under development. RASDR is targeted for use by amateurs and small institutions where cost is a primary consideration. The receiver will operate from HF thru 2.8 GHz. Front-end components such as preamps, block down-converters and pre-select bandpass filters are outside the scope of this development and will be provided by the user. The receiver includes RF amplifiers and attenuators, synthesized LOs, quadrature down converters, dual 8 bit ADCs and a Signal Processor that provides firmware processing of the digital bit stream. RASDR will interface to a user s PC via a USB or higher speed Ethernet LAN connection. The PC will run software that provides processing of the bit stream, a graphical user interface, as well as data analysis and storage. Software should support MAC OS, Windows and Linux platforms and will focus on such radio astronomy applications as total power measurements, pulsar detection, and spectral line studies.

  11. Large Instrument Development for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. Richard; Warnick, Karl F.; Jeffs, Brian D.; Norrod, Roger D.; Lockman, Felix J.; Cordes, James M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    This white paper offers cautionary observations about the planning and development of new, large radio astronomy instruments. Complexity is a strong cost driver so every effort should be made to assign differing science requirements to different instruments and probably different sites. The appeal of shared resources is generally not realized in practice and can often be counterproductive. Instrument optimization is much more difficult with longer lists of requirements, and the development process is longer and less efficient. More complex instruments are necessarily further behind the technology state of the art because of longer development times. Including technology R&D in the construction phase of projects is a growing trend that leads to higher risks, cost overruns, schedule delays, and project de-scoping. There are no technology breakthroughs just over the horizon that will suddenly bring down the cost of collecting area. Advances come largely through careful attention to detail in the adoption of new technology provided by industry and the commercial market. Radio astronomy instrumentation has a very bright future, but a vigorous long-term R&D program not tied directly to specific projects needs to be restored, fostered, and preserved.

  12. JPL Big Data Technologies for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.; D'Addario, L. R.; De Jong, E. M.; Mattmann, C. A.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Thompson, D. R.; Wagstaff, K.

    2014-04-01

    During the past three years the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been working on several technologies to deal with big data challenges facing next-generation radio arrays, among other applications. This program has focused on the following four areas: 1) We are investigating high-level ASIC architectures that reduce power consumption for cross-correlation of data from large interferometer arrays by one to two orders of magnitude. The cost of operations for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which may be dominated by the cost of power for data processing, is a serious concern. A large improvement in correlator power efficiency could have a major positive impact. 2) Data-adaptive algorithms (machine learning) for real-time detection and classification of fast transient signals in high volume data streams are being developed and demonstrated. Studies of the dynamic universe, particularly searches for fast (<< 1 second) transient events, require that data be analyzed rapidly and with robust RFI rejection. JPL, in collaboration with the International Center for Radio Astronomy Research in Australia, has developed a fast transient search system for eventual deployment on ASKAP. In addition, a real-time transient detection experiment is now running continuously and commensally on NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array. 3) Scalable frameworks for data archiving, mining, and distribution are being applied to radio astronomy. A set of powerful open-source Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) tools is now available through Apache. OODT was developed at JPL for Earth science data archives, but it is proving to be useful for radio astronomy, planetary science, health care, Earth climate, and other large-scale archives. 4) We are creating automated, event-driven data visualization tools that can be used to extract information from a wide range of complex data sets. Visualization of complex data can be improved through algorithms that detect events or features of interest and autonomously generate images or video to display those features. This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  13. Olfar orbiting low frequency antenna for radio astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Bentum; Albert Jan Boonstra

    2009-01-01

    New interesting astronomical science drivers for very low frequency radio astronomy have emerged, ranging from studies of the astronomical dark ages, the epoch of reionization, exoplanets, to ultra-high energy cosmic rays. However, astronomical observations with Earth-bound radio telescopes at very low frequencies are hampered by the ionospheric plasma, which scatters impinging celestial radio waves. This effect is larger at lower

  14. 47 CFR 5.91 - Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... false Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. 5.91 Section...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE (OTHER THAN BROADCAST) Applications...5.91 Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In...

  15. 47 CFR 5.91 - Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... false Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. 5.91 Section...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 5.91 Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In...

  16. 47 CFR 5.91 - Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... false Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. 5.91 Section...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 5.91 Notification to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In...

  17. 47 CFR 5.91 - Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... false Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. 5.91 Section...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE (OTHER THAN BROADCAST) Applications...5.91 Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In...

  18. 47 CFR 5.91 - Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... false Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. 5.91 Section...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE (OTHER THAN BROADCAST) Applications...5.91 Notification of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In...

  19. Scott M. Ransom National Radio Astronomy Observatory / Univ. of Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    at the University of Virginia where he has several graduate students and teaches the occasional graduate class. HeScott M. Ransom Astronomer National Radio Astronomy Observatory / Univ. of Virginia Scott

  20. Low Frequency Radio Astronomy with the existing and future radio telescopes

    E-print Network

    Demoulin, Pascal

    Low Frequency Radio Astronomy with the existing and future radio telescopes A.A. Konovalenko radio telescope and also the creation of new large telescope of 10 ­ 70 MHz frequency range, Emmen, "Astrophisycs in the LOFAR era") #12;#12;#12;The low-frequency radio telescopes in Europe LOFAR

  1. Adventures in Radio Astronomy Instrumentation and Signal Processing

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    arXiv:1109.0416v1[astro-ph.IM]2Sep2011 #12;Abstract This thesis describes the design Antenna Radio Astronomy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.2.1 Radio Telescope Arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 ii #12;3.5 Observing Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 3

  2. International Agreement Will Advance Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    Two of the world's leading astronomical institutions have formalized an agreement to cooperate on joint efforts for the technical and scientific advancement of radio astronomy. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in the United States and the Max-Planck Institute for Radioastronomy (MPIfR) in Germany concluded a Memorandum of Understanding outlining planned collaborative efforts to enhance the capabilities of each other's telescopes and to expand their cooperation in scientific research. The VLBA The VLBA CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF In the first project pursued under this agreement, the MPIfR will contribute $299,000 to upgrade the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array's (VLBA) capability to receive radio emissions at a frequency of 22 GHz. This improvement will enhance the VLBA's scientific productivity and will be particularly important for cutting-edge research in cosmology and enigmatic cosmic objects such as gamma-ray blazars. "This agreement follows many years of cooperation between our institutions and recognizes the importance of international collaboration for the future of astronomical research," said Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. "Our two institutions have many common research goals, and joining forces to keep all our telescopes at the forefront of technology will be highly beneficial for the science," said Anton Zensus, Director at MPIfR. In addition to the VLBA, the NRAO operates the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico and the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The MPIfR operates the 100-meter Effelsberg Radio Telescope in Germany and the 12-meter APEX submillimeter telescope in 5100 m altitude in the Cilean Atacama desert (together with the European Southern Observatory and the Swedish Onsala Space Observatory). With the 100-meter telescope, it is part of the VLBA network in providing transatlantic baselines. Both institutions are members of a global network of telescopes (the Global VLBI Network) that uses simultaneous observations to produce extremely high-resolution images, and another network (the High Sensitivity Array) that uses the same technique with large telescopes to observe particularly faint celestial objects. With this technique, NRAO telescopes work with MPIfR's Effelsberg telescope to produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those from the Hubble Space Telescope. Both institutions also are part of the international collaboration building the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile and of the international planning effort to build a Square Kilometer Array. The VLBA is a system of ten antennas, each with a dish 25 meters in diameter. From Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii to St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the VLBA spans more than 8000 kilometers. Under the new agreement, the two institutions will continue their previous observational collaborations, and in addition will share resources to improve the technical capabilities of each other's telescopes, particularly at short wavelengths, They also will collaborate in the peer-reviewed process each uses to allocate observing time, and agree to mutually maintain an "open skies" policy allowing open access to each other's telescopes on a peer-reviewed basis. The agreement notes the report of the U.S. National Science Foundation's (NSF) Senior Review committee, which called upon the NRAO to seek partners to contribute to the operation of the VLBA. The MPIfR affirms its strong interest in maintaining the VLBA's unique scientific capabilities, and its monetary contribution toward the 22 GHz upgrade of the VLBA is a solid sign of that commitment. "The VLBA provides the greatest resolving power of any instrument in astronomy, and the MPIfR's contribution to enhancing its capabilities is an important validation of the VLBA's importance to frontier astrophysics," Lo said. The joint VLBA project calls for the MPIfR to fund the receiving-system upgrades and the NRAO to perform the work. The project is scheduled to be complete, with all 10 VLBA an

  3. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 1 near Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Evans, D. R.; Carr, T. D.; Schauble, J. J.; Alexander, J. K.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Pedersen, M.; Lecacheux, A.

    1981-01-01

    The Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy experiment detected two distinct kinds of radio emissions from Saturn. The first, Saturn kilometric radiation, is strongly polarized, bursty, tightly correlated with Saturn's rotation, and exhibits complex dynamic spectral features somewhat reminiscent of those in Jupiter's radio emission. It appears in radio frequencies below about 1.2 megahertz. The second kind of radio emission, Saturn electrostatic discharge, is unpolarized, extremely impulsive, loosely correlated with Saturn's rotation, and very broadband, appearing throughout the observing range of the experiment (20.4 kilohertz to 40.2 megahertz). Its sources appear to lie in the planetary rings.

  4. Figure 1: ATA 42 antenna array at Hat Creek ********ADAPTIVE REAL TIME IMAGING FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY*******

    E-print Network

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Figure 1: ATA 42 antenna array at Hat Creek ********ADAPTIVE REAL TIME IMAGING FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY --------------------------­ · Astronomers primarily interested in astronomy. ­ Data reduction preoccupies radio astronomy specialists,f,p Bandpass( )f PolCal( )f,p Gains( )s,f,p S Beam Imager Astronomy Solver I2 ( ) )^(^, 2sVpfV - å ¹kj X Solver

  5. Olfar, orbiting low frequency antennas for radio astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Bentum; Chris Verhoeven; Albert-Jan Boonstra

    2009-01-01

    New interesting astronomical science drivers for very low frequency radio astronomy have emerged, ranging from studies of the astronomical dark ages, the epoch of reionization, exoplanets, to ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Huge efforts are currently made to establish low frequency Earthbound instruments, since today’s technology is able to support this. However, astronomical observations with Earth-bound radio telescopes at very low

  6. Explorations in Radio Astronomy for High School Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Bridger

    2002-01-01

    Few educational resources in Radio Astronomy are aimed at a high school audience. This rich field, however, utilizes several areas of physics studied at the secondary level, from interference and electromagnetism to relativity and geometry. During the summer, J. Bridger developed a series of web-based projects and hands-on explorations specifically targeted at secondary students. In addition, these projects were adapted

  7. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 2 near Jupiter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Warwick; J. B. Pearce; A. C. Riddle; J. K. Alexander; M. D. Desch; M. L. Kaiser; J. R. Thieman; T. D. Carr; S. Gulkis; A. Boischot; Y. LEBLANC; B. M. PEDERSEN; D. H. STAELIN

    1979-01-01

    The Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment to Jupiter has confirmed and extended to higher zenomagnetic latitudes results from the identical experiment carried by Voyager 1. The kilometric emissions discovered by Voyager 1 often extended to 1 megahertz or higher on Voyager 2 and often consisted of negatively, or less frequently, positively drifting narrowband bursts. On the basis of tentative

  8. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Electronics Division Internal Report No. 61

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Electronics Division Internal Report No. 61 FREQUENCY SWEEPER John Payne Sep tember 1967 NUMBER OF COPIES! 100 #12;FREQUENCY SWEEPER John Payne . General Description The sweeper described in this note has been designed to be suitable for installation in a front-end box

  9. Radio astronomy in Africa: the case of Ghana

    E-print Network

    Asabere, Bernard Duah; Horellou, Cathy; Winkler, Hartmut; Jarrett, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    South Africa has played a leading role in radio astronomy in Africa with the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO). It continues to make strides with the current seven-dish MeerKAT precursor array (KAT-7), leading to the 64-dish MeerKAT and the giant Square Kilometer Array (SKA), which will be used for transformational radio astronomy research. Ghana, an African partner to the SKA, has been mentored by South Africa over the past six years and will soon emerge in the field of radio astronomy. The country will soon have a science-quality 32m dish converted from a redundant satellite communication antenna. Initially, it will be fitted with 5 GHz and 6.7 GHz receivers to be followed later by a 1.4 - 1.7 GHz receiver. The telescope is being designed for use as a single dish observatory and for participation in the developing African Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Network (AVN) and the European VLBI Network. Ghana is earmarked to host a remote station during a possible SKA Phase 2. The loca...

  10. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;GaAs CHIP CHOKE WHISKER CHOKE (.006" QUARTZ) CHIP INTRODUCTION Schottky barrier-Choke Subassembly The GaAs Schottky barrier diode is mounted and contacted in the choke subassembly shown in Figure

  11. A history of radio astronomy polarisation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard

    2012-07-01

    While intensity of electromagnetic radiation (radio, infrared, light, or X-ray) gives us primary information about the distribution of the baryonic matter in the Universe, polarisation is a parameter that enables us to investigate many additional details. Polarisation at radio frequencies gives us details of emission processes since the non-thermal synchrotron process dominates at low radio frequencies in emission regions. In addition, polarised radio sources can be used as probes of the intervening interstellar medium through which the radio waves are propagated. Faraday rotation effects are observed and in conjunction with known thermal emission can be used to determine magnetic fields. The Zeeman effect, a direct method of determining magnetic fields, depends on the observation of the circularpolarisation components of a spectral line. In this paper I describe the early polarisation observations of radio sources, but in addition I follow the developments through to the present day.

  12. PARTNeR for Teaching and Learning Radio Astronomy Basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquerizo, Juan Ángel

    2010-10-01

    NASA has three satellite tracking stations around the world: CDSCC (Canberra, Australia), GDSCC (Goldstone, USA) and MDSCC (Madrid, Spain). One of the antennas located at MDSCC, DSS-61, is not used for satellite tracking any more and thanks to an agreement between INTA (Instituto Nacional de TA~l'cnica Aeroespacial) and NASA, it has been turned into an educational radio telescope. PARTNeR (Proyecto Académico con el RadioTelescopio de NASA en Robledo, Academic Project with the NASA Radio Telescope at Robledo) is a High School and University radio astronomy educational program that allows teachers and students to control this 34-meter radio telescope and conduct radio astronomical observations via the Internet. As radio astronomy is not a popular subject and astronomy has little presence in the High School Curriculum, teachers need specific training in those subjects to implement PARTNeR. Thus, High School teachers joining the project take a course to learn about the science of radio astronomy and how to use the antenna in their classrooms. Also, teachers are provided with some learning activities they can do with their students. These lesson plans are focused on the implementation of the project within an interdisciplinary framework. All educational resources are available on PARTNeR website. PARTNeR is an inquiry based approach to science education. Nowadays, students can join in three different observational programmes: variability studies in quasars, studies of radio-bursts in X-ray binaries (microquasars), and mapping of radio sources in the galactic plane. Nevertheless, any other project can be held after an evaluation by the scientific committee. The operational phase of the project started in the academic year 2003-04. Since then, 85 High Schools, seven Universities and six societies of amateur astronomers have been involved in the project. During the 2004-09 period, 103 High School teachers from Spain and Portugal have attended the training courses, and 105 radio astronomical remote observations have been performed with users. Until now, more than 2,000 students have been involved in radio astronomical observations.

  13. A Virtual Tour of the Radio Astronomy Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, S. B.; Finley, D. G.; Claussen, M. J.; Ulvestad, J. S.

    2000-12-01

    In the summer of 2000, two teachers working on a Masters of Science Teaching Degree at New Mexico Tech and participating in the Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program sponsored by the National Science Foundation, spent eight weeks as interns researching and working on projects at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) which will directly benefit students in their classrooms and also impact other science educators. One of the products of the interships is a set of web pages for NRAO's web page educational section. The purpose of these web pages is to familiarize students, teachers, and other people with the process that a radio astronomer goes through to do radio astronomy science. A virtual web tour was created of this process. This required interviewing radio astronomers and other professionals involved with this process at the NRAO (e.g. engineers, data analysts, and operations people), and synthesizing the interviews into a descriptive, visual-based set of web pages. These pages do meet the National as well as New Mexico Standards and Benchmarks for Science Education. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. The NSF's RET program is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Need a Classroom Stimulus? Introduce Radio Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derman, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Silently, invisibly, ceaselessly, our planet Earth is showered by radio waves from every direction and from every region of space. This radio energy originates in our solar system, throughout the Milky Way galaxy, and far beyond, out to the remotest reaches of the universe. Detecting and unraveling the origins of these invisible signals is what…

  15. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  16. An outside view of Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, G.

    Astronomy is in a golden age of discovery of the new, with a growing appreciation from astrophysics that physics has studied so far an almost insignificant fraction of reality. This golden age is enabled by technology, with next generation technologies approaching the Giga-euro/dollar investment level. This forces a strategic view of relative strengths in the past, and strategies for future developments. Some of these may transcend traditional wavelength classifications.

  17. 47 CFR 73.6027 - Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast...

  18. 47 CFR 73.6027 - Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast...

  19. 47 CFR 73.6027 - Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast...

  20. 47 CFR 73.6027 - Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast...

  1. 47 CFR 73.6027 - Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Class A TV notifications concerning interference to radio astronomy, research and receiving installations...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast...

  2. Developments in Coherent Amplifiers and Miniaturized Receivers for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kieran; Readhead, A. C.; Reeves, R.; Gawande, R.; Kooi, J.; Gaier, T.; Lawrence, C. R.; Kangaslahti, P.; Samoska, L.; Varonen, M.; Lai, R.; Sarkozy, S.; Church, S. E.; Sieth, M.; Devaraj, K.; Voll, P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of InP HEMT amplifiers have produced a breakthrough in the cryogenic noise performance of these devices. Caltech's Cahill Radio Astronomy Lab (CRAL), JPL and Northrop Grumman (NGAS) are working to produce new amplifiers which can exploit this improved performance for radio astronomy. In parallel, these new amplifiers are being integrated into a family of miniaturized modular receivers which have wide application as focal plane arrays. Such arrays will have a major impact on a diverse range of scientific goals, such as measurement of integrated CO from the Epoch of Reionization, efficient spectroscopic and continuum mapping of Galactic emission and measurement of the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background. We report on these developments and prospects for the future.

  3. Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickola, Marisa; Gaylard, Mike; Quick, Jonathan; Combrinck, Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    HartRAO provides the only fiducial geodetic site in Africa, and it participates in global networks for VLBI, GNSS, SLR, and DORIS. This report provides an overview of geodetic VLBI activities at HartRAO during 2012, including the conversion of a 15-m alt-az radio telescope to an operational geodetic VLBI antenna.

  4. Radio broadcasting: an attractive way of broadcasting astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosoia, C.

    2008-06-01

    Astronomy is full of beautiful skyscapes, shining stars and huge planets. The vast majority of them can be transformed into tactile images and complemented by audio descriptions. These translations of visual information into raised lines, shapes and textures can be felt with the fingertips instead of viewed with the eyes. In this way, the beauties of the Universe enter the universe of blind and visually impaired people. Happily, we all have radio broadcasting as an important source of information and entertainment. Science radio programmes can bring the real music of the spheres (as Pythagoras once suggested) to the audience.

  5. Data models for Radio Astronomy in the VO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santander-Vela, J. D.

    2009-07-01

    Data Models are an essential part of automatic data processing, but even more so when trying to tie together data coming from many different data sources, as is the case for the International Virtual Observatory. In this talk we will review the different data models used in the IVOA, which parts of that Data Modelling work are still incomplete, especially in radio wavelengths, and the work the AMIGA group has done within the IVOA Data Modelling Working Group to overcome those shortcomings both in missing data models and support for Radio Astronomy.

  6. Correlating Radio Astronomy Signals with Many-Core Hardware

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rob V. van Nieuwpoort; John W. Romein

    2011-01-01

    A recent development in radio astronomy is to replace traditional dishes with many small antennas. The signals are combined\\u000a to form one large, virtual telescope. The enormous data streams are cross-correlated to filter out noise. This is especially\\u000a challenging, since the computational demands grow quadratically with the number of data streams. Moreover, the correlator\\u000a is not only computationally intensive, but

  7. A Maser Amplifier for Radio Astronomy at X-Band

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Giordmaine; L. E. Alsop; C. H. Mayer; C. H. Townes

    1959-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of a maser radiometer for use in radio astronomy at 3-cm wavelength are discussed. The operating system which is described has a bandwidth of 5.5 mc and an input noise temperature, including background radiation into the antenna, of about 85°K. An rms fluctuation level of about 0.04°K is attained using an averaging time of 5

  8. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  9. Planetary radio astronomy: Earth, giant planets, and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, H. O.; Panchenko, M.; Weber, C.

    2014-11-01

    The magnetospheric phenomenon of non-thermal radio emission is known since the serendipitous discovery of Jupiter as radio planet in 1955, opening the new field of "Planetary Radio Astronomy". Continuous ground-based observations and, in particular, space-borne measurements have meanwhile produced a comprehensive picture of a fascinating research area. Space missions as the Voyagers to the Giant Planets, specifically Voyager 2 further to Uranus and Neptune, Galileo orbiting Jupiter, and now Cassini in orbit around Saturn since July 2004, provide a huge amount of radio data, well embedded in other experiments monitoring space plasmas and magnetic fields. The present paper as a condensation of a presentation at the Kleinheubacher Tagung 2013 in honour of the 100th anniversary of Prof. Karl Rawer, provides an introduction into the generation mechanism of non-thermal planetary radio waves and highlights some new features of planetary radio emission detected in the recent past. As one of the most sophisticated spacecraft, Cassini, now in space for more than 16 years and still in excellent health, enabled for the first time a seasonal overview of the magnetospheric variations and their implications for the generation of radio emission. Presently most puzzling is the seasonally variable rotational modulation of Saturn kilometric radio emission (SKR) as seen by Cassini, compared with early Voyager observations. The cyclotron maser instability is the fundamental mechanism under which generation and sufficient amplification of non-thermal radio emission is most likely. Considering these physical processes, further theoretical investigations have been started to investigate the conditions and possibilities of non-thermal radio emission from exoplanets, from potential radio planets in extrasolar systems.

  10. Radio Astronomy in Malaysia: Current Status and Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, N.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Ibrahim, U. F. S. U.; Umar, R.; Hassan, M. S. R.; Rosli, Z.; Hamidi, Z. S.; Ibrahim, Z. A.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we will present the current status of radio astronomical research and outreach in Malaysia. We will also present a short history of our research group, which is currently the only radio astronomical facility in Malaysia. Our group is called the Radio Cosmology Research Lab and was established in 2005 by Dr Zamri Zainal Abidin and Prof Dr Zainol Abidin Ibrahim. We will discuss the future plans for this group including our keen interest in being part of a more global network of radio astronomers. We are already an active member of the South-East Asia Astronomy Network (SEAAN) and aims to have a radio astronomical facility in order to join the Global Very Long Baseline Interferometer (VLBI) as well becoming a research hub for the future Square Kilometer Array (SKA) project. We will also present some of the scientific goals of our group including providing a platform for radio astronomers to be able to do observations of weak and high red-shifted radio objects such as galaxy clusters and supernovae.

  11. Millimeter Radio Astronomy and the Solar Convection Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhypov, O. V.; Antonov, O. V.; Khodachenko, M. L.

    The global distribution of solar surface activity (active regions) is connected with processes in the convection zone. To extract the information on large-scale motions in the convection zone, we study the solar synoptic charts (Mount Wilson 1998-2004, Fe I, 525.02 nm). The clear indication of large-scale ( ? 18 degree) turbulence is found. This may be a manifestations of the deep convection because there is no such global turbulent eddies in the solar photosphere. The preferred scales of longitudinal variations in surface solar activity are revealed. These correspond to about 15 degree to 51 degree (gigantic convection cells), 90 degree, 180 degree and 360 degree. Similar scales (e.g., 40 degree and 90 degree) are found in the millimeter radio-images (Metsahovi Radio Observatory 1994-1998, 37 and 87 GHz). Hence, the millimeter radio astronomy could prove useful for remote sensing of the solar convection zone.

  12. The Harvard Radio Astronomy Station at Fort Davis, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. Richard

    2010-03-01

    The Harvard Radio Astronomy Station at Fort Davis, Texas, came into operation in 1956 as a radio extension of the U.S. Air Force Sacramento Peak Observatory. The location near Fort Davis was chosen for the low level of man-made radio signals. Initially the receiving equipment at the site included a 28-ft diameter antenna and covered the range 100-580 MHz. The receivers swept through this band approximately three times per second, recording the spectrum of solar radio activity. In subsequent years the frequency range was extended to cover all or parts of 10 MHz to 4 GHz. All recorded solar bursts were identified according to five principal spectral types, and lists including times, durations, and frequency ranges of all solar activity were published. Studies of the bursts included analyses of their relationships to flares and other optical solar phenomena, and also their relationships to geophysical phenomena, including magnetic storms and polar blackouts. An 85-ft diameter antenna was installed in 1963, which during 1970-1974 was used for solar observations in the range 580 MHz to 4 GHz. Otherwise this antenna was used for non-solar radio astronomy, including lunar occultations of radio sources, measurements of flux densities at 5 GHz, investigations of the Galactic Center, and similar projects. The solar program was closed in late 1982 after 26 years of continuous operation. After 1974 the 85-ft antenna was used mainly in a program of VLBI network observations conducted by astronomers from Caltech and NRAO. In 1991 it was replaced by an antenna of the VLBA program of the NRAO. This paper describes some details of the antennas and receivers, and results of the solar studies. It also includes a brief discussion of the non-solar observations other than the VLBI program.

  13. Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) 1 observations of terrestrial radio noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Caruso, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Radio Astonomy Explorer (RAE) 1 data are analyzed to establish characteristics of HF terrestrial radio noise at an altitude of about 6000 km. Time and frequency variations in amplitude of the observed noise well above cosmic noise background are explained on the basis of temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric critical frequency coupled with those in noise source distributions. It is shown that terrestrial noise regularly breaks through the ionosphere and reaches RAE with magnitudes 15 or more db higher than cosmic noise background. Maximum terrestrial noise is observed when RAE is over the dark side of the Earth in the neighborhood of equatorial continental land masses where thunderstorms occur most frequently. The observed noise level is 30-40 db lower with RAE over oceans.

  14. Real-time Streaming Correlation for Long Wavelength Array (LWA) Radio Astronomy Applications

    E-print Network

    -scale interferometric radio telescope arrays. The Solution: PASI correlates 256, dual-polarized 50-100 KHz antennaReal-time Streaming Correlation for Long Wavelength Array (LWA) Radio Astronomy Applications

  15. Data Intensive Radio Astronomy en route to the SKA: The Rise of Big Radio Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    Advances in both digital processing devices and in technologies to sample the focal and aperture planes of radio antennas is enabling observations of the radio sky with high spectral and spatial resolution combined with large bandwidth and field of view. As a consequence, survey mode radio astronomy generating vast amounts of data and involving globally distributed collaborations is fast becoming a primary tool for scientific advance. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will open up a new frontier in data intensive astronomy. Within the next few years SKA precursor telescopes will demonstrate new technologies and take the first major steps toward the SKA. Projects that path find the scientific journey to the SKA with these and other telescopes are currently underway and being planned. The associated exponential growth in data require us to explore new methodologies for collaborative end-to-end execution of data intensive observing programs.

  16. RASDR: Benchtop Demonstration of SDR for Radio Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Vacaliuc, Bogdan [ORNL] [ORNL; Oxley, Paul [Retired] [Retired; Fields, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Kurtz, Dr. Stan [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM)] [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Leech, Marcus [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium] [Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium

    2012-01-01

    The Society of Amateur Radio Astronomers (SARA) members present the benchtop version of RASDR, a Software Defined Radio (SDR) that is optimized for Radio Astronomy. RASDR has the potential to be a common digital receiver interface useful to many SARA members. This document describes the RASDR 0.0 , which provides digitized radio data to a backend computer through a USB 2.0 interface. A primary component of RASDR is the Lime Microsystems Femtocell chip which tunes from a 0.4-4 GHz center frequency with several selectable bandwidths from 0.75 MHz to 14 MHz. A second component is a board with a Complex Programmable Logic Device (CPLD) chip that connects to the Femtocell and provides two USB connections to the backend computer. A third component is an analog balanced mixer up conversion section. Together these three components enable RASDR to tune from 0.015 MHz thru 3.8GHz of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum. We will demonstrate and discuss capabilities of the breadboard system and SARA members will be able to operate the unit hands-on throughout the workshop.

  17. Superconducting filter for radio astronomy using interdigitated, capacitively loaded spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolli, Pietro; Huang, Frederick

    2012-03-01

    A matched pair of microstrip spiral superconducting filters with centre frequency 357.5 MHz and 29.4% bandwidth has been developed for radio astronomy. The high coupling coefficients required for the large bandwidth have been achieved through interdigitating the spirals to provide a large interaction length, and by adding loading capacitors on the inner ends of the resonators, together with previously reported features. A low-pass filter has been cascaded with each band-pass filter to mitigate spurious responses. Measurements show 0.09 dB loss, thought to arise mainly from sources outside the filter itself, plus 0.12 dB maximum ripple.

  18. The Advancement of Radio Astronomy at Brigham Young University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honick, Charles; Migenes, V.; Blakley, D.

    2014-01-01

    We are presenting on the status and future plans of the radio astronomy project at Brigham Young University. The Physics and Astronomy department and the West Mountain Observatory already have optical facilities that offer students the opportunity to observe in the optical and NIR, but not at any other wavelengths. An array is being built to allow students to obtain data in the radio spectrum. The array is being built around the already operational 4 meter dish on top of the Eyring Science Center and will eventually contain baselines up to 8 km and a 10 m dish. We currently have selected the four sites for additional baselines. The array initially will be ready to observe HI at 1420 MHz and the OH MASER lines at 1665 MHz and 1667 MHz. We present preliminary spectra in L-band (21-18cm) with the 4 meter dish. The system will be using LNA's for signal amplification and will have digital correlation and spectral analysis through CASPER. The system is locked to a rubidium clock with a GPS master. In the future, we hope to extend the frequency coverage to C-band (5 GHz).

  19. Explorations in Radio Astronomy for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, J.

    2002-12-01

    Few educational resources in Radio Astronomy are aimed at a high school audience. This rich field, however, utilizes several areas of physics studied at the secondary level, from interference and electromagnetism to relativity and geometry. During the summer, J. Bridger developed a series of web-based projects and hands-on explorations specifically targeted at secondary students. In addition, these projects were adapted into designs for exhibits for a modern visitor center at the Very Large Array. The projects developed emphasize interactive, exploratory investigation as a means to conceptual understanding. Multi-antenna interferometry is modeled using microphones and parabolic dishes, and many astronomical phenomena (AGN and Gravitational Lensing) are simulated using simple inexpensive classroom materials. In addition, many projects were developed that enable students to use sky survey data to develop long-term original research projects, emphasizing the value of multi-wavelength observation. The final project, developed as a web page, also includes sections on history, modern research and interferometry theory. The site will be accessible from the NRAO site and can serve as a general secondary resource for teachers wishing to incorporate a Radio Astronomy unit into their science curriculum.

  20. Embracing the Wave: Using the Very Small Radio Telescope to Teach Students about Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Needles, M. M.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Doherty, M.; Minnigh, S.; Arndt, M. B.; Pratap, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT) is a low-cost educational tool appropriate for laboratory demonstrations of the nature of radio waves and the principles of interferometry for use in both high school and undergraduate physics/astronomy classes. The system consists of small direct broadcast antenna dishes and other commercially available parts and can be assembled for under $500. Complete teaching units have been developed and tested by high school physics teachers to demonstrate radio wave transmission and exponential absorption though materials (Beer's law), the polarization of electromagnetic waves (Malus' law), the inverse square law, and interferometry. These units can be used to explore the properties of electromagnetic waves, including similarities and differences between radio and visible light, while challenging students' misconceptions about a wavelength regime that is important to both astronomy and everyday life. In addition, the VSRT can be used as a radio astronomical interferometer to measure the diameter of the Sun at 12 GHz. Full details, including a parts list, comprehensive assembly instructions, informational memos, teaching units, software, and conformance to national and Massachusetts educational standards, are available on the web at http://www.haystack.mit.edu/edu/undergrad/VSRT/index.html . Development of the VSRT at MIT Haystack Observatory is made possible through funding provided by the National Science Foundation.

  1. The Search for Axions: Non-Conventional Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, R. F.

    2008-08-01

    The strong-CP problem in particle physics can be resolved quite elegantly when one ponders the ramifications of a hypothetical particle known as the axion. In this paper, a plausible argument for the axion is viewed from a historical perspective and its physical properties are presented within a cosmological framework. The detection of axions through enhanced Primakoff conversion is described along with details of the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX), where NRAO's contribution is highlighted. Other search experiments are also summarized. The paper concludes with a short discussion of how the technology of radio astronomy might be used to enable other experiments that are designed to further our understanding of fundamental physics.

  2. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager 2 near Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Riddle, A. C.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Thieman, J. R.; Carr, T. D.; Gulkis, S.; Boischot, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment to Jupiter has confirmed and extended to higher zenomagnetic latitudes results from the identical experiment carried by Voyager 1. The kilometric emissions discovered by Voyager 1 often extended to 1 megahertz or higher on Voyager 2 and often consisted of negatively, or less frequently, positively drifting narrowband bursts. On the basis of tentative identification of plasma wave emissions similar to those detected by Voyager 1, the plasma torus associated with Io appeared somewhat denser to Voyager 2 than it did to Voyager 1. The paper reports on quasi-periodic sinusoidal or impulsive bursts in the broadcast band range of wavelengths (800 to 1800 kHz). A Faraday effect appears at decametric frequencies, which probably results from propagation of the radiation near its sources on Jupiter. Finally, the occurrence of decametric emission in homologous arc families is discussed.

  3. NAIC/NRAO School on Single Dish Radio Astronomy ASP Conference Series, Vol. , 2001

    E-print Network

    O'Neil, Karen

    to calibrate radio telescope data in the centimeter wavelength regime. This includes a discussion of the varNAIC/NRAO School on Single Dish Radio Astronomy ASP Conference Series, Vol. , 2001 Salter, et al. Single Dish Calibration Techniques at Radio Wavelengths K. O'Neil NAIC/Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995

  4. Jansky and Reber: Two Remarkable Stories in Early Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. T., III

    1996-05-01

    Extraterrestrial radio waves were first detected in 1931-32 by Karl Jansky at the Bell Telephone Labs in New Jersey while he was investigating sources of interference to recently opened, trans-Atlantic shortwave (20 MHz) radiotelephone circuits. At this time Jansky was only a few years beyond his physics degree from the University of Wisconsin, where his father was a professor of engineering. Jansky studied this "star noise" off and on until 1935, establishing that the emission came from the direction of the Milky Way and the galactic center, but did not pursue it in any further detail. The only other person to make a significant contribution to the nascent subject before World War II was Grote Reber, an electrical engineer who worked for several different radio firms in Chicago. After reading Jansky's articles, in 1937 Reber decided to build a 30-ft diameter dish antenna in the backyard of his suburban home in Wheaton, Illinois. By 1939 he had detected the Jansky radiation, which he called "cosmic noise", at 160 MHz and he comenced a long term program of mapping it in detail (with a 12 degree beam). Reber became a well-known figure to the astronomers at the University of Chicago and Yerkes Observatory (Struve, Greenstein, Kuiper, Henyey, Keenan) as he sought to learn astronomy and convince the staff that this cosmic noise was of importance. Struve, editor of the "Astrophysical Journal", was finally persuaded to publish Reber's articles. During and just after the war Reber extended his work to 480 MHz. He then sought funds to move his dish to a quieter locale and to build a second, much larger dish, but neither of these plans came to fruition. It is ironic that the remarkable contributions of these two pioneers to the field that would eventually become known as "radio astronomy" (a term only introduced in the late 1940s) had little influence on the spectacular growth of the field in the decade after World War II. The great bulk of the important work was done in England and Australia, where it grew wholly independently out of wartime radar labs. Reasons for the lag in the US, largely due to the effects of military funding and the strong community of (optical) astronomers, will be discussed.

  5. Network Development of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of ASC LPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumsky, D. V.; Isaev, E. A.; Pugachev, V. D.; Samodurov, V. A.; Likhachev, S. F.; Shatskaya, M. V.; Kitaeva, M. A.

    All main changes in the network of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory has been related to introduction of the buffer data center in the recent years, upgrading internal and external communication channels and the exploitation of ip-telephony.

  6. Broad band antenna arrays and noise coupling for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters Weem, Jan Peter

    In radio astronomy radio telescopes that use large spherical or parabolic reflector antennas are often used. They contain cryogenic cooling to lower the noise temperature of the antennas, which makes the antennas expensive to build and maintain. A next generation radio telescope that uses a phased array antenna instead of the reflector type antennas has been proposed. The collecting area of the telescope is proposed to be one square kilometer and the frequency range from 200 MHz to 2 GHz. There are several advantages to a phased array radio telescope, as well as some potential difficulties that arise in its design. A phased array can have more than one beam, allowing astronomers to view multiple objects at the same time, and using analog and digital beam forming will allow for the active suppression of both mobile and stationary noise sources. Moreover, the large collecting area allows for higher noise temperature of the antenna, while still maintaining a high sensitivity. On the other hand, one disadvantage of the phased array is the potential for noise coupling that occurs when noise generated by LNAs in one antenna element is received by its neighboring elements, adding to the total noise of the telescope. The first step in the design of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) is the design of the sub-arrays. The sub- arrays are one square-meter dual polarized antenna arrays with an operating frequency from 200 MHz to 2 GHz. The sub-arrays elements must have broad beamwidth so that the array will have a large scan-angle and a low amount of coupling. The low coupling is important for the scan- impedance of the array, as well as its noise performance. In this thesis several antenna elements are studied, designed and built, including wire; log-periodic; slotline Vivaldi; and antipodal Vivaldi antennas. A twenty-element sub-array using the antipodal Vivaldi antenna element is designed and fabricated. Noise coupling in antenna arrays was first observed in the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WRST). A higher noise power than was predicted was measured when the antenna was directed at a cold region of the sky. This noise power was attributed to noise coupling between two elements in the feed of the antennas parabolic reflector. In a phased array where all the array elements are placed close together the coupling between them can be large, which will also increase the noise coupling in the array. A detailed analysis of the noise coupling of a phased array is performed. This analysis will lead to an analytical solution for the noise coupling in a phased array.

  7. Under the Radar: The First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller Goss, W.

    2012-05-01

    Under the Radar, the First Woman in Radio Astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott W. Miller Goss, NRAO Socorro NM Ruby Payne-Scott (1912-1981) was an eminent Australian scientist who made major contributions to the WWII radar effort (CSIR) from 1941 to 1945. In late 1945, she pioneered radio astronomy efforts at Dover Heights in Sydney, Australia at a beautiful cliff top overlooking the Tasman Sea. Again at Dover Heights, Payne-Scott carried out the first interferometry in radio astronomy using an Australian Army radar antenna as a radio telescope at sun-rise, 26 January 1946. She continued these ground breaking activities until 1951. Ruby Payne-Scott played a major role in discovering and elucidating the properties of Type III bursts from the sun, the most common of the five classes of transient phenomena from the solar corona. These bursts are one of the most intensively studied forms of radio emission in all of astronomy. She is also one of the inventors of aperture synthesis in radio astronomy. I examine her career at the University of Sydney and her conflicts with the CSIR hierarchy concerning the rights of women in the work place, specifically equal wages and the lack of permanent status for married women. I also explore her membership in the Communist Party of Australia as well as her partially released Australian Scientific Intelligence Organization file. Payne-Scott’s role as a major participant in the flourishing radio astronomy research of the post war era remains a remarkable story. She had a number of strong collaborations with the pioneers of early radio astronomy in Australia: Pawsey, Mills, Christiansen, Bolton and Little. I am currently working on a popular version of the Payne-Scott story; “Making Waves, The Story of Ruby Payne-Scott: Australian Pioneer Radio Astronomer” will be published in 2013 by Springer in the Astronomers’ Universe Series.

  8. Presented at "RFI2004: Workshop on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy"; Penticton, Canada, 16-18 July 2004

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    of the large financial investment foreseen in the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio telescope, it will need the radio frequency bands allocated for astronomical use. Radio telescopes are very sensitive, and their farPresented at "RFI2004: Workshop on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy

  9. Planetary radio astronomy observations from Voyager-2 near Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Evans, D. R.; Romig, J. H.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Aubier, M.; Leblanc, Y.; Lecacheux, A.; Pedersen, B. M.

    1981-01-01

    Voyager-2 planetry radio astronomy measurements obtained near Saturn are discussed. They indicate that Saturnian kilometric radiation is emitted by a strong, dayside source at auroral latitudes in the northern hemisphere and by a weaker (by more than an order of magnitude) source at complementary latitudes in the southern hemisphere. These emissions are variable both due to Saturn's rotation and, on longer time scales, probably due to influences of the solar wind and the satellite Dione. The Saturn electrostatic discharge bursts first discovered by Voyager-1 and attributed to emissions from the B-ring were again observed with the same broadband spectral properties and a 10(h)11(m) + or - 5(m) episodic recurrence period but with an occurrence frequency of only of about 30 percent of that detected with Voyager-1. During the crossing of the ring plane at a distance of 2.88 R sub S, an intense noise event is interpreted to be consequence of the impact/vaporization/ionization of charged micron-size G-ring particles distributed over a total vertical thickness of about 1500 km.

  10. Cosmic Noise: The Pioneers of Early Radio Astronomy and Their Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Woodruff T., III

    2012-01-01

    Extraterrestrial radio waves (the galactic background), often referred to as "cosmic noise", were first detected accidentally by Karl Jansky at a frequency of 20 MHz in 1932, with significant followup by Grote Reber. Yet after World War II it was England and Australia that dominated the field. An entirely different sky from that of visual astronomy was revealed by the discoveries of solar noise, "radio stars” (discrete sources such as Cas A, Tau A, Cyg A, Cen A and Vir A), galactic noise, lunar and meteor radar experiments, the detection of the 21 cm hydrogen line, and eventually optical identifications such as the Crab Nebula and M87. Key players included wartime radar experts such as Stanley Hey (the British Army's Operational Research Group), Martin Ryle (Cambridge University), Bernard Lovell (Jodrell Bank) and Joe Pawsey (Radiophysics Lab, Sydney). Younger leaders also emerged such as Graham Smith, Tony Hewish, John Davies, "Chris" Christiansen, Bernie Mills, Paul Wild, and John Bolton. Some optical astronomers (Jan Oort, Henk van de Hulst, Jesse Greenstein, Rudolph Minkowski, and Walter Baade) were also extremely supportive. By the end of the postwar decade, radio astronomy was firmly established within the gamut of astronomy, although very few of its practitioners had been trained as astronomers. I will also trace the technical and social aspects of this wholly new type of astronomy, with special attention on military and national influences. I argue that radio astronomy represents one of the key developments in twentieth century astronomy not only because of its own discoveries, but also its pathfinding for the further opening the electromagnetic spectrum. This study is based on exhaustive archival research and over one hundred interviews with pioneering radio astronomers. Full details are available in the book "Cosmic Noise: A History of Early Radio Astronomy" (Cambridge Univ. Pr.).

  11. Infrared Submillimeter and Radio Astronomy Research and Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, Wesley A.

    2000-01-01

    This program entitled "Infrared Submillimeter and Radio Astronomy Research and Analysis Program" with NASA-Ames Research Center (ARC) was proposed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) to cover three years. Due to funding constraints only the first year installment of $18,436 was funded, but this funding was spread out over two years to try to maximize the benefit to the program. During the tenure of this contact, the investigators at the SAO, Drs. Wesley A. Traub and Nathaniel P. Carleton, worked with the investigators at ARC, Drs. Jesse Bregman and Fred Wittebom, on the following three main areas: 1. Rapid scanning SAO and ARC collaborated on purchasing and constructing a Rapid Scan Platform for the delay arm of the Infrared-Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) interferometer on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. The Rapid Scan Platform was tested and improved by the addition of stiffening plates which eliminated a very small but noticeable bending of the metal platform at the micro-meter level. 2. Star tracking Bregman and Wittebom conducted a study of the IOTA CCD-based star tracker system, by constructing a device to simulate star motion having a specified frequency and amplitude of motion, and by examining the response of the tracker to this simulated star input. 3. Fringe tracking. ARC, and in particular Dr. Robert Mah, developed a fringe-packet tracking algorithm, based on data that Bregman and Witteborn obtained on IOTA. The algorithm was tested in the laboratory at ARC, and found to work well for both strong and weak fringes.

  12. Background radio-frequency radiation and its impact on radio astronomy Michelle C. Storey, Bruce MacA Thomas and John M. Sarkissian

    E-print Network

    Sarkissian, John M.

    1 Background radio-frequency radiation and its impact on radio astronomy Michelle C. Storey, Bruce 1710 Email:mstorey@atnf.csiro.au Abstract: The use of radio-frequency telecommunications equipment is dramatically increasing, and one consequence is that background levels of radio-frequency radiation

  13. Investigation on the Frequency Allocation for Radio Astronomy at the L Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Z. Z.; Umar, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Rosli, Z.; Asanok, K.; Gasiprong, N.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the frequency allocation reserved for radio astronomy in the L band set by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), which is between 1400 and 1427 MHz, is reviewed. We argue that the nearby frequencies are still very important for radio astronomers on the ground by investigating radio objects (H i sources) around 1300-1500 MHz. The L-band window is separated into a group of four windows, namely 1400-1427 MHz (window A), 1380-1400 MHz (window B), 1350-1380 MHz (window C), and 1300-1350 MHz (window D). These windows are selected according to their redshifts from a rest frequency for hydrogen spectral line at 1420.4057 MHz. Radio objects up to z ? 0.1 or frequency down to 1300 MHz are examined. We argue that since window B has important radio objects within the four windows, this window should also be given to radio astronomy. They are galaxies, spiral galaxies, and galaxy clusters. This underlines the significance of window B for radio astronomers on the ground. By investigating the severeness of radio frequency interference (RFI) within these windows, we have determined that window B still has significant, consistent RFI. The main RFI sources in the four windows have also been identified. We also found that the Department of Civil Aviation of Malaysia is assigned a frequency range of 1215-1427 MHz, which is transmitted within the four windows and inside the protected frequency for radio astronomy. We also investigated the RFI in the four windows on proposed sites of future radio astronomy observatories in Malaysia and Thailand and found the two best sites as Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI) and Ubon Ratchathani, respectively. It has also been determined that RFI in window B increases with population density.

  14. Solar System Radio Astronomy at The College of New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benigno, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    Our group at The College of New Jersey built a double dipole radio telescope as a contribution to NASA's Radio JOVE Program. We present observations of flares from Jupiter and the Sun and we give a brief description of the dominant physical mechanisms producing the radio waves from these two dominant sources of solar system radio emission. More recently we have built a basic radio interferometer with an 80 m baseline using two of these Radio JOVE double-dipoles. We describe the principles of interferometry as applicable to this telescope and present preliminary measurements made with this simple interferometer.

  15. Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy observations near Jupiter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Warwick; J. B. Pearce; A. C. Riddle; J. K. Alexander; M. D. Desch; M. L. Kaiser; J. R. Thieman; T. B. Carr; S. Gulkis; A. Boischot; C. C. Harvey; B. M. Pedersen

    1979-01-01

    Results are reported from the first low frequency radio receiver to be transported into the Jupiter magnetosphere. Dramatic new information was obtained both because Voyager was near or in Jupiter's radio emission sources and also because it was outside the relatively dense solar wind plasma of the inner solar system. Extensive radio arcs, from above 30 MHz to about 1

  16. Terrestrial Interference Effects on Space-Based Low Frequency Radio Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Basart; M. McCoy

    1994-01-01

    Radio astronomy observations in the HF (1-30 MHz) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum could result in new insights into astrophysical processes. However, this particular part of the spectrum is mostly inaccessible from the ground due to the effects of the Earth's ionosphere. One solution is to observe from Earth orbit, thereby avoiding most of the absorption and phase distortions from

  17. Plasma Diagnostics of the Interstellar Medium with Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke; Spangler, Steven R.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the degree to which radio propagation measurements diagnose conditions in the ionized gas of the interstellar medium (ISM). The "signal generators" of the radio waves of interest are extragalactic radio sources (quasars and radio galaxies), as well as Galactic sources, primarily pulsars. The polarized synchrotron radiation of the Galactic non-thermal radiation also serves to probe the ISM, including space between the emitting regions and the solar system. Radio propagation measurements provide unique information on turbulence in the ISM as well as the mean plasma properties such as density and magnetic field strength. Radio propagation observations can provide input to the major contemporary questions on the nature of ISM turbulence, such as its dissipation mechanisms and the processes responsible for generating the turbulence on large spatial scales. Measurements of the large scale Galactic magnetic field via Faraday rotation provide unique observational input to theories of the generation of the Galactic field.

  18. Plasma Diagnostics of the Interstellar Medium with Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke; Spangler, Steven R.

    We discuss the degree to which radio propagation measurements diagnose conditions in the ionized gas of the interstellar medium (ISM). The "signal generators" of the radio waves of interest are extragalactic radio sources (quasars and radio galaxies), as well as Galactic sources, primarily pulsars. The polarized synchrotron radiation of the Galactic non-thermal radiation also serves to probe the ISM, including space between the emitting regions and the solar system. Radio propagation measurements provide unique information on turbulence in the ISM as well as the mean plasma properties such as density and magnetic field strength. Radio propagation observations can provide input to the major contemporary questions on the nature of ISM turbulence, such as its dissipation mechanisms and the processes responsible for generating the turbulence on large spatial scales. Measurements of the large scale Galactic magnetic field via Faraday rotation provide unique observational input to theories of the generation of the Galactic field.

  19. MITIGATION OF CONTINUOUS INTERFERENCE IN RADIO ASTRONOMY USING SPATIAL FILTERING

    E-print Network

    van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    @astron.nl The contamination of radio astronomical measurements by man-made Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is becoming-frequency detection and blanking. Contin- ually present interferers cannot be cut out in the time-frequency plane and have to be removed using spatial filtering. One technique is based on the estimation of the spatial

  20. The First Steps of Radio Astronomy in Czestochowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosik, M.; Starzy?ski, S.; Szcze?niak, M.; Szcze?niak, R.; Ceglarek, A.

    2007-12-01

    In the paper, technical documentation and the principle of operation is presented. "KLAUDIA" radio telescope was built in Rabka in 2007 and it is used to receive secondary radio waves, emitted by the Earth's ionosphere at frequency of 40 kHz.

  1. Radio Astronomy Working Group for SEAAN and RFI Survey in INSTUN, Perak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Rosli, Zulfazli; Malim, Siti Fatin Fathinah; Anim, Norsuzian Mohd

    2010-07-01

    The South East Asia Astronomy Network (SEAAN) was established in 2006 at the Special Session of Astronomy for Developing World during the IAU General Assembly in Prague. It held its first meeting in 2007 at the Thai National Astronomy Meeting in Bangkok, Thailand. It aims to establish effective mechanisms for nurturing and sharing the development and experiences in astronomy research and education among SEA countries. This working group has a main objective of putting South East Asia on the map of the global radio astronomy community. This paper will discuss the working group's short-term and long-term goals. This paper will also discuss the results of the latest Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) study in Malaysia, particularly the survey at Institut Tanah dan Ukur Negara (INSTUN) in Perak. The RFI level at that site is measured at -94.312 (+/-0.999) dBm or 11.065 (+/-1.505) ?V on average, which is considered quite well when compared to the best site in Malaysia, which is Langkawi (-100.352 +/-0.036) dBm or 2.192 lp+/-0.019) ?V on average).

  2. Voyager 1 planetary radio astronomy observations near Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Riddle, A. C.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Thieman, J. R.; Carr, T. D.; Gulkis, S.; Boischot, A.

    1979-01-01

    Results from the first low-frequency radio receiver to be transported into the Jupiter magnetosphere are reported. Dramatic new information was obtained, both because Voyager was near or in Jupiter's radio emission sources and because it was outside the relatively dense solar wind plasma of the inner solar system. Extensive radio spectral arcs, from above 30 to about 1 MHz, occurred in patterns correlated with planetary longitude. A newly discovered kilometric wavelength radio source may relate to the plasma torus near Io's orbit. In situ wave resonances near closest approach define an electron density profile along the Voyager trajectory and form the basis for a map of the torus. Detailed studies are in progress and are outlined briefly.

  3. Voyager 1 Planetary Radio Astronomy Observations Near Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Riddle, A. C.; Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Thieman, J. R.; Carr, T. B.; Gulkis, S.; Boischot, A.

    1979-01-01

    Results are reported from the first low frequency radio receiver to be transported into the Jupiter magnetosphere. Dramatic new information was obtained both because Voyager was near or in Jupiter's radio emission sources and also because it was outside the relatively dense solar wind plasma of the inner solar system. Extensive radio arcs, from above 30 MHz to about 1 MHz, occurred in patterns correlated with planetary longitude. A newly discovered kilometric wavelength radio source may relate to the plasma torus near Io's orbit. In situ wave resonances near closest approach define an electron density profile along the Voyager trajectory and form the basis for a map of the torus. Studies in progress are outlined briefly.

  4. From the Beginning: Archiving the History of NRAO and US Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouton, E. N.

    2005-12-01

    In 2006 the National Radio Astronomy Observatory will celebrate its 50th anniversary. Before 2003, there were neither archives nor a formal archiving program at NRAO; institutional records were located at any of the four NRAO sites in four different states, and there was no record of the materials that we had. In mid-2003, the long-time NRAO librarian retired and began part time work as NRAO's first archivist. With the completion of an addition to the headquarters building in Charlottesville in spring 2005, the fledgling NRAO Archives moved into a new 1400 sq ft space. In addition to NRAO materials, the Archives also collects papers of individuals. Grote Reber, who built the first radio telescope in his backyard in Wheaton IL in 1937, had in 1995, donated many of his personal papers to NRAO, and these papers have been indexed and are available to researchers. We continue to receive additional materials from his estate in Tasmania. The complete papers of John Kraus, author, researcher, and professor in radio astronomy and engineering at Ohio State University for many years, were donated to the NRAO Archives by his son and estate executor in spring 2005. The NRAO Archives has also mounted Web resources with texts written by Nan Dieter Conklin and by Doc Ewen describing their work in the developing years of US radio astronomy. This talk will present the highlights of how, on a limited budget but with broad support of NRAO staff, the NRAO Archives has begun a program to gather and organize materials on institutional history as well as the personal papers and recollections of contributors to US radio astronomy history.

  5. Probing the field of radio astronomy with the SKA and the Hartebeesthoek Radio observatory: an engineer's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Sunelle

    2011-07-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is an international project to build the world's largest and most sensitive radio telescope interferometer. It will consist of thousands of antennas distributed over many kilometers, with the hosting country being either South Africa or Australia. This talk will give some background on the SKA technologies, pathfinders and Key Science Projects and also consider the system design options for the SKA Pulsar science case. The Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) is the only major radio astronomy observatory in Africa; with KAT-7 in testing and the MeerKAT still in it's design phase. Some of my research work at HartRAO is presented, which includes data analysis of the pointing model for the 26m radio telescope and evaluating the performance of the GPS-disciplined Rubidium and Hydrogen Maser frequency standards. I will also talk about our project to build a 1.4GHz receiver for a commercial satellite TV antenna as well as calibrating data at 22GHz for observing water masers in Orion.

  6. Multiphase turbulent interstellar medium: some recent results from radio astronomy

    E-print Network

    Roy, Nirupam

    2015-01-01

    The radio frequency 1.4 GHz transition of the atomic hydrogen is one of the important tracers of the diffuse neutral interstellar medium. Radio astronomical observations of this transition, using either a single dish telescope or an array interferometer, reveal different properties of the interstellar medium. Such observations are particularly useful to study the multiphase nature and turbulence in the interstellar gas. Observations with multiple radio telescopes have recently been used to study these two closely related aspects in greater detail. Using various observational techniques, the density and the velocity fluctuations in the Galactic interstellar medium was found to have a Kolmogorov-like power law power spectra. The observed power law scaling of the turbulent velocity dispersion with the length scale can be used to derive the true temperature distribution of the medium. Observations from a large ongoing atomic hydrogen absorption line survey have also been used to study the distribution of gas at d...

  7. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    -cycle refrigerator is used to remove the heat. Thus, the cryogenic system is a crucial element governing a receiver, Mean Time Between Failures and Refrigeration Table 2, Design Chart for 0-ring Face Seal Glands . Table 25 26 4 27 21 28 29 30 31 2 #12;1.0 Introduction The first elements in the signal path of a radio

  8. Workshop on Satellite Power Systems (SPS) effects on optical and radio astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, G.M.; Ekstrom, P.A. (eds.)

    1980-04-01

    The impacts of the SPS on astronomy were concluded to be: increased sky brightness, reducing the effective aperture of terrestrial telescopes; microwave leakage radiation causing erroneous radioastronomical signals; direct overload of radioastronomical receivers at centimeter wavelengths; and unintentional radio emissions associated with massive amounts of microwave power or with the presence of large, warm structures in orbit causing the satellites to appear as individual stationary radio sources; finally, the fixed location of the geostationary satellite orbits would result in fixed regions of the sky being unusable for observations. (GHT)

  9. Computational Intelligence in Radio Astronomy: Using Computational Intelligence Techniques to Tune Geodesy Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Angus; Adam Deller

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a number of popular Computational Intelligence (CI) algorithms are used to tune Geodesy models, a radio astronomy\\u000a problem. Several single and multiple objective variations of the Geodesy problem are examined with good results obtained using\\u000a state-of-the-art CI algorithms. These novel applications are used to develop insights into methods for applying CI algorithms\\u000a to unknown problem domains and

  10. Reference antenna-based subspace tracking for RFI mitigation in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellbourg, G.; Chippendale, A. P.; Kesteven, M. J.; Jeffs, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Interference mitigation is becoming necessary to make radio astronomy work in bands that are heavily used to support our modern lives. It is becoming particularly difficult to work at frequencies between 1100 MHz and 1300 MHz that are rapidly filling up with satellite navigation signals. Antenna array radio telescopes present the possibility of applying spatial Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) mitigation. Spatial filtering techniques for RFI mitigation have been introduced to radio astronomy in the last decades. The success of these techniques relies on accurately estimating the RFI spatial signature (or RFI subspace). The use of a reference antenna steering at the RFI sources provides a good estimation of the RFI subspace when correlated with an array radio telescope. However, predicting the evolution of this subspace with time is necessary in a multiple RFI scenario, when only a single RFI source can be monitored at a time with the reference antenna. This paper introduces a subspace tracking approach, based on the power method applied to covariance data. The RFI spatial signature estimates provided by the reference antenna are used to initialize the power method to support a faster convergence. Practical examples are shown, applying the method to real data from a single 188 element phased array feed designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope.

  11. Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2000-01-01

    This page contains links to one pagers on historical instruments of astronomy with photos of the following : Astronomy Slides, Celestial Globe, Cometarium, Globe, Gregorian Telescope, Kepler's Laws Demonstration, Orrery, Planetarium, Planisphere, Stereoscopic Pictures of the Moon, Tellurian, and Transit.

  12. Centimeter-wave Research with the Morehead State University 21 M Radio Telescope: Involving Undergraduate Students in Radio Astronomy Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malphrus, Benjamin K.; Pannuti, T. G.; Atwood, J. W.; Ennis, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    The Space Science Center at Morehead State University has developed a medium aperture cm-wave radio telescope, the 21 M Space Tracking Antenna and Radio Telescope. Located in the radio-frequency quiet, mountainous region of eastern Kentucky, the telescope serves as an Earth Station for satellite mission support and provides telemetry, tracking, and control services with an emphasis on university cubesat missions. In addition, the telescope is engaged in research programs in radio astronomy and features receivers operating in the Ku-band (11.2 to 12.7 GHz, including a well-known methanol line) and the L-band (1.4 to 1.7 GHz, including lines of atomic hydrogen and molecular hydroxyl). At these bands, the telescope is capable of supporting a wide variety of niche astronomical research programs, including longitudinal studies (e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGN) monitoring), observations of transient phenomena (e.g., gamma-ray bursts and supernovae), and surveys (e.g., kinematic studies of Galactic HI). A description of the space tracking antenna system and radio telescope, its capabilities and research projects planned for or currently underway with the telescope (namely monitoring AGNs and surveying the Galactic supernova remnant population) will be presented and discussed. Funding for the 21m telescope has been provided by NASA, the SBA, the Kentucky Science and Engineering Foundation and Kentucky NSF EPSCoR.

  13. Application of Field System-FS9 and a PC to Antenna Control Unit interface in Radio Astronomy in Peru

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erick Vidal; José Ishitsuka; Yasuhiro Koyama

    2006-01-01

    We are in the process to transform a 32m antenna in Peru, used for telecommunications, into a Radio Telescope to perform Radio Astronomy in Peru. The 32m antenna of Peru constructed by NEC was used for telecommunications with communications satellites at 6 GHz for transmission, and 4 GHz for reception. In collaboration of National Institute of Information and Communications Technology

  14. Scalable desktop visualisation of very large radio astronomy data cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Simon; Questiaux, Jacques; Finniss, Stephen; Tyler, Robin; Blyth, Sarah; Kuttel, Michelle M.

    2014-07-01

    Observation data from radio telescopes is typically stored in three (or higher) dimensional data cubes, the resolution, coverage and size of which continues to grow as ever larger radio telescopes come online. The Square Kilometre Array, tabled to be the largest radio telescope in the world, will generate multi-terabyte data cubes - several orders of magnitude larger than the current norm. Despite this imminent data deluge, scalable approaches to file access in Astronomical visualisation software are rare: most current software packages cannot read astronomical data cubes that do not fit into computer system memory, or else provide access only at a serious performance cost. In addition, there is little support for interactive exploration of 3D data. We describe a scalable, hierarchical approach to 3D visualisation of very large spectral data cubes to enable rapid visualisation of large data files on standard desktop hardware. Our hierarchical approach, embodied in the AstroVis prototype, aims to provide a means of viewing large datasets that do not fit into system memory. The focus is on rapid initial response: our system initially rapidly presents a reduced, coarse-grained 3D view of the data cube selected, which is gradually refined. The user may select sub-regions of the cube to be explored in more detail, or extracted for use in applications that do not support large files. We thus shift the focus from data analysis informed by narrow slices of detailed information, to analysis informed by overview information, with details on demand. Our hierarchical solution to the rendering of large data cubes reduces the overall time to complete file reading, provides user feedback during file processing and is memory efficient. This solution does not require high performance computing hardware and can be implemented on any platform supporting the OpenGL rendering library.

  15. Array signal processing for radio astronomy Alle-Jan van der Veen1, Amir Leshem2 and Albert-Jan Boonstra3

    E-print Network

    van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    large scale radio telescopes. Keywords: Array signal processing, radio astronomy, interference). The first example of a flexible massive phased array radio telescope is LOFAR (13,000 elements) which), and applied for example in the five kilometer Cambridge radio telescope, the 3 km Westerbork Synthesis Radio

  16. New Antennas and Methods for the Low Frequency Stellar and Planetary Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Falkovich, I. S.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, Ph.; Koliadin, V. L.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Melnik, V. N.; Litvinenko, G. V.; Gridin, A. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Reznik, A. P.; Sidorchuk, M. A.; Stepkin, S. V.; Mukha, D. V.; Nikolajenko, V. S.; Karlsson, R.; Thide, B.

    According to the special Program of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, creation of the new giant Ukrainian radio telescope (GURT) was started a few years ago on the UTR-2 radio telescope observatory. The main goal is to reach maximum band at the lowest frequencies (10-70 MHz), effective area (step-by-step up to 100,000 sq.m), and high interference immunity for resolving many astrophysical tasks when the sensitivity is less limited by the confusion effects. These tasks include stellar radio astronomy (the Sun, solar wind, flare stars, pulsars, transients) and planetary one (Jupiter, planetary lightnings, Earth ionosphere, the Moon, exoplanets). This array should be complementary to the LOFAR, E-LOFAR systems. The first stages of the GURT (6 x 25 cross dipole active elements) and broad-band digital registration of the impulsive and sporadic events were tested in comparison with the existing largest decameter array UTR-2.

  17. Fast pulsars, strange stars: An opportunity in radio astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1990-07-15

    The world's data on radio pulsars is not expected to represent the underlying pulsar population because of a search bias against detection of short periods, especially below 1 ms. Yet pulsars in increasing numbers with periods right down to this limit have been discovered suggesting that there may be even shorter ones. If pulsars with periods below 1/2 ms were found, the conclusion that the confined hadronic phase of nucleons and nuclei is only metastable would be almost inescapable. The plausible ground state in that event is the deconfined phase of (3-flavor) strange-quark-matter. From the QCD energy scale this is as likely a ground state as the confined phase. We show that strange matter as the ground state is not ruled out by any known fact, and most especially not by the fact that the universe is in the confined phase. 136 refs.

  18. Bayesian detection of radar interference in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffs, Brian D.; Lazarte, Weizhen; Fisher, J. Richard

    2006-06-01

    L-Band observations at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and other radio observatories are often made in frequency bands allocated to aviation pulsed radar transmissions. It is possible to mitigate radar contamination of the astronomical signal by time blanking data containing these pulses. However, even when strong direct path pulses and nearby fixed clutter echoes are removed there are still undetected weaker aircraft echoes present which can corrupt the data. In a previous paper we presented an algorithm to improve real-time echo blanking by forming a Kalman filter tracker to follow the path of a sequence of echoes observed on successive radar antenna sweeps. The tracker builds a history which can be used to predict the location of upcoming echoes. We now present details of a new Bayesian detection algorithm which uses this prediction information to enable more sensitive weak pulse acquisition. The developed track information is used to form a spatial prior probability distribution for the presence of the next echoes. Regions with higher probability are processed with a lower detection threshold to pull out low level pulses without increasing the overall probability of false alarm detection. The ultimate result is more complete removal, by blanking the detected pulse, of radar corruption in astronomical observations.

  19. PARAS program: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakubowski, Antoni K.; Haynes, David A.; Nuss, Ken; Hoffmann, Chris; Madden, Michael; Dungan, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBLI) scheme, would allow higher (than currently available) angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps, and the ability of observing rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using a passive phases array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150 meter diameter dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data is transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory pane is a hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and bottom triangle. Attitude control and stationkeeping functions are performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and six hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by a nuclear reactor. The total mass of the spacecraft is 22,060 kg.

  20. Accelerating radio astronomy cross-correlation with graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M. A.; LaPlante, P. C.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2013-05-01

    We present a highly parallel implementation of the cross-correlation of time-series data using graphics processing units (GPUs), which is scalable to hundreds of independent inputs and suitable for the processing of signals from 'large-Formula' arrays of many radio antennas. The computational part of the algorithm, the X-engine, is implemented efficiently on NVIDIA's Fermi architecture, sustaining up to 79% of the peak single-precision floating-point throughput. We compare performance obtained for hardware- and software-managed caches, observing significantly better performance for the latter. The high performance reported involves use of a multi-level data tiling strategy in memory and use of a pipelined algorithm with simultaneous computation and transfer of data from host to device memory. The speed of code development, flexibility, and low cost of the GPU implementations compared with application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementations have the potential to greatly shorten the cycle of correlator development and deployment, for cases where some power-consumption penalty can be tolerated.

  1. Radio astronomy with the European Lunar Lander: Opening up the last unexplored frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein Wolt, Marc; Aminaei, Amin; Zarka, Philippe; Schrader, Jan-Rutger; Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Falcke, Heino

    2012-12-01

    The Moon is a unique location in our solar system and provides important information regarding the exposure to free space that is essential for future human space exploration to mars and beyond. The active broadband (100 kHz-100 MHz) tripole antenna now envisaged to be placed on the European Lunar Lander located at the Lunar South Pole allows for sensitive measurements of the exosphere and ionosphere, and their interaction with the Earths magnetosphere, solar particles, wind and CMEs and studies of radio communication on the Moon, that are essential for future lunar human and science exploration. In addition, the Lunar South Pole provides an excellent opportunity for radio astronomy. Placing a single radio antenna in an eternally dark crater or behind a mountain at the South (or North) pole would potentially provide perfect shielding from man-made radio interference (RFI), absence of ionospheric distortions, and high temperature and antenna gain stability that allows detection of the 21 cm wave emission from pristine hydrogen formed after the Big Bang and into the period where the first stars formed. A detection of the 21 cm line from the Moon at these frequencies would allow for the first time a clue on the distribution and evolution on mass in the early universe between the Epoch of Recombination and Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Next to providing a cosmological breakthrough, a single lunar radio antenna would allow for studies of the effect of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the solar wind at distances close to Earth (space weather) and would open up the study of low frequency radio events (flares and pulses) from planets such as Jupiter and Saturn, which are known to emit bright (kJy-MJy) radio emission below 30 MHz (Jester and Falcke, 2009). Finally, a single radio antenna on the lunar lander would pave the way for a future large lunar radio interferometer; not only will it demonstrate the possibilities for lunar radio science and open up the last unexplored radio regime, but it will also allow a determination of the limitations of lunar radio science by measuring the local radio background noise.

  2. Pulsars in a Box: A Radio Astronomy Exercise for Windows from PROJECT CLEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, L. A.; Snyder, G. A.; Good, R. F.; Hayden, M. B.; Cooper, P. R.

    1996-12-01

    The latest astronomy laboratory exercise from PROJECT CLEA, "Radio Astronomy of Pulsars", is designed for use in introductory astronomy classes, but contains options and features that make it usable by upperclass astronomy students as well. The heart of the exercise is a simulated radio telescope, whose aperture, location, and beamwidth can be set by the instructor. It is steered by pushing buttons, but instead of seeing a star field on the field monitor,students see a projection of the sky showing, with a colored dot,where the beam is pointing. Large LED-like readouts display time and telescope coordinates. The telescope can be operated in either a tracking or transit mode. Using the telescope, students point to several pulsars suggested by the write-up (from an on-line catalog of over 500). Students can then use a multi-channel tunable receiver, with multiple oscilloscope displays, to view the incoming signal vs. time. The signal received is a combination of random receiver and background noise plus the pulsar signal (if it is in the beam) Receivers are tunable from 400 to 1400 MHz, and both the time and frequency behavior of signals can be studied. By measuring the dispersion delay at a number of different frequencies, students can determine the pulsar's distance. Data can be stored, displayed, and printed using a versatile measuring window. Though we provide a manual for a 2-3 hour lab exercise involving dispersion measures, the database and receivers can be used for a wide variety of other exercises, for instance the measurement of pulsar spin-down rates. We welcome suggestions for improvements and applications.

  3. Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

    Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics…

  4. U.S.-Canadian Partnership in Radio Astronomy Valuable for Science, NRAO Director Says

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    The United States and Canada intend to collaborate on two of the most important radio astronomy projects of the new century - the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), astronomers from both countries announced today. "This cooperative program - the North American Partnership in Radio Astronomy - involves the key projects that will dominate radio astronomy world-wide," said Paul Vanden Bout, director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This partnership will multiply the efforts of both nations' astronomers for the benefit of science. It builds on a long tradition of cooperative efforts in radio astronomy, and will ensure that we continue that tradition into the new millennium," Vanden Bout said. The U.S.-Canada radio astronomy partnership is outlined in two letters of intent signed recently. The first, between the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and Canada's National Research Council (NRC), states that both agencies will use their best efforts to obtain the necessary funding for construction and operation of ALMA. The second, between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, funded by the NSF, and the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, funded by the NRC, forms a partnership in the EVLA. The VLA Expansion Project is a two-phase program designed to improve the scientific capabilities of the VLA tenfold by replacing 1970s-vintage equipment with modern technologies and adding new radio-telescope antennas to the existing 27-antenna array. Dedicated in 1980, the VLA has been used for more than 10,000 observing projects covering nearly every area of astrophysics. It is the most powerful, flexible and widely-used radio telescope in the world. The Expanded VLA will provide the improved observational capabilities needed to meet the research challenges of the coming years. In addition to the participation by Canada, funds have been pledged by Mexico. Both Mexico and Germany have funded VLA improvements in the past. A proposal to the NSF requesting U.S. funds for the EVLA is currently under review by the National Science Foundation. The agreement between the NRAO and the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics (HIA) calls for HIA to build a new correlator - the digital "heart" that combines the received signals from multiple antennas to make those antennas work as a single, powerful telescope - for the EVLA. The new correlator will represent a contribution of 10 million (US). The full EVLA project will cost about 150 million, to be done in two phases, the first costing 75 million. "Canada has a strong program of radio astronomy, and in particular a skilled team of specialists in designing correlators, and we are pleased to have their talents directed toward building a new machine for the VLA," Vanden Bout said. ALMA will consist of 64 12-meter-diameter dish antennas comprising a single imaging telescope to study the universe at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths - the region between radio waves and infrared waves. An international project being designed and developed by the U.S. and European nations, ALMA will be located on a high-altitude site in the Atacama desert of Chile. "ALMA will give scientists an unprecedented look at the structure of the early universe and revolutionary insights on how stars and planets form, among many other contributions," Vanden Bout said. "The EVLA will bring unmatched power and versatility to the study of objects as close as the Sun and planets and as far as primeval galaxies at the edge of the observable universe. Together, these two instruments will be at the forefront of 21st Century astrophysics," he added. "ALMA has been a bilateral project involving the United States and Europe. These new agreements with Canada turn ALMA into a partnership between Europe and North America," Vanden Bout said. Design and development work on ALMA has been ongoing since 1998, funded by the NSF and European organizations. Canadians already have participated in this work. ALMA is pla

  5. BYU Radio Astronomy System for Imaging Galactic H1 and OH MASERs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakley, Daniel; Migenes, Victor

    2011-10-01

    We have built a radio astronomy system initially designed to image galactic H1 (Hydrogen Spin-Flip) [at 1.42 GHz] and OH MASERS [ 1.66 GHz ] in star forming regions. Initial system architecture includes one 4-meter dish antenna, 0.38dB noise figure LNA and conventional super-heterodyne block down-conversion. Enhancements underway include baseline extensions for these wavelengths, CASPER based digital correlation / spectrometer design activity including Linux server, additional imaging wavelengths, rubidium clocks, and lock-in amplifiers.

  6. Tectonic motion site survey of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, West Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, W. J., Jr.; Allenby, R. J.; Hutton, L. K.; Lowman, P. D., Jr.; Tiedemann, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    A geological and geophysical site survey was made of the area around the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) to determine whether there are at present local tectonic movements that could introduce significant errors to Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) geodetic measurements. The site survey consisted of a literature search, photogeologic mapping with Landsat and Skylab photographs, a field reconnaissance, and installation of a seismometer at the NRAO. It is concluded that local tectonic movement will not contribute significantly to VLBI errors. It is recommended that similar site surveys be made of all locations used for VLBI or laser ranging.

  7. Radio astronomy Explorer-B in-flight mission control system development effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutsky, D. A.; Bjorkman, W. S.; Uphoff, C.

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of the development for the Mission Analysis Evaluation and Space Trajectory Operations (MAESTRO) program to be used for the in-flight decision making process during the translunar and lunar orbit adjustment phases of the flight of the Radio Astronomy Explorer-B. THe program serves two functions: performance and evaluation of preflight mission analysis, and in-flight support for the midcourse and lunar insertion command decisions that must be made by the flight director. The topics discussed include: analysis of program and midcourse guidance capabilities; methods for on-line control; printed displays of the MAESTRO program; and in-flight operational logistics and testing.

  8. The impact of JPEG2000 lossy compression on the scientific quality of radio astronomy imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S. M.; Kitaeff, V. V.

    2014-10-01

    The sheer volume of data anticipated to be captured by future radio telescopes, such as, the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and its precursors present new data challenges, including the cost and technical feasibility of data transport and storage. Image and data compression are going to be important techniques to reduce the data size. We provide a quantitative analysis of the effects of JPEG2000's lossy wavelet image compression algorithm on the quality of the radio astronomy imagery data. This analysis is completed by evaluating the completeness, soundness and source parameterisation of the Duchamp source finder using compressed data. Here we found the JPEG2000 image compression has the potential to denoise image cubes, however this effect is only significant at high compression rates where the accuracy of source parameterisation is decreased.

  9. Moon-based Very Long-Wavelength Radio Astronomy Facility: science drives and technological challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid

    Scientific laboratories at manned and un-manned Moon bases are top priorities for the next wave of exploratory missions. Environmental conditions on the Moon are beneficial for various types of experimental research. Very Long Wavelength radio Astronomy (VLWA) is among the most attractive scientific disciplines for the suit of Moon-based laboratories. Space science has revolutionised astronomy by opening up several hitherto inaccessible windows in the spectrum. The opening of each new spectral window has resulted in unexpected discoveries and made it possible to obtain a comprehensive picture of physical processes in celestial sources. One of the last remaining unexplored regions of the spectrum is at the lowest radio frequencies. Radio emission below 15 MHz (wavelengths longer than 20 m) is inaccessible from the Earth surface due to absorption and scattering in the ionosphere. Unique new science areas for VLWA studies include: (i)Investigation of radio sky at so far inaccessible regime of electromagnetic radiation; (ii) Cosmological "experiments" with "fossil" relativistic electrons; (iii) Investigation of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays via VLWA emission from particle interactions with the Moon; (iv) Solar system "weather", including coronal mass ejections, (v) Searches for Jupiter-like exoplanets. In addition to the astrophysical tasks mentioned above, the VLWA facility on the Moon can be implemented as a Wide Area Network, as pioneered by the Earth-based Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). This allows the inclusion of other sensors, such as seismic detectors to conduct selenological studies. The LOFAR is being constructed in the Netherlands. It will operate in the frequency range 20 - 220 MHz. Several other projects will aim at addressing cosmological problems by studying the Universe at the range of frequencies below 100 MHz. These and other new radio astronomy facilities will lay the scientific and technological ground for VLWA in space. We will present a multi-step approach toward creating a permanent VLWA observatory on the Moon. Its first phase would include a demonstrator to be deployed as a small-scale scientific payload onboard one of the lunar missions of the next decade. A concept of an affordable fullscale observatory will be presented in the context of a long-term Moon exploration programme.

  10. Population density effect on radio frequencies interference (RFI) in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Hassan, Mohd Saiful Rizal; Rosli, Zulfazli; Hamidi, Zety Shahrizat

    2012-06-01

    Radio astronomical observation is infected by wide range of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). We will also use information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'good' areas generated by this study. After investigating a few suitable sites we will commence to the site and construct the RFI observation. Eventually, the best area we will be deciding from the observations soon. The result of this experiment will support our planning to build the first radio telescope in Malaysia. Radio observatories normally are located in remote area, in order to combat RFI from active spectrum users and radio noise produced in industrial or residential areas. The other solution for this problem is regulating the use of radio frequencies in the country (spectrum management). Measurement of RFI level on potential radio astronomical site can be done to measure the RFI levels at sites. Seven sites are chosen divide by three group, which is A, B and C. In this paper, we report the initial testing RFI survey for overall spectrum (0-2GHz) for those sites. The averaged RFI level above noise level at the three group sites are 19.0 (+/-1.79) dBm, 19.5 (+/-3.71) dBm and 17.0 (+/-3.71) dBm and the averaged RFI level above noise level for without main peaks are 20.1 (+/-1.77) dBm, 19.6 (+/-3.65) dBm and 17.2 (+/-1.43) dBm respectively.

  11. Astronomie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karttunen, Hannu; Kröger, Pekka; Oja, Heikki; Poutanen, Markku; Donner, Karl J.; Marx, Siegfried A.; Lehmann, Holger H.

    Astronomie gibt eine ausgezeichnete, reich illustrierte Darstellung aller klassischen und modernen Teilgebiete dieser Wissenschaft. Dabei wird ebenso großer Wert auf die faszinierenden Beobachtungsergebnisse und die zugrundeliegenden physikalischen Vorgänge gelegt. Das Buch eignet sich damit gleichermaßen als Begleiter zur Astronomie-Vorlesung wie als Fundgrube und Nachschlagewerk für jede(n) Astronomiebegeisterte(n). "... ein so modernes Buch, wie es kaum ein einzelner Autor vorlegen könnte." #Sterne und Weltraum (2/89)(zur englischen Ausgabe)#1

  12. Research on Haystack radiometer, 20-24 GHz maser, and radio astronomy programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    During the first half of 1973, the Haystack antenna was utilized 76% of the time. Of this useful time, 72% was devoted to radio astronomy observing, 5% was spent on radar-related research and 23% went into maintenance and system improvements. Twenty-eight new radio astronomy programs were accepted, eight of which were completed during the period. One new radar program, topographic observations of Mars, was started in June and will be completed early in 1974. Fourteen programs continued from the previous period were also defined as complete. As of 1 July, 28 ratio observing programs were in a continuing status on the Haystack books. Four radar projects were also continuing. The 20-24 GHz maser development described in the preceding report progressed very well during an on-antenna test phase which began early in the year, but which terminated unfortunately in June with the complete loss of gain in the maser. Investigation of this problem is in progress. During this on-antenna test phase, the most sensitive water vapor observing capability which has yet become available was demonstrated.

  13. Collaboration and Development of Radio Astronomy in Australasia and South-Pacific Region: New Zealand Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, S.; Natusch, T.

    2006-08-01

    Radio telescopes in the Asia-Pacific region form a natural network for VLBI observations, similar to the very successful networks in North America (Network Users Group) and Europe (European VLBI Network). New Zealand's VLBI facility, which we are developing since 2005, has the potential to strengthen the Asian-Pacific VLBI network and its role in astronomy, geodesy and geoscience. It will positively influence regional and international activities in geoscience and geodesy that advance New Zealand's national interests. A self-contained radio astronomy system for VLBI, including a 1.658 GHz (centre frequency), 16 MHz bandwidth RF system (feed and downconversion system locked to a Rubidium maser and GPS clock), an 8-bit sampler/digitisation system, and a disk-based recording system built around a commodity PC was developed in New Zealand Centre for Radiophysics and Space Research. This was designed as a portable system for use on various radio telescopes. A number of Trans-Tasman tests has been conducted in 2005-2006 between the CRSR system installed on a 6 metre dish located in Auckland and the Australia Telescope Compact Array in Narrabri, Australia. This work has been successful, with fringes located from the recorded data and high resolution image of the quasar PKS1921-231 obtained. Experiments were recently conducted with Japan; new tests are planned with Korea and Fiji. Plans have been made to build a new 16.5 m antenna in New Zealand's North Island and to upgrade an 11 m dish in the South Island. A possible future of New Zealand's participation in the SKA is being discussed.

  14. Radio Frequency Interference: Projects and Activities Developed for the High School Earth Science, Astronomy, and Physics Classroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Dunn; J. Brown

    2003-01-01

    Radio Frequency Interference: Projects and Activities Developed for the High School Earth Science, Astronomy, and Physics Classroom Susan Dunn Tewksbury Memorial High School Jason Brown Tyngsboro High School Preethi Pratap MIT Haystack Observatory The Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program, funded by the NSF, brings teachers into research environments to interact with scientists and translate the experience into the classroom.

  15. Matched wideband low-noise amplifiers for radio astronomy S. Weinreb, J. Bardin, H. Mani, and G. Jones

    E-print Network

    Weinreb, Sander

    Matched wideband low-noise amplifiers for radio astronomy S. Weinreb, J. Bardin, H. Mani, and G low noise amplifiers for the 0.3­4 GHz frequency range are described. The amplifiers can be operated temperature. One amplifier utilizes commercially available, plastic-packaged SiGe transistors for first

  16. The Radio Properties of the dMe Flare Star Proxima Centauri Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Academia Sinica,

    E-print Network

    White, Stephen

    The Radio Properties of the dMe Flare Star Proxima Centauri Jeremy Lim Institute of Astronomy--polarized and apparently narrowband flare at 20 cm, similar to those seen on other dMe flare stars. This flare was detected wavelength observations of other dMe flare stars. We show that the high mass--loss rate inferred by Mullan et

  17. Unformatted Digital Fiber-Optic Data Transmission for Radio Astronomy Front-Ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Matthew A.; Fisher, J. Richard; Castro, Jason J.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of a prototype integrated receiver front-end that combines all conversions from RF to baseband, from analog to digital, and from copper to fiber into one compact assembly, with the necessary gain and stability suitable for radio astronomy applications. The emphasis in this article is on a novel digital data link over optical fiber which requires no formatting in the front-end, greatly reducing the complexity, bulk, and power consumption of digital electronics inside the antenna, facilitating its integration with the analog components, and minimizing the self-generated radio-frequency interference (RFI) which could leak into the signal path. Management of the serial data link is performed entirely in the back-end based on the statistical properties of signals with a strong random noise component. In this way, the full benefits of precision and stability afforded by conventional digital data transmission are realized with far less overhead at the focal plane of a radio telescope.

  18. ASTRONOMY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR A UNIT ON ASTRONOMY ESTABLISHES (1) UNDERSTANDINGS AND ATTITUDES, (2) SKILLS, AND (3) CONCEPTS TO BE GAINED IN THE STUDY. THE OVERVIEW EXPLAINS THE ORGANIZATION AND OBJECTIVES OF THE UNIT. TOPICAL DIVISIONS ARE (1) THE EARTH, (2) THE MOON, (3) THE SUN, (4) THE SOLAR SYSTEM, (5) THE STARS, (6) THE UNIVERSE, AND (7) SPACE…

  19. The Development of Radio Astronomy at the Sternberg Astronomical Institute of Lomonosov Moscow State University and the Space Research Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gindilis, L. M.

    This chapter provides information about the emergence and development of radio astronomy at the Sternberg Astronmical Institute of Moscow State University (GAISH), and further at the Space Research Institute (IKI). The main results of theoretical studies of mechanisms for the Sun, Galactic and extragalactic radio emission and their relationship to physical processes in space are laid out in detail. The results of observations carried out at the initiative of and with the participation of radio astronomers from GAISH and IKI using many radio telescope in the Soviet Union and abroad are also considered, including methods for space radio astronomy.

  20. Probing Strongly-Scattered Compact Objects Using Ultra-High-Resolution Techniques in Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael Douglas

    This dissertation explores fundamental limits in radio astronomy and develops techniques that utilize the scintillation of compact objects to probe detailed properties of their emission regions and of the scattering material. I develop a statistical framework for observations with spectral resolution at or near the Nyquist limit, suitable for describing the observed statistics of strongly-scattered sources. I demonstrate that these statistics can effectively isolate the signature of an extended emission region, requiring no assumptions about the nature or distribution of the scattering material. Then, using observations of the Vela pulsar at 760 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope, I thereby achieve a spatial resolution of 4 km at the pulsar. Finally, I explore the signature of refractive scintillation on the interferometric visibility measured on long baselines, and I derive optimal correlation estimators for quantized data.

  1. New Mexico Fiber-Optic Link Marks Giant Leap Toward Future of Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    SOCORRO, NM -- Scientists and engineers at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) have made a giant leap toward the future of radio astronomy by successfully utilizing the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in conjunction with an antenna of the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) using the longest fiber-optic data link ever demonstrated in radio astronomy. The 65-mile fiber link will allow scientists to use the two National Science Foundation (NSF) facilities together in real time, and is the first step toward expanding the VLA to include eight proposed new radio-telescope antennas throughout New Mexico. LEFT: Miller Goss, NRAO's director of VLA/VLBA Operations, unveils graphic showing success of the Pie Town-VLA fiber link. The project, funded by the NSF and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), which operates NRAO for the NSF, links the VLA and the VLBA antenna in Pie Town, NM, using a Western New Mexico Telephone Co. fiber-optic cable. The successful hookup was announced at a ceremony that also marked the 10th anniversary of NRAO's Operations Center in Socorro. "Linking the Pie Town antenna to the VLA quadruples the VLA's ability to make detailed images of astronomical objects," said Paul Vanden Bout, NRAO's Director. "This alone makes the link an advance for science, but its greater importance is that it clearly demonstrates the technology for improving the VLA's capabilities even more in the future." "Clearly, the big skies and wide open spaces in New Mexico create near perfect conditions for the incredible astronomical assets located in our state. This new fiber-optic link paves the way for multiplying the already breathtaking scientific capabilities of the VLA," Senator Pete Domenici (R-NM) said. The VLA is a system of 27 radio-telescope antennas distributed over the high desert west of Socorro, NM, in the shape of a giant "Y." Made famous in movies, commercials and numerous published photos, the VLA has been one of the most productive and versatile astronomical observatories in the world since its dedication in 1980. The VLBA is a continent-wide system of 10 radio telescopes distributed across the continental United States, Hawaii and St. Croix in the Caribbean. In both the VLA and VLBA, the cosmic radio waves received by each antenna are combined with those received from every other antenna in the system to produce images with extremely great resolving power, or ability to see fine detail. The more widely separated the antennas, the greater the resolving power. The greatest separation between antennas of the VLA is 20 miles; in the VLBA, 5,000 miles. If your eyes could see the same level of detail as the VLA, you could, at the distance from New York to Los Angeles, make out an object the size of a small car. With the resolving power of the VLBA, you could read the owner's manual. The VLBA can make images hundreds of times more detailed than those available from the Hubble Space Telescope. However, because of the way in which such multi-antenna radio telescopes, called interferometers, work, there is a gap between the levels of detail obtainable with the VLA and the VLBA. Linking the VLA to the VLBA Pie Town antenna is the first step toward filling in that gap and allowing astronomers to see all scales of structure -- small, medium-sized, and large -- in objects such as stars, galaxies and quasars. Additional antennas, distributed throughout New Mexico, would fully fill that gap. Adding the new antennas to the VLA "would provide the capability to image astronomical objects on all spatial scales, from the very largest to the very smallest. The combination of the VLA and VLBA then would be the only single instrument in astronomy covering such a range of spatial scales, and thus a tool of great and unique value to science," said Vanden Bout. LEFT: NRAO Director Paul Vanden Bout, left, speaks with U.S. Senator Pete Domenici, right, following the ceremony at the Array Operations Center in Socorro Dec. 15. Nobel Laureate Robert Wilson is in the ba

  2. Panoramic Radio Astronomy: Wide-field 1-2 GHz research on galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In a burst of renewed vigor enabled by recent technological advancements, radio astronomers around the world are now developing a number of new telescopes and instruments. Within the coming few years, a major improvement will be achieved over current facilities. Interferometers such as ASKAP, MeerKAT and WSRT+APERTIF will provide a combination of larger field of view and increased simultaneous bandwidth, while maintaining good collecting area and angular resolution. They will achieve a survey speed 10-50 times larger at 1-2 GHz than what is currently possible, allowing for the first time optical-like all-sky extragalactic surveys at these frequencies. The way that radio astronomical research is carried out will change profoundly, marking a major step towards the capabilities sought after for the coming decades. Significant progress will be made in many fields of radio astronomy. One of the areas that will benefit most is research into the evolution of galaxies over the past few Gyr. In particular, wide-field observations at 1-2 GHz will provide an unprecedented panoramic view of the gas properties and star formation in galaxies, embedded in their environment, from z~0.2-0.5 to the present. We aim to bring together researchers in this field to discuss the optimal exploitation of the new radio observatories for future science programs. Within the framework of our current knowledge of the galaxy population at z<0.5, we will address: the key science questions that the new telescopes will permit us to answer in combination with complimentary work at other wavelengths; the observing/analysis modes/strategies which will allow us to most efficiently exploit the data; and the techniques for most effectively coping with the huge volume of survey products, so far unusual for the radio community. In keeping with the forward-looking spirit of this conference, we encourage potential speakers to present and discuss their plans for the instruments of the near future. The key points that the conference will address are: * Scope, depth and design of HI wide area surveys * Evolution of the HI mass function and its dependence on morphological type and environment * Evolution of galaxy scaling relations out to z~0.2 * The evolution of star formation and its relation to gas content in galaxies * Wide field-of-view deep HI observations of individual fields - nearby clusters, groups and galaxies * Continuum surveys: star-forming-galaxies and the role of AGN activity * Polarisation and magnetic fields in nearby galaxies

  3. Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Cazier

    2009-10-09

    Let's explore the universe together. First we'll be learning about stars: what they are and how they are formed. Then we'll explore different websites to learn about other parts of our solar system Write 5 new things you learn about stars from EACH of these sites: How Stars Work A Star s Story Now explore the rest of the universe. Write 3 new things you learn from EACH of these sites: Astronomy Kidastronomy NASA Planetary Tour StarChild Finished and unsure what to do? Go back to each of these websites and check out the games about ...

  4. New Book Recounts Exciting, Colorful History Of Radio Astronomy in Green Bank, West Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    A new book published by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) tells the story of the founding and early years of the Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. But it was Fun: the first forty years of radio astronomy at Green Bank, is not a formal history, but rather a scrapbook of early memos, recollections, anecdotes and reports. But it was Fun... is liberally illustrated with archival photographs. It includes historical and scientific papers from symposia held in 1987 and 1995 to celebrate the birthdays of two of the radio telescopes at the Observatory. Book cover The National Radio Astronomy Observatory was formed in 1956 after the National Science Foundation decided to establish an observatory in the eastern United States for the study of faint radio signals from distant objects in the Universe. But it was Fun... reprints early memos from the group of scientists who searched the mountains for a suitable site -- an area free from radio transmitters and other sources of radio interference -- "in a valley surrounded by as many ranges of high mountains in as many directions as possible," which was "at least 50 miles distant from any city or other concentration of people." The committee settled on Green Bank, a small village in West Virginia, and the book documents the struggles that followed to create a world-class scientific facility in an isolated area more accustomed to cows than computers. Groundbreaking at the Observatory, then a patchwork of farms and fields, took place in October 1957, only a few days after the launch of Sputnik by the Soviet Union. A year later, Green Bank's first telescope was dedicated, and the book contains a transcription of speeches given at that ceremony, when the Cold War, the space race and America's scientific stature were issues of the hour. The centerpiece of the new Observatory was to be a highly-precise radio telescope 140 feet in diameter, but it was expected that it would soon be surpassed by dishes of much greater size. The book reprints internal memos, reports, and recollections of astronomers who were there, as the initial elation turned to frustration when the 140 Foot Telescope project became mired in technical difficulties, plans for larger dishes were put on hold, and the scientific staff of the fledgling Observatory struggled to create a National Observatory with inadequate equipment in a very remote location. Articles by David Heeschen and John Findlay tell the story of the creation of the 300 Foot Telescope, at that time the largest in the world, which went from initial concept to full operation in only 23 months, and began a rich life of research that put the NRAO on the world scientific map. The 300 Foot Telescope was originally intended to be an interim instrument, but as documented in the book, demand for its use was so high that it was kept in operation long after its initial planned retirement, with regular upgrades and new generations of electronics. The sudden collapse of the 300 Foot Telescope on a calm evening after 26 years of operation shocked the astronomical community. But it was Fun... features dramatic first-hand accounts by the people who were there that night: the telescope operator who found himself under a falling structure; the Observatory staff who at first could not believe what happened, and those who worked during the night and into the next day to secure the area, preserve information on what happened, and deal with the rush of publicity. The book includes extensive photographs and the Executive Summary Report of the panel which was commissioned to investigate the collapse and its implication for the design of other large radio telescopes. But it was Fun... will appeal to a variety of audiences. Historians of science will be interested in the articles by David Heeschen, Gerald Tape, and Hugh van Horn, on the evolution of the concept of a National Observatory, and the difficulties of putting the concepts into practice in Green Bank. Those interested in astronomical discovery will find fascinating and highly personal a

  5. Prototyping scalable digital signal processing systems for radio astronomy using dataflow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sane, N.; Ford, J.; Harris, A. I.; Bhattacharyya, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    There is a growing trend toward using high-level tools for design and implementation of radio astronomy digital signal processing (DSP) systems. Such tools, for example, those from the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER), are usually platform-specific, and lack high-level, platform-independent, portable, scalable application specifications. This limits the designer's ability to experiment with designs at a high-level of abstraction and early in the development cycle. We address some of these issues using a model-based design approach employing dataflow models. We demonstrate this approach by applying it to the design of a tunable digital downconverter (TDD) used for narrow-bandwidth spectroscopy. Our design is targeted toward an FPGA platform, called the Interconnect Break-out Board (IBOB), that is available from the CASPER. We use the term TDD to refer to a digital downconverter for which the decimation factor and center frequency can be reconfigured without the need for regenerating the hardware code. Such a design is currently not available in the CASPER DSP library. The work presented in this paper focuses on two aspects. First, we introduce and demonstrate a dataflow-based design approach using the dataflow interchange format (DIF) tool for high-level application specification, and we integrate this approach with the CASPER tool flow. Secondly, we explore the trade-off between the flexibility of TDD designs and the low hardware cost of fixed-configuration digital downconverter (FDD) designs that use the available CASPER DSP library. We further explore this trade-off in the context of a two-stage downconversion scheme employing a combination of TDD or FDD designs.

  6. The beginnings of decameter radio astronomy: pioneering works of Semen Ya. Braude and his followers in Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, I. B.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Megn, A. V.

    2007-06-01

    S.Ya. Braude (1911-2003) was the well-known radio astronomer, one of the founders of low-frequency astronomical research in the world, in particular in the former Soviet Union. He began to work in this field of science in 1957, in Kharkiv city (Ukraine), from the design and manufacturing small decameter interferometer ID-1 and ID-2. Since that time Braude and his team have developed more sophisticated radio decameter telescopes as UTR-1 and UTR-2 (the largest in the world till now) as well as the first decameter VLBI network URAN. They have obtained some important pioneering results about low-frequency radio emission of objects in our Solar system, Galaxy and Metagalaxy by means of these telescopes. In this paper the key events of early history of decameter radio astronomy research in the former USSR are mentioned with emphasizing the role of S. Braude. For the period of 1957-1962, the quotations of Braude's Personal Diary (2003) are first laying open to the public. The most important results obtained by S.Ya. Braude and his followers as well as perspectives of decameter radio astronomy in Ukraine and in the world are highlighted briefly.

  7. The Evolution of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory into a User Based Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Kenneth I.; Bouton, E.

    2006-12-01

    The NRAO was conceived in the mid 1950s as a state-of-the-art facility to allow the United States to compete in the exciting radio astronomy discoveries then taking place in the U.K., the Netherlands and Australia. Otto Struve, the first NRAO director in Green Bank, was chosen to lead the Observatory research program. During Struve's tenure as director, nearly all of the research was carried out by NRAO staff members resident at the Green Bank Observatory. However, under Dave Heeschen, who served as NRAO Director from 1961 to 1978, the number of visitor programs gradually increased; the NRAO scientific staff become more involved in visitor support than in doing their own research, and users became more dependent on instruments and techniques developed by NRAO, often not even coming to the Observatory for their observations. Currently, about half of the observing time on NRAO facilities is allocated to observers from foreign institutions -institutions with which NRAO was built to compete.

  8. COMPUTER USE AUTHORIZATION ASTRONOMY DEPARTMENT

    E-print Network

    Militzer, Burkhard

    COMPUTER USE AUTHORIZATION ASTRONOMY DEPARTMENT RADIO ASTRONOMY LABORATORY THEORETICALASTROPHYSICS authorized to support charges for the computer account. Please give the completed form to Bill Boyd in 401: ____________________________ User I.D.: ________________________ CONDITIONS OF USE The Astronomy Department provides computing

  9. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: The Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D.

    2009-11-01

    The development of Russian (formerly Soviet) radio astronomy is indissolubly linked with the P N Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Russian Academy of Sciences. From the late 1940s, the institute conducted most of its radio astronomy research in the Crimea, at stations or on field trips; in the late 1950s, the center of gravity of research moved to the southern Moscow region, where one of the largest radio astronomy observatories in the country and in the world was developed within less than twenty years. The observatory unique instrumentation system is briefly reviewed in a historical perspective. Key research areas and some major achievements are outlined, and the prospects of the observatory as (currently) part of the LPI Astro Space Center are examined.

  10. 8 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL n VOLUME 21, NUMBER 1, 2014 InsIghts Into the UnIverse: Astronomy wIth hAystAck's rAdIo telescope

    E-print Network

    Williams, Brian C.

    wIth hAystAck's rAdIo telescope Insights into the Universe: Astronomy with Haystack's Radio Telescope game-changing tech- nology for radio science, and to apply it to the study of our planet, its space projects. The observatory is operated under an agreement with the Northeast Radio Observatory Corporation

  11. The Eclipsing Radio Emission of the Precataclysmic Binary Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Academia Sinica,

    E-print Network

    White, Stephen

    The Eclipsing Radio Emission of the Precataclysmic Binary V471 Tau Jeremy Lim Institute confirming the presence of eclipses in the centime­ ter radio emission of the eclipsing binary V471 Tau eclipse per orbit: in all we observed one near--complete radio eclipse, the ingress phase of two other

  12. Radio Astronomy Beam Forming on Many-Core Architectures Alessio Sclocco, Ana Lucia Varbanescu

    E-print Network

    van Nieuwpoort, Rob V.

    , omni- directional antennas instead, a novel design that promises ground-breaking research in astronomy. Where traditional tele- scopes use custom-built hardware, LOFAR uses software to do signal processing with the complexity of this scenario, telescopes rapidly evolve into software telescopes, while they used hardware

  13. Discovering astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of basic astronomical knowledge is presented with attention to the structure and dynamics of the stars and planets. Also dealt with are techniques of astronomical measurement, e.g., stellar spectrometry, radio astronomy, star catalogs, etc. Basic physical principles as they pertain to astronomy are reviewed, including the nature of light, gravitation, and electromagnetism. Finally, stellar evolution and cosmology are discussed with reference to the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe.

  14. New Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Elsevier Science began a fully electronic and refereed journal in astronomy and astrophysics in 1996. "New Astronomy" is available via the Web as well as in print. Elsevier states the journal will publish "articles in all fields of astronomy and astrophysics: theoretical, observational and instrumental. 'New Astronomy' includes full length research articles and letter articles. The journal covers solar, stellar, galactic and extragalactic astronomy and astrophysics. It reports on original research in all wavelength bands, ranging from radio to gamma-ray." The journal's Web site provides a listing of receiving editors, as well as a call for papers. It will be a scholarly journal of "rigorously refereed" papers and aims to provide a short publication time, with accepted articles being made immediately available electronically. Detailed instructions on submittal are at the site.

  15. Characterizing Interference in Radio Astronomy Observations through Active and Unsupervised Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doran, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the process of observing signals from astronomical sources, radio astronomers must mitigate the effects of manmade radio sources such as cell phones, satellites, aircraft, and observatory equipment. Radio frequency interference (RFI) often occurs as short bursts (< 1 ms) across a broad range of frequencies, and can be confused with signals from sources of interest such as pulsars. With ever-increasing volumes of data being produced by observatories, automated strategies are required to detect, classify, and characterize these short "transient" RFI events. We investigate an active learning approach in which an astronomer labels events that are most confusing to a classifier, minimizing the human effort required for classification. We also explore the use of unsupervised clustering techniques, which automatically group events into classes without user input. We apply these techniques to data from the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey to characterize several million detected RFI events from over a thousand hours of observation.

  16. Analysis of the Capability and Limitations of Relativistic Gravity Measurements Using Radio Astronomy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Counselman, C. C., III

    1975-01-01

    The uses of radar observations of planets and very-long-baseline radio interferometric observations of extragalactic objects to test theories of gravitation are described in detail with special emphasis on sources of error. The accuracy achievable in these tests with data already obtained, can be summarized in terms of: retardation of signal propagation (radar), deflection of radio waves (interferometry), advance of planetary perihelia (radar), gravitational quadrupole moment of sun (radar), and time variation of gravitational constant (radar). The analyses completed to date have yielded no significant disagreement with the predictions of general relativity.

  17. Effects of the Earth's Ionosphere on HF Radio Astronomy from Artificial Satellites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Grossi; K. M. Strom; S. E. Strom

    1961-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the effects of the ionosphere on HF observations from satellite-borne radio telescopes is presented. The primary effect investigated is the focusing effect of the ionosphere on incoming cosmic noise. This effect was computed according to the Hamiltonian equations for a ray path in a general magnetoionic medium, assuming the ionosphere to be a nonhomogenous, nonisotropic, magnetoionic

  18. Radio telescopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Findlay

    1964-01-01

    A radio telescope is used in radio astronomy to measure the intensity of the radiation received from various parts of the sky. Such a telescope must be able both to detect and to locate faint radio sources of small angular size, and also to measure the brightness distribution across extended radio sources or over large sky areas. Ideally the telescope

  19. Low noise, 0.4-3 GHz cryogenic receiver for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Gawande, R; Bradley, R; Langston, G

    2014-10-01

    We present the design and measurement of a radio telescope receiver front end cooled to 100 K physical temperature, and working over 400 MHz to 3 GHz frequency band. The system uses a frequency independent feed developed for operation as a feed for parabola using sinuous elements and integrated with an ultra-wideband low noise amplifier. The ambient temperature system is tested on the 43 m radio telescope in Green Bank, WV and the system verification results on the sky are presented. The cryogenic receiver is developed using a Stirling cycle, one stage cryocooler. The measured far field patterns and the system noise less than 80 K over a 5:1 bandwidth are presented. PMID:25362437

  20. The energy of electron beams near the Io footprint derived from radio-astronomy observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottez, F.; Hess, S.; Zarka, P.; Prangé, R.

    2008-12-01

    The energy of Jupiter-Io auroral electrons can be inferred through the analysis of decametric radio emissions, especially that of millisecond bursts. Jovian millisecond (or S-)bursts are intense impulsive decametric radio bursts drifting in frequency in tens of milliseconds. Previous analyses suggest that S-bursts are cyclotron-maser emission in the flux tubes connecting Io or Io's wake to Jupiter. Electrons are thought to be accelerated from Io to Jupiter. Near Jupiter, a loss cone appears in the magnetically mirrored electron population, which is able to amplify extraordinary (X) mode radio waves. Most of the theories about their origin include an interpretation of their frequency drift. We have analysed two sets of data collected at the DAM Nançay and Karkhov radio-telescopes; they are consistent with the above scenario. In addition, we confirm that the frequency drift df/dt(f) is negative on average and decreases in absolute value at high frequencies, consistent with the adiabatic theory of particles motion. We find a typical energy of 4 keV for the emitting electrons. In many cases, we find evidence of localized ~ 1 kV electric potential jumps at high latitudes along magnetic field lines connecting Io or Io's wake to Jupiter. These potential jumps are stable over tens of minutes and propagate upward with a velocity of the order of the sound velocity. We will discuss the consistency of such ~ 4 keV electron populations with other energy estimates derived from observations of the UV Jupiter-Io auroras.

  1. Molecular Clouds and Clumps in the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Johnson, A. M.; Jackson, J. M.; Shah, R. Y.; Simon, R.

    2009-05-01

    The Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (BU-FCRAO) Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) of 13CO J = 1 ? 0 emission covers Galactic longitudes 18° < ell < 55fdg7 and Galactic latitudes |b| <= 1°. Using the SEQUOIA array on the FCRAO 14 m telescope, the GRS fully sampled the 13CO Galactic emission (46'' angular resolution on a 22'' grid) and achieved a spectral resolution of 0.21 km s-1. Because the GRS uses 13CO, an optically thin tracer, rather than 12CO, an optically thick tracer, the GRS allows a much better determination of column density and also a cleaner separation of velocity components along a line of sight. With this homogeneous, fully sampled survey of 13CO emission, we have identified 829 molecular clouds and 6124 clumps throughout the inner Galaxy using the CLUMPFIND algorithm. Here we present details of the catalog and a preliminary analysis of the properties of the molecular clouds and their clumps. Moreover, we compare clouds inside and outside of the 5 kpc ring and find that clouds within the ring typically have warmer temperatures, higher column densities, larger areas, and more clumps compared with clouds located outside the ring. This is expected if these clouds are actively forming stars. This catalog provides a useful tool for the study of molecular clouds and their embedded young stellar objects.

  2. Controller-area-network bus control and monitor system for a radio astronomy interferometer.

    PubMed

    Woody, David P; Wiitala, Bradley; Scott, Stephen L; Lamb, James W; Lawrence, Ronald P; Giovanine, Curt; Fredsti, Sancar J; Beard, Andrew; Pryke, Clem; Loh, Michael; Greer, Christopher H; Cartwright, John K; Gutierrez-Kraybill, Colby; Bolatto, Alberto D; Muchovej, Stephen J C

    2007-09-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a controller-area-network bus (CANbus) monitor and control system for a millimeter wave interferometer. The Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) is a 15-antenna connected-element interferometer for astronomical imaging, created by the merger of two university observatories. Its new control system relies on a central computer supervising a variety of subsystem computers, many of which control distributed intelligent nodes over CANbus. Subsystems are located in the control building and in individual antennas and communicate with the central computer via Ethernet. Each of the CAN modules has a very specific function, such as reading an antenna encoder or tuning an oscillator. Hardware for the modules was based on a core design including a commercial CANbus-enabled single-board computer and some standard circuitry for interfacing to peripherals. Hardware elements were added or changed as necessary for the specific module types. Similarly, a base set of embedded code was implemented for essential common functions such as CAN message handling and time keeping and extended to implement the required functionality for the different hardware. Using a standard CAN messaging protocol designed to fit the requirements of CARMA and a well-defined interface to the high-level software allowed separate development of high-level code and embedded code with minimal integration problems. Over 30 module types have been implemented and successfully deployed in CARMA, which is now delivering excellent new science data. PMID:17902962

  3. Controller-area-network bus control and monitor system for a radio astronomy interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, David P.; Wiitala, Bradley; Scott, Stephen L.; Lamb, James W.; Lawrence, Ronald P.; Giovanine, Curt; Fredsti, Sancar J.; Beard, Andrew; Pryke, Clem; Loh, Michael; Greer, Christopher H.; Cartwright, John K.; Gutierrez-Kraybill, Colby; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Muchovej, Stephen J. C.

    2007-09-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a controller-area-network bus (CANbus) monitor and control system for a millimeter wave interferometer. The Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) is a 15-antenna connected-element interferometer for astronomical imaging, created by the merger of two university observatories. Its new control system relies on a central computer supervising a variety of subsystem computers, many of which control distributed intelligent nodes over CANbus. Subsystems are located in the control building and in individual antennas and communicate with the central computer via Ethernet. Each of the CAN modules has a very specific function, such as reading an antenna encoder or tuning an oscillator. Hardware for the modules was based on a core design including a commercial CANbus-enabled single-board computer and some standard circuitry for interfacing to peripherals. Hardware elements were added or changed as necessary for the specific module types. Similarly, a base set of embedded code was implemented for essential common functions such as CAN message handling and time keeping and extended to implement the required functionality for the different hardware. Using a standard CAN messaging protocol designed to fit the requirements of CARMA and a well-defined interface to the high-level software allowed separate development of high-level code and embedded code with minimal integration problems. Over 30 module types have been implemented and successfully deployed in CARMA, which is now delivering excellent new science data.

  4. Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale from 22 to 43 GHz using Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Bryan J.; Partridge, R. Bruce; Perley, Richard A.; Stevens, Jamie B.; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Rocha, Graca; Walter, Ben Z.; Zacchei, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The Planck mission detected hundreds of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Since Planck's calibration is absolute, based on the satellite's annual motion around the Sun, and since its beams are well-characterized at the sub-percent levels, Planck's flux density measurements are absolute to percent-level accuracy. We have made coordinated Planck, VLA and ATCA observations of ~60 strong, unresolved sources in order to compare Planck's absolute calibration to that used by these two interferometers at 22, 28 and 43 GHz. The flux densities of the sources used to calibrate the VLA observations are taken from Perley and Butler (2013), which is fundamentally based on models of the planet Mars calibrated via WMAP observations. The flux densities of the sources used to calibrate the ATCA observations are based on models of the planet Uranus. Despite the scatter introduced by the variability of many of the sources, the three flux density scales are determined to agree to 1-2% accuracy.

  5. Digital Signal Processing Using Stream High Performance Computing: A 512-Input Broadband Correlator for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocz, J.; Greenhill, L. J.; Barsdell, B. R.; Price, D.; Bernardi, G.; Bourke, S.; Clark, M. A.; Craig, J.; Dexter, M.; Dowell, J.; Eftekhari, T.; Ellingson, S.; Hallinan, G.; Hartman, J.; Jameson, A.; MacMahon, D.; Taylor, G.; Schinzel, F.; Werthimer, D.

    2015-03-01

    A "large-N" correlator that makes use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays and Graphics Processing Units has been deployed as the digital signal processing system for the Long Wavelength Array station at Owens Valley Radio Observatory (LWA-OV), to enable the Large Aperture Experiment to Detect the Dark Ages (LEDA). The system samples a ˜ 100 MHz baseband and processes signals from 512 antennas (256 dual polarization) over a ˜ 58 MHz instantaneous sub-band, achieving 16.8 Tops s-1 and 0.236 Tbit s-1 throughput in a 9 kW envelope and single rack footprint. The output data rate is 260 MB s-1 for 9-s time averaging of cross-power and 1 s averaging of total power data. At deployment, the LWA-OV correlator was the largest in production in terms of N and is the third largest in terms of complex multiply accumulations, after the Very Large Array and Atacama Large Millimeter Array. The correlator's comparatively fast development time and low cost establish a practical foundation for the scalability of a modular, heterogeneous, computing architecture.

  6. Peta-Flop Real Time Radio Astronomy Signal Processing Instrumentation and the CASPER Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werthimer, Dan

    2014-04-01

    I will briefly describe next generation radio telescopes, such as HERA and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), which will require 1E15 to 1E17 operations per second of real time processing. I'll present some of the new architectures we've used to develop a variety of heterogeneous FPGA-GPU-CPU based signal processing systems for such telescopes, including spectrometers, correlators, and beam formers. I will also describe the CASPER collaboration, which has developed architectures, open source programming tools, libraries and reference designs that make it relatively easy to develop a variety of scalable, upgradeable, fault tolerant, low power, real time digital signal processing instrumentation. CASPER utilizes commercial 10Gbit and 40 Gbit ethernet switches to interconnect open source general purpose field programmable gate array (FPGA) boards with GPUs and software modules. CASPER collaborators at hundreds of universities, government labs and observatories have used these techniques to rapidly develop and deploy a variety of correlators, beamformers, spectrometers, pulsar/transient machines, and VLBI instrumentation. CASPER instrumentation is also utilized in physics, medicine, genomics and engineering. Open source source hardware, software, libraries, tools, tutorials, reference designs, information about workshops, and how to join the collaboration are available at http://casper.berkeley.edu

  7. Fast gain calibration in radio astronomy using alternating direction implicit methods: Analysis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvini, Stefano; Wijnholds, Stefan J.

    2014-11-01

    Context. Modern radio astronomical arrays have (or will have) more than one order of magnitude more receivers than classical synthesis arrays, such as the VLA and the WSRT. This makes gain calibration a computationally demanding task. Several alternating direction implicit (ADI) approaches have therefore been proposed that reduce numerical complexity for this task from 𝒪(P3) to 𝒪(P2), where P is the number of receive paths to be calibrated Aims: We present an ADI method, show that it converges to the optimal solution, and assess its numerical, computational and statistical performance. We also discuss its suitability for application in self-calibration and report on its successful application in LOFAR standard pipelines. Methods: Convergence is proved by rigorous mathematical analysis using a contraction mapping. Its numerical, algorithmic, and statistical performance, as well as its suitability for application in self-calibration, are assessed using simulations. Results: Our simulations confirm the 𝒪(P2) complexity and excellent numerical and computational properties of the algorithm. They also confirm that the algorithm performs at or close to the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB, lower bound on the variance of estimated parameters). We find that the algorithm is suitable for application in self-calibration and discuss how it can be included. We demonstrate an order-of-magnitude speed improvement in calibration over traditional methods on actual LOFAR data. Conclusions: In this paper, we demonstrate that ADI methods are a valid and computationally more efficient alternative to traditional gain calibration methods and we report on its successful application in a number of actual data reduction pipelines.

  8. Society News: Monica Grady awarded CBE; Grubb Parsons Lecture 2012; Join the RAS; Astronomy on radio for kids; New Fellows; Peter D Hingley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-08-01

    RAS Fellow Prof. Monica Grady has been made a Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE), in recognition of her services to space science. The RAS sponsors the annual Grubb Parsons Lecture, which this year took place on 6 June at the University of Durham. If you are a professional astronomer, geophysicist, or similar, a student studying these disciplines, or simply someone with a serious interest in them, we urge you to apply for membership of the RAS. Outreach is an important activity for the RAS. We recently supported an astronomy series called Deep Space High on the digital radio channel Fun Kids.

  9. Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, 15(3), 255-257 (2012). IAU HISTORIC RADIO ASTRONOMY WORKING GROUP

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    -significant radio telescopes and associated instrumentation found worldwide; b) document the technical for the full restoration of the radio telescope, which was started in June, 2012. The radio telescope of their visits to see the radio heliograph. The first telescope on Haleakala on Maui was Grote Rebers sea

  10. Astronomy research at the Aerospace Corporation. [research projects - NASA programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulikas, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    This report reviews the astronomy research carried out at The Aerospace Corporation during 1974. The report describes the activities of the San Fernando Observatory, the research in millimeter wave radio astronomy as well as the space astronomy research.

  11. Multiwavelength Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Linda Hermans-Killam

    This site from NASA's Infrared Astrophysics Data Center explains how the universe can be observed using the entire electromagnetic spectrum. There is an introduction to using light in astronomy; information on and images taken from different areas of the electromagnetic spectrum of objects in the solar system, the Milky Way galaxy and beyond; and a table of radiation types, their characteristic temperatures, and objects emitting this type of radiation. The tutorial explains how observations are made using X-rays, gamma rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, infrared wavelengths, and radio wavelengths. There is a section on why telescopes are sent to space and a multiwavelength gallery.

  12. A Cryogenic Ultra-Low-Noise MMIC-based LNA with a discrete First Stage Transistor Suitable for Radio Astronomy Applications

    E-print Network

    McCulloch, Mark A; Piccirillo, Lucio

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a new design of MMIC based LNA is outlined. This design uses a discrete 100-nm InP HEMT placed in front of an existing InP MMIC LNA to lower the overall noise temperature of the LNA. This new approach known as the Transistor in front of MMIC (T+MMIC) LNA, possesses a gain in excess of 40dB and an average noise temperature of 9.4K compared to 14.5K for the equivalent MMIC-only LNA measured across a 27-33GHz bandwidth at a physical temperature of 8K. A simple ADS model offering further insights into the operation of the LNA is also presented and a potential radio astronomy application is discussed

  13. A Voyage through the Radio Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spuck, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    Each year, professionals and amateurs alike make significant contributions to the field of astronomy. High school students can also conduct astronomy research. Since 1992, the Radio Astronomy Research Team from Oil City Area Senior High School (OCHS) in Oil City, Pennsylvania, has traveled each year to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory…

  14. Research Experience for Teachers at NRAO-Green Bank: Calibration of Data from the Green Bank Telescope and Classroom Activities in Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. H.; Maddalena, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    The NSF-funded "Research Experience for Teachers" project provides teachers an opportunity to work on a current scientific or engineering research project. This paper will present the results of research conducted with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as classroom activities that will use GBT data. In order to determine the accuracy of the calibration of receivers on cm-wave radio telescopes, engineers must periodically determine the equivalent temperature of a receiver's calibration noise diode. The traditional methods utilize hot-cold loads and usually achieve an accuracy of no better than 5%, have a very coarse frequency resolution, and require days of labor. Using observations with the GBT of standard astronomical flux calibrators, we measured the noise diode temperatures for four receivers that cover 1 to 10 GHz. By comparing the detected power from the calibrators to that generated by the noise diodes we were able to determine the temperature of the noise diodes to an accuracy of 1% with very good frequency resolution (1 MHz). The astronomically determined values agree, with few exceptions, to the less accurate values generated by the receiver engineer. In contrast to the methods employed by engineers, the astronomical determinations took only a few hours. Using data collected from the GBT and the NRAO 140-foot telescope, high-school students at Breck School in Golden Valley, MN will use the Hands-On Universe (HOU) software to analyze fits files containing data from a 100 square-degree region of the Orion Nebula. Instead of always relying on optical images from personal observations or the HOU groups at Lawrence Hall of Science or Yerkes, students can now use radio images. Comparing radio images with those derived at optical wavelengths should prove enlightening for students, many of whom have misconceptions concerning radio astronomy.

  15. Federal Communications Commission US311 Radio astronomy observations may be made in the bands 13501400 MHz and 49504990 MHz

    E-print Network

    Bower, Geoffrey

    in the Police Radio Service (with a maximum authorized bandwidth of 20 kHz) for stolen vehicle recovery systems Service. Operations in this service are limited to Government Next Generation Weather Radar #12;

  16. A scientific program for infrared, submillimeter and radio astronomy from space: A report by the Management Operations Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Important and fundamental scientific progress can be attained through space observations in the wavelengths longward of 1 micron. The formation of galaxies, stars, and planets, the origin of quasars and the nature of active galactic nuclei, the large scale structure of the Universe, and the problem of the missing mass, are among the major scientific issues that can be addressed by these observations. Significant advances in many areas of astrophysics can be made over the next 20 years by implementing the outlined program. This program combines large observatories with smaller projects to create an overall scheme that emphasized complementarity and synergy, advanced technology, community support and development, and the training of the next generation of scientists. Key aspects of the program include: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility; the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy; a robust program of small missions; and the creation of the technology base for future major observatories.

  17. Working Papers: Astronomy and Astrophysics Panel Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Beichman, Charles A.; Canizares, Claude; Cronin, James; Heeschen, David; Houck, James; Hunten, Donald; Mckee, Christopher F.; Noyes, Robert; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1991-01-01

    The papers of the panels appointed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics survey Committee are compiled. These papers were advisory to the survey committee and represent the opinions of the members of each panel in the context of their individual charges. The following subject areas are covered: radio astronomy, infrared astronomy, optical/IR from ground, UV-optical from space, interferometry, high energy from space, particle astrophysics, theory and laboratory astrophysics, solar astronomy, planetary astronomy, computing and data processing, policy opportunities, benefits to the nation from astronomy and astrophysics, status of the profession, and science opportunities.

  18. Astronomy and astrophysics for the 1980's. Volume 2: Reports of the panels. Astronomy Survey Committee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contents: High-energy astrophysics: introduction, the nature of high-energy astronomy and the scope of the report, summary of principal recommendations, X-ray astronomy, extreme-ultraviolet astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy, cosmic-ray astronomy, high-energy solar astronomy, neutrino astronomy, gravitational-wave astronomy. Ultraviolet, optical, and infrared astronomy: summary and recommendations, highlights of astronomy in the 1970's, science opportunities for the 1980's, detailed description of the UVOIR program for the 1980's, projections into the future, epilogue. Radio astronomy: introduction: scope of the report, summary of recommendations, description of recommended projects and facilities, scientific priorities, reference to list of radio and radar astronomy observatories. Theoretical and laboratory astrophysics: introduction and summary of recommendations, theoretical astrophysics, laboratory astrophysics. Data processing and computational facilities: introduction, conclusions and recommendations, the trend toward decentralization, theoretical computing, image processing and analysis, data archiving, astronomical data bases, telecommunications, specialized architectures. Organization, education, and personnel: summary of recommendations, maintenance of scientific talent, other issues in the practice ofastronomy, astronomy and the astronomers in the 1970's.1982

  19. ASTRONOMY 1

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    dramsden

    2012-03-26

    Basic astronomy, focus on our solar system. You will start by taking a journey through our solar system by studying the planets. Click any link to blast off! planets for kids nine planets for kids astronomy nasa ...

  20. Sustainable Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Blaha; J. Goetz; T. Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Through our International Year of Astronomy outreach effort, we established a sustainable astronomy program and curriculum in the Northfield, Minnesota community. Carleton College offers monthly open houses at Goodsell Observatory and donated its recently \\

  1. Astronomy Communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Heck; C. Madsen

    2003-01-01

    Astronomers communicate all the time, with colleagues of course, but also with managers and administrators, with decision makers and takers, with social representatives, with the news media, and with the society at large. Education is naturally part of the process. Astronomy communication must take into account several specificities: the astronomy community is rather compact and well organized world-wide; astronomy has

  2. Seeking Graduate & Undergraduate Students I'm seeking students to participate in a variety of projects. All of these pertain to ongoing research in radio astronomy; in

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    -instrumenting the NRAO Green Bank 20-m radio telescope to search for a rare and recently-discovered astrophysical phased array-type radio telescope consisting of interconnected "tiles", with each tile consisting://arxiv.org/abs/1304.0812 ­ A different radio telescope: http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4816 and http://arxiv.org/abs/1307

  3. IAC-02-IAA.2.3.01 Dishing up the Data: the role of Australian space tracking and radio astronomy facilities in the

    E-print Network

    Sarkissian, John M.

    .Sarkissian@csiro.au Abstract The recent Australian film, The Dish, highlighted the role played by the Parkes Radio Telescope's major radio telescope facilities was being established at Parkes, in western New South Wales. This 64 Radio Telescope has been contracted by NASA on many occasions to support interplanetary spacecraft

  4. NEW THz SOLAR RADIO ASTRONOMY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre Kaufmann; Jean-Pierre Raulin; C. Guillermo; Gimenez de Castro; Hugo Levato; Adolfo Marun; Pablo Pereyra

    New striking aspects of solar activity have been found from observations at frequencies above 100 GHz, provided by the solar submillimeter-wave telescope (SST) at El Leoncito in the Argentina Andes. The SST utilizes a radome-enclosed 1.5-m Cassegrain reflector, operating simultaneously with four 212 GHz and two 405 GHz total power radiometers with 5ms time resolution. Partial overlapping of antenna beams

  5. Bad Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Plait, Philip

    Philip Plait, a professor at the physics and astronomy department at Sonoma State University, explores many popular myths and misconceptions about astronomy at this amusing and educational website. Students and educators can learn which ideas promoted by television, news, movies, and the general public are false and, more importantly, why they are false. Amateur astronomers can talk with others about an array of bad astronomy topics on the Bulletin Board. The website offers information about Philip Plait's public talks and about astronomical events.

  6. Astronomy Development in Nigeria: Challenges and Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okwe Chibueze, James

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria evidently has huge potentials to develop a strong astronomy community. Much of the strength lies in the great number of intelligent students with the potential of becoming good astronomers. Sadly, astronomy development in Nigeria has stagnated in the past decades owing to poor funding and/or indifferent attitude of the funding bodies, research-unfriendly environment, and non-existence of facilities. Currently, efforts toward fuelling advancement in astronomy are focused on building 'critical mass', establishing collaborations with universities/astronomy institutes outside Nigeria, converting out-of-use communication antennas into radio telescopes, and acquiring out-of-use telescopes for educational and low-level research purposes.

  7. Astronomy Week in Madeira, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusto, P.; Sobrinho, J. L.

    2012-05-01

    The outreach programme Semanas da Astronomia (Astronomy Weeks) is held in late spring or summer on the island of Madeira, Portugal. This programme has been attracting enough interest to be mentioned in the regional press/TV/radio every year and is now, without doubt, the astronomical highlight of the year on Madeira. We believe that this programme is a good case study for showing how to attract the general public to astronomy in a small (population 250 000, area 900 km2) and fairly isolated place such as Madeira. Our Astronomy Weeks have been different each year and have so far included exhibitions, courses, talks, a forum, documentaries, observing sessions (some with blackouts), music and an astro party. These efforts may contribute towards putting Madeira on the map with respect to observational astronomy, and have also contributed to the planned installation of two observatories in the island.

  8. Primary Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

    Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics…

  9. Intermediate Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

    Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics…

  10. Radio Surveys: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganti, Raffaella

    2015-03-01

    Radio astronomy has provided important surveys that have made possible key (and sometimes serendipitous) discoveries. I will briefly mention some of the past continuum and line (HI) radio surveys as well as new, on-going surveys and surveys planned for the near future. This new generation of large radio surveys is bringing extra challenges in terms of data handling but also great new possibilities thanks to the wider range of data products that they will provide.

  11. National Radio Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) "operates powerful, advanced radio telescopes spanning the western hemisphere." The website is nicely divided into information for the general public, astronomers, and teachers and students. Users can learn all about NRAO's many telescopes located throughout the United States. Researchers can find out about meetings, conferences, software resources, and surveys. Amateur radio astronomers can find links describing how to build antennas and interferometers. Everyone will enjoy the numerous images of astronomical phenomena and NRAO's telescopes and facilities.

  12. Sustainable Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, C.; Goetz, J.; Johnson, T.

    2011-09-01

    Through our International Year of Astronomy outreach effort, we established a sustainable astronomy program and curriculum in the Northfield, Minnesota community. Carleton College offers monthly open houses at Goodsell Observatory and donated its recently "retire" observing equipment to local schools. While public evenings continue to be popular, the donated equipment was underutilized due to a lack of trained student observing assistants. With sponsorship from NASA's IYA Student Ambassador program, the sustainable astronomy project began in 2009 to generate greater interest in astronomy and train middle school and high school students as observing assistants. Carleton physics majors developed curricular materials and instituted regular outreach programs for grades 6-12. The Northfield High School Astronomy Club was created, and Carleton undergraduates taught high school students how to use telescopes and do CCD imaging. During the summer of 2009, Carleton students began the Young Astronomers Summer Experience (YASE) program for middle school students and offered a two-week, astronomy-rich observing and imaging experience at Goodsell Observatory. In concert with NASA's Summer of Innovation initiative, the YASE program was offered again in 2010 and engaged a new group of local middle school students in hands-on scientific experiments and observing opportunities. Members of the high school astronomy club now volunteer as observing assistants in the community and graduates of the YASE programs are eager to continue observing as members of a public service astronomy club when they enter the Northfield High School. These projects are training future scientists and will sustain the public's interest in astronomy long after the end of IYA 2009.

  13. Infrared Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NASA's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) provides the Infrared Astronomy Website as one of its outreach programs. Infrared Astronomy, or "the detection and study of the infrared radiation (heat energy) emitted from objects in the Universe," is described and placed in context in the sections Discovery of Infrared, What is Infrared, Infrared Astronomy, Background, and the Infrared Universe. For current information, see the News & Discoveries, Active/ Future Projects, and Activities sections; past and current projects supported by IPAC are featured in the Infrared Gallery. The site targets a broad audience and is geared towards many learning levels.

  14. Astronomy Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, A.; Madsen, C.

    2003-07-01

    Astronomers communicate all the time, with colleagues of course, but also with managers and administrators, with decision makers and takers, with social representatives, with the news media, and with the society at large. Education is naturally part of the process. Astronomy communication must take into account several specificities: the astronomy community is rather compact and well organized world-wide; astronomy has penetrated the general public remarkably well with an extensive network of associations and organizations of aficionados all over the world. Also, as a result of the huge amount of data accumulated and by necessity for their extensive international collaborations, astronomers have pioneered the development of distributed resources, electronic communications and networks coupled to advanced methodologies and technologies, often much before they become of common world-wide usage. This book is filling up a gap in the astronomy-related literature by providing a set of chapters not only of direct interest to astronomy communication, but also well beyond it. The experts contributing to this book have done their best to write in a way understandable to readers not necessarily hyperspecialized in astronomy nor in communication techniques while providing specific detailed information, as well as plenty of pointers and bibliographic elements. This book will be very useful for researchers, teachers, editors, publishers, librarians, computer scientists, sociologists of science, research planners and strategists, project managers, public-relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related organizations, as well as for students aiming at a career in astronomy or related space science. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1345-0

  15. Multiverso: Rock'n'Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    In the last few years, there have been several projects involving astronomy and classical music. But have a rock band ever appeared at a science conference or an astronomer at a rock concert? We present a project, Multiverso, in which we mix rock and astronomy, together with poetry and video art (Caballero, 2010). The project started in late 2009 and has already reached tens of thousands people in Spain through the release of an album, several concert-talks, television, radio, newspapers and the internet.

  16. Islamic AstronomyIslamic Astronomy Topics covered

    E-print Network

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    Islamic AstronomyIslamic Astronomy #12;Topics covered ·· Islamic calendarIslamic calendar ·· types importance in the structure ofof kaabakaaba ·· problems in Islamic astronomyproblems in Islamic astronomy ·· solutions to problems by astronomerssolutions to problems by astronomers ·· Observatories in Islamic

  17. Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 15, Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation for Detection

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 1­5, Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation for Detection of Extended Sources with an Interferometer Geoffrey C. Bower Radio Astronomy Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Radio frequency interference (RFI) is a significant problem for current

  18. Minoan Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Mary; Henriksson, Göran

    Of the three great cultures of the ancient eastern Mediterranean — the Babylonian, Egyptian, and Minoan — we have considerable knowledge of the astronomy of the first two through their documents (see relevant sections of this Handbook). Very little written material, however, has survived from Minoan Crete, but the evidence of other impressive archaeological discoveries implies that the inhabitants were on a par with their neighbors and had made similar advances in astronomy. In lieu of written sources, we have used the methods of archaeoastronomy to recover as much as possible about Minoan astronomy. In short, these are measuring the orientations of walls and their opposite horizons at a representative selection of monuments, analyzing the measurements statistically, and comparing the results with digital reconstruction of the positions of significant celestial bodies for the time when the walls were built.

  19. Past, Present and Future of Chinese Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Through out the ancient history, Chinese astronomers had made tremendous achievements. Since the main purpose of the ancient Chinese astronomy was to study the correlation between man and the universe, all the Emperors made ancient Chinese astronomy the highly regarded science throughout the history. After a brief introduction of the achievement of ancient Chinese astronomy, I describe the beginnings of modern astronomy research in China in the 20th century. Benefiting from the fast development of Chinese economy, the research in astronomy in China has made remarkable progress in recent years. The number of astronomers has doubled in the past ten years, and the number of graduate students has grown over 1300. The current budget for astronomy research is ten times larger than that ten years ago. The research covers all fields in astronomy, from galaxies to the Sun. The recent progress in both the instruments, such as the Guo Shoujing's telescope, a Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), and the theoretical research will be briefly presented. The ongoing and future projects on the space- and ground-based facilities will be described, including the Five Hundred Meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST), ``Chang E'' (Lunar mission) project, Hard X-ray Modulate Telescope (HXMT), DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), Deep Space Solar Observatory (DSO), Chinese Antarctic Observatory (CAO), 65m steerable radio telescope, Chinese Spectral Radioheliogaph (CSRH) etc.

  20. On gamma-ray astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Morrison

    1958-01-01

    Summary  Photons in the visible range form the basis of astronomy. They move in straight lines, which preserves source information,\\u000a but they arise only very indirectly from nuclear or high-energy processes. Cosmic-ray particles, on the other hand, arise\\u000a directly from high-energy processes in astronomical objects of various classes, but carry no information about source direction.\\u000a Radio emissions are still more complex

  1. National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center: Arecibo Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The 305m radio telescope at the Arecibo Observatory "is the largest single-dish radio telescope on our planet and is available to the global scientific community for astronomical observation at wavelengths between 6 m and 3 m." Researchers can search WAPP data and information about past, present, and future projects at the Observatory. The extensive website provides numerous data reduction packages and file formats. Users can find extensive materials on the planetary studies, space and atmospheric science, and astronomy occurring at the observatory. Students and educators can learn about Arecibo's summer program. The News link is filled with fascinating new accomplishments, employment opportunities, and upcoming astronomy talks and seminars.

  2. Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-12-03

    This fact sheet describes the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) program. This educational program uses a 34-meter antenna for classroom radio astronomy observations via the Internet. It introduces students from elementary school through high school to the process of science with the goal of improving science literacy among American students.

  3. Infrared astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald F. Webbink; William Q. Jeffers

    1969-01-01

    This review paper is a survey of infrared astronomy up to early 1969. The techniques and photometric standards are mentioned briefly, and results cover solar, lunar, and planetary observations. Point sources and extended sources both within and beyond the Galaxy are included, ending with the problem of cosmic background radiation. It is concluded that great progress will be possible when

  4. Astronomy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid

    This document consists of activities and references for teaching astronomy. The activities (which include objectives, list of materials needed, and procedures) focus on: observing the Big Dipper and locating the North Star; examining the Big Dipper's stars; making and using an astrolabe; examining retograde motion of Mars; measuring the Sun's…

  5. Astronomy Quizzes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Arny, Thomas

    This website contains a collection of quizzes from a wide range of topics. Subjects covered include historical astronomy, astronomical units and scales, telescopes, planetary geology, the sun, stellar evolution, cosmology, and life in the universe. These quizzes have five to ten multiple choice questions each. Quizzes are graded automatically and the student is told which answers are correct and incorrect.

  6. Astronomy Books

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This reference list has 11 kid-friendly books on a wide range of astronomy topics. For each title, the publisher and publication date are included along with author name. The list includes engaging stories, field guides and other reference books.

  7. Kinesthetic Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kinesthetic Astronomy lessons emphasize astronomical concepts and phenomenon that people can readily encounter in their "everyday" lives such as time, seasons, and sky motions of the Sun, Moon, stars, and planets. They are intended for sixth graders up through adult learners in both formal and informal educational settings. You will be asked to register your name and email address before downloading the lessons.

  8. Astronomy Adventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Astronomy Adventures." Contents are organized into the following sections: (1)…

  9. Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope System Theory of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, George R.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this learning module is to enable learners to describe how the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) system functions in support of Apple Valley Science and Technology Center's (AVSTC) client schools' radio astronomy activities.

  10. Introduction 1.1 The Connection Between Xray Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 The Connection Between X­ray Astronomy and Radio Pulsars The X­ray study of rotation­powered or radio pulsars has had a close link with X­ ray astronomy from its very beginning. After the discovery of Sco X\\Gamma1 as the first extra­solar X­ray source by rocket­borne Geiger counters (Giacconi et

  11. Inuit Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, John

    Inuit live mainly in the treeless Arctic regions of North America, Greenland, and parts of northeastern Siberia. Their cosmology, based on shamanistic belief, constructed a view of the sky and its contents distinctively suited to their spiritual and pragmatic needs. Their astronomy, particularly for those groups living far above the Arctic Circle, reflects the unique appearance of the celestial sphere at high northerly latitudes, demonstrated most noticeably in the annual disappearance of the sun during midwinter months.

  12. Astronomy Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barnbaum, Cecilia

    2011-04-12

    This collection of animations introduces students to planetary motions, gravitational effects, and the scale of astronomical distances. Students can view visualizations of Earth's changing seasons, circumpolar motion, and the celestial equator and ecliptic plane. Animations on gravity explain how satellites orbit, the motions of comets and meteor storms, and gravitational 'warping'. Other animations explain how Earth's tides are produced, how astronomical distances are calculated, the use of spectra in astronomy, and the lifecycles of stars.

  13. Astronomy Workshop

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Douglas P. Hamilton

    The Astronomy Workshop from the University of Maryland features interactives, animations, calculators, and other online computer-assisted learning tools enabling middle-school and older students to investigate the solar system and the universe. Units allow students to investigate astronomical distances and the size of objects in the universe; examine what might happen if objects collide; investigate orbital mechanics; visualize the distribution and motions of objects in the solar system; and many other topics.

  14. Astronomy Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Software Bisque's TheSky, SkyPro and Remote Astronomy Software incorporate technology developed for the Hubble Space Telescope. TheSky and SkyPro work together to orchestrate locating, identifying and acquiring images of deep sky objects. With all three systems, the user can directly control computer-driven telescopes and charge coupled device (CCD) cameras through serial ports. Through the systems, astronomers and students can remotely operate a telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory Institute.

  15. Astronomy Animations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collection of animations introduces students to planetary motions, gravitational effects, and the scale of astronomical distances. Students can view visualizations of Earth's changing seasons, circumpolar motion, and the celestial equator and ecliptic plane. Animations on gravity explain how satellites orbit, the motions of comets and meteor storms, and gravitational 'warping'. Other animations explain how Earth's tides are produced, how astronomical distances are calculated, the use of spectra in astronomy, and the lifecycles of stars.

  16. Gravitational Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaprakash, B. Suryanarayana

    This chapter is about opening the gravitational window to observe the Universe. Although the weakest of all known forces, gravity plays a dominant role in forming stars and galaxies, shaping the large-scale structure, and driving the expansion of the Universe. Gravity has so far played a passive role in our understanding. We only witness its influence indirectly by observing its effect on star light (Doppler effect, cosmological redshift, gravitational lensing, etc.). However, we are at a momentous period that could soon transform our picture of the Universe by opening the gravitational window for observational astronomy. Gravitational waves have already been critical for understanding how neutron star binaries evolve [1] [2]. However, we have not directly observed the waves themselves. This will change before the end of this decade when several different methods of observing gravitational waves will reach sensitivity levels at which we should finally begin to unravel some of the deepest questions in astronomy, cosmology, and fundamental physics. The chapter by van den Broeck will deal with the two latter topics. In this chapter, we will discuss what gravitational waves are (Sect. 26.2), how they interact with matter (Sect. 26.3), on-going and future projects aimed at detecting cosmic gravitational waves (Sect. 26.4), expected and speculative astronomical sources, and a list of open problems on which gravitational astronomy could shed some light (Sect. 26.5).

  17. Gamma ray astronomy. [survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the instruments developed for gamma ray astronomy is given together with a brief summary of the current status of the observational results. These include the studies of galactic gamma ray emission, the diffuse, presumably extragalactic, gamma radiation, and localized gamma ray sources. The study of the spatial distribution of galactic gamma radiation is beginning to provide a new means for the study of galactic structure and dynamics. The diffuse emission may provide evidence of gamma ray emission in the cosmological past, although improved observations must be obtained before the picture can be clarified. The study of localized sources has shown NP0532, the Crab radio pulsar, to be a gamma ray pulsar also and strong emission from Vela may be due to supernova produced cosmic rays interacting with the remnant gas.

  18. The Beginning of Modern Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Frank J.; Rieke, G. H.; Gehrz, R. D.

    2007-09-01

    I came to the attention of astronomers through inventing the low temperature bolometer at Texas Instruments. I was quickly drawn into pioneering infrared (IR) astronomy. I soon transferred to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and then to the University of Arizona to make astronomy my focus. Parallel programs were getting under way at the California Institute of Technology, Cornell, the Universities of Minnesota and of California, San Diego. Although our methods were crude, discoveries were easy and exciting. I was involved in many of them because I could supply good detectors and invented a number of new techniques. Eventually, I supplied detector systems and instruments through founding of a small company. By the early 1970s, systematic IR astronomy was under way on many important problems that are still active research topics. This rapid success led to investments in large new telescopes and in the IRAS survey satellite.

  19. Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibe, Mary; MacLaren, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) project as a way of teaching astronomy concepts to middle school students. The project provides students opportunities to work with professional scientists. (SOE)

  20. Big data challenges for large radio arrays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dayton L. Jones; Kiri Wagstaff; David R. Thompson; Larry D'Addario; Robert Navarro; Chris Mattmann; Walid Majid; Joseph Lazio; Robert Preston; Umaa Rebbapragada

    2012-01-01

    Future large radio astronomy arrays, particularly the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to generate data at rates far higher than can be analyzed or stored affordably with current practices. This is, by definition, a \\

  1. The Radio JOVE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L.; Thieman, J.; Higgins, C.

    1999-09-01

    Radio JOVE is an interactive educational activity which brings the radio sounds of Jupiter and the Sun to students, teachers, and the general public. This is accomplished through the construction of a simple radio telescope kit and the use of a real-time radio observatory on the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/) will contain science information, instruction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for students and teachers. Our target audience is high school science classes, but subjects can be tailored to college undergraduate physics and astronomy courses or even to middle school science classes. The goals of the project are: 1) Educate people about planetary and solar radio astronomy, space physics, and the scientific method 2) Provide teachers and students with a hands-on radio astronomy exercise as a science curriculum support activity by building and using a simple radio telescope receiver/antenna kit 3) Create the first ever online radio observatory which provides real-time data for those with internet access 4) Allow interactions among participating schools by facilitating exchanges of ideas, data, and observing experiences. Our current funding will allow us to impact 100 schools by partially subsidizing their participation in the program. We expect to expand well beyond this number as publicity and general interest increase. Additional schools are welcome to fully participate, but we will not be able to subsidize their kit purchases. We hope to make a wide impact among the schools by advertising through appropriate newsletters, space grant consortia, the INSPIRE project (http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire/), electronic links, and science and education meetings. We would like to acknoledge support from the NASA/GSFC Director's Discretionary Fund, the STScI IDEAS grant program and the NASA/GSFC Space Science Data Operations Office.

  2. The General History of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, Owen

    2010-04-01

    Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. The Birth of Astrophysics and Other Late Nineteenth-Century Trends (c.1850-c.1920); 1. The origins of astrophysics A. J. Meadows; 2. The impact of photography on astronomy John Lankford; 3. Telescope building, 1850-1900 Albert Van Helden; 4. The new astronomy A. J. Meadows; 5. Variable stars Helen Sawyer Hogg; 6. Stellar evolution and the origin of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram David DeVorkin; Part II. Observatories and Instrumentation: 7. Astronomical institutions. Introduction Owen Gingerich, Greenwich Observatory Philip S. Laurie, Paris Observatory Jacques Lévy, Pulkovo Observatory Aleksandr A. Mikhailov, Harvard College Observatory Howard Plotkin, United States Naval Observatory Deborah Warner, Lick Observatory Trudy E. Bell, Potsdam Astrophysical Observatory Dieter B. Herrmann; 8. Building large telescopes, 1900-1950 Albert Van Helden; 9. Astronomical institutions in the southern hemisphere, 1850-1950 David S. Evans; 10. Twentieth-century instrumentation Charles Fehrenbach, with a section on 'Early rockets in astronomy' Herbert Friedman; 11. Early radio astronomy Woodruff T. Sullivan III; Appendix: The world's largest telescopes, 1850-1950 Barbara L. Welther; Illustrations: acknowledgements and sources; Index.

  3. TeachAstronomy.com - Digitizing Astronomy Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin; Impey, C. D.; Austin, C.; Patikkal, A.; Paul, M.; Ganesan, N.

    2013-06-01

    Teach Astronomy—a new, free online resource—can be used as a teaching tool in non-science major introductory college level astronomy courses, and as a reference guide for casual learners and hobbyists. Digital content available on Teach Astronomy includes: a comprehensive introductory astronomy textbook by Chris Impey, Wikipedia astronomy articles, images from Astronomy Picture of the Day archives and (new) AstroPix database, two to three minute topical video clips by Chris Impey, podcasts from 365 Days of Astronomy archives, and an RSS feed of astronomy news from Science Daily. Teach Astronomy features an original technology called the Wikimap to cluster, display, and navigate site search results. Development of Teach Astronomy was motivated by steep increases in textbook prices, the rapid adoption of digital resources by students and the public, and the modern capabilities of digital technology. This past spring semester Teach Astronomy was used as content supplement to lectures in a massive, open, online course (MOOC) taught by Chris Impey. Usage of Teach Astronomy has been steadily growing since its initial release in August of 2012. The site has users in all corners of the country and is being used as a primary teaching tool in at least four states.

  4. Planetary astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, David; Hunten, Donald; Ahearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Black, David; Brown, Robert A.; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Cochran, Anita L.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Depater, Imke

    1991-01-01

    The authors profile the field of astronomy, identify some of the key scientific questions that can be addressed during the decade of the 1990's, and recommend several facilities that are critically important for answering these questions. Scientific opportunities for the 1990' are discussed. Areas discussed include protoplanetary disks, an inventory of the solar system, primitive material in the solar system, the dynamics of planetary atmospheres, planetary rings and ring dynamics, the composition and structure of the atmospheres of giant planets, the volcanoes of IO, and the mineralogy of the Martian surface. Critical technology developments, proposed projects and facilities, and recommendations for research and facilities are discussed.

  5. Egyptian astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrillat, H.

    In Egypt, stars and planets were seen as goods and astronomy was practiced by priests in the temples. The most important time cycle of the Egyptian calendar was that of the heliac rising of Sirius during all the history of Ancient Egypt. Thus Egyptian astronomers built a calendar of 365 days, which was never corrected and in which the heliacal raising was evidently shifting at the rate of one day every four years. The year had twelve months of thirty days and a holy period of five days.

  6. Astronomy stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenson, Rhoda

    2015-03-01

    For many years I have taught physics and astronomy courses to liberal arts students. I have found most of my students to be intelligent and diligent, but not anxious to study science. They typically take the class only because their degree requires a science course. Many arrive having already decided they will not be able to do the math or understand the scientific concepts, and have essentially built a wall between themselves and science. In the 1990s, in an effort to help break down that wall, as part of an NSF-supported course, "The Evolution of the Universe, Earth and Life," I began using creative writing assignments.

  7. Infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Frederick; Houck, James; Bally, John; Becklin, Eric; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Draine, Bruce; Frogel, Jay; Gatley, Ian; Gehrz, Robert; Hildebrand, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The decade of 1990's presents an opportunity to address fundamental astrophysical issues through observations at IR wavelengths made possible by technological and scientific advances during the last decade. The major elements of recommended program are: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the IR Optimized 8-m Telescope (IRO), a detector and instrumentation program, the SubMilliMeter Mission (SMMM), the 2 Microns All Sky Survey (2MASS), a sound infrastructure, and technology development programs. Also presented are: perspective, science opportunities, technical overview, project recommendations, future directions, and infrastructure.

  8. Astronomy Looks Different When You Listen to It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the use of a radio telescope to arouse new interest among students. The article partitions into the following sections: (1) Radio Astronomy--Which Level; (2) First Steps: The Site--The Antenna; (3) The Electronics: Do It Yourself, or Store Bought; (4) Field Test: Music of the Spheres; (5) Getting Started: Entry Level Projects; and (6)…

  9. Early infrared astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequeux, James

    2009-07-01

    I present a short history of infrared astronomy, from the first scientific approaches of the ‘radiant heat’ in the seventeenth century to the 1970's, the time when space infrared astronomy was developing very rapidly. The beginning of millimeter and submillimeter astronomy is also covered. As the progress of infrared astronomy was strongly dependent on detectors, some details are given on their development.

  10. Astronomy Books of 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercury, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides annotated listing of books in 16 areas: (1) amateur astromony; (2) children's books; (3) comets; (4) cosmology; (5) education in astronomy; (6) general astronomy; (7) history of astronomy; (8) life in the universe; (9) miscellaneous; (10) physics and astronomy; (11) pseudo-science; (12) space exploration; (13) stars and stellar evolution;…

  11. Planetary Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1998-01-01

    This 1-year project was an augmentation grant to my NASA Planetary Astronomy grant. With the awarded funding, we accomplished the following tasks: (1) Conducted two NVK imaging runs in conjunction with the ILAW (International Lunar Atmosphere Week) Observing Campaigns in 1995 and 1997. In the first run, we obtained repeated imaging sequences of lunar Na D-line emission to better quantify the temporal variations detected in earlier runs. In the second run we obtained extremely high resolution (R=960.000) Na line profiles using the 4m AAT in Australia. These data are being analyzed under our new 3-year Planetary Astronomy grant. (2) Reduced, analyzed, and published our March 1995 spectroscopic dataset to detect (or set stringent upper limits on) Rb. Cs, Mg. Al. Fe, Ba, Ba. OH, and several other species. These results were reported in a talk at the LPSC and in two papers: (1) A Spectroscopic Survey of Metallic Abundances in the Lunar Atmosphere. and (2) A Search for Magnesium in the Lunar Atmosphere. Both reprints are attached. Wrote up an extensive, invited Reviews of Geophysics review article on advances in the study of the lunar atmosphere. This 70-page article, which is expected to appear in print in 1999, is also attached.

  12. Successful Innovative Methods in Introducing Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattejee, T. K. C.

    2006-08-01

    Innovating new informative methods to induce interest in students has permitted us to introduce astronomy in several universities and institutes in Mexico. As a prelude, we gave a popular course in the history of astronomy. This was very easy as astronomy seems to be the most ancient of sciences and relating the achievements of the ancient philosophers/scientists was very enlightening. Then we put up an amateur show of the sky every week (subject to climatic conditions for observability). We showed how to take photographs and make telescopic observations. We enlightened the students of the special missions of NASA and took them to museums for space exploration. We gave a popular seminar on "Astrodynamics," highlighting its importance. We gave a series of introductory talks in radio and T.V. Finally we exposed them to electronic circulars, like "Universe Today" and "World Science." The last mentioned strategy had the most electrifying effect. We may not have been successful without it, as the students began to take the matter seriously only after reading numerous electronic circulars. In this respect, these circulars are not only informative about the latest news in astronomy, but highlight the role of astronomy in the modern world. Without it, students seem to relate astronomy to astrology; it is due to this misconception that they are not attracted to astronomy. Students were hardly convinced of the need for an astronomy course, as they did not know about the scope and development of the subject. This awakened the interests of students and they themselves proposed the initiation of an elementary course in astronomy to have a feel of the subject. Later on they proposed a course on "Rocket Dynamics." We will discuss our methods and their impact in detail.

  13. Infrared Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hermans-Killam, Linda

    Despite the claims of certain science fiction novels and films, humans cannot see in infrared. As many people know, the primary source of infrared radiation is heat, and the study of infrared astronomy allows scientists to detect radiation emitted from objects throughout the universe. This delightful website (created by NASA and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at the California Institute of Technology) provides a wide range of material on this fascinating area of scientific study. Visitors can lean about the discovery of infrared, learn about the technology that is used in such endeavors, and of course, look over dozens of infrared images and video clips. Educators will be glad to learn that there are a number of activities offered here for use in the classroom, including one that will help students learn how to build a photocell detector.

  14. Teaching and Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay; Percy, John

    2005-12-01

    Preface; Part I. Astronomy in the Curriculum Around the World: Preface; 1. Why astronomy is useful and should be included in the school curriculum John R. Percy; 2. Astronomy and mathematics education Rosa M. Ros; 3. Astronomy in the curriculum around the world; 4. Engaging gifted science students through astronomy Robert Hollow; 5. Poster highlights: astronomy in the curriculum around the world; Part II. Astronomy Education Research: Preface; 6. Astronomy education research down under John M. Broadfoot and Ian S. Ginns; 7. A contemporary review of K-16 astronomy education research Janelle M. Bailey and Timothy F. Slater; 8. Implementing astronomy education research Leonarda Fucili; 9. The Astronomy Education Review: report on a new journal Sidney C. Wolff and Andrew Fraknoi; 10. Poster highlights: astronomy education research; Part III. Educating Students: Preface; 11. Textbooks for K-12 astronomy Jay M. Pasachoff; 12. Distance/internet astronomy education David H. McKinnon; 13. Educating students with robotic telescopes - open discussion; 14. Poster highlights - educating students; Part IV. Educating teachers: Preface; 15. Pre-service astronomy education of teachers Mary Kay Hemenway; 16. In-service education of teachers Michèle Gerbaldi; 17. Poster highlights: educating teachers; Part V. Astronomy and Pseudoscience: Preface; 18. Astronomy, pseudoscience and rational thinking Jayant V. Narlikar; 19. Astronomical pseudosciences in North America John R. Percy and Jay M. Pasachoff; Part VI. Astronomy and Culture: Preface; 20. Teaching astronomy in other cultures: archeoastronomy Julieta Fierro; 21. Poster highlights: astronomy and culture; Part VII. Astronomy in Developing Countries: Preface; 22. Astronomy Curriculum for developing countries Case Rijsdijk; 23. Science education resources for the developing countries James C. White II; Part VIII. Public Outreach in Astronomy: Preface; 24. What makes informal education programs successful? Nahide Craig and Isabel Hawkins; 25. The role of science centers and planetariums Nick Lomb; 26. Science education for the new century - a European perspective Claus Madsen; 27. Communicating astronomy to the public Charles Blue; 28. Poster highlights: public outreach in astronomy; Part IX. The Education Programs of the IAU: Preface; 29. A short overview of astronomical education carried out by the IAU Syuzo Isobe; Part X. Discussion; Index.

  15. Teaching and Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay; Percy, John

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Part I. Astronomy in the Curriculum Around the World: Preface; 1. Why astronomy is useful and should be included in the school curriculum John R. Percy; 2. Astronomy and mathematics education Rosa M. Ros; 3. Astronomy in the curriculum around the world; 4. Engaging gifted science students through astronomy Robert Hollow; 5. Poster highlights: astronomy in the curriculum around the world; Part II. Astronomy Education Research: Preface; 6. Astronomy education research down under John M. Broadfoot and Ian S. Ginns; 7. A contemporary review of K-16 astronomy education research Janelle M. Bailey and Timothy F. Slater; 8. Implementing astronomy education research Leonarda Fucili; 9. The Astronomy Education Review: report on a new journal Sidney C. Wolff and Andrew Fraknoi; 10. Poster highlights: astronomy education research; Part III. Educating Students: Preface; 11. Textbooks for K-12 astronomy Jay M. Pasachoff; 12. Distance/internet astronomy education David H. McKinnon; 13. Educating students with robotic telescopes - open discussion; 14. Poster highlights - educating students; Part IV. Educating teachers: Preface; 15. Pre-service astronomy education of teachers Mary Kay Hemenway; 16. In-service education of teachers Michèle Gerbaldi; 17. Poster highlights: educating teachers; Part V. Astronomy and Pseudoscience: Preface; 18. Astronomy, pseudoscience and rational thinking Jayant V. Narlikar; 19. Astronomical pseudosciences in North America John R. Percy and Jay M. Pasachoff; Part VI. Astronomy and Culture: Preface; 20. Teaching astronomy in other cultures: archeoastronomy Julieta Fierro; 21. Poster highlights: astronomy and culture; Part VII. Astronomy in Developing Countries: Preface; 22. Astronomy Curriculum for developing countries Case Rijsdijk; 23. Science education resources for the developing countries James C. White II; Part VIII. Public Outreach in Astronomy: Preface; 24. What makes informal education programs successful? Nahide Craig and Isabel Hawkins; 25. The role of science centers and planetariums Nick Lomb; 26. Science education for the new century - a European perspective Claus Madsen; 27. Communicating astronomy to the public Charles Blue; 28. Poster highlights: public outreach in astronomy; Part IX. The Education Programs of the IAU: Preface; 29. A short overview of astronomical education carried out by the IAU Syuzo Isobe; Part X. Discussion; Index.

  16. Nontechnical Astronomy Books of 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercury, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 126 reviews. Categories include amateur astronomy, children's books, computers and astronomy, cosmic rays, cosmology, education in astronomy, galaxies, general astronomy, history of astronomy, life in the universe, physics and astronomy, pseudoscience, quasars and active galaxies, reference, solar system, space exploration, stars and…

  17. Radio Telescope Gets Star Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-11-01

    Actress Jodie Foster, who played a scientist in search of extraterrestrial life in the 1997 film Contact, narrates a new promotional film to reintroduce the public to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) renovated Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. The 24-minute film, Beyond the Visible, which will air in the VLA Visitor Center, focuses on the operation of the telescope and scientific achievements associated with it.

  18. Observatory Publishes Memoir of Pioneer Radio Astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-07-01

    One of the pioneers of radio astronomy tells her story of the formative years of that science in a memoir published by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Dr. Nan Dieter Conklin's book, Two Paths to Heaven's Gate, recounts her experiences making important scientific discoveries in an era when astronomy's "vision" was first extending beyond the light discernable to human eyes. Book Cover CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Conklin's story is remarkable not only because of her impressive scientific achievements, but also "because she was a woman who nevertheless pursued and succeeded in science -- the first U.S. woman whose Ph.D. thesis was based on her own radio astronomy research and the first U.S. woman to publish original radio astronomy research in a refereed journal -- and because she lived and worked with the degenerative disease multiple sclerosis," according to Claire Hooker of the University of Toronto. In the memoir, Conklin recounts her career and life from the awakening stirred by her first astronomy course at Goucher College in Baltimore, to junior research jobs in Washington, D.C., to graduate school at Harvard and ultimately to the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley. In addition to providing an insider's view of the process of scientific discovery, Conklin also gives the reader a fascinating look at a scientific community and social structure that, though only a half-century removed from the present, was vastly different from today's. Along the way, Conklin candidly reveals the person behind the science -- the person who dealt with the joys and tragedies of life while remaining dedicated to unlocking the secrets of the Universe. "Nan was and remains an inspiration to myself and hundreds of others in the field, both for her scientific acumen and for her ability to overcome extraordinary personal challenges," said Miller Goss of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  19. Green Bank (National Radio Astronomical Observatory)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Located in Green Bank, Pocahontas County, West Virginia. The site of the world's largest fully steerable radio telescope, which was under construction during 1999 and 2000. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) is a facility of the US National Science Foundation, and is operated under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI)....

  20. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  1. Astronomy Links

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Teitelbaum

    2010-11-18

    Here are some links to Astronomy applets, animations, and movies. Celestial and Terrestrial Motions Sky and telescope Interactive Sky Chart Rotating Sky Explorer Ecliptic (Zodiac) Simulator Seasonal Solar Motions Antarctica Time Lapse: A Year on Ice Aurora Australis: The Southern Lights [Daylight Hours Explorer Season as viewed from Space Animation Sun Position and Season animation Paths of the Sun Seasons and Ecliptic Simulator Sun s Rays Simulator Sun Motions Simulator Time-Lapse Seasons Simulator Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion Kepler s 1st and 2nd laws Applet Orbit Applet Planetary Orbit Simulator Gravity Simulator Moon Phases and Satellite Motions Lunar and Solar Eclipse Information Moon Phase Animation What Causes Tides Lunar Phase Quizzer Eclipse Shadow Simulator Moon Phases and the Horizon Diagram Synodic Lag The Solar System Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Images Planetary Photo Journal Planetary Configuration Simulator Geocentric Retrograde Motion Animation Epicycle / Orbit Applet Gravity Simulator Ptolemaic Orbit of Mars The Universe Virtual Reality Milky Way Panorama Interactive H-R Diagram Element Absorption and Emision Lines Doppler Shift Demonstrator Lookback Time Simulator Other: SpaceWeather.com ...

  2. 5/29/13 BDlive -Print Article www.bdlive.co.za/national/science/2013/05/17/radio-astronomy-publication-a-milestone-for-sa?service=print 1/1

    E-print Network

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    Astronomers working on the KAT-7 radio telescope have published their first scientific paper ASTRONOMERS working on the KAT-7 radio telescope have published their first scientific paper, a milestone (SKA), which will be the world's most powerful radio telescope when completed. South Africa is co

  3. Interstellar Radio Communication and the Frequency Selection Problem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. D. Drake; Carl Sagan

    1973-01-01

    THE largest microwave radio telescope on Earth, at the Arecibo Observatory of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, will soon have the capability of communicating with an identical radio telescope, if such exists, anywhere in the Galaxy. But such communication assumes some previous agreement between the transmitting and receiving civilizations, or mutual discovery of the chosen radio frequency, bandpass, information

  4. Radio Interferometry & The Measurement Equation -1 School of Physics

    E-print Network

    Tittley, Eric

    Radio Interferometry & The Measurement Equation - 1 School of Physics and Astronomy An Introduction to Radio Interferometry and The Measurement Equation Formalism Pedagogical Seminar Louise M. Ker March 2010 Abstract The next generation of radio telescopes, such as LOFAR, e-Merlin, ASKAP, MeerKat and even- tually

  5. Introductory Astronomy Clearinghouse Labs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-11-18

    This website from the University of Washington Department of Astronomy provides introductory astronomy activities on topics such as: fundamentals of astronomy, observing the sky, the sun, stars, stellar evolution, the H-R diagram, the Milky Way Galaxy, galaxies, and cosmology. Printable laboratory guides are available for download in Microsoft Word format.

  6. Discovering Astronomy Through Poetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John C. Mannone

    2011-01-01

    The literature is replete with astronomical references. And much of that literature is poetry. Using this fact, not only can the teacher infuse a new appreciation of astronomy, but also, the student has the opportunity to rediscover history through astronomy. Poetry can be an effective icebreaker in the introduction of new topics in physics and astronomy, as well as a

  7. Teaching and Learning Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, John R.

    2010-10-01

    I review the teaching and learning of astronomy, in elementary and secondary school, colleges and universities, and for the public through astronomy outreach and communication. I describe International Year of Astronomy 2009, and some of the national and personal projects in which I am involved.

  8. Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a fact sheet describing the GAVRT program. This educational program uses a 34-meter antenna for classroom radio astronomy observations via the Internet. The GAVRT Project introduces students in elementary through high school grades to the process of science with the goal of improving science literacy among American students.

  9. Distant FR I radio galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field: implications for the cosmological evolution of radio-loud AGN

    E-print Network

    Best, Philip

    Distant FR I radio galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field: implications for the cosmological evolution of radio-loud AGN I. A. G. SnellenP and P. N. Best Institute for Astronomy, Royal Observatory, Blackford S T R AC T Deep and high-resolution radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field and flanking fields have

  10. Author (s): NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    /C card is shown in Figure 1 below. AKAN. Nitat 0 -> S/H AlD ECT () P/O SMD854 P/0 SMD854 HI/LD SE control circuit would latch in the base address bits (ADDRO-ADDR2) instead of the higher address bits (ODR, there is appreciable discharge of the 5000 pF capacitor. The time constant is around 8 ps. The test I made on the op

  11. CROSSCORRELATION SPECTROPOLARIMETRY IN SINGLEDISH RADIO ASTRONOMY

    E-print Network

    Heiles, Carl

    of the received linear polarization. Stokes V defines the circular polarization: V = i LCP \\Gamma i RCP . Here we follow the IEEE definition for circular polarization; LCP means left­hand­circular polarization. LCP anticlockwise. From the receiver, LCP appears to rotate clockwise. Generally in this paper we follow Tinbergen

  12. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    the two calculator. keys FMT, GO TO, starting the card-reader motor. To load a card, insert.it into the upper slot of the card reader, oriented with the_card-,side to.be used _pointing _downward. Load, first, sides one and two of the program card, then sides three and four of the constant card. The card-reader

  13. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    · ·· · · · III. Configuration and Location of the Receiver RF Components . . . . . 11 IV. Vacuum System . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · . · · · · 31 Figures Figure 1 View of Interior of Dewar . . . . · · . · · · · · . . . 4 Figure 2 Cross Section Through Dewar and Tank Assembly . . . . . . 5 Figure 3 Cross Section Through Mixer Mounting Structure

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    of the system and recommendations for completion of the system are included. The test set is to be used of the mixer. II. General Layout of the System The system consists of three sections (Figure #1). The first of the photodetectors. The cold load is in a styrofoam dewar with a plastic lining to prevent leakage. It contains

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY SOCORRO, NEW MEXICO

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    stress is significantly elevated. One way to reduce this stress concentration is to reduce the center reduces the stress riser at the shoulder fillet by making the diameter transition much more gradual. The finite element analysis result shown in Figure 1 verifies that the new axle design reduces the stress

  16. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    at present: electroplating gold, copper, nickel, chromium, tin; immersion plating · zinc; electropolishing) Stannate alkaline tinplate modified with bismuth addition5 Electropolishing is performed in a bath

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia 22903

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    bandwidth is examined for three circuits: (i) parallel RC, (ii) parallel RC with series L, and (iii be well described by the parallel RC circuit shown in Fig. 1(a). This is true of Schottky diodes and SIS) parallel RCL with series L. The broadband matching theories of Bode (1945) and Fano (1950) are used

  18. Digital Instrumentation for the Radio Astronomy Community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aaron Parsons; Dan Werthimer; Donald Backer; Tim Bastian; Geoffrey Bower; Walter Brisken; Henry Chen; Adam Deller; Terry Filiba; Dale Gary; Lincoln Greenhill; David Hawkins; Glenn Jones; Glen Langston; Joseph Lasio; Joeri Van Leeuwen; Daniel Mitchell; Jason Manley; Andrew Siemion; Hayden Kwok-Hay So; Alan Whitney; Dave Woody; Melvyn Wright; Kristian Zarb-Adami

    2009-01-01

    Time-to-science is an important figure of merit for digital instrumentation serving the astronomical community. A digital signal processing (DSP) community is forming that uses shared hardware development, signal processing libraries, and instrument architectures to reduce development time of digital instrumentation and to improve time-to-science for a wide variety of projects. We suggest prioritizing technological development supporting the needs of this

  19. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    was 180 OPTION BASE 1 185 COM Zo,F,Dat(51,18),INTEGER Nogo,Count 190 Farstart 195 END When COMPILEd with SOURCE OFF, it read 185 COM Zo,F,Dat(51,18),INTEGER Nogo,Count 190 Farstart 195 end and when UNCOMPILEd, it then read 185 COM Zo,F,Dat(51,18),INTEGER Nogo,Count 190 Farstart 195 END Rerunning FARANT after

  20. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    . Symmetrical square- wave bias of the junction, use of a cryogenic transformer, balanced-bridge techniques sensitivity, AT (which is proportional to minimum detectable flux, Smin = 2kAT/nA) gives: 2NEP ATd - \\ 2 kB 2 bandwidth. The 2 factor in the numerator is due to switching. Using values of Tm , Bm , and Bd for present

  1. (Astro)Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    , cosmic microwave background #12; Labs Six labs planned, of which at least four will use the Small: measuring the Milky Way's rotation curve #5: millimeter interferometry of an external galaxy #6: class visit grains that glow because they're warm + ionized plasmas that glow because they're warm, or because

  2. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, WV

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    .....................................................7 Figure 5: Comparison radiometer and test setup...........................................10 Figure 7: Reference load connected to radiometer. ...........................................................11 Figure 8: LNA input port connected to radiometer. ...............................................

  3. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    to the cold plate of the refrigerator, and the other end to a heater resistor. Temperature sensors were. 2. Location of heater resistor and temperature sensors when measuring the thermal resistance/32" sheet stock: Unannealed. Annealed. This specimen was annealed at 550EC for 3.5 hours in a nitrogen

  4. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    with a sensitivity of ~10-10 std. cc/sec indicated no measurable leak at the metal to G-10 O-ring seals failures in the CDL "rocket" test receiver. Two concerns about these helium line isolators are helium

  5. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia 22901

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    Description of Control System ........................................................... .........2 4. 0. eLoadiWind Torque for Closed Position Loop 16. Tachometer Buffer 17. Control Circuits 18. Elevation Report No. 127 THE 45-FOOT ANTENNA DRIVE SYSTEM John M. Payne MARCH 1973 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;THE 45

  6. Interference Mitigation In Radio Astronomy and

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    protected world-wide by ITU regulation GLONASS ­ The Russian Version of the US Global Position System (GPS temperatures infer ocean salinity, soil moisture, ... · AND this entire band is allocated primarily to aviation ocean salinity, soil moisture, ... · AND this entire band is allocated primarily to aviation radars

  7. African Astronomy and the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Gordon

    2010-02-01

    We highlight the growth of astronomy across Africa and the effect of hosting the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will have on this growth. From the construction of a new 25m radio telescope in Nigeria, to new university astronomy programmes in Kenya, the HESS in Namibia and the Mauritian Radio Telescope, to the world class projects being developed in South Africa (Southern African Large Telescope and Karoo Array Telescope) astronomy is re-emerging across the continent. The SKA will represent the pinnacle of technological advancement in astronomy when constructed; requiring ultra high speed data transmission lines over 3000 km baselines and the World's fastest computer for correlation purposes. The investment alone to build the SKA on African soil will be of great economic benefit to its people, but the required network connectivity will significantly drive commercial expansion far beyond the initial value of the SKA investment. The most important consequence of hosting the SKA in Africa would be the impact on Human Capital Development (HCD) on the continent. Major HCD projects already underway producing excellent results will be presented. )

  8. A Voyage through the Radio Universe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Timothy Spuck

    2004-10-01

    The Radio Astronomy Research Team from from Oil City Area Senior High School (OCHS) in Oil City, Pennsylvania, embarked on a special project titled "Mapping the Universe" at the start of the 2000 school year. For the project, students analyzed data from the Arecibo Radio Telescope, which is the world's largest single dish radio telescope, in an effort to learn more about distant galaxies. Students used the information they gathered to calculate the Hubble constant--an accomplishment usually achieved by professional astronomers.

  9. Using large radio telescopes at decametre wavelengths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Lecacheux; A. A. Konovalenko; H. O. Rucker

    2004-01-01

    With the aim of evaluating the actual possibilities of doing, from the ground, sensitive radio astronomy at decametre wavelengths (particularly below ?50MHz), an extensive program of radio observations was carried out, in 1999–2002, by using digital spectral and waveform analysers (DSP) of new generation, connected to several of the largest, decametre radio telescopes in the world (i.e., the UTR-2 and

  10. Astronomy and Politics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, John M.

    The relationship between astronomy and politics is a complex but important part of understanding the practice of astronomy throughout history. This chapter explores some of the ways that astronomy, astrology, and politics have interacted, placing particular focus on the way that astronomy and astrology have been used for political purposes by both people in power and people who wish to influence a ruler's policy. Also discussed are the effects that politics has had on the development of astronomy and, in particular, upon the recording and preservation of astronomical knowledge.

  11. Radio Science in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefeuvre, Francois; Mc Kinnel, Lee-Anne; Chukwuma, Victor; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine

    2010-05-01

    Radio science activities covered by URSI (International Radio Science Union) are briefly reviewed. They encompass the knowledge and study of all aspects of electromagnetic fields and waves in a wide frequency range running from micro pulsation frequencies (i.e. from ~1 mHz) to Terahertz. The topics include: electromagnetic measurements and standards, electromagnetic theory and applications, radio-communication systems and signal processing, electronics and Photonics, electromagnetic environment and interference, wave propagation and remote sensing, ionospheric radio and propagation, waves in plasmas, radio astronomy, and electromagnetics in biology and medicine. The main radio science activities conducted by the URSI national Committees of South Africa, Egypt and Nigeria, and by African radio scientists groups gathered in GIRGEA (Groupe International de Recherche en Géophysique Europe Afrique) are reviewed. The emphasis is put on the activities developed in the context of the IHY programme and of the SCINDA network for forecasting ionospheric irregularities that adversely impact communication and navigation systems in the low latitude regions.

  12. Solar radio observations in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marqué, Christophe; Bourgoignie, Bram; Dufond, Jean-Luc; Ergen, Aydin; Magdalenic, Jasmina

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the "Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence", a Belgian research effort dedicated to Sun-Earth relationship studies, the Royal Observatory of Belgium is refurbishing several radio telescopes and setting up new solar monitoring radio instruments from the metric to the microwave domain, in its radio astronomy station of Humain, in the south of Belgium. We will present the current status of the instruments already on site, as well as the ongoing developments, and give examples on how the data are used for the scientific studies and operational space weather activities of the solar physics department of the Observatory.

  13. Deterministic RF ing in phased arrays for the next generation of radio telescopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bart Smolders; Grant Hampson

    2002-01-01

    A requirement of the next generation of radio telescopes for astronomy is the ability to cope with the forever increasing problem of radio-frequency interference (RFI). Unlike conventional fixed parabolic receivers, currently used in astronomy, the application of phased-array beamforming techniques opens up the possibility to spatially RFI in the RF domain, prior to signal digitization. This paper presents results from

  14. The road to the Radio Synoptic SKA (RSSKA) Steven T. Myers

    E-print Network

    Myers, Steven T.

    has been proposed for a Radio Synoptic Survey Telescope (RSST) 3 . A RSST would be designed to survey the next generation of radio astronomical telescopes and arrays. One of the original drivers for the SKAThe road to the Radio Synoptic SKA (RSSKA) Steven T. Myers National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P

  15. Electronic Noise Calibrator for the Small Radio Telescope RODOLFO MONTEZ JR.

    E-print Network

    Seager, Sara

    Electronic Noise Calibrator for the Small Radio Telescope RODOLFO MONTEZ JR. University of Texas calibrator for MIT Haystack Observatory's Small Radio Telescope (SRT) is described. The electronic noise for Undergraduates (REU) Program at MIT Haystack Observatory. Key words: radio astronomy: radio telescope

  16. "Conference on communicating astronomy with the public":taking action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, L.

    In October 2003, The National Radio Astronomy Observatories (NRAO) and the National Research Council (NRC) held a three-day conference in Washington, D.C., on communicating with the public about astronomy. The goals of this conference, intended to be a working meeting, were 'to develop a program to share outreach and education resources among the astronomical community [and] to find ways of communicating with underdeveloped constituencies.' Scientists, communication specialists and others active in public outreach and education about astronomy and space science deliberated on the current state of astronomy communications, the needs of the mass media and the entertainment media, the conduct of public outreach and education as an element of research astronomy, and best practices in astronomy outreach and education. Two important products of the meeting were: 1) A 'Washington charter for communicating astronomy with the public,' a position paper articulating principles of action for funding agencies, professional astronomical societies, individual researchers and universities, laboratories, research organizations and other institutions interested in communicating with the public about astronomy; 2) The appointment of a task force to to organize an electronic archive of informational resources about astronomy. Two options under consideration by the task force are creation of a Web site providing links, categorized and searchable, to astronomy public outreach and education resources; and creation of a Web site that would be a searchable database of astronomy information and imagery (either representative or comprehensive). This paper will highlight the proceedings of the conference, report outcomes, and provide a status report on post-conference actions.

  17. Some innovative programmes in Astronomy education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, G. S. D.; Sujatha, S.

    In order to inculcate a systematic scientific awareness of the subject of Astronomy among the students and to motivate them to pursue careers in Astronomy and Astrophysics, various innovative educational programmes have been designed at MPBIFR. Among them, the main programme is termed as the ``100-hour Certificate Course in Astronomy and Astrophysics'' which has been designed basically for the students of the undergraduate level of B.Sc. and B.E. streams. The time duration of the 100 hours in this course is partitioned as 36 hours of classroom lectures, 34 hours of practicals and field trips and the remaining 30 hours being dedicated to dissertation writing and seminar presentations by the students. In addition, after the 100-hour course, the students have the option to take up specialized advance courses in the topics of Astrobiology, Astrochemistry, Radio Astronomy, Solar Astronomy and Cosmology as week-end classes. These courses are at the post graduate level and are covered in a span of 18 to 20 hours spread over a period of 9 to 10 weeks. As a preparatory programme, short-term introductory courses in the same subject are conducted for the high school students during the summer vacation period. Along with this, a three-week programme in basic Astronomy is also designed as an educational package for the general public. The students of these courses have the opportunity of being taken on field trips to various astronomical centers as well as the Radio, Solar and the Optical Observatories as part of their curriculum. The guided trips to the ISRO’s Satellite Centre at Bangalore and the Satellite Launching Station at SHAR provide high degree of motivation apart from giving thrilling experiences to the students. Further, the motivated students are encouraged to involve themselves in regular research programmes in Astronomy at MPBIFR for publishing research papers in national and international journals. The teaching and mentoring faculty for all these programmes includes the visiting Scientists and Professors from various Research Organizations located in and around Bangalore as well as the in-house Scientific staff. It is gratifying to note that several students, after going through one or more of these courses, have indeed made commitments to pursue Astronomy as their career, some of them even obtaining admissions in to the institutes and universities in India and abroad for further studies in this field.

  18. The Radio Sky in the STARLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fultz, C.; Smith, T.; Buck, S.; Harris, R.; Boltuch, D.; Hund, L.; Moffett, D.; Walsh, L.; LaFratta, M.; Castelaz, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    The STARLAB is a portable planetarium created, produced, and distributed by Learning Technologies, Ltd. Upon entering the STARLAB, images are projected onto the ceiling of the planetarium's dome using custom, interchangeable projection cylinders mounted on top of an ultrabright point light source. The STARLAB is ideal for teaching students about astronomy since it may be easily transported to schools across the nation. In order to take advantage of this powerful teaching tool, one of the foremost priorities of the Sensing the Radio Sky project was the development a projection cylinder that would visually interpret the quantitative data taken with radio telescopes and present that information in a form that students could understand and appreciate. The final version of the cylinder demonstrates a variety of topics relevant to an understanding of radio astronomy. When using the Radio Sky cylinder in the STARLAB, teachers may discuss the differences between optical and radio astronomy such as the structure of the Milky Way Galaxy, different sources of electromagnetic radiation, and important radio sources within and outside of the Galaxy. In addition, the flexibility of the cylinder's design allows for a variety of educational activities to be conducted within the STARLAB, all complemented by the Radio Sky cylinder's unique presentation of the Galaxy in radio wavelengths. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  19. The Old Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This series of webpages is part of a course, called Astronomy 161: The Solar System, offered by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Tennessee. This section covers the view of the universe that astronomers held up to 500 years ago, including: the apparent motion of the planets (such as retrograde motion) on the celestial sphere; the universe of Ptolemy and Aristotle, involving epicycles; and medieval Aristotelian astronomy.

  20. Astronomy Education Review

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an online journal in Astronomy Education Research. This site attempts to offer teachers knowledge about how students learn, creative curriculum, and an archive of resources for teaching astronomy at all levels. The site offers researchers the opportunity to publish results, they can also share experiences and innovations, identify useful resources and reviews by other educators, communicate with other engaged in like projects, and participate in discussions of challenging issues. This is a fine repository for educators in astronomy.

  1. Astronomical Book Trek: Astronomy Books of 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1983-01-01

    Provided in two separate annotated lists are technical and nontechnical astronomy books. Categories in the latter group include: general astronomy; astronomy textbooks; amateur astronomy; astronomy history; life on other worlds; astrophysics; the solar system; space exploration; and the sun. (JN)

  2. Project Earth Science: Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    P. Sean Smith

    2001-01-01

    The hands-on, teacher-tested activities in Project Earth Science: Astronomy brings the sometimes daunting concepts of astronomy down to Earth. Background information, supplementary readings, and suggestions for integrating other disciplines provide the teacher with a framework to launch a successful introduction to astronomy. Students will discover Earth's uniqueness by examining it as a part of the whole--one planet within our Solar System. How did the planets form? Are we seeing a star's present or past? Why is Earth's distance from the Sun so important? Project Earth Science: Astronomy will lead you and your students on an exploration that takes you to the stars and back.

  3. Space science in the twenty-first century: Imperatives for the decades 1995 to 2015: Astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The program of new initiatives for the era 1995 to 2015 focuses on improvements in capabilities in two areas: higher angular resolution and greater collecting areas. The expected 1995 status is outlined for radio astronomy, infrared and submillimeter astronomy, ultraviolet and optical wavelengths, X-ray astronomy, gamma-ray astronomy, cosmic-ray astronomy, astrophysics, gravitational physics, NASA operational status, and international programs. New initiatives and practical considerations (budgetary requirements, international cooperation, cost-to-weight ratio, management, facilities, and instrumentation) are reviewed.

  4. Information Content in Radio Waves: Student Investigations in Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K.; Scaduto, T.

    2013-12-01

    We describe an inquiry-based instructional unit on information content in radio waves, created in the summer of 2013 as part of a MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This topic is current and highly relevant, addressing science and technical aspects from radio astronomy, geodesy, and atmospheric research areas as well as Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Projects and activities range from simple classroom demonstrations and group investigations, to long term research projects incorporating data acquisition from both student-built instrumentation as well as online databases. Each of the core lessons is applied to one of the primary research centers at Haystack through an inquiry project that builds on previously developed units through the MIT Haystack RET program. In radio astronomy, students investigate the application of a simple and inexpensive software defined radio chip (RTL-SDR) for use in systems implementing a small and very small radio telescope (SRT and VSRT). Both of these systems allow students to explore fundamental principles of radio waves and interferometry as applied to radio astronomy. In ionospheric research, students track solar storms from the initial coronal mass ejection (using Solar Dynamics Observatory images) to the resulting variability in total electron density concentrations using data from the community standard Madrigal distributed database system maintained by MIT Haystack. Finally, students get to explore very long-baseline interferometry as it is used in geodetic studies by measuring crustal plate displacements over time. Alignment to NextGen standards is provided for each lesson and activity with emphasis on HS-PS4 'Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer'.

  5. Random time series in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Simon

    2013-02-13

    Progress in astronomy comes from interpreting the signals encoded in the light received from distant objects: the distribution of light over the sky (images), over photon wavelength (spectrum), over polarization angle and over time (usually called light curves by astronomers). In the time domain, we see transient events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts and other powerful explosions; we see periodic phenomena such as the orbits of planets around nearby stars, radio pulsars and pulsations of stars in nearby galaxies; and we see persistent aperiodic variations ('noise') from powerful systems such as accreting black holes. I review just a few of the recent and future challenges in the burgeoning area of time domain astrophysics, with particular attention to persistently variable sources, the recovery of reliable noise power spectra from sparsely sampled time series, higher order properties of accreting black holes, and time delays and correlations in multi-variate time series. PMID:23277606

  6. Random time series in Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Vaughan, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Progress in astronomy comes from interpreting the signals encoded in the light received from distant objects: the distribution of light over the sky (images), over photon wavelength (spectrum), over polarization angle, and over time (usually called light curves by astronomers). In the time domain we see transient events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and other powerful explosions; we see periodic phenomena such as the orbits of planets around nearby stars, radio pulsars, and pulsations of stars in nearby galaxies; and persistent aperiodic variations (`noise') from powerful systems like accreting black holes. I review just a few of the recent and future challenges in the burgeoning area of Time Domain Astrophysics, with particular attention to persistently variable sources, the recovery of reliable noise power spectra from sparsely sampled time series, higher-order properties of accreting black holes, and time delays and correlations in multivariate time series.

  7. Multiversos: Rock'n'Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.; Arias, A.; García, N.

    2011-11-01

    Imagine that you can use your fingers only for typing target coordinates at thetelescope, reduce images and spectra with IRAF, or write papers for Astronomy &Astrophysics, but you would never be able to play an electric guitar.Imagine that you love music, work in front of the computer always withheadphones, and dream of playing with your favourite rock band in a tumultuousconcert.Imagine that you are an astronomer who, after a "cosmic fluke", share stagewith the band which themes you have always hummed since you were a teenager.Imagine that you were born for rock, played a main role in the best Spanishalbum of the 90s (Omega, with Enrique Morente), and your songs arerutinary played by Radio 3, but you would never be able to detect an exoplanetor a galaxy at a high redshift.Imagine that you love Astronomy, try to see the Moon craters and Andromeda withyour small telescope through the light pollution of your city, and explain yourdaughter that Pluto is not a planet any longer. Imagine that you are a musician who, after a "cosmic fluke", give a talk justafter a Nobel laureate that discovered the cosmic microwave backgroundradiation.Such "cosmic flukes" sometimes happen. If you were not at the dinner of the SEA meeting and do not believe us, visithttp://www.myspace.com/antonioariasmultiverso or open the proceedings DVD andlisten "El ordenador simula el nacimiento de las estrella...".

  8. The Network for Astronomy in Education in Southwest New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, B.

    1998-12-01

    The Network for Astronomy in Education was organized to use astronomy as a motivational tool to teach science methods and principles in the public schools. NFO is a small private research observatory, associated with the local University, Western New Mexico. We started our program in 1996 with an IDEA grant by introducing local teachers to the Internet, funding a portable planetarium (Starlab) for the students, and upgrading our local radio linked computer network. Grant County is a rural mining and ranching county in Southwest New Mexico. It is ethnically diverse and has a large portion of the population below the poverty line. It's dryness and 6000' foot elevation, along with dark skies, suite it to the appreciation of astronomy. We now have 8 local schools involved in astronomy at some level. Our main programs are the Starlab and Project Astro, and we will soon install a Sidewalk Solar System in the center of Silver City.

  9. Radio emission from the sun and stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Radio astronomy of the sun has reached a high level of maturity, while radio astronomy of the stars is now a burgeoning new field of study. The present review is mainly concerned with radiation which is emitted by 'normal' stars, defined here to include those appearing on classical Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams. The mechanisms for both steady, quiescent emission and intense, strongly varying outbursts are discussed. Included are discussions of bremsstrahlung, gyrosynchrotron emission, electron-cyclotron masers, and plasma radiation. The manifestation of these mechanisms in various kinds of solar radiation are considered along with stellar manifestations.

  10. Indian Astronomy: History of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    From the time of A macronryabhat under dota (ca AD 500) there appeared in India a series of Sanskrit treatises on astronomy. Written always in verse, and normally accompanied by prose commentaries, these served to create an Indian tradition of mathematical astronomy which continued into the 18th century. There are as well texts from earlier centuries, grouped under the name Jyotishaveda macronn d...

  11. ESO's Astronomy Education Programme

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. P. I. Pierce-Price; H. Boffin; C. Madsen

    2006-01-01

    ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, has operated a programme of astronomy education for some years, with a dedicated Educational Office established in 2001. We organise a range of activities, which we will highlight and discuss in this presentation. Many are run in collaboration with the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE), such as the

  12. Rubric Sorting Astronomy Essays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Len, P. M.

    2014-07-01

    Student essays on introductory astronomy exams can be consistently and efficiently graded by a single instructor, or by multiple graders for a large class. This is done by constructing a robust outcome rubric while sorting exams into separate stacks, then checking each stack for consistency. Certain online resources readily provide primary source prompts for writing astronomy exam essay questions.

  13. Astronomy in Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Valério A. R. M.; Paulo, Cláudio M.

    2015-03-01

    We present the state of Astronomy in Mozambique and how it has evolved since 2009 following the International Year of Astronomy. Activities have been lead by staff at University Eduardo Mondlane and several outreach activities have also flourished. In 2010 the University introduced its first astronomy module, Introduction to Astronomy and Astrophysics, for the second year students in the Department of Physics. The course has now produced the first students who will be graduating in late 2012 with some astronomy content. Some of these students will now be looking for further studies and those who have been keen in astronomy have been recommended to pursue this as a career. At the university level we have also discussed on the possibility to introduce a whole astronomy course by 2016 which falls well within the HCD that the university is now investing in. With the announcement that the SKA will be split between South Africa with its partner countries (including Mozambique), and Australia we have been working closely with the Ministry of Science and Technology to make astronomy a priority on its agenda. In this respect, an old telecommunications antenna is being converted by the South Africa SKA Project Office, and donated to Mozambique for educational purposes. It will be situated in Maluana, Mozambique.

  14. Astronomy Without a Telescope

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Strobel, Nick

    Created by author Nick Strobel, "Astronomy Notes" is an educational resource for introductory astronomy classes for undergraduates. This section describes: the celestial sphere, coordinate systems, the motion of the stars. There are also sections describing: time, the seasons, time zones, the phases of the moon, solar eclipses, lunar eclipses, and the motions of the planets.

  15. X-ray astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Rocchia

    1984-01-01

    The observation of X-rays is a relatively new branch of Astronomy. As every new field of science this astronomy had an extremely fast and fruitful development. After twenty years of X ray exploration it is time to summarize the results and to envisage the future. This is the aim of this expose.After a brief review of the birth conditions of

  16. Astronomy and Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, M.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy is, by definition, the sum of the material and spiritual values created by mankind and of the institutions necessary to communicate these values. Consequently, astronomy belongs to the culture of each society and its scientific progress does nothing but underline its role in culture. It is interesting that there is even a European society which bears this name "Astronomy for Culture" (SEAC). Its main goal is "the study of calendric and astronomical aspects of culture". Owning ancient evidence of astronomical knowledge, dating from the dawn of the first millennium, Romania is interested in this topic. But Astronomy has a much deeper role in culture and civilization. There are many aspects that deserve to be discussed. Examples? The progress of astronomy in a certain society, in connection with its evolution; the place held by the astronomy in literature and, generally, in art; the role of the SF in the epoch of super-mediatization; astronomy and belief; astronomy and astrology in the modern society, and so forth. These are problems that can be of interest for IAU, but the most important one could be her educational role, in the formation of the culture of the new generation, in the education of the population for the protection of our planet, in the ensuring of a high level of spiritual development of the society in the present epoch.

  17. Astronomy LITE Demonstrations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth Brecher

    2006-01-01

    Project LITE (Light Inquiry Through Experiments) is a materials, software, and curriculum development project. It focuses on light, optics, color and visual perception. According to two recent surveys of college astronomy faculty members, these are among the topics most often included in the large introductory astronomy courses. The project has aimed largely at the design and implementation of hands-on experiences

  18. Astronomy Demonstrations and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    Demonstrations in astronomy classes seem to be more necessary than in physics classes for three reasons. First, many of the events are very large scale and impossibly remote from human senses. Secondly, while physics courses use discussions of one- and two-dimensional motion, three-dimensional motion is the normal situation in astronomy; thus,…

  19. Junior High Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid; Smith, Murray

    Selected materials needed to teach an astronomy unit as well as suggested procedures, activities, ideas, and astronomy fact sheets published by the Manitoba Planetarium are provided. Subjects of the fact sheets include: publications and classroom picture sets available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and facts and statistics…

  20. A Basic Astronomy Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    This bibliography lists the most useful and scientifically accurate astronomy books published in the 1980s for beginners and students. The books are categorized under the topics of: (1) astronomy in general; (2) solar system as a whole; (3) planets; (4) asteroids, comets, and meteorites; (5) the sun; (6) stars and their evolution; (7) mikly way…

  1. Monitoring Radio Frequency Interference in Southwest Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The radio signals received from astronomical objects are extremely weak. Because of this, radio sources are easily shrouded by interference from devices such as satellites and cell phone towers. Radio astronomy is very susceptible to this radio frequency interference (RFI). Possibly even worse than complete veiling, weaker interfering signals can contaminate the data collected by radio telescopes, possibly leading astronomers to mistaken interpretations. To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and RFI, an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project_the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)_encourages students to collect and analyze RFI data and develop conclusions as a team. Because the project focuses on electromagnetic radiation, it is appropriate for physics, physical science, chemistry, or general science classes. My class-about 50 students from 15 southwest Virginia high schools-participated in the Quiet Skies Project and were pioneers in the use of the beta version of the Quiet Skies Detector (QSD), which is used to detect RFI. Students have been involved with the project since 2005 and have collected and shared data with NRAO. In analyzing the data they have noted some trends in RFI in Southwest Virginia.

  2. To See the Unseen: A History of Planetary Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butrica, Andrew J.

    1996-01-01

    This book relates the history of planetary radar astronomy from its origins in radar to the present day and secondarily to bring to light that history as a case of 'Big Equipment but not Big Science'. Chapter One sketches the emergence of radar astronomy as an ongoing scientific activity at Jodrell Bank, where radar research revealed that meteors were part of the solar system. The chief Big Science driving early radar astronomy experiments was ionospheric research. Chapter Two links the Cold War and the Space Race to the first radar experiments attempted on planetary targets, while recounting the initial achievements of planetary radar, namely, the refinement of the astronomical unit and the rotational rate and direction of Venus. Chapter Three discusses early attempts to organize radar astronomy and the efforts at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory, in conjunction with Harvard radio astronomers, to acquire antenna time unfettered by military priorities. Here, the chief Big Science influencing the development of planetary radar astronomy was radio astronomy. Chapter Four spotlights the evolution of planetary radar astronomy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA facility, at Cornell University's Arecibo Observatory, and at Jodrell Bank. A congeries of funding from the military, the National Science Foundation, and finally NASA marked that evolution, which culminated in planetary radar astronomy finding a single Big Science patron, NASA. Chapter Five analyzes planetary radar astronomy as a science using the theoretical framework provided by philosopher of science Thomas Kuhn. Chapter Six explores the shift in planetary radar astronomy beginning in the 1970s that resulted from its financial and institutional relationship with NASA Big Science. Chapter Seven addresses the Magellan mission and its relation to the evolution of planetary radar astronomy from a ground-based to a space-based activity. Chapters Eight and Nine discuss the research carried out at ground-based facilities by this transformed planetary radar astronomy, as well as the upgrading of the Arecibo and Goldstone radars. A technical essay appended to this book provides an overview of planetary radar techniques, especially range-Doppler mapping.

  3. 1730 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 46, NO. 5, AUGUST 2000 Radio-Astronomical Imaging in the Presence of

    E-print Network

    van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    which became the trademark of radio astronomy, we use phased-array radio telescopes comprised of tens this principle was the 5­km Cam- bridge radio telescope. During the 1970's, new instruments with large apertures were constructed. Among these are the Wester- bork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) in the Netherlands

  4. The Future of Space Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, George B.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of space astronomy, considering advantages, the space telescope and ground-based astronomy, an orbiting astrophysics facility, solar physics, and other areas. Indicates that earth-based astronomy will continue to be carried out there and space astronomy will be limited to observations that can be carried out only from…

  5. Gravitational Waves and Time Domain Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Nissanke, Samaya; Williams, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe will open in roughly five years, when Advanced LIGO and Virgo achieve the first detections of high frequency gravitational waves, most likely coming from compact binary mergers. Electromagnetic follow-up of these triggers, using radio, optical, and high energy telescopes, promises exciting opportunities in multi-messenger time domain astronomy. In the decade, space-based observations of low frequency gravitational waves from massive black hole mergers, and their electromagnetic counterparts, will open up further vistas for discovery. This two-part workshop featured brief presentations and stimulating discussions on the challenges and opportunities presented by gravitational wave astronomy. Highlights from the workshop, with the emphasis on strategies for electromagnetic follow-up, are presented in this report.

  6. arXiv:0910.1517v2[astro-ph.IM]10Jun2010 Experimental Astronomy manuscript No.

    E-print Network

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    multiple single dishes. The first multi-element radio interferometer for astronomy was built by Sir Martin Ryle [12]. An interferometer measures the cross-correlation between the signals for a given pair

  7. Big Computing in Astronomy: Perspectives and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratius, Victor

    2014-06-01

    Hardware progress in recent years has led to astronomical instruments gathering large volumes of data. In radio astronomy for instance, the current generation of antenna arrays produces data at Tbits per second, and forthcoming instruments will expand these rates much further. As instruments are increasingly becoming software-based, astronomers will get more exposed to computer science. This talk therefore outlines key challenges that arise at the intersection of computer science and astronomy and presents perspectives on how both communities can collaborate to overcome these challenges.Major problems are emerging due to increases in data rates that are much larger than in storage and transmission capacity, as well as humans being cognitively overwhelmed when attempting to opportunistically scan through Big Data. As a consequence, the generation of scientific insight will become more dependent on automation and algorithmic instrument control. Intelligent data reduction will have to be considered across the entire acquisition pipeline. In this context, the presentation will outline the enabling role of machine learning and parallel computing.BioVictor Pankratius is a computer scientist who joined MIT Haystack Observatory following his passion for astronomy. He is currently leading efforts to advance astronomy through cutting-edge computer science and parallel computing. Victor is also involved in projects such as ALMA Phasing to enhance the ALMA Observatory with Very-Long Baseline Interferometry capabilities, the Event Horizon Telescope, as well as in the Radio Array of Portable Interferometric Detectors (RAPID) to create an analysis environment using parallel computing in the cloud. He has an extensive track record of research in parallel multicore systems and software engineering, with contributions to auto-tuning, debugging, and empirical experiments studying programmers. Victor has worked with major industry partners such as Intel, Sun Labs, and Oracle. He holds a distinguished doctorate and a Habilitation degree in Computer Science from the University of Karlsruhe. Contact him at pankrat@mit.edu, victorpankratius.com, or Twitter @vpankratius.

  8. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    2000-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: ANIMATED ORBITS OF PLANETS AND MOONS: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. SOLAR SYSTEM COLLISIONS: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. SCIENTIFIC NOTATION: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. ORBITAL SIMULATIONS: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. ASTRONOMY WORKSHOP BULLETIN BOARD: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  9. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    1999-09-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Scale of the Universe: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Scientific Notation: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  10. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.

    1999-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed and maintained at the University of Maryland for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 63 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of explosion, crater size, and magnitude of the ``planetquake'' generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Scale of the Universe: Travel away from the Earth at a chosen speed and see how long it takes to reach other planets, stars and galaxies. This tool helps students visualize astronomical distances in an intuitive way. Scientific Notation: Students are interactively guided through conversions between scientific notation and regular numbers. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by NSF.

  11. Astronomy Landscape in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemaungani, Takalani

    2015-01-01

    The vision for astronomy in Africa is embedded in the African Space Policy of the African Union in early 2014. The vision is about positioning Africa as an emerging hub for astronomy sciences and facilities. Africa recognized the need to take advantage of its natural resource, the geographical advantage of the clear southern skies and pristine sites for astronomy. The Pan African University (PAU) initiative also presents an opportunity as a post-graduate training and research network of university nodes in five regions of Africa and supported by the African Union. The Southern African node based in South Africa concentrates on space sciences which also includes astronomy. The PAU aims to provide the opportunity for advanced graduate training and postgraduate research to high-performing African students. Objectives also include promoting mobility of students and teachers and harmonizing programs and degrees.A number of astronomy initiatives have burgeoned in the Southern African region and these include the Southern Africa Largest Optical Telescope (SALT), HESS (High Energy Stereoscopic System), the SKA (Square Kilometre Array) and the AVN (African Very Long Baseline Interferometer Network). There is a growing appetite for astronomy sciences in Africa. In East Africa, the astronomy community is well organized and is growing - the East African Astronomical society (EAAS) held its successful fourth annual conference since 2010 on 30 June to 04 July 2014 at the University of Rwanda. Centred around the 'Role of Astronomy in Socio-Economic Transformation,' this conference aimed at strengthening capacity building in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Space Science in general, while providing a forum for astronomers from the region to train young and upcoming scientists.

  12. Teaching Astronomy with Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Carmen; Impey, Chris David; Wenger, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Students today are expected to have access to computers and the Internet. Students young and old, in school and out of school, are interested in learning about astronomy, and have computers to use for this. Teach Astronomy is a website with a comprehensive digital astronomy textbook freely available to students and educators. In addition to the textbook, there are astronomy Wikipedia articles, image archives from Astronomy Picture of the Day and AstroPix, and video lectures covering all topics of astronomy. Teach Astronomy has a unique search tool called the wikimap that can be used to search through all of the resources on the site. Astronomy: State of the Art (ASOTA) is a massive, open, online course (MOOC). Over 18,000 students have enrolled over the past year and half. This MOOC has been presented in various forms. First, only to students on the web, with content released weekly on host site Udemy. Then to university students who met formally in the classroom for educational activities, but were also expected to watch lectures online on their own time. Presently, it is available online for students to go at their own pace. In the future it will be available in an extended format on a new host site, Coursera. ASOTA instructors use social media to interact with students. Students ask questions via the course host site, Udemy. Live question and answer sessions are conducted using Google Hangouts on Air, and interesting and relevant astronomy news, or supplementary educational content is shared via the ASOTA Facebook page. Teaching on the Internet may seem impersonal and impractical, but by learning to use all of these tools, instructors have the ability to interact with students, and keep them engaged.

  13. Discovering Astronomy Through Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannone, John C.

    2011-05-01

    The literature is replete with astronomical references. And much of that literature is poetry. Using this fact, not only can the teacher infuse a new appreciation of astronomy, but also, the student has the opportunity to rediscover history through astronomy. Poetry can be an effective icebreaker in the introduction of new topics in physics and astronomy, as well as a point of conclusion to a lecture. This presentation will give examples of these things from the ancient literature (sacred Hebraic texts), classical literature (Homer's Iliad and Odyssey), traditional poetry (Longfellow, Tennyson and Poe) and modern literature (Frost, Kooser, and others, including the contemporary work of this author).

  14. Bakersfield College: Astronomy Notes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nick Strobel, from Bakersfield College, created this website to provide educational materials for the introductory astronomy course he teaches. Users can find a seventeen chapter online textbook, equipped with fantastic astronomy images and numerous review questions. The site offers a description of angular momentum; a mathematics review; tables of astronomy constants, physical constants, planets, and stars; and a glossary. Students can benefit by reading the study guide, which addresses ways to improve study habits and exam scores. Be sure to read Mr. Strobel's Copyright Notice prior to utilizing the resources avaiable here.

  15. Astronomy Java Applets

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Scharein, Robert Glenn, 1959-

    These interactive astronomy java applets were created for astronomy students at the University of British Columbia. They cover topics dealing with the solar system and demonstrate the phases of the inner planets, retrograde motion, Kepler's Laws, cratering and solar eclipses. Applets on stellar astronomy include: fusion in the sun, the Big Bang, extrasolar planets, black holes, the H-R diagram, binary stars, parallax, the Doppler Effect, and black body radiation. The last set of simulations deal with telescopes. They demonstrate Snell's Law, electrostatics, and properties of lenses and mirrors.

  16. The Unified Astronomy Thesaurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, A.; Gray, N.; Erdmann, C.; Biemesderfer, C.; Frey, K.; Soles, J.

    2014-05-01

    The Unified Astronomy Thesaurus (UAT) is an open, interoperable and community-supported thesaurus which unifies the existing divergent and isolated Astronomy & Astrophysics vocabularies into a single high-quality, freely-available open thesaurus formalizing astronomical concepts and their inter-relationships. The UAT builds upon the existing IAU Thesaurus with major contributions from the astronomy portions of the thesauri developed by the Institute of Physics Publishing, the American Institute of Physics, and SPIE. We describe the effort behind the creation of the UAT and the process through which we plan to maintain the document updated through broad community participation.

  17. Infrared Astronomy in the Past Half Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, M.

    Infrared astronomy has greatly changed in the past four decades. From a small extension to optical astronomy that stretched out to slightly longer wavelengths, infrared astronomy gradually reached out to cover the entire wavelength range to the radio regime, and established itself as a field of importance in its own right. These efforts required the development of new detection techniques that permitted access to ever larger portions of the near-,mid and far-infrared regime and extended out into the submillimeter domain. Infrared and submillimeter techniques became essential for the investigations of star formation processes that took place at such low temperatures that no optical emission could be expected. The new observations pierced the dark dust clouds populating the Milky Way to provide a clear view of the Galaxy's center. In the distant Universe startlingly luminous merging galaxies came into view. We were beginning to look far back in time to perceive the gradual evolution of galaxies over the aeons. A serious drawback, however, persisted. At progressively longer wavelengths the view of the Universe became increasingly blurred. Ordinary telescopes no longer provided sharp views. Interferometers would have to be pioneered and constructed at great cost. Major investments led to the construction of dedicated facilities, on the ground, in the air and in space. The increased funding, however, also dictated that infrared astronomers reorganize themselves.Initially started by a few individuals working with their students and a few technicians, infrared astronomy had to change as increasing numbers of scientists entered the field and began to erect facilities that required the dedicated efforts of hundreds of astronomers on a single project. Infrared astronomy has evolved into Big Science, a limit at which increasing budgets threaten to become an unacceptable burden on society. Members of our discipline will need to think carefully how we may continue to pursue further advances within socially affordable limits.

  18. Astronomy without astronomers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, Magdalena

    Astronomy in Romania has an old tradition. After half a century of privations and isolation from the rest of the world, we believed that the changes undergone by our country in 1989 (and by the neighbour countries, as well) will be benefit for the Romanian astronomy, too. Indeed, it was, but for a very short period. The young people left the country, one by one, and others cannot accept the low salary offered by a research institute. The economy doesn't allow us to enrich the astronomical endowment. Of course, we cannot close the observatories. We have to find other ways to save the astronomy in this part of Europe, especially in the epoch of the space astronomy.

  19. Astronomy, Astrology, and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Dorian Gieseler

    Astronomy and astrology were combined with medicine for thousands of years. Beginning in Mesopotamia in the second millennium BCE and continuing into the eighteenth century, medical practitioners used astronomy/astrology as an important part of diagnosis and prescription. Throughout this time frame, scientists cited the similarities between medicine and astrology, in addition to combining the two in practice. Hippocrates and Galen based medical theories on the relationship between heavenly bodies and human bodies. In an enduring cultural phenomenon, parts of the body as well as diseases were linked to zodiac signs and planets. In Renaissance universities, astronomy and astrology were studied by students of medicine. History records a long tradition of astrologer-physicians. This chapter covers the topic of astronomy, astrology, and medicine from the Old Babylonian period to the Enlightenment.

  20. Astronomy Forum John Womersley

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    Astronomy Forum John Womersley July 2010 #12;Comprehensive Spending Review · The government has for long term economic recovery and this case is (we hope) getting a fair hearing · We are presenting clear

  1. Women in Astronomy Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, Meg

    2000-04-01

    For more than a century women have played a key role in astronomy, making major discoveries that advanced the field. Today there are many examples of women astronomers leading new fields and making fundamental contributions to understanding the Universe. Yet women remain a small fraction of practicing (academic) astronomers. Only 5% of the full professors in astronomy are women, even though at least 10% of astronomy Ph.D.s have gone to women over the last 100 years (and the fraction is now approaching 25%). These and other statistics for women in astronomy, including those from the recent survey by the American Astronomical Society, suggest mechanisms are in place to help men advance beyond their representation in the talent pool. To ensure equity of opportunity and to strengthen science by drawing on the largest possible talent base, similar mechanisms might allow talented women astronomers to meet with comparable success.

  2. Updating GCSE Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Julien

    2009-08-01

    Julien King, Chair of the RAS Education Committee, brings news of changes to the GCSE Astronomy syllabus, mainly additions aimed at making the content more relevant to recent developments in research.

  3. Cultural Astronomy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Steven L.

    While Japan is known more for its contributions to modern astronomy than its archaeoastronomical sites, there is still much about the culture's heritage that is of interest in the study of cultural astronomy. This case study provides an overview of historical considerations necessary to understand the place of astronomy in Japanese society as well as methodological considerations that highlight traditional approaches that have at times been a barrier to interdisciplinary research. Some specific areas of study in the cultural astronomy of Japan are discussed including examples of contemporary research based on interdisciplinary approaches. Japan provides a fascinating background for scholars who are willing to go beyond their curiosity for sites of alignment and approach the culture with a desire to place astronomical iconography in social context.

  4. Relativity in fundamental astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffel, M.

    2015-03-01

    An overview is given over the broad field of Relativity in Fundamental Astronomy. The present status is recalled and deficiencies are pointed out that might lead to future work within IAU Commission 52.

  5. Center for Astronomy Education

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-09-14

    The focus of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Astronomy Education is simple, yet important: it is "dedicated to the professional development of introductory astronomy instructors." To that end, this website provides articles from guest bloggers, educational materials, and an array of high-quality resources. On the homepage, visitors can view sections that include Teaching Strategies, Publications, and Seeing the Universe. The Teaching Strategies area includes guest posts from college level astronomy instructors, while the archive includes posts focused on classroom assessment, curriculum, and goals. Moving on, the Seeing the Universe area includes an archive of images that can be used in the astronomy classroom. One of the best overall resources in the Teaching Strategies section is "You Don't Have to Do it from Scratch," which teaches instructors how to use conventional PowerPoint lectures more effectively. Finally, visitors can connect with the Center via Facebook and other social media sites.

  6. NASA thesaurus: Astronomy vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A terminology of descriptors used by the NASA Scientific and Technical information effort to index documents in the area of astronomy is presented. The terms are listed in hierarchical format derived from the 1988 edition of the NASA Thesaurus Volume 1 -- Hierarchical Listing. Over 1600 terms are included. In addition to astronomy, space sciences covered include astrophysics, cosmology, lunar flight and exploration, meteors and meteorites, celestial mechanics, planetary flight and exploration, and planetary science.

  7. Tips for Astronomy TA's

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this website, the University of Washington offers great hints to help beginner astronomy teaching assistants (TAs) become better instructors. The site addresses preparation for classroom teaching, questioning style, classroom strategies, increasing student motivation, and many other topics of interest to teachers. For first-time teachers, the section describing the first day of class may be the most important. While designed for astronomy TAs, anyone involved in the teaching profession can hone their skills by following the suggestions presented.

  8. Astronomy in the Marketplace

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-04-30

    This is an activity about cultural references to astronomy. Learners will create a list of products that have been named after astronomical objects, which the class discusses. As a homework project, they can search local stores or media for additional astronomical references. This is Activity M-3 of Universe at Your Fingertips 2.0: A Collection of Activities and Resources for Teaching Astronomy DVD-ROM, which is available for purchase.

  9. Music and Astronomy

    E-print Network

    J. A. Caballero; S. Gonzalez Sanchez; I. Caballero

    2008-10-16

    What do Brian May (the Queen's lead guitarist), William Herschel and the Jupiter Symphony have in common? And a white dwarf, a piano and Lagartija Nick? At first glance, there is no connection between them, nor between Music and Astronomy. However, there are many revealing examples of musical Astronomy and astronomical Music. This four-page proceeding describes the sonorous poster that we showed during the VIII Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society.

  10. Astronomy in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Mexican astronomy has a long standing tradition of excellence in research. After a brief review of its history, I outline the current profile of the community, the available infrastructure and participating institutions, and give a glimpse into the future through current projects. The development of astronomy can serve as a powerful lever for science, technological development, education and outreach, as well as for improving the much needed link between basic research and industry development.

  11. GAIN ESTIMATION METHODS FOR POLARIZED RADIO TELESCOPE ARRAYS A.J. Boonstra

    E-print Network

    van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    GAIN ESTIMATION METHODS FOR POLARIZED RADIO TELESCOPE ARRAYS A.J. Boonstra 1¡ and A.J. van der@cas.et.tudelft.nl In radio telescope arrays, the complex receiver gains and sensor noise powers are initially unknown phase. 1. INTRODUCTION In interferometric radio astronomy, the telescope array complex receiver gains

  12. Signal Processing Tools for Radio Alle-Jan van der Veen and Stefan J. Wijnholds

    E-print Network

    Langendoen, Koen

    Radio astronomy is known for its very large telescope dishes, but is currently making a transition, the aperture of a radio telescope has to be 5 to 6 orders of magni- tude larger than that of an optical telescope to provide the same resolution. This implies that the aperture of a radio telescope should have

  13. Using multiple beams to identify radio frequency interference in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Harp

    2005-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a multiuser instrument and will perform simultaneous radio astronomy and radio search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) observations. It is a multibeam instrument, with 16 independently steerable dual-polarization beams at four different tunings. Here we describe a new method for identifying radio frequency interference (RFI) that leverages the unique attributes of the ATA. Given four

  14. Reports on Astronomy 2006-2009 (IAU XXVIIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hucht, Karel A.

    2009-04-01

    Preface; Division I. Fundamental Astronomy Jan Vondrák; Division II. Sun and Heliosphere Donald B. Melrose; Division III. Planetary Systems Sciences Edward L. G. Bowell; Division IV. Stars Monique Spite; Division V. Variable Stars Alvaro Giménez; Division VI. Interstellar Matter Thomas J. Miller; Division VII. Galactic System Ortwin Gerhard; Division VIII. Galaxies and the Universe Sadanori Okamura; Division IX. Optical and Infrared Techniques Andreas Quirrenbach; Division X. Radio Astronomy Ren-Dong Nan; Division XI. Space and High-Energy Astrophysics Günther Hasinger; Division XII. Union-wide Activities Malcolm G. Smith; EC Service. Press Office Lars Lindberg Christensen; Author index.

  15. Applications of correlator chips in radio science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Spectral line observations in radio astronomy require simultaneous power estimation in many (often hundreds to thousands) frequency bins. Digital autocorrelation spectrometers, which appeared thirty years ago, are now being implemented in VLSI. The same architecture can be used to implement transversal digital filters. This was done at the Arecibo Observatory for pulse compression in radar observations of Venus.

  16. Astronomy and Mathematics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    There are many European countries where Astronomy does not appear as a specific course on the secondary school. In these cases Astronomy content can be introduced by means of other subjects. There are some astronomical topics within the subject of Physics but this talk concerns introducing Astronomy in Mathematics classes. Teaching Astronomy through Mathematics would result in more exposure than through Physics as Mathematics is more prevalent in the curriculum. Generally it is not easy to motivate students in Mathematics but they are motivated to find out more about the universe and Astronomy current events than appears in the media. This situation can be an excellent introduction to several mathematics topics. The teachers in secondary and high school can use this idea in order to present more attractive mathematics courses. In particular some different examples will be offered regarding * Angles and spherical coordinates considering star traces * Logarithms and visual magnitudes * Plane trigonometry related orbital movements * Spherical trigonometry in connection with ecliptic obliquity * Conic curves related to sundial at several latitudes Some students do not enjoy studying Mathematics but they can be attracted by practical situations using Applied Mathematics: Astronomy is always very attractive to teenagers.

  17. Astronomy Students Learn to Think Big.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Presents background information related to astronomy for high school students. Discusses the differences between astronomy and astrophysics, and the employment of the astronomy graduates. Lists degree programs in astronomy and related subjects in an appendix. (YP)

  18. Voyager spacecraft radio observations of Jupiter: Initial cruise results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Kaiser; M. D. Desch; A. C. Riddle; A. Lecacheux; J. B. Pearce; J. K. Alexander; J. W. Warwick; J. R. Thieman

    1979-01-01

    Jupiter's hectometric (HOM) wave-length radio emissions have been detected by the planetary radio astronomy instruments onboard the two Voyager spacecraft. The emission is surprisingly similar in morphology but opposite in polarization to the decametric (DAM) wavelength Jovian radio noise that has been observed with ground-based telescopes for more than two decades. The HOM emissions are predominantly left-hand polarized and their

  19. Voyager spacecraft radio observations of Jupiter: Initial cruise results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Riddle, A. C.; Lecacheux, A.; Pearce, J. B.; Alexander, J. K.; Warwick, J. W.; Thieman, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Jupiter's low-frequency radio emission were detected by the planetary radio astronomy instruments onboard the two Voyager spacecraft. The emission is surprisingly similar in morphology but opposite in polarization to the high-frequency Jovian radio noise that were observed with ground-based telescopes for more than two decades. Several possible explanations for the behavior of the low-frequency emission are examined, but none of them is completely satisfactory.

  20. MPS Internships in Public Science Education: Sensing the Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Melvin; Castelaz, M. W.; Moffett, D.; Walsh, L.; LaFratta, M.

    2006-12-01

    The intent of the “Sensing the Radio Sky” program is to teach high school students the concepts and relevance of radio astronomy through presentations in STARLAB portable planetariums. The two year program began in the summer of 2004 and was completed in December 2006. The program involved a team of 12 undergraduate physics and multimedia majors and four faculty mentors from Furman University, University of North Carolina-Asheville and Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). One component of the program is the development and production of a projection cylinder for the portable STARLAB planetariums. The cylinder gives a thorough view of the Milky Way and of several other celestial sources in radio wavelengths, yet these images are difficult to perceive without prior knowledge of radio astronomy. Consequently, the Radio Sky team created a multimedia presentation to accompany the cylinder. This multimedia component contains six informative lessons on radio astronomy assembled by the physics interns and numerous illustrations and animations created by the multimedia interns. The cylinder and multimedia components complement each other and provide a unique, thorough, and highly intelligible perspective on radio astronomy. The final draft is complete and will be sent to Learning Technologies, Inc., for marketing to owners of STARLAB planetariums throughout the world. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  1. Astronomical Book Trek: Astronomy Books of 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1984-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of technical and non-technical astronomy books. Topic areas of non-technical books include general astronomy, amateur astronomy, computers and astronomy, history of astronomy, pseudoscience, space exploration, physics and astronomy, and textbooks. Each entry includes author, title, description, source, and current cost.…

  2. Astronomy and Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    2009-10-01

    The problems of teaching of astronomy in the schools of the former communist countries has been disccused in the connection with the genealogical (family names) of the Presidents of the Countries and scientists astronomers and other Country leaders. Particularly the recent decision of the Russian authorities to reduce the hours for the course of astronomy in the Russian secondary schools is supposed to critics. Some improvements of the situation has been reported. The hours for the astronomy teaching in Russia varry, according with the will of Ministers of Education of the Countries, Prime ministers and Presidents. Similar news came from the Romania. In conclusion, there is no a stable curriculum for astronomy (physics) in some countries. This reffer especially to the number of hours. The influence of presidents of the Countries is so great, that the fate of the astronomy teaching (probably of science teaching in general), that it is difficult to have a scientific education in a country without an elementary scientific education of the Leaders of the Countries, particularly of the persons above. An incomplete list of political leaders and scientists (astronomers and physicists) with the same family names is given. Since the number of persons with decision power in the area is about 3 per country in 4 years, the modern astronomy is taught during about 200 years, the total number of family names responsible for the area of astronomy teaching throughout the world during the last 200 years is about 10000. A similar calculation could be made for physics teaching. Another aspect of the problem is the relation of the number of publications with the GDP/capita of the country. The relation between science and policy is mediated by the number of papers /population which "grosso modo" is proportional to the GDP/capita for the country given. Subsequently the GDP/capita corellates strongly with the policy. The SPIRES database ilustrates this with evidence, but with taking in account of some historical traditions of the country.

  3. Astronomy and Astrophysics Review Xray astronomy of stellar coronae ?

    E-print Network

    Guedel, Manuel

    and evolution of stellar magnetic fields from the first days of a protostellar life to the latest stages of stellar evolution among giants and su­ pergiants. The discipline of stellar coronal X­ray astronomy hasAstronomy and Astrophysics Review in press X­ray astronomy of stellar coronae ? Manuel G Ë? udel

  4. The history of radio telescopes, 1945-1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Woodruff T.

    2009-08-01

    Forged by the development of radar during World War II, radio astronomy revolutionized astronomy during the decade after the war. A new universe was revealed, centered not on stars and planets, but on the gas between the stars, on explosive sources of unprecedented luminosity, and on hundreds of mysterious discrete sources with no optical identifications. Using “radio telescopes” that looked nothing like traditional (optical) telescopes, radio astronomers were a very different breed from traditional (optical) astronomers. This pathbreaking of radio astronomy also made it much easier for later “astronomies” and their “telescopes” (X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, gamma-ray) to become integrated into astronomy after the launch of the space age in the 1960s. This paper traces the history of radio telescopes from 1945 through about 1990, from the era of converted small-sized, military radar antennas to that of large interferometric arrays connected by complex electronics and computers; from the era of strip-chart recordings measured by rulers to powerful computers and display graphics; from the era of individuals and small groups building their own equipment to that of Big Science, large collaborations and national observatories.

  5. Massive Datasets in Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Robert J. Brunner; S. George Djorgovski; Thomas A. Prince; Alex S. Szalay

    2001-06-26

    Astronomy has a long history of acquiring, systematizing, and interpreting large quantities of data. Starting from the earliest sky atlases through the first major photographic sky surveys of the 20th century, this tradition is continuing today, and at an ever increasing rate. Like many other fields, astronomy has become a very data-rich science, driven by the advances in telescope, detector, and computer technology. Numerous large digital sky surveys and archives already exist, with information content measured in multiple Terabytes, and even larger, multi-Petabyte data sets are on the horizon. Systematic observations of the sky, over a range of wavelengths, are becoming the primary source of astronomical data. Numerical simulations are also producing comparable volumes of information. Data mining promises to both make the scientific utilization of these data sets more effective and more complete, and to open completely new avenues of astronomical research. Technological problems range from the issues of database design and federation, to data mining and advanced visualization, leading to a new toolkit for astronomical research. This is similar to challenges encountered in other data-intensive fields today. These advances are now being organized through a concept of the Virtual Observatories, federations of data archives and services representing a new information infrastructure for astronomy of the 21st century. In this article, we provide an overview of some of the major datasets in astronomy, discuss different techniques used for archiving data, and conclude with a discussion of the future of massive datasets in astronomy.

  6. Astronomy 101 Student Demographics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, G. L.; Hufnagel, B.; Snyder, K. L.; Miller, E. A.

    2001-05-01

    From 1999 to 2001, the Astronomy Diagnostic Test Version 2.0 (ADT 2.0) was administered to undergraduates taking introductory astronomy for non-science majors (Astronomy 101) across the United States. A national database has been established using the results from the ADT 2.0 taken as a pretest by more than 5000 students. The 33-question multiple choice test contains 12 student background questions that can be used to create a profile of student enrollments in Astronomy 101. Students who take introductory astronomy reflect undergraduate national trends of gender, choice of major, and ethnic background. Specific questions on course expectations reveal that these students are less confident of their abilities in science than in mathematics. Mathematics background is evenly split between those who have completed only high school level topics (algebra and geometry) and those who have completed college level topics (pre-calculus and calculus). Class demographics aid in the design of effective teaching strategies for successful learning. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation through grants REC-0089239 and DGE-9714489.

  7. Interference Cancellation Using an Array Feed Design for Radio Telescopes ChodHansen, Karl F.Wornick,'andBrion D.Jcffs

    E-print Network

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    Interference Cancellation Using an Array Feed Design for Radio Telescopes ChodHansen, Karl F.Introduction Radio frequency intcrfcrcnce (WI) is a growing problem far radio astronomers. Major sources with a single reflector. Outside of radio astronomy, array feeds are used to compensate for reflector

  8. The ATA Digital Processing Requirements are Driven by RFI Concerns As a new generation radio telescope, the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a prototype for

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    generation radio telescope, the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a prototype for the SKA. Here we describe, radio telescopes must support a wide range of RFI mitigation strategies including online deterministic processing. As radio frequency interference (RFI) becomes increasingly problematical for radio astronomy

  9. Quickly Creating Interactive Astronomy Illustrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    An innate advantage for astronomy teachers is having numerous breathtaking images of the cosmos available to capture students' curiosity, imagination, and wonder. Internet-based astronomy image libraries are numerous and easy to navigate. The Astronomy Picture of the Day, the Hubble Space Telescope image archive, and the NASA Planetary…

  10. Astronomy Librarians - Quo Vadis?

    E-print Network

    Lagerstrom, Jill

    2011-01-01

    "You don't look like a librarian" is a phrase we often hear in the astronomy department or observatory library. Astronomy librarians are a breed apart, and are taking on new and non-traditional roles as information technology evolves. This talk will explore the future of librarians and librarianship through the lens of the recent talks given at the sixth "Libraries and Information Services in Astronomy" conference held in Pune, India in February 2010. We will explore the librarian's universe, illustrating how librarians use new technologies to perform such tasks as bibliometrics, how we are re-fashioning our library spaces in an increasingly digital world and how we are confronting the brave new world of open access, to name but a few topics.

  11. Astronomy Librarian - Quo Vadis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerstrom, Jill; Grothkopf, Uta

    "You don't look like a librarian" is a phrase we often hear in the astronomy department or observatory library. Astronomy librarians are a breed apart, and are taking on new and non-traditional roles as information technology evolves. This talk will explore the future of librarians and librarianship through the lens of some of the recent talks given at the sixth "Libraries and Information Services in Astronomy" conference held in Pune, India in February 2010. We will explore the librarian's universe, illustrating how librarians use new technologies to perform such tasks as bibliometrics, how we are re-fashioning our library spaces in an increasingly digital world and how we are confronting the brave new world of Open Access, to name but a few topics.

  12. Astronomy education in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutawarakorn, Busaba; Soonthornthum, B.; Kirdkao, T.

    Thailand is one of the developing countries which pursues the goal to advance economy, technology as well as science. Education in Astronomy is considered as a supporting factor, since it is one of the basic sciences which can teach the young generation to understand and conserve their mother nature and at the same time helps to develop analytical thinking. The poster reports the present developments in astronomical education in Thailand which includes (1) current astronomy education in school and university; (2) educational activities outside school; (3) development of programs for teaching astronomy in school (including teacher training); (4) the access of educational resources via internet. Proposals for future development and collaborations will be presented and discussed.

  13. Teaching Astronomy Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radnofsky, Mary L.; Bobrowsky, Matthew

    This article is intended to provide an overview of the practical, pedagogical, and philosophical considerations in designing a Web-based astronomy course, and to demonstrate the educational benefits that such online courses can afford students. Because online students need to take more responsibility for their learning, faculty must make course expectations extremely clear. Online education allows for increased student participation and equal access to college by such groups as the military, the handicapped, full-time employees, and rural and senior citizens. Teaching the sciences online--especially astronomy--gives students more time to think critically about new information. This article also includes tools, checklists, and resources helpful for introducing faculty to online course development in astronomy.

  14. Astronomy Media Player

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From the planets to various interstellar bodies, learning about astronomy can be fun and engaging. One way to learn about such matters is via podcasts, and this website is committed to finding the best astronomy podcasts from various places around the world. Users can get started by looking at one the following sections: "General", "Observing", "Courses", "Your Questions", "Observations", and "Top Ten". Each section contains a host of current (and former) podcasts. Persons looking to find answers to specific astronomy queries will want to look over podcasts like "Ask an Astronomer" and "Brain Bites" in the "Your Questions" area. The "Observatories" area is equally delightful, and it contains links to podcasts such as "Gemini Observatory" and "W.M. Keck Observatory". Of course, the social media options on the site are quite good, and it's easy to reference such treasures on Facebook, Digg, and so on.

  15. Astronomy.com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The publishers of Astronomy magazine (originally reviewed in the August 8, 1997 Scout Report http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/report/sr/1997/scout-970808.html#10 ) recently announced the release of their updated and expanded Website. The site has the look and feel of a commercial site (and a few ads), but all content is free. Designed for Astronomy hobbyists, the site contains the latest space news, feature articles, a nice beginners section, tips and tools for parents and teachers, a photo gallery, and star charts. Users can also participate in discussion forums, search for astronomy organizations, and subscribe to a free bulletin service. Please note that registration is required for access to some parts of the site.

  16. The Astronomy Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-08

    This rather fine website is a must-visit for anyone involved in teaching college-level astronomy. The Astronomy Center is sponsored by the American Astronomical Society, the American Association of Physics Teachers, and the National Science Foundation, among other distinguished organizations. Visitors can get started by looking over the Recent Additions area, which in the past has included features on the phases of the moon, interactive activities related to fossil stars, and a telescope primer for educators. Moving on, visitors can use the Browse By Topic area to find specific materials on 13 subjects, including galaxies, the solar system, and the Milky Way. Also, visitors can browse by document type, where the headings include Simulations, Projects, and Labs. The Cosmic Time and Distance area is a real delight, as it includes activities that will challenge students to explore the concepts of parallax and aberration of light as they apply to astronomy.

  17. Astronomy Education Review

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-03-09

    The Astronomy Education Review (AER) is a web-based journal for "everyone who works in astronomy and space science education." AER is published by the American Astronomical Society, and each edition contains papers, reviews of research, and short articles on innovative work in the field. The journal began in 2001, and visitors can search through the past articles by keyword or volume. On the homepage, it's a great idea to start by scanning through the 10 Most Recent Additions to AER area. Here, users will find pieces like "Astronomy Apps for Mobile Devices" and "Using Smartphone Camera Technology to Explore Stellar Parallax: Method, Results, and Reactions." Along the top of the homepage, visitors can use the Browse tab, look over the About section, or read throughout the Features. This last area contains links to their RSS feed and a place to subscribe for alerts about new items from the AER.

  18. The Murchison Widefield Array: The Square Kilometre Array Precursor at Low Radio Frequencies

    E-print Network

    Goeke, Robert F.

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is one of three Square Kilometre Array Precursor telescopes and is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in the Murchison Shire of the mid-west of Western Australia, a ...

  19. 100 Hours of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Mike

    2009-01-01

    The 100 Hours of Astronomy cornerstone project (100HA) is a round-the-clock, worldwide event with 100 continuous hours of a wide range of public outreach activities including live webcasts, observing events and more. One of the key goals of 100HA is to have as many people as possible look through a telescope as Galileo did for the first time 400 years ago. 100HA will take place from 2-5 April when the Moon goes from first quarter to gibbous, good phases for early evening observing. Saturn will be the other highlight of early evening observing events. 100 Hours of Astronomy consists of five main events: 1. An opening event featuring the telescope that Galileo used to make his groundbreaking observations. 2. Activities at science centres, planetariums and science museums including live webcasts, live observations by visitors using remotely-operated telescopes, and enhanced outreach programs including public observing sessions held by amateur astronomy groups. 3. Observing sessions and other educational activities in schools groups held by astronomy clubs and others. 4. 24 hours of live webcasts from research observatories around the world, along with observing events and other outreach activities at participating observatories. 5. 24 hours of sidewalk astronomy - public observing sessions in population centres to bring the opportunity to view the Moon, Saturn and other objects to as many people as possible. The annual International Sidewalk Astronomy Night will be held during this event. These primary activities will be scheduled so that each supports the other, leading in order from one to the next and culminating in the world's greatest public observing event. A wrap-up will be held at the IAU General Assembly in 2009 to recognize all participants’ contributions to this unique global event.

  20. Babylonian Mathematical Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossendrijver, Mathieu

    The earliest known form of mathematical astronomy of the ancient world was developed in Babylonia in the 5th century BCE. It was used for predicting a wide range of phenomena of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets. After a brief discussion of the material evidence and historical context of Babylonian mathematical astronomy, its main concepts and methods are illustrated on the basis of a tablet with computed data for Jupiter. Finally, the past, present, and future directions of research are briefly addressed.

  1. Open Astronomy Curricula

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-11-24

    This set of twelve lesson plans is intended to encourage the teaching of astronomy to K-12 students. The lessons are designed to make use of a planetarium projector, but they can be modified for use with different planetarium systems, including the free (General Public License) planetarium software 'Stellarium'. They introduce students to basics of earth's movements, the Greco-Roman constellations, and objects in the sky (for younger students); the differences between stars and planets, planetary motions, phases of the moon; stellar navigation, the solstices and equinoxes, the history of astronomy, and other topics (secondary students). The lessons are available in PDF (for printing) and RTF (for editing) formats.

  2. Cosmic Ray Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Paul Sommers; Stefan Westerhoff

    2008-02-09

    Cosmic ray astronomy attempts to identify and study the sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. It is unique in its reliance on charged particles as the information carriers. While no discrete source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays has been identified so far, a new generation of detectors is acquiring the huge exposure that is needed at the highest energies, where deflection by magnetic fields is minimized and the background from distant sources is eliminated by pion photoproduction. In this paper, we summarize the status of cosmic ray astronomy, describing the detectors and the analysis techniques.

  3. Astronomy before the telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C.

    This book is the most comprehensive and authoritative survey to date of world astronomy before the telescope in AD 1609. International experts have contributed chapters examining what observations were made, what instruments were used, the effect of developments in mathematics and measurement, and the diversity of early views of cosmology and astrology. The achievements of European astronomers from prehistoric times to the Renaissance are linked with those of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, India and the Islamic world. Other chapters deal with early astronomy in the Far East and in the Americas, and with traditional astronomical knowledge in Africa, Australia and the Pacific.

  4. Gamma-ray Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Jim Hinton

    2007-12-20

    The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

  5. Meta Research: Astronomy Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Meta Research, headed by astronomer Tom Van Flandern, fosters "research into ideas not otherwise supported solely because they conflict with mainstream theories in Astronomy." The website offers papers on alternative explanations in the fields of cosmology, solar systems, and gravity. Individuals can find out about upcoming solar eclipse expeditions and view images from past trips. Students and educators can find links to numerous astronomy-related animations including the Face on Mars, Fission Model, and Leonids meteor storm. Interested visitors can learn about membership opportunities and Meta Research publications.

  6. Radio Ghosts

    E-print Network

    Ensslin, T A

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that patches of old radio plasma (`radio ghosts') of former radio galaxies form a second distinct phase of the inter-galactic medium (IGM), not mixed with the thermal gas. The separation of this phase from the ambient gas and its resistance against eroding turbulent forces is given by magnetic fields, which are expected to be roughly in pressure equilibrium with the surrounding medium. Since patches of this plasma are largely invisible in the radio we use the term `radio ghost' to characterize their nature. Possibilities and difficulties of different detection strategies of ghosts are discussed. These involve radio emission, cosmic microwave background (CMB) and starlight Comptonization, and Faraday rotation. Re-activation of the electron population in shock waves of cosmological structure formation, which seems to lead to the cluster radio relic phenomena. We discuss the role radio ghosts can have: They are able to store relativistic particles for cosmological times, but are al...

  7. Cognitive radio: Making software radios more personal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Mitola; Gerald Quentin Maguire Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Software radios are emerging as platforms for multiband multimode personal communications systems. Radio etiquette is the set of RF bands, air interfaces, protocols, and spatial and temporal patterns that moderate the use of the radio spectrum. Cognitive radio extends the software radio with radio-domain model-based reasoning about such etiquettes. Cognitive radio enhances the flexibility of personal services through a Radio

  8. The Fate of Comet C\\/1999 S4 (LINEAR) at Radio Wavelengths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Biver; D. Bockelée-Morvan; P. Colom; J. Crovisier; E. Gérard; F. Henry; R. Moreno; D. C. Lis; H. E. Matthews; J. Bauer; D. Despois

    2000-01-01

    Comet C\\/1999 S4 (LINEAR) was observed at radio wavelengths using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO), James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) (Mauna-Kea) and Institut de RadioAstronomie Millimétrique (IRAM) 30-m millimeter and submillimeter radio telescopes and Nançay decimeter radio telescope between January 3 and August 2, 2000. HCN, CS, H2CO and OH lines were clearly detected in June-July 2000. Marginal detections or

  9. The African Cultural Astronomy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urama, Johnson O.; Holbrook, Jarita C.

    2011-06-01

    Indigenous, endogenous, traditional, or cultural astronomy focuses on the many ways that people and cultures interact with celestial bodies. In most parts of Africa, there is very little or no awareness about modern astronomy. However, like ancient people everywhere, Africans wondered at the sky and struggled to make sense of it. The African Cultural Astronomy Project aims to unearth the body of traditional knowledge of astronomy possessed by peoples of the different ethnic groups in Africa and to consider scientific interpretations when appropriate for cosmogonies and ancient astronomical practices. Regardless of scientific validity, every scientist can relate to the process of making observations and creating theoretical mechanisms for explaining what is observed. Through linking the traditional and the scientific, it is believed that this would be used to create awareness and interest in astronomy in most parts of Africa. This paper discusses the vision, challenges and prospects of the African Cultural Astronomy Project in her quest to popularize astronomy in Africa.

  10. Teaching Astronomy Using Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang; Brown, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal presented a set of innovative uses of video analysis for introductory physics using Tracker. In addition, numerous other papers have described how video analysis can be a meaningful part of introductory courses. Yet despite this, there are few resources for using video analysis in introductory astronomy classes. In…

  11. Adaptive Optics in Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jay J. McCarthy

    The field of adaptive optics (AO) has developed as a means to correct for the phase disturbances of an optical signal by understanding the medium through which it passes. This paper is intended to be a brief introduction to the field of adaptive optics with an emphasis the role of AO in astronomy. T e l e s c o

  12. Data in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, B.

    The importance of data in astronomy and astrophysics is discussed. The growth of astronomical and astrophysical data in the 20th century is examined, the critical evaluation of such data is reviewed, and the accessibility of the data is considered. The possibility of centralizing information concerning the plates stored in plate vaults at various observatories is discussed.

  13. Resources for Teaching Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grafton, Teresa; Suggett, Martin

    1991-01-01

    Resources that are available for teachers presenting astronomy in the National Curriculum are listed. Included are societies and organizations, resource centers and places to visit, planetaria, telescopes and binoculars, planispheres, star charts, night sky diaries, equipment, audiovisual materials, computer software, books, and magazines. (KR)

  14. Astronomy and Public Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2014-01-01

    Astronomy is an unusual science in that almost all of what we study can only be passively observed. We enjoy tremendous public support for our research and education, both domestically and abroad. Our discoveries in cosmology and exoplanets have captured world-wide attention, as have stunning images from the Great Observatories of NASA, and ground based telescopes. Despite the passive nature of our science, it touches humanity profoundly. There are groups of amateur astronomers in every conceivable country who meet to look at the sky. Almost one billion people from 150 countries participated in The International Year of Astronomy 2009. No other science reaches humanity as ours does. In a recent poll, it was found that the among all the things the US does abroad, US science is seen by the world as our most positive face. We as astronomers can use this good will to affect positive changes in the world through public policy. I would like to explore how astronomy has impacted public policy, especially foreign policy, and what more we can do in the future. I also hope to encourage astronomers that a career path into public policy is an excellent use of a Ph.D. in astronomy.

  15. The Future of Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Jesse L.

    1973-01-01

    Presents a summary of the Reports of the Panels'' published by the Astronomy Survey Committee of the National Academy of Sciences in 1973, involving aspects of cosmology, quasars, exploding galaxies, stars, stellar evolution, solar system, organic molecules, life, and interstellar communication. Included are recommendations for scientific…

  16. History of Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenberg, Marc

    1985-01-01

    Examines the development of American astronomy by discussing: general studies on the subject; early efforts through 1825; establishing foundations (1825-1875); the transitional period (1875-1945); and the space age (1945 to the present). Points out that the field is underdeveloped with a need for additional work. (JN)

  17. The International Astronomy Olympiad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Michael G.

    2011-06-01

    The International Astronomy Olympiad (IAO) is an annual scientific-educating event for students of the junior high-school classes, aged 14-18 years. The Euro-Asian Astronomical Society founded the IAO in 1996. The Olympiad includes an intellectual competition between these students. The style of the problems is aimed at developping the imagination, creativity and independent thinking.

  18. Gamma-ray astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Houston; A. W. Wolfendale

    1982-01-01

    A brief description is given of the present status of gamma-ray astronomy, both galactic and extragalactic. More detailed attention is given to a specific question: the nature of the apparent 'gamma-ray sources'. The undoubted correlation of at least some of the sources with dense clouds of gas in the interstellar medium is discussed. A new analysis of the SAS II

  19. Astronomy Video Contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, John

    2008-05-01

    One of Galileo's staunchest supporters during his lifetime was Johannes Kepler, Imperial Mathematician to the Holy Roman Emperor. Johannes Kepler will be in St. Louis to personally offer a tribute to Galileo. Set Galileo's astronomy discoveries to music and you get the newest song by the well known acappella group, THE CHROMATICS. The song, entitled "Shoulders of Giants” was written specifically for IYA-2009 and will be debuted at this conference. The song will also be used as a base to create a music video by synchronizing a person's own images to the song's lyrics and tempo. Thousands of people already do this for fun and post their videos on YOU TUBE and other sites. The ASTRONOMY VIDEO CONTEST will be launched as a vehicle to excite, enthuse and educate people about astronomy and science. It will be an annual event administered by the Johannes Kepler Project and will continue to foster the goals of IYA-2009 for years to come. The Astronomy Video poster will contain all the basic information about the contest including: categories, rules, prizes, web address for more info and how to download the new song, "Shoulders of Giants.”

  20. Astronomy Video Contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, John

    2008-05-01

    During Galileo's lifetime his staunchest supporter was Johannes Kepler, Imperial Mathematician to the Holy Roman Emperor. Johannes Kepler will be in St. Louis to personally offer a tribute to Galileo. Set Galileo's astronomy discoveries to music and you get the newest song by the well known acappella group, THE CHROMATICS. The song, entitled "Shoulders of Giants” was written specifically for IYA-2009 and will be debuted at this conference. The song will also be used as a base to create a music video by synchronizing a person's own images to the song's lyrics and tempo. Thousands of people already do this for fun and post their videos on YOU TUBE and other sites. The ASTRONOMY VIDEO CONTEST will be launched as a vehicle to excite, enthuse and educate people about astronomy and science. It will be an annual event administered by the Johannes Kepler Project and will continue to foster the goals of IYA-2009 for years to come. During this presentation the basic categories, rules, and prizes for the Astronomy Video Contest will be covered and finally the new song "Shoulders of Giants” by THE CHROMATICS will be unveiled

  1. Firefighters' Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Public Technology Inc. asked for NASA assistance to devise the original firefighter's radio. Good short-range radio communications are essential during a fire to coordinate hose lines, rescue victims, and otherwise increase efficiency. Useful firefighting tool is lower cost, more rugged short range two-way radio. Inductorless electronic circuit replaced inductances and coils in radio circuits with combination of transistors and other low-cost components. Substitution promises reduced circuit size and cost. Enhanced electrical performance made radio more durable and improved maintainability by incorporating modular construction.

  2. Strategies for Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J.

    2000-12-01

    No matter whether you are teaching school children, undergraduates, or colleagues, a few key strategies are always useful. I will present and give examples for the following five key strategies for teaching astronomy. 1. Provide a Contextual Framework: It is much easier to learn new facts or concepts if they can be ``binned" into some kind of pre-existing mental framework. Unless your listeners are already familiar with the basic ideas of modern astronomy (such as the hierarchy of structure in the universe, the scale of the universe, and the origin of the universe), you must provide this before going into the details of how we've developed this modern picture through history. 2. Create Conditions for Conceptual Change: Many people hold misconceptions about astronomical ideas. Therefore we cannot teach them the correct ideas unless we first help them unlearn their prior misconceptions. 3. Make the Material Relevant: It's human nature to be more interested in subjects that seem relevant to our lives. Therefore we must always show students the many connections between astronomy and their personal concerns, such as emphasizing how we are ``star stuff" (in the words of Carl Sagan), how studying other planets helps us understand our own, and so on. 4. Limit Use of Jargon: The number of new terms in many introductory astronomy books is larger than the number of words taught in many first courses in foreign language. This means the books are essentially teaching astronomy in a foreign language, which is a clear recipe for failure. We must find ways to replace jargon with plain language. 5. Challenge Your Students: Don't dumb your teaching down; by and large, students will rise to meet your expectations, as long as you follow the other strategies and practice good teaching.

  3. Using the Teach Astronomy Website to Enrich Introductory Astronomy Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Impey, C. D.; Patikkal, A.; Austin, C. L.

    2013-04-01

    This year we implemented Teach Astronomy as a free online resource to be used as a teaching tool for non-science major astronomy courses and for a general audience interested in the subject. The comprehensive astronomy content of the website includes: an introductory text book, encyclopedia articles, images, two to three minute topical video clips, podcasts, and news articles. Teach Astronomy utilizes a novel technology to cluster, display, and navigate search results, called a Wikimap. We will present an overview of how Teach Astronomy works and how instructors can use it as an effective teaching tool in the classroom. Additionally, we will gather feedback from science instructors on how to improve the features and functionality of the website, as well as develop new assignment ideas using Teach Astronomy.

  4. The Geminga radio pulsar. New low-frequency results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malov, O. I.; Malofeev, V. M.; Teplykh, D. A.; Logvinenko, S. V.

    2015-03-01

    New detections of radio emission from the Geminga pulsar at three low radio frequencies are presented. The observations were carried out at 42-112 MHz on two sensitive transit radio telescopes of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory. Three new digital receivers were used to detect the pulses and obtain dynamical spectra. Examples of mean profiles and individual pulses of Geminga are presented. Dynamical spectra at these three frequencies are presented for the first time. The availability of simultaneous observations at three frequencies has made it possible to refine the pulsar's dispersion measure.

  5. Radio Telescope Engineering: the 40m IGN Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Fernández, J. A.; Gómez González, J.; Barcía Cáncio, A.

    2006-12-01

    Large fully steerable radio telescopes are extensively used for radio astronomy and geodetic applications in the microwave and millimeter wave range. Single dish, connected interferometry and VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) observational techniques involve the construction of big collecting areas with high precision drive systems, high precision surfaces, ultra-high sensitivities and complex electronic processes. In this document we intend to review some of the main aspects in the design and construction of large size and high precision surface radio telescopes. We will discuss different engineering topics and illustrate them with examples based on our experience with the construction of the 40 meter IGN radio telescope

  6. NSF Internships in Public Science Education: Sensing the Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, L.; Boltuch, D.; Fultz, C.; Buck, S.; Smith, T.; Harris, R.; Moffett, D.; LaFratta, M.; Walsh, L.; Castelaz, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    The intent of the "Sensing the Radio Sky" project is to teach high school students the concepts and relevance of radio astronomy through presentations in STARLAB portable planetariums. The two year project began in the summer of 2004. A total of twelve interns and four faculty mentors from Furman University and UNCA have participated at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute to develop the Radio Sky project. The project united physics and multimedia majors and allowed these students to apply their knowledge of different disciplines to a common goal. One component of the project is the development and production of a cylinder to be displayed in portable STARLAB planetariums. The cylinder gives a thorough view of the Milky Way and of several other celestial sources in radio wavelengths, yet these images are difficult to perceive without prior knowledge of radio astronomy. Consequently, the Radio Sky team created a multimedia presentation to accompany the cylinder. This multimedia component contains six informative lessons on radio astronomy assembled by the physics interns and numerous illustrations and animations created by the multimedia interns. The cylinder and multimedia components complement each other and provide a unique, thorough, and highly intelligible perspective on radio astronomy. The project is near completion and the final draft will be sent to Learning Technologies, Inc., for marketing to owners of STARLAB planetariums throughout the world. The development of the Radio Sky project has also provided a template for potential similar projects that examine our universe in different wavelengths, such as gamma ray, x-ray, and infrared. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  7. Radio wave.

    PubMed

    Elkin, V

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries with high rates of poverty and illiteracy, radio is emerging as an excellent medium for delivering information on health issues, family planning, nutrition, and agricultural development. Since radio does not require wired electricity, it can reach remote rural populations. Surveys have found that between 50-75% of poor rural households in developing countries own radios, and the majority listen to educational radio at least once a week. A program that reaches the urban poor outside of Lima, Peru, has been instrumental in controlling the spread of cholera. A Bolivian station broadcasts 8 hours of literacy, health, agricultural, and cultural programming a day to an audience of more than 2 million Aymara Indians. Small village radio stations with a broadcast range of 15 miles can be established for under US$400 and can generally achieve sustainability through local fundraising events such as raffles. In many cases, listeners have become broadcasters at their local radio stations. PMID:12286181

  8. Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André

    2000-11-01

    This book offers a unique collection -- the first of its kind -- of chapters dealing with socio-dynamical aspects of the astronomy (and related space sciences) community: characteristics of organizations, publication studies, research indicators, space science planning, research communication, public outreach, and so on. The experts contributing to this book have done their best to write in a way understandable by readers not necessarily hyper-specialized in astronomy, while still providing specific detailed information. The book concludes with an extensive bibliography of publications related to socio-astronomy and to the interactions of the astronomy community with society at large. This book will be most usefully read by researchers, teachers, editors, publishers, librarians, science sociologists, research planners and strategists, project managers, and public relations officers, plus those in charge of astronomy-related organizations, as well as by students aiming at a career in astronomy or related space science. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/book.htm/0-7923-6671-9

  9. Astronomy and astrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    Astrology meets a large success in our societies, from the private to the political sphere as well as in the media, in spite of the demonstrated inaccuracy of its psychological as well as operational predictions. We analyse here the relations between astrology and astronomy, as well as the criticisms opposed by the latter to the former. We show that most of these criticisms are weak. Much stronger ones emerge from the analysis of the astrological practice compared to the scientific method, leading us to conclude to the non-scientificity of astrology. Then we return to the success of astrology, and from its analysis we propose a renewed (and prophylactic) rôle for astronomy in society.

  10. Kerala School of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian, Krishnamurthi

    It is well known that the Kerala school of astronomy, pioneered by M?dhava in the fourteenth century, made remarkable contributions to the development of calculus. In this chapter, we shall summarize the equally significant contribution made by the Kerala astronomers to the development of planetary theory. By 1500 CE, N?laka??ha Somay?j? came up with a remarkable revision of the traditional Indian planetary theory, in which, for the first time in the History of Astronomy, he arrives at a correct formulation of the equation of center and the latitudinal motion of the interior planets, which in turn makes his model computationally equivalent to the Keplerian theory under certain approximation.

  11. Life after Introductory Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, B.; Hameed, S.

    2000-12-01

    Beginning astronomy is a popular class for undergraduates, and a fair percentage of these students would take another nontechnical class in this field if one were available. What other courses exist for students to take after introductory astronomy? At NMSU we offer three classes that enroll large numbers of juniors/seniors who are nonscience majors. These classes are (1) Into the Final Frontier: the Human Exploration of Space, (2) The Search for Life in the Universe, (3) and Revolutionary Ideas in Science. Curricula for these classes, teaching strategies, and course materials will be provided in this poster presentation for those wishing to offer similar classes at their institutions. Some of th work presented in this poster was support by the NSF and NASA

  12. Transmission of Babylonian Astronomy to Other Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alexander

    Babylonian astronomy and astrology were extensively transmitted to other civilizations in the second and first millennia BC. Greek astronomy in particular was largely shaped by knowledge of Babylonian observations and mathematical astronomy.

  13. Millisecond solar radio spikes observed at 1420 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, B. P.; Kus, A. J.

    We present results from observations of narrowband solar millisecond radio spikes at 1420 MHz. Observing data were collected between February 2000 and December 2001 with the 15-m radio telescope at the Centre for Astronomy Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Poland, equipped with a radio spectrograph that covered the 1352-1490 MHz frequency band. The radio spectrograph has 3 MHz frequency resolution and 80 microsecond time resolution. We analyzed the individual radio spike duration, bandwidth and rate of frequency drift. A part of the observed spikes showed well-outlined subtle structures. On dynamic radio spectrograms of the investigated events we notice complex structures formed by numerous individual spikes known as chains of spikes and distinctly different structure of columns. Positions of active regions connected with radio spikes emission were investigated. It turns out that most of them are located near the center of the solar disk, suggesting strong beaming of the spikes emission.

  14. Radio Ghosts

    E-print Network

    Torsten A. Ensslin

    1999-06-11

    We investigate the possibility that patches of old radio plasma (`radio ghosts') of former radio galaxies form a second distinct phase of the inter-galactic medium (IGM), not mixed with the thermal gas. The separation of this phase from the ambient gas and its resistance against eroding turbulent forces is given by magnetic fields, which are expected to be roughly in pressure equilibrium with the surrounding medium. Since patches of this plasma are largely invisible in the radio we use the term `radio ghost' to characterize their nature. Possibilities and difficulties of different detection strategies of ghosts are discussed. These involve radio emission, cosmic microwave background (CMB) and starlight Comptonization, and Faraday rotation. Re-activation of the electron population in shock waves of cosmological structure formation, which seems to lead to the cluster radio relic phenomena. We discuss the role radio ghosts can have: They are able to store relativistic particles for cosmological times, but are also able to release them under the influence of very strong turbulence. This might happen during a major merger event of clusters of galaxies. The released relativistic proton population could produce the observed radio halos of some cluster of galaxies via hadronic reactions with the background gas leading to the production of secondary electrons and positrons. Destroyed ghosts, mixed with the IGM can help to magnetize it. Finally, the strong field strength within ghosts should have a significant impact on the propagation of extragalactic high energy cosmic rays.

  15. SPAN: Astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Green, James L.; Warren, Wayne H., Jr.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) is a multi-mission, correlative data comparison network which links science research and data analysis computers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. The purpose of this document is to provide Astronomy and Astrophysics scientists, currently reachable on SPAN, with basic information and contacts for access to correlative data bases, star catalogs, and other astrophysic facilities accessible over SPAN.

  16. Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devinney, E. J.; Prša, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Degeorge, M.

    2010-12-01

    From the perspective (and bias) as Eclipsing Binary researchers, we give a brief overview of the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, describe major application areas of AI in astronomy, and illustrate the power of an AI approach in an application developed under the EBAI (Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence) project, which employs Artificial Neural Network technology for estimating light curve solution parameters of eclipsing binary systems.

  17. Quia Astronomy Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Quia is short for Quintessential Instructional Archive. This site offers a collection of astronomy-based computer activities and quizzes developed by educators for students. Games include concentration (memory), word searches, matching, and flash cards. Topics covered include the nine planets, constellations, stellar evolution, moons, the Messier catalog, and general solar system and astronomical body facts. More tools are available with a subscription to Quia

  18. Interactive Astronomy Games

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cherilynn Morrow

    These two interactive astronomy games, 'Small and Large' and 'Near and Far', help to introduce important basic concepts about the size of the Universe. In 'Small and Large', students examine pictures of various astronomical objects and arrange them numerically by size. In 'Near and Far, they arrange pictures of objects by their distance from Earth. The games serve as motivators for further discussion and learning and may be used with large groups, a few students or with just one other person.

  19. Astronomy Education and Outreach

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Smith, Gene

    This site, created by Dr. Gene Smith of the University of California, San Diego, is very useful for a teacher. There are many tutorials, educational sites, curriculum resources and links to other courses. Topics on this page include: telescopes, nuclear energy, solar neutrinos, general relativity, galaxies, quasars, thermal radiation, atomic structure, black holes, dark matter and cosmology. This is a great resource for a general overview of many different topics in astronomy.

  20. The Interactive Astronomy Textbook

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher J. Fluke; David G. Barnes

    2008-01-01

    We introduce the use of in situ interactive three-dimensional (3-d) figures in digital astronomy textbooks as a means of enhancing student learning. The recent 3-d extensions to the Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF), combined with simple JavaScript, provide new ways to present intrinsically 3-d models, data sets, and instructional diagrams in digital publications. This is an enhancement to the usual

  1. Gamma ray astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Pohl

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes recents results in gamma-ray astronomy, most of which were derived with data from groundbased gamma-ray detectors. Many of the contributions presented at this conference involve multiwavelength studies which combine ground-based gamma-ray measurements with optical data or space-based X-ray and gamma-ray measurements. Besides measurements of the diffuse emission from the Galaxy, observations of blazars, gamma-ray bursts, and supernova

  2. Eric Weisstein's World of Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Weisstein, Eric W.

    This working project by Eric W. Weisstein of Wolfram Research, Inc., this site is a budding encyclopedia of astronomy, with entries submitted by experts in the field. The site is subdivided into seven different categories consisting of: atmospheres, calendars, galactic astronomy, observational astronomy, remote sensing, solar system and stars. Currently the page features 588 entires, 2,892 cross-references and 18 different figures and counting. The page also features links to additional resources in chemistry, mathematics and physics.

  3. ESO's Astronomy Education Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce-Price, D. P. I.; Boffin, H.; Madsen, C.

    2006-08-01

    ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, has operated a programme of astronomy education for some years, with a dedicated Educational Office established in 2001. We organise a range of activities, which we will highlight and discuss in this presentation. Many are run in collaboration with the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE), such as the "Catch a Star!" competition for schools, now in its fourth year. A new endeavour is the ALMA Interdisciplinary Teaching Project (ITP). In conjunction with the EAAE, we are creating a set of interdisciplinary teaching materials based around the Atacama Large Millimeter Array project. The unprecedented astronomical observations planned with ALMA, as well as the uniqueness of its site high in the Atacama Desert, offer excellent opportunities for interdisciplinary teaching that also encompass physics, engineering, earth sciences, life sciences, and culture. Another ongoing project in which ESO takes part is the "Science on Stage" European science education festival, organised by the EIROforum - the group of seven major European Intergovernmental Research Organisations, of which ESO is a member. This is part of the European Science Teaching Initiative, along with Science in School, a newly-launched European journal for science educators. Overviews of these projects will be given, including results and lessons learnt. We will also discuss possibilities for a future European Astronomy Day project, as a new initiative for European-wide public education.

  4. Astronomy Camp = IYA x 22: 22 Years of International Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; McCarthy, D. W.; Camp Staff, Astronomy

    2010-01-01

    Do you remember childhood dreams of being an astronomer, or the ravenous desire for ever larger glass and better equipment as an amateur astronomer? What if your child or the person down the street could live that dream for a weekend or a week? The University of Arizona Astronomy Camp continues to substantiate those dreams after more than two decades in existence. Astronomy Camp is an immersion hands-on field experience in astronomy, ranging from two to eight nights, occurring a few times per year. Participants span an age range from elementary students to octogenarians. The three basic offerings include adult camps, a beginning Camp for teenagers, and an advanced teen Camp. Several variants of the basic Camp model have evolved, including an ongoing decade long series of specialized Camps for Girl Scout leaders from across the country, funded by the NIRCam instrument development program for the James Webb Space Telescope. The advanced teen Camp is a microcosm of the entire research arc: the participants propose projects, spend the week collecting and analyzing data using research grade CCDs, infrared arrays, and radio/sub-millimeter telescopes, and finish with a presentation of the results. This past summer the Camps moved to Kitt Peak National Observatory for the first time, providing access to a vast and diverse collection of research instruments, including the 0.9-meter WIYN and 2.3-meter Bok telescopes, the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope, and the 12-meter ARO radio telescope. Education research into the Camp's impact indicates that reasons for its appeal to youth include a learner-centered and personal approach with a fun attitude toward learning, authentic scientific inquiry led by mentors who are real scientists, a peer group with common interests in science and engineering, and the emotional appeal of spending time on a dark "sky island" devoted to the exploration of nature.

  5. Quickly creating interactive astronomy illustrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    An innate advantage for astronomy teachers is having numerous breathtaking images of the cosmos available to capture students' curiosity, imagination, and wonder. Internet-based astronomy image libraries are numerous and easy to navigate. The Astronomy Picture of the Day, the Hubble Space Telescope image archive, and the NASA Planetary Photojournal are just a few of the many available.1-3 At the same time, computer video projectors and SMART Boards are becoming ever more commonplace in classrooms. Taken together, it has never been easier to bring astronomy directly into classrooms to actively engage students to improve student understanding and motivate student learning.

  6. Antenna array characterization via radio interferometry observation of astronomical sources

    E-print Network

    Colegate, T M; Hall, P J; Padhi, S K; Wayth, R B; de Vaate, J G Bij; Crosse, B; Emrich, D; Faulkner, A J; Hurley-Walker, N; Acedo, E de Lera; Juswardy, B; Razavi-Ghods, N; Tingay, S J; Williams, A

    2015-01-01

    We present an in-situ antenna characterization method and results for a "low-frequency" radio astronomy engineering prototype array, characterized over the 75-300 MHz frequency range. The presence of multiple cosmic radio sources, particularly the dominant Galactic noise, makes in-situ characterization at these frequencies challenging; however, it will be shown that high quality measurement is possible via radio interferometry techniques. This method is well-known in the radio astronomy community but seems less so in antenna measurement and wireless communications communities, although the measurement challenges involving multiple undesired sources in the antenna field-of-view bear some similarities. We discuss this approach and our results with the expectation that this principle may find greater application in related fields.

  7. Highlights of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hucht, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Preface Karel A. van der Hucht; Part I. Invited Discourses: Part II. Joint Discussions: 1. Particle acceleration - from Solar System to AGN Marian Karlicky and John C. Brown; 2. Pulsar emission and related phenomena Werner Becker, Janusz A. Gil and Bronislaw Rudak; 3. Solar activity regions and magnetic structure Debi Prasad Choudhary and Michal Sobotka; 4. The ultraviolet universe: Stars from birth to death Ana I. Gomez de Castro and Martin A. Barstow; 5. Calibrating the top of the stellar M-L relationship Claus Leitherer, Anthony F. J. Moat and Joachim Puls; 6. Neutron stars and black holes in star clusters Frederic A. Rasio; 7. The Universe at z > 6 Daniel Schaerer and Andrea Ferrara; 8. Solar and stellar activity cycles Klaus G. Strassmeier and Alexander Kosovichev; 9. Supernovae: One millennium after SN 1006 P. Frank Winkler, Wolfgang Hillebrandt and Brian P. Schmidt; 10. Progress in planetary exploration missions Guy J. Consolmagno; 11. Pre-solar grains as astrophysical tools Anja C. Andersen and John C. Lattanzio; 12. Long wavelength astrophysics T. Joseph W. Lazio and Namir E. Kassim; 13. Exploiting large surveys for galactic astronomy Christopher J. Corbally, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones, Sunetra Giridhar and Thomas H. Lloyd Evans; 14. Modeling dense stellar systems Alison I. Sills, Ladislav Subr and Simon F. Portegies Zwart; 15. New cosmology results from the Spitzer Space Telescope George Helou and David T. Frayer; 16. Nomenclature, precession and new models in fundamental astronomy Nicole Capitaine, Jan Vondrak & James L. Hilton; 17. Highlights of recent progress in seismology of the Sun and Sun-like stars John W. Leibacher and Michael J. Thompson; Part III. Special Sessions: SpS 1. Large astronomical facilities of the next decade Gerard F. Gilmore and Richard T. Schilizzi; SpS 2. Innovation in teaching and learning astronomy methods Rosa M. Ros and Jay M. Pasachoff; SpS 3. The Virtual Observatory in action: New science, new technology and next-generation facilities Nicholas A. Walton, Andrew Lawrence & Roy Williams; SpS 5. Astronomy for the developing world John B. Hearnshaw and Peter Martinez; SpS 6. Astronomical data management Raymond P. Norris; SpS 7. Astronomy in Antarctica Michael G. Burton; Author index.

  8. The Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite: instrument hardware.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, V.; Melnick, G. J.; Erickson, N.; Goldsmith, P.; Harwit, M.; Schieder, R.; Snell, R. L.; Stauffer, J. R.

    The Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) will study Galactic star formation and interstellar chemistry through a survey of dense molecular clouds in five astrophysically important transitions of H2O, H218O, O2, C I, and 13CO. To carry out this mission the SWAS instrument and spacecraft are designed to embody all the elements of a ground-based radio telescope. The "instrument" portion of the satellite is comprised of: (1) the antenna, (2) two heterodyne receivers, (3) an acousto-optical spectrometer, (4) the thermal control system, (5) the instrument control electronics, (6) the star tracker, and (7) the instrument structure. The "spacecraft" portion of the satellite is comprised of: (1) the attitude control system (ACS), (2) the solar arrays and power regulating hardware, (3) the onboard command, data, and ACS computer, (4) the solid-state memory for data recording, and (5) all data uplink and downlink receivers and transmitters. This contribution discusses the instrument hardware.

  9. Report Of The Cospar WG On "Future Of Space Astronomy"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubertini, Pietro; Space Astronomy*, Cospar WG on Future of

    2011-09-01

    The COSPAR President on April 20, 2010 appointed the "Future of Space Astronomy” Working Group under the aegis of Commission E, with the aim to analyze the difficult situation of space astronomy over the next two decades and recommend ways to improve the prospects. Having assessed the scientific needs and the current plans of the main space agencies worldwide, the WG has identified some major concerns about the lack of a secured future for Space Astronomy. In fact, astronomers today have access to an impressive set of space missions and ground-based observatories that gives them nearly continuous coverage of the electromagnetic spectrum from the gamma-ray to the radio regions. But the picture becomes concerning and critical in the next 10 - 15 years, when current space astronomy missions will have ended and new missions will be much less numerous. Astronomy is a difficult observational science requiring continuous and simultaneous access to the full electromagnetic spectrum to explore our complex Universe and to pursue answers to fundamental scientific questions. The history of space astronomy, especially the past three decades, has demonstrated clearly the importance and benefits of access to the gamma-ray, X-ray, UV-optical, near IR and far-IR spectrum from space. So far the only planned observatory class missions, proposed to NASA-ESA-JAXA are JWST (2018), WFIRST/EUCLID (2018-2020), Athena (ex IXO, 2022) and LISA. The latter two under re-scope in an ESA alone scenario with a cost <1B€. We will present the main WG outcome with a number of recommendations and, finally, suggest a road map for the next decades. *WG membership: Pietro Ubertini (Chair), Italy, Neil Gehrels (Co-Chair), USA, Ian Corbett (IAU liason), UK, Paolo De Bernardis, Italy, Marcos Machado, Argentina, Matt Griffin, UK, Michael Hauser, USA, Ravinder K. Manchanda, India, Nobuyuki Kawai, Japan, Shuang-Nan Zhang, China, Mikhail Pavlinsky, Russia

  10. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  11. Radio Traffic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Sarnoff

    1914-01-01

    The functions of the traffic department of a radio company, namely: procuring and moving traffic, procuring equipment contracts, and operating ship and shore stations economically and efficiently, are described. In connection with the work of the Marconi Company, the cooperation between the Western Union and Postal Telegraph Companies and the radio company is treated in detail. The complete routine procedure

  12. Impulsive radio discharges near Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. R.; Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Carr, T. D.; Schauble, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Nonthermal radio emissions from the Saturn system were first detected by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy (PRA) experiment on board Voyager 1 in January 1980. Since then emission between 100 kHz and 1 MHz from the planet, termed Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR), has been received almost continuously. A description is presented of eight characteristics which have been fairly well defined by the Voyager 1 encounter. These include a very flat broadband frequency spectrum, a period of approximately 10 h 10 min, a change in the envelope shape of episodes between pre and postencounter, an intensity population structure typical of plural populations, and an episodic structure of a width of approximately 180 deg. It was found that postencounter episodes continue for about three times as long as preencounter ones, and that postencounter bursts are left-circularly polarized at high frequencies. At least one episode shows the onset of high frequency events some time before that of lower frequency ones.

  13. Pulsar Astronomy ---2000 and Beyond ASP Conference Series, Vol. 3 \\Theta 10 8 , 1999

    E-print Network

    Lorimer, Dunc

    Pulsar Astronomy --- 2000 and Beyond ASP Conference Series, Vol. 3 \\Theta 10 8 , 1999 M. Kramer, N. Wex, and R. Wielebinski, eds. Puzzling Pulsars and Supernova Remnants D.R. Lorimer Arecibo Observatory, University of Amsterdam Abstract. The fact that the majority of the youngest radio pulsars are surrounded

  14. Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. SgrTimeVarv3resubmit c January 23, 2009

    E-print Network

    Falcke, Heino

    Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. SgrTimeVar­v3­resubmit c # ESO 2009 January 23, 2009 Jet­lag in the previously published pressure­driven jet model. The predicted lags are then compared to radio monitoring. A successful theory explaining the emission is based on a relativistic jet model scaled down from powerful

  15. Scientific results and prospects from the 8.2-m Subaru Telescope: extra galactic astronomy

    E-print Network

    Iye, Masanori

    Deep Field North. Keywords: cluster of galaxies, gravitational lens, radio galaxies, Subaru telescope 2Scientific results and prospects from the 8.2-m Subaru Telescope: extra galactic astronomy M. Iye Telescope had its astronomical first light at the Cassegrain focus in January 1999. Commissioning

  16. Voyager detection of nonthermal radio emission from Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    The planetary radio astronomy experiment on board the Voyager spacecraft has detected bursts of nonthermal radio noise from Saturn occurring near 200 kilohertz, with a peak flux density comparable to higher frequency Jovian emissions. The radiation is right-hand polarized and is most likely emitted in the extraordinary magnetoionic mode from Saturn's northern hemisphere. Modulation that is consistent with a planetary rotation period of 10 hours 39.9 minutes is apparent in the data.

  17. Design parameters and measured performance of the IRAM 30-m Millimeter Radio Telescope

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JACOB W. M. BAARS; ALBERT GREVE; HAUKE HEIN; DAVE MORRIS; JUAN PENALVER; CLEMENS THUM

    1994-01-01

    The “Millimeter Radio Telescope” (MRT) is operated by the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the millimeter range (IRAM) and is located at 2850-m altitude in the Sierra Nevada, near Granada, Spain. It is a reflector antenna of 30-m diameter with a surface accuracy of 0.08 mm and a pointing accuracy of better than 2 arcsec. The telescope is equipped with

  18. Using Multiple Beams to Distinguish Radio Frequency Interference from SETI Signals

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    for extra-terrestrial intelligence) observations. It is a multi-beam instrument, with 16 independently for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI).1,2 A key element of any RFI mitigation strategy is to discriminate RFI from Array is a multi-user instrument and will perform simultaneous radio astronomy and radio SETI (search

  19. Astronomy Matters for Chemistry Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes basic misconceptions about the origin of elements and forms of matter found in chemistry texts that need modification in light of modern observational data and interpretations given in astronomy. Notes that there are forms of matter other than elements and compounds. Confounding examples from astronomy include white dwarfs, neutron…

  20. Research Review NOVA and Astronomy

    E-print Network

    van Rooij, Robert

    Research Review NOVA and Astronomy 2010 October 2011 #12;2 QANU / Research Review NOVA NOVA and Astronomy 3 Contents: Update 5 1. The Review Committee and Review Procedures 7 2. Remarks concerning the overall NOVA research school 9 3. General Remarks on the level of the Institutes 15 4

  1. Science and Mathematics in Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolack, Edward

    2009-01-01

    A brief historical introduction to the development of observational astronomy will be presented. The close historical relationship between the successful application of mathematical concepts and advances in astronomy will be presented. A variety of simple physical demonstrations, hands-on group activities, and puzzles will be used to understand how the properties of light can be used to understand the contents of our universe.

  2. Reports of planetary astronomy, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A collection is presented of summaries designed to provide information about scientific research projects conducted in the Planetary Astronomy Program in 1990 and 1991, and to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned scientists and interested persons in universities, government, and industry. Highlights of recent accomplishments in planetary astronomy are included.

  3. Animations for Physics and Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Michael R. Gallis

    This collection of animations illustrates basic concepts in physics and astronomy. Topics include astronomy, mechanics, vectors, electricity and magnetism, waves, optics, and many others. The animations are organized by topic and may be downloaded or streamed from the website. The site also includes links to papers on the use of animations in physics education.

  4. UndergraduateStudies of Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Robeson, Scott M.

    The Astronomy Department at Indiana University maintains a full program of activities in research, teaching The program of study leading to the B.S. in Astronomy & Astrophysics has the following basic course). Physics Courses: P221, P222 (Physics I & II), P301 ( Physics III), P331-P332 ( Electricity and Magnetism I

  5. Prospects for gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission and the Gamma Ray Experiment aboard the SMM spacecraft are discussed. Mission plans for interplanetary probes are also discussed. The Gamma Ray observatory and its role in future gamma ray astronomy is highlighted. It is concluded that gamma ray astronomy will be of major importance in the development of astronomical models and in the development of comsological theory.

  6. Gamma ray astronomy in perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview of the development of gamma ray astronomy is presented. Gamma ray telescopes and other optical measuring instruments are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on findings that were unobtainable before gamma ray astronomy. Information on evolution of the solar system, the relationship of the solar system to the galaxy, and the composition of interstellar matter is discussed.

  7. Dyslexia and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneps, Matthew H.; Greenhill, L. J.; Rose, L. T.

    2007-12-01

    Dyslexia is a hereditary neurological disability that impairs reading. It is believed that anywhere from 5% to 20% of all people in the US may have dyslexia to a greater or lesser degree. Though dyslexia is common, it is a "silent disability" in the sense that it is not easy to tell which individuals suffer from dyslexia and which do not. There is a substantial body of evidence to suggest that people with dyslexia tend to do well in science. For example, Baruj Benacerraf, a Nobel laureate in medicine, is among those whose impairments have been documented and studied. Given that dyslexia was not diagnosed in schools prior to the late 1970's, many established science researchers may have dyslexia and be unaware of their impairment. Therefore, it would not be surprising to find that substantial numbers of scientists working in the fields of astronomy and astrophysics have dyslexia, and yet be unaware of the effects this disability has had on their research. A recently proposed theory by the authors suggests that there may be specific neurological reasons why those with dyslexia may be predisposed to science, and predicts that dyslexia may be associated with enhanced abilities for certain types of visual processing, with special implications for image processing. Our study, funded by the NSF, investigates this hypothesis in the context of astronomy and astrophysics. We expect this work will uncover and document challenges faced by scientists with dyslexia, but perhaps more importantly, lead to an understanding of the strengths these scientists bring to research. The program will serve as a clearing-house of information for scientists and students with dyslexia, and begin to provide mentoring for young people with dyslexia interested in astronomy. Scientists who have reason to believe they may have dyslexia are encouraged to contact the authors.

  8. Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekers, Ron; Wilson, Thomas L.

    ``Radio Telescopes" starts with a brief historical introduction from Jansky's1931 discovery of radio emission from the Milky Way through the development ofradio telescope dishes and arrays to aperture synthesis imaging. It includessufficient basics of electromagnetic radiation to provide some understanding of thedesign and operation of radio telescopes. The criteria such as frequencyrange, sensitivity, survey speed, angular resolution, and field of view thatdetermine the design of radio telescopes are introduced. Because it is soeasy to manipulate the electromagnetic waves at radio frequencies, radiotelescopes have evolved into many different forms, sometimes with "wire"structures tuned to specific wavelengths, which look very different from anykind of classical telescope. To assist astronomers more familiar with otherwavelength domains, the appendix A.1. includes a comparison of radioand optical terminology. Some of the different types of radio telescopesincluding the filled aperture dishes, electronically steered phased arrays, andaperture synthesis radio telescopes are discussed, and there is a sectioncomparing the differences between dishes and arrays. Some of the morerecent developments including hierarchical beam forming, phased arrayfeeds, mosaicing, rotation measure synthesis, digital receivers, and longbaseline interferometers are included. The problem of increasing radiofrequency interference is discussed, and some possible mitigation strategies areoutlined.

  9. Optics in astronomy. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, J. V.

    Ground-based optical astronomy is undergoing a renaissance inspired by recent technological advances. This book collects contributions from expert international designers and observers which show the fundamental role of innovative optical design in modern astrophysics and cosmological research. The papers are based on those presented at a conference held at the Royal Greenwich Observatory in celebration of the 80th birthday of C. G. Wynne. New and future telescopes, instruments, spectrographs and detector-systems are described in the context of the research problems at which they are targeted. This book is an essential reference for both state-of-the-art instrumentation and future design.

  10. School Workshops on Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenda-?akowicz, J.; ?akowicz, G.

    2015-03-01

    Do you want to know how to make students volunteer to stay all night long watching the stars with their telescopes freezing? Or how to inspire decent adults to prepare a `queue-list to Jupiter', wait for their turn for hours, and control that no one approaches the telescope bypassing the line? Or how to attract people of all age to forget their laziness and duties, and to get up at 3 a.m. to watch the transit of Venus? If your answer is `yes', then come and see what can be done at the School Workshops on Astronomy.

  11. Astronomy Mission Module

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a lesson about finding habitable planets. Learners will use an online, multimedia module to simulate the techniques that scientists might use to find a star system and planet that meet the astronomical conditions required for human habitability. Students then summarize their learning from this unit in a final project. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson 13 in the Astro-Venture Astronomy Unit. The lessons are designed for educators to use in conjunction with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

  12. Islamic Mathematical Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montelle, Clemency

    A short survey on Islamic mathematical astronomy practiced during the period running from the eight century until the fifteenth is presented. Various pertinent themes, such as the translation of foreign scientific works and their impact on the tradition; the introduction, assimilation, and critique of the Ptolemaic model; and the role of observations, will be covered. In addition, the z?j, the dominant format for astronomical works, will be briefly explained as well as the legacy of the Islamic tradition of astral sciences to other cultures.

  13. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.

    2006-08-01

    By using astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients, I have been able to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students. I will present some of the edible demonstrations I have created including using popcorn to simulate radioactivity; using chocolate, nuts, and marshmallows to illustrate density and differentiation during the formation of the planets; and making big-bang brownies or chocolate chip-cookies to illustrate the expansion of the Universe. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented.

  14. Software for Astronomy Students

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Love, Jamie

    This website contains links as well as self-extracting files to download various astronomical software to complement lessons about astronomy. Programs include eclipsing binary stars, Luna view, a solar system simulator, an H-R calculator to create types of stars, Starclock to show the evolution of star types, Mystars and Starcalc that both show views of the night sky, and Geoclock which provides a calculator for sunrise, sunset and more. Most of these programs are free and the rest are shareware. This site gives easy instructions on how to download the software to a PC (there are a few links for Macs), and a brief description of what the software does.

  15. Astronomy in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobouti, Y.

    2006-08-01

    Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan, Iran In spite of her renowned pivotal role in the advancement of astronomy on the world scale during 9th to 15th centuries, Iran's rekindled interest in modern astronomy is a recent happening. Serious attempts to introduce astronomy into university curricula and to develop it into a respectable and worthwhile field of research began in the mid 60's. The pioneer was Shiraz University. It should be credited for the first few dozens of astronomy- and astrophysics- related research papers in international journals, for training the first half a dozen of professional astronomers and for creating the Biruni Observatory. Here, I take this opportunity to acknowledge the valuable advice of Bob Koch and Ed Guinan, then of the University of Pennsylvania, in the course of the establishment of this observatory. At present the astronomical community of Iran consists of about 65 professionals, half university faculty members and half MS and PhD students. The yearly scientific contribution of its members has, in the past three years, averaged to about 15 papers in reputable international journals, and presently has a healthy growth rate. Among the existing observational facilities, Biruni Observatory with its 51 cm Cassegrain, CCD cameras, photometers and other smaller educational telescopes, is by far the most active place. Tusi Observatory of Tabriz University has 60 and 40 cm Cassegrains, and a small solar telescope. A number of smaller observing facilities exist in Meshed, Zanjan, Tehran, Babol and other places. The Astronomical Society of Iran (ASI), though some 30 years old, has expanded and institutionalized its activities since early 1990's. ASI sets up seasonal schools for novices, organizes annual colloquia and seminars for professionals and supports a huge body of amateur astronomers from among high school and university students. Over twenty of ASI members are also members of IAU and take active part in its events. In the past five years, astronomers of Iran have staged an intensive campaign to have a National Observatory of their Own (NOI). Initial planning is for one 2 m telescope and appropriate measuring devices. The project is approved and will be funded by the government in the course of five years. The site selection for NOI, however, is already in its third year and has been and is being generously funded by the government. Last, but not least, Nojum, the only astronomical monthly magazine of the Middle East, is presently in its fifteenth year. It has a good readership among both professionals and amateurs of Farsi speaking communities within the country and abroad. .

  16. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of recent papers in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. It is mentioned that the strongest feature of the gamma ray sky is the general radiation from the galactic plane which is superimposed on what appears to be a general diffuse radiation, whose properties are not yet defined. The observation of high-energy galactic gamma radiation by the SAS-2 satellite is considered as is the observation of point and localized sources (the Crab Nebula, Vela, etc.). The observation of diffusive gamma radiation is discussed.

  17. Gamma-ray astronomy

    E-print Network

    Martin Pohl

    2001-11-29

    This paper summarizes recents results in gamma-ray astronomy, most of which were derived with data from ground-based gamma-ray detectors. Many of the contributions presented at this conference involve multiwavelength studies which combine ground-based gamma-ray measurements with optical data or space-based X-ray and gamma-ray measurements. Besides measurements of the diffuse emission from the Galaxy, observations of blazars, gamma-ray bursts, and supernova remnants this paper also covers theoretical models for the acceleration of radiating particles and their emission mechanisms in these sources.

  18. Applied Astronomy: Asteroid Prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.

    2013-09-01

    In the age of asteroid mining the ability to find promising ore-bearing bodies will be valuable. This will give rise to a new discipline- "Applied Astronomy". Just as most geologists work in industry, not in academia, the same will be true of astronomers. Just how rare or common ore-rich asteroids are likely to be, and the skills needed to assay their value, are discussed here, with an emphasis on remote - telescopic - methods. Also considered are the resources needed to conduct extensive surveys of asteroids for prospecting purposes, and the cost and timescale involved. The longer-term need for applied astronomers is also covered.

  19. Astronomy in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, Beatriz; Maciel, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    A historical background combined with political decisions along time explain the increasing importance of Brazil in the world's astronomical scenario. Professional astronomy was triggered in the late sixties and early seventies by the two main historical institutions then existing (ON and IAG/USP), together with the creation of agencies for research and combined with individual actions. There are presently 670 astronomers working in the country, including permanent jobs and graduate students. A brief description of observational facilities and plans to increase access to other facilities is presented.

  20. The Optical/NearIR Colors of Broad Absorption Line Quasars, Including the Candidate RadioLoud BAL Quasar 1556+3517

    E-print Network

    Martini, Paul

    ., Tucson, Arizona 85721 Electronic Mail: pathall@as.arizona.edu Paul Martini 1 and D. L. DePoy 1 Astronomy to be preferentially radio­intermediate (Francis, Hooper, & Impey 1993) is due to extinction artificially lowering that no BALs are radio­loud quasars (RLQs), defined as having either an absolute radio power P ¸ ?10 32:5 ergs

  1. Applications for Fibre Optics In Radio Roshene McCool

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Applications for Fibre Optics In Radio Astronomy Roshene McCool , Dr. Ralph Spencer , Dr. Bryan, Jodrell Bank Observatory, Abstract This paper describes how fibre optic communications play an important and shipped from the observation site. Data transfer by fibre optics offers several advantages over existing

  2. Preliminary Report on Water Supply, Millimeter Array Project, National Radio

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    INVEREX Preliminary Report on Water Supply, Millimeter Array Project, National Radio Astronomy of water supply and (2) any obvious geological evidence regarding the quality of the basement which would 22­23,in which a geological observation and search for water supply were conducted. The regional

  3. Giant metrewave radio telescope (GMRT) - Scientific objectives and design aspects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Swarup

    1990-01-01

    A description is presented of the giant meterwave radio telescope (GMRT) being set up in India about 80 km north of Pune. The telescope will serve as a frontline research facility for astronomy and astrophysics. One of the important aims of the telescope is to search for the highly redshifted 21-cm line radiation from primordial neutral hydrogen clouds in order

  4. Promoting Mental Model Building in Astronomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ian; Barker, Miles; Jones, Alister

    2003-01-01

    While astronomy has recently re-emerged in many science curricula, there remain unresolved teaching and learning difficulties peculiar to astronomy education. This paper argues that mental model building, the core process in astronomy itself, should be reflected in astronomy education. Also, this crucial skill may promote a better understanding of…

  5. Introducing Astronomy Through Solar and Lunar Calendar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moedji Raharto

    2003-01-01

    Lack of competence teachers to educate basic science astronomy and space science in Indonesia implies that knowledge of astronomy and space science will be transmitted to the young generation improperly. Priority in curriculum of basic science include only small amount of general astronomy and public perception that astronomy is less importance than basic science both are disadvantage for developing astronomical

  6. Women in Italian astronomy

    E-print Network

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This document gives some quantitative facts about the role of women in Italian astronomy. More than 26% of Italian IAU members are women: this is the largest fraction among the world leading countries in astronomy. Most of this high fraction is due to their presence in INAF, where women make up 32% of the research staff (289 out of 908) and 40% of the technical/administrative staff (173 out of 433); the percentage is slightly lower among permanent research staff (180 out of 599, about 30%). The presence of women is lower in the Universities (27 out of 161, about 17%, among staff). In spite of these (mildly) positive facts, we notice that similarly to other countries (e.g. USA and Germany) career prospects for Italian astronomers are clearly worse for women than for men. Within INAF, the fraction of women is about 35-40% among non-permanent position, 36% for Investigators, 17% for Associato/Primo Ricercatore, and only 13% among Ordinario/Dirigente di Ricerca. The situation is even worse at University (only 6% ...

  7. Adaptive Optics in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddier, François

    2004-11-01

    Part I. Introductory Background: 1. Historical context F. Roddier; 2. Imaging through the atmosphere F. Roddier; Part II. The Design of an Adaptive Optics System: 3. Theoretical aspects F. Roddier; 4. Wave-front compensation devices M. Séchaud; 5. Wave-front sensors G. Rousset; 6. Control techniques P.-Y. Madec; 7. Performance estimation and system modeling M. Northcott; Part III. Adaptive Optics with Natural Guide Stars: 8. The COME-ON/ADONIS systems G. Rousset and J.-L. Beuzit; 9. The UH-CFHT systems F. Roddier and F. Rigaut; 10. Adaptive optics in solar astronomy J. Beckers; Part IV. Adaptive Optics with Laser Beacons: 11. Overview of adaptive optics with laser beacons D. Sandler; 12. The design of laser beacon AO systems D. Sandler; 13. Laser beacon adaptive optics systems D. Sandler; Part V. The Impact of Adaptive Optics in Astronomy: 14. Observing with adaptive optics P. Léna and O. Lai; 15. Astronomical results P. Léna and O. Lai; 16. Future expectations F. Roddier; Index.

  8. The Slacker Astronomy Podcast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A.; Gay, P.; Searle, T.

    2005-05-01

    The Slacker Astronomy podcast is a weekly audio show about astronomy. Available in MP3 format, it is syndicated using RSS and XML feeds that make downloading snap. Each show presents a recent astronomical news item in an entertaining, humorous, and easy-to-understand manner that informs yet respects the intelligence of the listener. First launched on 05 Feb 14, the show has grown to over 5,000 weekly subscribers as of 05 April 01 without any formal publicity. Response has been over overwhelmingly positive, with strong reviews coming from other popular podcasts and coverage on the front page of the MSNBC.com science section. Our only consistent negative feedback is that the show is too short and too infrequent. This demonstrates a strong need to add content. We believe podcasting provides a unique mechanism to extend astronomical outreach to the younger generations and to those who lead busy lifestyles. Our formula is proving successful and we are looking for ways to quantify our impact and measure our demographic so that we can serve them better.

  9. Astronomy books in Spanish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, Julieta

    Great cultures have created language. They have discovered its strength among other reasons for education. For a long time the Bible was one of the few books available in western culture, its influence is beyond any doubt. Many developing nations have no science books in their mother tongue. They might carry a few translations but these do not convey the local culture so it is harder for students to grasp the concepts and to build on what they know. Books, even if they are extremely simple, should be written in local languages because that will facilitate the conveying of knowledge and the creation of scientific culture. In the books examples that pertain to every day local life must be given, in particular examples that have to do with women. Women play a central role in developing nations by child bearing; if they become literate they will influence enormously the quality of their children's education, in particular their science comprehension. In Mexico a collection that includes astronomy books has recently been edited by the National Council for Culture and Arts. The books are small and light, which encourages middle-school students to carry them around and read them while traveling in public transportation, such as the subway. Every other page is a new subject, that carries illustrations, abstracts and conclusions. The astronomy books are on search for extraterrestrial life, the stars and the universe. These books are distributed nation-wide and are inexpensive. They have been written by Mexican astronomers.

  10. Astronomy LITE Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2006-12-01

    Project LITE (Light Inquiry Through Experiments) is a materials, software, and curriculum development project. It focuses on light, optics, color and visual perception. According to two recent surveys of college astronomy faculty members, these are among the topics most often included in the large introductory astronomy courses. The project has aimed largely at the design and implementation of hands-on experiences for students. However, it has also included the development of lecture demonstrations that employ novel light sources and materials. In this presentation, we will show some of our new lecture demonstrations concerning geometrical and physical optics, fluorescence, phosphorescence and polarization. We have developed over 200 Flash and Java applets that can be used either by teachers in lecture settings or by students at home. They are all posted on the web at http://lite.bu.edu. For either purpose they can be downloaded directly to the user's computer or run off line. In lecture demonstrations, some of these applets can be used to control the light emitted by video projectors to produce physical effects in materials (e.g. fluorescence). Other applets can be used, for example, to demonstrate that the human percept of color does not have a simple relationship with the physical frequency of the stimulating source of light. Project LITE is supported by Grant #DUE-0125992 from the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education.

  11. Making Astronomy Accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, Noreen A.

    2011-05-01

    A new semester begins, and your students enter the classroom for the first time. You notice a student sitting in a wheelchair or walking with assistance from a cane. Maybe you see a student with a guide dog or carrying a Braille computer. Another student gestures "hello” but then continues hand motions, and you realize the person is actually signing. You wonder why another student is using an electronic device to speak. Think this can't happen in your class? According to the U.S. Census, one out of every five Americans has a disability. And some disabilities, such as autism, dyslexia and arthritis, are considered "invisible” disabilities. This means you have a high probability that one of your students will have a disability. As an astronomy instructor, you have the opportunity to reach a wide variety of learners by using creative teaching strategies. I will share some suggestions on how to make astronomy and your part of the universe more accessible for everyone.

  12. Thread Safe Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Robert Seaman

    2008-02-02

    Observational astronomy is the beneficiary of an ancient chain of apprenticeship. Kepler's laws required Tycho's data. As the pace of discoveries has increased over the centuries, so has the cadence of tutelage (literally, "watching over"). Naked eye astronomy is thousands of years old, the telescope hundreds, digital imaging a few decades, but today's undergraduates will use instrumentation yet unbuilt - and thus, unfamiliar to their professors - to complete their doctoral dissertations. Not only has the quickening cadence of astronomical data-taking overrun the apprehension of the science within, but the contingent pace of experimental design threatens our capacity to learn new techniques and apply them productively. Virtual technologies are necessary to accelerate our human processes of perception and comprehension to keep up with astronomical instrumentation and pipelined dataflows. Necessary, but not sufficient. Computers can confuse us as efficiently as they illuminate. Rather, as with neural pathways evolved to meet competitive ecological challenges, astronomical software and data must become organized into ever more coherent "threads" of execution. These are the same threaded constructs as understood by computer science. No datum is an island.

  13. Challenges in Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Greve, Jean-Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Astronomy is an attractive subject for education. It deals with fascination of the unknown and the unreachable, yet is uses tools, concepts and insights from various fundamental sciences such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology. Because of this it can be well used for introducing sciences to young people and to raise their interest in further studies in that direction. It is also an interesting subject for teaching as its different aspects (observation techniques, theory, data sampling and analysis, modelling,?) offer various didactical approaches towards different levels of pupils, students and different backgrounds. And it gives great opportunities to teach and demonstrate the essence of scientific research, through tutorials and projects. In this paper we discuss some of the challenges education in general, and astronomy in particular, faces in the coming decades, given the major geophysical and technological changes that can be deducted from our present knowledge. This defines a general, but very important background in terms of educational needs at various levels, and in geographical distribution of future efforts of the astronomical community. Special emphasis will be given to creative approaches to teaching, to strategies that are successful (such as the use of tutorials with element from computer games), and to initiatives complementary to the regular educational system. The programs developed by the IAU will be briefly highlighted.

  14. The Astronomy Genealogy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    The Astronomy Genealogy Project, to be known as AstroGen, will list as many as possible of the world's astronomers with their academic parents (aka thesis advisors) and enable the reader to trace both academic ancestors and descendants. It will be very similar to the highly successful Mathematics Genealogy Project (MGP), available at http://genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu. The MGP, which has been in operation since 1996, now contains the names of about 170,000 "mathematicians." These include many physicists and astronomers, as well as practitioners of related sciences. Mitchel Keller, the director of the MGP, has generously shared the software used in that project, and the American Astronomical Society (AAS) will host AstroGen, a project of the Historical Astronomy Division, on its website. We expect to start seeking entries soon, depending on the availability of computational assistance from the AAS IT department. We are seeking volunteers to help run the project. If you are interested, please contact me at joe.tenn@sonoma.edu.

  15. Astronomy. Inspiration. Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, N.

    2008-10-01

    This paper speculates how poetry and other kind of arts are tightly related to astronomy. Hence the connection between art and natural sciences in general will be discussed in the frame of ongoing multidisciplinary project `Astronomy. Inspiration. Art' at Public Observatory in Belgrade (started in 2004). This project tends to inspire (better to say `infect') artist with a cosmic themes and fantastic sceneries of the Universe. At the very beginning of the project, Serbian poet and philosopher Laza Lazi? (who published 49 books of poetry, stories and novels), as well as writer Gordana Maleti? (with 25 published novels for children) were interested to work on The Inspiration by Astronomical Phenomena in Serbian Literature. Five young artists and scientists include their new ideas and new approach to multidisciplinary studies too (Srdjan Djuki?, Nenad Jeremi?, Olivera Obradovi?, Romana Vujasinovi?, Elena Dimoski). Two books that will be presented in details in the frame of this Project, "STARRY CITIES" (http://zavod.co.yu) and "ASTROLIES", don't offer only interesting illustrations, images from the latest astronomical observations and currently accepted cosmological theories -- those books induces, provoking curiosity in a specific and witty way, an adventure and challenge to explore and create.

  16. Thread safe astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, R.

    2008-03-01

    Observational astronomy is the beneficiary of an ancient chain of apprenticeship. Kepler's laws required Tycho's data. As the pace of discoveries has increased over the centuries, so has the cadence of tutelage (literally, "watching over"). Naked eye astronomy is thousands of years old, the telescope hundreds, digital imaging a few decades, but today's undergraduates will use instrumentation yet unbuilt - and thus, unfamiliar to their professors - to complete their doctoral dissertations. Not only has the quickening cadence of astronomical data-taking overrun the apprehension of the science within, but the contingent pace of experimental design threatens our capacity to learn new techniques and apply them productively. Virtual technologies are necessary to accelerate our human processes of perception and comprehension to keep up with astronomical instrumentation and pipelined dataflows. Necessary, but not sufficient. Computers can confuse us as efficiently as they illuminate. Rather, as with neural pathways evolved to meet competitive ecological challenges, astronomical software and data must become organized into ever more coherent `threads' of execution. These are the same threaded constructs as understood by computer science. No datum is an island.

  17. Astronomy in Antarctica

    E-print Network

    Burton, Michael G

    2010-01-01

    Antarctica provides a unique environment for astronomy. The cold, dry and stable air found above the high plateau, as well as the pure ice below, offers new opportunities across the photon & particle spectrum. The summits of the plateau provide the best seeing conditions, the darkest skies and the most transparent atmosphere of any earth-based observing site. Astronomical activities are now underway at four plateau sites: the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Concordia Station at Dome C, Kunlun Station at Dome A and Fuji Station at Dome F, in addition to long duration ballooning from the coastal station of McMurdo. Astronomy conducted includes optical, IR, THz & sub-mm, measurements of the CMBR, solar, as well as high energy astrophysics involving measurement of cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos. Antarctica is also the richest source of meteorites on our planet. An extensive range of site testing measurements have been made over the high plateau. We summarise the facets of Antarctica that are dri...

  18. CB Radios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Dick

    1977-01-01

    Citizen band radios keep trucking across the American scene, and no doubt your students are caught in the folk craze. Provides some suggestions for channeling students' interests with a unit on CBs. (Author/RK)

  19. Monitoring Radio Frequency Interference: The Quiet Skies Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, S.; Gear, C.; Maddalena, R. J.; Heatherly, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Quiet Skies Project is a result of the Research Experience for Teacher (RET) program during the summer of 2004. Teachers were involved in discovering the relationship between radio frequency interference (RFI) and radio astronomy observations. S. Rapp participated in astronomy observations with the Green Bank Telescope in order to characterize RFI issues at radio observatories and worked closely with the Green Bank Interference Protection Group. This work included such tasks as mitigation of locally-generated RFI from power poles and running radiation propagation studies for transmitters within the National Radio Quiet Zone. A curriculum was created to allow high school students to participate in a research effort to determine RFI levels in their communities. The aim of the project is to promote student awareness of radio astronomy and radio frequency interference through an inquiry-based science curriculum. It is hoped that the project will go national by 2007. A prototype RFI detector was created and tested at four wavelengths; 850, 900, 1425, and 1675 MHz. High school students used a beta version of the RFI detector to explore the occurrence of RFI at their schools and in their communities. The student goals of the Quiet Skies Project are to: Measure interference levels at their schools and in their communities; Reduce and transmit their data to an NRAO data base; Use online spectrum allocation data, and local information to determine possible causes of interference in their area; Analyze the complex trade-offs between radio astronomy's need for quiet skies, and other commercial, and non-commercial uses of the spectrum and share their insights with others. This work was funded by the NSF-RET program and a grant from the NASA-IDEAS program

  20. A subspace-tracking approach to interference nulling for phased array-based radio telescopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven W. Ellingson; Grant A. Hampson

    2002-01-01

    Several next-generation radio telescopes, now in the planning stages, are based on phased-array technology. One reason for this is to make use of adaptive nulling techniques to combat radio frequency interference, which is a growing problem for radio astronomy. This paper presents a low-complexity approach to interference nulling which is suitable for use in such systems. The approach uses subspace-tracking

  1. Handbook of Pulsar Astronomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Lorimer; M. Kramer

    2005-01-01

    Radio pulsars are rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars. This comprehensive book brings together key observational techniques, background information and a review of the latest results, including the recent discovery of a double pulsar system. Useful software tools are provided to analyze example data, made available on a related website. The work will be of great value to graduate students

  2. Spreading Astronomy Education Through Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baki, P.

    2006-08-01

    Although Astronomy has been an important vehicle for effectively passing a wide range of scientific knowledge, teaching the basic skills of scientific reasoning, and for communicating the excitement of science to the public, its inclusion in the teaching curricula of most institutions of higher learning in Africa is rare. This is partly due to the fact that astronomy appears to be only good at fascinating people but not providing paid jobs. It is also due to the lack of trained instructors, teaching materials, and a clear vision of the role of astronomy and basic space science within the broader context of education in the physical and applied sciences. In this paper we survey some of the problems bedeviling the spread of astronomy in Africa and discuss some interdisciplinary traditional weather indicators. These indicators have been used over the years to monitor the appearance of constellations. For example, orions are closely intertwined with cultures of some ethnic African societies and could be incorporated in the standard astronomy curriculum as away of making the subject more `home grown' and to be able to reach out to the wider populace in popularizing astronomy and basic sciences. We also discuss some of the other measures that ought to be taken to effectively create an enabling environment for sustainable teaching and spread of astronomy through Africa.

  3. Using Group Research to Stimulate Undergraduate Astronomy Major Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, A. M.; Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Turner, J. D.; Shirley, Y. L.; Walker-LaFollette, A. M.; Robertson, A. N.; Carleton, T. M.; Smart, B. M.; Towner, A. P. M.; Wallace, S. C.; Smith, C.-T. W.; Austin, C. L.; Small, L. C.; Daugherty, M. J.; Guvenen, B. C.; Crawford, B. E.; Schlingman, W. M.

    2013-04-01

    The University of Arizona Astronomy Club has been working on two large group research projects since 2009. One research project is a transiting extrasolar project that is fully student led and run. We observed the transiting extrasolar planets, TrES-3b and TrES-4b, with the 1.55 meter Kuiper Telescope using different filters to test a proposed method of detecting extrasolar planet magnetic fields. The second project is a radio astronomy survey utilizing the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 meter telescope on Kitt Peak to study molecular gas in cold star-like cores identified by the Planck all sky survey. This project provides a unique opportunity for a large group of students to get hands-on experience observing with a world-class radio observatory. These projects involve students in every single step of the process including: proposal writing to obtain telescope time on various Southern Arizona telescopes, observing at these telescopes, data reduction and analysis, managing large data sets, and presenting results at scientific meetings and in journal publications. The primary goal of these projects is to involve students in cutting-edge research early on in their undergraduate studies. These projects are designed to be continuous long term projects so that new students can easily join. New students learn from the more experienced students on the projects, creating a learner-centered environment. Independent study credit is now an option for some students working on these projects.

  4. Using Group Research Projects to Stimulate Undergraduate Astronomy Major Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Allison M.; Hardegree-Ullman, K. K.; Turner, J. D.; Shirley, Y. L.; Walker-LaFollette, A. M.; Robertson, A. N.; Carleton, T. M.; Smart, B. M.; Towner, A. P. M.; Wallace, S. C.; Smith, C. W.; Small, L. C.; Daugherty, M. J.; Guvenen, B. C.; Crawford, B. E.; Austin, C. L.; Schlingman, W. M.

    2012-05-01

    The University of Arizona Astronomy Club has been working on two large group research projects since 2009. One research project is a transiting extrasolar planet project that is fully student led and run. We observed the transiting exoplanets, TrES-3b and TrES-4b, with the 1.55 meter Kupier Telescope in near-UV and optical filters in order to detect any asymmetries between filters. The second project is a radio astronomy survey utilizing the Arizona Radio Observatory 12m telescope on Kitt Peak to study molecular gas in cold cores identified by the Planck all sky survey. This project provides a unique opportunity for a large group of students to get hands-on experience observing with a world-class radio observatory. These projects involve students in every single step of the process including: proposal writing to obtain telescope time on various Southern Arizona telescopes, observing at these telescopes, data reduction and analysis, managing large data sets, and presenting results at scientific meetings and in journal publications. The primary goal of these projects is to involve students in cutting-edge research early on in their undergraduate studies. The projects are designed to be continuous long term projects so that new students can easily join. As of January 2012 the extrasolar planet project became an official independent study class. New students learn from the more experienced students on the projects creating a learner-centered environment.

  5. Le Point sur... Astronomie III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecker, J.-C.

    Ce fascicule contient l'ensemble des textes du débat sur la cosmologie du big-bang entre Joseph Silk, Jayant V. Narlikar, arbitrés par Jean-Claude Pecker. Il regroupe également des articles de mise au point sollicités par le rédacteur en chef de la rubrique Astronomie des Comptes rendus de l'Académie des sciences. Les textes se proposent de faire découvrir aux lecteurs, dans les principales disciplines de l'astronomie, les résultats les plus remarquables des dernières années. Ces mises au point sur des questions particulièrement importantes de l'astronomie sont rédigées soit en francais, soit en anglais et accompagnèes d'une bibliographie dètaillèe.

  6. Chinese Calendar and Mathematical Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    The Chinese calendar (li ?) was a system of mathematical astronomy that included mathematical techniques for the computation of celestial movements. It was the basis for producing astronomical ephemerides and annual almanacs. Calendar making started early in China. Since the Great Inception calendar reform in 104 BC, China has produced about 100 calendars (astronomical systems). The focus of calendar making was the prediction of solar, lunar, and planetary motions. As astronomy developed, new observational discoveries were incorporated into the calendar to make the system more precise. The history of astronomy in ancient China was largely a history of calendar making.

  7. Astronomy and Culture in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urama, J. O.

    Astronomy cannot be said to be entirely new in Nigeria. There are hundreds of cosmogony and ancient astronomical practices in Nigeria, but these need to be studied systematically. Nigerian ethnoastronomy is revealed in the folklore, ancient architecture, religious practices, traditional poetry and art works of the different ethnic groups. Though expressed within a cultural framework, much of Nigerian ethnoastronomy contains scientific principles of astronomy. This paper discusses the need to bridge the gap between ethnoastronomy in Nigeria and modern astronomy by providing scientific interpretation to such cosmogonies and ancient astronomical practices.

  8. Introducing Astronomy Related Research into Non-Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Douglas

    The concern over the insufficient number of students choosing to enter the science and engineering fields has been discussed and documented for years. While historically addressed at the national level, many states are now recognizing that the lack of a highly-skilled technical workforce within their states' borders has a significant effect on their economic health. Astronomy, as a science field, is no exception. Articles appear periodically in the most popular astronomy magazines asking the question, "Where are the young astronomers?" Astronomy courses at the community college level are normally restricted to introductory astronomy I and II level classes that introduce the student to the basics of the night sky and astronomy. The vast majority of these courses is geared toward the non-science major and is considered by many students to be easy and watered down courses in comparison to typical physics and related science courses. A majority of students who enroll in these classes are not considering majors in science or astronomy since they believe that science is "boring and won't produce any type of career for them." Is there any way to attract students? This paper discusses an approach being undertaken at the Estrella Mountain Community College to introduce students in selected mathematics courses to aspects of astronomy related research to demonstrate that science is anything but boring. Basic statistical techniques and understanding of geometry are applied to a large virgin data set containing the magnitudes and phase characteristics of sets of variable stars. The students' work consisted of developing and presenting a project that explored analyzing selected aspects of the variable star data set. The description of the data set, the approach the students took for research projects, and results from a survey conducted at semester's end to determine if student's interest and appreciation of astronomy was affected are presented. Using the data set provided, the students were provided the opportunity for original research and discoveries.

  9. On the proposed triggering of Jovian radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Calvert (1985) has proposed that a solar type III radio bursts can trigger the onset of certain Jovian hectometer wavelength emissions. It is shown, using the data obtained by the Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment, that this triggering hypothesis is not supported statistically. Furthermore, the causality of this proposed triggering is questioned because much of the Jovian hectometer emission is due to a quasi-continuous radio source rotating, in lighthouse fashion, with Jupiter. Thus, an observed 'onset' of emission is simply a function of the observer's position in local time around Jupiter.

  10. Infrared astronomy after IRAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Thompson, R. I.; Werner, M. W.; Witteborn, F. C.; Becklin, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    The development of infrared astronomy in the wake of IRAS is discussed. Attention is given to an overview of next generation infrared telescope technology, with emphasis on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) which has been built to replace IRAS in the 1990s. Among the instruments to be included on SIRTF are: a wide-field high-resolution camera covering the infrared range 3-30 microns with large arrays of detectors; an imaging photometer operating in the range 3-700 microns; and a spectrograph covering the range 2.5-200 microns with resolutions of 2 and 0.1 percent. Observational missions for the SIRTF are proposed in connection with: planetary formation; star formation; cosmic energy sources; active galactic nuclei; and quasars.

  11. AstronomyDaily.Com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Astronomy Daily.Com offers real time astronomical data tailored to the viewer's location and time zone. The personalized front page presents a chart of tonight's sky. Diagrams allow users to view the planets in their orbits. Educators and students can find images of today's moon and its phase on the calendar, plus data dealing with its current position and its physical and orbital characteristics. Phil Harrington, a supervisor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, provides two monthly articles; the first assesses a phenomenon in the sky that can be observed with binoculars and the second discusses a phenomenon in the Deep Sky. Viewers can also participate in many discussion forums with other interested astronomers. Although users are required to register in order to view the customized site, no personal identification is requested. This site is also reviewed in the October 3, 2003 NSDL Physical Sciences Report.

  12. Astronomy and political theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campion, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    This paper will argue that astronomical models have long been applied to political theory, from the use of the Sun as a symbol of the emperor in Rome to the application of Copernican theory to the needs of absolute monarchy. We will begin with consideration of astral divination (the use of astronomy to ascertain divine intentions) in the ancient Near East. Particular attention will be paid to the use of Newton's discovery that the universe operates according to a single set of laws in order to support concepts of political quality and eighteenth century Natural Rights theory. We will conclude with consideration of arguments that the discovery of the expanding, multi-galaxy universe, stimulated political uncertainty in the 1930s, and that photographs of the Earth from Apollo spacecraft encouraged concepts of the `global village'.

  13. Williams College Astronomy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Williams College Astronomy website promotes its educational and research activities dealing with many aspects of coronal heating, planetary nebulae, solar eclipses, relativistic astrophysics, and related astronomical topics. The website features the latest astronomical news stories and a bulletin of the latest activities of the group. By visiting the People link, researchers can discover the many research activities and published papers on subjects including studying the sun at total solar eclipses and detecting diatomic carbon molecule (C2) in interstellar space. Students and educators can find numerous images of planetary nebulae observed at Kitt Peak National Observatory and Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory as well as a short introduction to planetary nebulae and two exercises to explore the image database. The website offers a great tutorial and history of solar eclipses. Visitors can learn about the history of the Hopkins Observatory, the oldest observatory in the United States.

  14. The Interactive Astronomy Textbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluke, Christopher J.; Barnes, David G.

    We introduce the use of in situ interactive three-dimensional (3-d) figures in digital astronomy textbooks as a means of enhancing student learning. The recent 3-d extensions to the Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF), combined with simple JavaScript, provide new ways to present intrinsically 3-d models, data sets, and instructional diagrams in digital publications. This is an enhancement to the usual method of presenting static, two-dimensional views, or "comic strip" sequences, to indicate changes in viewpoint. Interactive figures provide opportunities for students to undertake active learning while reading a textbook: they are able to explore and uncover the connections between viewpoint, orientation, and the 3-d nature of models and data sets for themselves.

  15. Ancient Hawaiian Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    The Hawaiian Islands provide a cultural setting where the prominent place of astronomy within religious, navigational, and calendrical traditions is evident from a rich ethnohistoric record. The many hundreds of temple platforms and enclosures (heiau) whose remains survive across the archipelago have provided a natural focus for archaeoastronomers not only to examine orientations and structural alignments but to explore a range of issues relating to field method and practice in a context where spatially patterned archaeological data and ethnohistorical evidence exist in relatively fine balance. As archaeoastronomy has developed within the islands, it has become better integrated into archaeological investigations tackling questions of broader anthropological significance, one of the most fascinating being when, how, and why Polynesian chiefdoms became transformed into archaic states, something that happened here but nowhere else in Polynesia.

  16. Color in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    2002-05-01

    The vocabulary of astronomy is riddled with color terms. Stars are referred to as red or blue - even brown -- though rarely green. Astronomers say light from a star can be "blueshifted" or that it can be "reddened". Color, however, is not a simple one-dimensional physical parameter equal to wavelength or frequency. It is a complex, psychophysical phenomenon involving at least three degrees of freedom - hue, saturation and brightness -- as well as observational context. Nonetheless, many astronomers treat hue alone or hue plus saturation as the same thing as color. A recent report on "the color of the universe" is a case in point (Baldry and Glazebrook, Bull. Am. As. Soc., 34, No. 1, 571, 2002). Even discounting the authors' initial and (possibly) subsequent errors in arriving at a "color" associated with the composite spectrum derived from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (first reported as "pale turquoise", then "beige"), the method of viewing the light was left vague, and context is important. For example, consider the question "What color is the Moon?" When viewed from Earth, the Moon appears white against the black sky. Place a piece of "average" lunar material in a lighted room, and it will appear dark gray. To most human observers, the 2000 or so naked eye stars observable from the northern hemisphere all appear white, with the few exceptions which look reddish/orange such as Betelgeuse, Arcturus, Aldeberan, Antares and Pollux. Yet the dimmer double star companion to Alberio can appear bluish when viewed beside its much brighter yellowish/orange neighbor if both are viewed by eye through a small aperture, slightly defocused telescope. This presentation will explore several visual phenomena that can help clarify the concept of color in astronomy. Supported in part by NSF grant # DUE-9950551 for "Project LITE: Light Inquiry Through Experiments".

  17. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  18. The Astronomy Olympiad italian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrelli, S.; Giacomini, L.

    2011-10-01

    The International Astronomy Olympiad (IAO) is an internationally annual astronomy scientific-educating event, born in 1996, which includes an intellectual competition between students aged between 14 and 17. In Italy, the Olympiad is coorganized since 2007 by INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) and SAiT (Società Astronomica Italiana) becoming every year a more visible and global event in the italian scenario (in 2011, INAF institutes participating to the local activities were 13). Unluckily, the Italian Committee of the Olympiads cannot involve directly nor rely on schools, since astronomy is no longer part of the scholastic programs. For this reason, the Committee needed to develop in the last years a non traditional mediatic approach that allowed in 2011 to reach a participation of more than 500 teenagers to the Olympics. We will give an overview of the Astronomy Olympics project in Italy and of this non conventional mediatic approach.

  19. Communicating Astronomy Beyond IYA2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienberg, Richard Tresch

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009, celebrating the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first look at the night sky through a telescope, was arguably the most successful public-outreach event in the history of science. Thousands of professional and amateur astronomers, public-information officers, writers, publishers, teachers, and informal educators from 148 countries worked tirelessly to share the wonders of astronomy with millions of people, from rural schoolchildren to the President of the United States. How to build on IYA2009 was the theme of "Communicating Astronomy with the Public 2010," a conference held in Cape Town, South Africa, in March 2010. I report some of the highlights from CAP2010 and consider the extent to which the IYA2009 helped us address global challenges in astronomy communication.

  20. Demographics in Astronomy and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvestad, James S.

    2011-05-01

    Astronomy has been undergoing a significant demographic shift over the last several decades, as shown by data presented in the 2000 National Research Council (NRC) report "Federal Funding of Astronomical Research," and the 2010 NRC report, "New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics." For example, the number of advertised postdoctoral positions in astronomy has increased much more rapldly than the number of faculty positions, contributing to a holding pattern of early-career astronomers in multiple postdoctoral positions. This talk will summarize some of the current demographic trends in astronomy, including information about gender and ethnic diversity, and describe some of the possible implications for the future. I thank the members of the Astro2010 Demographics Study Group, as well as numerous white-paper contributors to Astro2010, for providing data and analyses.