Science.gov

Sample records for radio channel measurements

  1. Microwave line-of-sight channel measurements, channel modelling, and application of channel models to digital radio performance prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeggman, Sven-Gustav

    1991-07-01

    Time and frequency domain measurements with pulse and sweep techniques, derivation of channel models from the results, and application of the model to performance prediction are studied. The measuring systems and the methods leading to channel models are reviewed. Statistical models are obtained only from the frequency domain results. Single and two channel models for signal level equivalent three path models are derived. The latter single and two channel models are also available as parameter time history. Three performance prediction approaches are tried. The first approach is based on Rummler's channel model and on signature sets for various interference conditions. The second approach is based on the derived channel models. Several methods are used, also a new method where time is divided into mutually exclusive flat and dispersive fade time. The total outage can be summed, but normally flat fading outage can be neglected. The third approach is based on the time history model. Outage state is determined from signature sets, and cumulative outage is obtained from the stored time information. The method can be extended to calculation of the performance measures defined by CCIR.

  2. Car-to-car radio channel measurements at 5 GHz: Pathloss, power-delay profile, and delay-Doppler

    E-print Network

    Zemen, Thomas

    Car-to-car radio channel measurements at 5 GHz: Pathloss, power-delay profile, and delay Contact: apaier@nt.tuwien.ac.at Abstract-- We carried out a car­to­infrastructure (C2I) and car­to­car (C2­Doppler spectra in a C2C highway scenario, where both cars were traveling in opposite directions. A pathloss

  3. Radio Channel Simulator (RCSM)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-31

    This is a simulation package for making site specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power at discrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. It is intended for use with wireless network simulation packages and to support wireless network deployments.

  4. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.757 Section 22.757...Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed...

  5. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.757 Section 22.757...Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed...

  6. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.757 Section 22.757...Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed...

  7. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.757 Section 22...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE...Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed...

  8. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.757 Section 22...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE...Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed...

  9. In-Tunnel Vehicular Radio Channel Characterization Laura Bernado1, Anna Roma1, Alexander Paier2, Thomas Zemen1, Nicolai Czink1, Johan Karedal3,

    E-print Network

    Zemen, Thomas

    In-Tunnel Vehicular Radio Channel Characterization Laura Bernad´o1, Anna Roma1, Alexander Paier2. In this paper we evaluate vehicle-to-vehicle in-tunnel radio channel measurements. We estimate the time. By looking at the maximum values of rms spreads we conclude that when transmitting through a channel under in-tunnel

  10. Development of a fast sampling system for estimation of impulse responses of mobile radio channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melancon, Pierre

    1994-07-01

    This paper describes the features of measurement equipment developed to measure impulse response estimates of mobile radio channels in less than a ms per measurement. The development of such equipment was required to measure mobile radio channels in realistic operating scenarios, in a normal sized vehicle moving at typical speeds in different environments. Up to speeds of 70 km/hr, the measurement period is short enough to assume the equipment is measuring the same channel during the whole sampling interval. AT the transmitter end of the measurement system, a wideband signal (10 MHz) is produced by modulating a carrier frequency with a 511 bit pseudo random sequence at 5 Mb/s and transmitted through the radio channel. The received signal is down-converted to 70 MHz and demodulated by a complex demodulator. The quadrature baseband signals at the demodulator outputs are then filtered and sampled at high speed by two fast digitizers. During this process, the data are stored in large memory banks to allow a fast sampling rate during a long period of time. Data are transferred to laser disks for further processing in the laboratory. Impulse response of radio channels are estimated by performing a software correlation between a measurement system back to back reference and real time measurements. A minivan was modified to hold the receiver, digitizers, memory banks and the computer. A shaft encoder was attached to its rear left wheel to trigger measurements while moving. Features of the system are discussed along with the effects of data block length, signal to noise ratio, sampling rate, memory size and phase stability on the design of the measurement equipment. Finally, some measurement results are presented and discussed.

  11. A Framework for Maximum Capacity in Multi-channel Multi-radio Wireless Networks

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xin

    and complexity. Most work in the literature consider the performance of multi-channel multi- radio wirelessA Framework for Maximum Capacity in Multi-channel Multi-radio Wireless Networks (Invited Paper) Wei Abstract-- Wireless networks with multi-channel multi-radio availability are attracting more and more

  12. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Channels for basic exchange telephone radio... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed in § 22.725...

  13. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Channels for basic exchange telephone radio... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed in § 22.725...

  14. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Channels for basic exchange telephone radio... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed in § 22.725...

  15. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Channels for basic exchange telephone radio... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Rural Radiotelephone Service Basic Exchange Telephone Radio Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed in § 22.725...

  16. Demand based State Aware Channel Reconfiguration Algorithm for Multi-Channel Multi-Radio Wireless Mesh Networks 

    E-print Network

    Balachandran, Athula; Franklin, A A; Siva Ram Murthy, C.; Marina, Mahesh

    Efficient utilization of Multi Channel - Multi Radio (MC-MR) Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) can be achieved only by intelligent Channel Assignment (CA) and Link Scheduling (LS). Due to the dynamic nature of traffic demand in WMNs, the CA has...

  17. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.725 Section 22.725...radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. The following channels are...transmitters in basic exchange telephone radio systems. These channels may be...

  18. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.725 Section 22.725...radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. The following channels are...transmitters in basic exchange telephone radio systems. These channels may be...

  19. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.725 Section 22.725...radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. The following channels are...transmitters in basic exchange telephone radio systems. These channels may be...

  20. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.725 Section 22.725...radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. The following channels are...transmitters in basic exchange telephone radio systems. These channels may be...

  1. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.725 Section 22.725...radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. The following channels are...transmitters in basic exchange telephone radio systems. These channels may be...

  2. Practical, Distributed Channel Assignment and Routing in Dual-radio Mesh Networks

    E-print Network

    Li, Jinyang

    ACM 978-1-60558-594-9/09/08 ...$10.00. channels. Another important advantage of multi-radio net- works there has been significant work on multi-radio mesh protocols [16, 20, 30, 32, 4, 29, 13], realizingPractical, Distributed Channel Assignment and Routing in Dual-radio Mesh Networks Aditya Dhananjay

  3. 47 CFR 22.757 - Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.757 Section 22.757 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON... Systems § 22.757 Channels for basic exchange telephone radio systems. The channels listed in § 22.725...

  4. Congestion Control and Channel Assignment in Multi-Radio Wireless Mesh Networks

    E-print Network

    Knightly, Edward W.

    more complex because it requires the radio channel assignments and the traffic allocations per channel in two subproblems: A congestion control subproblem for traffic allocation to a fixed channel assignment assignment, achieves the best distribution of traffic over the possible combinations of radios (i.e., logical

  5. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  6. Extragalactic dispersion measures of fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Han, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Fast radio bursts show large dispersion measures, much larger than the Galactic dispersion measure foreground. Therefore, they evidently have an extragalactic origin. We investigate possible contributions to the dispersion measure from host galaxies. We simulate the spatial distribution of fast radio bursts and calculate the dispersion measures along the sightlines from fast radio bursts to the edge of host galaxies by using the scaled NE2001 model for thermal electron density distributions. We find that contributions to the dispersion measure of fast radio bursts from the host galaxy follow a skew Gaussian distribution. The peak and the width at half maximum of the dispersion measure distribution increase with the inclination angle of a spiral galaxy, to large values when the inclination angle is over 70°. The largest dispersion measure produced by an edge-on spiral galaxy can reach a few thousand pc cm?3, while the dispersion measures from dwarf galaxies and elliptical galaxies have a maximum of only a few tens of pc cm?3. Notice, however, that additional dispersion measures of tens to hundreds of pc cm?3 can be produced by high density clumps in host galaxies. Simulations that include dispersion measure contributions from the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Andromeda Galaxy are shown as examples to demonstrate how to extract the dispersion measure from the intergalactic medium.

  7. Adaptation of the Electra Radio to Support Multiple Receive Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, Edgar H.; Shah, Biren N.; Bruvold, Kristoffer N.; Bell, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Proposed future Mars missions plan communication between multiple assets (rovers). This paper presents the results of a study carried out to assess the potential adaptation of the Electra radio to a multi-channel transceiver. The basic concept is a Frequency Division multiplexing (FDM) communications scheme wherein different receiver architectures are examined. Options considered include: (1) multiple IF slices, A/D and FPGAs each programmed with an Electra baseband modem; (2) common IF but multiple A/Ds and FPGAs and (3) common IF, single A/D and single or multiple FPGAs programmed to accommodate the FDM signals. These options represent the usual tradeoff between analog and digital complexity. Given the space application, a common IF is preferable; however, multiple users present dynamic range challenges (e.g., near-far constraints) that would favor multiple IF slices (Option 1). Vice versa, with a common IF and multiple A/Ds (Option 2), individual AGC control of the A/Ds would be an important consideration. Option 3 would require a common AGC control strategy and would entail multiple digital down conversion paths within the FPGA. In this paper, both FDM parameters as well as the different Electra design options will be examined. In particular, signal channel spacing as a function of user data rates and transmit powers will be evaluated. In addition, tradeoffs between the different Electra design options will be presented with the ultimate goal of defining an augmented Electra radio architecture for potential future missions.

  8. Radio occultation measurements of the lunar ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Maccaferri, G.; Cassaro, P.

    Radio occultation measurements by using interplanetary probes is a well known technique to obtain information on planetary atmospheres. To further understand the morphology of the lunar ionosphere we performed radio occultation experiments by using the radio sounding technique. This method mainly consists in the analisys of the effects produced on the radio wave transmitted from the spacecraft to the Earth when it crosses the atmosphere. The wave amplitude and phase undergo modifications that are correlated to the physical parameters - i.e. electron density - of the crossed medium. The first data set was obtained during the lunar occultations of the European probe SMART-1 shortly before impacting the lunar soil on September 3rd, 2006. During this experiment several radio occultation measurements of the signal transmitted by the spacecraft were performed in S and X band by using the 32 meters radiotelescopes (at Medicina and Noto) of the Istituto di Radioastronomia - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica. Further experiments were performed during lunar occultations of Saturn and Venus. On May 22nd and June 18th 2007 the Cassini spacecraft, orbiting Saturn, and the Venus Express spacecraft, orbiting Venus, respectively were occulted by the Moon. The variation of the Total Electron Content (TEC) measured by our instruments (˜ 1013 el/m2) on this occasion is in agreement with values of the electron number density acquired by in situ measuments of the US Apollo missions and the USSR Luna 19 and 22 probes.

  9. Association of type II soalr radio bursts with coronal structures above H-alpha filament channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, R. T.

    1984-09-01

    A study of type II solar radio bursts recorded at 160 MHz by the Culgoora radioheliograph during 1980 to 1982 shows that the radio emission occurs above H? filaments rather than above H? flares. This suggests that the type II radio emission most probably originates from within a coronal helmet streamer overlying the filament channel.

  10. Channel State Prediction in Cognitive Radio, Part I: Response Delays in Practical Hardware Platforms

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    . This work is a part of the effort toward building a cognitive radio network testbed. I. INTRODUCTION radio (SDR) can benefit CR work, and existing SDR development platforms can be extended for developingChannel State Prediction in Cognitive Radio, Part I: Response Delays in Practical Hardware

  11. Error analysis of bent ray radio occultation measurments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saintgermain, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    There are two types of experimental measurement errors of the Doppler data associated with the radio occultation, random and systematic. Random errors are due to thermal noise in the transmission channel, and the phase lock loop, and quantization error in the digital circuitry. These are called noise type errors. The systematic errors are due to geometric uncertainty and equipment phase instability. Considered is the amount of uncertainty, due to random measurement errors, in the refractivity profiles reconstructed by this type of indirect sensing experiment. A class of refractivity profiles is defined which approximately fit the set of measured data. Bounds are placed on the extent of this class of solution profiles. To accomplish this, the sensivity of the reconstructed refractivity profiles to errors in the measured quantity and the statistics of the errors in the measurement are examined.

  12. Direct Distance Measurements to Superluminal Radio Sources

    E-print Network

    D. C. Homan; J. F. C. Wardle

    2000-01-17

    We present a new technique for directly measuring the distances to superluminal radio sources. By comparing the observed proper motions of components in a parsec scale radio jet to their measured Doppler factors, we can deduce the distance to the radio source independent of the standard rungs in the cosmological distance ladder. This technique requires that the jet angle to the line of sight and the ratio of pattern to flow velocities are sufficiently constrained. We evaluate a number of possibilities for constraining these parameters and demonstrate the technique on a well defined component in the parsec scale jet of the quasar 3C279 (z = 0.536). We find an angular size distance to 3C279 of greater than 1.8 (+0.5,-0.3) n^{1/8} Gpc, where n is the ratio of the energy density in the magnetic field to the energy density in the radiating particles in that jet component. For an Einstein-de Sitter Universe, this measurement would constrain the Hubble constant to be H measurements on higher redshift sources may help discriminate between cosmological models.

  13. New approaches in cellular radio systems using dynamic radio channel management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Nusret; Ergul, F. R.

    2004-09-01

    New approaches are presented to facilitate dynamic radio bandwidth management for mobile communication systems. The aim is achieve an overall high level of QoS for both handoff calls and new calls. At the same time, the utilization of wireless network resources, i.e. the revenues earned by the operator. The simultaneous satisfaction of these two conflicting interests, under varying mobility and network traffic conditions, will be difficult. However, a balanced operation could be obtained by applying two novel approaches in system management. First, apriori information about possible handoffs, in the form of cell transition probabilities could be provided by the mobile, which is based on data collected by the mobile itself. This information is used to make handoff reservation requests in neighboring cells. Second, simultaneously controlling the radio resource reservation and new call admission to the system. This approach controls both the amount of reserved channels and the number of new calls admitted in a dynamic way. A theoretical analysis and a simulation have been used to study these approaches and it has been demonstrated that these approaches perform better then other reported approaches in the literature.

  14. Multiple-site investigation of the properties of an HF radio channel and the ionosphere using Digital Radio Mondiale broadcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynarczyk, Janusz; Koperski, Piotr; Kulak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM), one of the new digital radio broadcasting standards, has been designed to overcome typical short wave radio channel difficulties, such as the multipath propagation and fast temporal changes of the received signal level, both related to the properties of the ionosphere along the path of propagation. In particular, some of the RF carriers used in the applied COFDM transmission technique serve to estimate the current state of the radio channel to enable the proper demodulation of the received signal.We have been detecting such RF carriers on select frequency channels (standard DRM broadcast) using a network of recording stations located in different parts of Poland in order to collect data on the HF radio channel. We have been also evaluating the usefulness of this procedure in providing information on the current state of the ionosphere in the refraction region between the transmitter and receivers. When the DRM system becomes more widespread, this method can supplement data that comes from the ionosondes, since it does not require much financial resources and the receivers can be easily scattered over a large area. This paper presents a set of experimental data and its analysis.

  15. Radio Plasma Imager Simulations and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Benson, R. F.; Fung, S. F.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Boardsen, S. A.; Reinisch, B. W.; Haines, D. M.; Bibl, K.; Cheney, G.; Galkin, I. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) will be the first-of-its kind instrument designed to use radio wave sounding techniques to perform repetitive remote sensing measurements of electron number density (N(sub e)) structures and the dynamics of the magnetosphere and plasmasphere. RPI will fly on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission to be launched early in the year 2000. The design of the RPI is based on recent advances in radio transmitter and receiver design and modern digital processing techniques perfected for ground-based ionospheric sounding over the last two decades. Free-space electromagnetic waves transmitted by the RPI located in the low density magnetospheric cavity will be reflected at distant plasma cutoffs. The location and characteristics of the plasma at those remote reflection points can then be derived from measurements of the echo amplitude, phase, delay time, frequency, polarization, Doppler shift, and echo direction. The 500 m tip-to-tip X and Y (spin plane) antennas and 20 m boom Z axis antenna on RPI will be used to measures echoes coming from distances of several R(sub E).

  16. Design and Implementation of an Underlay Control Channel for Cognitive Radios

    SciTech Connect

    Daryl Wasden; Hussein Moradi; Behrouz Farhang-Boroujeny

    2012-11-01

    Implementation of any cognitive radio network requires an effective control channel that can operate under various modes of activity from the primary users. This paper reports the design and implementation of a filter bank multicarrier spread spectrum (FBMC-SS) system for use as the control channel in cognitive radio networks. The proposed design is based on a filtered multitone (FMT) implementation. Carrier and timing acquisition and tracking methods as well as a blind channel estimation method are developed for the proposed control channel. We also report an implementation of the proposed FBMC-SS system on a hardware platform; a FlexRIO FPGA module from National Instruments.

  17. 47 CFR 22.725 - Channels for conventional rural radiotelephone stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... stations and basic exchange telephone radio systems. 22.725 Section 22.725 Telecommunication FEDERAL... basic exchange telephone radio systems. The following channels are allocated for paired assignment to... telephone radio systems. These channels may be assigned for use by central office or rural...

  18. Multi-channel Jamming Attacks using Cognitive Radios Ashwin Sampath, Hui Dai, Haitao Zheng and Ben Y. Zhao

    E-print Network

    Almeroth, Kevin C.

    Multi-channel Jamming Attacks using Cognitive Radios Ashwin Sampath, Hui Dai, Haitao Zheng and Ben explore the feasibility and im- pact of cognitive radio based jamming attacks on 802.11 networks. We show that attackers can utilize cognitive radios' fast channel switching capability to amplify their jamming impact

  19. A review of radio channel models for body centric communications

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Simon L; D'Errico, Raffaele; Oestges, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The human body is an extremely challenging environment for the operation of wireless communications systems, not least because of the complex antenna-body electromagnetic interaction effects which can occur. This is further compounded by the impact of movement and the propagation characteristics of the local environment which all have an effect upon body centric communications channels. As the successful design of body area networks (BANs) and other types of body centric system is inextricably linked to a thorough understanding of these factors, the aim of this paper is to conduct a survey of the current state of the art in relation to propagation and channel models primarily for BANs but also considering other types of body centric communications. We initially discuss some of the standardization efforts performed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 802.15.6 task group before focusing on the two most popular types of technologies currently being considered for BANs, namely narrowband and Ultrawideband (UWB) communications. For narrowband communications the applicability of a generic path loss model is contended, before presenting some of the scenario specific models which have proven successful. The impacts of human body shadowing and small-scale fading are also presented alongside some of the most recent research into the Doppler and time dependencies of BANs. For UWB BAN communications, we again consider the path loss as well as empirical tap delay line models developed from a number of extensive channel measurement campaigns conducted by research institutions around the world. Ongoing efforts within collaborative projects such as Committee on Science and Technology Action IC1004 are also described. Finally, recent years have also seen significant developments in other areas of body centric communications such as off-body and body-to-body communications. We highlight some of the newest relevant research in these areas as well as discussing some of the advanced topics which are currently being addressed in the field of body centric communications. PMID:26430285

  20. RADIO MEASUREMENTS OF CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS Stephen M. White

    E-print Network

    White, Stephen

    1 RADIO MEASUREMENTS OF CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS Stephen M. White Dept. of Astronomy, Univ corona using radio observations is reviewed. This is a well established technique that exploits the fact that the electron gyrofrequency for typical coronal magnetic field strengths (100­2000 Gauss) lies in the radio

  1. Characterization of dual-polarization LTE radio over a free-space optical turbulence channel.

    PubMed

    Bohata, J; Zvanovec, S; Korinek, T; Mansour Abadi, M; Ghassemlooy, Z

    2015-08-10

    A dual polarization (DP) radio over a free-space optical (FSO) communication link using a long-term evolution (LTE) radio signal is proposed and analyzed under different turbulence channel conditions. Radio signal transmission over the DP FSO channel is experimentally verified by means of error vector magnitude (EVM) statistics. We demonstrate that such a system, employing a 64 quadrature amplitude modulation at the frequency bands of 800 MHz and 2.6 GHz, evinces reliability with <8% of EVM in a turbulent channel. Based on the results, we show that transmitting the LTE signal over the FSO channel is a potential solution for last-mile access or backbone networks, when using multiple-input multiple-output based DP signals. PMID:26368379

  2. Information capacities of quantum measurement channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holevo, A. S.

    2013-03-01

    We study the relation between the unassisted and entanglement-assisted classical capacities C and Cea of entanglement-breaking channels. We argue that the gain of entanglement assistance Cea/C > 1 generically for measurement channels with unsharp observables; in particular for the measurements with pure posterior states the information loss in the entanglement-assisted protocol is zero, resulting in an arbitrarily large gain for very noisy or weak signal channels. This is illustrated by examples of continuous observables corresponding to state tomography in finite dimensions and heterodyne measurement. In contrast, state preparations are characterized by the property of having no gain of entanglement assistance, Cea/C = 1.

  3. Simulator-probe for diagnostic testing of short-wave radio channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparyan, Y. M.; Movsesyan, R. M.; Oganesyan, M. G.; Poliyevskiy, G. A.; Shirinyan, P. A.

    1984-05-01

    Introduction of channel multiplexing equipment into short-wave radio channels requires prior diagnostic testing of these radio channels. A probe was developed predistorts the discrete signal in conformance with the characteristics of the channel multiplexing equipment. The simulator-probe generates equences of video pulses with + or - 20 V and + or - 9 V amplitudes respectively. This probe is capable of estimating the corrective capability of a tested radio channel with regenerator and channel inspection with a ring-type phase indicator. The probe includes a pulse generator and its output signals are transmitted to two channels. A wobbling device connected through a switch simulates swinging shift of the regenerated signal. Constant-bias and random-bias distortions are simulated by a rise-time and fall-time discriminator. A switch directs the output pulses of this discriminator to a random-bias module. Phase matching of the internal channel signal and the external predistorted signal is effected by means of a cycle phasing device. The ring-type indicator reads the phase after it is synchronized. The entire probe is built with a high degree of circuit integration using series K155 microchips. Experimental operation of its first prototype that it is a convenient and very reliable devices.

  4. Energy-Efficient Channel Handoff for Sensor Network-Assisted Cognitive Radio Network

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad; Sajjad Khan, Muhammad; Vu-Van, Hiep; Insoo, Koo

    2015-01-01

    The visiting and less-privileged status of the secondary users (SUs) in a cognitive radio network obligates them to release the occupied channel instantly when it is reclaimed by the primary user. The SU has a choice to make: either wait for the channel to become free, thus conserving energy at the expense of delayed transmission and delivery, or find and switch to a vacant channel, thereby avoiding delay in transmission at the expense of increased energy consumption. An energy-efficient decision that considers the tradeoff between energy consumption and continuous transmission needs to be taken as to whether to switch the channels. In this work, we consider a sensor network-assisted cognitive radio network and propose a backup channel, which is sensed by the SU in parallel with the operating channel that is being sensed by the sensor nodes. Imperfect channel sensing and residual energy of the SU are considered in order to develop an energy-efficient handoff strategy using the partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP), which considers beliefs about the operating and backup channels and the remaining energy of the SU in order to take an optimal channel handoff decision on the question “Should we switch the channel?” The objective is to dynamically decide in each time slot whether the SU should switch the channel or not in order to maximize throughput by utilizing energy efficiently. Extensive simulations were performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed channel handoff strategy, which was demonstrated in the form of throughput with respect to various parameters, i.e., detection probability, the channel idle probabilities of the operating and backup channels, and the maximum energy of the SU. PMID:26213936

  5. Energy-Efficient Channel Handoff for Sensor Network-Assisted Cognitive Radio Network.

    PubMed

    Usman, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Sajjad; Vu-Van, Hiep; Insoo, Koo

    2015-01-01

    The visiting and less-privileged status of the secondary users (SUs) in a cognitive radio network obligates them to release the occupied channel instantly when it is reclaimed by the primary user. The SU has a choice to make: either wait for the channel to become free, thus conserving energy at the expense of delayed transmission and delivery, or find and switch to a vacant channel, thereby avoiding delay in transmission at the expense of increased energy consumption. An energy-efficient decision that considers the tradeoff between energy consumption and continuous transmission needs to be taken as to whether to switch the channels. In this work, we consider a sensor network-assisted cognitive radio network and propose a backup channel, which is sensed by the SU in parallel with the operating channel that is being sensed by the sensor nodes. Imperfect channel sensing and residual energy of the SU are considered in order to develop an energy-efficient handoff strategy using the partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP), which considers beliefs about the operating and backup channels and the remaining energy of the SU in order to take an optimal channel handoff decision on the question "Should we switch the channel?" The objective is to dynamically decide in each time slot whether the SU should switch the channel or not in order to maximize throughput by utilizing energy efficiently. Extensive simulations were performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed channel handoff strategy, which was demonstrated in the form of throughput with respect to various parameters, i.e., detection probability, the channel idle probabilities of the operating and backup channels, and the maximum energy of the SU. PMID:26213936

  6. SINCGARS (Single-Channel Ground/Airborne Radio System) operator performance decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Richard L.; Buckalew, Louis W.

    1988-11-01

    The Single-Channel Ground/Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS) is scheduled to replace the Army's VRC-12 and PRC-77 radios. However, SINCGARS is more complex to operate and requires more training. This study examined the decay of operational skills and knowledge in two groups of recently trained operators who went without exposure to SINCGARS for several weeks. Performance levels were measured with the SINCGARS Learning-Retention Test (SLRT), a simulated hands-on performance test emphasizing skills and operational knowledge retention. The results provided tentative indications that operators may lose about 10 percent of their prior performance levels within the first few weeks. This figure is expected to vary considerably, depending on the type of soldier, the length of the nonexposure period, and other conditions. It was also found that performance level was correlated with soldiers' Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) General Technical (GT) scores. Correlations between GT and SLRT scores obtained at two different times were .43 and .50, respectively. However, no relation was observed between performance decay and GT. Further evaluation of operator performance decay needs to be done to determine the effect of longer periods of nonexposure (e.g., 60 and 90 days).

  7. Soft-decision feedback equalizer for continuous phase modulated signals in wideband mobile radio channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Joseph C. S.; Steele, Raymond

    1994-02-01

    A combination of a decision feedback equalizer (DFE) and a Viterbi processor for the equalization of continuous phase modulated (CPM) signals transmitted over wideband mobile radio channels is described. The equalizer structure allows soft-decision to be made and incorrect decisions to be changed in the feedback filter of the DFE.

  8. Antenna Devices and Measurement of Radio Emission

    E-print Network

    Erdmann, Martin

    Auger Observatory 43 5.1 GHz Radio Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 5.3.3 Data Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 5.3.4 Calibration and Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 5.3.5 Prospects for AERA

  9. AUTOMATIC RADIO TRACKING OF FISH IN EXPERIMENTAL CHANNELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automatic tracking system controlled by an RCA 1802 microprocessor was developed to locate fish in a 400 m outdoor experimental channel at the U.S. EPA Monticello Ecological Research Station. The monitoring network consisted of 12 horizontally polarized antennas spaced at 30 m...

  10. A Phase Measurement Radio Positioning System for Indoor Use

    E-print Network

    A Phase Measurement Radio Positioning System for Indoor Use by Matthew S. Reynolds Submitted Positioning System for Indoor Use by Matthew S. Reynolds Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering is designed to work indoors, where the microwave radio signals of the Global Positioning System (GPS) cannot

  11. Radiometer Calibration Using Colocated GPS Radio Occultation Measurements

    E-print Network

    Blackwell, William J.

    We present a new high-fidelity method of calibrating a cross-track scanning microwave radiometer using Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (GPSRO) measurements. The radiometer and GPSRO receiver periodically ...

  12. Optical radio-photonic channel for transmission of a coherent narrowband analog signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, D. I.; Denisyuk, I. Yu.; Fokina, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    The channel of an optical transmission line of coherent narrowband analog signal consisting of a continuous-wave laser, an electro-optic modulator, and a vector phase rotator based on electrically controlled fiber-optical 1 × 2 splitter and fixed delay lines is analyzed. The scheme is constructed from commercially available components used in digital optical communication systems. The applicability of components for analog and small-signal circuits is determined. Variation of radio signal phase in the range from 0° to 170° for radio signal frequencies between 1 and 2 GHz is demonstrated experimentally. It is shown that phase variation is a linear function of frequency in this range.

  13. Capacity of Cognitive Radio with Partial Channel Distribution Information in Rayleigh Fading Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Li, Q.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the capacity of the secondary user (SU) in a cognitive radio (CR) network in Rayleigh fading environments. Different from existing works where perfect channel state information (CSI) or channel distribution information (CDI) of the interference link from the SU to the primary user (PU) is assumed to be available, this paper assumes that only partial CDI is available. Specifically, we assume the distribution parameter is unknown and estimated from a set of channel gain samples. With such partial CDI, closed-form expressions for the ergodic and outage capacities of the SU are obtained under the transmit power and the interference outage constraints. It is shown that the capacity with partial CDI is not degraded compared to that with perfect CDI if the interference outage constraint is loose. It is also shown that the capacity can be significantly improved by increasing the number of channel gain samples.

  14. OFDR based distributed temperature sensor using the three-channel simultaneous radio-frequency lock-in technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke; Zhou, Xinlei; Peng, Wei; Yu, Qingxu

    2015-09-01

    Weak signal detection for single-mode fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS) is a key technology to achieve better performance. A hybrid technique combining the incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry (IOFDR) and the three-channel simultaneous radio-frequency (RF) lock-in amplifier (LIA) is presented to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the measured spontaneous Raman backscattered light. The field programmable gate array (FPGA) based RF-LIA is designed with a novel and simple structure. The measurement frequency range is achieved from 1 kHz to 100 MHz. Experimental results show that the backscattered light signal of picowatt level can be detected with high SNR. With a 2.5 km single-mode fiber, a 1064 nm laser source, and the measurement time of 500 s, this sensing system can reach a spatial resolution of 0.93 m and a temperature resolution of about 0.2°C.

  15. Stochastic Wireless Channel Modeling, Estimation and Identification from Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Djouadi, Seddik M; Li, Yanyan

    2008-07-01

    This paper is concerned with stochastic modeling of wireless fading channels, parameter estimation, and system identification from measurement data. Wireless channels are represented by stochastic state-space form, whose parameters and state variables are estimated using the expectation maximization algorithm and Kalman filtering, respectively. The latter are carried out solely from received signal measurements. These algorithms estimate the channel inphase and quadrature components and identify the channel parameters recursively. The proposed algorithm is tested using measurement data, and the results are presented.

  16. 802.11s based multi-radio multi-channel mesh networking for fractionated spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Tony; Thapa, Bishal; Taylor, Steve

    802.11s is a new IEEE standard for mesh networking. It defines the protocols needed to build mobile ad hoc networks that operate over 802.11a, b, g and n waveforms running on inexpensive, and high performance commercial WiFi stations. We have developed a new capability to add to the 802.11s that uses multiple directional radio links that can operate simultaneously within a single mesh node. This is the basis of our multi-channel multi-radio mesh network used in the DARPA F6 program called F6Net. We have developed an analysis and emulation facility that lets us model the F6Net and evaluate the performance in a real world experimentation setup. This paper presents an “ Over-the-Air” experimentation testbed that uses standard Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) 2.4GHz WiFi dongles in an indoor environment, and a shared-code simulation testbed that uses hardware simulated drivers within NS3's channel simulation facility to test 80211s network. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that provides a comprehensive evaluation platform with a full-fledged COTS hardware/software prototype to evaluate 802.11s network. Furthermore, we explain the design and development of multi-radio mesh extension for 802.11s that yields a robust and scalable mesh network suitable for clusters of LEO satellites.

  17. Measurement of stream channel habitat using sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flug, M.; Seitz, H.; Scott, J.

    1998-01-01

    An efficient and low cost technique using a sonar system was evaluated for describing channel geometry and quantifying inundated area in a large river. The boat-mounted portable sonar equipment was used to record water depths and river width measurements for direct storage on a laptop computer. The field data collected from repeated traverses at a cross-section were evaluated to determine the precision of the system and field technique. Results from validation at two different sites showed average sample standard deviations (S.D.s) of 0.12 m for these complete cross-sections, with coefficient of variations of 10%. Validation using only the mid-channel river cross-section data yields an average sample S.D. of 0.05 m, with a coefficient of variation below 5%, at a stable and gauged river site using only measurements of water depths greater than 0.6 m. Accuracy of the sonar system was evaluated by comparison to traditionally surveyed transect data from a regularly gauged site. We observed an average mean squared deviation of 46.0 cm2, considering only that portion of the cross-section inundated by more than 0.6 m of water. Our procedure proved to be a reliable, accurate, safe, quick, and economic method to record river depths, discharges, bed conditions, and substratum composition necessary for stream habitat studies. ?? 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Channel direction information probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Villardi, Gabriel Porto; Kojima, Fumihide; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the problem of channel direction information (CDI) probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system. The CDI of the channel from the secondary transmitter (ST) to primary receiver (PR) is elementary information in designing the beamforming at the ST for mitigating the interference to the PR. However, lacking the explicit cooperation between primary and secondary systems, the CDI has to be acquired by probing at the ST, which is challenging. To solve this, we consider the line of sight (LoS) channel between the ST and the PR, and propose one CDI probing scheme for the ST. Specifically, the ST sends two types of probing signals by beamforming towards an interested region where both the secondary receiver (SR) and the PR are located and then actively learns the hidden feedback information from the primary system to acquire the CDI. The proposed scheme has a closed-form solution, and avoids the iteration between the probing and acquisition, which is desirable for practical system. Moreover, we show that the proposed probing scheme can be extended for primary systems working under multi-access channel and broadcasting channel. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can improve the accuracy of the acquired CDI at the ST in cognitive ratio system remarkably.

  19. Application of the Hardman methodology to the Single Channel Ground-Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The HARDMAN methodology was applied to the various configurations of employment for an emerging Army multipurpose communications system. The methodology was used to analyze the manpower, personnel and training (MPT) requirements and associated costs, of the system concepts responsive to the Army's requirement for the Single Channel Ground-Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS). The scope of the application includes the analysis of two conceptual designs Cincinnati Electronics and ITT Aerospace/Optical Division for operating and maintenance support addressed through the general support maintenance echelon.

  20. Indoor radio measurement and planning for UMTS/HSDPA with antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eheduru, Marcellinus

    Over the last decade, mobile communication networks have evolved tremendously with a key focus on providing high speed data services in addition to voice. The third generation of mobile networks in the form of Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) is already offering revolutionary mobile broadband experience to its users by deploying High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) as its packet-data technology. With data speeds up to 14.4 Mbps and ubiquitous mobility, HSDPA is anticipated to become a preferred broadband access medium for end-users via mobile phones, laptops etc. While majority of these end-users are located indoors most of the time, approximately 70-80% of the HSDPA traffic is estimated to originate from inside buildings. Thus for network operators, indoor coverage has become a necessity for technical and business reasons. Macro-cellular (outdoor) to indoor coverage is a natural inexpensive way of providing network coverage inside the buildings. However, it does not guarantee sufficient link quality required for optimal HSDPA operation. On the contrary, deploying a dedicated indoor system may be far too expensive from an operator's point of view. In this thesis, the concept is laid for the understanding of indoor radio wave propagation in a campus building environment which could be used to plan and improve outdoor-to-indoor UMTS/HSDPA radio propagation performance. It will be shown that indoor range performance depends not only on the transmit power of an indoor antenna, but also on the product's response to multipath and obstructions in the environment along the radio propagation path. An extensive measurement campaign will be executed in different indoor environments analogous to easy, medium and hard radio conditions. The effects of walls, ceilings, doors and other obstacles on measurement results would be observed. Chapter one gives a brief introduction to the evolution of UMTS and HSDPA. It goes on to talk about radio wave propagation and some important properties of antennas which must be considered when choosing an antenna for indoor radio propagation. The challenges of in-building network coverage and also the objectives of this thesis are also mentioned in this chapter. The evolution and standardization, network architecture, radio features and most importantly, the radio resource management features of UMTS/HSDPA are given in chapter two. In this chapter, the reason why Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) was specified and selected for 3G (UMTS) systems would be seen. The architecture of the radio access network, interfaces with the radio access network between base stations and radio network controllers (RNC), and the interface between the radio access network and the core network are also described in this chapter. The main features of HSDPA are mentioned at the end of the chapter. In chapter three the principles of the WCDMA air interface, including spreading, Rake reception, signal fading, power control and handovers are introduced. The different types and characteristics of the propagation environments and how they influence radio wave propagation are mentioned. UMTS transport, logical and physical channels are also mentioned, highlighting their significance and relationship in and with the network. Radio network planning for UMTS is discussed in chapter four. The outdoor planning process which includes dimensioning, detailed planning, optimization and monitoring is outlined. Indoor radio planning with distributed antenna systems (DAS), which is the idea and motivation behind this thesis work, is also discussed. The various antennas considered and the antenna that was selected for this thesis experiment was discussed in chapter five. The antenna radiation pattern, directivity, gain and input impedance were the properties of the antenna that were taken into consideration. The importance of the choice of the antenna for any particular type of indoor environment is also mentioned. In chapter six, the design and fabrication of the monopole antennas used for the experimental m

  1. The Tunka Radio Extension (Tunka-Rex): Radio Measurements of Cosmic Rays in Siberia (PISA 2015)

    E-print Network

    Schröder, F G; Budnev, N M; Gress, O A; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Huege, T; Kazarina, Y; Kleifges, M; Konstantinov, E N; Korosteleva, E E; Kostunin, D; Krömer, O; Kuzmichev, L A; Lubsandorzhiev, N; Mirgazov, R R; Monkhoev, R; Pakhorukov, A; Pankov, L; Prosin, V V; Rubtsov, G I; Wischnewski, R; Zagorodnikov, A

    2015-01-01

    The Tunka observatory is located close to Lake Baikal in Siberia, Russia. Its main detector, Tunka-133, is an array of photomultipliers measuring Cherenkov light of air showers initiated by cosmic rays in the energy range of approximately $10^{16}-10^{18}\\,$eV. In the last years, several extensions have been built at the Tunka site, e.g., a scintillator array named Tunka-Grande, a sophisticated air-Cherenkov-detector prototype named HiSCORE, and the radio extension Tunka-Rex. Tunka-Rex started operation in October 2012 and currently features 44 antennas distributed over an area of about $3\\,$km$^2$, which measure the radio emission of the same air showers detected by Tunka-133 and Tunka-Grande. Tunka-Rex is a technological demonstrator that the radio technique can provide an economic extension of existing air-shower arrays. The main scientific goal is the cross-calibration with the air-Cherenkov measurements. By this cross-calibration, the precision for the reconstruction of the energy and mass of the primary...

  2. Rocket radio measurement of electron density in the nighttime ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Smith, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    One experimental technique based on the Faraday rotation effect of radio waves is presented for measuring electron density in the nighttime ionosphere at midlatitudes. High frequency linearly-polarized radio signals were transmitted to a linearly-polarized receiving system located in a spinning rocket moving through the ionosphere. Faraday rotation was observed in the reference plane of the rocket as a change in frequency of the detected receiver output. The frequency change was measured and the information was used to obtain electron density data. System performance was evaluated and some sources of error were identified. The data obtained was useful in calibrating a Langmuir probe experiment for electron density values of 100/cu cm and greater. Data from two rocket flights are presented to illustrate the experiment.

  3. Indoor radio channel modeling and mitigation of fading effects using linear and circular polarized antennas in combination for smart home system at 868 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, S.; Welpot, M.; Gaspard, I.

    2014-11-01

    The markets for smart home products and services are expected to grow over the next years, driven by the increasing demands of homeowners considering energy monitoring, management, environmental controls and security. Many of these new systems will be installed in existing homes and offices and therefore using radio based systems for cost reduction. A drawback of radio based systems in indoor environments are fading effects which lead to a high variance of the received signal strength and thereby to a difficult predictability of the encountered path loss of the various communication links. For that reason it is necessary to derive a statistical path loss model which can be used to plan a reliable and cost effective radio network. This paper presents the results of a measurement campaign, which was performed in six buildings to deduce realistic radio channel models for a high variety of indoor radio propagation scenarios in the short range devices (SRD) band at 868 MHz. Furthermore, a potential concept to reduce the variance of the received signal strength using a circular polarized (CP) patch antenna in combination with a linear polarized antenna in an one-to-one communication link is presented.

  4. Measuring Ion Channels on Solid Supported Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Patrick; Dueck, Benjamin; Mourot, Alexandre; Hatahet, Lina; Fendler, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Application of solid supported membranes (SSMs) for the functional investigation of ion channels is presented. SSM-based electrophysiology, which has been introduced previously for the investigation of active transport systems, is expanded for the analysis of ion channels. Membranes or liposomes containing ion channels are adsorbed to an SSM and a concentration gradient of a permeant ion is applied. Transient currents representing ion channel transport activity are recorded via capacitive coupling. We demonstrate the application of the technique to liposomes reconstituted with the peptide cation channel gramicidin, vesicles from native tissue containing the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and membranes from a recombinant cell line expressing the ionotropic P2X2 receptor. It is shown that stable ion gradients, both inside as well as outside directed, can be applied and currents are recorded with an excellent signal/noise ratio. For the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the P2X2 receptor excellent assay quality factors of Z? = 0.55 and Z? = 0.67, respectively, are obtained. This technique opens up new possibilities in cases where conventional electrophysiology fails like the functional characterization of ion channels from intracellular compartments. It also allows for robust fully automatic assays for drug screening. PMID:19580777

  5. Saras Measurement of the Radio Background At Long Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Nipanjana; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Sethi, Shiv; Udaya Shankar, N.; Raghunathan, A.

    2015-03-01

    SARAS is a correlation spectrometer connected to a frequency independent antenna that is purpose-designed for precision measurements of the radio background at long wavelengths. The design, calibration, and observing strategies admit solutions for the internal additive contributions to the radiometer response, and hence a separation of these contaminants from the antenna temperature. We present here a wideband measurement of the radio sky spectrum by SARAS that provides an accurate measurement of the absolute brightness and spectral index between 110 and 175 MHz. Accuracy in the measurement of absolute sky brightness is limited by systematic errors of magnitude 1.2%; errors in calibration and in the joint estimation of sky and system model parameters are relatively smaller. We use this wide-angle measurement of the sky brightness using the precision wide-band dipole antenna to provide an improved absolute calibration for the 150 MHz all-sky map of Landecker and Wielebinski: subtracting an offset of 21.4 K and scaling by a factor of 1.05 will reduce the overall offset error to 8 K (from 50 K) and scale error to 0.8% (from 5%). The SARAS measurement of the temperature spectral index is in the range ?2.3 to ?2.45 in the 110–175 MHz band and indicates that the region toward the Galactic bulge has a relatively flatter index.

  6. Radio Astronomers Set New Standard for Accurate Cosmic Distance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    A team of radio astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most accurate measurement ever made of the distance to a faraway galaxy. Their direct measurement calls into question the precision of distance determinations made by other techniques, including those announced last week by a team using the Hubble Space Telescope. The radio astronomers measured a distance of 23.5 million light-years to a galaxy called NGC 4258 in Ursa Major. "Ours is a direct measurement, using geometry, and is independent of all other methods of determining cosmic distances," said Jim Herrnstein, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. The team says their measurement is accurate to within less than a million light-years, or four percent. The galaxy is also known as Messier 106 and is visible with amateur telescopes. Herrnstein, along with James Moran and Lincoln Greenhill of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Phillip Diamond, of the Merlin radio telescope facility at Jodrell Bank and the University of Manchester in England; Makato Inoue and Naomasa Nakai of Japan's Nobeyama Radio Observatory; Mikato Miyoshi of Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; Christian Henkel of Germany's Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy; and Adam Riess of the University of California at Berkeley, announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. "This is an incredible achievement to measure the distance to another galaxy with this precision," said Miller Goss, NRAO's Director of VLA/VLBA Operations. "This is the first time such a great distance has been measured this accurately. It took painstaking work on the part of the observing team, and it took a radio telescope the size of the Earth -- the VLBA -- to make it possible," Goss said. "Astronomers have sought to determine the Hubble Constant, the rate of expansion of the universe, for decades. This will in turn lead to an estimate of the age of the universe. In order to do this, you need an unambiguous, absolute distance to another galaxy. We are pleased that the NSF's VLBA has for the first time determined such a distance, and thus provided the calibration standard astronomers have always sought in their quest for accurate distances beyond the Milky Way," said Morris Aizenman, Executive Officer of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Astronomical Sciences. "For astronomers, this measurement is the golden meter stick in the glass case," Aizenman added. The international team of astronomers used the VLBA to measure directly the motion of gas orbiting what is generally agreed to be a supermassive black hole at the heart of NGC 4258. The orbiting gas forms a warped disk, nearly two light-years in diameter, surrounding the black hole. The gas in the disk includes water vapor, which, in parts of the disk, acts as a natural amplifier of microwave radio emission. The regions that amplify radio emission are called masers, and work in a manner similar to the way a laser amplifies light emission. Determining the distance to NGC 4258 required measuring motions of extremely small shifts in position of these masers as they rotate around the black hole. This is equivalent to measuring an angle one ten-thousandth the width of a human hair held at arm's length. "The VLBA is the only instrument in the world that could do this," said Moran. "This work is the culmination of a 20-year effort at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics to measure distances to cosmic masers," said Irwin Shapiro, Director of that institution. Collection of the data for the NGC 4258 project was begun in 1994 and was part of Herrnstein's Ph.D dissertation at Harvard University. Previous observations with the VLBA allowed the scientists to measure the speed at which the gas is orbiting the black hole, some 39 million times more massive than the Sun. They did this by observing the amount of change in the wavelength of the radio wave

  7. THREE-CHANNEL DIGITAL RADIO VECTOR FIELD SENSOR: DESCRIPTION AND DEMONSTRATION

    E-print Network

    vector wave field is measured with three orthogonal dipole antennas or the magnetic vector wave field with three orthogonal loop antennas. Three identical parallel channels with anti-aliasing filters limit computer connected to the internet. The RVFS is an implementation of the Information Dense Antenna

  8. PAD-MAC: Primary User Activity-Aware Distributed MAC for Multi-Channel Cognitive Radio Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Piran, Md. Jalil; Kim, Hansoo; Yun, Jihyeok; Suh, Doug Young

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive radio (CR) has emerged as a promising technology to solve problems related to spectrum scarcity and provides a ubiquitous wireless access environment. CR-enabled secondary users (SUs) exploit spectrum white spaces opportunistically and immediately vacate the acquired licensed channels as primary users (PUs) arrive. Accessing the licensed channels without the prior knowledge of PU traffic patterns causes severe throughput degradation due to excessive channel switching and PU-to-SU collisions. Therefore, it is significantly important to design a PU activity-aware medium access control (MAC) protocol for cognitive radio networks (CRNs). In this paper, we first propose a licensed channel usage pattern identification scheme, based on a two-state Markov model, and then estimate the future idle slots using previous observations of the channels. Furthermore, based on these past observations, we compute the rank of each available licensed channel that gives SU transmission success assessment during the estimated idle slot. Secondly, we propose a PU activity-aware distributed MAC (PAD-MAC) protocol for heterogeneous multi-channel CRNs that selects the best channel for each SU to enhance its throughput. PAD-MAC controls SU activities by allowing them to exploit the licensed channels only for the duration of estimated idle slots and enables predictive and fast channel switching. To evaluate the performance of the proposed PAD-MAC, we compare it with the distributed QoS-aware MAC (QC-MAC) and listen-before-talk MAC schemes. Extensive numerical results show the significant improvements of the PAD-MAC in terms of the SU throughput, SU channel switching rate and PU-to-SU collision rate. PMID:25831084

  9. Montblanc1: GPU accelerated radio interferometer measurement equations in support of Bayesian inference for radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, S. J.; Marais, P. C.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Natarajan, I.; Tasse, C.; Smirnov, O.

    2015-09-01

    We present Montblanc, a GPU implementation of the Radio interferometer measurement equation (RIME) in support of the Bayesian inference for radio observations (BIRO) technique. BIRO uses Bayesian inference to select sky models that best match the visibilities observed by a radio interferometer. To accomplish this, BIRO evaluates the RIME multiple times, varying sky model parameters to produce multiple model visibilities. ?2 values computed from the model and observed visibilities are used as likelihood values to drive the Bayesian sampling process and select the best sky model. As most of the elements of the RIME and ?2 calculation are independent of one another, they are highly amenable to parallel computation. Additionally, Montblanc caters for iterative RIME evaluation to produce multiple ?2 values. Modified model parameters are transferred to the GPU between each iteration. We implemented Montblanc as a Python package based upon NVIDIA's CUDA architecture. As such, it is easy to extend and implement different pipelines. At present, Montblanc supports point and Gaussian morphologies, but is designed for easy addition of new source profiles. Montblanc's RIME implementation is performant: On an NVIDIA K40, it is approximately 250 times faster than MEQTREES on a dual hexacore Intel E5-2620v2 CPU. Compared to the OSKAR simulator's GPU-implemented RIME components it is 7.7 and 12 times faster on the same K40 for single and double-precision floating point respectively. However, OSKAR's RIME implementation is more general than Montblanc's BIRO-tailored RIME. Theoretical analysis of Montblanc's dominant CUDA kernel suggests that it is memory bound. In practice, profiling shows that is balanced between compute and memory, as much of the data required by the problem is retained in L1 and L2 caches.

  10. SHARED SECRET KEY ESTABLISHMENT USING WIRELESS CHANNEL MEASUREMENTS

    E-print Network

    Patwari, Neal

    SHARED SECRET KEY ESTABLISHMENT USING WIRELESS CHANNEL MEASUREMENTS by Jessica Erin Dudley Croft stopped trying to understand. #12;ABSTRACT Secret key establishment (SKE) is a method that allows two users, Alice and Bob, to obtain shared secret keys using randomness inherent in the wireless channel

  11. Radio Telescopes' Precise Measurements Yield Rich Scientific Payoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    Having the sharpest pictures always is a big advantage, and a sophisticated radio-astronomy technique using continent-wide and even intercontinental arrays of telescopes is yielding extremely valuable scientific results in a wide range of specialties. That's the message delivered to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, Texas, by Mark Reid of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, a leading researcher in the field of ultra-precise astronomical position measurements. Very Long Baseline Interferometry provides extremely high precision that can extend use of the parallax technique to many more celestial objects. Parallax is a direct means of measuring cosmic distances by detecting the slight shift in an object’s apparent position in the sky caused by Earth’s orbital motion. Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF "Using radio telescopes, we are measuring distances and motions of celestial bodies with unprecedented accuracy. That's helping us better understand many processes ranging from star formation to the scale of the entire Universe," Reid said. The observing technique, called Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), was pioneered in 1967, but has come into continuous use only in the past 10-15 years. The National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of 10 radio-telescope antennas ranging from Hawaii to the Caribbean, was dedicated in 1993. There are other VLBI systems in Europe and Asia, and large radio telescopes around the world cooperate regularly to increase sensitivity. VLBI observations routinely produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those made at visible-light wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope. Several groups of researchers from across the globe use the VLBA to study stellar nurseries in our own Milky Way Galaxy and measure distances to regions where new stars are forming. The key has been to improve measurement accuracy to a factor of a hundred times better than that produced by the highly successful Hipparcos satellite. Using small clouds of gas in star-forming regions that strongly amplify radio waves, called cosmic masers, the astronomers measured the tiny shift in the object's position in the sky caused by the Earth's orbit around the sun. This, in turn, yielded highly-accurate distances by the simple surveying technique of triangulation, the "gold standard" of distance measuring techniques available to astronomers. Dr. Mark Reid Dr. Mark Reid Credit: CfA Click image for high-resolution file (1.02 MB) "Knowing the distance accurately means we also know the luminosities, masses and ages of the young stars much more accurately, and that is vital to understanding how star formation works," Reid said. In addition, he pointed out, the VLBA observations have shown the motions of the young stars in the Milky Way are much more complicated than simple circular motion. Massive young stars appear to be born orbiting the Milky Way considerably slower than older stars. "This might be explained by the interaction of giant molecular clouds, the ultimate sites of massive star formation, as they "surf" spiral density waves in the Milky Way." An international team of scientists led by Reid has used VLBI to detect the slight change in apparent position of the object at the Milky Way's center caused by our Solar System's orbit around that center. "It takes our Solar System more than 200 million years to circle the center of our Galaxy, and yet we can detect that motion in only a couple weeks with the VLBA -- truly astounding!" Reid said. The VLBA studies of the Galactic Center have shown that an object called Sagittarius A* is at the exact gravitational center of our Galaxy. That means, the scientists say, that the object must be incredibly massive. "The VLBA measurements, combined with infrared observations of stellar orbits around this object, provide overwhelming evidence that it's a supermassive black hole," Reid explained. "These observations are also going to make it possibl

  12. The finescale structure of the global tropopause derived from COSMIC GPS radio occultation measurements

    E-print Network

    Son, Seok-Woo

    The finescale structure of the global tropopause derived from COSMIC GPS radio occultation of the lapserate tropopause is examined by using stateoftheart Global Positioning System radio occultation structure of the global tropopause derived from COSMIC GPS radio occultation measurements, J. Geophys. Res

  13. Generalized formalisms of the radio interferometer measurement equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, D. C.; Smirnov, O. M.

    2015-05-01

    The radio interferometer measurement equation (RIME) is a matrix-based mathematical model that describes the response of a radio interferometer. The Jones calculus it employs is not suitable for describing the analogue components of a telescope. This is because it does not consider the effect of impedance mismatches between components. This paper aims to highlight the limitations of Jones calculus, and suggests some alternative methods that are more applicable. We reformulate the RIME with a different basis that includes magnetic and mixed coherency statistics. We present a microwave network inspired 2N-port version of the RIME, and a tensor formalism based upon the electromagnetic tensor from special relativity. We elucidate the limitations of the Jones-matrix-based RIME for describing analogue components. We show how measured scattering parameters of analogue components can be used in a 2N-port version of the RIME. In addition, we show how motion at relativistic speed affects the observed flux. We present reformulations of the RIME that correctly account for magnetic field coherency. These reformulations extend the standard formulation, highlight its limitations, and may have applications in space-based interferometry and precise absolute calibration experiments.

  14. Radiation pattern measurement for Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Yan, Y.; Wang, W.; Liu, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) is an Interferometry that is currently being built in Inner-Mongolia. The CSRH system will consist of 100 antennas covering 0.4~15GHz frequency range. The program utilizes the antenna in two frequency bands about 0.4~2GHz and 2~15GHz. The design and far field performance of the feed for CSRH-I(0.4~2GHz) is introduced in this paper. Amplitude and phase, co-polar and cross-polar patterns of the feed were measured and simulated at phi angles of 0-90 and for theta rotation angles of -90 to +90 in 1.3 step. The measured far filed patterns coincide with simulation results very well.

  15. Progress in Understanding Horizontal Resolution of Radio Occultation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, B.; Tyler, G. L.

    1997-07-01

    The meaning of high vertical resolution and the ``horizontal'' resolution of radio occultation measurements has been subject to interpretation of the Abel transform relationships between the occultation ray paths and an assumed spherically symmetric atmospheric refractivity field. For the spherically symmetric case the refractivity field is recovered exactly, within the limitations of ray optics. Only brute force methods have been available for analysis of non-spherically symmetric cases. For example, ray tracing is employed to calculate the ray asymptotes for perturbed, approximately symmetric models, followed by application of the Abel inversion to retrieve the apparent refractivity, which then can be compared with the model results. In instances where the bending angle is small a straight ray model leads to the inversion kernel for the Abel transform (Ahmad & Tyler, ``The 2-D Resolution Kernel associated with Retrieval of Ionospheric and Atmospheric Refractivity Profiles by Abelian Inversion of Radio Occultation Phase Data,'' submitted to RADIO SCIENCE, April, 1997). Weighted integrals of the 2-D refractivity field employing the inversion kernel then give the corresponding Abel inversion directly. This approach permits rapid computation of the effects of departures from spherical symmetry. Inspection of the inversion kernel provides insight into the Abel transform inversion procedure. An interesting and useful result is understanding of the artifacts created by atmospheric structures of limited horizontal extent. Transformation of the curved ray case appropriate for thick atmospheres to an equivalent straight ray case yields the kernel function for the curved rays in a spherically symmetric atmosphere. A remaining problem is to estimate the effects of ray path deviation from the background path on the analysis; for realistic cases this effect is believed to be small, however.

  16. Radio-Frequency Rectification on Membrane Bound Pores

    E-print Network

    Sujatha Ramachandran; Robert H. Blick; Daniel W. van der Weide

    2007-09-12

    We present measurements on direct radio-frequency pumping of ion channels and pores bound in bilipid membranes. We make use of newly developed microcoaxes, which allow delivering the high frequency signal in close proximity to the membrane bound proteins and ion channels. We find rectification of the radio-frequency signal, which is used to pump ions through the channels and pores.

  17. Super-Sharp Radio "Vision" Measures Galaxy's Motion in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) have measured the motion across the sky of a galaxy nearly 2.4 million light-years from Earth. While scientists have been measuring the motion of galaxies directly toward or away from Earth for decades, this is the first time that the transverse motion (called proper motion by astronomers) has been measured for a galaxy that is not a satellite of our own Milky Way Galaxy. M33 Radio/Optical Image of M33 CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, NOAO/AURA/NSF (Click on image for more files) An international scientific team analyzed VLBA observations made over two and a half years to detect minuscule shifts in the sky position of the spiral galaxy M33. Combined with previous measurements of the galaxy's motion toward Earth, the new data allowed the astronomers to calculate M33's movement in three dimensions for the first time. "A snail crawling on Mars would appear to be moving across the surface more than 100 times faster than the motion we measured for this galaxy," said Mark Reid, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. M33 is a satellite of the larger galaxy M31, the well-known Andromeda Galaxy that is the most distant object visible to the naked eye. Both are part of the Local Group of galaxies that includes the Milky Way. In addition to measuring the motion of M33 as a whole, the astronomers also were able to make a direct measurement of the spiral galaxy's rotation. Both measurements were made by observing the changes in position of giant clouds of molecules inside the galaxy. The water vapor in these clouds acts as a natural maser, strengthening, or amplifying, radio emission the same way that lasers amplify light emission. The natural masers acted as bright radio beacons whose movement could be tracked by the ultra-sharp radio "vision" of the VLBA. Reid and his colleagues plan to continue measuring M33's motion and also to make similar measurements of M31's motion. This will allow them to answer important questions about the composition, history and fates of the two galaxies as well as of the Milky Way. "We want to determine the orbits of M31 and M33. That will help us learn about their history, specifically, how close have they come in the past?" Reid explained. "If they have passed very closely, then maybe M33's small size is a result of having material pulled off it by M31 during the close encounter," he added. Accurate knowledge of the motions of both galaxies also will help determine if there's a collision in their future. In addition, orbital analysis can give astronomers valuable clues about the amount and distribution of dark matter in the galaxies. M33's motion in space M33's motion in space, relative to M31 and the Milky Way CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) The direct measurement of M33's transverse angular spin is the first time such a measurement has been done accurately. In the 1920s, some astronomers thought they had measured the spin of spiral galaxies, but their results proved to be in error. More recently, radio astronomers have measured the Doppler shift of hydrogen gas in galaxies to determine the spin speed, which, when combined with the angular spin, gives a direct estimate of the distance of the galaxy. The astronomers' task was not simple. Not only did they have to detect an impressively tiny amount of motion across the sky, but they also had to separate the actual motion of M33 from the apparent motion caused by our Solar System's motion around the center of the Milky Way. The motion of the Solar System and the Earth around the Galactic center, some 26,000 light-years away, has been accurately measured using the VLBA over the last decade. "The VLBA is the only telescope system in the world that could do this work," Reid said. "Its extraordinary ability to resolve fine detail is unmatched and was the absolute prerequisite to making these measurements." Reid worked with Andreas Brunthaler of the Max Planck

  18. On Fairness of Incentive-Compatible Multi-Radio Channel Assignment in Multiple

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    networks. In particular, given the increasing popularity of multi-radio wireless devices, a number of works to the setting of a single collision domain. Unlike these works, in this paper, we consider non-cooperative multi-radio of our contributions in this paper: · This is the first work to study fairness of non-cooperative multi-radio

  19. Abel transform inversion of radio occultation measurements made with a receiver inside the Earth's atmosphere.

    E-print Network

    Haase, Jennifer

    Abel transform inversion of radio occultation measurements made with a receiver inside the Earth­Antipolis, France June 2001 1 #12; Abstract Radio occultation measurements made with a receiver inside the Earth to problems encountered when inverting seismic time­travel data and solar occultation measurements, where

  20. Measurement of multipath delay profile in land mobile satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, Tetsushi; Arakaki, Yoshiya; Wakana, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Ryutaro

    1993-01-01

    Mobile satellite communication channel has been evaluated mainly with fading statistics of signal. When bandwidth of transmitting signal becomes wider, frequency selectivity of fading becomes a significant factor of the channel. Channel characteristics, not only signal variation but multipath delay spread should be evaluated. A multipath measurement system is proposed and developed for mobile satellite applications. With this system and ETS-V satellite, multipath delay profiles are measured in various environments including Tokyo metropolis and Sapporo city at 1.5 GHz. Results show that the maximum excess delay is within 1 microsec and the maximum delay spread is 0.2 microsecs at elevation angles of 40 to 47 degrees. In wideband signal transmission of about 1 MHz and more, designers should consider the effect of selective fading due to the multipath of land mobile satellite channel.

  1. Polarized radio emission from extensive air showers measured with LOFAR

    SciTech Connect

    Schellart, P.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J.E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J.R.; Krause, M.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J.P.; Veen, S. ter; Thoudam, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present LOFAR measurements of radio emission from extensive air showers. We find that this emission is strongly polarized, with a median degree of polarization of nearly 99%, and that the angle between the polarization direction of the electric field and the Lorentz force acting on the particles, depends on the observer location in the shower plane. This can be understood as a superposition of the radially polarized charge-excess emission mechanism, first proposed by Askaryan and the geomagnetic emission mechanism proposed by Kahn and Lerche. We calculate the relative strengths of both contributions, as quantified by the charge-excess fraction, for 163 individual air showers. We find that the measured charge-excess fraction is higher for air showers arriving from closer to the zenith. Furthermore, the measured charge-excess fraction also increases with increasing observer distance from the air shower symmetry axis. The measured values range from (3.3± 1.0)% for very inclined air showers at 25 m to (20.3± 1.3)% for almost vertical showers at 225 m. Both dependencies are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions.

  2. Measurement of laser-ion guiding channel strength

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, E.J.; Caporaso, G.J.; Chong, Y.P.; Prono, D.S.; Rainer, F.; Struve, K.W.; Weir, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) beam is guided in a low density ion channel produced in benzene gas by a KrF laser. The strength of the ion channel has been measured by deflecting the electron beam in a steady transverse magnetic field. After emerging from the magnetic field, the beam oscillates transversely inside the channel with a few mm amplitude. The transverse position of the beam is measured at many positions using the wall current monitors. The wavelength of the oscillation is measured from a plot of transverse position vs propagation distance. With a 0.5 J laser pulse and 4 x 10/sup -4/ Torr benzene pressure the wavelength was 1 m corresponding to 90 esu/cm/sup 3/ with ..gamma.. = 84.

  3. Walkie-Talkie Measurements for the Speed of Radio Waves in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombi, Andra; Tunyagi, Arthur; Neda, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    A handheld emitter-receiver device suitable for the direct estimation of the velocity of radio waves in air is presented. The velocity of radio waves is measured using the direct time-of-flight method, without the need for any tedious and precise settings. The results for two measurement series are reported. Both sets of results give an estimate…

  4. Prediction of uncertainties in atmospheric properties measured by radio occultation experiments

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    Prediction of uncertainties in atmospheric properties measured by radio occultation experiments occultation experiments measure time series of these frequency shifts, from which Ne and nn can be determined with the uncertainties of the radio occultation experiment on Mars Global Sur- veyor. These expressions can be used

  5. Residence times and diel passage distributions of radio-tagged juvenile spring chinook salmon and steelhead in a gatewell and fish collection channel of a Columbia River Dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Maule, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    The amount of time radio-tagged juvenile spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and juvenile steelhead O. mykiss spent within a gatewell and the juvenile collection channel at McNary Dam, Columbia River, USA, was measured to determine the diel passage behavior and residence times within these portions of the juvenile bypass system. The median gatewell residence times were 8.9 h for juvenile chinook salmon and 3.2 h for steelhead. Juvenile spring chinook salmon spent 83% of their time in the 18-m-deep gatewell at depths of 9 m or less, and juvenile steelhead spent 96% of their time in the upper 11 m. Fish released during midday and those released in the evening generally exited the gatewell in the evening, indicating that fish entering the gatewell during daylight will have prolonged residence times. Median collection-channel residence times of juvenile chinook salmon were much shorter (2.3 min) than those of steelhead (28.0 min), most likely because of the greater size of the steelhead and the high water velocities within the channel (2.1 m/s). This and other studies indicate most juvenile salmonids enter gatewells of several Columbia and Snake river dams in the evening and pass into the collection channels quickly. However, this is not consistent with the natural in-river migration patterns of these species and represents a delay in dam passage.

  6. An in situ measurement of the radio-frequency attenuation in ice at Summit Station, Greenland

    E-print Network

    J. Avva; J. M. Kovac; C. Miki; D. Saltzberg; A. G. Vieregg

    2015-12-02

    We report an in situ measurement of the electric field attenuation length at radio frequencies for the bulk ice at Summit Station, Greenland, made by broadcasting radio-frequency signals vertically through the ice and measuring the relative power in the return ground bounce signal. We find the depth-averaged field attenuation length to be 947 +92/-85 meters at 75 MHz. While this measurement has clear radioglaciological applications, the radio clarity of the ice also has implications for the detection of ultra-high energy (UHE) astrophysical particles via their radio emission in dielectric media such as ice. Assuming a reliable extrapolation to higher frequencies, the measured attenuation length at Summit Station is comparable to previously measured radio-frequency attenuation lengths at candidate particle detector sites around the world, and strengthens the case for Summit Station as a promising northern site for UHE neutrino detection.

  7. Observational Constraints of Humidity Climatology From GPS Radio Occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, P.; Jiang, J. H.; Su, H.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown large differences in the humidity climatology of the upper troposphere (UT) region between global models and observations. Such discrepancies can lead to large differences in the water vapor feedback estimations between models, reanalyses and satellite observations, and therefore climate projection uncertainties. Global Circulation Models (GCMs) could also mischaracterize the middle troposphere moist convection leading to erroneous conclusions about the water vapor vertical distribution and horizontal transport. We observationally constrain the UT humidity by employing high accuracy (<1.0%) and high vertical resolution (100-200 m) Global Positioning System Radio Occultation (GPSRO) refractivity measurements. Preliminary results from GPSRO reveal a significantly drier tropical boundary layer than both ECMWF and MERRA reanalyses. In the middle and upper troposphere, GPSRO is moister than ECMWF but drier than MERRA. These features are more pronounced at equatorial latitudes. These differences could have greater repercussions with regards to the water vapor feedback estimation. Also, zonally varying distributions of relative humidity (RH) from GPSRO, MERRA and ECMWF were also correlated with precipitation measurements from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). We found latitudinal differences between maxima of precipitation and RH, which could imply that large-scale horizontal transport in the boundary layer plays a critical role to governing the coupling strength between precipitation and RH. The application of GPSRO data in constraining the underlying model physics will be discussed.

  8. Navigation Signal Disturbances by Multipath Propagation - Scaled Measurements with a Universal Channel Sounder Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geise, Robert; Neubauer, Bjoern; Zimmer, Georg

    2015-11-01

    The performance of navigation systems is always reduced by unwanted multipath propagation. This is especially of practical importance for airborne navigation systems like the instrument landing system (ILS) or the VHF omni directional radio range (VOR). Nevertheless, the quantitative analysis of corresponding, potentially harmful multipath propagation disturbances is very difficult due to the large parameter space. Experimentally difficulties arise due to very expensive, real scale measurement campaigns and numerical simulation techniques still have shortcomings which are briefly discussed. In this contribution a new universal approach is introduced on how to measure very flexibly multipath propagation effects for arbitrary navigation systems using a channel sounder architecture in a scaled measurement environment. Two relevant scenarios of multipath propagation and the impact on navigation signals are presented. The first describes disturbances of the ILS due to large taxiing aircraft. The other example shows the influence of rotating wind turbines on the VOR.

  9. Measurement of Radio Emission from Cosmic Ray induced Air Showers

    E-print Network

    Erdmann, Martin

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3.3 Low Energy Enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3.4 Radio Detector - AERA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 4.2 AERA Data Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 4.2.1 Event Rate and Antenna of the Radio Signal Front 51 5.1 Reconstruction Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 5

  10. Equivalence and Accuracy of MOSFET Channel Length Measurement Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sanjay

    1989-02-01

    It is shown that the MOSFET channel length measurement techniques of Terada and Muta, Peng et al., Whitfield, Suciu and Johnston, and De La Moneda et al. are actually equivalent, i.e. merely different expressions of the same formula for channel length in terms of measured resistance, and that some of the transresistance methods of Jain, although not equivalent, are also related to the same formula. The accuracy of this formula is evaluated for the general case and related to the error components due to source and drain resistance asymmetry, short channel geometry effect, and variation of series resistance with bias. No independent error component due to field-induced mobility degradation is found. Finally the errors in the methods of Terada and Muta, Chen et al., Sheu et al., Wordeman et al. and Jain, are determined and compared. The gate transresistance technique is found to be the most accurate method.

  11. At-sea distribution of radio-marked Ashy Storm-Petrels Oceanodroma homochroa captured on the California Channel Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, J.; Takekawa, J.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Small, rare and wide-ranging pelagic birds are difficult to locate and observe at sea; little is therefore known regarding individual movements and habitat affinities among many of the world's storm-petrels (Family Hydrobatidae). We re-located 57 of 70 radio-marked Ashy Storm-Petrels Oceanodroma homochroa captured at three colonies in the California Channel Islands: Scorpion Rocks (2004, 2005), Santa Barbara Island (2004) and Prince Island (2005). Between 23 July and 22 September 2004, and 5 July and 4 August 2005, we flew 29 telemetry surveys, covered more than 65 000 km2 (2004) and 43 000 km2 (2005) of open ocean from San Nicolas Island north to the Farallon Islands and obtained 215 locations from 57 storm-petrels at sea. In both years, radio-marked storm-petrels were aggregated over the continental slope from Point Conception to Point Buchon, within the western Santa Barbara Channel, and over the Santa Cruz Basin between Santa Cruz, San Nicolas and Santa Barbara islands. Individuals captured in the Channel Islands ranged more than 600 km and were located as far north as Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. This is the first study to use radiotelemetry to determine the at-sea distribution and movements for any storm-petrel species.

  12. River discharge estimation using channel width measurements from

    E-print Network

    Stuttgart, Universität

    River discharge estimation using channel width measurements from satellite imagery (MODIS) Omid ­ 9 October 2014, Berlin #12;Introduction River discharge is a critical component of the global hydrological water cycle. Flow of water in rivers is a substantial resource for human societies and natural

  13. Spectroscopic Measurements of Radio Frequency Plasmas in Supercritical Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, Tsunehiro; Iwamae, Atsushi; Kawashima, Ayato

    2010-10-29

    Spectroscopic measurements of radio frequency (rf) plasma were performed under high pressure CO{sub 2} conditions (5 and 7 MPa) and supercritical (sc)CO{sub 2} conditions (8-20 MPa). The temperatures evaluated from C{sub 2} Swan bands increased from 3600 K to 4600 K with increasing pressure. The broadening and shifting of the O I line profile ({approx}777 nm) of rf plasma was observed under scCO{sub 2} conditions. The width of the line profile increased with increasing pressure. The reason for the broadening and shifting is still unclear because the present theory used to explain them is not valid for such high pressure conditions. Further, the broadening of the Ar I line profile ({approx}811.5 nm) in rf plasmas was observed under atmospheric Ar (0.1 MPa), high pressure Ar conditions (1-4 MPa), and scAr condition (5 MPa); the observation of the O I line profile in CO{sub 2} plasmas is difficult in this pressure range owing to its weak intensity therein. Similar to the case of the O I line in CO{sub 2} plasmas, the reason for the broadening of the Ar I line profile at 5 MPa is unclear.

  14. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  15. Measurement-assisted quantum communication in spin channels with dephasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Abolfazl; Omar, Yasser

    2015-10-01

    We propose a protocol for countering the effects of dephasing in quantum state transfer over a noisy spin channel weakly coupled to the sender and receiver qubits. Our protocol, based on performing regular global measurements on the channel, significantly suppresses the nocuous environmental effects and offers much higher fidelities than the traditional no-measurement approach. Our proposal can also operate as a robust two-qubit entangling gate over distant spins. Our scheme counters any source of dephasing, including those for which the well established dynamical decoupling approach fails. Our protocol is probabilistic, given the intrinsic randomness in quantum measurements, but its success probability can be maximized by adequately tuning the rate of the measurements.

  16. Precision measurement of top quark mass in dilepton channel

    SciTech Connect

    Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; /Michigan U.

    2006-01-01

    We present recent measurements of the top quark mass using events collected at the CDF and D0 detectors from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. These analyses are performed using events consistent with the decay channel t{bar t} {yields} {bar b}{ell}{sup -}{bar v}{sub {ell}}b{ell}' + v'{sub {ell}}, or the dilepton channel. 230-360 pb{sup -1} of data are used.

  17. MEASURING THE JET POWER OF FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shabala, S. S.; Santoso, J. S.; Godfrey, L. E. H.

    2012-09-10

    We use frequency-dependent position shifts of flat-spectrum radio cores to estimate the kinetic power of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. We find a correlation between the derived jet powers and AGN narrow-line luminosity, consistent with the well-known relation for radio galaxies and steep spectrum quasars. This technique can be applied to intrinsically weak jets even at high redshift.

  18. Measurement and visualization of impingement cooling in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, E.

    Experimental measurement techniques such as naphthalene sublimation, liquid crystal thermography and real-time holographic interferometry are standard. Their application in narrow channels causes problems and is therefore limited. The channel width must not change too much because the naphthalene sublimation and the liquid crystal coating necessary for the thermography may cause non-negotiable variations. The interferometry fails in turbulent flow area. The diffraction along the channel edges is an additional difficulty. A comparison of the results obtained from the application of all three techniques, which has not been considered in earlier publications, is made here. The methods were used to measure and visualize the heat transfer characteristics of an array of 1.2mm diameter impinging jets in an enclosed channel (>=2.2mm) with single-sided flow-off at Reynolds numbers of about Rez 20,000. Scale-up ratios as low as 2.4 have been used in order to maintain similarity as it has not been previously reported. The naphthalene technique provided a high spatially resolved measurement of the Sherwood number along a downstream line. The liquid crystal thermography technique provided 2D contours of the Nusselt number. The temperature distribution within dead water zones was visualized with holographic interferometry. The cross-flow effects caused a shift in the stagnation point and a monotone decrease in the Nusselt number in the downstream direction.

  19. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.

    1999-09-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using six candidate events for the process pp¯-->tt¯+X-->l+?bl-?¯b¯+X, observed in the D0 experiment at the Fermilab pp¯ collider. Using maximum likelihood fits to the dynamics of the decays, we measure a mass for the top quark of mt=168.4+/-12.3(stat)+/-3.6(syst) Gev. We combine this result with our previous measurement in the tt¯-->l+jets channel to obtain mt=172.1+/-7.1 GeV as the best value of the mass of the top quark measured by D0.

  20. Analysis of Wireless Sensor Network Topology and Estimation of Optimal Network Deployment by Deterministic Radio Channel Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Erik; Lopez-Iturri, Peio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in the implementation and design of context-aware scenarios is the adequate deployment strategy for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), mainly due to the strong dependence of the radiofrequency physical layer with the surrounding media, which can lead to non-optimal network designs. In this work, radioplanning analysis for WSN deployment is proposed by employing a deterministic 3D ray launching technique in order to provide insight into complex wireless channel behavior in context-aware indoor scenarios. The proposed radioplanning procedure is validated with a testbed implemented with a Mobile Ad Hoc Network WSN following a chain configuration, enabling the analysis and assessment of a rich variety of parameters, such as received signal level, signal quality and estimation of power consumption. The adoption of deterministic radio channel techniques allows the design and further deployment of WSNs in heterogeneous wireless scenarios with optimized behavior in terms of coverage, capacity, quality of service and energy consumption. PMID:25664434

  1. Analysis of wireless sensor network topology and estimation of optimal network deployment by deterministic radio channel characterization.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Erik; Lopez-Iturri, Peio; Azpilicueta, Leire; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in the implementation and design of context-aware scenarios is the adequate deployment strategy for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), mainly due to the strong dependence of the radiofrequency physical layer with the surrounding media, which can lead to non-optimal network designs. In this work, radioplanning analysis for WSN deployment is proposed by employing a deterministic 3D ray launching technique in order to provide insight into complex wireless channel behavior in context-aware indoor scenarios. The proposed radioplanning procedure is validated with a testbed implemented with a Mobile Ad Hoc Network WSN following a chain configuration, enabling the analysis and assessment of a rich variety of parameters, such as received signal level, signal quality and estimation of power consumption. The adoption of deterministic radio channel techniques allows the design and further deployment of WSNs in heterogeneous wireless scenarios with optimized behavior in terms of coverage, capacity, quality of service and energy consumption. PMID:25664434

  2. Measurements of electronic properties of the Miyun 50 m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi-Zhen; Zhu, Xin-Ying; Kong, De-Qing; Zheng, Lei; Yao, Cheng; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Su, Yan; Piao, Ting-Yi

    2009-03-01

    Measurement results of some properties of the Miyun 50 m radio telescope (MRT50) of the National Astronomical Observatories, such as pointing calibration, antenna beams, system noise temperature, gain and gain variations with elevation are introduced. By using a new de-convolution technique developed by our group, the broadening effect on measured beams caused by the width of an extended radio source has been removed so that we obtained higher accuracy on the measurements of MRT50 beams.

  3. Strain tensors in layer systems by precision ion channeling measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trinkaus, H.; Buca, D.; Hollaender, B.; Minamisawa, R. A.; Mantl, S.; Hartmann, J. M.

    2010-06-15

    A powerful method for analyzing general strain states in layer systems is the measurement of changes in the ion channeling directions. We present a systematic derivation and compilation of the required relations between the strain induced angle changes and the components of the strain tensor for general crystalline layer systems of reduced symmetry compared to the basic (cubic) crystal. It is shown that, for the evaluation of channeling measurements, virtually all layers of interest may be described as being 'pseudo-orthorhombic'. The commonly assumed boundary conditions and the effects of surface misorientations on them are discussed. Asymmetric strain relaxation in layers of reduced symmetry is attributed to a restriction in the slip system of the dislocations inducing it. The results are applied to {l_brace}110{r_brace}SiGe/Si layer systems.

  4. A Novel Dynamic Channel Access Scheme Using Overlap FFT Filter-Bank for Cognitive Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Motohiro; Umehira, Masahiro; Ishihara, Koichi; Takatori, Yasushi

    An OFDMA based channel access scheme is proposed for dynamic spectrum access to utilize frequency spectrum efficiently. Though the OFDMA based scheme is flexible enough to change the bandwidth and channel of the transmitted signals, the OFDMA signal has large PAPR (Peak to Average Power Ratio). In addition, if the OFDMA receiver does not use a filter to extract sub-carriers before FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) processing, the designated sub-carriers suffer large interference from the adjacent channel signals in the FFT processing on the receiving side. To solve the problems such as PAPR and adjacent channel interference encountered in the OFDMA based scheme, this paper proposes a novel dynamic channel access scheme using overlap FFT filter-bank based on single carrier modulation. It also shows performance evaluation results of the proposed scheme by computer simulation.

  5. Initial results from radio occultation measurements with the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: A nocturnal mixed layer in the tropics

    E-print Network

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Initial results from radio occultation measurements with the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, dynamics Meteorology a b s t r a c t The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) performs radio occultation (RO (MRO) has been performing radio occultation (RO) measurements since the primary science phase

  6. Characterizing radio channels : the science and technology of propagation and interference, 1900-1935

    E-print Network

    Yeang, Chen-Pang.

    2004-01-01

    Guglielmo Marconi's trans-Atlantic wireless experiment in 1900 marked the beginning of a communication revolution that transformed the open space above the earth into channels of information flow. This dissertation grapples ...

  7. FOREGROUND PREDICTIONS FOR THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POWER SPECTRUM FROM MEASUREMENTS OF FAINT INVERTED RADIO SOURCES AT 5 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Michael D.; Becker, Robert H.; De Vries, Willem; White, Richard L.

    2012-05-10

    We present measurements of a population of matched radio sources at 1.4 and 5 GHz down to a flux limit of 1.5 mJy in 7 deg{sup 2} of the NOAO Deep Field South. We find a significant fraction of sources with inverted spectral indices that all have 1.4 GHz fluxes less than 10 mJy and are therefore too faint to have been detected and included in previous radio source count models that are matched at multiple frequencies. Combined with the matched source population at 1.4 and 5 GHz in 1 deg{sup -2} in the ATESP survey, we update models for the 5 GHz differential number counts and distributions of spectral indices in 5 GHz flux bins that can be used to estimate the unresolved point source contribution to the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. We find a shallower logarithmic slope in the 5 GHz differential counts than in previously published models for fluxes {approx}< 100 mJy as well as larger fractions of inverted spectral indices at these fluxes. Because the Planck flux limit for resolved sources is larger than 100 mJy in all channels, our modified number counts yield at most a 10% change in the predicted Poisson contribution to the Planck temperature power spectrum. For a flux cut of 5 mJy with the South Pole Telescope and a flux cut of 20 mJy with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, we predict a {approx}30% and {approx}10% increase, respectively, in the radio source Poisson power in the lowest frequency channels of each experiment relative to that predicted by previous models.

  8. Microfabricated Patch Clamp Electrodes for Improved Ion Channel Protein Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemic, James; Klemic, Kathryn; Reed, Mark; Sigworth, Frederick

    2002-03-01

    Ion channels are trans-membrane proteins that underlie many cell functions including hormone and neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction and cell signaling cascades. Ion channel proteins are commonly characterized via the patch clamp method in which an extruded glass tube containing ionic solution, manipulated by an expert technician, is brought into contact with a living cell to record ionic current through the cell membrane. Microfabricated planar patch electrodes, micromolded in the silicone elastomer poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) from microlithographically patterned structures, have been developed that improve on this method. Microfabrication techniques allow arrays of patch electrodes to be fabricated, increasing the throughput of the measurement technique. Planar patch electrodes readily allow the automation of cell sealing, further increasing throughput. Microfabricated electrode arrays may be readily integrated with microfluidic structures to allow fast, in situ solution exchange. Miniaturization of the electrode geometry should increase both the signal to noise and the bandwidth of the measurement. Microfabricated patch electrode arrays have been fabricated and measurements have been taken.

  9. Modelling the transfer function in medium bandwidth radio channels during multipath propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvain, M.; Lavergnat, J.

    1985-12-01

    The computation of the effects of a multipath propagation channel on a line-of-sight link requires a statistical model of the channel transfer function. The various steps in the construction and validation of such a model are discussed, and several proposed models are compared from the point of view of their applications. The selection of data for the model is examined, and the results of modelling are considered in terms of a Rummler model, a complex polynomial expansion, and a normalized two-ray model. The use of the complete two-ray model is addressed. Results from the PACEM I experiment are used by way of illustration.

  10. Orbit Determination Using TDMA Radio Navigation Data with Implicit Measurement Times

    E-print Network

    Psiaki, Mark L.

    Orbit Determination Using TDMA Radio Navigation Data with Implicit Measurement Times Ryan C. Dougherty and Mark L. Psiaki Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 14853-7501 An orbit determination Kalman-Band signals from satellites in low Earth orbit, a carrier phase measurement and a biased pseudorange

  11. Plasma resistivity profile measurement from an external radio-frequency magnetic coil

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    - pressed as R / fgeom , where is the skin depth. The skin depth characterizes the depth of penetrationPlasma resistivity profile measurement from an external radio-frequency magnetic coil John T (Presented on 20 April 2004; published 7 October 2004) Plasma resistivity is obtained by measuring the change

  12. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nunez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-21

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  13. Measurements of the effects of humidity on radio-aerosol penetration through ultrafine capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, C.

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of humidity on radio-aerosol penetration through ultrafine capillaries. A number of tests were conducted at relative humidities of 20%, 50%, and 80%, with sampling times of 20, 40, and 60 min. The radio-aerosol consisted of polystyrene particles with a diameter of 0.1 {micro}m. The ultrafine capillaries had a diameter of 250 {micro}m. The data from these tests varied significantly. These results made the identification of radio-aerosol penetration trends inconclusive. The standard deviation for all penetration data ranged from 3% to 30%. The results of this study suggest that a better control of the experimental parameters was needed to obtain more accurate data from experiments associated with radio-aerosol penetration in the presence of moisture. The experimental parameters that may have contributed to the wide variance of data, include aerosol flow, radio-aerosol generation, capillary characteristics, humidity control, and radiation measurements. It was the uncertainty of these parameters that contributed to the poor data which made conclusive deductions about radio-aerosol penetration dependence on humidity difficult. The application of this study is to ultrafine leaks resulting from stress fractures in high-level nuclear waste transportation casks under accident scenarios.

  14. Source and event selection for radio-planetary frame-tie measurements using the Phobos Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linfield, R.; Ulvestad, J.

    1988-01-01

    The Soviet Phobos Lander mission will place two spacecraft on the Martian moon Phobos in 1989. Measurements of the range from Earth-based stations to the landers will allow an accurate determination of the ephemerides of Phobos and Mars. Delta Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) between the landers and compact radio sources nearby on the sky will be used to obtain precise estimates of the angular offset between the radio and planetary reference frames. The accuracy of this frame-tie estimate is expected to be in the vicinity of 10 mrad, depending on how well several error sources can be controlled (calibrated or reduced). Many candidate radio sources for VLBI measurements were identified, but additional work is necessary to select those sources which have characteristics appropriate to the present application. Strategies for performing the source selection are described.

  15. Occupational exposure of personnel operating military radio equipment: measurements and simulation.

    PubMed

    Paljanos, Annamaria; Miclaus, Simona; Munteanu, Calin

    2015-09-01

    Technical literature provides numerous studies concerning radiofrequency exposure measurements for various radio communication devices, but there are few studies related to exposure of personnel operating military radio equipment. In order to evaluate exposure and identify cases when safety requirements are not entirely met, both measurements and simulations are needed for accurate results. Moreover, given the technical characteristics of the radio devices used in the military, personnel mainly operate in the near-field region so both measurements and simulation becomes more complex. Measurements were made in situ using a broadband personal exposimeter equipped with two isotropic probes for both electric and magnetic components of the field. The experiment was designed for three different operating frequencies of the same radio equipment, while simulations were made in FEKO software using hybrid numerical methods to solve complex electromagnetic field problems. The paper aims to discuss the comparative results of the measurements and simulation, as well as comparing them to reference levels specified in military or civilian radiofrequency exposure standards. PMID:26444196

  16. Analysis of the Temporal Structural Function of Tropospheric Delay of Radio Waves Using Radio Measurements of the Signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorov, V. E.; Teptin, G. M.

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of a three-year experimental study of propagation of decimeter radio waves in the troposphere. The time analysis of the structural function of tropospheric delay of the decimeter radio waves for the three-year measurements of the GLONASS and GPS signals in a city of Kazan is given. The tropospheric contribution to the variance of the decimeter radio-wave delay is for the first time observed to significantly differ for the variations with time scales 1 to 24 h.

  17. THE HUYGENS DOPPLER WIND EXPERIMENT Titan Winds Derived from Probe Radio Frequency Measurements

    E-print Network

    THE HUYGENS DOPPLER WIND EXPERIMENT Titan Winds Derived from Probe Radio Frequency Measurements M., Univ. Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, 53121 Bonn, Germany 2NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York) will be performed during the Titan atmospheric des- cent of the ESA Huygens Probe. The direction and strength

  18. An analysis of source structure effects in radio interferometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    To begin a study of structure effects, this report presents a theoretical framework, proposes an effective position approach to structure corrections based on brightness distribution measurements, and analyzes examples of analytical and measured brightness distributions. Other topics include the effect of the frequency dependence of a brightness distribution on bandwidth synthesis (BWS) delay, the determination of the absolute location of a measured brightness distribution, and structure effects in dual frequency calibration of charged particle delays. For the 10 measured distributions analyzed, it was found that the structure effect in BWS delay at X-band (3.6 cm) can reach 30 cm, but typically falls in the range of 0 to 5 cm. A trial limit equation that is dependent on visibility was successfully tested against the 10 measured brightness distributions (seven sources). If the validity of this particular equation for an upper limit can be established for nearly all sources, the structure effect in BWS delay could be greatly reduced without supplementary measurements of brightness distributions.

  19. INDOOR RADIO CHANNEL CHARACTERIZATION OF SPREAD SPECTRUM D. Dres, D. Vouyioukas, Prof. P. Constantinou

    E-print Network

    Vouyioukas, Demosthenes

    . The measurements were conducted at the three - floor story building of Electrical Engineers. A ground plan. 3 Ground plan of second and third floor respectively Each floor consists of offices of 35 m2 - 70 m2 was to study the radiocoverage of the three - floor story building of Electrical Engineering. The measurement

  20. Measurement of the linear polarization of channeling radiation in silicon and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Rzepka, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Diedrich, E.; Kotthaus, R.; Kufner, W.; Roessl, W.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hoffmann-Stascheck, P.; Genz, H.; Nething, U.; Richter, A.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1995-07-01

    Utilizing 90{degree} Compton scattering the linear polarization of channeling radiation produced at the superconducting accelerator S-DALINAC with 62 MeV electrons in silicon and diamond has been measured in the energy range between 50 and 400 keV. Planar channeling radiation due to transitions involving transversal bound as well as unbound states is completely linearly polarized perpendicular to the channeling plane. Axial channeling radiation does not show linear polarization.

  1. Measurement of cosmic-ray air showers with the Tunka Radio Extension (Tunka-Rex)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezyazeekov, P. A.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O. A.; Haungs, A.; Hiller, R.; Huege, T.; Kazarina, Y.; Kleifges, M.; Konstantinov, E. N.; Korosteleva, E. E.; Kostunin, D.; Krömer, O.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Levinson, E.; Lubsandorzhiev, N.; Mirgazov, R. R.; Monkhoev, R.; Pakhorukov, A.; Pankov, L.; Prosin, V. V.; Rubtsov, G. I.; Rühle, C.; Schröder, F. G.; Wischnewski, R.; Zagorodnikov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Tunka-Rex is a radio detector for cosmic-ray air showers in Siberia, triggered by Tunka-133, a co-located air-Cherenkov detector. The main goal of Tunka-Rex is the cross-calibration of the two detectors by measuring the air-Cherenkov light and the radio signal emitted by the same air showers. This way we can explore the precision of the radio-detection technique, especially for the reconstruction of the primary energy and the depth of the shower maximum. The latter is sensitive to the mass of the primary cosmic-ray particles. In this paper we describe the detector setup and explain how electronics and antennas have been calibrated. The analysis of data of the first season proves the detection of cosmic-ray air showers and therefore, the functionality of the detector. We confirm the expected dependence of the detection threshold on the geomagnetic angle and the correlation between the energy of the primary cosmic-ray particle and the radio amplitude. Furthermore, we compare reconstructed amplitudes of radio pulses with predictions from CoREAS simulations, finding agreement within the uncertainties.

  2. Measurements of time average series resonance effect in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Chuaqui, H.; Kakati, M.

    2011-10-01

    Self-excited plasma series resonance is observed in low pressure capacitvely coupled radio frequency discharges as high-frequency oscillations superimposed on the normal radio frequency current. This high-frequency contribution to the radio frequency current is generated by a series resonance between the capacitive sheath and the inductive and resistive bulk plasma. In this report, we present an experimental method to measure the plasma series resonance in a capacitively coupled radio frequency argon plasma by modifying the homogeneous discharge model. The homogeneous discharge model is modified by introducing a correction factor to the plasma resistance. Plasma parameters are also calculated by considering the plasma series resonances effect. Experimental measurements show that the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance, which arises in capacitive discharge due to the nonlinear interaction of plasma bulk and sheath, significantly enhances both the Ohmic and stochastic heating. The experimentally measured total dissipation, which is the sum of the Ohmic and stochastic heating, is found to increase significantly with decreasing pressure.

  3. Measurements of time average series resonance effect in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Chuaqui, H.; Kakati, M.

    2011-10-15

    Self-excited plasma series resonance is observed in low pressure capacitvely coupled radio frequency discharges as high-frequency oscillations superimposed on the normal radio frequency current. This high-frequency contribution to the radio frequency current is generated by a series resonance between the capacitive sheath and the inductive and resistive bulk plasma. In this report, we present an experimental method to measure the plasma series resonance in a capacitively coupled radio frequency argon plasma by modifying the homogeneous discharge model. The homogeneous discharge model is modified by introducing a correction factor to the plasma resistance. Plasma parameters are also calculated by considering the plasma series resonances effect. Experimental measurements show that the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance, which arises in capacitive discharge due to the nonlinear interaction of plasma bulk and sheath, significantly enhances both the Ohmic and stochastic heating. The experimentally measured total dissipation, which is the sum of the Ohmic and stochastic heating, is found to increase significantly with decreasing pressure.

  4. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sebastien; Salvade, Yves; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10{sup -7} or better, resulting in a resolution of {+-}25 {mu}m for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented.

  5. GIS technology for spatiotemporal measurements of gully channel width evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field observations of gully evolution in active croplands have often revealed the presence of a less erodible soil layer that is typically associated with tillage practices (i.e. plowpan). This more erosion-resistant layer limits channel incision forcing the gully channel to expand laterally through...

  6. Magnetization of the ionospheres of Venus and Mars: Results from radio occultation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, R.; Kliore, A.J. )

    1991-07-01

    In situ measurements by the Pioneer Venus orbiting spacecraft, conducted during solar maximum only, have shown that magnetization (permeation of large-scale magnetic fields) of the ionosphere of Venus occurs under high solar wind dynamic pressure and that this takes place most frequently near the subsolar region. In this paper, the authors use remote sensing radio occultation measurements to study magnetization of the ionospheres of Venus and Mars based on these characteristics. For Venus they take advantage of the unique data set consisting of 148 electron density profiles deduced from Pioneer Venus radio occultation measurements. They demonstrate that radio occultation measurements yield results on frequency of occurrence of magnetization during solar maximum that are similar to those obtained from the Pioneer Venus in situ magnetic field measurements. During solar minimum, for which direct ionospheric measurements have never been made, they find that magnetization of the Venus ionosphere is more pervasive than at solar maximum. Magnetization extends to higher solar zenith angles (SZA) and appears stronger than at solar maximum. These results confirm that during solar minimum, the high solar wind dynamic pressure state is more prevalent at Venus because the ionospheric plasma pressure is weaker than at solar maximum. Comparison of a large number of electron density profiles of Mars (deduced from radio occultation measurements by the Viking 1 and 2 and Mariner 9 spacecraft for SZA > 46{degrees}) with those of Venus shows an absence of the ledge and disturbed topside plasma observed in the Venus profiles. These results, however, do not constitute evidence against magnetization of the ionosphere of Mars, as Shinagawa and Cravens (1989) have shown on their one-dimensional MHD models that, even when the ionosphere of Mars is highly magnetized, the magnetic structure differs from that at Venus, and a ledge does not form in its electron density profiles.

  7. Point-to-point measurement of radio frequency attenuation in South Polar ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Michael; Hoffman, Kara

    2011-04-01

    For ultra high energy (UHE) electromagnetic showers in a dense medium, radio frequency Cherenkov emission is enhanced due to the Askaryan effect. Present and future detectors such as RICE, ANITA, ARIANNA and the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) exploit this effect to detect UHE neutrinos interacting with Antarctic ice. The radio frequency electromagnetic wave attenuation length (the distance over which signal amplitude diminishes by a factor of 1 / e due to absorption or scattering) is of tantamount importance as it determines the size scale and effective volume of these detectors. Previous attenuation measurements rely on reflections off the bedrock of signals from a surface-mounted transmitter. Using RICE in-ice transmitters and IceCube Radio Extension in-ice receivers, we are conducting a point-to-point attenuation measurement in the upper 1500 meters of South Polar ice, the region of interest for planned near-surface detectors such as ARA. We will present the analysis method as well as preliminary results.

  8. Radio observations of the planets - The importance of laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, I.; Mitchell, D. L.

    1993-03-01

    Laboratory data on the line broadening parameters of H2S gas under Uranian/Neptunian conditions, on the far wings of the H2S and NH3 line profiles, and on the dielectric properties of CH4-, NH3-, H2S-, and NH4SH-ice are needed to constrain elemental abundances and understand the dynamics and cloud physics in the atmospheres of the giant planets. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of gaseous H2SO4 at millimeter wavelengths are needed in order to obtain a better understanding of Venus' atmosphere. To determine wind velocity fields in Venus' and Mars' atmospheres, accurate measurements of the center frequencies of the CO lines are necessary. The absorption and scattering properties of lunar soils and/or terrestrial rock powders at frequencies from approximately 1 to 200 GHz, determined in laboratory experiments, would provide a valuable addition to existing data at 450 MHz, 35 GHz, and far infrared frequencies. These data would be used to analyze the microwave spectra of planetary surfaces. Such studies may be helpful in distinguishing the effects of radiative transfer from those of nonlinear heat conduction and internal heat sources.

  9. The Accuracy of Radio Interferometric Measurements of Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Spieth, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of very long base interferometry earth rotation (UT1) measurements is examined by intercomparing TEMPO and POLARIS data for 1982 and the first half of 1983. None of these data are simultaneous, and so a proper intercomparison requires accounting for the scatter introduced by the rapid, unpredictable, UT1 variations driven by exchanges of angular momentum with the atmosphere. A statistical model of these variations, based on meteorological estimates of the Atmospheric Angular Momentum is derived, and the optimal linear (Kalman) smoother for this model is constructed. The scatter between smoothed and independent raw data is consistent with the residual formal errors, which do not depend upon the actual scatter of the UT1 data. This represents the first time that an accurate prediction of the scatter between UT1 data sets were possible.

  10. Method of measuring nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial cells grown in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, S.; Liu, A. C.; Barakat, A. I.; Choy, J. C.; Gray, B. L.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a simple and versatile method is presented which enables detection of nitric oxide (NO) released from vascular endothelial cells (ECs) cultured in microfluidic structures. The culturing system and NO measurement method allow cell shape to be controlled in a non-invasive manner using microfluidic structures while NO release is monitored for cell shape versus function studies. The culturing system consists of arrays of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fluidic channels 120 micrometers in depth and ranging from 100 micrometers to 3 mm in width. The number of channels in each array is varied to yield a constant cell culture surface area (75 mm2) independent of channel width. The channel surfaces are collagen-coated and ECs are cultured to confluence within the channels. A cell scraper is then used to scrape extraneous cells cultured between channels, and NO measurements are made 18 to 24 hours later. A chemiluminescence-based sensor system (NOA 280i, Sievers NO Analyzer) is utilized to measure sample NO. Initial results indicate that NO concentrations can be measured from different microfluidic channel-containing samples using this method. It is shown that there is no significant difference in NO concentration derived from channels of different widths even though the degree of cell elongation varies due to physical constraint by microfluidic channel walls. However, cells treated with TNF? release more NO than untreated cells in fluidic channels, which is comparable to the function of ECs cultured in conventional culturing systems such as culturing dishes.

  11. A Specific Multi-channel Photon-Counting Unit for Air-Pollution Measurement

    E-print Network

    Athens, University of

    A Specific Multi-channel Photon-Counting Unit for Air-Pollution Measurement Papageorgas P.1.g. confocal microscopy), air pollution optical measurements, laser sounding of the atmosphere for the in situ quantitative monitoring of up to five air pollutants simultaneously and one calibration channel

  12. Measurement of Ensemble TRPV1 Ion Channel Currents Using Droplet Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Vijayvergiya, Viksita; Acharya, Shiv; Wilson, Sidney P; Schmidt, Jacob J

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological characterization of ion channels is useful for elucidation of channel function as well as quantitative assessment of pharmaceutical effects on ion channel conductance. We used droplet bilayers to measure ensemble ion channel currents from membrane preparations made from TRPV1-expressing HEK cells. Conductance measurements showed rectification, activation by acid and capsaicin, and inhibition by capsazepine, SB 452533, and JNJ 17293212. We also quantitatively measured concentration-dependent inhibition of channel conductance through determination of capsazepine IC50 in agreement with previously published studies using patch clamp. These results, combined with the reduced apparatus and material requirements of droplet bilayers, indicate that this platform could be used for study of other physiologically relevant ion channels. PMID:26513481

  13. Measurement of Ensemble TRPV1 Ion Channel Currents Using Droplet Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvergiya, Viksita; Acharya, Shiv; Wilson, Sidney P.; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological characterization of ion channels is useful for elucidation of channel function as well as quantitative assessment of pharmaceutical effects on ion channel conductance. We used droplet bilayers to measure ensemble ion channel currents from membrane preparations made from TRPV1-expressing HEK cells. Conductance measurements showed rectification, activation by acid and capsaicin, and inhibition by capsazepine, SB 452533, and JNJ 17293212. We also quantitatively measured concentration-dependent inhibition of channel conductance through determination of capsazepine IC50 in agreement with previously published studies using patch clamp. These results, combined with the reduced apparatus and material requirements of droplet bilayers, indicate that this platform could be used for study of other physiologically relevant ion channels. PMID:26513481

  14. Development of algorithms Simulation of realistic transmitter and channel conditions

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    in industrial environment [4] measurements 1 ns 1 100ms #12;: industrial LOS/NLOS [2]: space-variant channel model with spatial evolution of channel impulse responses ultra-wideband space-variant multipath indoor radio channel model," IEEE Conference on Ultra Wideband

  15. Assessment of the Impacts of Radio Frequency Interference on SMAP Radar and Radiometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis W.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Johnson, Joel T.; Hirad Ghaemi

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission will measure soil moisture with a combination of Lband radar and radiometer measurements. We present an assessment of the expected impact of radio frequency interference (RFI) on SMAP performance, incorporating projections based on recent data collected by the Aquarius and SMOS missions. We discuss the impacts of RFI on the radar and radiometer separately given the differences in (1) RFI environment between the shared radar band and the protected radiometer band, (2) mitigation techniques available for the different measurements, and (3) existing data sources available that can inform predictions for SMAP.

  16. Over-The-Air Measurements of Small Radio Terminals Using Spheroidal Coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshirogi, Tasuku; Kawamura, Takashi; Yamamoto, Aya; Sakuma, Toru; Nago, Yasuhiko; Mattori, Shigenori

    We propose a novel method for measuring the matched total radiated power (TRP) and matched total radiated sensitivity (TRS) of small radio terminals, called over-the-air (OTA) measurement, using a spheroidal coupler (SC). To measure these parameters accurately in a multiple-reflection environment, such as in an SC, we developed two key techniques, i.e. displacement method and reflection compensation method, and verified their effectiveness by several simulations and fundamental experiments on a test transmitter. We also describe an absolute method for measuring antenna radiation efficiency using the displacement method. Furthermore, we describe TRP and TRS measurements for actual UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System) terminals, and verify that the proposed method achieves quick measurements with good accuracy. The SC provides a compact, low-cost OTA measurement system with high sensitivity and high speed.

  17. Plan View and Profile Relations: Measuring Correlation Between Channel Profile and Network Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelef, E.; Hilley, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    In this research, we explore the relationships between channel network attributes and the corresponding channel profile geometries using high-resolution digital topography and model-generated synthetic topographies. This combined analysis addresses one of the long-standing questions in geomorphology relating to the mechanistic significance of various plan-view channel network geometry measures. Statistically based numerical studies suggest that Hortonian measures of channel network architecture (e.g. bifurcation ratio, area ratio, and length ratio) describe virtually all possible network geometries, and so are not diagnostic when evaluating the origins of the geometry of a particular network. We further explore this hypothesis by examining the correlation between Hack exponent, the channel profile characteristics, and process changes (i.e debris flow vs. fluvial flows) within the landscape. Analysis of high resolution DEMs as well as modeled landscapes, suggests that the Hack exponent is likewise insensitive to changes in the channel profile concavity. In contrast, we find that changes in the concavity of channel profiles apparently impacts the spatial distribution of plan-view junction angles of joining stream segments throughout a catchment. In the context of previous work, this angle might be expected to be a function of the ratio between the slopes of the adjoined channels. Channel concavity determines downstream change in this ratio for channel segments throughout the basin, and so such a metric might be used to explicitly link profile channel geometries to plan-view network geometries. Because profile geometries may change with different advective mass transport processes, such a metric may provide a link between the processes that transport material across a landscape, the profile geometry of channels through which these flows traverse, and the overall drainage network geometry. Additional numerical and field data based analysis are required to further explore the sensitivity of the junction angle, as well as other measures, to process changes along the channel network.

  18. Sub-micrometer fluidic channel for measuring photon emitting entities

    DOEpatents

    Stavis, Samuel M; Edel, Joshua B; Samiee, Kevan T; Craighead, Harold G

    2014-11-18

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  19. The New Horizons Bistatic Radio Science Experiment to Measure Pluto's Surface Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscott, I.; Hinson, D. P.; Tyler, G. L.; Vincent, M.

    2014-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) payload includes a Radio Science Experiment (REX) for principally occultation and radiometric measurement of Pluto and Charon during the flyby in July 2015. The REX subsystem is contained, together with the NH X-Band radio, in the Integrated Electronics Module (IEM) in the New Horizons spacecraft. REX samples and records in two polarizations both total RF power in a 4.5 MHz bandwidth, and radio signal waveforms in a narrow, 1.25 kHz band. During the encounter, and at closest approach to Pluto, the spacecraft's high gain antenna (HGA) will scan Pluto's equatorial latitudes, intercepting the specular zone, a region near Pluto's limb that geometrically favors reflection from the earth's direction. At the same time, a powerful 80 kW uplink beacon will have been transmitted from earth by the DSN to arrive at Pluto during spacecraft closest approach. Reflection from the specular zone is expected to be sufficiently strong to observe the bistatic uplink in the REX narrowband record. Measurements in both polarizations will then be combined to yield surface reflectivity, roughness and limits on the dielectric constant in the specular zone.

  20. LDV measurements of Rayleigh streaming in channels of rectangular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessis, R.; Bailliet, H.; Reyt, I.; Valière, J.-Ch.

    2015-10-01

    Rayleigh streaming, suspected to hamper the efficiency of thermoacoustic engines, has been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies in the last decades. This phenomenon is well characterized in the case of two-dimensional channels, but streaming in three-dimensional enclosures, such as rectangular channels, is a usually described using a two-dimensional theoretical model, although such predictions have rarely been confronted to measurements. We present results of LDV measurements in rectangular channels with different aspect ratios. The axial particle velocity is estimated from velocity measurements and axial acoustic and streaming velocity evolutions along transverse axes are considered. Results for different channel heights are used to discuss the limit of validity of the usual 2D channel hypothesis when considering a rectangular enclosure.

  1. Astrometric measurements of radio sources optical counterparts. OATo campaign: some final results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciarelli, B.; Crosta, M. T.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Massone, G.; Morbidelli, R.; Jin, W.; Tang, Z., Deiana, G.; Poma, A.; Uras, S.

    2005-01-01

    Positions to better than 0.1"" of optical counterparts of some extragalactic radio sources taken from the IERS list are obtained via photographic astrometry. These objects are part of an observational campaign carried out at Torino Observatory (OATo) a few years ago with the aim of improving the ERF optical link. The full data archive (about 350 plates for approximately 90 radio sources) has been digitized at Cagliari Observatory with the automatized Torino-Cagliari Measuring Machine (TO.CA.M.M.). Some preliminary results on the astrometric quality of these data have already been published; presently the reduction procedures are being revised also in view of high-quality reference catalogues recently made available and all the digitized images are consistently being re-calibrated. In this contribution we present some final results on the stability of TO.CA.M.M. discuss the adopted calibration methods and give precise positions in the ICRF system of a few selected targets.

  2. Jupiters Synchrotron Radiation at 50 MHZ measured by the large Jicamarca Radio Observatory Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodman, R. F.; Villanueva, F.

    2013-05-01

    The large 50 MHz antenna of the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (300mx300m) has been used to observe and measure Jupiters synchrotron radiation. Previously, the lowest frequency used to observe this radiation has been 80 MHz, with a much smaller antenna. Our measurements show that the level of radiation is below the sensitivity of the system used. Thus, we were capable of establishing an upper level limit for radiation at this frequency and found it to be several dBs below the expected level derived from a smooth extrapolation of its spectrum.

  3. DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR FOR CONTEXT;

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA ABSTRACT Dam removal is often implemented to assess downstream channel changes associated with a small dam removal. The Brownsville Dam, a 2.1 m tall

  4. An interlaboratory comparison programme on radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements: the second round of the scheme.

    PubMed

    Nicolopoulou, E P; Ztoupis, I N; Karabetsos, E; Gonos, I F; Stathopulos, I A

    2015-04-01

    The second round of an interlaboratory comparison scheme on radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements has been conducted in order to evaluate the overall performance of laboratories that perform measurements in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations and broadcast antenna facilities. The participants recorded the electric field strength produced by two high frequency signal generators inside an anechoic chamber in three measurement scenarios with the antennas transmitting each time different signals at the FM, VHF, UHF and GSM frequency bands. In each measurement scenario, the participants also used their measurements in order to calculate the relative exposure ratios. The results were evaluated in each test level calculating performance statistics (z-scores and En numbers). Subsequently, possible sources of errors for each participating laboratory were discussed, and the overall evaluation of their performances was determined by using an aggregated performance statistic. A comparison between the two rounds proves the necessity of the scheme. PMID:25205832

  5. Solar wind interaction with the ionosphere of Venus inferred from radio scintillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, R.; Sjogren, W.L.; Kliore, A.J. ); Luhmann, J.G. ); Brace, L.H. )

    1989-02-01

    This paper presents the first S-band (2.3 GHz) radio scintillations observed in the ionosphere of Venus and discovered when the Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft traversed the ionosphere of Venus. In situ plasma measurements as well as propagation calculations confirm that the scintillations are caused by electron density irregularities in the topside ionosphere of Venus below the ionopause. While these topside plasma irregularities have not been studied before, simultaneous magnetic field measurements presented here reveal that they are associated with the penetration of large-scale magnetic fields in the ionosphere. Previous studies based on extensive magnetic field measurements have shown that the presence of large-scale magnetic fields occurs in the subsolar region when the solar wind dynamic pressure exceeds the ionospheric plasma pressure. As with the large-scale magnetic fields, the disturbed plasma and resulting scintillations are therefore a manifestation of high-dynamic solar wind interaction with the ionosphere. Since the scintillations only occur in the subsolar region of Venus, the global morphology of ionospheric scintillations at Venus is different from that of the terrestrial ionosphere, where scintillations are observed in both polar and equatorial regions, with peaks occurring during nighttime. This difference apparently stems from the fact that Venus is not a magnetic planet. The authors also demonstrate that the disturbed plasma produced by the high-dynamic solar wind interaction can be remotely sensed by scintillations during radio occultation measurements, that is, when the spacecraft is outside the ionosphere.

  6. Measurements of radio propagation in rock salt for the detection of high-energy neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Amy Connolly; Abigail Goodhue; Christian Miki; Ryan Nichol; David Saltzberg

    2008-06-12

    We present measurements of the transmission of radio/microwave pulses through salt in the Cote Blanche salt mine operated by the North American Salt Company in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. These results are from data taken in the southwestern region of the 1500 ft. (457 m) deep level of the mine on our third and most recent visit to the mine. We transmitted and received a fast, high-power, broadband pulse from within three vertical boreholes that were drilled to depths of 100 ft. (30 m) and 200 ft. below the 1500 ft. level using three different pairs of dipole antennas whose bandwidths span 125 to 900 MHz. By measuring the relative strength of the received pulses between boreholes with separations of 50 m and 169 m, we deduce the attenuation of the signal attributed to the salt medium. We fit the frequency dependence of the attenuation to a power law and find the best fit field attenuation lengths to be 93 \\pm 7 m at 150 MHz, 63 \\pm 3 m at 300 MHz, and 36 \\pm 2 m at 800 MHz. This is the most precise measurement of radio attenuation in a natural salt formation to date. We assess the implications of this measurement for a future neutrino detector in salt.

  7. The radio waves & thermal electrostatic noise spectroscopy (SORBET) experiment on BepiColombo/MMO/PWI and the importance of radio HF measurements at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncuquet, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Issautier, K.; Kojima, H.; Maksimovic, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zarka, P.

    SORBET (Spectroscopie des Ondes Radio & du Bruit Electrostatique Thermique) is a radio HF spectrometer designed for the radio and Plasma Waves Instrument (PWI) onboard BepiColombo/Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which performs remote and in-situ measurements of waves (electromagnetic and electrostatic). Technically, SORBET includes a plasma wave spectrometer, with two E-field inputs from the two perpendicular electric antennas and one B-field input from a search coil, in the range 2.5 kHz - 640 kHz. This frequency band includes the local gyrofrequency and plasma frequency expected on most part of the MMO orbits. SORBET also includes a higher frequency radio receiver for remote sensing in the range 500kHz-10.2MHz. Owing to its capabilities, SORBET will be able to address the following scientific objectives: High resolution mapping (˜ 30 km) of electron density and temperature in the solar wind and Hermean magnetosphere and exo-ionosphere, via the technique of Quasi-Thermal Noise (QTN) spectroscopy. It is noteworthy that the QTN technique is weakly sensitive to spacecraft potential and photoelectron perturbations, a point highly in favour of this technique at Mercury. These QTN measurements will be determinant for the dynamic modeling of the magnetosphere and will provide a fundamental input for the chemistry of cold ionized species (Na, K, O ...) in Mercury's environment. Detection and study of Hermean radio emissions, including possible cyclotron emissions (up to ˜ 10-20 kHz) from mildly energetic electrons in highly magnetized (polar?) regions, and possible synchrotron radiation (up to a few MHz?) from more energetic electrons. Monitoring of solar radio emissions up to ~10 MHz, in order to create a solar activity index from the view point of Mercury, allowing to correlate it with the Hermean magnetospheric response. We propose to further discuss these scientific objectives and to underline that such radio HF measurements are a clue for understanding the structure and dynamics (regions, boundaries, acceleration, dissipation processes ...) of the Hermean magnetosphere/exo-ionosphere system and its interaction with the solar wind.

  8. Rayleigh beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Millimeter-wavelength Rayleigh scattering from water droplets in a cloud is proposed as a means of generating a bright beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope. A ?=3 mm transmitter, with an output power of a few watts, illuminating a stratiform cloud, can generate a beacon with the same flux as Mars in 10 GHz bandwidth, but the beacon has a narrow line width, so it is extremely bright. The key advantage of the beacon is that it can be used at any time, and positioned anywhere in the sky, as long as there are clouds.

  9. Rayleigh beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Padin, S

    2014-12-01

    Millimeter-wavelength Rayleigh scattering from water droplets in a cloud is proposed as a means of generating a bright beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope. A ?=3??mm transmitter, with an output power of a few watts, illuminating a stratiform cloud, can generate a beacon with the same flux as Mars in 10 GHz bandwidth, but the beacon has a narrow line width, so it is extremely bright. The key advantage of the beacon is that it can be used at any time, and positioned anywhere in the sky, as long as there are clouds. PMID:25607971

  10. Measurements of the Suitability of Large Rock Salt Formations for Radio Detection of High Energy Neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Gorham, P W; Odian, A; Williams, D; Besson, D; Frichter, G; Tantawi, S G; Gorham, Peter; Saltzberg, David; Odian, Allen; Williams, Dawn; Besson, David; Frichter, George; Tantawi, Sami

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility that large rock salt formations might be suitable as target masses for detection of neutrinos of energies about 10 PeV and above. In neutrino interactions at these energies, the secondary electromagnetic cascade produces a coherent radio pulse well above ambient thermal noise via the Askaryan effect. We describe measurements of radio-frequency attenuation lengths and ambient thermal noise in two salt formations. Measurements in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in an evaporite salt bed in Carlsbad, NM yielded short attenuation lengths, 3-7 m over 150-300 MHz. However, measurements at United Salt's Hockley mine, located in a salt dome near Houston, Texas yielded attenuation lengths in excess of 250 m at similar frequencies. We have also analyzed early ground-penetrating radar data at Hockley mine and have found additional evidence for attenuation lengths in excess of several hundred meters at 440 MHz. We conclude that salt domes, which may individually contain...

  11. Measurements of the Suitability of Large Rock Salt Formations for Radio Detection of High Energy Neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Peter Gorham; David Saltzberg; Allen Odian; Dawn Williams; David Besson; George Frichter; Sami Tantawi

    2002-01-23

    We have investigated the possibility that large rock salt formations might be suitable as target masses for detection of neutrinos of energies about 10 PeV and above. In neutrino interactions at these energies, the secondary electromagnetic cascade produces a coherent radio pulse well above ambient thermal noise via the Askaryan effect. We describe measurements of radio-frequency attenuation lengths and ambient thermal noise in two salt formations. Measurements in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in an evaporite salt bed in Carlsbad, NM yielded short attenuation lengths, 3-7 m over 150-300 MHz. However, measurements at United Salt's Hockley mine, located in a salt dome near Houston, Texas yielded attenuation lengths in excess of 250 m at similar frequencies. We have also analyzed early ground-penetrating radar data at Hockley mine and have found additional evidence for attenuation lengths in excess of several hundred meters at 440 MHz. We conclude that salt domes, which may individually contain several hundred cubic kilometer water-equivalent mass, provide attractive sites for next-generation high-energy neutrino detectors.

  12. Interplanetary dust detection by radio antennas: Mass calibration and fluxes measured by STEREO/WAVES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavsky, A.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Mann, I.; Czechowski, A.; Issautier, K.; Le Chat, G.; Pantellini, F.; Goetz, K.; Maksimovic, M.; Bale, S. D.; Kasper, J. C.

    2012-05-01

    We analyze dust impacts recorded by the S/WAVES radio instrument onboard the two STEREO spacecraft near 1 A.U. during the period 2007-2010. The impact of a dust particle on a spacecraft produces a plasma cloud whose associated electric field can be detected by on-board electric antennas. For this study we use the electric potential time series recorded by the waveform sampler of the instrument. The high time resolution and long sampling times of this measurement enable us to deduce considerably more information than in previous studies based on the dynamic power spectra provided by the same instrument or by radio instruments onboard other spacecraft. The large detection area compared to conventional dust detectors provides flux data with a better statistics. We show that the dust-generated signals are of two kinds, corresponding to impacts of dust from distinctly different mass ranges. We propose calibration formulas for these signals and show that we are able to use S/WAVES as a dust detector with convincing results both in the nanometer and micrometer size ranges. In the latter, the orbital motion of the spacecraft enables us to distinguish between interstellar and interplanetary dust components. Our measurements cover the mass intervals ˜10-22-10-20 kg and ˜10-17 - 5 × 10-16 kg. The flux of the larger dust agrees with measurements of other instruments on different spacecraft.

  13. Radio frequency coupling apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Steven W. (Golden, CO); Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample using radio-frequency coupling. The measuring apparatus includes an antenna that is positioned a coupling distance from a semiconductor sample which is exposed to light pulses from a laser during sampling operations. A signal generator is included to generate high frequency, such as 900 MHz or higher, sinusoidal waveform signals that are split into a reference signal and a sample signal. The sample signal is transmitted into a sample branch circuit where it passes through a tuning capacitor and a coaxial cable prior to reaching the antenna. The antenna is radio-frequency coupled with the adjacent sample and transmits the sample signal, or electromagnetic radiation corresponding to the sample signal, to the sample and receives reflected power or a sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal back. To lower impedance and speed system response, the impedance is controlled by limiting impedance in the coaxial cable and the antenna reactance. In one embodiment, the antenna is a waveguide/aperture hybrid antenna having a central transmission line and an adjacent ground flange. The sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal is then transmitted to a mixer which also receives the reference signal. To enhance the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus, the mixer is operated to phase match the reference signal and the sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal.

  14. Controlling of Entropic Uncertainty in Qubits System Under the Generalized Amplitude Damping Channel via Weak Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Yang; Fang, Mao-Fa; Yu, Min

    2015-10-01

    We study the effect of weak measurements on the entropic uncertainty in two-qubit system under the generalized amplitude damping channel. Our results show that, the entropic uncertainty in qubits system can be reduced under weak measurements by choosing appropriate measuring strength, which provides a new method to break through the restriction of uncertainty relation in quantum mechanics.

  15. SPR Imaging Measurements of 1-D and 2-D DNA Microarrays Created from Microfluidic Channels on

    E-print Network

    SPR Imaging Measurements of 1-D and 2-D DNA Microarrays Created from Microfluidic Channels on Gold have recently demon- strated that SPR imaging measurements of DNA microarrays fabricated on gold concentrations.1-3 In those initial sets of measurements, the DNA microarrays consisted of 60 500 µm × 500 µm

  16. Measurement of the t-channel single top quark production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    The D0 collaboration reports direct evidence for electroweak production of single top quarks through the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson. This is the first analysis to isolate an individual single top quark production channel. We select events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and two, three or four jets from 2.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. One or two of the jets are identified as containing a b hadron. We combine three multivariate techniques optimized for the t-channel process to measure the t- and s-channel cross sections simultaneously. We measure cross sections of 3.14{sub -0.80}{sup +0.94} pb for the t-channel and 1.05 {+-} 0.81 pb for the s-channel. The measured t-channel result is found to have a significance of 4.8 standard deviations and is consistent with the standard model prediction.

  17. Antenna Performance Measurements in L, S, C, and X Bands for TM65m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Q.; Zhao, R. B.; Yu, L. F.; Yin, H. L.; Lao, B. Q.; Wu, Y. J.; Li, B.; Dong, J.; Jiang, Y. B.; Xia, B.; Zuo, X. T.; Gou, W.; Guo, W.; Wu, X. C.; Lu, X. J.; Liu, Q. H.; Fan, Q. Y.; Jiang, D. R.; Qian, Z. H.

    2015-05-01

    The measured results of the antenna efficiency, sensitivity, and system noise temperature for TM65m telescope are reported in this paper. The key parameters describing a radio astronomy receiving system are introduced firstly. Then the measurement methods are discussed, and the errors are assessed. Finally, the measurements of the antenna efficiency, sensitivity, and system temperature performances are given. The results show that the efficiency and SEFD (System Equivalent Flux Density) decrease dramatically at both low and high elevations when the position of the sub-reflector is fixed. The antenna efficiency in C and X bands reaches more than 60% over the entire elevation range if a sub-reflector model is applied. The system noise temperatures are independent of the sub-reflector model. The sensitivity and system noise temperature of the C band has the best performance among the four bands.

  18. Direction of Arrival Measurements of Auroral Medium Frequency Burst Radio Emissions at Toolik Lake, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Labelle, J. W.; Hughes, J. M.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Ye, S.; Lummerzheim, D.

    2007-12-01

    MF burst is an impulsive radio emission of auroral origin detected by ground-based instruments approximately between 1,300 and 3,700 kHz, and associated with substorm onsets. Its exact generation mechanism is unknown, though it has been speculated that it arises from mode conversion radiation. To discover the generation mechanism and the relation of MF burst to auroral processes, Dartmouth has deployed radio interferometers in Alaska, Northern Canada, Greenland, and Antarctica, including a three-element interferometer deployed at Toolik Lake Field Station in Alaska in 2006. This instrument measured spectra, amplitudes, and directions of arrival (DOA's) of over 47 MF burst events occurring between November 30, 2006 and May 26, 2007. These represent the first DOA measurements ever reported for the impulsive MF burst phenomenon. Preliminary analysis shows that the events originated from a wide range of directions in the sky, with all azimuths represented in the distribution of DOA's. The DOA of each individual event is well-defined, however. Many events show apparent motion, with southward motions more common than northward among the subset of events analyzed so far. Some of the events were detected simultaneously on an interferometer deployed at Kaktovik, Alaska, 400 km away. The all-sky imager at Toolik Lake was also operational for some events. Further analysis of these data promises to reveal first information about the locations and motions of MF burst sources, a first step towards discovering the generation mechanism of this mysterious radio emission and its relation to auroral processes.

  19. Separate in situ measurements of ECA under land and channel in PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higier, Andrew; Liu, Hongtan

    2012-10-01

    Separate in situ measurements of electrochemical areas (ECA) under land and channel areas in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are realized using cyclic voltammetry. Experiments are carried out using special membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) in single-channel serpentine flow fields with different widths of channels and lands. The experimental results show that ECAs are significantly higher in the areas under the land than that under the channel. ECA-normalized polarization curves show that ECA is the most significant factor causing higher current density under the land than under the channel in the high cell potential region, and the true concentration polarization under the land in the low potential region is actually much greater than what can be seen in conventional polarization curves. Further experimental results show that, within the compression pressure range examined, ECA increases with compression pressure significantly.

  20. Multiple Radios for Effective Rendezvous in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-print Network

    Chu, Xiaowen

    Multiple Radios for Effective Rendezvous in Cognitive Radio Networks Lu Yu1 , Hai Liu1 , Yiu in cognitive radio networks (CRNs) for establishing a communication link on a commonly-available channel is equipped with one radio (i.e., one wireless transceiver). As the cost of wireless transceivers is dropping

  1. Experimental Measurements of Skin Friction in Air and Water Micro-Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crafton, Jim; Fonov, Sergey; Jones, Grant; Forlines, Alan

    2008-11-01

    Surface Stress Sensitive Film (S3F), is a relatively new experimental sensor that provides continuous measurements of skin friction and pressure on aerodynamic and hydrodynamic surfaces. This sensor is based on the distortions of an elastic polymer film which deforms under the action of the applied normal and tangential loads. Skin friction and pressure gradients are determined by monitoring these distortions and applying a finite element model to the elastic film. This technique has been demonstrated by performing quantitative measurements of pressure and skin friction in several wind tunnels, water tunnel, and channel flows. This paper will focus on experimental measurements in fully developed micro-channels that have been used to validate the S3F measurements. Comparisons between S3F, theoretical relations based on Reynolds number and Poiseuille Flow, and experimental measurements of skin friction based on monitoring the pressure gradient in the channel indicate agreement of better than 5%.

  2. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: measuring radio galaxy bias through cross-correlation with lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Rupert; Lindsay, Sam N.; Sherwin, Blake D.; de Bernardis, Francesco; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gallardo, Patricio; Henderson, Shawn; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Jarvis, Matt; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Madhavacheril, Mathew; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Naess, Sigurd; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; van Engelen, Alexander; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-07-01

    We correlate the positions of radio galaxies in the FIRST survey with the cosmic microwave background lensing convergence estimated from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope over 470 deg2 to determine the bias of these galaxies. We remove optically cross-matched sources below redshift z = 0.2 to preferentially select active galactic nuclei (AGN). We measure the angular cross-power spectrum C_l^{? g} at 4.4? significance in the multipole range 100 < l < 3000, corresponding to physical scales within ?2-60 Mpc at an effective redshift zeff = 1.5. Modelling the AGN population with a redshift-dependent bias, the cross-spectrum is well fitted by the Planck best-fitting ? cold dark matter cosmological model. Fixing the cosmology and assumed redshift distribution of sources, we fit for the overall bias model normalization, finding b(zeff) = 3.5 ± 0.8 for the full galaxy sample and b(zeff) = 4.0 ± 1.1(3.0 ± 1.1) for sources brighter (fainter) than 2.5 mJy. This measurement characterizes the typical halo mass of radio-loud AGN: we find log (M_halo / M_{?}) = 13.6^{+0.3}_{-0.4}.

  3. The Q/U Imaging Experiment: Polarization Measurements of Radio Sources at 43 and 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Ruud, T. M.; Wehus, I. K.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Gaier, T.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Miller, A. D.; Radford, S. J. E.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Staggs, S. T.; Tajima, O.; Thompson, K. L.; QUIET Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ˜480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30-40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%-20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  4. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Simultaneously in Dilepton and Lepton + Jets Decay Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorko, Wojciech T.; /Chicago U.

    2008-09-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the top quark mass using simultaneously data from two decay channels. They use a data sample of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collisions with integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector. They select dilepton and lepton + jets channel decays of t{bar t} pairs and reconstruct two observables in each topology. They use non-parametric techniques to derive probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the reconstructed top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the dilepton topology and the reconstructed top quark mass and the invariant mass of jets from the W boson decay in lepton + jets channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson resonance from the lepton + jets channel. Using 144 dilepton candidate events and 332 lepton + jets candidate events they measure: M{sub top} = 171.9 {+-} 1.7 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} = 171.9 {+-} 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}. The measurement features a robust treatment of the systematic uncertainties, correlated between the two channels and develops techniques for a future top quark mass measurement simultaneously in all decay channels. Measurements of the W boson mass and the top quark mass provide a constraint on the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. The Higgs boson mass implied by measurement presented here is higher than Higgs boson mass implied by previously published, most precise CDF measurements of the top quark mass in lepton + jets and dilepton channels separately.

  5. Reconstruction of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air showers from LOPES radio measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W. D.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Bähren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Fuchs, B.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Krömer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Link, K.; ?uczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Morello, C.; Oehlschläger, J.; Palmieri, N.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J. A.; Lopes Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    LOPES is a digital radio interferometer located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany, that measures radio emission from extensive air showers at MHz frequencies in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. In this article, we explore a method (slope method) that leverages the slope of the measured radio lateral distribution to reconstruct crucial attributes of primary cosmic rays. First, we present an investigation of the method on the basis of pure simulations. Second, we directly apply the slope method to LOPES measurements. Applying the slope method to simulations, we obtain uncertainties on the reconstruction of energy and depth of shower maximum (Xmax) of 13% and 50 g /cm2, respectively. Applying it to LOPES measurements, we are able to reconstruct energy and Xmax of individual events with upper limits on the precision of 20%-25% for the primary energy and 95 g /cm2 for Xmax, despite strong human-made noise at the LOPES site.

  6. Measuring a Cherenkov ring in the radio emission from air showers at 110-190 MHz with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelles, A.; Schellart, P.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; de Vries, K. D.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Hörandel, J. R.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; van den Akker, M.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Garrett, M. A.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Mevius, M.; Norden, M. J.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, G.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B. W.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.

    2015-05-01

    Measuring radio emission from air showers offers a novel way to determine properties of the primary cosmic rays such as their mass and energy. Theory predicts that relativistic time compression effects lead to a ring of amplified emission which starts to dominate the emission pattern for frequencies above ? 100 MHz. In this article we present the first detailed measurements of this structure. Ring structures in the radio emission of air showers are measured with the LOFAR radio telescope in the frequency range of 110-190 MHz. These data are well described by CoREAS simulations. They clearly confirm the importance of including the index of refraction of air as a function of height. Furthermore, the presence of the Cherenkov ring offers the possibility for a geometrical measurement of the depth of shower maximum, which in turn depends on the mass of the primary particle.

  7. Reconstruction of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air-showers from LOPES radio measurements

    E-print Network

    W. D. Apel; J. C. Arteaga-Velazquez; L. Bähren; K. Bekk; M. Bertaina; P. L. Biermann; J. Blümer; H. Bozdog; I. M. Brancus; E. Cantoni; A. Chiavassa; K. Daumiller; V. de Souza; F. Di Pierro; P. Doll; R. Engel; H. Falcke; B. Fuchs; D. Fuhrmann; H. Gemmeke; C. Grupen; A. Haungs; D. Heck; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; D. Huber; T. Huege; P. G. Isar; K. -H. Kampert; D. Kang; O. Krömer; J. Kuijpers; K. Link; P. ?uczak; M. Ludwig; H. J. Mathes; M. Melissas; C. Morello; J. Oehlschläger; N. Palmieri; T. Pierog; J. Rautenberg; H. Rebel; M. Roth; C. Rühle; A. Saftoiu; H. Schieler; A. Schmidt; F. G. Schröder; O. Sima; G. Toma; G. C. Trinchero; A. Weindl; J. Wochele; J. Zabierowski; J. A. Zensus

    2014-08-11

    LOPES is a digital radio interferometer located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany, which measures radio emission from extensive air showers at MHz frequencies in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. In this article, we explore a method (slope method) which leverages the slope of the measured radio lateral distribution to reconstruct crucial attributes of primary cosmic rays. First, we present an investigation of the method on the basis of pure simulations. Second, we directly apply the slope method to LOPES measurements. Applying the slope method to simulations, we obtain uncertainties on the reconstruction of energy and depth of shower maximum Xmax of 13% and 50 g/cm^2, respectively. Applying it to LOPES measurements, we are able to reconstruct energy and Xmax of individual events with upper limits on the precision of 20-25% for the primary energy and 95 g/cm^2 for Xmax, despite strong human-made noise at the LOPES site.

  8. Reconstruction of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air-showers from LOPES radio measurements

    E-print Network

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; ?uczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2014-01-01

    LOPES is a digital radio interferometer located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany, which measures radio emission from extensive air showers at MHz frequencies in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. In this article, we explore a method (slope method) which leverages the slope of the measured radio lateral distribution to reconstruct crucial attributes of primary cosmic rays. First, we present an investigation of the method on the basis of pure simulations. Second, we directly apply the slope method to LOPES measurements. Applying the slope method to simulations, we obtain uncertainties on the reconstruction of energy and depth of shower maximum Xmax of 13% and 50 g/cm^2, respectively. Applying it to LOPES measurements, we are able to reconstruct energy and Xmax of individual events with upper limits on the precision of 20-25% for the primary energy and 95 g/cm^2 for Xmax, despite strong human-made noise at the LOPES site.

  9. Emissive sheath measurements in the afterglow of a radio frequency plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, J. P. Hershkowitz, N.; Barnat, E. V.; Weatherford, B. R.; Kaganovich, I. D.

    2014-01-15

    The difference between the plasma potential and the floating potential of a highly emissive planar surface was measured in the afterglow of a radio frequency discharge. A Langmuir probe was used to measure the electron temperature and an emissive probe was used to measure the spatial distribution of the potential using the inflection point in the limit of zero emission technique. Time-resolved measurements were made using the slow-sweep method, a technique for measuring time-resolved current-voltage traces. This was the first time the inflection point in the limit of zero emission was used to make time-resolved measurements. Measurements of the potential profile of the presheath indicate that the potential penetrated approximately 50% farther into the plasma when a surface was emitting electrons. The experiments confirmed a recent kinetic theory of emissive sheaths, demonstrating that late in the afterglow as the plasma electron temperature approached the emitted electron temperature, the emissive sheath potential shrank to zero. However, the difference between the plasma potential and the floating potential of a highly emissive planar surface data appeared to be much less sensitive to the electron temperature ratio than the theory predicts.

  10. Portable Wireless LAN Device and Two-way Radio Threat Assessment for Aircraft Navigation Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Williams, Reuben A.; Smith, Laura J.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2003-01-01

    Measurement processes, data and analysis are provided to address the concern for Wireless Local Area Network devices and two-way radios to cause electromagnetic interference to aircraft navigation radio systems. A radiated emission measurement process is developed and spurious radiated emissions from various devices are characterized using reverberation chambers. Spurious radiated emissions in aircraft radio frequency bands from several wireless network devices are compared with baseline emissions from standard computer laptops and personal digital assistants. In addition, spurious radiated emission data in aircraft radio frequency bands from seven pairs of two-way radios are provided, A description of the measurement process, device modes of operation and the measurement results are reported. Aircraft interference path loss measurements were conducted on four Boeing 747 and Boeing 737 aircraft for several aircraft radio systems. The measurement approach is described and the path loss results are compared with existing data from reference documents, standards, and NASA partnerships. In-band on-channel interference thresholds are compiled from an existing reference document. Using these data, a risk assessment is provided for interference from wireless network devices and two-way radios to aircraft systems, including Localizer, Glideslope, Very High Frequency Omnidirectional Range, Microwave Landing System and Global Positioning System. The report compares the interference risks associated with emissions from wireless network devices and two-way radios against standard laptops and personal digital assistants. Existing receiver interference threshold references are identified as to require more data for better interference risk assessments.

  11. SHORT COMMUNICATION: Some considerations related to the evaluation of measurement uncertainty for complex-valued quantities in radio frequency measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. D.

    2007-12-01

    Several issues are discussed that relate to the evaluation of measurement uncertainty for complex-valued quantities in radio frequency measurements. In situations where there is information about the magnitude of a complex quantity, but not phase, uniform distributions in the form of a disc or a ring may be appropriate representations for the uncertainty. Variance-covariance matrices for these distributions are given for use in bivariate uncertainty calculations. The situation in which an uncertainty statement is provided in polar coordinates is also discussed. Such uncertainty statements need to be transformed into the real-imaginary coordinate system for the preferred method of uncertainty calculation. A simple transformation procedure is described together with a method to assess its accuracy.

  12. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-01

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O3+ ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  13. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deyang; Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-01

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O(3+) ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured. PMID:26628167

  14. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    E-print Network

    Yu, Deyang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking the advantages of high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two 128-channel Faraday cup arrays are built, and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O3+ ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  15. Measuring Channel Capacity to Distinguish Undue Influence James Newsome

    E-print Network

    Zakhor, Avideh

    by the Blaster and SQL Slammer worms. Influence measurement correctly distinguishes real attacks from taint- ing to control-flow hijacking and the execution of the attacker's injected code) [25]. Despite these attractive

  16. Investigation of the plasmasphere electron content on the base of radio-measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, I.; Zakharenkova, I.; Krankowski, A.

    2013-12-01

    The electron densities in plasmasphere are several orders of magnitude less than in ionosphere and the plasmasphere is often ignored at analysis and estimation of GPS TEC data, however the plasmaspheric contribution to the GPS TEC can became significant under certain conditions. This paper presents results of study of the plasmaspheric electron content variations for such cases - period of very low solar activity and during strong geomagnetic storm. Estimates of IEC can be retrieved as a result of integration of ionospheric electron density profiles (EDP). For this aim one can use EDPs derived from satellite radio occultation (RO) or ground-based radio-physical measurements. For case of the extended solar minimum of 23/24 cycle, 2009 the PEC was estimated by combination of GPS TEC observations and FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC RO measurements. It was analyzed the monthly medians of TEC and PEC for different seasons (equinoxes and solstices). Results shows that for mid-latitudinal points PEC estimates varied weakly with the time of a day and reached the value of several TECU for the condition of solar minimum. Percentage contribution of PEC to GPS TEC indicated the clear dependence from the time with maximal values (more than 50-60%) during night-time and lesser values (25-45%) during day-time. The variations of PEC during strong geomagnetic storms at November 2004 were estimated by combining of mid-latitude Kharkov Incoherent Scatter Radar observations and GPS TEC data. The comparison between two independent measurements was performed by analysis of the height-temporal distribution for specific point corresponded to the mid-latitudes of Europe. Percentage contribution of PEC to GPS TEC indicated the clear dependence from the time with maximal values (more than 70%) during night-time and smaller values (30-45%) during day-time for weak disturbance and quite time and rather high values during strong negative storm (up to 90%) with small changes in time. These changes can be explained by the competing effects of electric fields and winds which tend to raise the layer to the region with lower loss rate and movement of ionospheric plasma to protonosphere. The results of our investigations can be further used for GNSS applications as well as for long base low frequency radio astronomical facilities (like LOFAR) during high precision measurements campaigns.

  17. Multifrequency channel microwave reflectometer with frequency hopping operation for density fluctuation measurements in Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Tokuzawa, T; Ejiri, A; Kawahata, K

    2010-10-01

    In order to measure the internal structure of density fluctuations using a microwave reflectometer, the broadband frequency tunable system, which has the ability of fast and stable hopping operation, has been improved in the Large Helical Device. Simultaneous multipoint measurement is the key issue of this development. For accurate phase measurement, the system utilizes a single sideband modulation technique. Currently, a dual channel heterodyne frequency hopping reflectometer system has been constructed and applied to the Alfve?n eigenmode measurements. PMID:21033938

  18. Multifrequency channel microwave reflectometer with frequency hopping operation for density fluctuation measurements in Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuzawa, T.; Kawahata, K.; Ejiri, A.

    2010-10-15

    In order to measure the internal structure of density fluctuations using a microwave reflectometer, the broadband frequency tunable system, which has the ability of fast and stable hopping operation, has been improved in the Large Helical Device. Simultaneous multipoint measurement is the key issue of this development. For accurate phase measurement, the system utilizes a single sideband modulation technique. Currently, a dual channel heterodyne frequency hopping reflectometer system has been constructed and applied to the Alfven eigenmode measurements.

  19. New expansion rate measurements of the Crab nebula in radio and optical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, M. F.; Nugent, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present new radio measurements of the expansion rate of the Crab nebula's synchrotron nebula over a ˜30-yr period. We find a convergence date for the radio synchrotron nebula of CE 1255 ± 27. We also re-evaluated the expansion rate of the optical-line-emitting filaments, and we show that the traditional estimates of their convergence date are slightly biased. Using an unbiased Bayesian analysis, we find a convergence date for the filaments of CE 1091 ± 34 (˜40 yr earlier than previous estimates). Our results show that both the synchrotron nebula and the optical-line-emitting filaments have been accelerated since the explosion in CE 1054, but that the synchrotron nebula has been relatively strongly accelerated, while the optical filaments have been only slightly accelerated. The finding that the synchrotron emission expands more rapidly than the filaments supports the picture that the latter are the result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface between the pulsar-wind nebula and the surrounding freely expanding supernova ejecta, and rules out models where the pulsar-wind bubble is interacting directly with the pre-supernova wind of the Crab's progenitor.

  20. New expansion rate measurements of the Crab Nebula in radio and optical

    E-print Network

    Bietenholz, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    We present new radio measurements of the expansion rate of the Crab nebula's synchrotron nebula over a ~30-yr period. We find a convergence date for the radio synchrotron nebula of CE 1255 +- 27. We also re-evaluated the expansion rate of the optical line emitting filaments, and we show that the traditional estimates of their convergence dates are slightly biased. Using an un-biased Bayesian analysis, we find a convergence date for the filaments of CE 1091 +- 34 (~40 yr earlier than previous estimates). Our results show that both the synchrotron nebula and the optical line-emitting filaments have been accelerated since the explosion in CE 1054, but that the synchrotron nebula has been relatively strongly accelerated, while the optical filaments have been only slightly accelerated. The finding that the synchrotron emission expands more rapidly than the filaments supports the picture that the latter are the result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface between the pulsar-wind nebula and the surroun...

  1. Quantitative prediction of radio frequency induced local heating derived from measured magnetic field maps in magnetic resonance imaging: A phantom validation at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Liu, Jiaen; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2014-12-01

    Electrical Properties Tomography (EPT) technique utilizes measurable radio frequency (RF) coil induced magnetic fields (B1 fields) in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system to quantitatively reconstruct the local electrical properties (EP) of biological tissues. Information derived from the same data set, e.g., complex numbers of B1 distribution towards electric field calculation, can be used to estimate, on a subject-specific basis, local Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR plays a significant role in RF pulse design for high-field MRI applications, where maximum local tissue heating remains one of the most constraining limits. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of such B1-based local SAR estimation, expanding on previously proposed EPT approaches. To this end, B1 calibration was obtained in a gelatin phantom at 7 T with a multi-channel transmit coil, under a particular multi-channel B1-shim setting (B1-shim I). Using this unique set of B1 calibration, local SAR distribution was subsequently predicted for B1-shim I, as well as for another B1-shim setting (B1-shim II), considering a specific set of parameter for a heating MRI protocol consisting of RF pulses plaid at 1% duty cycle. Local SAR results, which could not be directly measured with MRI, were subsequently converted into temperature change which in turn were validated against temperature changes measured by MRI Thermometry based on the proton chemical shift.

  2. Quantitative prediction of radio frequency induced local heating derived from measured magnetic field maps in magnetic resonance imaging: A phantom validation at 7?T

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Jiaen; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2014-12-15

    Electrical Properties Tomography (EPT) technique utilizes measurable radio frequency (RF) coil induced magnetic fields (B1 fields) in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system to quantitatively reconstruct the local electrical properties (EP) of biological tissues. Information derived from the same data set, e.g., complex numbers of B1 distribution towards electric field calculation, can be used to estimate, on a subject-specific basis, local Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR plays a significant role in RF pulse design for high-field MRI applications, where maximum local tissue heating remains one of the most constraining limits. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of such B1-based local SAR estimation, expanding on previously proposed EPT approaches. To this end, B1 calibration was obtained in a gelatin phantom at 7?T with a multi-channel transmit coil, under a particular multi-channel B1-shim setting (B1-shim I). Using this unique set of B1 calibration, local SAR distribution was subsequently predicted for B1-shim I, as well as for another B1-shim setting (B1-shim II), considering a specific set of parameter for a heating MRI protocol consisting of RF pulses plaid at 1% duty cycle. Local SAR results, which could not be directly measured with MRI, were subsequently converted into temperature change which in turn were validated against temperature changes measured by MRI Thermometry based on the proton chemical shift.

  3. Lunar occultation of the diffuse radio sky: LOFAR measurements between 35 and 80 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Brentjens, M.; Abdalla, F. B.; Asad, K. M. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bus, S.; Chapman, E.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Fernandez, E. R.; Ghosh, A.; Harker, G.; Jelic, V.; Jensen, H.; Kazemi, S.; Lambropoulos, P.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Mellema, G.; Mevius, M.; Offringa, A. R.; Pandey, V. N.; Patil, A. H.; Thomas, R. M.; Veligatla, V.; Yatawatta, S.; Zaroubi, S.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Corstanje, A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Nelles, A.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Renting, A.; Röttgering, H.; Schwarz, D.; Shulevski, A.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B. W.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; Vocks, C.; Wise, M. W.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2015-07-01

    We present radio observations of the Moon between 35 and 80 MHz to demonstrate a novel technique of interferometrically measuring large-scale diffuse emission extending far beyond the primary beam (global signal) for the first time. In particular, we show that (i) the Moon appears as a negative-flux source at frequencies 35 < ? < 80 MHz since it is `colder' than the diffuse Galactic background it occults, (ii) using the (negative) flux of the lunar disc, we can reconstruct the spectrum of the diffuse Galactic emission with the lunar thermal emission as a reference, and (iii) that reflected RFI (radio-frequency interference) is concentrated at the centre of the lunar disc due to specular nature of reflection, and can be independently measured. Our RFI measurements show that (i) Moon-based Cosmic Dawn experiments must design for an Earth-isolation of better than 80 dB to achieve an RFI temperature <1 mK, (ii) Moon-reflected RFI contributes to a dipole temperature less than 20 mK for Earth-based Cosmic Dawn experiments, (iii) man-made satellite-reflected RFI temperature exceeds 20 mK if the aggregate scattering cross-section of visible satellites exceeds 175 m2 at 800 km height, or 15 m2 at 400 km height. Currently, our diffuse background spectrum is limited by sidelobe confusion on short baselines (10-15 per cent level). Further refinement of our technique may yield constraints on the redshifted global 21 cm signal from Cosmic Dawn (40 > z > 12) and the Epoch of Reionization (12 > z > 5).

  4. Interplay between Appearance and Disappearance Channels for Precision Measurements of ??? and ?

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma, Pilar; Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2014-11-01

    We discuss how the CP violating phase ? and the mixing angle ??? can be measured precisely in an environment where there are strong correlations between them. This is achieved by paying special attention to the mutual roles and the interplay between the appearance and the disappearance channels in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We analyze and clarify the general structure of the ??? - ??? - ? degeneracy for both the appearance and disappearance channels in a more complete fashion than what has previously been discussed in the literature. A full understanding of this degeneracy is of vital importance if ??? is close to maximal mixing. The relative importance between the appearance and disappearance channels depends upon the particular setup and how close to maximal mixing Nature has chosen the value for ???. For facilities that operate with a narrow band beam or a wide band beam centered on the first oscillation extremum, the contribution of the disappearance channel depends critically on the systematic uncertainties assumed for this channel. Whereas for facilities that operate at energies above the first oscillation extremum or at the second oscillation extremum the appearance channels dominate. On the other hand, for ? we find that the disappearance channel usually improves the sensitivity, modestly for facilities around the first oscillation extremum and more significantly for facilities operating at an energy above the first oscillation extremum, especially near ? ~ ± ?/2.

  5. Measurement of heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with turbulence promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Park, J. S.; Ibrahim, M. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Periodic rib turbulators were used in advanced turbine cooling designs to enhance the internal heat transfer. The objective of the present project was to investigate the combined effects of the rib angle of attack and the channel aspect ratio on the local heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with two opposite ribbed walls for Reynolds number varied from 10,000 to 60,000. The channel aspect ratio (W/H) was varied from 1 to 2 to 4. The rib angle of attack (alpha) was varied from 90 to 60 to 45 to 30 degree. The highly detailed heat transfer coefficient distribution on both the smooth side and the ribbed side walls from the channel sharp entrance to the downstream region were measured. The results showed that, in the square channel, the heat transfer for the slant ribs (alpha = 30 -45 deg) was about 30% higher that of the transverse ribs (alpha = 90 deg) for a constant pumping power. However, in the rectangular channels (W/H = 2 and 4, ribs on W side), the heat transfer at alpha = 30 -45 deg was only about 5% higher than 90 deg. The average heat transfer and friction correlations were developed to account for rib spacing, rib angle, and channel aspect ratio over the range of roughness Reynolds number.

  6. A high-frequency warm shallow water acoustic communications channel model and measurements.

    PubMed

    Chitre, Mandar

    2007-11-01

    Underwater acoustic communication is a core enabling technology with applications in ocean monitoring using remote sensors and autonomous underwater vehicles. One of the more challenging underwater acoustic communication channels is the medium-range very shallow warm-water channel, common in tropical coastal regions. This channel exhibits two key features-extensive time-varying multipath and high levels of non-Gaussian ambient noise due to snapping shrimp-both of which limit the performance of traditional communication techniques. A good understanding of the communications channel is key to the design of communication systems. It aids in the development of signal processing techniques as well as in the testing of the techniques via simulation. In this article, a physics-based channel model for the very shallow warm-water acoustic channel at high frequencies is developed, which are of interest to medium-range communication system developers. The model is based on ray acoustics and includes time-varying statistical effects as well as non-Gaussian ambient noise statistics observed during channel studies. The model is calibrated and its accuracy validated using measurements made at sea. PMID:18189549

  7. Climate comparison of reference upper-air measurements: GPS radio occultation and GRUAN radiosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladstädter, Florian; Steiner, Andrea K.; Schwärz, Marc; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    The confidence in the vertical structure of the rate of temperature change in the upper-air region is still low. To change this, measurements of suitable quality are required. Observations from the GPS radio occultation (GPSRO) satellite technique and from the newly established GCOS Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN) are both candidates to serve as reference observations. GPSRO is currently the only self-calibrated and SI-traceable satellite measurement system, where the observations can be traced back to precise time measurements. These observations possess the required high quality with global coverage, but common physical parameters such as temperature are only available after a sophisticated retrieval process. GRUAN on the other hand delivers data only from a sparse network of radiosonde stations (16 stations at present), with a more straight-forward measurement principle and careful bias corrections applied. Owing to the strongly differing techniques, GPSRO and GRUAN have their unique strengths and weaknesses. In this study, we compare collocated profiles from these two datasets for the time period 2011 to 2013, with a special focus on day/night biases, and use interpolated ERA-Interim data as an additional source of background information. The GRUAN effort is a vital contribution to the goal of anchoring less accurate upper-air measurements to reference data. GPSRO adds to this global coverage and more stratospheric extend, and, as an observing system independent from radiosondes, serves as another fundamentally needed source of thermodynamic reference data in the free atmosphere.

  8. Beam emittance measurements and simulations of injector line for radio frequency quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Jose V.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, Rajni; Singh, P.

    2015-07-01

    A 400 keV deuteron (D+) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, built, and commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. A beam line has been developed for injecting deuterons into the 400 keV RFQ. This comprises of a RF plasma ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system, consisting of two solenoid magnets and two steerer magnets. The ion source is characterized in terms of transverse beam emittance. A slit-wire scanner based emittance measurement setup has been developed for the transverse emittance measurements of H+ and D+ beams. The measured emittance values are found to be well within the acceptance value for the RFQ. These measured emittance parameters are used to optimize the solenoid fields in LEBT to match the beam from the ion source to RFQ. TRACEWIN simulation code is used for the beam transport simulations. The simulations show 99% transmission of D+ beam through the RFQ, while 95% transmission has been measured experimentally.

  9. A New Top Mass Measurement in The Dilepton Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Trovato, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The top quark discovery completed the present picture of the fundamental constituents of the nature. Since then, the Collider Detector at Fermilab and D0 Collaborations have been spending great efforts to measure its properties better. About 30 times larger than the second heaviest quark, the mass of the top has been measured with increased statistic and more and more sophisticated techniques in order to reduce as much as possible its uncertainty. This is because the top is expected to play a fundamental role in the Standard Model. The value of its mass sets boundaries on the mass of the unobserved Higgs boson, and perhaps more appealing, studies of its properties might lead to the discovery of new physics.

  10. Radio Astronomy Radio astronomy

    E-print Network

    Metchev, Stanimir

    Radio Astronomy Jin Koda #12;Radio astronomy #12;Atmospheric Window #12;Centimeter radio astronomy Effelsberg 100m telescope (Germany) Green Bank 100m telescope (National Radio Astronomy Observatory;WestVirginia) #12;Centimeter radio astronomy HI 21cm line emission traces the distribution of atomic hydrogen. Dust

  11. Channeling of high-power radio waves under conditions of strong anomalous absorption in the presence of an averaged electron heating source

    SciTech Connect

    Vas'kov, V. V.; Ryabova, N. A.

    2010-02-15

    Strong anomalous absorption of a high-power radio wave by small-scale plasma inhomogeneities in the Earth's ionosphere can lead to the formation of self-consistent channels (solitons) in which the wave propagates along the magnetic field, but has a soliton-like intensity distribution across the field. The structure of a cylindrical soliton as a function of the wave intensity at the soliton axis is analyzed. Averaged density perturbations leading to wave focusing were calculated using the model proposed earlier by Vas'kov and Gurevich (Geomagn. Aeron. 16, 1112 (1976)), in which an averaged electron heating source was used. It is shown that, under conditions of strong electron recombination, the radii of individual solitons do not exceed 650 m.

  12. Shallow water radio-magnetotelluric (RMT) measurements in urban environment: A case study from Stockholm city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Suman; Bastani, Mehrdad; Malehmir, Alireza; Wang, Shunguo; Pedersen, Laust

    2014-05-01

    The Radio-MagnetoTelluric (RMT) method uses the electromagnetic signal from distant radio transmitters in the frequency range 15 to 250 kHz. RMT applications in near-surface studies have already been well established. Two components of electric field and three components of magnetic field are measured. These measured components are related to each other via transfer functions which contain detailed information about the variation of electrical resistivity of the subsurface. The present study is carried out in the frame of TRUST (TRansparent Underground STructure) project supported by several research and public organizations as well as industry. The study area is located close to central Stockholm in Sweden where the Swedish traffic authority has planned to construct a 21-km long motorway to bypass the city. In order to reduce the impact on natural and cultural environments, 18 km of the motorway will be located in tunnels. The main objective of this study is thus to identify potential fracture zones and faults as well as the general geological settings. The proposed path of the tunnel partly passes under the Lake Mälaren at a depth of about 60 m. Thus a challenge was posed on the applicability of RMT method in shallow water environments. Successful applications of RMT measurements using the Uppsala University's EnviroMT system on land encouraged us to modify the system to acquire data over lake water especially in urban areas. Pioneered by the Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), RMT data were collected over the Lake Mälaren in spring 2012. The prototype acquisition system did not only turn out to be appropriate for such a challenging environment, but it was also much more efficient as compared with land surveys. Fifty two lines including 1160 stations with an average spacing of 15 m were covered in three days. Cultural noise associated with the city-related environment had to be identified and filtered out before inversion could be carried out. Reliable estimates of the impedance tensor were obtained by the parametric representation combined with a Truncated Singular Value Decomposition (TSVD) regularization of Bastani and Pedersen (2001). The processed data were then inverted to obtain 2D resistivity models. The resulting models along 23 lines correlate well and image variation of water depth, thickness of subaqueous sediments as well as the depth to crystalline bedrock. Low resistivity zones observed in the bedrock coincide well with the low velocity zones identified in refraction seismic surveys available along the RMT lines, indicating the presence of possible fracture zones in the bedrock. The experiment illustrates that the RMT methods can be well adapted to this type of environment; it is fast and cost-effective in shallow water especially in urban settings. Acknowledgments: Formas, SGU, BeFo, SBUF, Skanska, Boliden, FQM and NGI References: Bastani, M., 2001, EnviroMT - a new Controlled Source/Radio Magnetotelluric System: Ph.D. thesis, ISBN 91-554-5051-2, Uppsala University. Bastani, M. and Pedersen, L. B., 2001, Estimation of magnetotelluric transfer functions from radio transmitters. GEOPHYSICS, 66, 1038-1051.

  13. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the Dilepton Decay Channel at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Jayatilaka, Bodhitha A

    2006-08-01

    The top quark, the most recently discovered quark, is the most massive known fundamental fermion. Precision measurements of its mass, a free parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics, can be used to constrain the mass of the Higgs Boson. In addition, deviations in the mass as measured in different channels can provide possible evidence for new physics. We describe a measurement of the top quark mass in the decay channel with two charged leptons, known as the dilepton channel, using data collected by the CDF II detector from p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The likelihood in top mass is calculated for each event by convolving the leading order matrix element describing q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}'{nu}{sub {ell}'} with detector resolution functions. The presence of background events in the data sample is modeled using similar calculations involving the matrix elements for major background processes. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup -1}, we observe 78 candidate events and measure M{sub t} = 164.5 {+-} 3.9(stat.) {+-} 3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, the most precise measurement of the top quark mass in this channel to date.

  14. Effect of weak measurement on entanglement distribution over noisy channels

    E-print Network

    Xin-Wen Wang; Sixia Yu; Deng-Yu Zhang; C. H. Oh

    2015-08-13

    Being able to implement effective entanglement distribution in noisy environments is a key step towards practical quantum communication, and long-term efforts have been made on the development of it. Recently, it has been found that the null-result weak measurement (NRWM) can be used to enhance probabilistically the entanglement of a single copy of amplitude-damped entangled state. This paper investigates remote distributions of bipartite and multipartite entangled states in the amplitude-damping environment by combining NRWMs and entanglement distillation protocols (EDPs). We show that the NRWM has no positive effect on the distribution of 2-qubit maximally entangled states, although it is able to increase the amount of entanglement of each source state (noisy entangled state) of EDPs with a certain probability. More importantly, we find that the NRWM would contribute to remote distributions of multipartite entangled states, e.g.,Wstates. We demonstrate that the NRWM can not only reduce the fidelity threshold for distillability of the decohered $N$-qubit W state, but also raise the distillation efficiency of the $N$-qubit W state. Our results also suggest a new idea for quantifying the ability of a local filtering operation in protecting entanglement from decoherence.

  15. Radio Occultation Measurements of Pluto’s Atmosphere with New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, David P.; Linscott, Ivan; Tyler, Len; Bird, Mike; Paetzold, Martin; Strobel, Darrell; Summers, Mike; Woods, Will; Stern, Alan; Weaver, Hal; Olkin, Cathy; Young, Leslie; Ennico, Kimberly; Gladstone, Randy; Greathouse, Tommy; Kammer, Josh; Parker, Alex; Parker, Joel; Retherford, Kurt; Schindhelm, Eric; Singer, Kelsi; Steffl, Andrew; Tsang, Con; Versteeg, Maarten

    2015-11-01

    The reconnaissance of the Pluto System by New Horizons included radio occultations at both Pluto and Charon. This talk will present the latest results from the Pluto occultation. The REX instrument onboard New Horizons received and recorded uplink signals from two 70-m antennas and two 34-m antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric occultation by Pluto. At the time this was written only a short segment of data at occultation entry (193°E, 17°S) was available for analysis. The REX measurements extend unequivocally to the surface, providing the first direct measure of the surface pressure and the temperature structure in Pluto’s lower atmosphere. Data from occultation exit (16°E, 15°N) are scheduled to arrive on the ground in late August 2015. Those observations will yield an improved estimate of the surface pressure, a second temperature profile, and a measure of the diameter of Pluto with a precision of a few hundred meters. This work is supported by the NASA New Horizons Mission.

  16. Radio Frequency Phototube, Optical Clock and Precise Measurements in Nuclear Physics

    E-print Network

    Amur Margaryan

    2009-10-24

    Recently a new experimental program of novel systematic studies of light hypernuclei using pionic decay was established at JLab (Study of Light Hypernuclei by Pionic Decay at JLab, JLab Experiment PR-08-012). The highlights of the proposed program include high precision measurements of binding energies of hypernuclei by using a high resolution pion spectrometer, HpiS. The average values of binding energies will be determined within an accuracy of ~10 keV or better. Therefore, the crucial point of this program is an absolute calibration of the HpiS with accuracy 10E-4 or better. The merging of continuous wave laser-based precision optical-frequency metrology with mode-locked ultrafast lasers has led to precision control of the visible frequency spectrum produced by mode-locked lasers. Such a phase-controlled mode-locked laser forms the foundation of an optical clock or femtosecond optical frequency comb (OFC) generator, with a regular comb of sharp lines with well defined frequencies. Combination of this technique with a recently developed radio frequency (RF) phototube results in a new tool for precision time measurement. We are proposing a new time-of-flight (TOF) system based on an RF phototube and OFC technique. The proposed TOF system achieves 10 fs instability level and opens new possibilities for precise measurements in nuclear physics such as an absolute calibration of magnetic spectrometers within accuracy 10E-4 - 10E-5.

  17. In situ measurement of gas composition changes in radio frequency plasmas using a quartz sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Nonaka, Hidehiko

    2009-09-15

    A simple method using a quartz sensor (Q-sensor) was developed to observe gas composition changes in radio frequency (rf) plasmas. The output depends on the gases' absolute pressure, molecular weight, and viscosity. The pressure-normalized quartz sensor output depends only on the molecular weight and viscosity of the gas. Consequently, gas composition changes can be detected in the plasmas if a sensor can be used in the plasmas. Influences imparted by the plasmas on the sensor, such as those by reactive particles (e.g., radicals and ions), excited species, electrons, temperature, and electric potentials during measurements were investigated to test the applicability of this quartz sensor measurement to plasma. The Q-sensor measurement results for rf plasmas with argon, hydrogen, and their mixtures are reproducible, demonstrating that the Q-sensor measurement is applicable for plasmas. In this work, pressure- and temperature-normalized Q-sensor output (NQO) were used to obtain the gas composition information of plasma. Temperature-normalization of the Q-sensor output enabled quartz sensor measurements near plasma electrodes, where the quartz sensor temperature increases. The changes in NQO agreed with results obtained by gas analysis using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Results confirmed that the change in NQO is mainly attributable to changes in the densities and kinds of gas molecules in the plasma gas phase, not by other extrinsic influences of plasma. For argon, hydrogen, and argon-hydrogen plasmas, these changes correspond to reduction in nitrogen, production of carbon monoxide, and dissociation of hydrogen molecules, respectively. These changes in NQO qualitatively and somewhat quantitatively agreed with results obtained using gas analysis, indicting that the measurement has a potential application to obtain the gas composition in plasmas without disturbing industrial plasma processes.

  18. Radio Occultation Measurements of Transient Eddies in the Northern Hemisphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, D. P.

    2005-12-01

    The Radio Science (RS) investigation of Mars Global Surveyor has collected more than 16,000 radio occultation profiles of the neutral atmosphere, including more than 10,000 profiles at mid-to-high latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Key attributes include fine vertical resolution and a unique measure of geopotential height on surfaces of constant pressure, which offer new insight into the behavior of transient eddies, particularly in the lowest scale height above the surface. We identified and characterized the dominant eddies through ``space-time'' analysis of both geopotential and temperature measurements. Results include the eddy amplitude, zonal wave number, and period. Eddy activity appears at zonal wave numbers 1--3. Variations in the amplitudes of these modes tend to be anticorrelated, particularly at wave numbers 1 and 3, so that a large amplitude in one mode is often accompanied by a small amplitude in the others. The wave number of the dominant mode changes at intervals of 40--60 sols. These results evoke the ``baroclinic wave transitions'' that appear in Viking Lander pressure measurements [ Collins et al., Icarus 120, 344-357, 1996], and there is a close resemblance between the transient eddies in the two sets of observations. In the RS measurements, eddy activity near the surface is particularly intense in two seasonal windows, one in early autumn (Ls ? 180°--240°) and the other in late winter (Ls ? 300°--360°), separated by a lull around winter solstice. At Ls=190°--200° of Mars Year 26 (MY 26), the dominant eddies at 69°N have a zonal wave number of 2, a period of 3.0 sols, and an amplitude of ~10 K at 610 Pa. Meridional winds implied by geostrophic balance at 610 Pa have an average amplitude of 10--15 m s-1 and a 10% probability of exceeding 20~m~s-1. At Ls=315°--335° of MY 25, the dominant eddies at 64°N have a zonal wave number of 3, a period of 2.3 sols, and an amplitude of ~6~K. Meridional winds at 610 Pa have an average amplitude of 10-15~m~s-1 and an 8% probability of exceeding 25~m~s-1. Through the lifting and advection of dust, these transient eddies probably contribute to seasonal variations in dust opacity.

  19. Peak radiated power measurement of the DOE Mark II container tag with integrated ST-676 sensor radio frequency identification device.

    SciTech Connect

    Jursich, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The total peak radiated power of the Department of Energy Mark II container tag was measured in the electromagnetic reverberation chamber facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The tag's radio frequency content was also evaluated for possible emissions outside the intentional transmit frequency band. No spurious emissions of any significance were found, and the radiated power conformed to the manufacturer's specifications.

  20. The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment: Expected Performance in Measurements of Pluto's Atmospheric Structure, Surface Pressure, and Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Woods, W. W.; Tyler, G. L.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Strobel, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    The New Horizons (NH) payload includes a Radio Science Experiment (REX) for investigating key characteristics of Pluto and Charon during the upcoming flyby in July 2015. REX flight equipment augments the NH radio transceiver used for spacecraft communications and tracking. The REX hardware implementation requires 1.6 W and 160 g. This presentation will focus on the final design and the predicted performance of two high-priority observations. First, REX will receive signals from a pair of 70-m antennas on Earth - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric radio occultation by Pluto. The data recorded by REX will reveal the surface pressure, the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere, and the surface radius. Second, REX will measure the thermal emission from Pluto at 4.2-cm wavelength during two linear scans across the disk at close range when both the dayside and the nightside are visible, allowing the surface temperature and its spatial variations to be determined. Both scans extend from limb to limb with a resolution of about 10 pixels; one bisects Pluto whereas the second crosses the winter pole. We will illustrate the capabilities of REX by reviewing the method of analysis and the precision achieved in a lunar occultation observed by New Horizons in May 2011. Re-analysis of radio occultation measurements by Voyager 2 at Triton is also under way. More generally, REX objectives include a radio occultation search for Pluto's ionosphere; examination of Charon through both radio occultation and radiometry; a search for a radar echo from Pluto's surface; and improved knowledge of the Pluto system mass and the Pluto-Charon mass ratio from a combination of two-way and one-way Doppler frequency measurements.

  1. CHANNEL DISTORTION COMPENSATION BASED ON THE MEASUREMENT OF HANDSET'S FREQUENCY RESPONSES

    E-print Network

    Mak, Man-Wai

    for speaker veri cation. Under this ap- proach, channel cepstra are derived from the direct measurements method is readily applicable to telephone- based speaker veri cation. Experimental evaluations based to the commercialization of speaker recogni- tion technologies. One example of \\mismatched condi- tions" is handset

  2. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....686 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO... half-wave dipole tuned to the visual carrier frequency of the channel being measured or a gain antenna... antenna shall be either a standard half-wave dipole tuned to the center frequency of the channel...

  3. The Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment - Titan Winds Derived from Probe Radio Frequency Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, M. K.; Dutta-Roy, R.; Heyl, M.; Allison, M.; Asmar, S. W.; Folkner, W. M.; Preston, R. A.; Atkinson, D. H.; Edenhofer, P.; Plettemeier, D.; Wohlmuth, R.; Iess, L.; Tyler, G. L.

    2002-07-01

    A Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE) will be performed during the Titan atmospheric descent of the ESA Huygens Probe. The direction and strength of Titan's zonal winds will be determined with an accuracy better than 1 m s-1 from the start of mission at an altitude of ˜160 km down to the surface. The Probe's wind-induced horizontal motion will be derived from the residual Doppler shift of its S-band radio link to the Cassini Orbiter, corrected for all known orbit and propagation effects. It is also planned to record the frequency of the Probe signal using large ground-based antennas, thereby providing an additional component of the horizontal drift. In addition to the winds, DWE will obtain valuable information on the rotation, parachute swing and atmospheric buffeting of the Huygens Probe, as well as its position and attitude after Titan touchdown. The DWE measurement strategy relies on experimenter-supplied Ultra-Stable Oscillators to generate the transmitted signal from the Probe and to extract the frequency of the received signal on the Orbiter. Results of the first in-flight checkout, as well as the DWE Doppler calibrations conducted with simulated Huygens signals uplinked from ground (Probe Relay Tests), are described. Ongoing efforts to measure and model Titan's winds using various Earth-based techniques are briefly reviewed.

  4. The Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment - Titan Winds Derived from Probe Radio Frequency Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, M. K.; Dutta-Roy, R.; Heyl, M.; Allison, M.; Asmar, S. W.; Folkner, W. M.; Preston, R. A.; Atkinson, D. H.; Edenhofer, P.; Plettemeier, D.; Wohlmuth, R.; Iess, L.; Tyler, G. L.

    2002-07-01

    A Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE) will be performed during the Titan atmospheric descent of the ESA Huygens Probe. The direction and strength of Titan's zonal winds will be determined with an accuracy better than 1 m s-1 from the start of mission at an altitude of ~160 km down to the surface. The Probe's wind-induced horizontal motion will be derived from the residual Doppler shift of its S-band radio link to the Cassini Orbiter, corrected for all known orbit and propagation effects. It is also planned to record the frequency of the Probe signal using large ground-based antennas, thereby providing an additional component of the horizontal drift. In addition to the winds, DWE will obtain valuable information on the rotation, parachute swing and atmospheric buffeting of the Huygens Probe, as well as its position and attitude after Titan touchdown. The DWE measurement strategy relies on experimenter-supplied Ultra-Stable Oscillators to generate the transmitted signal from the Probe and to extract the frequency of the received signal on the Orbiter. Results of the first in-flight checkout, as well as the DWE Doppler calibrations conducted with simulated Huygens signals uplinked from ground (Probe Relay Tests), are described. Ongoing efforts to measure and model Titan's winds using various Earth-based techniques are briefly reviewed.

  5. Measurements of radio propagation in rock salt for the detection of high-energy neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Connolly, Amy; Miki, Christian; Nichol, Ryan; Saltzberg, David

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the transmission of radio/microwave pulses through salt in the Cote Blanche salt mine operated by the North American Salt Company in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. These results are from data taken in the southwestern region of the 1500 ft. (457 m) deep level of the mine on our third and most recent visit to the mine. We transmitted and received a fast, high-power, broadband pulse from within three vertical boreholes that were drilled to depths of 100 ft. (30 m) and 200 ft. below the 1500 ft. level using three different pairs of dipole antennas whose bandwidths span 125 to 900 MHz. By measuring the relative strength of the received pulses between boreholes with separations of 50 m and 169 m, we deduce the attenuation of the signal attributed to the salt medium. We fit the frequency dependence of the attenuation to a power law and find the best fit field attenuation lengths to be 93 \\pm 7 m at 150 MHz, 63 \\pm 3 m at 300 MHz, and 36 \\pm 2 m at 800 MHz. This is the most precise measuremen...

  6. First measurements of radar coherent scatter by the Radio Aurora Explorer CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcivan, H.; Cutler, J. W.; Bennett, M.; Kempke, B.; Springmann, J. C.; Buonocore, J.; Nicolls, M.; Doe, R.

    2012-07-01

    The Radio Aurora Explorer CubeSat detected the first radar echoes during the solar storm of March 8, 2012. The 300 s ground-to-space bi-static radar experiment was conducted in conjunction with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar in the local morning (˜8 am) over Poker Flat, Alaska. The geomagnetic conditions for the E region field-aligned irregularity generation were optimal due to strong (about 1500 m/s) F region ion drifts and sufficient E region ionization (electron densities were ˜2 × 1011 m-3). The corresponding E region electric field of ˜80 mV/m was larger than the excitation threshold for the Farley-Buneman instability. An auto-correlation analysis resolved, for the first time, the distribution of auroral E region backscatter with 3 km resolution in altitude and sub-degree resolution in aspect angle. Moreover, the measured Doppler velocities of the UHF scatter shows the phase speed saturation of the meter-scale plasma waves. The measured Doppler velocity is in excellent agreement with the Cs cos ? formula for auroral E region irregularities.

  7. Ionizing radiation effects on a 64-channel charge measurement ASIC designed in CMOS 0.35 ?m technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.; Marchetto, F.; Pardo, J.; Donetti, M.; Attili, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Iliescu, S.; Mazza, G.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.

    2008-08-01

    A 64-channel circuit Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) for charge measurement has been designed in CMOS 0.35 ?m technology and characterized with electrical tests. The ASIC has been conceived to be used as a front-end for dosimetry and beam monitoring detector read-out. For that application, the circuitry is housed at a few centimeters from the irradiated area of the detectors and therefore radiation damages can affect the chip performances. The ASIC has been tested on an X-ray beam. In this paper, the results of the test and an estimate of the expected lifetime of the ASIC in a standard radio-therapeutical treatment environment are presented. An increase of the background current of 2 fA/Gy has been observed at low doses, whilst the gain changes by less than 3% when irradiated up to 15 kGy. Furthermore it has been assessed that, when used as an on-line beam monitor and the annealing effect has been taken into account, the background current increase is ˜440 fA/year.

  8. Radio measurements of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air showers by Tunka-Rex

    E-print Network

    P. A. Bezyazeekov; N. M. Budnev; O. A. Gress; A. Haungs; R. Hiller; T. Huege; Y. Kazarina; M. Kleifges; E. N. Konstantinov; E. E. Korosteleva; D. Kostunin; O. Krömer; L. A. Kuzmichev; N. Lubsandorzhiev; R. R. Mirgazov; R. Monkhoev; A. Pakhorukov; L. Pankov; V. V. Prosin; G. I. Rubtsov; F. G. Schröder; R. Wischnewski - Tunka-Rex Collaboration

    2015-09-18

    We reconstructed the energy and the position of the shower maximum of air showers with energies $E \\gtrsim 100\\,$PeV using radio measurements performed with Tunka-Rex. A comparison to air-Cherenkov measurements of the same air showers with the Tunka-133 photomultiplier array confirms that the radio reconstruction works reliably. Splitting our data set into two seasons, we had blinded the Tunka-133 reconstruction for the second season, which we used as later, independent cross-check of the methods developed for the first season. This gives additional confidence in the radio reconstruction. An event-to-event comparison of Tunka-Rex and Tunka-133 shows that both experiments yield consistent values for energy and $X_{\\mathrm{max}}$. The energy precision of Tunka-Rex is comparable to the Tunka-133 precision of $15\\,\\%$, and comes with a $20\\,\\%$ uncertainty on the absolute scale dominated by the amplitude calibration of the antennas. For $X_{\\mathrm{max}}$, this is the first direct experimental correlation of radio measurements with another, established method. At the moment, the $X_{\\mathrm{max}}$ resolution of Tunka-Rex is approximately $40\\,$g/cm$^2$. This resolution probably can be improved by deploying additional antennas and further development of the reconstruction methods, since the present analysis does not yet reveal any principle limitations.

  9. Measuring the Impact on Farmers of Agricultural Radio and Television Programs in Southwest Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahaya, Mohammed Kuta; Badiru, Olabode Idris

    2002-01-01

    A survey examined the effectiveness of two long-running Nigerian agricultural programs on television and radio as perceived by 198 farmers. Results indicate a positive assessment of their value for improving agricultural production. Although more listen to the radio, the television program also received high marks. (Contains 17 references.) (JOW)

  10. Radio frequency interference measurement in site testing programs for the future multi-wavelength observatory in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, T.; Dermawan, B.; Mahasena, P.; Munir, A.; Nurzaman, M. Z.; Jaelani, A. T.

    2015-09-01

    A new multi-wavelength astronomical observatory in Indonesia is currently under preparation. To pave the way the presence of radio astronomical facilities in the planned observatory, we conduct a series of radio frequency interference (RFI) measurements as part of its site testing programs. The corresponding sites, instruments as well as its measurement set up must be selected, planned, and implemented accordingly. This work presents our preparation set up and considers the RFI measurement at meter and centimeter wavelengths (or frequencies from 50 MHz up to 6 GHz). In this frequency range, it is relevant to adopt the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Protocol as our measurement method. The first results using the Mode 1 of the SKA Protocol are used as reference in this work. Preparation of the Mode 2 is currently undertaken and its preliminary results are presented.

  11. A Measurement of the Millimeter Emission and the Sunyaev-zel'dovich Effect Associated with Low-frequency Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gralla, Megan B.; Crichton, Devin; Marriage, Tobias A.; Mo, Wenli; Aguirre, Paula; Addison, Graeme E.; Asboth, V.; Battaglia, Nick; Bock, James; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Duenner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek Renee A.; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Ivison, R. J.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Switzer, Eric R.; Wollack, Edward J.; Zemcov, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the millimeter-wavelength properties of 1.4 GHz-selected sources and a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect associated with the halos that host them. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) has conducted a survey at 148 GHz, 218 GHz and 277 GHz along the celestial equator. Using samples of radio sources selected at 1.4 GHz from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) Survey and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array Sky Survey (NVSS), we measure the stacked 148, 218 and 277 GHz flux densities for sources with 1.4 GHz flux densities ranging from 5 to 200 mJy. At these flux densities, the radio source population is dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN), with both steep and at spectrum populations, which have combined radio-to-millimeter spectral indices ranging from 0.5 to 0.95, reecting the prevalence of steep spectrum sources at high flux densities and the presence of at spectrum sources at lower flux densities. The thermal Sunyaev-Zelapos;dovich (SZ) eect associated with the halos that host the AGN is detected at the 5 level through its spectral signature. When we compare the SZ eect with weak lensing measurements of radio galaxies, we find that the relation between the two is consistent with that measured by Planck for local bright galaxies. We present a detection of the SZ eect in some of the lowest mass halos (average M(sub 200) approx. equals 10(exp 13) solar M h(sup-1) (sub 70) ) studied to date. This detection is particularly important in the context of galaxy evolution models, as it confirms that galaxies with radio AGN also typically support hot gaseous halos. With Herschel* observations, we show that the SZ detection is not significantly contaminated by dusty galaxies or by dust associated with the AGN or galaxies hosting the AGN. We show that 5 mJy < S(sub 1:4) < 200 mJy radio sources contribute l(l +1)C(sub l)/(2 pi ) = 0:37+/- 0:03 micro K(exp 2) to the angular power spectrum at l = 3000 at 148 GHz, after accounting for the SZ effect associated with their host halos.

  12. Inconsistencies in Tropical Tropopause Temperatures Between Radiosonde and GPS Radio Occultation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Leroy, S. S.; Moyer, E. J.; Ao, C. O.; Weinstock, E. M.; Anderson, J. G.

    2004-12-01

    Accurate temperature measurements at the tropical tropopause are critical to diagnosing the relationship between water vapor saturation mixing ratio and stratospheric water vapor and, accordingly, the mechanisms for stratosphere-troposphere exchange. The radiosonde network has provided the most accurate temperature record in the tropics to date, but a self-consistent temperature mapping of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) with radiosonde data is impaired by (i) very limited spatial sampling, especially over the predominantly marine tropics, (ii) differences in radiosonde instrument packages, and (iii) solar radiation effects on reported temperatures. Global positioning system (GPS) radio occultation measurements offer a powerful approach to examining the temperature structure of the TTL that provides homogeneous spatial coverage of the tropics while still maintaining high vertical resolution. We use a GPS occultation data set obtained from the CHAMP satellite for 2001-2003 with retrievals performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and subjected to objective quality control. These occultations are compared with radiosonde measurements from the WMO global network that have been processed through the complex quality control of NCEP. GPS occultations and radiosondes show significant differences in (i) the mean cold-point tropopause temperature, (ii) the distribution of cold-point temperatures, and (iii) the height of the cold-point tropopause. We investigate differences between radiosonde and occultation climatologies of the TTL, paying special attention to the merits and deficiencies of each measurement approach. We also compare the GPS occultation retrievals of JPL to other retrieval algorithms to investigate potential biases. The temperature differences between GPS occultations and radiosondes at the cold-point tropopause could have profound implications for the water vapor budget of the stratosphere.

  13. Coupled Radon and Water Temperature Measurements to Characterize the Effects of Altered Stream Channel Planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerson, B. E.; Poole, G. C.; O'Daniel, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    In summer 2011, a 2.6 km reach of Meacham Creek, Oregon, USA, was altered from a straight, steep wall-based channel to more a sinuous, low-gradient channel. Key objectives of this restoration project were to increase the rate and magnitude of hyporheic exchange. The overarching goal was to initiate increased buffering and lagging of water temperature in the subsurface to mitigate warm surface water temperature in Meacham Creek, an important spawning and rearing stream for depressed populations of Chinook salmon and summer steelhead. To evaluate progress toward project goals and objectives, stream temperature and groundwater temperature in 22 wells have been measured hourly at the restoration site since March 2011. In addition, the radioactive isotope 222Rn was measured in each well and in the surface water on two occasions. The relative residence time of down welling stream water measured in the wells can be determined by ranked amplitude depression and lagged phase of annual temperature signals in the wells relative to that of the open channel flow. Residence times predicted by annual temperature signal dynamics are corroborated by 222Rn concentrations in each well. The data collected to date provide a foundation for developing a groundwater thermal model to predict the effects of channel reconfiguration on ground-surface water exchange and associated temperature effects at the reach scale.

  14. Revealing dissipationless chiral edge channel in magnetic topological insulator via non-local transport measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Kou, Xufeng; Guo, Shih-Ting; Fan, Yabin; Pan, Lei; Lang, Murong; Jiang, Ying; Shao, Qiming; Nie, Tianxiao; Murata, Koichi; Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Yong; He, Liang; Lee, Ting-Kuo; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-03-01

    We observed quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in our 10-quintuple layer Cr-doped (BiSb)2Te3 film grown by MBE technique. The Hall resistance Rxy attains quantized value of h/e2 (25.8 k ?) as temperature drops below 85 mK. Unlike previous report in a thinner Cr-doped (BiSb)2Te3 film, a finite longitudinal resistance is found in the QAHE regime and remains non-zero up to 15 Tesla suggesting the coexistence of the chiral edge channel and certain dissipative conduction channel. From macroscopic non-local transport measurements with leads separated by few millimeters, we further identify the dissipationless nature of the chiral edge channel associated with the QAHE. Detailed T-dependence and field-dependence of the non-local signals will be presented and discussed.

  15. Effects of horizontal velocity variations on ultrasonic velocity measurements in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Use of an ultrasonic velocity meter to determine discharge in open channels involves measuring the velocity in a line between transducers in the stream and relating that velocity to the average velocity in the stream. The standard method of calculating average velocity in the channel assumes that the velocity profile in the channel can be represented by the one-dimensional von Karman universal velocity profile. However, the velocity profile can be described by a two-dimensional equation that accounts for the horizontal velocity variations induced by the channel sides. An equation to calculate average velocity accounts for the two-dimensional variations in velocity within a stream. The use of this new equation to calculate average velocity was compared to the standard method in theoretical trapezoidal cross sections and in the L-31N and Snapper Creek Extension Canals near Miami, Florida. These comparisons indicate that the two-dimensional variations have the most significant effect in narrow, deep channels. Also, the two-dimensional effects may be significant in some field situations and need to be considered when determining average velocity and discharge with an ultrasonic velocity meter.

  16. Remote, PCM-controlled, multi-channel radio frequency FM telemetry system for cryogenic wind tunnel application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A telemetry system used in the NASA-Langley cryogenic transonic wind tunnel to obtain rotational strain and temperature data is described. The system consists of four FM transmitters allowing for a remotely controlled PCM combination. A rotating four-contact mercury slip-ring is used as an interface between the fixed and rotating mechnical structures. Over 60 channels of data on the main fan disk and blade structures have been obtained. These data are studied to verify computer predictions and mechanical life. A series of block diagrams are included.

  17. A liquid He cooled two-axis goniometer for channeling measurements down to 5 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, R.; Geerk, J.; Ratzel, F.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid He cooled two-axis goniometer was built to perform channeling measurements at temperatures down to 5 K. The rotation about the vertical axis is achieved by a rotatable He-vessel. The rotation about the sample surface normal is possible by a sample holder which is pressed against the He-vessel and driven via a worm gear. The precision of the vertical rotation is ±0.02°, the precision of the horizontal rotation is ±0.2°. To test the goniometer channeling measurements with 2 MeV He + ions on a Mo-single crystal at temperatures of 295 K, 77 K and 5 K have been performed. The measured minimum yields and critical angles are compared with calculated parameters obtained by Monte Carlo methods.

  18. Determining atmospheric electric fields from the radio footprint of cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers as measured with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, U.; Trinh, G. T. N.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Horandel, J.; Koehn, C.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rutjes, C.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.

    2014-12-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower, electric currents are induced that generate the emission of radio waves which have been detected with LOFAR (www.lofar.org), an array of a large number of simple antennas primarily developed for radio-astronomy observations. Events have been collected under fair-weather conditions as well as under atmospheric conditions where thunderstorms occur. Of the 196 radio pulses detected under fair weather conditions, the intensity as well as the polarization can be reproduced rather accurately for 192 events with the standard model [1] using a superposition of a geomagnetically-induced transverse current and charge excess contributions. This indicates that the emission process is well understood. However, for most of the events measured under thunderstorm conditions as well as for 4 fair weather events we observe large differences in intensity and polarization pattern from the fair weather model. For these events it is not possible to get a good fit of the measured intensity pattern. The dominant polarization direction differs from the expected v x B orientation. We show that this difference is a consequence of atmospheric electric fields. We also show that the effects of atmospheric electric fields are understood, and that from the cosmic-ray radio footprint the atmospheric electric field can be deduced. [1] P. Schellart et al., submitted for publication, [arXiv:1406.1355].

  19. A Measurement of the Millimeter Emission and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Associated with Low-Frequency Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gralla, Megan B.; Crichton, Devin; Marriage, Tobias; Mo, Wenli; Aguirre, Paula; Addison, Graeme E.; Asboth, V.; Battaglia, Nick; Bock, James; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark; Dunner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renee A.; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Ivison, R.J.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Wollack, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the millimeter-wavelength properties of 1.4 GHz-selected sources and a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect associated with the halos that host them. We stack data at 148, 218 and 277 GHz from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at the positions of a large sample of radio AGN selected at 1.4 GHz. The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect associated with the halos that host the AGN is detected at the 5 sigma level through its spectral signature, representing a statistical detection of the SZ effect in some of the lowest mass halos (average M(sub 200) approximately equals 10(sup 13) solar mass h(sub 70)(exp -1) ) studied to date. The relation between the SZ effect and mass (based on weak lensing measurements of radio galaxies) is consistent with that measured by Planck for local bright galaxies. In the context of galaxy evolution models, this study confirms that galaxies with radio AGN also typically support hot gaseous halos. Adding Herschel observations allows us to show that the SZ signal is not significantly contaminated by dust emission. Finally, we analyze the contribution of radio sources to the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  20. Quantitative Measurement of Vocal Fold Vibration in Male Radio Performers and Healthy Controls Using High-Speed Videoendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Warhurst, Samantha; McCabe, Patricia; Heard, Rob; Yiu, Edwin; Wang, Gaowu; Madill, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Acoustic and perceptual studies show a number of differences between the voices of radio performers and controls. Despite this, the vocal fold kinematics underlying these differences are largely unknown. Using high-speed videoendoscopy, this study sought to determine whether the vocal vibration features of radio performers differed from those of non-performing controls. Method Using high-speed videoendoscopy, recordings of a mid-phonatory/i/ in 16 male radio performers (aged 25–52 years) and 16 age-matched controls (aged 25–52 years) were collected. Videos were extracted and analysed semi-automatically using High-Speed Video Program, obtaining measures of fundamental frequency (f0), open quotient and speed quotient. Post-hoc analyses of sound pressure level (SPL) were also performed (n?=?19). Pearson's correlations were calculated between SPL and both speed and open quotients. Results Male radio performers had a significantly higher speed quotient than their matched controls (t?=?3.308, p?=?0.005). No significant differences were found for f0 or open quotient. No significant correlation was found between either open or speed quotient with SPL. Discussion A higher speed quotient in male radio performers suggests that their vocal fold vibration was characterised by a higher ratio of glottal opening to closing times than controls. This result may explain findings of better voice quality, higher equivalent sound level and greater spectral tilt seen in previous research. Open quotient was not significantly different between groups, indicating that the durations of complete vocal fold closure were not different between the radio performers and controls. Further validation of these results is required to determine the aetiology of the higher speed quotient result and its implications for voice training and clinical management in performers. PMID:24971625

  1. A radio-polarisation and rotation measure study of the Gum Nebula and its environment

    E-print Network

    Purcell, C R; Sun, X H; Carretti, E; Bernardi, G; Haverkorn, M; Kesteven, M J; Poppi, S; Schnitzeler, D H F M; Staveley-Smith, L

    2015-01-01

    The Gum Nebula is 36 degree wide shell-like emission nebula at a distance of only 450 pc. It has been hypothesised to be an old supernova remnant, fossil HII region, wind-blown bubble, or combination of multiple objects. Here we investigate the magneto-ionic properties of the nebula using data from recent surveys: radio-continuum data from the NRAO VLA and S-band Parkes All Sky Surveys, and H-alpha data from the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas. We model the upper part of the nebula as a spherical shell of ionised gas expanding into the ambient medium. We perform a maximum-likelihood Markov chain Monte-Carlo fit to the NVSS rotation measure data, using the H-halpha data to constrain average electron density in the shell $n_e$. Assuming a latitudinal background gradient in RM we find $n_e=1.3^{+0.4}_{-0.4} {\\rm cm}^{-3}$, angular radius $\\phi_{\\rm outer}=22.7^{+0.1}_{-0.1} {\\rm deg}$, shell thickness $dr=18.5^{+1.5}_{-1.4} {\\rm pc}$, ambient magnetic field strength $B_0=3.9^{+4.9}_{-2.2} \\mu{\\rm G}$ and warm ...

  2. Measurements of copper and cesium telluride cathodes in a radio-frequency photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Eduard; Bettoni, Simona; Braun, Hans-Heinrich; Ganter, Romain; Schietinger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) photoinjectors are commonly used to generate intense bright electron beams for a wide range of applications, most notably as drivers for X-ray Free-Electron Lasers. The photocathode, mounted inside an rf gun and illuminated by a suitable laser, thereby plays a crucial role as the source of the electrons. The intrinsic emittance and the quantum efficiency of the electron source are determined by the properties of the photocathode's surface material. We present measurements of the intrinsic emittance and the quantum efficiency performed with copper and cesium telluride cathodes in the same rf photoinjector, thus comparing, for the first time, the performance of metal and semiconductor cathodes under the same conditions. Our results are consistent with theoretical expectations and show that the difference in intrinsic emittance for the two types of material is not significant in view of accelerator applications. We conclude that cesium telluride photocathodes provide a much higher quantum efficiency at essentially negligible degradation in beam emittance.

  3. RECONCILING MODELS OF LUMINOUS BLAZARS WITH MAGNETIC FLUXES DETERMINED BY RADIO CORE-SHIFT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    2014-11-20

    Estimates of magnetic field strength in relativistic jets of active galactic nuclei, obtained by measuring the frequency-dependent radio core location, imply that the total magnetic fluxes in those jets are consistent with the predictions of the magnetically arrested disk (MAD) scenario of jet formation. On the other hand, the magnetic field strength determines the luminosity of the synchrotron radiation, which forms the low-energy bump of the observed blazar spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs of the most powerful blazars are strongly dominated by the high-energy bump, which is most likely due to the external radiation Compton mechanism. This high Compton dominance may be difficult to reconcile with the MAD scenario, unless (1) the geometry of external radiation sources (broad-line region, hot-dust torus) is quasi-spherical rather than flat, or (2) most gamma-ray radiation is produced in jet regions of low magnetization, e.g., in magnetic reconnection layers or in fast jet spines.

  4. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN DISPERSION MEASURE AND X-RAY COLUMN DENSITY FROM RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    He, C.; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    Pulsars are remarkable objects that emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, providing a powerful probe of the interstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the relation between dispersion measure (DM) and X-ray absorption column density N{sub H} using 68 radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory or XMM-Newton. We find a best-fit empirical linear relation of N{sub H} (10{sup 20} cm{sup -2})= 0.30{sup +0.13}{sub -0.09} DM (pc cm{sup -3}), which corresponds to an average ionization of 10{sup +4}{sub -3}%, confirming the ratio of one free electron per 10 neutral hydrogen atoms commonly assumed in the literature. We also compare different N{sub H} estimates and note that some N{sub H} values obtained from X-ray observations are higher than the total Galactic H I column density along the same line of sight, while the optical extinction generally gives the best N{sub H} predictions.

  5. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  6. Measurement of communications channel parameters in systems for transmitting discrete information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, V. V.

    A procedure is presented for synthesizing suboptimal devices for measuring the signal-to-noise ratio or other communications-channel parameters which carry information on the noise stability of discrete-information transmission systems. The input signal to the measurement device is a series of readouts of demodulator analog output signals. Noise is assumed to be normal and additive. Synthesis of the suboptimal device is in two stages: first, definition of sufficient statistics, then, determination of a nonlinear transformation which will operate on the statistics to yield an unbiased estimate of the measured parameter.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of a new SWIR-channel measuring tropospheric CH 4 and CO from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongma, Rienk T.; Gloudemans, Annemieke M. S.; Hoogeveen, Ruud W. M.; Aben, Ilse; de Vries, Johan; Escudero-Sanz, Isabel; van den Oord, Gijsbertus; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2006-08-01

    In preparation for future atmospheric space missions a consortium of Dutch organizations is performing design studies on a nadir viewing grating-based imaging spectrometer using OMI and SCIAMACHY heritage. The spectrometer measures selected species (O 3, NO II, HCHO, H IIO, SO II, aerosols (optical depth, type and absorption index), CO and CH4) with sensitivity down to the Earth's surface, thus addressing science issues on air quality and climate. It includes 3 UV-VIS channels continuously covering the 270-490 nm range, a NIR-channel covering the 710-775 nm range, and a SWIR-channel covering the 2305-2385 nm range. This instrument concept is, named TROPOMI, part of the TRAQ-mission proposal to ESA in response to the Call for Earth Explorer Ideas 2005, and, named TROPI, part of the CAMEO-proposal prepared for the US NRC decadal study-call on Earth science and applications from space. The SWIR-channel is optional in the TROPOMI/TRAQ instrument and included as baseline in the TROPI/CAMEO instrument. This paper focuses on derivation of the instrument requirements of the SWIR-channel by presenting the results of retrieval studies. Synthetic detector spectra are generated by the combination of a forward model and an instrument simulator that includes the properties of state-of-the-art detector technology. The synthetic spectra are input to the CO and CH 4 IMLM retrieval algorithm originally developed for SCIAMACHY. The required accuracy of the Level-2 SWIR data products defines the main instrument parameters like spectral resolution and sampling, telescope aperture, detector temperature, and optical bench temperature. The impact of selected calibration and retrieval errors on the Level-2 products has been characterized. The current status of the SWIR-channel optical design with its demanding requirements on ground-pixel size, spectral resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio will be presented.

  8. Revisiting the dispersion measure of fast radio bursts associated with gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yun-Wei

    2014-12-01

    Some fast radio bursts (FRBs) are expected to be associated with the afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while a short-lived, supermassive neutron star (NS) forms during the GRBs. I investigate the possible contributions to the dispersion measure (DM) of the FRBs from the GRB ejecta and the wind blown from the precollapsing NS. On the one hand, sometimes an internal X-ray plateau afterglow could be produced by the NS wind, which indicates that a great number of electron-positron pairs are carried by the wind. If the pair-generation radius satisfies a somewhat rigorous condition, the relativistic and dense wind would contribute a high DM to the associated FRB, which can be comparable to and even exceed the DM contributed by the intergalactic medium. On the other hand, if the wind only carries a Goldreich-Julian particle flux, its DM contribution would become negligible; meanwhile, the internal plateau afterglow would not appear. Alternatively, the FRB should be associated with a GRB afterglow produced by the GRB external shock, i.e., an energy-injection-caused shallow-decay afterglow or a normal single-power-law afterglow if the impulsive energy release of the GRB is high enough. In the latter case, the DM contributed by the high-mass GRB ejecta could be substantially important, in particular, for an environment of main-sequence stellar wind. In summary, a careful assessment on the various DM contributors could be required for the cosmological application of the expected FRB-GRB association. The future DM measurements of GRB-associated FRBs could provide a constraint on the physics of NS winds.

  9. A Radio-Polarisation and Rotation Measure Study of the Gum Nebula and Its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, C. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Sun, X. H.; Carretti, E.; Bernardi, G.; Haverkorn, M.; Kesteven, M. J.; Poppi, S.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Gum Nebula is 36°-wide shell-like emission nebula at a distance of only ˜450 pc. It has been hypothesized to be an old supernova remnant, fossil H ii region, wind-blown bubble, or combination of multiple objects. Here we investigate the magneto-ionic properties of the nebula using data from recent surveys: radio-continuum data from the NRAO VLA and S-band Parkes All Sky Surveys, and H ? data from the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas. We model the upper part of the nebula as a spherical shell of ionized gas expanding into the ambient medium. We perform a maximum-likelihood Markov chain Monte Carlo fit to the NVSS rotation measure data, using the H ? data to constrain average electron density in the shell ne. Assuming a latitudinal background gradient in rotation measure, we find {{n}e}=1.3-0.4+0.4 c{{m}-3}, angular radius {{? }outer}=22\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 7-0.1+0.1, shell thickness dr=18.5-1.4+1.5 pc, ambient magnetic field strength {{B}0}=3.9-2.2+4.9 ? G, and warm gas filling factor f=0.3-0.1+0.3. We constrain the local, small-scale (˜260 pc) pitch-angle of the ordered Galactic magnetic field to +7{}^\\circ ? \\wp ? +44{}^\\circ , which represents a significant deviation from the median field orientation on kiloparsec scales (˜-7.°2). The moderate compression factor X=6.0-2.5+5.1 at the edge of the H ? shell implies that the “old supernova remnant” origin is unlikely. Our results support a model of the nebula as a H ii region around a wind-blown bubble. Analysis of depolarization in 2.3 GHz S-PASS data is consistent with this hypothesis and our best-fitting values agree well with previous studies of interstellar bubbles.

  10. Radio occultation measurements of transient eddies in the northern hemisphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, D. P.

    2006-05-01

    We have characterized the behavior of transient eddies in the northern hemisphere of Mars through analysis of Radio Science (RS) occultation data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The ``weather'' in the lowest scale height above the surface at 55°N-80°N is dominated by shallow, eastward moving baroclinic eddies distinguished by their intensity and coherence. The vertical structure of these eddies is fully resolved by the RS measurements, which also yield unique estimates of the near-surface meridional winds implied by geostrophic balance. We identified and characterized the most prominent eddies through space-time analysis of RS measurements of geopotential height at 610 Pa, a few kilometers above the surface. Eddy activity appears as well-defined modes with zonal wave numbers 1-3, and variations in the amplitudes of these modes tend to be anticorrelated so that a large amplitude in one mode is often accompanied by a small amplitude in the others. The wave number and period of the dominant mode shift at intervals of 30-50 sols. Eddy winds near the surface vary distinctively with season in response to changes in eddy amplitude and zonal wave number. The meridional winds peak sharply in two seasonal windows, one in early-to-middle autumn and the other in middle-to-late winter, separated by a lull around winter solstice. Comparisons with previous results reveal close connections with the transient eddies observed by the Viking Landers and with distinctive southward moving frontal dust storms observed by the MGS Mars Orbiter Camera.

  11. Measurements of mixed convective heat transfer to low temperature helium in a horizontal channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeroshenko, V. M.; Kuznetsov, Y. V.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Hendricks, R. C.; Daney, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A horizontal 2.85 m long, 19 mm i.d. stainless steel heated circular channel was employed to measure coefficients of heat transfer to low temperature helium flow. Experimental parameters range from 6.5 to 15 K, from 0.12 to 0.3 MPa at heat fluxes up to 1000 W/m square and Reynolds numbers from 9,000 to 20,000. A significantly nonuniform distribution of heat transfer coefficients over the tube periphery is observed. Difference between temperatures on the upper and lower surfaces of the stainless steel channel wall was found to reach 9 K. It was noted that the highest temperature on the wall outer surface is displaced from its uppermost point. Measurements of local flow temperatures revealed vortical structure of the flow. The displacement of the point with the highest temperature is attributable to the effect of vortices. The relationships for calculating local and averaged coefficients of heat transfer are proposed.

  12. Measurement of the Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section in the All-Jets Decay Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R.; Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; Maciel, A.K.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A.; Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V.; Gomez, B.; Hoeneisen, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P.; Ducros, Y.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Parua, N.; Shankar, H.C.; Park, Y.M.; Choi, S.; Kim, S.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Magana-Mendoza, L.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Pawlik, B.; Gavrilov, V.; Gershtein, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Belyaev, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Ermolov, P.; Karmanov, D.; Leflat, A.; Manankov, V.; Merkin, M.; Shabalina, E.; Abramov, V.; Babintsev, V.V.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bojko, N.I.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Denisov, S.P.; Dyshkant, A.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Galyaev, A.N.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Kostritskiy, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kozlovsky, E.A.; Mayorov, A.A.; Babukhadia, L.; Davis, K.; Fein, D.; Forden, G.E.; Guida, J.A.; Johns, K.; Nang, F.; Narayanan, A.; Rutherfoord, J.; Shupe, M.; Barberis, E.; Clark, A.R.; Dahl, O.I.; Grudberg, P.; and others

    1999-09-01

    We present a measurement of t{ovr t} production in p{ovr p} collisions at {radical} (s) =1.8 TeV from 110 pb{sup {minus}1} of data collected in the all-jets decay channel with the D0 detector at Fermilab. A neural network analysis yields a cross section of 7.1{plus_minus}2.8(stat){plus_minus}1.5( syst) pb at a top quark mass (m{sub t}) of 172.1 GeV/c{sup 2} . Using previous D0 measurements from dilepton and single lepton channels, the combined D0 result for the t{ovr t} production cross section is 5.9{plus_minus}1.2(stat){plus_minus}1.1( syst) pb for m{sub t}=172.1 GeV /c{sup 2} . {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Lightning Return-Stroke Current Waveforms Aloft, from Measured Field Change, Current, and Channel Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. C.; LeVine, D. M.; Idone, V. P.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstructions of six rocket-triggered lightning channels are derived from stereo photographs. These reconstructed channels are used to infer the behavior of the current in return strokes above the ground from current waveforms measured at the channel base and electric-field-change waveforms measured at a range of 5.2 kilometers for 24 return strokes in these channels. Streak photographs of 14 of the same strokes are analyzed to determine the rise times, propagation speeds, and amplitudes of relative light intensity for comparison with the electrical inferences. Results include the following: 1) The fine structure of the field-change waveforms that were radiated by these subsequent return strokes can be explained, in large part, by channel geometry. 2) The average 10 - 90% rise time of the stroke current increased by about a factor of seven in our sample, from an observed 0.31 plus or minus 0.17 microseconds at the surface to an inferred 2.2 plus or minus 0.5 microcseconds at 1 kilometer path length above the surface. 3) The three-dimensional propagation speed of the current front averaged 1.80 plus or minus 0.24 X 10(exp 8) meters per second over channel lengths typically greater than 1 kilometer. 4) Assuming that the measured current was entirely due to the return stroke forced an unreasonably large and abrupt reduction in inferred current amplitude over the first few tens of meters above the surface, especially in cases when the leader was bright relative to its stroke. Therefore, a significant fraction of the current at the surface was probably due to the leader, at least in such cases. 5) Peak return-stroke currents decreased by approximately 37 plus or minus 12% from 100 meters to 1 kilometer of path length above the surface. Because of uncertainty about how to partition the measured current between leader and return stroke, we are unable to infer the variation of current amplitude near the ground.

  14. Measuring flood discharge in unstable stream channels using ground-penetrating radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spicer, K.R.; Costa, J.E.; Placzek, G.

    1997-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to test the ability of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to measure stream-channel cross sections at high flows without the necessity of placing instruments in the water. Experiments were conducted at four U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations in southwest Washington State. With the GPR antenna suspended above the water surface from a bridge or cableway, traverses were made across stream channels to collect radar profile plots of the streambed. Subsequent measurements of water depth were made using conventional depth-measuring equipment (weight and tape) and were used to calculate radar signal velocities. Other streamflow-parameter data were collected to examine their relation to radar signal velocity and to claritv of streambed definition. These initial tests indicate that GPR is capable of producing a reasonably accurate (??20%) stream-channel profile and discharge far more quickly than conventional stream-gaging procedures, while avoiding the problems and hazards associated with placing instruments in the water.

  15. Measurement of gating forces of mechanosensitive channels of large conductance in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandzic, Elvis; Wiseman, Paul; Kilfoil, Maria

    2006-03-01

    In order to sense and respond to external mechanical stimuli, cells have evolved schemes to incorporate mechanosensors within their plasma membranes. Mechanosensitive channels of large conductance (MscL) are used by bacterial cells to respond quickly and effectively to hypo-osmotic shock: the opening of this channel permits cells to quickly release large amounts of osmolytes in order to quickly equalize unbalanced osmotic pressure across a membrane. In this study, we are investigating the physical mechanism of the MscL gating within the native environment of the Escherichia coli cells. We are using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and derivative proteins (CFP, BFP) to label the C-termini of MscL subunits in order to observe the channels in live bacteria by fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, we label the opposite termini with a different chromophore system that constitutes an excellent fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair with CFP. Channels are activated within the bacterial membrane by osmotic stress and interactions between differently labeled subunits are measured by fluorescence microscopy.

  16. Laser measurement of H{sup -} ions in a field-effect-transistor based radio frequency ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Matsuno, T.; Funaoi, T.; Ando, A.; Tauchi, Y.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y.

    2012-02-15

    Hydrogen negative ion density measurements are required to clarify the characteristics of negative ion production and ion source performance. Both of laser photodetachment and cavity ring down (CRD) measurements have been implemented to a field-effect-transistor based radio-frequency ion source. The density ratio of negative hydrogen ions to electrons was successfully measured by laser photodetachment and effect of magnetic filter field on negative ion density was confirmed. The calculated CRD signal showed that CRD mirrors with >99.990% reflectivity are required and loss of reflectivity due to cesium contamination should be minimized.

  17. First Results from The New Horizons Radio Science Experiment: Measurements of Pluto's Atmospheric Structure, Surface Pressure, and Microwave Brightness Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscott, Ivan; Stern, Alan; Weaver, Hal; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Cathy; Ennico, Kim

    2015-11-01

    The Radio Science Experiment (REX), on board the New Horizons spacecraft, measured key characteristics of Pluto and Charon during the July 14, 2015, flyby. The REX flight instrument is integrated into the NH X-band radio transceiver and provides high precision, narrow band recording of powerful uplink transmissions from Earth stations, as well as a record of broadband radiometric power. This presentation reviews the performance and initial results of the radio occultation of Pluto, the radiometric temperature profiles, and gravity measurements during the encounter. REX received two pair of 20-kW uplink signals, one pair per polarization, transmitted from the DSN at 4.2- cm wavelength during a diametric radio occultation of Pluto. The REX recording of the uplinks affords a precise measurement of the surface pressure, the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere, and the surface radius of Pluto. The ingress portion of one polarization was played back from the spacecraft in July, while the egress portion of the same polarization was played back in August. Both ingress and egress segments of the occultation have been processed to obtain the pressure and temperature structure of Pluto’s atmosphere. In addition, REX measured the thermal emission from Pluto at 4.2- cm wavelength during two linear scans across the disk at close range when both the dayside and the night side were visible. Both scans extend from limb to limb with a resolution of one-tenth Pluto’s disk and temperature resolution of 0.1 K. A third radiometric scan was obtained during the dark side transit of the occultation. This work was supported by NASA’s New Horizons project.

  18. Measurement of the PPN Parameter (gamma) with radio signals from the Cassini Spacecraft at X- and Ka-Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John D.; Lau, Eunice L.; Giampieri, Giacomo

    2005-01-01

    Radio Doppler data from the Cassini spacecraft during its solar conjunction in June 2002 can be used to measure the bending of light by solar gravitation. In terms of the standard post-Newtonian parameter (gamma), we find that (gamma) - 1 = (-1.3 +/- 5.2)x10^-5 in agreement with the theory of General Relativity. This result implies that the parameter (omega) in the Brans-Dicke theory is greater than 9000 at a 95% confidence level.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring temperature of an earth formation in the presence of a radio frequency electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kunetka, R.E.; Dowling, D.J.

    1984-09-04

    A method and apparatus for measuring the temperature in a subsurface earth formation that is being heated in situ by subjection to a radio frequency electromagnetic field. It includes lowering a maximum registering thermometer into the formation on a non-conductive flexible line, and holding it there long enough to reach the ambient temperature at that location. Then, the thermometer is raised to the surface fast enough to avoid any significant change on the way up to read that registered maximum.

  20. Toward Global Soundings and Atmospheric Measurements for Climate and NWP Using GNSS Radio Occultation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, S. A.; Ector, D.; Wilczynski, P.; Fulton, R. A.; Whitely, D.; Cucurull, L.; Chu, V.; Schreiner, W. S.; Rocken, C.; Anthes, R. A.; Kuo, Y.; Cook, K.

    2010-12-01

    The history of observing radio occultations [RO] using a space-borne platform and an earth-based or another space-based platform to probe an intervening planetary atmosphere, i.e. to determine atmospheric profiles and characteristics, dates back to 1964 with the sounding of the atmosphere of Mars and subsequent soundings of planetary atmospheres using a radio transmitter on a satellite and the RO technique. The first use of a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) transmitter as a signal source to sound the Earth’s intervening atmosphere utilizing the satellite RO technique was demonstrated with the transmitters on the US Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation of navigation and timing satellites (24-30 satellites) and the receiver on the GPS-MET satellite mission. Several satellite RO missions followed using GPS signal sources - i.e. CHAMP, SAC-C, Oersted, IOX, GRACE and GRAS. In April 2006 a joint USA/Taiwan mission, FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC, a constellation of 6 microsatellites, began sounding successfully the Earth’s atmosphere using GPS and RO for meteorological, ionospheric and climatic studies. Within the next two decades there will be a multiplicity of GNSS constellations flying. Several nations are now planning or initializing other full, operational GNSS missions which will significantly increase the potential number of signal source satellites for RO, to somewhere in the range of 87-125 transmitters, including: 1. GPS (USA), 2. GLONASS (Russian Federation), 3. Galileo (EU) 4. COMPASS (China), 5. IRNSS (India), 6. QZSS (Japan). The national commitments for operations and sustainment of these GNSS constellations have been made for at least the next decades. The operation and sustainment of a large constellation of RO satellites capable of handling the signals from this large multiplicity of GNSS systems would provide soundings and observations of the Earth’s atmosphere for research and operations with unparalleled spatial and temporal coverage. Such a multiplicity of RO receiver satellites would enable high spatial density, global soundings and some critical atmospheric measurements with short repeat times for NWP and some of the shorter climate time scales. The United States and Taiwan have such a new program in formulation for a constellation of 12-24 small RO satellites called COSMIC-2 or FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2. COSMIC-2 is a follow-on mission to the Taiwan/USA partnered mission, FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC. This paper will present new results of analyses of such a COSMIC-2 constellation of RO satellites and the multiplicities of GNSS signal sources including the spatial and temporal coverage and scales, the sounding performance in terms of the measurement range, uncertainty and resolution of the bending angle, refractivity and atmospheric density, temperature and water vapor profiles as well as the ionospheric specification, TEC, and electron density profiles.

  1. Reconstructing energy and Xmax of cosmic ray air showers using the radio lateral distribution measured with LOPES

    E-print Network

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; ?uczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmid, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2013-01-01

    The LOPES experiment, a digital radio interferometer located at KIT (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), obtained remarkable results for the detection of radio emission from extensive air showers at MHz frequencies. Features of the radio lateral distribution function (LDF) measured by LOPES are explored in this work for a precise reconstruction of two fundamental air shower parameters: the primary energy and the shower Xmax. The method presented here has been developed on (REAS3-)simulations, and is applied to LOPES measurements. Despite the high human-made noise at the LOPES site, it is possible to reconstruct both the energy and Xmax for individual events. On the one hand, the energy resolution is promising and comparable to the one of the co-located KASCADE-Grande experiment. On the other hand, Xmax values are reconstructed with the LOPES measurements with a resolution of 90 g/cm2 . A precision on Xmax better than 30 g/cm2 is predicted and achievable in a region with a lower human-made noise level.

  2. Venus: ionosphere and atmosphere as measured by dual-frequency radio occultation of mariner v.

    PubMed

    1967-12-29

    Venus has daytime and nighttime ionospheres at the positions probed by radio occulation. The main layers are thin by terrestrial standards, with the nighttime peak concentration of electrons being about two orders of magnitude below that of the daytime peak. Above the nighttime peak were several scale-height regimes extending to a radius of at least 7500, and probably to 9700, kilometers from the center of Venus. Helium and hydrogen at plasma temperatures of 600 degrees to 1100 degrees K seem indicated in the regimes from 6300 to 7500 kilometers, with cooler molecular ions in lower regions. Above the daytime peak a sharp plasmapause was discovered, marking a sudden transition from appreciable ionization concentrations near Venus to the tenuous conditions of the solar wind. This may be indicative of a kind of interaction of the magnetized solar wind with a planetary body that differs from the two different kinds of interaction characterized by Earth and by Moon. For Venus and probably for Mars, the magnetic field of the solar wind may pile up in front of the conducting ionosphere, form an induced magnetosphere that ends at the plasmapause, above which any ionosphere that tends to form is swept away by the shocked solar wind that flows between the stand-off bow-shock and the magnetopause. The neutral atmosphere was also probed and a surface reflection may have been detected, but the data have not yet been studied in detail. Results are consistent with a super-refractive atmosphere, as expected from Soviet measurements near the surface. Thus, two unusual features of Venus can be described in terms of a light trap in the lower atmosphere, and a magnetic trap in the conducting ionosphere. PMID:17749790

  3. Direct measurement of electron channeling in a crystal using scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kourkoutis, L. Fitting; Parker, M. K.; Vaithyanathan, V.; Schlom, D. G.; Muller, D. A.

    2011-08-15

    Self-focusing of an atomic-scale high-energy electron wave packet by channeling along a zone axis in crystalline silicon is directly measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy using thin epitaxial SrTiO{sub 3}(100) islands grown on Si(100) as test objects. As the electron probe propagates down a silicon atom column, it is progressively focused onto the column, resulting in a fourfold increase in the scattered signal at the channeling maximum. This results in an enhancement of the visibility of the SrTiO{sub 3} islands, which is lost if the sample is flipped upside down and the channeling occurs only after the probe scatters off the SrTiO{sub 3} layer. The evolution of the probe wave function calculated by the multislice method accurately predicts the trends in the channeling signal on an absolute thickness scale. We find that while electron channeling enhances the visibility of on-column atoms, it suppresses the contribution from off-column atoms. It can therefore be used as a filter to selectively image the atoms that are most aligned with the atomic columns of the substrate. By using this technique, coherent islands can be distinguished from relaxed islands. For SrTiO{sub 3} films formed in a topotactic reaction on Si(100), we show that only {approx}55% of the SrTiO{sub 3} is aligned with the Si atom columns. The fraction of coherent SrTiO{sub 3} islands on Si(100) can be increased by choosing growth conditions away from equilibrium.

  4. 204 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 3, MARCH 2007 Admittance Measurements on OFET Channel and

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jong Duk

    . The effective delay of the R­C network depends on the sheet resistance of the channel, the insula- tor Channel and Its Modeling With R­C Network Keum-Dong Jung, Cheon An Lee, Dong-Wook Park, Byung-Gook Park­C network, and both the capacitance and loss of the measured admittance show good agreement with the model

  5. Radiation temperature measurement method for semitransparent materials using one-channel infrared pyrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tairan; Liu, Jiangfan; Zong, Anzhou

    2014-10-10

    Semitransparent zinc sulfide (ZnS) crystal materials are widely used as the infrared-transmitting windows for optical instruments operating in long wavelengths. This paper describes a temperature measurement method for high-temperature ZnS materials using the one-channel optical pyrometer based on a theoretical model of radiation transfer in semitransparent plates. Numerical analyses of the radiation properties of ZnS plate are used to optimize the spectral band for the optical pyrometry. The optimized measurement spectral band is based on a trade-off between the measurement radiation intensity and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the ZnS material. The effective waveband emittance of one-dimensional (1D) ZnS plates is analyzed for various experimental conditions (temperatures, thicknesses, and direction angles) for the one-channel infrared pyrometer with the optimized measurement spectral response. The analysis can be used to improve radiation temperature measurements of semitransparent ZnS materials in applications. PMID:25322390

  6. Pressure and velocity field measurements of pulsating flow in a square channel y-junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuhoff, Markus; Kalpakli, Athanasia; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2013-11-01

    The pressure and velocity fields in a y-junction of a square (40 × 40 mm2) cross-section channel were investigated during pulsating flow. One of the sides of the channel was covered with fast responding pressure sensitive paint (PSP) whereas the velocity field at the channel center parallel to the PSP surface was measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The flow conditions, in terms of mass flow rate and pulsation frequency, were selected to resemble the flow inside an exhaust manifold of a small internal combustion engine, although the gas was at room temperature. The mass flow was varied between 10 and 130 g/s with pulsations between 0 and 80 Hz. For both the PSP and the PIV measurements images were acquired unsynchronized to the pulses using a high-speed camera and phase averages were formed a posteriori. The use of PSP together with PIV demonstrates how the two techniques can be used to verify and complement each other, PIV excelling at the lower mass flow rates and PSP at the higher. It is shown that the signal-to-noise ratio for PSP at low velocities can be enhanced using a technique based on singular value decomposition.

  7. Phase distribution measurements in narrow rectangular channels using image-processing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C.L.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1992-06-01

    Phase distribution of air-water flow in a narrow rectangular channel is examined using image-processing techniques. Ink is added to the water, and clear channel walls were used to allow high-speed, still photographs and video tape to be taken of the air-water flow field. Flow field images are digitized and stored in a Macintosh IIci computer using a frame grabber board. Local grey levels are related to liquid thickness in the flow channel using a calibration fixture. Image-processing shareware is used to calculate the spatially averaged liquid thickness from the image of the flow field. Time-averaged spatial liquid distributions are calculated using image calculation algorithms. The spatially averaged liquid distribution is calculated from the time-averaged spatial liquid distribution to formulate the combined temporally and spatially averaged liquid fraction values. The temporally and spatially averaged liquid fractions measured using this technique compare well to those predicted from pressure gradient measurements at zero superficial liquid velocity. 11 refs.

  8. Measurements of Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in Channel Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian J.; Skor, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Under microgravity conditions, the shear lift force acting on bubbles, droplets or solid particles in multiphase flows becomes important because under normal gravity, this hydrodynamic force is masked by buoyancy. This force plays an important role in furnishing the detachment process of bubbles in a setting where a bubble suspension is needed in microgravity. In this work, measurements of the shear lift force acting on a bubble in channel flow are performed. The shear lift force is deduced from the bubble kinematics using scaling and then compared with predictions from models in literature that address different asymptotic and numerical solutions. Basic trajectory calculations are then performed and the results are compared with experimental data of position of the bubble in the channel. A direct comparison of the lateral velocity of the bubbles is also made with the lateral velocity prediction from investigators, whose work addressed the shear lift on a sphere in different two-dimensional shear flows including Poiseuille flow.

  9. Genetic interactions found between calcium channel genes modulate amyloid load measured by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Koran, Mary Ellen I; Hohman, Timothy J; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) is known to have a complex, oligogenic etiology, with considerable genetic heterogeneity. We investigated the influence of genetic interactions between genes in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathway on amyloid-beta (A?) deposition as measured by PiB or AV-45 ligand positron emission tomography (PET) to aid in understanding LOAD's genetic etiology. Subsets of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohorts were used for discovery and for two independent validation analyses. A significant interaction between RYR3 and CACNA1C was confirmed in all three of the independent ADNI datasets. Both genes encode calcium channels expressed in the brain. The results shown here support previous animal studies implicating interactions between these calcium channels in amyloidogenesis and suggest that the pathological cascade of this disease may be modified by interactions in the amyloid-calcium axis. Future work focusing on the mechanisms of such relationships may inform targets for clinical intervention. PMID:24026422

  10. Measurement of the gravitational redshift effect with RadioAstron satellite

    E-print Network

    Birukov, A V; Litvinov, D A; Porayko, N K; Rudenko, V N

    2015-01-01

    RadioAstron satellite admits in principle a testing the gravitational redshift effect with an accuracy of better than $10^{-5}$. It would surpass the result of Gravity Probe A mission at least an order of magnitude. However, RadioAstron's communications and frequency transfer systems are not adapted for a direct application of the non relativistic Doppler and troposphere compensation scheme used in the Gravity Probe A experiment. This leads to degradation of the redshift test accuracy approximately to the level 0.01. We discuss the way to overcome this difficulty and present preliminary results based on data obtained during special observing sessions scheduled for testing the new techniques.

  11. Measurement of the gravitational redshift effect with RadioAstron satellite

    E-print Network

    A. V. Birukov; V. L. Kauts; D. A. Litvinov; N. K. Porayko; V. N. Rudenko

    2015-06-07

    RadioAstron satellite admits in principle a testing the gravitational redshift effect with an accuracy of better than $10^{-5}$. It would surpass the result of Gravity Probe A mission at least an order of magnitude. However, RadioAstron's communications and frequency transfer systems are not adapted for a direct application of the non relativistic Doppler and troposphere compensation scheme used in the Gravity Probe A experiment. This leads to degradation of the redshift test accuracy approximately to the level 0.01. We discuss the way to overcome this difficulty and present preliminary results based on data obtained during special observing sessions scheduled for testing the new techniques.

  12. Analysis of the Capability and Limitations of Relativistic Gravity Measurements Using Radio Astronomy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Counselman, C. C., III

    1975-01-01

    The uses of radar observations of planets and very-long-baseline radio interferometric observations of extragalactic objects to test theories of gravitation are described in detail with special emphasis on sources of error. The accuracy achievable in these tests with data already obtained, can be summarized in terms of: retardation of signal propagation (radar), deflection of radio waves (interferometry), advance of planetary perihelia (radar), gravitational quadrupole moment of sun (radar), and time variation of gravitational constant (radar). The analyses completed to date have yielded no significant disagreement with the predictions of general relativity.

  13. Single-molecule mobility and spectral measurements in submicrometer fluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavis, Samuel M.; Edel, Joshua B.; Li, Yougen; Samiee, Kevan T.; Luo, Dan; Craighead, Harold G.

    2005-08-01

    Electrophoretic mobility differences of biological molecules are frequently exploited to physically separate and subsequently identify the components of a mixture. We present a method to rapidly identify single molecules by measuring both their mobility and fluorescence emission under continuous flow without separation. Submicrometer fluidic channels were used to detect individual nucleic-acid-engineered fluorescent labels driven electrokinetically in free solution. Two separate focal volumes along the length of the fluidic channel collected spectral, spatial, and temporal information from the passage of fluorescent labels through the channel. One focal volume was defined by a focused 488-nm-wavelength laser and the other by a focused 568-nm laser. The subfemtoliter focal volumes resulted in signal-to-noise ratios sufficient for single-fluorophore detection, and the two excitation wavelengths enabled detection of multicolor fluorescent labels and discrimination of single-color detection events. Each fluorescent label was uniformly excited and analyzed as it passed through the channel. Flow control facilitated high throughput at low concentrations, as well as a balance of several experimental parameters. Two fluorescent labels were considered for identification by single-molecule mobility measurements. Approximately 81% of fluorescent labels of one variety and 77% of the other were found to be identifiable based on their mobility alone. As implemented, this method could be used in conjunction with spectral analysis of fluorescent labels to enhance the resolution of single-molecule identification. Ultimately, this technique could be used autonomously to detect biomolecules bound to fluorescent labels and to identify similarly labeled biomolecules by their mobility.

  14. Analysis of Tracking Measuring Method of Focus Cabin of Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope(FAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hui; Zhu, Lichun

    2015-08-01

    FAST (Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope) project is one of the Chinese mega-Science Projects to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. FAST has three outstanding innovation aspects: in the karst depression which is large to host the 500-meter telescope, an active main reflector correcting for spherical aberration on the ground to achieve a full polarization is being built, the light-weight feed focus cabin in which a parallel robot as a secondary adjustable system to move with high precision is driven by cables and servomechanism plus. The part of main reflector which is illuminated by the feed is continually adjusted to fit the paraboloid of revolution in real time when tracking the radio source. How to get high precise real-time feedback data of moving focus cabin’s position when tracking the source is one of the crucial problems for the astronomical observation.At present 24 steady basis pillars for measurement whose position coordinates are already known, have been built in the construction field of FAST. Total stations will be installed on one of those pillars, and prisms will be installed on focus cabin. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and reliability of two measuring method: the space distance intersection calculation method and polar measuring method. The space distance intersection calculation method is only using multiple measuring distances between three pillars and prism and known coordinates of pillars to calculate the prism’s coordinates, the polar measurement is using the measuring distance and angles to get the prism’s coordinate.

  15. Radio measurements of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air showers by Tunka-Rex

    E-print Network

    Bezyazeekov, P A; Gress, O A; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Huege, T; Kazarina, Y; Kleifges, M; Konstantinov, E N; Korosteleva, E E; Kostunin, D; Krömer, O; Kuzmichev, L A; Lubsandorzhiev, N; Mirgazov, R R; Monkhoev, R; Pakhorukov, A; Pankov, L; Prosin, V V; Rubtsov, G I; Schröder, F G

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the energy and the position of the shower maximum of air showers with energies $E \\gtrsim 100\\,$PeV using radio measurements performed with Tunka-Rex. A comparison to air-Cherenkov measurements of the same air showers with the Tunka-133 photomultiplier array confirms that the radio reconstruction works reliably. Splitting our data set into two seasons, we had blinded the Tunka-133 reconstruction for the second season, which we used as later, independent cross-check of the methods developed for the first season. This gives additional confidence in the radio reconstruction. An event-to-event comparison of Tunka-Rex and Tunka-133 shows that both experiments yield consistent values for energy and $X_{\\mathrm{max}}$. The energy precision of Tunka-Rex is comparable to the Tunka-133 precision of $15\\,\\%$, and comes with a $20\\,\\%$ uncertainty on the absolute scale dominated by the amplitude calibration of the antennas. For $X_{\\mathrm{max}}$, this is the first direct experimental correlation of radi...

  16. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel thinsp

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R.; Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; Maciel, A.K.; da Motta, H.; Oliveira, E.; Santoro, A.; Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V.; Gomez, B.; Hoeneisen, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P.; Ducros, Y.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Parua, N.; Shankar, H.C.; Park, Y.M.; Choi, S.; Kim, S.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Magana-Mendoza, L.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Pawlik, B.; Gavrilov, V.; Gershtein, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Belyaev, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Ermolov, P.; Karmanov, D.; Leflat, A.; Manankov, V.; Merkin, M.; Shabalina, E.; Abramov, V.; Babintsev, V.V.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bojko, N.I.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Denisov, S.P.; Dyshkant, A.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Galyaev, A.N.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Kostritskiy, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kozlovsky, E.A.; Mayorov, A.A.; Babukhadia, L.; Davis, K.; Fein, D.; Forden, G.E.; Guida, J.A.; James, E.; Johns, K.; Nang, F.; Narayanan, A.; Rutherfoord, J.; Shupe, M.; Aihara, H.; Barberis, E.; Chen, L.; and others

    1999-09-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass using six candidate events for the process p{bar p}{r_arrow}t{bar t}+X{r_arrow}l{sup +}{nu}bl{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{bar b}+X, observed in the D0 experiment at the Fermilab p{bar p} collider. Using maximum likelihood fits to the dynamics of the decays, we measure a mass for the top quark of m{sub t}=168.4{plus_minus}12.3(stat){plus_minus}3.6(syst) Gev. We combine this result with our previous measurement in the t{bar t}{r_arrow}l+jets channel to obtain m{sub t}=172.1{plus_minus}7.1 GeV as the best value of the mass of the top quark measured by D0. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Statistically steady measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in a gas channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arindam; Andrews, Malcolm J.

    2006-03-01

    A novel gas channel experiment is described to study the development of high Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing. Two gas streams, one containing air and the other containing a helium-air mixture, flow parallel to each other separated by a thin splitter plate. The streams meet at the end of a splitter plate leading to the formation of an unstable interface and of buoyancy driven mixing. This buoyancy driven mixing experiment allows for long data collection times, has short transients, and is statistically steady. The facility was designed to be capable of large Atwood number studies (At˜0.75). We describe initial validation work to measure the self similar evolution of mixing at density differences (0.035channel facility and present validation results for experimental runs at Atwood numbers up to 0.1. Diagnostics include a constant temperature hot wire anemometer, and high resolution digital image analysis. The hot-wire probe gives velocity statistics of the mixing layer. A multiposition single-wire technique was used to measure the velocity fluctuations in three mutually perpendicular directions. Analysis of the measured data was used to explain the mixing as it develops to a self-similar regime in this flow. A digital image analysis procedure was used to characterize various properties of the flow and also to validate the hot wire measurements.

  18. AG Channel Measurement and Modeling Results for Over-Sea Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David; Sun, Rouyu

    2014-01-01

    This report describes results from flight tests conducted in an over-sea environment, for the purpose of characterizing the air-to-ground (AG) channel, for future unmanned aircraft system (UAS) communication system analysis and design. These results are for the first of a set of several flight tests conducted in different ground site (GS) environments. An ultimate aim of all these tests is the development of models for the AG channel that can be used in communication system evaluation. In this report we provide measured results for propagation path loss, root-mean square delay spread (RMS-DS), and the correlation coefficient of the primary received signal components on the four antennas (two antennas for C-band, two for L-band). For path loss, the curved-earth two-ray model provides a reasonable fit to the measured data, altered by several dB at the shortest link distances by aircraft antenna pattern effects. This two-ray model also accounts for the majority of measured RMS-DS results of a few tens of nanoseconds, except for the occasional intermittent reflections from surface objects. These intermittent reflections yield RMS-DS values up to several hundred nanoseconds. For portions of the flight path that were over a harbor area highly populated with boats, the channel was found to be more "continuously dispersive," with RMS-DS reaching approximately 250 ns. A separate model will be developed for this over-harbor setting. The correlation coefficient results are still undergoing analysis; preliminary observations are that correlation between signals on the same-band antennas is generally large (>0.6) for the C-band straight flight paths, whereas for the L-band signals and for the oval-shaped flight paths the correlation is generally small (below 0.4). Inter-band correlations are typically very small, and are well modeled as zero-mean Gaussian in distribution, with a standard deviation less than 0.2. Hence the over-sea channel effects in the two bands can be considered uncorrelated, which will allow for good diversity gains in dual-band systems. We describe initial modeling approaches for the over-sea channel; complete models for this and the over-harbor setting will appear in a subsequent report.

  19. Inyong Choi et al. Objective Quality Measurement in Multi-channel Audio Coding Systems OBJECTIVE MEASUREMENT OF PERCEIVED AUDITORY QUALITY IN

    E-print Network

    Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara

    Inyong Choi et al. Objective Quality Measurement in Multi-channel Audio Coding Systems 1 OBJECTIVE different competing multi-channel audio compression coding systems are being developed, most current quality results in the prediction of perceived quality. INTRODUCTION Low bit-rate audio coding technology now

  20. 78 FR 27306 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, Arkansas, and Cleveland, Mississippi

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ...MB Docket No. 12-53; RM-11658] Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, Arkansas...Audio Division, at the request of Delta Radio Network, LLC, substitutes FM Channel...List of Subjects in 47 CFR part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal...

  1. Venus: estimates of the surface temperature and pressure from radio and radar measurements.

    PubMed

    Wood, A T; Wattson, R B; Pollack, J B

    1968-10-01

    The radio brightness temperature and radar cross section spectra of Venus are in much better accord with surface boundary conditions deduced from a combination of the Mariner V results and the radar radius than those obtained by the Venera 4 space probe. The average surface temperature and pressure are approximately 750 degrees K and 90 atmospheres. PMID:17738181

  2. Using a novel flood prediction model and GIS automation to measure the valley and channel morphology of large river networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for measuring river valley and channel morphology require intensive ground-based surveys which are often expensive, time consuming, and logistically difficult to implement. The number of surveys required to assess the hydrogeomorphic structure of large river n...

  3. Measurement of Field Aligned Electron and Ion Densities and Ducts from the Whistler and Z Mode Radio Sounding from IMAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Hazra, S.; Mayank, K.; Reddy, A.; Liu, Y.; Carpenter, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present recent results from the application of whistler mode (WM) and Z mode (ZM) radio sounding experiments from the IMAGE satellite to the magnetospheric plasma diagnostics. A recently developed WM radio sounding method [Sonwalkar et al., JGR, 116, A11210, doi:10.1029/2011JA016759, 2011] was applied to 200 cases of WM echoes observed within the plasmasphere to measure field aligned electron density (Ne) and ion densities (NH+, NHe+, NO+) for L~1.6 -4, altitude <5000 km, Kp ~1-7, and F10.7 ~ 72-110 (low solar activity). The measured plasma parameters are in general consistent with the past space borne (e.g. CHAMP, DMSP, Alouette, ISIS, AE) and ground (e.g. ionosonde) measurements, but show significant differences from those predicted by IRI-2012 and GCPM models. We believe our measurements will lead to an improved model of electron and ion densities at <5000 km within the plasmasphere. The WM radio sounding method was applied to a case study of the variation of plasma parameters at L~2 during the development of a major storm, from quiet conditions and subsequent recovery, followed by a moderate and minor storm. Our study showed that relative to the preceding quiet time: (1) There was depletion in electron density, H+, He+ and enhancement in O+ ions leading to increase in O+-H+ transition height; (2) The recovery period of electrons and individual ions was different; (3) A similar trend in the variation of electron density, H+, O+ was observed after the moderate storm and the minor storm but He+ was not affected. Following a ray tracing technique originally developed for whistler mode sounding, we analyzed the fast nonducted and ducted Z mode echoes to obtain field aligned electron density and duct parameters (duct width and enhancement) from the measured dispersion of Z mode echoes. With the help of two case studies, we illustrate that fast Z mode echoes provide measurement of electron density at altitudes <10,000 km and duct width and enhancement within an uncertainty of ~0.05 L and a few percent, respectively. Application of ZM radio sounding method presented here to a large number (~2000) case observed at low- to mid-latitudes should provide distribution of electron density and duct parameters in this latitude range for altitude <10,000 km. Our measurements will contribute towards a better understanding of the ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling.

  4. Quantum Markov chains, sufficiency of quantum channels, and Rényi information measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Nilanjana; Wilde, Mark M.

    2015-12-01

    A short quantum Markov chain is a tripartite state {? }{ABC} such that system A can be recovered perfectly by acting on system C of the reduced state {? }{BC}. Such states have conditional mutual information I(A;B| C) equal to zero and are the only states with this property. A quantum channel {N} is sufficient for two states ? and ? if there exists a recovery channel using which one can perfectly recover ? from {N}(? ) and ? from {N}(? ). The relative entropy difference D(? \\parallel ? )-D({N}(? )\\parallel {N}(? )) is equal to zero if and only if {N} is sufficient for ? and ?. In this paper, we show that these properties extend to Rényi generalizations of these information measures which were proposed in (Berta et al 2015 J. Math. Phys. 56 022205; Seshadreesan et al 2015 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48 395303), thus providing an alternate characterization of short quantum Markov chains and sufficient quantum channels. These results give further support to these quantities as being legitimate Rényi generalizations of the conditional mutual information and the relative entropy difference. Along the way, we solve some open questions of Ruskai and Zhang, regarding the trace of particular matrices that arise in the study of monotonicity of relative entropy under quantum operations and strong subadditivity of the von Neumann entropy.

  5. Lightning Return-Stroke Current Waveforms Aloft, From Measured Field Change, Current, and Channel Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. C.; LeVine, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Direct current measurements are available near the attachment point from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning, but little is known about the rise time and peak amplitude of return-stroke currents aloft. We present, as functions of height, current amplitudes, rise times, and effective propagation velocities that have been estimated with a novel remote-sensing technique from data on 24 subsequent return strokes in six different lightning flashes that were triggering at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, FL, during 1987. The unique feature of this data set is the stereo pairs of still photographs, from which three-dimensional channel geometries were determined previously. This has permitted us to calculate the fine structure of the electric-field-change (E) waveforms produced by these strokes, using the current waveforms measured at the channel base together with physically reasonable assumptions about the current distributions aloft. The computed waveforms have been compared with observed E waveforms from the same strokes, and our assumptions have been adjusted to maximize agreement. In spite of the non-uniqueness of solutions derived by this technique, several conclusions seem inescapable: 1) The effective propagation speed of the current up the channel is usually significantly (but not unreasonably) faster than the two-dimensional velocity measured by a streak camera for 14 of these strokes. 2) Given the deduced propagation speed, the peak amplitude of the current waveform often must decrease dramatically with height to prevent the electric field from being over-predicted. 3) The rise time of the current wave front must always increase rapidly with height in order to keep the fine structure of the calculated field consistent with the observations.

  6. Factors affecting measurement of channel thickness in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) has been considered to be a useful tool for simultaneous separation and characterization of polydisperse macromolecules or colloidal nanoparticles. AF4 analysis requires the knowledge of the channel thickness (w), which is usually measured by injecting a standard with known diffusion coefficient (D) or hydrodynamic diameter (dh). An accurate w determination is a challenge due to its uncertainties arising from the membrane's compressibility, which may vary with experimental condition. In the present study, influence of factors including the size and type of the standard on the measurement of w was systematically investigated. The results revealed that steric effect and the particles-membrane interaction by van der Waals or electrostatic force may result in an error in w measurement. PMID:25817708

  7. In situ measurements of subsurface contaminants with a multi-channel laser-induced fluorescence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu Pepper, Jane; Wright, Andrew O.; Kenny, Jonathan E.

    2002-01-01

    A new multi-channel laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) probe with novel optical fiber probe geometry has been designed and integrated into a cone penetrometer testing (CPT) system for in situ contamination detection. The system is capable of collecting excitation and emission matrices (EEMs) of subsurface contaminants as a function of depth in seconds. Compared to our previous multi-channel LIF-CPT system, the new system is faster and more compact, with reduced probe size and sampling area. This article describes the first field demonstration of the system at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts. One contaminated site within the base was characterized through in situ measurements of 26 LIF-CPT pushes. To validate the LIF results, core samples taken at five locations were analyzed by both on-site LIF measurements and by off-site laboratory analyses with EPA methods. The comparison of the LIF and laboratory results is presented, along with the results of the in situ measurements.

  8. In situ measurements of subsurface contaminants with a multi-channel laser-induced fluorescence system.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Jane Wu; Wright, Andrew O; Kenny, Jonathan E

    2002-01-15

    A new multi-channel laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) probe with novel optical fiber probe geometry has been designed and integrated into a cone penetrometer testing (CPT) system for in situ contamination detection. The system is capable of collecting excitation and emission matrices (EEMs) of subsurface contaminants as a function of depth in seconds. Compared to our previous multi-channel LIF-CPT system, the new system is faster and more compact, with reduced probe size and sampling area. This article describes the first field demonstration of the system at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts. One contaminated site within the base was characterized through in situ measurements of 26 LIF-CPT pushes. To validate the LIF results, core samples taken at five locations were analyzed by both on-site LIF measurements and by off-site laboratory analyses with EPA methods. The comparison of the LIF and laboratory results is presented, along with the results of the in situ measurements. PMID:11808737

  9. Multi-channel optical pyrometer for sub-nanosecond temperature measurements at NDCX-I/II

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Waldron, W.L.

    2011-04-13

    We present a detailed technical description of a fast multi-channel pyrometer designed for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments with intense heavy ion beams at the neutralized-drift-compression-experiment linear accelerator (NDCX-I/II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The unique features of the described instrument are its sub-nanosecond temporal resolution (100 ps rise-time) and a broad range, 1,500 K - 12,000 K of measurable brightness temperatures in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. The working scheme, calibration procedure, experimental data obtained with the pyrometer and future applications are presented.

  10. A single-channel SQUID magnetometer for measuring magnetic field of human fetal heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachir, Wesam; Grot, Przemyslaw; Dunajski, Zbigniew

    2004-07-01

    A non-invasive single-channel SQUID magnetometer for fetal magnetocardiography has been developed. The signal is picked-up with a wire wound third order gradiometer. The optimal configuration of the flux transformer is a trade-off between sufficient sensitivity for the magnetic field originated in fetal heart and effective immunity against the ambient magnetic noise. The over all system performance together with the measuring probe and SQUID electronics is described. The balancing of the third order flux transformer is discussed as well as the signal processing of fetal magnetocardiogram recordings.

  11. Radio links in space information transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepliakov, I. M.; Kalashnikov, I. D.; Roshchin, B. V.

    Textbook on the fundamentals and practical aspects of space radio data transmission systems and radio links. Major topics treated include: basic types of radio links and their characteristics; handling capacity, modulation, and coding in ideal communication channels; eliminating spurious responses in the absence of a signal in digital radio links; synchronization in digital radio links; modulation techniques in digital data transfer; coding and message codes; random-parameter radio links; lumped noise and digital radio links; scrambling, countermeasures, and hidden radio links; sampling and restoration of analog messages; noise immunity in PCM analog data transmission; multiplexing; comparison of analog data transmission techniques; radiotelephone communication links; and adaptive telemetry.

  12. Robust state transfer in the quantum spin channel via weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi; Yao, Chunmei; Zou, Jian

    2013-10-01

    Using the weak measurement (WM) and quantum measurement reversal (QMR) approach, robust state transfer and entanglement distribution can be realized in the spin-(1)/(2) Heisenberg chain. We find that the ultrahigh fidelity and long distance of quantum state transfer with certain success probability can be obtained using proper WM and QMR, i.e., the average fidelity of a general pure state from 80% to almost 100%, which is almost size independent. We also find that the distance and quality of entanglement distribution for the Bell state and the general Werner mixed state can be obviously improved by the WM and QMR approach.

  13. Radio-frequency measurements of UNiX compounds (X= Al, Ga, Ge) in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, Charles H; Mcdonald, David R; Zapf, Vivien; Altarawneh, Moaz M; Lacerda, Alex H; Adak, Sourav; Karunakar, Kothapalli; Nakotte, Heinrich; Chang, S; Alsmadi, A M; Alyones, S

    2009-01-01

    We performed radio-frequency (RF) skin-depth measurements of antiferromagnetic UNiX compounds (X=Al, Ga, Ge) in magnetic fields up to 60 T and at temperatures between 1.4 to {approx}60 K. Magnetic fields are applied along different crystallographic directions and RF penetration-depth was measured using a tunnel-diode oscillator (TDO) circuit. The sample is coupled to the inductive element of a TDO resonant tank circuit, and the shift in the resonant frequency {Delta}f of the circuit is measured. The UNiX compounds exhibit field-induced magnetic transitions at low temperatures, and those transitions are accompanied by a drastic change in {Delta}f. The results of our skin-depth measurements were compared with previously published B-T phase diagrams for these three compounds.

  14. Measurement of the top quark mass in the and channels using ATLAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.

    2015-07-01

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels $t\\bar{t} \\to \\mathrm{lepton+jets}$ and $t\\bar{t} \\to \\mathrm{dilepton}$ (lepton=$e, \\mu$) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton--proton centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb$^{-1}$. The $t\\bar{t} \\to \\mathrm{lepton+jets}$ analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative $b$-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms $b$-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from $b$-quarks and $u, d, c, s$-quarks or gluons, respectively. The analysis of the $t\\bar{t} \\to \\mathrm{dilepton}$ channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the $m_{\\ell b}$ observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+$b$-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be $172.33\\pm 0.75(\\rm {stat}) \\pm 1.02(\\rm {syst})$ GeV, and $173.79 \\pm 0.54({\\rm stat}) \\pm 1.30({\\rm syst})$ GeV in the $t\\bar{t} \\to lepton+jets$ and $t\\bar{t} \\to dilepton$ channels, respectively. The combination of the two results yields $m_{\\mathrm top} = 172.99 \\pm 0.48({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.78({\\rm syst})$ GeV, with a total uncertainty of $0.91$ GeV.

  15. High-Resolution Radio Continuum Measurements of the Nuclear Disks of Arp 220

    E-print Network

    Barcos-Muñoz, Loreto; Evans, Aaron S; Privon, George C; Armus, Lee; Condon, Jim; Mazzarella, Joseph M; Meier, David S; Momjian, Emmanuel; Murphy, Eric J; Ott, Juerguen; Reichardt, Ashely; Sakamoto, Kazushi; Sanders, David B; Schinnerer, Eva; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Surace, Jason A; Thompson, Todd A; Walter, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum images of the nuclei of Arp 220, the nearest ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. These images have both the angular resolution to study detailed morphologies of the two nuclei that power the system and sensitivity to a wide range of spatial scales. At 33 GHz, and with a resolution of 0".081 x 0".063 (29.9 x 23.3 pc), we resolve the emission surrounding both nuclei and conclude that is mostly synchrotron in nature. The spatial distributions of radio emission in both nuclei are well described by exponential profiles. These have deconvolved half-light radii of 51 and 35 pc for the eastern and western nuclei, and they match the number density profile of radio supernovae observed with very long baseline interferometry. This similarity might be due to the fast cooling of cosmic rays electrons caused by the presence of a strong (~ mG) magnetic field in this system. We estimate high luminosity surface densities of $\\mathrm{\\Sigma_{IR} \\sim 4.2^{+1.6}_{-0.7} \\...

  16. e-MERLIN Radio Continuum Measurements of OB Star Winds in Cyg OB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morford, Jack; Prinja, Raman; Fenech, Danielle Marie

    2015-08-01

    We report on the first results from the e-MERLIN Cyg OB2 Radio Survey (COBRaS), which is designed to exploit e-MERLIN's enhanced capabilities to conduct deep-field mapping of the tremendously rich Cyg OB2 association in our Galaxy. The project aims to deliver the most detailed radio census of the most massive OB association in the northern hemisphere.There is considerable evidence for structure (clumping) in the radiatively driven stellar winds of hot stars. The existence of clumping has important consequences for mass-loss rate determinations. Mass-loss rates that are not corrected for clumping provide incorrect inputs for stellar and Galactic evolution models. Radio observations are ideally suited to study the effect of clumping in the outer regions of the wind. We present the first 20 cm (L-band) continuum detections of OB stars in Cyg OB2. These data substantially increase the observational detections of the outer wind of massive stars. In combination with other observations at different wavelengths COBRaS will greatly advance our knowledge of clumping as a function of radial distance around massive stars. The observations allow us to quantify the amount of clumping and search for possible relations with stellar and/or wind parameters.

  17. Test of the Pioneer anomaly with the Voyager 2 radio-ranging distance measurements to Uranus and Neptune

    E-print Network

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2006-08-29

    In this paper we test the hypothesis that the Pioneer anomaly can be of gravitational origin by comparing the predicted model-independent shifts Delta a/a for the semimajor axis of Uranus and Neptune with the Voyager 2 radio-technical distance measurements performed at JPL-NASA. As in the case of other tests based on different methods and data sets (secular perihelion advance, right ascension/declination residuals over about one century), the orbits of the investigated planets are not affected by any anomalous acceleration like that experienced by the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft.

  18. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel at D0.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guo, F; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kur?a, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S

    2011-08-19

    We measure the top quark mass (m(t)) in p ?p collisions at a center of mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV using dilepton t ?t?W(+)bW(-) ?b??(+)?(?)b?(-) ??(?) ?b events, where ? denotes an electron, a muon, or a tau that decays leptonically. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb(-1) collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We obtain m(t)=174.0±1.8(stat)±2.4(syst) GeV, which is in agreement with the current world average m(t)=173.3±1.1 GeV. This is currently the most precise measurement of m(t) in the dilepton channel. PMID:21929164

  19. Purity of Gaussian states: Measurement schemes and time evolution in noisy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Matteo G.A.; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Serafini, Alessio; De Siena, Silvio

    2003-07-01

    We present a systematic study of the purity for Gaussian states of single-mode continuous variable systems. We prove the connection of purity to observable quantities for these states, and show that the joint measurement of two conjugate quadratures is necessary and sufficient to determine the purity at any time. The statistical reliability and the range of applicability of the proposed measurement scheme are tested by means of Monte Carlo simulated experiments. We then consider the dynamics of purity in noisy channels. We derive an evolution equation for the purity of general Gaussian states both in thermal and in squeezed thermal baths. We show that purity is maximized at any given time for an initial coherent state evolving in a thermal bath, or for an initial squeezed state evolving in a squeezed thermal bath whose asymptotic squeezing is orthogonal to that of the input state.

  20. Field intercomparison of channel master ADCP with RiverSonde Radar for measuring river discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spain, P.; Marsden, R.; Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Ruhl, C.

    2005-01-01

    The RiverSonde radar makes non-contact measurement of a horizontal swath of surface velocity across a river section. This radar, which has worked successfully at several rivers in the Western USA, has shown encouraging correlation with simultaneous measurements of average currents at one level recorded by an acoustic travel-time system. This work reports a field study intercomparing data sets from a 600 kHz Channel Master ADCP with the RiverSonde radar. The primary goal was to begin to explore the robustness of the radar data as a reliable index of discharge. This site Is at Three Mile Slough in Northern California, USA. The larger intent of the work is to examine variability in space and time of the radar's surface currents compared with subsurface flows across the river section. Here we examine data from a couple of periods with strong winds. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  1. Voltage noise measurements across the pancreatic beta-cell membrane: calcium channel characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Atwater, I; Dawson, C M; Eddlestone, G T; Rojas, E

    1981-01-01

    1. Membrane potential fluctuations were measured in cells from mouse Islets of Langerhans identified as beta-cells by the characteristic pattern of electrical activity induced by 11 mM-D-glucose. 2. The membrane potential was controlled by adjusting the external potassium concentration, [K+]o, keeping the sum [Na+]o plus [K+]o constant. In the absence of glucose, when [K+]o is raised, the resulting depolarization is accompanied by a significant increase in voltage noise. 3 The amplitude and time course of the voltage noise were measured under various experimental conditions. The variance of the fluctuating voltage decreased monotonically along the depolarization induced by sudden increase in [K+]o, suggesting a monotonic reduction in the number of elementary events. 4. The frequency characteristics of the excess noise could be analysed as the sum of 1/f and 1/f2 components. While the 1/f component remained unaffected by the external application of 20mM-tetraethylammonium (TEA) and either 2 mM-Mn2+ or 2 mM-Co2+, the 1/f2 component was suppressed by both Mn2+ and Co2+. 5. The corner frequency, fc, of the 1/f2 component depended on membrane potential, which was adjusted by adjusting the [K+]o jump. These results support the idea that fc in these experiments is a measure of the channel relaxation. 6. Measurements of the input resistance in the frequency range from 0 to 25 Hz were used to obtain a rough estimate of the size of the channel conductance as 5 x 10(-12) omega (-1). PMID:6273530

  2. Effect of Vapor-Cell Geometry on Rydberg-Atom-Based Measurements of Radio-Frequency Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haoquan; Kumar, Santosh; Sheng, Jiteng; Shaffer, James P.; Holloway, Christopher L.; Gordon, Joshua A.

    2015-10-01

    A new approach to detect absolute radio-frequency (rf) electric fields (E-fields) that uses Rydberg atoms at room temperature in vapor cells has been demonstrated recently. The large-transition dipole moments between energetically adjacent Rydberg states enable this technique to make traceable E-field measurements with high sensitivity over a large frequency range from 1 GHz to 1 THz. In this paper, we experimentally investigate how the vapor-cell geometry affects the accuracy of the measurements. We find that the effects of the vapor cell on the measured rf E-field are minimized by making the vapor-cell size small compared to the wavelength of the rf E-field.

  3. Eratosthenes via Ham Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koser, John F.

    1975-01-01

    A secondary geology class used Eratosthenes' method for measuring the circumference of the earth by comparing their measurements of the shadow of a vertical rod to the measurements made by another person contacted by ham radio. (MLH)

  4. Aircraft Engine On-Line Diagnostics Through Dual-Channel Sensor Measurements: Development of a Baseline System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a baseline system which utilizes dual-channel sensor measurements for aircraft engine on-line diagnostics is developed. This system is composed of a linear on-board engine model (LOBEM) and fault detection and isolation (FDI) logic. The LOBEM provides the analytical third channel against which the dual-channel measurements are compared. When the discrepancy among the triplex channels exceeds a tolerance level, the FDI logic determines the cause of the discrepancy. Through this approach, the baseline system achieves the following objectives: (1) anomaly detection, (2) component fault detection, and (3) sensor fault detection and isolation. The performance of the baseline system is evaluated in a simulation environment using faults in sensors and components.

  5. Solar gravitational deflection of radio waves measured by very-long-baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Kent, S. M.; Knight, C. A.; Shapiro, I. I.; Clark, T. A.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Utilizing a four-antenna technique, simultaneous observations were made, at each end of an 845-km baseline, of the radio sources 3C279 and 3C273B, which are 10 deg apart in the sky. Differences in interferometric phases at 3.7-cm wavelength monitored near the time of the 1972 occultation of 3C279 by the sun, yielded a gravitational deflection of 0.99 plus or minus 0.03 times the value predicted by general relativity, corresponding to gamma = 0.98 plus or minus 0.06 (standard error).

  6. Lightning Return-Stroke Current Waveforms Aloft, From Measured Field Change, Current, and Channel Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, J. C.; Le Vine, D. M.

    2002-12-01

    Direct current measurements are available near the attachment point from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning, but little is known about the rise time and peak amplitude of return-stroke currents aloft. We present, as functions of height, current amplitudes, rise times, and effective propagation velocities that have been estimated with a novel remote-sensing technique [Willett and Le Vine, Proceedings, 10th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity, Osaka, Japan, 10-14 June 1996] from data on 24 subsequent return strokes in six different lightning flashes that were triggering at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, FL, during 1987. The unique feature of this data set is the stereo pairs of still photographs, from which three-dimensional channel geometries were determined previously [Willett and Le Vine, AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December, 1995]. This has permitted us to calculate the fine structure of the electric-field-change (E) waveforms produced by these strokes, using the current waveforms measured at the channel base [Leteinturier and Hamelin, IEEE Trans. EMC, 33, 351-357, 1991] together with physically reasonable assumptions about the current distributions aloft. The computed waveforms have been compared with observed E waveforms from the same strokes [Willett et al., J. Geophys. Res., 94, 13,275-13,286, 1989], and our assumptions have been adjusted to maximize agreement. In spite of the non-uniqueness of solutions derived by this technique, several conclusions seem inescapable: 1) The effective propagation speed of the current up the channel is usually significantly (but not unreasonably) faster than the two-dimensional velocity measured by a streak camera for 14 of these strokes. 2) Given the deduced propagation speed, the peak amplitude of the current waveform often must decrease dramatically with height to prevent the electric field from being over-predicted. 3) The rise time of the current wave front must always increase rapidly with height in order to keep the fine structure of the calculated field consistent with the observations.

  7. Twenty-channel grating polychromator for millimeter wave plasma emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallo, A.; Cutler, R. C.; McCarthy, M. P.

    1988-06-01

    A 20-channel grating instrument based on the Ebert-Fastie grating monochromator has been built to measure electron temperature profiles and electron temperature fluctuations in TFTR (tokamak fusion test reactor). Second-harmonic electron cyclotron emission for the plasma over the frequency range of 120-400 GHz is utilized; this corresponds to a central tokamak magnetic field of 2.9-5 T. System sensitivity is typically 10-eV rms for a 2.5-kHz bandpass with a 2.5-cm radial resolution and a 5-cm antenna spot size at the plasma center. The ratio of the largest to smallest plasma radius observed by the instrument can be as large as 1.65, which maximizes spatial coverage of the plasma. Emission is detected by 20 liquid-helium-cooled indium antimonide hot-electron bolometers mounted in a long hold cryostat. The 6.5-l helium reservoir must be filled every 19 days, while the liquid-nitrogen reservoir is filled automatically once a day. This instrument has about twice the number of channels and much better spatial resolution than other instruments of this type used for plasma diagnostics.

  8. Genetic Interactions Found Between Calcium Channel Genes Modulate Amyloid Load Measured by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Hohman, Timothy J.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) is known to have a complex, oligogenic etiology, with considerable genetic heterogeneity. We investigated the influence of genetic interactions between genes in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathway on amyloid-beta (A?) deposition as measured by PiB or AV-45 ligand positron emission tomography (PET) to aid in understanding LOAD’s genetic etiology. Subsets of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohorts were used for discovery and for two independent validation analyses. A significant interaction between RYR3 and CACNA1C was confirmed in all three of the independent ADNI datasets. Both genes encode calcium channels expressed in the brain. The results shown here support previous animal studies implicating interactions between these calcium channels in amyloidigenesis and suggest that the pathological cascade of this disease may be modified by interactions in the amyloid-calcium axis. Future work focusing on the mechanisms of such relationships may inform targets for clinical intervention. PMID:24026422

  9. Temperature measurement and visualization study of liquid helium cavitation flow through Venturi channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, T.; Murakami, M.

    2002-05-01

    In the present experiment, the cavitation flow of liquid helium is generated downstream of the throat in a Venturi channel with a rectangular cross section. We measured the temperature variation induced by cavitation, and took visualization pictures of cavitation flow to examine the general feature of liquid helium cavitation flow. It is found that there are some definite differences in the appearance of cavitation between He I and He II flows, and that the phase transition from He I to He II is sometimes induced because of the temperature drop in cavitating He I flow. In He I, large temperature drop produced in the vicinity of the throat rapidly becomes diminishes with the distance from the throat, while in He II it still develops in the upper half of the downstream region of the channel. Visualization pictures show that in the case of He I the bubbly portion is composed of numerous small vapor bubbles, and then in the downstream region they disappear rapidly. But in He II the bubbly flow portion is composed of large scale bubbles.

  10. Channel Strain in Advanced Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors Measured Using Nano-Beam Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akio; Nakamura, Hidetatsu; Fukai, Toshinori; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki

    2008-04-01

    Using high-precision nano-beam electron diffraction (NBD), we clarified the influences of stress liner and the stress of shallow trench isolation on channel strain in advanced metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). For systematic strain measurements, we improved the precision of NBD by observing large reciprocal lattice vectors under appropriate diffraction conditions. The absolute value of the channel strain increases by stress liner as gate length decreases, although the drive current increase due to stress liner saturates at a shorter channel length. The normal strain in the gate length direction is inversely proportional to the distance from the gate electrode to the shallow trench isolation (STI). Furthermore, the relationship between measured channel strain induced by STI and drive current change was shown. The drive current of n- and p-MOSFET changes about 5% with 2×10-3 channel strain variation. This result suggests that reducing the shallow trench isolation stress is effective for controlling the drive current change, depending on the active region layout. We conclude that the experimental measurement of channel strain is necessary for device and circuit design.

  11. SARAS: a precision system for measurement of the cosmic radio background and signatures from the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Nipanjana; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Raghunathan, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.

    2013-08-01

    SARAS is a correlation spectrometer purpose designed for precision measurements of the cosmic radio background and faint features in the sky spectrum at long wavelengths that arise from redshifted 21-cm from gas in the reionization epoch. SARAS operates in the octave band 87.5-175 MHz. We present herein the system design arguing for a complex correlation spectrometer concept. The SARAS design concept provides a differential measurement between the antenna temperature and that of an internal reference termination, with measurements in switched system states allowing for cancellation of additive contaminants from a large part of the signal flow path including the digital spectrometer. A switched noise injection scheme provides absolute spectral calibration. Additionally, we argue for an electrically small frequency-independent antenna over an absorber ground. Various critical design features that aid in avoidance of systematics and in providing calibration products for the parametrization of other unavoidable systematics are described and the rationale discussed. The signal flow and processing is analyzed and the response to noise temperatures of the antenna, reference termination and amplifiers is computed. Multi-path propagation arising from internal reflections are considered in the analysis, which includes a harmonic series of internal reflections. We opine that the SARAS design concept is advantageous for precision measurement of the absolute cosmic radio background spectrum; therefore, the design features and analysis methods presented here are expected to serve as a basis for implementations tailored to measurements of a multiplicity of features in the background sky at long wavelengths, which may arise from events in the dark ages and subsequent reionization era.

  12. The solar wind density spectrum near the Sun: Results from Voyager radio measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, W.A.; Liu, W. ); Harmon, J.K.; Martin, C.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Spacecraft radio propagation data are analyzed to estimate the solar wind density fluctuation power spectrum across five decades of spatial wave number. The data were from radio science observations made during superior conjunctions of the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecrafts in 1979 and 1980. These data were analyzed to yield the wave structure function, a statistic which is related to, but obtained more readily than, the spectrum itself. Structure functions were obtained from a total of 28 observations spanning the heliocentric distance range 7-22 R{sub S}. Each structure function was a composite of two shorter segments estimated, respectively, from phase scintillation and spectral broadening analyses. The composite structure functions tend to be steep (approximately Kolmogorov) at large scales (10{sup 3}-10{sup 6} km) and nearly always show some flattening at smaller scales (10-100 km). The inflection between the steep and flatter regions is abrupt and occurs at scales of 100-300 km. Most of the structure functions also show some turnover at the very smallest scales. These results are in excellent agreement with the spectral shape model proposed by Coles and Harmon (1989). A few transients were seen in the Voyager data which were characterized by an overall increase in power at large scales and a steeping of the structure function at small scales. These transients were similar in appearance to transients reported earlier from Arecibo spectral broadening observations.

  13. A determination of the mass of Sagittarius A* from its radio spectral and source size measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Jokipii, J. R.; Narayanan, Ajay

    1992-01-01

    There is growing evidence that Sgr A* may be a million solar mass black hole accreting from the Galactic center wind. A consideration of the spectral and source size characteristics associated with this process can offer at least two distinct means of inferring the mass M, complementing the more traditional dynamical arguments. We show that M is unmistakably correlated with both the radio spectral index and the critical wavelength below which the intrinsic source size dominates over the angular broadening due to scattering in the interstellar medium. Current observations can already rule out a mass much in excess of 2 x 10 exp 6 solar masses and suggest a likely value close to 1 x 10 exp 6 solar masses, in agreement with an earlier study matching the radio and high-energy spectral components. We anticipate that such a mass may be confirmed with the next generation of source-size observations using milliarcsecond angular resolution at 0.5 - 1 cm wavelengths.

  14. The Radio - 2 mm Spectral Index of the Crab Nebula Measured with GISMO

    E-print Network

    Arendt, R G; Staguhn, J G; Benford, D J; Devlin, M J; Dicker, S R; Fixsen, D J; Irwin, K D; Jhabvala, C A; Korngut, P M; Kovács, A; Maher, S F; Mason, B S; Miller, T M; Moseley, S H; Navarro, S; Sievers, A; Sievers, J L; Sharp, E; Wollack, E J

    2011-01-01

    We present results of 2 mm observations of the Crab Nebula, obtained using the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer (GISMO) bolometer camera on the IRAM 30 m telescope. Additional 3.3 mm observations with the MUSTANG bolometer array on the Green Bank Telescope are also presented. The integrated 2 mm flux density of the Crab Nebula provides no evidence for the emergence of a second synchrotron component that has been proposed. It is consistent with the radio power law spectrum, extrapolated up to a break frequency of log(nu_{b} [GHz]) = 2.84 +/- 0.29 or nu_{b} = 695^{+651}_{-336} GHz. The Crab Nebula is well-resolved by the ~16.7" beam (FWHM) of GISMO. Comparison to radio data at comparable spatial resolution enables us to confirm significant spatial variation of the spectral index between 21 cm and 2 mm. The main effect is a spectral flattening in the inner region of the Crab Nebula, correlated with the toroidal structure at the center of the nebula that is prominent in the near-IR through X-ray...

  15. THE RADIO-2 mm SPECTRAL INDEX OF THE CRAB NEBULA MEASURED WITH GISMO

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, R. G.; George, J. V.; Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Maher, S. F.; Moseley, S. H.; Sharp, E.; Wollack, E. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S. R.; Korngut, P. M.; Irwin, K. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Miller, T. M.; Kovacs, A.; Mason, B. S.; Navarro, S.; Sievers, A.; Sievers, J. L.

    2011-06-10

    We present results of 2 mm observations of the Crab Nebula, obtained using the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer (GISMO) bolometer camera on the IRAM 30 m telescope. Additional 3.3 mm observations with the MUSTANG bolometer array on the Green Bank Telescope are also presented. The integrated 2 mm flux density of the Crab Nebula provides no evidence for the emergence of a second synchrotron component that has been proposed. It is consistent with the radio power-law spectrum, extrapolated up to a break frequency of log ({nu}{sub b}[GHz]) = 2.84 {+-} 0.29 or {nu}{sub b} = 695{sup +651}{sub -336} GHz. The Crab Nebula is well resolved by the {approx}16.''7 beam (FWHM) of GISMO. Comparison to radio data at comparable spatial resolution enables us to confirm significant spatial variation of the spectral index between 21 cm and 2 mm. The main effect is a spectral flattening in the inner region of the Crab Nebula, correlated with the toroidal structure at the center of the nebula that is prominent in the near-IR through X-ray regime.

  16. PIV flow measurements for heat transfer characterization in two-pass square channels with smooth and 90 ribbed walls

    E-print Network

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    PIV flow measurements for heat transfer characterization in two-pass square channels with smooth the correlation between the high- Reynolds number turbulent flow and wall heat transfer characteristics in a two number (Re) of 30,000. The PIV measurement results were compared with the heat transfer experimental data

  17. in the lipid bilayer Distance measurements reveal a common topology of prokaryotic voltage-gated ion channels

    E-print Network

    Bezanilla, Francisco

    in the lipid bilayer Distance measurements reveal a common topology of prokaryotic voltage.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes: #12;Distance measurements reveal a common topology of prokaryotic voltage conformations in a mem- brane environment. The validity of the crystal structure for the prokaryotic K channel

  18. Application of left- and right-looking SAR stereo to depth measurements of the Ammavaru outflow channel, Lada Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Venusian channels are too narrow to be resolved by Magellan's radar altimeter, so they are not visible in the standard topographic data products. Stereo image data, in addition to their benefit to geologic mapping of Venus structures as a whole, are indispensible in measuring the topography across the channels. These measurements can then be used in conjunction with the regional topographic maps based on the altimeter data to produce cross-sectional areas for the channels and estimate the fluid discharge through them. As an example of the application of the stereo image data to venusian channels, a number of test depth and profile measurements were made of the large outflow channel system in Lada Terra, centered at 50 deg S latitude, 21 deg E longitude (F-MIDR 50S021). These measurements were made by viewing the cycle 1 and 2 digital FMIDRs in stereo on a display monitor, so as to minimize the errors in measuring parallax displacement as much as possible. The MIDRs are produced at a scale of 75 m/pixel. This corresponds to a vertical scale of about 17 m/pixel, when calculating the height of a feature from its parallax displacement. An error in placement determination of 1 pixel was assumed to characterize the vertical accuracy as plus or minus 17 m. When this technique was applied to the outflow channel, it was noted that the walls of the collapsed terrain source and 'trough reach' of the channel are laid over in both the cycle 1 and 2 images. This is evident when examining the distance between features on the plateau and the cliff walls in the two images. The layover 'shifts' the features closer to the apparent edge of the wall relative to the oppositely illuminated image.

  19. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-15

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and {+-}0.2{sup 0}, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ('Dee' voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  20. Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics from Greenland; In situ measurements of the Radio Attenuation Length at the proposed Greenland Neutrino Observatory Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avva, Jessica; Vieregg, Abigail

    2014-08-01

    Neutrino astrophysics allows us to explore the ultra-high energy universe from a unique perspective and to test our understanding of particle physics at energies greater than those achievable at particle colliders. The future of ultra-high energy neutrino detection lies with ground-based radio arrays with the sensitivity required to reach even the most pessimistic models of neutrino production. The Greenland Neutrino Observatory (GNO) is a proposed ground-based radio array located at Summit Station in Greenland. We present an in situ measurement of the radio attenuation length of the ice from 50 - 200 MHz at the Summit Station site taken in June 2013, and show that Summit Station is a world-class location for a next-generation radio detector of ultra-high energy neutrinos.

  1. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  2. Characterization and Absolute QE Measurements of Delta-Doped N-Channel and P-Channel CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquot, Blake C.; Monacos, Steve P.; Jones, Todd J.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael E.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the methodology for making absolute quantum efficiency (QE) measurements from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) through the near infrared (NIR) on delta-doped silicon CCDs. Delta-doped detectors provide an excellent platform to validate measurements through the VUV due to their enhanced UV response. The requirements for measuring QE through the VUV are more strenuous than measurements in the near UV and necessitate, among other things, the use of a vacuum monochromator, and good camera vacuum to prevent chip condensation, and more stringent handling requirements. The system used for these measurements was originally designed for deep UV characterization of CCDs for the WF/PC instrument on Hubble and later for Cassini CCDs.

  3. Evaluating the use of drone photogrammetry for measurement of stream channel morphology and response to high flow events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Katie; Ballow, William

    2015-04-01

    Traditional high-precision survey methods for stream channel measurement are labor-intensive and require wadeability or boat access to streams. These conditions limit the number of sites researchers are able to study and generally prohibit the possibility of repeat channel surveys to evaluate short-term fluctuations in channel morphology. In recent years, unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) equipped with photo and video capabilities have become widely available and affordable. Concurrently, developments in photogrammetric software offer unprecedented mapping and 3D rendering capabilities of drone-captured photography. In this study, we evaluate the potential use of drone-mounted cameras for detailed stream channel morphometric analysis. We used a relatively low-cost drone (DJI Phantom 2+ Vision) and commercially available, user friendly software (Agisoft Photscan) for photogrammetric analysis of drone-captured stream channel photography. Our test study was conducted on Proctor Creek, a highly responsive urban stream in Atlanta, Georgia, within the crystalline Piedmont region of the southeastern United States. As a baseline, we performed traditional high-precision survey methods to collect morphological measurements (e.g., bankfull and wetted width, bankfull and wetted thalweg depth) at 11 evenly-spaced transects, following USGS protocols along reaches of 20 times average channel width. We additionally used the drone to capture 200+ photos along the same reaches, concurrent with the channel survey. Using the photogrammetry software, we generated georeferenced 3D models of the stream channel, from which morphological measurements were derived from the 11 transects and compared with measurements from the traditional survey method. We additionally explored possibilities for novel morphometric characterization available from the continuous 3D surface, as an improvement on the limited number of detailed cross-sections available from standard methods. These results showed great promise for the drone photogrammetry methods, which encouraged the exploration of the possibility of repeat aerial surveys to evaluate channel response to high flow events. Repeat drone surveys were performed following a sequence of high-flow events in Proctor Creek to evaluate the possibility of using these methods for assessment of stream channel response to flooding.

  4. Measurement of the quenching and channeling effects in a CsI crystal used for a WIMP search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, G. B.; Seong, I. S.; Kim, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Li, J.; Park, J. W.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, K. W.; Bhang, H.; Kim, S. C.; Choi, Seonho; Choi, J. H.; Joo, H. W.; Lee, S. J.; Olsen, S. L.; Myung, S. S.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. D.; Kang, W. G.; So, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, H. S.; Hahn, I. S.; Leonard, D. S.; Li, J.; Li, Y. J.; Yue, Q.; Li, X. R.

    2015-05-01

    We have studied channeling effects in a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal that is similar in composition to the ones being used in a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) dark matter candidates, and measured its energy-dependent quenching factor, the relative scintillation yield for electron and nuclear recoils. The experimental results are reproduced with a GEANT4 simulation that includes a model of the scintillation efficiency as a function of electronic stopping power. We present the measured and simulated quenching factors and the estimated effects of channeling.

  5. Measurement of the quenching and channeling effects in a CsI crystal used for a WIMP search

    E-print Network

    J. H. Lee; G. B. Kim; I. S. Seong; B. H. Kim; J. H. Kim; J. Li; J. W. Park; J. K. Lee; K. W. Kim; H. Bhang; S. C. Kim; Seonho Choi; J. H. Choi; H. W. Joo; S. J. Lee; S. L. Olsen; S. S. Myung; S. K. Kim; Y. D. Kim; W. G. Kang; J. H. So; H. J. Kim; H. S. Lee; I. S. Hahn; D. S. Leonard; J. Li; Y. J. Li; Q. Yue; X. R. Li

    2015-02-12

    We have studied channeling effects in a Cesium Iodide (CsI) crystal that is similar in composition to the ones being used in a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) dark matter candidates, and measured its energy-dependent quenching factor, the relative scintillation yield for electron and nuclear recoils. The experimental results are reproduced with a GEANT4 simulation that includes a model of the scintillation efficiency as a function of electronic stopping power. We present the measured and simulated quenching factors and the estimated effects of channeling.

  6. Measurement of the quenching and channeling effects in a CsI crystal used for a WIMP search

    E-print Network

    Lee, J H; Seong, I S; Kim, B H; Kim, J H; Li, J; Park, J W; Lee, J K; Kim, K W; Bhang, H; Kim, S C; Choi, Seonho; Choi, J H; Joo, H W; Lee, S J; Olsen, S L; Myung, S S; Kim, S K; Kim, Y D; Kang, W G; So, J H; Kim, H J; Lee, H S; Hahn, I S; Leonard, D S; Li, Y J; Yue, Q; Li, X R

    2015-01-01

    We have studied channeling effects in a Cesium Iodide (CsI) crystal that is similar in composition to the ones being used in a search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) dark matter candidates, and measured its energy-dependent quenching factor, the relative scintillation yield for electron and nuclear recoils. The experimental results are reproduced with a GEANT4 simulation that includes a model of the scintillation efficiency as a function of electronic stopping power. We present the measured and simulated quenching factors and the estimated effects of channeling.

  7. Channel probe measurements for the American sector clutter experiment, January, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1994-05-20

    The ionospheric phenomenon called Equatorial Spread F encompasses a variety of effects associated with plasma irregularities occurring in the post-sunset and nighttime ionosphere near the magnetic equator. These irregularities can seriously degrade the performance of systems which involve either of necessity or inadvertently radio propagation through the equatorial ionosphere. One such system is Over-the-Horizon (OTH) radars which operate in the high-frequency (hf) band and use ionospheric reflection for forward and backscatter propagation to ranges of thousands of kilometers. When such radars are directed towards the equator, Spread F irregularities can cause scintillation effects which may be aliased into the ranges of interest and have the effect of causing, excess clutter in which targets may be hidden. In January, 1994 Los Alamos participated in a campaign to measure Spread F effects on OTH propagation from the United States looking towards South America in conjunction with local diagnostics in Peru. During the campaign Los Alamos fielded a 1600 km bistatic path between Piura, Peru, and Arequipa, Peru-, the one-hop reflection region for this path was near the magnetic equator, We obtained four types of measurements: an oblique ionogram between Piura and Arequipa every three minutes; Doppler spread and spatial correlation for a single frequency cw path between Piura and Arequipa; Doppler spread, time-delay spread, and spatial coherence for a 10 kHz bandwidth path between Piura and Arequipa-, and Doppler spread and time-delay spread for the one-way path between the AVA radar in New York and Arequipa, Peru. This report describes the diagnostic experiments that we carried out and gives a brief description of some of the data we obtained.

  8. Functional reconstitution and channel activity measurements of purified wildtype and mutant CFTR protein.

    PubMed

    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2015-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates. PMID:25867140

  9. Radio-frequency electromagnetic fields associated with cellular-radio cell-site antennas.

    PubMed

    Petersen, R C; Testagrossa, P A

    1992-01-01

    Because of a heightened public awareness of issues pertaining to the use of electromagnetic energy, concurrent with a rapid growth of the cellular telephone industry, a study was initiated to characterize the electromagnetic environment associated with typical cell-site antennas. In particular, the radio-frequency electromagnetic (RF) fields in the vicinity of several antenna towers, ranging in height from 46-82 m, were characterized by measurement. In all cases, the antennas were omnidirectional co-linear arrays. The maximal power densities considered representative of public exposure were found to be less than 100 microW/m2 (10 nW/cm2) per radio channel. Comparison of measured values with the corresponding values that were calculated from the free-space transmission formula indicated that the analytical technique is conservative (i.e., overestimates field levels). The measured and corresponding analytical values were found to be well below accepted exposure limits even when extrapolated to simultaneous and continuous operation of the maximal number of transmitters that would be expected to be installed at a cell-site. Additional measurements were made in the near field of the same antenna type in a roof-mounted configuration. At a distance of 0.7 m from the antenna, the maximal power density in the main beam was found to be less than 30 W/m2 (3 mW/cm2) when normalized to sixteen radio channels (the maximal number used on a single antenna) and less than 30 mW/m2 (3 microW/m2) at 70 m. In all cases, the effective radiated power (ERP) by each radio channel was 100 W referenced to a half-wave dipole. This paper describes the instrumentation and measurement techniques used for this study and provides a summary of the results. PMID:1482416

  10. Three-Dimensional Holographic Refractive-Index Measurement of Continuously Flowing Cells in a Microfluidic Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yongjin; Lue, Niyom; Hamza, Bashar; Martel, Joseph; Irimia, Daniel; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Choi, Wonshik; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter

    2014-02-01

    The refractive index of biological specimens is a source of intrinsic contrast that can be explored without any concerns of photobleaching or harmful effects caused by extra contrast agents. In addition, the refractive index contains rich information related to the metabolism of cells at the cellular and subcellular levels. Here, we report a no-moving-parts approach that provides three-dimensional refractive-index maps of biological samples continuously flowing in a microfluidic channel. Specifically, we use line illumination and off-axis digital holography to record the angular spectra of light scattered from flowing samples at high speed. Applying the scalar diffraction theory, we obtain accurate refractive-index maps of the samples from the measured spectra. Using this method, we demonstrate label-free three-dimensional imaging of live RKO human colon cancer cells and RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells, and obtain the volume, dry mass, and density of these cells from the measured three-dimensional refractive-index maps. Our results show that the reported method, alone or in combination with the existing flow cytometry techniques, shows promise as a quantitative tool for stain-free characterization of a large number of cells.

  11. Turbulence Measurements from a Moored Platform at Mid-Depth in a Swift Tidal Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Alex; Lueck, Rolf; Wolk, Fabian; McMillan, Justine

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from a turbulence experiment with a 3-m long streamlined floatation body, instrumented with velocity shear probes, fast-response thermistors, a 1 MHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (AD2CP), and an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV). The system was deployed over seven tidal cycles at mid-depth in a 30-m deep tidal channel in the lower Bay of Fundy, Canada. Peak flow speeds exceeded 2 m s-1, and while 10-min time scale average speeds were similar between ebb and flood, the variances were markedly higher during flood. Turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rates measured with the shear probes exhibit a pronounced flood/ebb contrast: O(10-4) W kg-1 peak values during flood, but lower by an order of magnitude during ebb. Dissipation rates follow u3 scaling over a wide range of flow speeds between 0.5 and 2.5 m s-1. Below 0.5 m s-1 an asymmetry in the mounting arrangement caused the floatation body to pitch upward, biasing the measured dissipation values high. The ADV on the platform registered mean speed - used to implement Taylor's hypothesis - which was corroborated with the platform-mounted ADCP. Additional ADCPs were also deployed on a nearby bottom pod, sampling at turbulence resolving rates - up to 8 Hz. Comparisons between the shear probe and acoustic estimates of the TKE spectrum and dissipation rate - at comparable depths - are presented.

  12. Three-channel imaging fabry-perot interferometer for measurement of mid-latitude airglow.

    PubMed

    Shiokawa, K; Kadota, T; Ejiri, M K; Otsuka, Y; Katoh, Y; Satoh, M; Ogawa, T

    2001-08-20

    We have developed a three-channel imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer with which to measure atmospheric wind and temperature in the mesosphere and thermosphere through nocturnal airglow emissions. The interferometer measures two-dimensional wind and temperature for wavelengths of 630.0 nm (OI, altitude, 200-300 km), 557.7 nm (OI, 96 km), and 839.9 nm (OH, 86 km) simultaneously with a time resolution of 20 min, using three cooled CCD detectors with liquid-N(2) Dewars. Because we found that the CCD sensor moves as a result of changes in the level of liquid N(2) in the Dewars, the cooling system has been replaced by thermoelectric coolers. The fringe drift that is due to changes in temperature of the etalon is monitored with a frequency-stabilized He-Ne laser. We also describe a data-reduction scheme for calculating wind and temperature from the observed fringes. The system is fully automated and has been in operation since June 1999 at the Shigaraki Observatory (34.8N, 136.1E), Shiga, Japan. PMID:18360466

  13. Measurements in a Braided River chute and lobe: 1. Flow pattern, sediment transport, and channel change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, R. I.; Ashmore, P. E.; Ashworth, P. J.; Paola, C.; Prestegaard, K. L.

    1992-07-01

    This paper and its companion (Ashworth et al., this issue) discuss measurements of channel change and associated flow and sediment transport processes in a representative chute-and-bar reach within a proglacial gravel-bed river, the Sunwapta River in the Canadian Rockies. During a week in which water discharge through the reach increased then decreased, a sediment wave passed into and partly along the reach. At first the chute aggraded, then sediment was eroded from the chute and deposited in a prograding lobe to one side of the original bar head between two distributaries. Measurements of velocity, shear stress, and gravel transport rate revealed day-to-day changes in the divergent pattern of flow and sediment transport. The off-center location of the lobe reflected an initial asymmetry in the pattern of flow and sediment transport, but as the lobe grew, the flow and transport gradually switched away to the other distributary. Width-averaged bed load transport rates do not agree well with average rates inferred from bar head deposition or from volumes and spatial patterns of scour and fill; the indirect estimates are considered more reliable than those based on direct sampling for necessarily brief durations. By the end of the study the new lobe had almost accreted onto the original bar head, supporting the idea that most braid bars are of compound origin. Temporal and spatial patterns in grain size distributions of the bed, bed load, and deposited sediment are discussed in the companion paper.

  14. Accelerator measurements of magnetically-induced radio emission from particle cascades with applications to cosmic-ray air showers

    E-print Network

    K. Belov; K. Mulrey; A. Romero-Wolf; S. A. Wissel; A. Zilles; K. Bechtol; K. Borch; P. Chen; J. Clem; P. W. Gorham; C. Hast; T. Huege; R. Hyneman; K. Jobe; K. Kuwatani; J. Lam; T. Liu; J. Nam; C. Naudet; R. Nichol; B. F. Rauch; B. Rotter; D. Saltzberg; H. Schoorlemmer; D. Seckel; B. Strutt; A. G. Vieregg; C. Williams

    2015-07-27

    An experiment at SLAC provides the first beam test of radio-frequency (RF) radiation from a charged particle cascade in the presence of a magnetic field (up to $\\sim$1~kG), a model system for RF emission from a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of RF emission, which are relied upon in ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm recent predictions that the magnetically induced emission forms a beam that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties.

  15. Rnyi entropy measure of noise-aided information transmission in a binary channel Franois Chapeau-Blondeau, David Rousseau, and Agns Delahaies

    E-print Network

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    Rényi entropy measure of noise-aided information transmission in a binary channel François Chapeau May 2010 This paper analyzes a binary channel by means of information measures based on the Rényi information transmission based on the Shannon entropy measure. The extended model is used to investigate

  16. USING RADIO HALOS AND MINIHALOS TO MEASURE THE DISTRIBUTIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELDS AND COSMIC RAYS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Keshet, Uri; Loeb, Abraham

    2010-10-10

    Some galaxy clusters show diffuse radio emission in the form of giant halos (GHs) on Mpc scales or minihalos (MHs) on smaller scales. Comparing Very Large Array and XMM-Newton radial profiles of several such clusters, we find a universal linear correlation between radio and X-ray surface brightness, valid in both types of halos. It implies a halo central emissivity {nu}j{sub {nu}} = 10{sup -31.4{+-}0.2}(n/10{sup -2}cm{sup -3}){sup 2}(T/T{sub 0}){sup 0.2{+-}0.5}ergs{sup -1}cm{sup -3}, where T and T{sub 0} are the local and central temperatures, respectively, and n is the electron number density. We argue that the tight correlation and the scaling of j{sub {nu}}, combined with morphological and spectral evidence, indicate that both GHs and MHs arise from secondary electrons and positrons, produced in cosmic-ray ion (CRI) collisions with a strongly magnetized B {approx}> 3{mu}G intracluster gas. When the magnetic energy density drops below that of the microwave background, the radio emission weakens considerably, producing halos with a clumpy morphology (e.g., RXC J2003.5 - 2323 and A2255) or a distinct radial break. We thus measure a magnetic field B = 3{mu}G at a radius r {approx_equal} 110kpc in A2029 and r {approx_equal} 50kpc in Perseus. The spectrum of secondaries, produced from hadronic collisions of {approx}20GeV CRIs, reflects the energy dependence of the collision cross section. We use the observed spectra of halos, in particular where they steepen with increasing radius or frequency, to (1) measure B {approx_equal} 10({nu}/700MHz){mu}G with {nu} the spectral break frequency, (2) identify a correlation between the average spectrum and the central magnetic field, and (3) infer a CRI spectral index s {approx}< -2.7 and energy fraction {xi}{sub p} {approx} 10{sup -3.6{+-}0.2} at particle energies above 10 GeV. Our results favor a model where CRIs diffuse away from their sources (which are probably supernovae, according to a preliminary correlation with star formation), whereas the magnetic fields are generated by mergers in GHs and by core sloshing in MHs.

  17. Effect of Ducting on Radio Occultation Measurements: An Assessment Based on High-Resolution Radiosonde Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ao, C. O

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the presence of elevated ducts in the lower atmosphere has an adverse effect on the inversion of GPS radio occultation data. The problem arises because the microwave refractivity within and below an elevated duct is no longer uniquely determined by the bending angle profile. Applying Abel inversion without a priori knowledge of the duct will introduce a negative bias in the retrieved refractivity profile within and below the duct. In this work, high vertical resolution radiosonde data are used to give a quantitative assessment of the characteristics and effects of ducts, including their frequency of occurrences, heights, and thicknesses at different latitudes and seasons. The negative bias from the Abel-retrieved refractivity profiles resulting from these ducts is also computed. The results give a strong indication that ducting in the lower troposphere is a frequent phenomenon over the tropics and midlatitudes. The ducts are shown to be predominantly caused by sharp changes in the vertical structure of water vapor. The majority of the ducts are found to be below 2 km, with a median duct layer thickness of about 100 m. The negative refractivity bias is shown to be largest below 2 km, with a median value of about 0.5-1% in the tropics and 0.2-0.5% in midlatitudes. The bias is about a factor of 2-3 smaller between 2 to 3 km and is negligible above 4 km.

  18. 47 CFR 95.7 - Channel sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channel sharing. 95.7 Section 95.7... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.7 Channel sharing. (a) Channels or channel pairs (one 462... and use of channels to reduce interference and to make the most effective use of the facilities....

  19. Measurement setup and protocol for characterizing and testing radio frequency personal exposure meters.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Oliver; Neubauer, Georg; Röösli, Martin; Riederer, Markus; Frei, Patrizia; Mohler, Evelyn; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    Body-worn radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) personal exposure meters (PEMs) have been increasingly used for exposure assessment in epidemiological research. However, little research on the measurement accuracy of these devices is available. In this article a novel measurement setup and a measurement protocol are presented for characterizing and testing PEMs. The whole setup and procedure is tested using two EME SPY 120 devices. The performance of the PEM was analyzed for absolute measurements in an anechoic chamber. Modulated signals representing the different services as real signals generated by appropriate testers were used. Measurement results were evaluated with respect to a root mean square detector. We found that measurement accuracy depends strongly on the carrier frequency and also on the number of occupied time slots for Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA)-based services. Thus, correction factors can only be derived if the distribution of the network configuration over the measurement time for all measurement points is available. As a result of the simplicity of the measurement setup and the straightforward measurement protocol, the possibility of fast validation leads to a higher accuracy in the characterization and testing of PEMs. PMID:21755521

  20. Measurement of the ttbar production cross section in the MET+jets channel at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Compostella, Gabriele; /INFN, Trento

    2008-03-01

    This thesis is focused on an inclusive search of the t{bar t} {yields} E{sub T} + jets decay channel by means of neural network tools in proton antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). At the Tevatron p{bar p} collider top quarks are mainly produced in pairs through quark-antiquark annihilation and gluon-gluon fusion processes; in the Standard Model description, the top quark then decays to a W boson and a b quark almost 100% of the times, so that its decay signatures are classified according to the W decay modes. When only one W decays leptonically, the t{bar t} event typically contains a charged lepton, missing transverse energy due to the presence of a neutrino escaping from the detector, and four high transverse momentum jets, two of which originate from b quarks. In this thesis we describe a t{bar t} production cross section measurement which uses data collected by a 'multijet' trigger, and selects this kind of top decays by requiring a high-P{sub T} neutrino signature and by using an optimized neural network to discriminate top quark pair production from backgrounds. In Chapter 1, a brief review of the Standard Model of particle physics will be discussed, focusing on top quark properties and experimental signatures. In Chapter 2 will be presented an overview of the Tevatron accelerator chain that provides p{bar p} collisions at the center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and proton and antiproton beams production procedure will be discussed. The CDF detector and its components and subsystems used for the study of p{bar p} collisions provided by the Tevatron will be described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 will detail the reconstruction procedures used in CDF to detect physical objects exploiting the features of the different detector subsystems. Chapter 5 will provide an overview of the main concepts regarding Artificial Neural Networks, one of the most important tools we will use in the analysis. Chapter 6 will be devoted to the description of the main characteristics of the t{bar t} {yields} E{sub T} + jets decay channel used to train our neural network to discriminate the top pair production from background processes. We will discuss the event selection method and the technique used for background prediction, that will rely on b-jets identification rate parameterization. Finally, Chapter 7 will provide a description of the final data sample and a detailed discussion of the systematic uncertainties before determining the cross section measurement by means of a likelihood maximization.

  1. Aircraft Engine On-Line Diagnostics Through Dual-Channel Sensor Measurements: Development of an Enhanced System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an enhanced on-line diagnostic system which utilizes dual-channel sensor measurements is developed for the aircraft engine application. The enhanced system is composed of a nonlinear on-board engine model (NOBEM), the hybrid Kalman filter (HKF) algorithm, and fault detection and isolation (FDI) logic. The NOBEM provides the analytical third channel against which the dual-channel measurements are compared. The NOBEM is further utilized as part of the HKF algorithm which estimates measured engine parameters. Engine parameters obtained from the dual-channel measurements, the NOBEM, and the HKF are compared against each other. When the discrepancy among the signals exceeds a tolerance level, the FDI logic determines the cause of discrepancy. Through this approach, the enhanced system achieves the following objectives: 1) anomaly detection, 2) component fault detection, and 3) sensor fault detection and isolation. The performance of the enhanced system is evaluated in a simulation environment using faults in sensors and components, and it is compared to an existing baseline system.

  2. Design and Testing of A Closed Stirring-respirometer for Measuring Oxygen Consumption of Channel Catfish Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A closed stirring-respirometer was designed to allow for agitation of small samples of channel catfish egg masses while measuring oxygen consumption. Egg mass samples ranging in size from 15-46 g were placed on a platform above a magnetic spin bar; the degree of agitation was controlled with a magne...

  3. Radio Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, John R.; Bittner, Denise A.

    This book, a how-to-do-it guide for the novice and the professional alike, deals with several aspects of radio journalism: producing documentaries, preparing and announcing radio news, ethics and responsibility, regulation of radio journalism, and careers. It traces the history and growth of radio news, shows its impact on the public, and…

  4. The 'Brick Wall' radio loss approximation and the performance of strong channel codes for deep space applications at high data rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate performance of strong channel codes in presence of imperfect carrier phase tracking for residual carrier BPSK modulation in this paper an approximate 'brick wall' model is developed which is independent of the channel code type for high data rates. It is shown that this approximation is reasonably accurate (less than 0.7dB for low FERs for (1784,1/6) code and less than 0.35dB for low FERs for (5920,1/6) code). Based on the approximation's accuracy, it is concluded that the effects of imperfect carrier tracking are more or less independent of the channel code type for strong channel codes. Therefore, the advantage that one strong channel code has over another with perfect carrier tracking translates to nearly the same advantage under imperfect carrier tracking conditions. This will allow the link designers to incorporate projected channel code performance of strong channel codes into their design tables without worrying about their behavior in the face of imperfect carrier phase tracking.

  5. Automatic Measurement of Water Levels by Using Image Identification Method in Open Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung Yang, Han; Xue Yang, Jia

    2014-05-01

    Water level data is indispensable to hydrology research, and it is important information for hydraulic engineering and overall utilization of water resources. The information of water level can be transmitted to management office by the network so that the management office may well understand whether the river level is exceeding the warning line. The existing water level measurement method can only present water levels in a form of data without any of images, the methods which make data just be a data and lack the sense of reality. Those images such as the rising or overflow of river level that the existing measurement method cannot obtain simultaneously. Therefore, this research employs a newly, improved method for water level measurement. Through the Video Surveillance System to record the images on site, an image of water surface will be snapped, and then the snapped image will be pre-processed and be compared with its altitude reference value to obtain a water level altitude value. With the ever-growing technology, the application scope of image identification is widely in increase. This research attempts to use image identification technology to analyze water level automatically. The image observation method used in this research is one of non-contact water level gage but it is quite different from other ones; the image observation method is cheap and the facilities can be set up beside an embankment of river or near the houses, thus the impact coming from external factors will be significantly reduced, and a real scene picture will be transmitted through wireless transmission. According to the dynamic water flow test held in an indoor experimental channel, the results of the research indicated that all of error levels of water level identification were less than 2% which meant the image identification could achieve identification result at different water levels. This new measurement method can offer instant river level figures and on-site video so that a disaster prevention measures can be made accordingly. Keywords: Image identification; Water Level; Video surveillance system.

  6. Higgs Differential Cross Sections, Spin/CP Measurements, and Rare Channels at the LHC and Tevatron

    E-print Network

    Tackmann, Kerstin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings report on a collection of Higgs boson property studies based on the LHC Run1 dataset, consisting of about 25~fb$^{-1}$ pp collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8~TeV by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as a study from the CDF and D0 experiments, based on about 10~fb$^{-1}$ $p\\bar{p}$ collision data taken at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96~TeV at the Tevatron collider. The results of total, fiducial and differential cross section measurements are reported, and studies of the spin and CP are described. No significant deviation from the Standard Model predictions has been found. Searches for rare decay channels, including $H\\to Z\\gamma$, $H\\to\\mu\\mu$, $H\\to J/\\psi\\gamma$ and $H\\to\\gamma^*\\gamma\\to\\ell\\ell\\gamma$ do not show any evidence for signal and upper limits on their branching ratios are set.

  7. Determination of the manning coefficient from measured bed roughness in natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Limerinos, John Thomas

    1970-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to test the hypothesis that basic values of the Manning roughness coefficient of stream channels may be related to (1) some characteristic size of the streambed particles and to (2) the distribution of particle size. These two elements involving particle size can be combined into a single element by weighting characteristic particle sizes. The investigation was confined to channels with coarse bed material to avoid the complication of bed-form roughness that is associated with alluvial channels composed of fine bed material. Fifty current-meter measurements of discharge and appropriate field surveys were made at 11 sites on California streams for the purpose of computing the roughness coefficient, n, by the Manning formula. The test sites were selected to give a wide range in average size of bed material, and the discharge measurements and surveys were made at such times as to provide data covering a suitable range in stream depth. The sites selected were relatively free of the extraneous flow-retarding effects associated with irregular channel conformation and streambank vegetation. The characteristic bed-particle sizes used in the analyses were the 16,- 50,- and 84-percentile sizes as obtained from a cumulative frequency distribution of the diameters of randomly sampled surficial bed material. Separate distributions were computed for the minimum and intermediate values of the three diameters of a particle. The minimum diameters of the streambed particles were used in the study because a particle at rest on the bed invariably has its minimum diameter in the vertical position; this diameter is, therefore, the most representative measure of roughness height. The intermediate diameter was also studied because this is the diameter most easily measurable-either by sieve analysis or by photographic techniques--and--because it is the diameter that had been used in previous studies by other investigators. No significant difference in reliability was found between the results obtained using minimum diameters and those obtained using intermediate diameters. In analyzing the field data, the roughness parameter, n/R1/6 (where R is hydraulic radius), was related to relative smoothness, R/d (where d is a characteristic, or weighted characteristic, particle size). The parameter n/R1/6, rather than n, was used because it is directly proportional to the square root of the Darcy-Weisbach friction factor, f, which is more widely used in theoretical studies of hydraulic friction. If the transformation of n/R1/6 to vf is made, the relations obtained in this study are of a form that is identical with that of the theoretical friction equation obtained by several investigators and that derived from field data by Leopold and Wolman (1957). The constants in the equation vary, of course, with the characteristic particle size used. The relations best fitting the field data for this study were obtained by using either a characteristic particle diameter equal to the 84-percentile size (d84, the size equal to, or exceeding, that of 84 percent of the streambed particles), or a diameter obtained by weighting three characteristic particle sizes (dw, the size obtained by assigning a weight of 0.1 to d16 , a weight of 0.3 to d50 , and a weight of 0.6 to d84). The use of d84 alone gave slightly better results than the use of dw, and, in addition, the use of d84 alone is attractive from a standpoint of simplicity. It is difficult, however, to rationalize the use of d84 alone because of the implication that the distribution of sizes is irrelevant, and it matters not at all whether 84 percent of the bed material is sand or whether it is large cobbles, as long as 16 percent of the material is of greater size. Consequently, the author recommends the use of dw rather than d84 , although there was no unanimity of opinion on this recommendation among his colleagues who reviewed this paper. The reader is free to

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 54, NO. 4, APRIL 2006 1827 UWB On-Body Radio Channel Modeling Using

    E-print Network

    Hao, Yang

    are essen- tial. The idea of a number of nodes scattered around the human body and communicating wirelessly wearable entertainment systems and high performance mobile PCs. For low-power, reliable, and robust on-body of the on-body radio propagation and its behavior with regards to different environments and system

  9. Determining electrical properties based on B1 fields measured in an MR scanner using a multi-channel transmit/receive coil: a general approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaen; Zhang, Xiaotong; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2013-07-01

    Electrical properties tomography (EPT) is a recently developed noninvasive technology to image the electrical conductivity and permittivity of biological tissues at Larmor frequency in magnetic resonance scanners. The absolute phase of the complex radio-frequency magnetic field (B1) is necessary for electrical property calculation. However, due to the lack of practical methods to directly measure the absolute B1 phases, current EPT techniques have been achieved with B1 phase estimation based on certain assumptions on object anatomy, coil structure and/or electromagnetic wave behavior associated with the main magnetic field, limiting EPT from a larger variety of applications. In this study, using a multi-channel transmit/receive coil, the framework of a new general approach for EPT has been introduced, which is independent on the assumptions utilized in previous studies. Using a human head model with realistic geometry, a series of computer simulations at 7 T were conducted to evaluate the proposed method under different noise levels. Results showed that the proposed method can be used to reconstruct the conductivity and permittivity images with noticeable accuracy and stability. The feasibility of this approach was further evaluated in a phantom experiment at 7 T.

  10. X-Ray Measurement of the Spin-down of Calvera: A Radio- and Gamma-Ray-Quiet Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is \\dot{P}=(3.19+/- \\,0.08)\\times 10^{-15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity \\dot{E}=6.1\\times 10^{35} erg s-1, characteristic age \\tau _c\\equiv P/2\\dot{P}=2.9\\times 10^5 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength Bs = 4.4 × 1011 G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy ?-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a ?-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 1032 erg s-1, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable \\dot{E}. Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and ?-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  11. Low temperature radio-frequency transverse susceptibility measurements using a CMOS oscillator circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, A. I.; Bartolomé, J.; García del Pozo, J. M.; Arauzo, A.; Guerrero, E.; Téllez, P.; Bartolomé, F.; García, L. M.

    2012-08-01

    A transverse susceptibility (TS) measurement system based on a simple inverter CMOS cell oscillator cross-coupled to a LC tank is presented. The system has been implemented to operate at a Quantum Design Physical Properties Measurement System (PPMS). We introduce several improvements with respect to similar currently operating TS measurement equipments. The electronics have been redesigned to use CMOS transistors as active devices, which simplifies the circuit design and enlarge the tuning range, thus making the proposed electronic block more feasible, predictable, and precise. Additionally, we propose a newly designed sample holder, which facilitates the procedure to change a sample and improves reproducibility of the circuit. Our design minimizes the thermal leak of the measuring probe by one order of magnitude, allowing to measure from 1.8 K in standard PPMS systems, thanks to the use of a low temperature beryllium-copper coaxial cable instead of the conventional RG402 Cu coaxial cable employed in the insert for the PPMS in similar systems. The data acquisition method is also simplified, so that the measuring sequences are implemented directly in the PPMS controller computer by programming them in the Quantum Design MultiVu software that controls the PPMS. We present the test measurements performed on the system without sample to study the background signal and stability of the circuit. Measurements on a Gd2O3 calibrating sample yield to the estimation of the system sensitivity, which is found to be on the order of 10-6 emu. Finally, measurements on a TmCo2 Laves phase sample with a ferrimagnetic transition temperature around 4 K are described, demonstrating that the developed system is well suited to explore interesting magnetic phenomena at this temperature scale.

  12. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An extensive set of ground-based measurements of the diurnal variation of medium frequency radio wave adsorption and virtual height is analyzed in terms of current understanding of the D- and lower E-region ion production and loss process. When this is done a gross discrepancy arises, the source of which is not known.

  13. The First measurement of the top quark mass at CDF II in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels simultaneously

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-09-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. This is the first measurement of the top quark mass using top-antitop pair candidate events in the lepton + jets and dilepton decay channels simultaneously. They reconstruct two observables in each channel and use a non-parametric kernel density estimation technique to derive two-dimensional probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the top quark mass and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton + jets channel, and the top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the diletpon channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. using 332 lepton + jets candidate events and 144 diletpon candidate events, they measure the top quark mass to be m{sub top} = 171.9 {+-} 1.7 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} = 171.9 {+-} 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  14. First simultaneous measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Krop, D.; Kwang, S.; Lee, H. S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Wilbur, S.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K.

    2009-05-01

    We present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions collected at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. This is the first measurement of the top quark mass using top-antitop pair candidate events in the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels simultaneously. We reconstruct two observables in each channel and use a nonparametric kernel density estimation technique to derive two-dimensional probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the top quark mass and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and the top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the dilepton channel. We perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. Using 332 lepton+jets candidate events and 144 dilepton candidate events, we measure the top quark mass to be M{sub top}=171.9{+-}1.7(stat+JES){+-}1.1(other syst) GeV/c{sup 2}=171.9{+-}2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. A novel method for measuring the polarization angle of satellite radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniadis, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    One of the most important parameters for the study of the physics of the ionosphere is the columnar electron content. This can be obtained indirectly by measuring the Faraday rotation of signals emitted from satellites. Many different types of polarimeters have been developed for this purpose. Efforts to develop a new type of polarimeter, suitable for extensive network operation, led to a novel technique for measuring the polarization angle.

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. COM-25, NO. 10, OCTOBER 1977 1103 Packet Switching inRadio Channels:Part IV-Stability

    E-print Network

    Kleinrock, Leonard

    ,contrary to ALOHA channels where steady-state performance is badly degraded when true stability is to be guaranteed the carrier due to other users' transmissions; based on thischannel stateinfor- mation (busy or idle

  17. On the optimal frequency of observation of Cherenkov radiation in the radio astronomy method for measuring superhigh-energy cosmic-ray particle flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonenko, A. D.

    2008-09-01

    Possible reasons for the absence of direct observations of individual events in measuring the super-high-energy particle flux by the radio astronomy technique are considered. One of these reasons is probably associated with the choice of extremely high frequencies (˜1.5 GHz) for detecting radio pulses. Calculations show that the radiation intensity attains its peak value at frequencies ˜500 600 MHz and then sharply decreases so that it becomes three orders of magnitude lower even at a frequency of ˜1.5 GHz. The effectiveness of particle detection in the range of high (˜600 MHz) and low (˜60 MHz) frequencies is analyzed.

  18. Modeling Radio Networks Calvin Newport and Nancy Lynch

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Nancy

    Modeling Radio Networks Calvin Newport and Nancy Lynch MIT CSAIL, Cambridge, MA {cnewport for the study of probabilistic distributed algorithms in synchronous radio networks. Though the radio setting describe a radio channel as a probabilistic automaton; (2) a mathematical notion of implementing one

  19. A brief Overview of the GSM Radio Interface Thierry Turletti

    E-print Network

    Turletti, Thierry

    Networking. Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 Radio Transmission Aspects 2 3 From Speech to Radio Waves 4 3A brief Overview of the GSM Radio Interface Thierry Turletti Telemedia Networks and Systems Group to the GSM­900 radio interface. It is not exhaustive and it is restricted to the TraOEc Channel

  20. Two-channel algorithm for single-shot, high-resolution measurement of optical wavefronts using two image sensors.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Jin; Okamoto, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Tomita, Akihisa

    2015-10-10

    We propose a two-channel holographic diversity interferometer (2ch-HDI) system for single-shot and highly accurate measurements of complex amplitude fields with a simple optical setup. In this method, two phase-shifted interference patterns are generated, without requiring a phase-shifting device, by entering a circularly polarized reference beam into a polarizing beam splitter, and the resulting patterns are captured simultaneously using two image sensors. However, differences in the intensity distributions of the two image sensors may lead to serious measurement errors. Thus, we also develop a two-channel algorithm optimized for the 2ch-HDI to compensate for these differences. Simulation results show that this algorithm can compensate for such differences in the intensity distributions in the two image sensors. Experimental results confirm that the combination of the 2ch-HDI and the calculation algorithm significantly enhances measurement accuracy. PMID:26479799

  1. Measurement of radio wave reflection due to temperature rising from rock salt and ice irradiated by an electron beam for an ultra-high-energy neutrino detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tanikawa, Takahiro; Chiba, Masami; Kamijo, Toshio; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2012-11-12

    An ultra-high-energy neutrino (UHE{nu}) gives temperature rise along the hadronic and electromagnetic shower when it enters into rock salt or ice. Permittivities of them arise with respect the temperatures at ionization processes of the UHE{nu} shower. It is expected by Fresnel's formula that radio wave reflects at the irregularity of the permittivity in the medium. We had found the radio wave reflection effect in rock salt. The reflection effect and long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new UHE{nu} detection method. An experiment for ice was performed to study the reflection effect. A coaxial tube was filled with rock salt powder or ice. Open end of the coaxial tube was irradiated by a 2 MeV electron beam. Radio wave of 435 MHz was introduced to the coaxial tube. We measured the reflection wave from the open end. We found the radio wave reflection effect due to electron beam irradiation in ice as well as in rock salt.

  2. Direct thrust measurements and modelling of a radio-frequency expanding plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Takahashi, K.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2011-08-01

    It is shown analytically that the thrust from a simple plasma thruster (in the absence of a magnetic field) is given by the maximum upstream electron pressure, even if the plasma diverges downstream. Direct thrust measurements of a thruster are then performed using a pendulum thrust balance and a laser displacement sensor. A maximum thrust of about 2 mN is obtained at 700 W for a thruster length of 17.5 cm and a flow rate of 0.9 mg s-1, while a larger thrust of 4 mN is obtained at a similar power for a length of 9.5 cm and a flow rate of 1.65 mg s-1. The measured thrusts are in good agreement with the maximum upstream electron pressure found from measurements of the plasma parameters and in fair agreement with a simple global approach used to model the thruster.

  3. Direct thrust measurements and modelling of a radio-frequency expanding plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.; Takahashi, K.

    2011-08-15

    It is shown analytically that the thrust from a simple plasma thruster (in the absence of a magnetic field) is given by the maximum upstream electron pressure, even if the plasma diverges downstream. Direct thrust measurements of a thruster are then performed using a pendulum thrust balance and a laser displacement sensor. A maximum thrust of about 2 mN is obtained at 700 W for a thruster length of 17.5 cm and a flow rate of 0.9 mg s{sup -1}, while a larger thrust of 4 mN is obtained at a similar power for a length of 9.5 cm and a flow rate of 1.65 mg s{sup -1}. The measured thrusts are in good agreement with the maximum upstream electron pressure found from measurements of the plasma parameters and in fair agreement with a simple global approach used to model the thruster.

  4. Two-dimensional profile measurement of plasma parameters in radio frequency-driven argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-09-01

    The two-dimensional profiles of the electron density, electron temperature, neutral translational temperature, and molecular rotational temperature are investigated in an argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet, which is driven by the radio frequency of 13.56 MHz by means of the laser scattering methods of Thomson, Rayleigh, and Raman. All measured parameters have maximum values at the center of the discharge and decrease toward the plasma edge. The results for the electron temperature profile are contrary to the results for the microwave-driven plasma. From our experimental results, the profiles of the plasma parameters arise from the radial contraction of plasmas and the time averaged profile of the electric field, which is obtained by a microwave simulation performed under identical conditions to the plasma jet. In the case of the neutral temperature, a higher translational temperature than the rotational temperature is measured, and its discrepancy is tentatively explained in terms of the low ion-neutral charge exchange rate and the additional degrees of freedom of the molecules. The description of our experimental results and the underlying physics are addressed in detail.

  5. Radio frequency measurements of tunnel couplings and singlet-triplet spin states in Si:P quantum dots.

    PubMed

    House, M G; Kobayashi, T; Weber, B; Hile, S J; Watson, T F; van der Heijden, J; Rogge, S; Simmons, M Y

    2015-01-01

    Spin states of the electrons and nuclei of phosphorus donors in silicon are strong candidates for quantum information processing applications given their excellent coherence times. Designing a scalable donor-based quantum computer will require both knowledge of the relationship between device geometry and electron tunnel couplings, and a spin readout strategy that uses minimal physical space in the device. Here we use radio frequency reflectometry to measure singlet-triplet states of a few-donor Si:P double quantum dot and demonstrate that the exchange energy can be tuned by at least two orders of magnitude, from 20??eV to 8?meV. We measure dot-lead tunnel rates by analysis of the reflected signal and show that they change from 100?MHz to 22?GHz as the number of electrons on a quantum dot is increased from 1 to 4. These techniques present an approach for characterizing, operating and engineering scalable qubit devices based on donors in silicon. PMID:26548556

  6. Radio frequency measurements of tunnel couplings and singlet-triplet spin states in Si:P quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, M. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Weber, B.; Hile, S. J.; Watson, T. F.; van der Heijden, J.; Rogge, S.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Spin states of the electrons and nuclei of phosphorus donors in silicon are strong candidates for quantum information processing applications given their excellent coherence times. Designing a scalable donor-based quantum computer will require both knowledge of the relationship between device geometry and electron tunnel couplings, and a spin readout strategy that uses minimal physical space in the device. Here we use radio frequency reflectometry to measure singlet-triplet states of a few-donor Si:P double quantum dot and demonstrate that the exchange energy can be tuned by at least two orders of magnitude, from 20 ?eV to 8 meV. We measure dot-lead tunnel rates by analysis of the reflected signal and show that they change from 100 MHz to 22 GHz as the number of electrons on a quantum dot is increased from 1 to 4. These techniques present an approach for characterizing, operating and engineering scalable qubit devices based on donors in silicon.

  7. Radio frequency measurements of tunnel couplings and singlet–triplet spin states in Si:P quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    House, M. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Weber, B.; Hile, S. J.; Watson, T. F.; van der Heijden, J.; Rogge, S.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Spin states of the electrons and nuclei of phosphorus donors in silicon are strong candidates for quantum information processing applications given their excellent coherence times. Designing a scalable donor-based quantum computer will require both knowledge of the relationship between device geometry and electron tunnel couplings, and a spin readout strategy that uses minimal physical space in the device. Here we use radio frequency reflectometry to measure singlet–triplet states of a few-donor Si:P double quantum dot and demonstrate that the exchange energy can be tuned by at least two orders of magnitude, from 20??eV to 8?meV. We measure dot–lead tunnel rates by analysis of the reflected signal and show that they change from 100?MHz to 22?GHz as the number of electrons on a quantum dot is increased from 1 to 4. These techniques present an approach for characterizing, operating and engineering scalable qubit devices based on donors in silicon. PMID:26548556

  8. The Rotation Period and Magnetic Field of the T Dwarf 2MASSI J1047539+212423 Measured from Periodic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. K. G.; Berger, E.

    2015-08-01

    Periodic radio bursts from very low mass stars and brown dwarfs simultaneously probe their magnetic and rotational properties. The brown dwarf 2MASSI J1047539+212423 (2M 1047+21) is currently the only T dwarf (T6.5) detected at radio wavelengths. Previous observations of this source with the Arecibo observatory revealed intermittent, 100%-polarized radio pulses similar to those detected from other brown dwarfs, but were unable to constrain a pulse periodicity; previous Very Large Array (VLA) observations detected quiescent emission a factor of ?100 times fainter than the Arecibo pulses but no additional events. Here we present 14 hr of VLA observations of this object that reveal a series of pulses at ?6 GHz with highly variable profiles, showing that the pulsing behavior evolves on time scales that are both long and short compared to the rotation period. We measure a periodicity of ?1.77 hr and identify it with the rotation period. This is just the sixth rotation period measurement in a late T dwarf, and the first obtained in the radio. We detect a pulse at 10 GHz as well, suggesting that the magnetic field strength of 2 M 1047+21 reaches at least 3.6 kG. Although this object is the coolest and most rapidly rotating radio-detected brown dwarf to date, its properties appear continuous with those of other such objects, suggesting that the generation of strong magnetic fields and radio emission may continue to even cooler objects. Further studies of this kind will help to clarify the relationships between mass, age, rotation, and magnetic activity at and beyond the end of the main sequence, where both theories and observational data are currently scarce.

  9. Simple measures of channel habitat complexity predict transient hydraulic storage in streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream thalweg depth profiles (along path of greatest channel depth) and woody debris tallies have recently become components of routine field procedures for quantifying physical habitat in national stream monitoring efforts. Mean residual depth, standard deviation of thalweg dep...

  10. Measurement of flow in a microfluidic channel in response to application of voltage

    E-print Network

    Soukup, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores two methods of calculating the flow of Electrorheological fluid in a microfluidic channel in response to a gradient in an electric field: MATLAB simulation and microscopy experiments. Electrorheological ...

  11. Timing offset and quantization error trade-off in interleaved multi-channel measurements

    E-print Network

    McMichael, Joseph Gary

    2011-01-01

    Time-interleaved analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are traditionally designed with equal quantization granularity in each channel and uniform sampling offsets. Recent work suggests that it is often possible to achieve a ...

  12. Increasing fluxes of S5 1044+71 measured with RATAN-600 radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkin, S. T.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Sotnikova, Yu. V.; Erkenov, A.; Udovitskij, R. Yu.; Mufakharov, T. V.

    2014-02-01

    We report about the growing fluxes of the quasar S5 1044+71, identified with the FERMI source 2FGL J1048.3+714, since detection of the high state in the rest of January 2014 (ATEL #5792). We continue measurements and again detect the increase of the flux densities at frequencies 8.2-21.7 GHz in February.

  13. Delay time measurements of the propagation of radio waves in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohde, F.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and operation of the Geodetic Secor System are described. The precision of the ionospheric radiation measurements was determined by a collocation experiment. The EGRS-13 satellite, which was used in the experiment, is discussed. The geodetic network is shown in a diagram form. Conclusions resulting from the experiments are reported.

  14. 1. VIEW TO NORTHWEST WITH RADIO CONTROL HOUSE (RIGHT), TRANSMITTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW TO NORTHWEST WITH RADIO CONTROL HOUSE (RIGHT), TRANSMITTER TOWER (CENTER), AND NORTH BREAKWATER LIGHT IN DISTANCE AT LEFT - Frankfort Coast Guard Station, Radio Control House, Second Street at ship channel, Frankfort, Benzie County, MI

  15. Ionosphere plasma electron parameters from radio frequency sweeping impedance probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, E.; Patra, S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we will describe the technique of using an RF sweeping impedance probe (SIP) to measure the AC impedance of an electrically short monopole immersed in a plasma. We analyze the SIP measurements which are taken from the payload of the Storms sounding rocket, launched from Wallops Island, Virginia, in 2007. The scientific objective of the Storms mission was to concentrate on whether density irregularities observed in midlatitude spread F could arise from ionospheric coupling to terrestrial weather. As such, independent measurements of the electron density profile are crucial. Since the inherent nature of the SIP technique makes it relatively insensitive to errors introduced through spacecraft charging, probe contamination, and other DC effects, it is an ideal instrument to employ under disturbed plasma conditions. The instrument measures both the magnitude and phase of the AC impedance from 100 kHz to 20 MHz in 128 frequency steps, performing 45,776 sweeps over the entire flight. From these measurements we infer both the absolute electron density ne and the electron neutral collision frequencies ?en throughout the flight trajectory. The SIP data can be approximately analyzed using a fluid formulation and thin sheath approximation particularly at altitudes below 200 km, which allows us to match the measurements to quasi-static analytical formulas. At about 265 km on the upleg, the magnitude data transitioned to a highly damped response with increasing altitude. The phase data, on the other hand, continued to indicate increased plasma density and reduced collisionality as expected. For a large portion of the flight, the payload of the Storms mission exhibited an uncontrolled coning motion, making the local magnetic field orientation with respect to the dipole difficult to decipher. Despite these difficulties, we were able to obtain robust estimates of the electron density profile, using the phase information from each sweep. In addition, the electron neutral collision frequency obtained from matching to phase data alone was on the correct order of magnitude with respect to Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter-Extended model values in the ionosphere between 100 km and 150 km.

  16. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for applications that must be stable against environmental perturbations, such as acceleration or power supply variations. Measurements on fabricated devices in fact confirm predictions by the new model of up to 4x improvement in frequency stability against DC-bias voltage variations for contour-mode disk resonators as the resistance loading their ports increases. By enhancing circuit visualization, this circuit model makes more obvious the circuit design procedures and topologies most beneficial for certain mechanical circuits, e.g., filters and oscillators. The second method enables simultaneous low motional resistance ( Rx 70,000) at 61 MHz using an improved ALD-partial electrode-to-resonator gap filling technique that reduces the Q-limiting surface losses of previous renditions by adding an alumina pre-coating before ALD of the gap-filling high-k dielectric. This effort increases the Q over the ˜10,000 of previous renditions by more than 6x towards demonstration of the first VHF micromechanical resonators in any material, piezoelectric or not, to meet the simultaneous high Q (>50,000) and low motional resistance Rx (< 200O) specs highly desired for front-end frequency channelizer requirements in cognitive and software-defined radio architectures. The methods presented in this chapter finally overcome the high impedance bottleneck that has plagued capacitively transduced micro-mechanical resonators over the past decade. The third method introduces a capacitively transduced micromechanical resonator constructed in hot filament CVD boron-doped microcrystalline diamond (MCD) structural material that posts a measured Q of 146,580 at 232.441 kHz, which is 3x higher than the previous high for conductive polydiamond. Moreover, radial-contour mode disk resonators fabricated in the same MCD film and using material mismatched stems exhibit a Q of 71,400 at 299.86 MHz. The material used here further exhibits an acoustic velocity of 18,516 m/s, which is now the highest to date among available surface micromachinable materials. For many potential applications, the hot filamen

  17. Improvement of GPS radio occultation retrieval error of E region electron density: COSMIC measurement and IRI model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kang-Hung; Su, Ching-Lun; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we use the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model to simulate temporal and spatial distributions of global E region electron densities retrieved by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites by means of GPS radio occultation (RO) technique. Despite regional discrepancies in the magnitudes of the E region electron density, the IRI model simulations can, on the whole, describe the COSMIC measurements in quality and quantity. On the basis of global ionosonde network and the IRI model, the retrieval errors of the global COSMIC-measured E region peak electron density (NmE) from July 2006 to July 2011 are examined and simulated. The COSMIC measurement and the IRI model simulation both reveal that the magnitudes of the percentage error (PE) and root mean-square-error (RMSE) of the relative RO retrieval errors of the NmE values are dependent on local time (LT) and geomagnetic latitude, with minimum in the early morning and at high latitudes and maximum in the afternoon and at middle latitudes. In addition, the seasonal variation of PE and RMSE values seems to be latitude dependent. After removing the IRI model-simulated GPS RO retrieval errors from the original COSMIC measurements, the average values of the annual and monthly mean percentage errors of the RO retrieval errors of the COSMIC-measured E region electron density are, respectively, substantially reduced by a factor of about 2.95 and 3.35, and the corresponding root-mean-square errors show averaged decreases of 15.6% and 15.4%, respectively. It is found that, with this process, the largest reduction in the PE and RMSE of the COSMIC-measured NmE occurs at the equatorial anomaly latitudes 10°N-30°N in the afternoon from 14 to 18 LT, with a factor of 25 and 2, respectively. Statistics show that the residual errors that remained in the corrected COSMIC-measured NmE vary in a range of -20% to 38%, which are comparable to or larger than the percentage errors of the IRI-predicted NmE fluctuating in a range of -6.5% to 20%.

  18. Measurement of the Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in a Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian; Skor, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Two-phase flow systems play vital roles in the design of some current and anticipated space applications of two-phase systems which include: thermal management systems, transfer line flow in cryogenic storage, space nuclear power facilities, design and operation of thermal bus, life support systems, propulsion systems, In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), and space processes for pharmaceutical applications. The design of two-phase flow systems for space applications requires a clear knowledge of the behaviors of the dispersed phase (bubble), its interaction with the continuous phase (liquid) and its effect on heat and mass transfer processes, The need to understand the bubble generation process arises from the fact that for all space applications, the size and distribution of bubbles are extremely crucial for heat and mass transfer control. One important force in two-phase flow systems is the lift force on a bubble or particle in a liquid shear flow. The shear lift is usually overwhelmed by buoyancy in normal gravity, but it becomes an important force in reduced gravity. Since the liquid flow is usually sheared because of the confining wall, the trajectories of bubbles and particles injected into the liquid flow are affected by the shear lift in reduced gravity. A series of experiments are performed to investigate the lift force on a bubble in a liquid shear flow and its effect on the detachment of a bubble from a wall under low gravity conditions. Experiments are executed in a Poiseuille flow in a channel. An air-water system is used in these experiments that are performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. A bubble is injected into the shear flow from a small injector and the shear lift is measured while the bubble is held stationary relative to the fluid. The trajectory of the bubble prior, during and after its detachment from the injector is investigated. The measured shear lift force is calculated from the trajectory of the bubble at the detachment point. These values for the shear lift are then compared with the theoretical predictions from various published works on shear lift in the open literature, which include asymptotic solutions at low bubble Reynolds number, potential flow predictions and numerical studies that deal with intermediate bubble Reynolds numbers.

  19. Measurement of a Phase of a Radio Wave Reflected from Rock Salt and Ice Irradiated by an Electron Beam for Detection of Ultra-High-Energy Neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Chiba, Masami; Tanikawa, Takahiro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Watanabe, Souichirou; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We have found a radio-wave-reflection effect in rock salt for the detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos which are expected to be generated in Greisen, Zatsepin, and Kuzmin (GZK) processes in the universe. When an UHE neutrino interacts with rock salt or ice as a detection medium, a shower is generated. That shower is formed by hadronic and electromagnetic avalanche processes. The energy of the UHE neutrino shower converts to thermal energy through ionization processes. Consequently, the temperature rises along the shower produced by the UHE neutrino. The refractive index of the medium rises with temperature. The irregularity of the refractive index in the medium leads to a reflection of radio waves. This reflection effect combined with the long attenuation length of radio waves in rock salt and ice would yield a new method to detect UHE neutrinos. We measured the phase of the reflected radio wave under irradiation with an electron beam on ice and rock salt powder. The measured phase showed excellent consis...

  20. Measurement of power transfer efficiency and ion density in various radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Won; Hwang, Hye-Ju; Choi, Ik-Jin; Lee, Young-Kwang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2011-10-01

    The power transfer efficiency and plasma density were measured in low pressure inductive coupled argon plasma at 20-100 mTorr, 20-80 W and 13.56-60 MHz. For this experiment, a variable-frequency matching box (matcher) was developed and a modified method to determine the power transfer efficiency was used. To match 13.5 MHz, 40.68 MHz and 60 MHz rf power source, three vacuum variable capacitors and one fixed capacitor were built in matching box to the plasma characteristic impedance. We measured the feeding line current using Rogowski coil to obtain matcher resistance and plasma resistance, so the power transfer efficiency could be obtained. The calibration process, calculations of the exact current from the voltage, is not necessary to obtain power transfer efficiency. This is the advantage of using Rogowski coil. It is clearly observed that the power transfer efficiency decrease with increasing driving frequency and decreasing pressure, whereas the ion density shows the opposite tendency compared to power efficiency.

  1. AG Channel Measurement and Modeling Results for Over-Water and Hilly Terrain Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David W.; Sun, Ruoyu

    2015-01-01

    This report describes work completed over the past year on our project, entitled "Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Research: The AG Channel, Robust Waveforms, and Aeronautical Network Simulations." This project is funded under the NASA project "Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS)." In this report we provide the following: an update on project progress; a description of the over-freshwater and hilly terrain initial results on path loss, delay spread, small-scale fading, and correlations; complete path loss models for the over-water AG channels; analysis for obtaining parameter statistics required for development of accurate wideband AG channel models; and analysis of an atypical AG channel in which the aircraft flies out of the ground site antenna main beam. We have modeled the small-scale fading of these channels with Ricean statistics, and have quantified the behavior of the Ricean K-factor. We also provide some results for correlations of signal components, both intra-band and inter-band. An updated literature review, and a summary that also describes future work, are also included.

  2. Radio-Frequency Illuminated Superconductive Disks: Reverse Josephson Effects and Implications for Precise Measuring of Proposed Gravity Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Koczor, Ronald J.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported results using a high precision gravimeter to probe local gravity changes in the neighborhood of large bulk-processed high-temperature superconductors. It have been indicated three essential components to achieve anomalous gravity effects, namely large, two-layer high-temperature YBCO superconductors, magnetic levitation and AC input in the form of radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. We report experiments on RF-illuminated (1-15 MHz) superconducting disks with corresponding gravity readings indicating an apparent increase in observed gravity of approximately 3-5 x l0(exp -5)cm/sq s, above and to the side of the superconductor. In this preliminary study, RF- illumination is achieved using a series of large radius (15 cm) spiral antenna with RF power inputs equal to or greater than 90 W. The observed gravitational modification range is significantly lower than the 2.1% gravity modification. The error analyses of thermal and electromagnetic interference in a magnetically shielded gravimeter with vacuum enclosures, Faraday cages and shielded instrument leads, are outlined both experimentally and theoretically. The nearly exact correspondence between the peak gravity effects reported and the well-known peak in AC resistance in superconductors (2-7 MHz, owing to reverse Josephson quantum effects) suggests that electrical resistance will arise in this frequency range and subsequently any trapped magnetic fields in the superconductor may disperse partially into the measuring instrument's local environment. Implications for propulsion initiatives and RF-heating in superconductors will be discussed.

  3. Radio path length correction using water vapour radiometry

    E-print Network

    R. J. Sault; G. J. Carrad; P. J. Hall; J. Crofts

    2006-12-31

    Path length changes through the atmosphere cause significant errors for astronomical radio interferometry at high frequencies (e.g. 100 GHz). Path length differences typically give rise to a differential excess path of 1mm for antennas separated by 1km, and have fluctuation time scales of greater than 10 seconds. To measure these fluctuations, we are building a four-channel radiometer centred on the 22 GHz water line. By sensing the water vapour emission, the excess path can be deduced and corrected. Multiple channels give us robustness against various systematic errors, but gain stability of the radiometer of 1 pair in 10^4 is still required.

  4. Multiplexing of Radio-Frequency Single Electron Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Pellerano, F. A.; Stahle, C. M.; Aidala, K.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present results on wavelength division multiplexing of radio-frequency single electron transistors. We use a network of resonant impedance matching circuits to direct applied rf carrier waves to different transistors depending on carrier frequency. A two-channel demonstration of this concept using discrete components successfully reconstructed input signals with small levels of cross coupling. A lithographic version of the rf circuits had measured parameters in agreement with electromagnetic modeling, with reduced cross capacitance and inductance, and should allow 20 to 50 channels to be multiplexed.

  5. First Beam Measurements of the S-Band photocathode Radio-Frequency Gun at Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ying-Chao; Yan, Li-Xin; Du, Qiang; He, Xiao-Zhong; Xiang, Dao; Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Huang, Wen-Hui; Lin, Yu-Zheng

    2007-07-01

    During the last decades, photocathode rf gun has been proven to be successful in generating the high brightness electron beam (~1nC,~1?mmmrad,~1 ps) which is required by the ILC, XFEL, Thomson scattering x-ray source, etc. A photocathode rf gun system is built to develop electron source for the Thomson scattering x-ray source at Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University. The system consists of a BNL/ATF-type 1.6 cell S-band rf cavity, a solenoid for emittance compensation, a laser system and some simple equipments for beam diagnosis. The first beam measurements of the photocathode rf gun, including the dark current, transverse beam profile, charge and quantum efficiency, are reported.

  6. Plasma density mapping in the solar wind through use of VHF radio to measure electron content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    How the electron content between the Solar probe and the earth can be observed with a minimum of equipment and give a quantitative rationale for the use of a signal near 400 MHz to supplement the telecommunications signal is described. The emphasis is on the method of making content observations and on their value. While far from the Sun, the electron content is so low that the S-X dual-frequency system is insufficiently sensitive and a UHF system is optimum. As the probe approaches the Sun, the UHF may be disrupted by scintillation and the variations of the telecommunications signal must be used for the content measurement. By operating the suggested system in different modes as the solar distance changes, operation during the entire mission is possible.

  7. Fading channel simulator

    DOEpatents

    Argo, Paul E. (Los Alamos, NM); Fitzgerald, T. Joseph (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  8. Radio Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Neil

    1998-01-01

    Thousands of today's high school students run FM radio stations at school, carrying on a tradition that began 50 years ago. Radio helps students learn to work with others and develop a strong sense of responsibility. A sidebar gives advice on starting a high school radio station. (MLF)

  9. Channel Analysis and Estimation and Compensation of Doppler Shift in Underwater Acoustic Communication and Mitigation of IFI, ISI in Ultra-wideband Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sadia

    Water occupies three fourth of earth's surface. The remaining one fourth is land. Although human habitats reside on land, there is no denying of the vital connection between land and water. The future sustainability of human species on this planet depends on wise utilization of all available resources, including that provided by the vast water world. Therefore, it is imperative to explore, understand, and define this massive, varying, and in many areas, unexplored water domain. The water domain exploration and data collection can be conducted using manned or unmanned vehicles, as allowed by the water environment. This dissertation addresses three of the key difficulties that occur during underwater acoustic communication among manned and/or unmanned vehicles and proposes feasible solutions to resolve those difficulties. The focus and the contributions of this research involve the following perspectives: 1) Representation of Underwater Acoustic Communication (UAC) Channels: Providing a comprehensive classification and representation of the underwater acoustic communication channel based on the channel environment. 2) Estimation and Compensation of Doppler Shift: Providing compensation algorithm to mitigate varying Doppler shift effect over subcarriers in UAC Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems. 3) Mitigation of Inter-symbol Interference (ISI): Providing feasible solution to long delay spread causing ISI in Ultra-wideband channels.

  10. Development of a wall-shear-stress sensor and measurements in mini-channels with partial blockages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afara, Samer; Medvescek, James; Mydlarski, Laurent; Baliga, Bantwal R.; MacDonald, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The design, construction, operation and validation of a wall-shear-stress sensor, and measurements obtained using this sensor in air flows downstream of partial blockages in a mini-channel are presented. The sensor consisted of a hot wire mounted over a small rectangular slot and operated using a constant-temperature anemometer. It was used to investigate flows similar to those within the mini-channels inside notebook computers. The overall goal of the present work was to develop a sensor suitable for measurements of the wall-shear stress in such flows, which can be used to validate corresponding numerical simulations, as the latter are known to be often surprisingly inaccurate. To this end, measurements of the wall-shear stress, and the corresponding statistical moments and power spectral densities, were obtained at different distances downstream of the partial blockage, with blockage ratios of 39.7, 59.2, and 76.3 %. The Reynolds number (based on average velocity and hydraulic diameter) ranged from 100 to 900. The results confirmed the presence of unsteadiness, separation, reattachment, and laminar-turbulent transition in the ostensibly laminar flow of air in mini-channels with partial blockages. The present results demonstrate why accurate numerical predictions of cooling air flows in laptop and notebook computers remain a challenging task.

  11. Wuhan Atmosphere Radio Exploration (WARE) radar: System design and online winds measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengyu, Zhao; Chen, Zhou; Haiyin, Qing; Guobin, Yang; Yuannong, Zhang; Gang, Chen; Yaogai, Hu

    2013-05-01

    The basic configuration of the Wuhan MST (mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere) radar, which was designed and constructed by the School of Electronic Information, Wuhan University, is preliminarily described in this paper. The Wuhan MST radar operates at very high frequency (VHF) band (53.8 MHz) by observing the real-time characteristics of turbulence and the wind field vector in the height range of 3.5-90 km (not including 25-60 km) with high temporal and height resolutions. This all-solid-state, all-coherent pulse Doppler radar is China's first independent development of an MST radar focusing on atmospheric observation. The subsystems of the Wuhan MST radar include an antenna system, a feeder line system, all-solid-state radar transmitters, digital receivers, a beam control system, a signal processing system, a data processing system, a product generation system, and a user terminal. Advanced radar technologies are used, including highly reliable all-solid-state transmitters, low-noise large dynamic range digital receivers, an active phased array, high-speed digital signal processing, and real-time graphic terminals. This paper describes the design and implementation of the radar. Preliminary online wind measurements and results of the comparison to simultaneous observations by a GPS rawinsonde are presented as well.

  12. The RadioAstron project: Measurements and analysis of basic parameters of space telescope in flight in 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Yu. A.; Vasil'kov, V. I.; Popov, M. V.; Soglasnov, V. A.; Voitsik, P. A.; Lisakov, M. M.; Kut'kin, A. M.; Nikolaev, N. Ya.; Nizhel'skii, N. A.; Zhekanis, G. V.; Tsybulev, P. G.

    2014-09-01

    The results of a large number of the antenna radiometric measurements at bands of 92, 18, 6.2, 1.35, and 1.7-1.2 cm are presented by the data of the standard telemetry system of the Spektr-R spacecraft. Both special sessions of calibration object observations in the mode of a single space radio telescope (SRT) operation and numerous observations of researched sources in the mode of the ground-space interferometer were used. The obtained results agree with the first results of Kardashev et al. (2013), i.e., within 10-15% at bands of 92, 18, and 6.2 cm and 20-25% at the band of 1.35 cm. In the main, the measurements for the eight subbands at wavelengths of 1.7-1.2 cm indicate a monotonic increase in the spectral system equivalent flux density (SEFD) of noise radiation with a frequency consistent with the calculated estimates for the discussed model. The sensitivity of the ground-space interferometer for the five subbands at wavelengths from 1.35 to 1.7 cm can be higher by a factor of 1.5, and for the three subbands from 1.35 to 1.2 cm lower by a factor of 1.5 than at the band of 1.35 cm. The SRT contribution to the interferometer sensitivity proportional to the square root of SEFD is close to the design one at the bands of 92 and 18 cm and decreases the design sensitivity approximately by a factor of 1.5 and 2 at the bands of 6.2 and 1.35 cm, respectively. These differences of implemented values from the design ones were not significantly affected the scientific program implementation.

  13. Determination of the extragalactic-planetary frame tie from joint analysis of radio interferometric and lunar laser ranging measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Charlot, P.; Finger, M. H.; Williams, J. G.; Sovers, O. J.; Newhall, XX; Standish, E. M., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of extragalactic radio sources provide the basis for defining an accurate non-rotating reference frame in terms of angular positions of the sources. Measurements of the distance from the Earth to the Moon and to the inner planets provide the basis for defining an inertial planetary ephemeris reference frame. The relative orientation, or frame tie, between these two reference frames is of interest for combining Earth orientation measurements, for comparing Earth orientation results with theories referred to the mean equator and equinox, and for determining the positions of the planets with respect to the extragalactic reference frame. This work presents an indirect determination of the extragalactic-planetary frame tie from a combined reduction of VLBI and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) observations. For this determination, data acquired by LLR tracking stations since 1969 have been analyzed and combined with 14 years of VLBI data acquired by NASA's Deep Space Network since 1978. The frame tie derived from this joint analysis, with an accuracy of 0.003 sec, is the most accurate determination obtained so far. This result, combined with a determination of the mean ecliptic (defined in the rotating sense), shows that the mean equinox of epoch J2000 is offset from the x-axis of the extragalactic frame adopted by the International Earth Rotation Service for astrometric and geodetic applications by 0.078 sec +/- 0.010 sec along the y-direction and y 0.019 sec +/- 0.001 sec. along the z-direction.

  14. Measurement of Differential Cross-Sections in the ttbar -> l+jets Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kvita, J.; /Charles U.

    2009-04-01

    The analysis presented in this thesis focuses on kinematic distributions in the t{bar t} system and studies in detail selected differential cross sections of top quarks as well as the reconstructed t{bar t} pair, namely the top quark transverse momentum and the t{bar t} system mass. The structure of the thesis is organized as follows: first the Standard Model of the particle physics is briefly introduced in Chapter 1, with relevant aspects of electroweak and strong interactions discussed. The physics of the top quark and its properties are then outlined in Chapter 2, together with the motivation for measuring the transverse top quark momentum and other kinematic-related variables of the t{bar t} system. The concepts of present-day high energy physics collider experiments and the explicit example of Fermilab Tevatron collider and the D0 detector in Chapters 3 and 4 are followed by the description of basic detector-level objects, i.e. tracks, leptons and jets, in Chapter 5; their identification and calibration following in next chapter with the emphasis on the jet energy scale in Chapter 6 and jet identification at the D0. The analysis itself is outlined in Chapter 7 and is structured so that first the data and simulation samples and the basic preselection are described in Chapter 8 and 9, followed by the kinematic reconstruction part in Chapter 10. Chapter 11 on background normalization and Chapter 12 with raw reconstructed spectra results (at the detector-smeared level) are followed by the purity-based background subtraction method and examples of signal-level corrected spectra in Chapter 13. Next, the procedure of correcting measured spectra for detector effects (unfolding) is described in Chapters 14-15, including migration matrix studies, acceptance correction determination as well as the regularized unfolding procedure itself. Final differential cross sections are presented in Chapter 16 with the main results in Figures 16.19-16.20. Summary and discussion close the main analysis part in Chapter 17, supplemented by appendices on the wealthy of analysis control plots of the t{bar t} {yields} {ell} + jets channel, selected D0 event displays and finally the list of publications and references. Preliminary results of this analysis have been documented in D0 internal notes [UnfoldTop], [p17Top], [p14Top]; as well as presented at conferences [APS08], [APS05]. The author has also been a co-author of more than 135 D0 collaboration publications since 2005. The author has taken part in the jet energy scale calibration efforts performing final closure tests and deriving a correction to jet energy offset due to the suppression of the calorimeter signal. The author has also co-performed the {phi}-intercalibration of the hadronic calorimeter and co-supervised the electromagnetic {phi}-intercalibration; recently has also been involved in maintaining the jet identification efficiencies measurement as a JetID convener. During the years in Fermilab, many events have taken place in the course of the analysis in persuasion, including more than 170 shifts served for the D0 detector with or without the beam, 168 talks presented with mixed results and reactions; and tens of thousands of code lines in C (and sometimes perhaps even really C++) written while terabytes of data were processed, analyzed, and sometimes also lost. It has been a long but profoundly enriching chapter of my life.

  15. Hybrid Two-phase Flow Measurements in a Narrow Channel Using Neutron Radiography and Liquid Film Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Daisuke; Saito, Yasushi; Kawabata, Yuji

    Gas-liquid two-phase flow in a narrow gap has been studied to develop a solid target cooling system for an accelerator driven system. Flow measurements are important to understand two-phase flow dynamics also in such a narrow channel. Although contact methods can measure detailed structure of two-phase flow, the intrusive effect on the flow becomes relatively larger in such a small channel. Therefore, non-intrusive measurement would be desirable. Neutron radiography (NRG) is one of the powerful tools for gas-liquid two-phase flow measurement and void fraction distribution can be estimated from the acquired images. However, the temporal resolution of NRG is about 100?1,000 Hz depending on the neutron flux and it should be increased to investigate flow dynamics. So the authors focused on a hybrid measurement of the NRG and a conductance liquid film sensor (LFS). The combination of these methods can complement the spatial and temporal information of the flow. In this study, the hybrid measurements were performed by NRG and LFS to visualize the detailed structure of narrow two-phase flow.

  16. An episode of rapid bedrock channel incision during the last glacial cycle, measured with 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reusser, L.; Bierman, P.; Pavich, M.; Larsen, J.; Finkel, R.

    2006-01-01

    We use 10Be to infer when, how fast, and why the Susquehanna River incised through bedrock along the U.S. Atlantic seaboard, one of the world's most prominent and ancient passive margins. Although the rate at which large rivers incise rock is a fundamental control on the development of landscapes, relatively few studies have directly measured how quickly such incision occurs either in tectonically active environments or along passive margins. Exposure ages of fluvially carve d, bedrock strath terraces, preserved along the lower Susquehanna River, demonstrate that even along a passive margin, large rivers are capable of incising through rock for short periods of time at rates approaching those recorded in tectonically active regions, such as the Himalayas. Over eighty samples, collected along and between three prominent levels of strath terraces within Holtwood Gorge, indicate that the Susquehanna River incised more than 10 meters into the Appalachian Piedmont during the last glacial cycle. Beginning ???36 ka, incision rates increased dramatically, and remained elevated until ???14 ka. The northern half of the Susquehanna basin was glaciated during the late Wisconsinan; however, similar rates and timing of incision occurred in the unglaciated Potomac River basin immediately to the south. The concurrence of incision periods on both rivers suggests that glaciation and associated meltwater were not the primary drivers of incision. Instead, it appears that changing climatic conditions during the late Pleistocene promoted an increase in the frequency and magnitude of flood events capable of exceeding thresholds for rock detachment and bedrock erosion, thus enabling a short-lived episode of rapid incision into rock. Although this study has constraine d the timing and rate of bedrock incision along the largest river draining the Atlantic passive margin, the dates alone cannot explain fully why, or by what processes, this incision occurred. However, cosmogenic dating offers compelling evidence that episodes of rapid incision into bedrock are tied to glacial cycles and changes in global climate. These results, and the methods we employ, provide valuable insights into the nature of bedrock channel incision, not only along the Susquehanna River and passive margins, but also across a wide range of settings around the globe. Because river incision into bedrock transmits the effects of changing climate and tectonics through fluvial networks to hillslopes, comprehending when, where, and why rivers incise has important implications for the evolution of landscapes.

  17. Providing hydrogen maser timing stability to orbiting VLBI radio telescope observations by post-measurement compensation of linked frequency standard imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springett, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Orbiting VLBI (OVLBI) astronomical observations are based upon measurements acquired simultaneously from ground-based and earth-orbiting radio telescopes. By the mid-1990s, two orbiting VLBI observatories, Russia's Radioastron and Japan's VSOP, will augment the worldwide VLBI network, providing baselines to earth radio telescopes as large as 80,000 km. The challenge for OVLBI is to effectuate space to ground radio telescope data cross-correlation (the observation) to a level of integrity currently achieved between ground radio telescopes. VLBI radio telescopes require ultrastable frequency and timing references in order that long term observations may be made without serious cross-correlation loss due to frequency source drift and phase noise. For this reason, such instruments make use of hydrogen maser frequency standards. Unfortunately, space-qualified hydrogen maser oscillators are currently not available for use on OVLBI satellites. Thus, the necessary long-term stability needed by the orbiting radio telescope may only be obtained by microwave uplinking a ground-based hydrogen maser derived frequency to the satellite. Although the idea of uplinking the frequency standard intrinsically seems simple, there are many 'contaminations' which degrade both the long and short term stability of the transmitted reference. Factors which corrupt frequency and timing accuracy include additive radio and electronic circuit thermal noise, slow or systematic phase migration due to changes of electronic circuit temporal operating conditions (especially temperature), ionosphere and troposphere induced scintillations, residual Doppler-incited components, and microwave signal multipath propagation. What is important, though, is to realize that ultimate stability does not have to be achieved in real-time. Instead, information needed to produce a high degree of coherence in the subsequent cross-correlation operation may be derived from a two-way coherent radio link, recorded and later introduced as compensations adjunct to the VLBI correlation process. Accordingly, this paper examines the technique for stable frequency/time transfer within the OVLBI system, together with a critique of the types of link degradation components which must be compensated, and the figures of merit known as coherence factors.

  18. Studying atmospheric and ionospheric variabilities from long-term spectrometric and radio sounding measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Irina; Ratovsky, Konstantin

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the variability in the neutral upper atmosphere and ionosphere parameters over East Siberia. The analysis is based on 2008-2014 data set of mesopause temperature (Tm) obtained from spectrometric measurements of the OH emission (834.0 nm, band (6-2)) at the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics Geophysical Observatory (51.8°N, 103.1°E), and the data of F2 peak electron density (NmF2) from Irkutsk DPS-4 Digisonde (52.3°N, 104.3°E). The seasonal patterns of the NmF2 and Tm variability in different period ranges were analyzed and compared. The period range included day-to-day (periods T > 24 h) and tidal (8 h ? T ? 24 h) variations as well as variations in the internal gravity wave period range (T < 8 h). The comparison revealed both common features and distinctions in the seasonal patterns of the ionospheric and atmospheric variabilities. The main common feature is that the winter variability exceeds the summer one. In both atmospheric and ionospheric day-to-day variability seasonal variations, there are maxima in winter months and an additional maximum around the autumn equinox. The main distinction is that the equinox peaks observed in the seasonal variations of the diurnal atmospheric variability are not seen in the ionospheric seasonal pattern. The physical reasons of the obtained features are discussed. The revealed similarities in the seasonal behaviors may indicate that planetary waves propagating from the lower atmosphere layers have a significant impact on the mesopause temperature regime and ionospheric day-to-day variations.

  19. Characteristics of tropopause-penetrating convection determined by TRMM and COSMIC GPS radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Tao; Fu, Yunfei

    2015-07-01

    Distribution and influence of convection in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere have been investigated case by case or on regional to global scale. However, previous studies were limited by using proxies for convection or the bias of the tropopause data. Here the tropopause-penetrating convection is investigated based on the sole use of observational products from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar data and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC). The result shows that the frequency of precipitation-top heights above the monthly mean tropopause in the tropics is reduced logarithmically if the cold-point tropopause is adopted instead of the lapse-rate tropopause. Using the collocated COSMIC and precipitation radar observations, the tropopause-penetrating convection, i.e., the convection with the precipitation-top height above the lapse-rate tropopause, can be found over the summer monsoon regions and some continental regions. The averaged relative precipitation-top heights of tropopause-penetrating convective clusters are about 0.2-0.5 km without significant land-ocean difference, while equivalent radii of clusters are 2.7-3.5 km over land and 0.2-0.5 km larger than those over ocean. These areal and vertical extents are smaller than those reported by previous studies. Furthermore, the collocated temperature profiles show that the tropopause-penetrating convection generates warming in the upper troposphere and cooling near the lapse-rate tropopause and in the lower stratosphere. Moreover, the tropopause-penetrating convection leads to a rapid (within 20 min) lift of the lapse-rate tropopause by the adiabatic lofting within the convection (within a 10 km radius).

  20. 47 CFR 95.29 - Channels available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channels available. 95.29 Section 95.29... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.29 Channels available. (a) For a base station, fixed... transmission of another GMRS station on a different channel or channels), the licensee of the GMRS system...

  1. Firefighters' Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Public Technology Inc. asked for NASA assistance to devise the original firefighter's radio. Good short-range radio communications are essential during a fire to coordinate hose lines, rescue victims, and otherwise increase efficiency. Useful firefighting tool is lower cost, more rugged short range two-way radio. Inductorless electronic circuit replaced inductances and coils in radio circuits with combination of transistors and other low-cost components. Substitution promises reduced circuit size and cost. Enhanced electrical performance made radio more durable and improved maintainability by incorporating modular construction.

  2. Measurements of an Antenna Surface for a Millimeter-Wave Space Radio Telescope. II. Metal Mesh Surface for Large Deployable Reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Tsuboi, Masato

    2013-02-01

    Large deployable antennas with a mesh surface woven by fine metal wires are an important technology for communications satellites and space radio telescopes. However, it is difficult to make metal mesh surfaces with sufficient radio-frequency (RF) performance for frequencies higher than millimeter waves. In this paper, we present the RF performance of metal mesh surfaces at 43 GHz. For this purpose, we developed an apparatus to measure the reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, and radiative coefficient of the mesh surface. The reflection coefficient increases as a function of the metal mesh surface tension, whereas the radiative coefficient decreases. The anisotropic aspects of the reflection coefficient and the radiative coefficient are also clearly seen. They depend on the front and back sides of the metal mesh surface and the rotation angle. The transmission coefficient was measured to be almost constant. The measured radiative coefficients and transmission coefficients would cause significant degradation of the system noise temperature. In addition, we carried out an astronomical observation of a well-known SiO maser source, R Cas, by using a metal mesh mirror on the NRO 45-m radio telescope Coudé system. The metal mesh mirror considerably increases the system noise temperature, and slightly decreases the peak antenna temperature. These results are consistent with laboratory measurements.

  3. Width of Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet CMEs

    E-print Network

    G. Michalek; N. Gopalswamy; H. Xie

    2007-10-24

    In the present paper we report on the difference in angular sizes between radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs. For this purpose we compiled these two samples of events using Wind/WAVES and SOHO/LASCO observations obtained during 1996-2005. It is shown that the radio-loud CMEs are almost two times wider than the radio-quiet CMEs (considering expanding parts of CMEs). Furthermore we show that the radio-quiet CMEs have a narrow expanding bright part with a large extended diffusive structure. These results were obtained by measuring the CME widths in three different ways.

  4. Statistically steady measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in a gas channel 

    E-print Network

    Banerjee, Arindam

    2006-10-30

    A novel gas channel experiment was constructed to study the development of high Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing. Two gas streams, one containing air and the other containing helium-air mixture, flow parallel to each other separated by a thin...

  5. On distributed coding, quantization of channel measurements and faster-than-Nyquist signaling 

    E-print Network

    Liveris, Angelos Dimitriou

    2006-04-12

    . Asymmetric Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 a. LDPC Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 b. Convolutional Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 c. Concatenated Interleaved Codes . . . . . . . . . . 29 d. Simulation Results... Fading Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 D. Binary Wyner-Ziv Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 1. System Setup and the Shamai-Verd? Scheme . 68 viii CHAPTER Page 2. Nested Convolutional/Turbo Codes . . . . . . . . . . 72 a. Parallel...

  6. Study of multi-acoustic channel supersonic Doppler flowmeter for measuring coal slurry-coal log pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu; Yang, Jie; Tang, Jun

    2006-11-01

    Coal slurry-coal log pipeline is a new technology for long distance transportation of coal logs (cylindrical coal briquettes) by using coal slurry as carrier and pump as power set. Because of the difficulty of measuring flow rate of coal slurry-coal log pipeline, the study of measuring technology and the development of flowmeter are necessary. In consideration of the characteristics of transportation of coal logs in coal slurry pipeline, a non-contacting measuring method and the supersonic Doppler effect are selected and used. By detecting frequency drifts produced by reflecting supersonic wave from moving coal particles and coal logs in pipeline the flow rate of coal slurry-coal log pipeline (the total quantity of coal transported by the pipeline) can be measured. Based on the concept of liner concentration of coal logs in pipeline and characteristics of Doppler frequency drifts of coal particles and coal logs moved in pipeline, the measuring method of supersonic wave and the transportation principle of coal slurry-coal log pipeline are discussed and a multi-acoustic channel supersonic Doppler flowmeter is designed for measuring the total quantity of coal transported by pipeline. The flowmeter is composed of supersonic transducer, electron circuit, flow rate indication and integral calculation system. The multi-acoustic channel technique and a suitable acoustic wedge with a certain shape and special solid material are selected and used for increasing the measuring precision. In this paper the Doppler signal is measured and analyzed by using mixing-frequency technique and FPT (rapid Fourier transformation), and some designed circuits and signal measurement process are also offered.

  7. Non-invasive cerebral blood volume measurement during seizures using multi-channel near infrared spectroscopic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Eiju; Maki, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Fumio; Yamashita, Yuichi; Koizumi, Hideaki; Mayanagi, Yoshiaki

    2000-07-01

    Near infrared spectroscopic topography (NIRS) is widely recognized as a noninvasive method to measure the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) dynamics coupled with neuronal activities. We analyzed the rCBV change in the early phase of epileptic seizures in 12 consecutive patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Seizure was induced by bemegride injection. We used eight-channel NIRS in nine cases and 24 channel in three cases. In all of the cases, rCBV increased rapidly after the seizure onset on the focus side. The increased rCBV was observed for about 30 - 60 s. The NIRS method can be applied to monitor the rCBV change continuously during seizures. Therefore, this method may be combined with ictal SPECT as one of the most reliable noninvasive methods of focus diagnosis.

  8. 76 FR 13524 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ...RM-11611] Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications...Media, Inc., allots FM Channel 258A at Willow Creek, California. Channel 258A can be allotted at Willow Creek, consistent with the minimum...

  9. 75 FR 3694 - Radio Broadcasting Services, Peach Springs, Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ...Radio Broadcasting Services, Peach Springs, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications...allotment of FM Channel 281C3 at Peach Springs, Arizona. The reference coordinates for Channel 281C3 at Peach Springs are 35-33-46 NL and...

  10. Measurements of the charge asymmetry using the dilepton decay channel in pp collisions at = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Heracleous, N.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Kim, T. J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Velde, C. Vander; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Diblen, S. Salva; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Marono, M. Vidal; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Junior, M. Correa Martins; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Manganote, E. J. Tonelli; Pereira, A. Vilela; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Sierra, L. F. Chaparro; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Tikvica, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. b.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Alvarez, J. D. Ruiz; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Donckt, M. Vander; Verdier, P.

    2014-04-01

    The charge asymmetry in proton-proton collisions at = 7 TeV is measured using the dilepton decay channel (ee, e ?, or ??). The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 5.0 fb-1, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The tt and lepton charge asymmetries, defined as the differences in absolute values of the rapidities between the reconstructed top quarks and antiquarks and of the pseudorapidities between the positive and negative leptons, respectively, are measured to be A C = -0 .010 ± 0 .017 (stat .) ± 0 .008 (syst .) and = 0 .009 ± 0 .010 (stat .) ± 0 .006 (syst .). The lepton charge asymmetry is also measured as a function of the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the system. All measurements are consistent with the expectations of the standard model. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. 47 CFR 76.609 - Measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Measurements. 76.609 Section 76.609 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND... cable television channel for which signal leakage can be measured. (3) The resonant half wave...

  12. 47 CFR 76.609 - Measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Measurements. 76.609 Section 76.609 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND... cable television channel for which signal leakage can be measured. (3) The resonant half wave...

  13. The effect of a Chandra-measured merger-related gas component on the lobes of a dead radio galaxy

    E-print Network

    D. M. Worrall; M. Birkinshaw; R. P. Kraft; M. J. Hardcastle

    2007-02-15

    We use Chandra data to infer that an X-ray bright component of gas is in the process of separating the radio lobes of 3C 442A. This is the first radio galaxy with convincing evidence that central gas, overpressured with respect to the lobe plasma and not simply a static atmosphere, is having a major dynamical effect on the radio structure. We speculate that the expansion of the gas also re-excites electrons in the lobes of 3C 442A through compression and adiabatic heating. Two features of 3C 442A contribute to its dynamical state. Firstly, the radio source is no longer being powered by a detected active jet, so that the dynamical state of the radio plasma is at the mercy of the ambient medium. Secondly the two early-type galaxies, NGC 7236 and NGC 7237, one of which was the original host of 3C 442A, are undergoing a merger and have already experienced a close encounter, suggesting that the X-ray bright gas is mostly the heated combined galaxy atmospheres. The lobes have been swept apart for about 10^8 yrs by the pressure-driven expansion of the X-ray bright inner gas.

  14. Measurements of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere during tropical cyclones using the GPS radio occultation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Neubert, Torsten; Syndergaard, Stig; Nielsen, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Water vapour transport to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere by deep convective storms affects the radiation balance of the atmosphere and has been proposed as an important component of climate change. The aim of the work presented here is to understand if the GPS radio occultation technique is useful for characterization of this process. Our assessment addresses the question if severe storms leave a significant signature in radio occultation profiles in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. Radio occultation data from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) were analyzed, focusing on two particular tropical cyclones with completely different characteristics, the hurricane Bertha, which formed in the Atlantic Basin during July 2008 and reached a maximum intensity of Category 3, and the typhoon Hondo, which formed in the south Indian Ocean during 2008 reaching a maximum intensity of Category 4. The result is positive, suggesting that the bending angle of a GPS radio occultation signal contains interesting information on the atmosphere around the tropopause, but not any information regarding the water vapour. The maximum percentage anomaly of bending angle between 14 and 18 km of altitude during tropical cyclones is typically larger than the annual mean by 5-15% and it can reach 20% for extreme cases. The results are discussed in connection to the GPS radio occultation receiver which will be part of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) payload on the International Space Station.

  15. The Effect of a Chandra-measured Merger-related Gas Component on the Lobes of a Dead Radio Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, M.; Kraft, R. P.; Hardcastle, M. J.

    2007-04-01

    We use Chandra data to infer that an X-ray-bright component of gas is in the process of separating the radio lobes of 3C 442A. This is the first radio galaxy with convincing evidence that central gas, overpressured with respect to the lobe plasma and not simply a static atmosphere, is having a major dynamical effect on the radio structure. We speculate that the expansion of the gas also reexcites electrons in the lobes of 3C 442A through compression and adiabatic heating. Two features of 3C 442A contribute to its dynamical state. First, the radio source is no longer being powered by a detected active jet, so that the dynamical state of the radio plasma is at the mercy of the ambient medium. Second, the two early-type galaxies, NGC 7236 and NGC 7237, one of which was the original host of 3C 442A, are undergoing a merger and have already experienced a close encounter, suggesting that the X-ray-bright gas is mostly the heated combined galaxy atmospheres. The lobes have been swept apart for ~108 yr by the pressure-driven expansion of the X-ray-bright inner gas.

  16. First measurement of the local radio luminosity function for AGN and star-forming galaxies at 150 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews Franzen, Thomas; Jackson, Carole Ann; Sadler, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    We observe local radio galaxies as a mix of true radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) and more normal star-forming (SF) galaxies. Whilst there is an overlap in their intrinsic radio luminosities, their dominant properties (AGN/SF) can usually be discerned from optical/IR spectroscopy. Using new survey data from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and the 6dF Galaxy Survey (median z=0.05), we derive the local radio luminosity function (LRLF) for both AGN and star-forming galaxies at 150 MHz. These LRLFs provide an essential benchmark from which to analyse the magnitude of cosmic evolution of these galaxies to high redshift. Moreover, in order to investigate the lifecycle (or episodic nature) of radio-loud AGN we show that a combination of MWA, PMN and AT20G survey data can identify local galaxies which appear to be recently restarted, thus providing an estimate on the ‘newly active’ fraction AGN at the current epoch.

  17. Simultaneous Measurement of Temperature and Emissivity of Lunar Regolith Simulant using Dual-Channel Millimeter-Wave Radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Sundaram, S. K.; Matyas, Josef; Woskov, Paul P.

    2011-05-19

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments (high temperature, pressure, and corrosive environments). PNNL’s state-of-the-art dual channel millimeter-wave passive radiometer with active interferometric capabilities allows for radiometric measurements of sample temperature and emissivity up to at least 1600?C. Interferometric capabilities through the mixed “video” channels at 137 GHz allow simultaneous measurement of additional parameters, e.g., volume expansion/level change and viscosity. These capabilities have been used to demonstrate measurement of melting of simulated lunar regolith. The paper presents the theoretical background and basis for the dual-receiver system, describes the hardware in detail, and demonstrates the data analysis. Observed phenomena include melting and foaming of regolith with oxygen evolution. Post-experiment analysis of emissivity versus temperature allows further extraction from the radiometric data of millimeter wave coupling factors, which provide corroboratory evidence to the interferometric data of the processes observed. These results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting quantitative and qualitative process parameters for industrial processes and access to real-time dynamics of materials behavior in extreme environments.

  18. Microelectrode array measurement of potassium ion channel remodeling on the field action potential duration in rapid atrial pacing rabbits model

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Juan; Yan, Huang; Wugeti, Najina; Guo, Yujun; Zhang, Ling; Ma, Mei; Guo, Xingui; Jiao, Changan; Xu, Wenli; Li, Tianqi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) arises from abnormalities in atrial structure and electrical activity. Microelectrode arrays (MEA) is a real-time, nondestructive measurement of the resting and action potential signal, from myocardial cells, to the peripheral circuit of electrophysiological activity. This study examined the field action potential duration (fAPD) of the right atrial appendage (RAA) by MEA in rapid atrial pacing (RAP) in the right atrium of rabbits. In addition, this study also investigated the effect of potassium ion channel blockers on fAPD. Methods: 40 New Zealand white rabbits of either sex were randomly divided into 3 groups: 1) the control, 2) potassium ion channel blocker (TEA, 4-Ap and BaCl2), and 3) amiodarone groups. The hearts were quickly removed and right atrial appendage sectioned (slice thickness 500 ?m). Each slice was perfused with Tyrode’s solution and continuously stimulated for 30 minutes. Sections from the control group were superfused with Tyrode’s solution for 10 minutes, while the blocker groups and amiodarone were both treated with their respective compounds for 10 minutes each. The fAPD of RAA and action field action potential morphology were measured using MEA. Results: In non-pace (control) groups, fAPD was 188.33 ± 18.29 ms after Tyrode’s solution superfusion, and 173.91 ± 6.83 ms after RAP. In pace/potassium ion channel groups, TEA and BaCl2 superfusion prolonged atrial field action potential (fAPD) (control vs blocker: 176.67 ± 8.66 ms vs 196.11 ± 10.76 ms, 182.22 ± 12.87 ms vs 191.11 ± 13.09 ms with TEA and BaCl2 superfusion, respectively, P < 0.05). 4-AP superfusion significantly prolonged FAPD. In pace/amiodarone groups, 4-Ap superfusion extended fAPD. Conclusions: MEA was a sensitive and stable reporter for the measurement of the tissue action potential in animal heart slices. After superfusing potassium ion channel blockers, fAPD was prolonged. These results suggest that Ito, IKur and IK1 remodel and mediate RAP-induced atrial electrical remodeling. Amiodarone alter potassium ion channel activity (Ito, IKur, IK1 and IKs), shortening fAPD. PMID:25784994

  19. 77 FR 38210 - Channel Spacing and Bandwidth Limitations for Certain Economic Area (EA)-Based 800 MHz...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... MHz Specialized Mobile Radio Licensees AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule... Specialized Mobile Radio (SMR) licensees to exceed a legacy channel spacing requirement and...

  20. Measurements of fiducial and differential cross sections for Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel at ?s = 8 TeV with ATLAS

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Measurements of fiducial and differential cross sections are presented for Higgs boson production in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 8 TeV. The analysis is performed in the H ? ?? decay channel ...

  1. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...which communication channels can be provided. This account shall also include the associated carrier and auxiliary equipment and patch bay equipment which is an integral part of the radio equipment. Such equipment may be located in central office...

  2. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...which communication channels can be provided. This account shall also include the associated carrier and auxiliary equipment and patch bay equipment which is an integral part of the radio equipment. Such equipment may be located in central office...

  3. 47 CFR 32.2231 - Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...which communication channels can be provided. This account shall also include the associated carrier and auxiliary equipment and patch bay equipment which is an integral part of the radio equipment. Such equipment may be located in central office...

  4. Measuring Temperature-Dependent Propagating Disturbances in Coronal Fan Loops Using Multiple SDO-AIA Channels and Surfing Transform Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uritskiy, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.; Viall, Nicholeen M.; Ofman, Leon

    2013-01-01

    A set of co-aligned high resolution images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is used to investigate propagating disturbances (PDs) in warm fan loops at the periphery of a non-flaring active region NOAA AR 11082. To measure PD speeds at multiple coronal temperatures, a new data analysis methodology is proposed enabling quantitative description of sub visual coronal motions with low signal-to-noise ratios of the order of 0.1. The technique operates with a set of one-dimensional surfing signals extracted from position-timeplots of several AIA channels through a modified version of Radon transform. The signals are used to evaluate a two-dimensional power spectral density distribution in the frequency - velocity space which exhibits a resonance in the presence of quasi-periodic PDs. By applying this analysis to the same fan loop structures observed in several AIA channels, we found that the traveling velocity of PDs increases with the temperature of the coronal plasma following the square root dependence predicted for the slow mode magneto-acoustic wave which seems to be the dominating wave mode in the studied loop structures. This result extends recent observations by Kiddie et al. (2012) to a more general class of fan loop systems not associated with sunspots and demonstrating consistent slow mode activity in up to four AIA channels.

  5. The Rotation Period and Magnetic Field of the T Dwarf 2MASSI J1047539+212423 Measured From Periodic Radio Bursts

    E-print Network

    Williams, P K G

    2015-01-01

    Periodic radio bursts from very low mass stars and brown dwarfs simultaneously probe their magnetic and rotational properties. The brown dwarf 2MASSI J1047539+212423 (2M 1047+21) is currently the only T dwarf (T6.5) detected at radio wavelengths. Previous observations of this source with the Arecibo observatory revealed intermittent, 100%-polarized radio pulses similar to those detected from other brown dwarfs, but were unable to constrain a pulse periodicity; previous VLA observations detected quiescent emission a factor of ~100 times fainter than the Arecibo pulses but no additional events. Here we present 14 hours of Very Large Array observations of this object that reveal a series of pulses at ~6 GHz with highly variable profiles, showing that the pulsing behavior evolves on time scales that are both long and short compared to the rotation period. We measure a periodicity of ~1.77 hr and identify it with the rotation period. This is just the sixth rotation period measurement in a late T dwarf, and the fir...

  6. Radio Ghosts

    E-print Network

    Torsten A. Ensslin

    1999-06-11

    We investigate the possibility that patches of old radio plasma (`radio ghosts') of former radio galaxies form a second distinct phase of the inter-galactic medium (IGM), not mixed with the thermal gas. The separation of this phase from the ambient gas and its resistance against eroding turbulent forces is given by magnetic fields, which are expected to be roughly in pressure equilibrium with the surrounding medium. Since patches of this plasma are largely invisible in the radio we use the term `radio ghost' to characterize their nature. Possibilities and difficulties of different detection strategies of ghosts are discussed. These involve radio emission, cosmic microwave background (CMB) and starlight Comptonization, and Faraday rotation. Re-activation of the electron population in shock waves of cosmological structure formation, which seems to lead to the cluster radio relic phenomena. We discuss the role radio ghosts can have: They are able to store relativistic particles for cosmological times, but are also able to release them under the influence of very strong turbulence. This might happen during a major merger event of clusters of galaxies. The released relativistic proton population could produce the observed radio halos of some cluster of galaxies via hadronic reactions with the background gas leading to the production of secondary electrons and positrons. Destroyed ghosts, mixed with the IGM can help to magnetize it. Finally, the strong field strength within ghosts should have a significant impact on the propagation of extragalactic high energy cosmic rays.

  7. The 18th Annual IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications (PIMRC'07) FIRST RESULTS FROM CAR-TO-CAR AND CAR-TO-INFRASTRUCTURE

    E-print Network

    Zemen, Thomas

    (PIMRC'07) FIRST RESULTS FROM CAR-TO-CAR AND CAR-TO-INFRASTRUCTURE RADIO CHANNEL MEASUREMENTS AT 5.2 GHZ apaier@nt.tuwien.ac.at ABSTRACT Car-to-car and car-to-infrastructure (henceforth called C2X with high Doppler resolution. As first results from evaluating the measurement data we present the power

  8. Radio Science in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefeuvre, Francois; Mc Kinnel, Lee-Anne; Chukwuma, Victor; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine

    2010-05-01

    Radio science activities covered by URSI (International Radio Science Union) are briefly reviewed. They encompass the knowledge and study of all aspects of electromagnetic fields and waves in a wide frequency range running from micro pulsation frequencies (i.e. from ~1 mHz) to Terahertz. The topics include: electromagnetic measurements and standards, electromagnetic theory and applications, radio-communication systems and signal processing, electronics and Photonics, electromagnetic environment and interference, wave propagation and remote sensing, ionospheric radio and propagation, waves in plasmas, radio astronomy, and electromagnetics in biology and medicine. The main radio science activities conducted by the URSI national Committees of South Africa, Egypt and Nigeria, and by African radio scientists groups gathered in GIRGEA (Groupe International de Recherche en Géophysique Europe Afrique) are reviewed. The emphasis is put on the activities developed in the context of the IHY programme and of the SCINDA network for forecasting ionospheric irregularities that adversely impact communication and navigation systems in the low latitude regions.

  9. The ionosphere as a focusing lens - A case study involving simultaneous type III solar radio storm measurements from the ISIS 1 and 2 and ISEE 3 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, H. G.; Benson, R. F.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of using terrestrial ionospheric focusing to improve the directivity of electric dipoles on space missions has been investigated by comparing simultaneous observations of a solar radio storm by the ISIS 1 and ISIS 2 spacecraft, in near earth orbit, and the ISEE 3 spacecraft located beyond the magnetosphere. To this end, a three-dimensional ray tracing in a spherically stratified ionosphere has been carried out for conditions appropriate to the observations by the ISIS spacecraft of a solar radio storm in September 1983. The procedure allows Poynting flux spectral densities measured on ISIS to be converted to spectral densities well outside the ionosphere where they can be compared directly with simultaneous observations on ISEE 3. The results demonstrate good agreement over their common observing frequency range (1-2 MHz).

  10. The ionosphere as a focusing lens - A case study involving simultaneous type III solar radio storm measurements from the ISIS 1 and 2 and ISEE 3 satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.; Benson, R. F.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1990-06-01

    The possibility of using terrestrial ionospheric focusing to improve the directivity of electric dipoles on space missions has been investigated by comparing simultaneous observations of a solar radio storm by the ISIS 1 and ISIS 2 spacecraft, in near earth orbit, and the ISEE 3 spacecraft located beyond the magnetosphere. To this end, a three-dimensional ray tracing in a spherically stratified ionosphere has been carried out for conditions appropriate to the observations by the ISIS spacecraft of a solar radio storm in September 1983. The procedure allows Poynting flux spectral densities measured on ISIS to be converted to spectral densities well outside the ionosphere where they can be compared directly with simultaneous observations on ISEE 3. The results demonstrate good agreement over their common observing frequency range (1-2 MHz).

  11. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  12. Visual measurement of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet by dual-channel simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Zhong, Liyun; Luo, Chunshu; Niu, Wenhu; Lu, Xiaoxu

    2015-01-01

    To perform the visual measurement of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet, a dual-channel simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry (DCSPSI) method is proposed. Based on polarization components to simultaneously generate a pair of orthogonal interferograms with the phase shifts of ?/2, the real-time phase of a dynamic process can be retrieved with two-step phase-shifting algorithm. Using this proposed DCSPSI system, the transient mass (TM) of the evaporation process of a sessile droplet with different initial mass were presented through measuring the real-time 3D shape of a droplet. Moreover, the mass flux density (MFD) of the evaporating droplet and its regional distribution were also calculated and analyzed. The experimental results show that the proposed DCSPSI will supply a visual, accurate, noncontact, nondestructive, global tool for the real-time multi-parameter measurement of the droplet evaporation. PMID:26178451

  13. Observations of Binary Stars with the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument. VI. Measures during 2014 at the Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horch, Elliott P.; van Belle, Gerard T.; Davidson, James W., Jr.; Ciastko, Lindsay A.; Everett, Mark E.; Bjorkman, Karen S.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of 938 speckle measures of double stars and suspected double stars drawn mainly from the Hipparcos Catalog, as well as 208 observations where no companion was noted. One hundred fourteen pairs have been resolved for the first time. The data were obtained during four observing runs in 2014 using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument at Lowell Observatory's Discovery Channel Telescope. The measurement precision obtained when comparing to ephemeris positions of binaries with very well-known orbits is generally less than 2 mas in separation and 0.°5 in position angle. Differential photometry is found to have internal precision of approximately 0.1 mag and to be in very good agreement with Hipparcos measures in cases where the comparison is most relevant. We also estimate the detection limit in the cases where no companion was found. Visual orbital elements are derived for six systems.

  14. Observations of Binary Stars with the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument. VI. Measures During 2014 at the Discovery Channel Telescope

    E-print Network

    Horch, Elliott P; Davidson,, James W; Ciastko, Lindsay A; Everett, Mark E; Bjorkman, Karen S

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of 938 speckle measures of double stars and suspected double stars drawn mainly from the Hipparcos Catalogue, as well as 208 observations where no companion was noted. One hundred fourteen pairs have been resolved for the first time. The data were obtained during four observing runs in 2014 using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI) at Lowell Observatory's Discovery Channel Telescope. The measurement precision obtained when comparing to ephemeris positions of binaries with very well-known orbits is generally less than 2 mas in separation and 0.5 degrees in position angle. Differential photometry is found to have internal precision of approximately 0.1 magnitudes and to be in very good agreement with Hipparcos measures in cases where the comparison is most relevant. We also estimate the detection limit in the cases where no companion was found. Visual orbital elements are derived for 6 systems.

  15. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at CDF Using the Template Method in the Lepton + Jets Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, Jahred A.; /Chicago U.

    2008-05-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The analysis uses a template method, in which the overconstrained kinematics of the Lepton+Jets channel of the t{bar t} system are used to measure a single quantity, the reconstructed top quark mass, that is strongly correlated with the true top quark mass. in addition, the dijet mass of the hadronically decaying W boson is used to constrain in situ the uncertain jet energy scale in the CDF detector. Two-dimensional probability density functions are derived using a kernel density estimate-based machinery. Using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data, the top quark mass is measured to be 171.8{sub -1.9}{sup +1.9}(stat.) {+-} 1.0(syst.)GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. Characterization of the transport properties of channel delta-doped structures by light-modulated Shubnikov-de Haas measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, R. A.; Schacham, S. E.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Young, P. G.; Bibyk, S. B.; Ringel, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    The transport properties of channel delta-doped quantum well structures were characterized by conventional Hall effect and light-modulated Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect measurements. The large number of carriers that become available due to the delta-doping of the channel, leads to an apparent degeneracy in the well. As a result of this degeneracy, the carrier mobility remains constant as a function of temperature from 300 K down to 1.4 K. The large amount of impurity scattering, associated with the overlap of the charge carriers and the dopants, resulted in low carrier mobilities and restricted the observation of the oscillatory magneto-resistance used to characterize the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) by conventional SdH measurements. By light-modulating the carriers, we were able to observe the SdH oscillation at low magnetic fields, below 1.4 tesla, and derive a value for the quantum scattering time. Our results for the ratio of the transport and quantum scattering times are lower than those previously measured for similar structures using much higher magnetic fields.

  17. Radio constraints on Galactic WIMP dark matter

    E-print Network

    Roberto A. Lineros

    2013-09-18

    Synchrotron emission from electron cosmic ray populations can be used to study both cosmic rays physics and WIMP dark matter imprints on radio skymaps. We used available radio data - from MHz to GHz - to analyze the contribution from galactic WIMP annihilations and impose constraints on WIMP observables: annihilation cross section, channel and mass. Depending on the annihilation channel we obtain as competitive bounds as those obtained in FERMI-LAT gamma ray analysis of dwarf satellite galaxies.

  18. Visible and near-infrared channel calibration of the GOES-6 VISSR using high-altitude aircraft measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gilbert R.; Levin, Robert H.; Koyanagi, Robert S.; Wrigley, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    Present and future visible and near-infrared wavelength sensors mounted on operational satellites do not have on-board absolute calibration devices. One means of establishing an in-orbit calibration for a satellite sensor is to make simultaneous measurements of a bright, relatively uniform scene along the satellite view vector from a calibrated instrument on board a high altitude aircraft. Aircraft data were recorded over White Sands, New Mexico, and the coincident aircraft and orbiting satellite data is compared for the visible and near-infrared wavelength channel of the GOES-6 Visible Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer.

  19. On the subjective evaluation of the interference protection ratios' measurements for co-channel FM-TV signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groumpos, P. P.; Whyte, W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of subjective measurements made to determine the relationship between the image impairment grade and the wanted-signal to interference power ratios (C/I) for co-channel FM television signals are presented. The variation of C/I ratio with picture impairment grade is investigated for three different noise levels. The assessment of impairment grade due to thermal noise only and to picture content is also investigated. A statistical analysis for performed experiments is presented. The results presented here may be used by communication system designers to determine the required system characteristics.

  20. A measurement of top quark pair differential cross-section d?/dmtt in the dilepton channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Ki; Errede, Steven; Vichou, Irene

    2013-04-01

    This analysis presents a study of the measurement of the differential cross section as a function of invariant mass of the top quark pairs using 7TeV 2011 data recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events of top-antitop pairs are selected in the di-lepton channel. The reconstructed differential distribution is subtracted with estimated backgrounds and is unfolded to correct for detector response and acceptance using the SVD algorithm. Tests on unfolding with MC simulated data are performed. Effects of the main sources of systematic uncertainties on the differential distribution are estimated.

  1. Multiscale bloom dynamics from a high frequency autonomous measurement system in the Eastern English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derot, Jonathan; Schmitt, François; Gentilhomme, Valérie

    2014-05-01

    We consider here a dataset from an Eulerian automated system, located on the coastal area of the French side of the English Channel (Boulogne-sur-Mer), called MAREL Carnot, operated by IFREMER (France). This system records more than 15 physico-chemical parameters at 20 minutes intervals, and at the constant depth of -1,5m whatever the tidal range. Our study focuses on the period 2004 to 2011. The objective of this study is to have a better understanding of the bloom fluorescence multiscale dynamics, as regards the coastal area of English Channel and possible influence of temperature on this dynamics. Annual blooms are visible, superposed to multiscale fluctuations. The probability density function (PDF) of the fluorescence time series very nicely obeys a power law with slope -2. The PDF for annual portions obeys also power laws, with slopes which are related to the annual average. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is used to study the dynamics and display the power spectrum, which will be linked with these dynamics. EMD method is also used to extract a trend and isolate the blooms from the high frequency dynamics. We show that the high frequency part of the fluorescence dynamics has a very large variance during bloom events, compared to normal conditions. We also show that there is a link between the mean winter temperature and the strength of bloom next spring. These results contribute to statistically characterize the bloom dynamics and extract some possible universal relations. Keywords: English Channel; Autonomous monitoring; Power spectra; EMD method; Probability density functions; Power laws.

  2. Volume transport and mixing of the Faroe Bank Channel overflow from one year of moored measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullgren, J. E.; Darelius, E.; Fer, I.

    2015-10-01

    One-year long time series of current velocity and temperature from ten moorings deployed in the Faroe Bank Channel (FBC) are analysed to describe the structure and variability of the dense overflow plume on daily to seasonal time scales. Mooring arrays are deployed in two sections: located 25 km downstream of the main sill, in the channel that geographically confines the overflow plume at both edges (section C), and 60 km further downstream, over the slope (section S). At section C, the average volume transport of overflow waters (< 3 °C) from the Nordic Seas towards the Iceland Basin is 1.3 ± 0.3 Sv; at Section S, transport of modified overflow water (< 6 °C) is 1.8 ± 0.7 Sv. The volume transport through the slope section is dominated by mesoscale variability at 3-5 day time scale. A simplified view of along-path entrainment of a gravity current is not accurate for the FBC overflow. As the plume proceeds into the stratified ambient water, there is substantial detrainment from the deeper layer (bounded by the 3 °C isotherm), of comparable magnitude to the entrainment into the interfacial layer (between the 3 and 6 °C isotherms). Time series of gradient Richardson number suggests a quiescent plume core capped by turbulent near bottom and interfacial layers in the channel. At section S, in contrast, the entire overflow plume is turbulent. Based on a two-layer heat budget constructed for the overflow, mean diffusivities across the top of the bottom layer, and across the interfacial layer are (30 ± 15) × 10-4 m2 s-1 and (119 ± 43) × 10-4 m2 s-1, respectively.

  3. A photoelectric technique for measuring lightning-channel propagation velocities from a mobile laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Rust, W. David

    1989-01-01

    The present device for lightning channel propagation-velocity determination employs eight photodetectors mounted behind precision horizontal slits in the focal plane of a photographic camera lens. The eight photodetector pulses, IRIG-B time, and slow and fast electric field-change waveforms are recorded on a 14-track analog tape recorder. A comparison of the present results with those obtained by a streaking camera shows no significant differences between the velocities obtained from the same strokes with the two systems; neither is there any difference in pulse characteristics or in the velocities calculated from them.

  4. 47 CFR 73.220 - Restrictions on use of channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restrictions on use of channels. 73.220 Section 73.220 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES FM Broadcast Stations § 73.220 Restrictions on use of channels. (a) The frequency 89.1 MHz (channel 206) is revised in the...

  5. 47 CFR 95.1211 - Channel use policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channel use policy. 95.1211 Section 95.1211... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1211 Channel use policy. (a) The channels authorized for MedRadio operation by this part of the FCC Rules are available on a shared...

  6. An RF Sensor for Gauging Screen-Channel Liquid Acquisition Devices for Cryogenic Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Metzger, Scott; Asipauskas, Marius

    2014-01-01

    A key requirement of a low-gravity screen-channel liquid acquisition device (LAD) is the need to retain 100% liquid in the channel in response to propellant outflow and spacecraft maneuvers. The point at which a screen-channel LAD ingests vapor is known as breakdown, and can be measured several different ways such as: visual observation of bubbles in the LAD channel outflow; a sudden change in pressure drop between the propellant tank and LAD sump outlet; or, an indication by wet-dry sensors placed in the LAD channel or outflow stream. Here we describe a new type of sensor for gauging a screen-channel LAD, the Radio Frequency Mass Gauge (RFMG). The RFMG measures the natural electromagnetic modes of the screen-channel LAD, which is very similar to an RF waveguide, to determine the amount of propellant in the channel. By monitoring several of the RF modes, we show that the RFMG acts as a global sensor of the LAD channel propellant fill level, and enables detection of LAD breakdown even in the absence of outflow. This paper presents the theory behind the RFMG-LAD sensor, measurements and simulations of the RF modes of a LAD channel, and RFMG detection of LAD breakdown in a channel using a simulant fluid during inverted outflow and long-term stability tests.

  7. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  8. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Schaffer, R. D.; Gorenstein, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of Radio Astronomy Operations during April and May 1981 are reported. Work in progres in support of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel, Twin Quasi-Stellar Object VLBI, is reported.

  9. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  10. Measurement of flow speed in the channels of novel threadlike structures on the surfaces of mammalian organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Baeckkyoung; Kim, Min Su; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Yoo, Jung Sun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Youn-Joong; Kim, Ki-Woo; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2008-02-01

    There have been several reports on novel threadlike structures (NTSs) on the surfaces of the internal organs of rats and rabbits since their first observation by Bonghan Kim in 1963. To confirm this novel circulatory function, it is necessary to observe the flow of liquid through the NTS as well as the structurally corroborating channels in the NTS. In this article, we report on the measurement of the flow speed of Alcian blue solution in the NTSs on the organ surfaces of rabbits, and we present electron microscopic images depicting the cribrous cross-section with channels. The speed was measured as 0.3 ± 0.1 mm/s, and the flow distance was up to 12 cm. The flow was unidirectional, and the phase contrast microscopic images showed that the NTSs were strongly stained with Alcian blue. The ultrastructure of the NTSs revealed by cryo-scanning electron microscopy and high-voltage electron microscopy showed that (1) there were cell-like bodies and globular clumps of matter inside the sinus of the channel with thin strands of segregated zones which is a microscopic evidence of the liquid flow, (2) the sinuses have wall structures surrounded with extracellular matrices of collagenous fibers, and (3) there exists a cribriform structure of sinuses. To understand the mechanism for the circulation, a quantitative analysis of the flow speed has been undertaken applying a simplified windkessel model. In this analysis, it was shown that the liquid flow through the NTSs could be due to peristaltic motion of the NTS itself.

  11. X-ray measurement of electron and magnetic-field energy densities in the west lobe of the giant radio galaxy 3C 236

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Naoki; Koyama, Shoko

    2015-08-01

    X-ray emission associated with the west lobe of the giant radio galaxy 3C 236 was investigated with the Suzaku observatory to evaluate the energetics in the lobe. After removing contamination from point-like X-ray sources detected with Chandra and subtracting the X-ray and non-X-ray backgrounds, the Suzaku spectrum from the lobe was reproduced by a power-law model with a photon index of ? = 2.23_{-0.38-0.12}^{+0.44+0.14}, where the first and second errors represent the statistical and systematic ones, respectively. Within the errors, the X-ray index was consistent with the radio synchrotron one, ?R = 1.74 ± 0.07, estimated in the 326-2695 MHz range. This agreement supports that the X-ray emission is attributed to the inverse-Compton radiation from the synchrotron electrons filling the lobe, where the cosmic microwave background photons are up-scattered. This result made 3C 236 the largest radio galaxy of which the lobe has ever been probed through the inverse-Compton X-ray photons. When the photon index was fixed at ?R, the X-ray flux density at 1 keV was measured as SX = 12.3 ± 2.0 ± 1.9 nJy. A comparison of the X-ray flux to the radio one (SR = 1.11 ± 0.02 Jy at 608.5 MHz) yields the energy densities of the electrons and magnetic field in the west lobe as u_e = 3.9_{-0.7 -0.9}^{+0.6 +1.0} × 10^{-14} erg cm-3 and u_m = 0.92_{-0.15 -0.35}^{+0.21 +0.52}× 10^{-14} erg cm-3, respectively, indicating a mild electron dominance of u_e/u_m = 4.2_{-1.3 -2.3}^{+1.6 +4.1}. The latter corresponds to the magnetic field strength of B = 0.48_{-0.04 -0.10}^{+0.05 +0.12} ?G. These are typical among the lobes of giant radio galaxies. A summary of the ue-size relation for the inverse-Compton-detected radio galaxies implies that the west lobe of 3C 236 is still actively energized by its jet.

  12. In Situ Measurement, Characterization, and Modeling of Two-Phase Pressure Drop Incorporating Local Water Saturation in PEMFC Gas Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Evan J.

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) have been an area of focus as an alternative for internal combustion engines in the transportation sector. Water and thermal management techniques remain as one of the key roadblocks in PEMFC development. The ability to model two-phase flow and pressure drop in PEMFCs is of significant importance to the performance and optimization of PEMFCs. This work provides a perspective on the numerous factors that affect the two-phase flow in the gas channels and presents a comprehensive pressure drop model through an extensive in situ fuel cell investigation. The study focused on low current density and low temperature operation of the cell, as these conditions present the most challenging scenario for water transport in the PEMFC reactant channels. Tests were conducted using two PEMFCs that were representative of the actual full scale commercial automotive geometry. The design of the flow fields allowed visual access to both cathode and anode sides for correlating the visual observations to the two-phase flow patterns and pressure drop. A total of 198 tests were conducted varying gas diffusion layer (GDL), inlet humidity, current density, and stoichiometry; this generated over 1500 average pressure drop measurements to develop and validate two-phase models. A two-phase 1+1 D modeling scheme is proposed that incorporates an elemental approach and control volume analysis to provide a comprehensive methodology and correlation for predicting two-phase pressure drop in PEMFC conditions. Key considerations, such as condensation within the channel, consumption of reactant gases, water transport across the membrane, and thermal gradients within the fuel cell, are reviewed and their relative importance illustrated. The modeling scheme is shown to predict channel pressure drop with a mean error of 10% over the full range of conditions and with a mean error of 5% for the primary conditions of interest. The model provides a unique and comprehensive basis for developing a fundamental adiabatic two-phase flow pressure drop predictive scheme for PEMFC reactant channels.

  13. Field Calibration of the Saltation-Abrasion Model Using Measurements of the Energy Delivered to the Channel Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turowski, J. M.; Wyss, C. R.; Beer, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The saltation-abrasion model (SAM) is one of the highest-developed process models for fluvial bedrock erosion, describing bedrock erosion due to the impact of saltating bedload particles. The fundamental assumption in the model is a proportionality of the erosion rate and the energy delivered to the channel bed by these impacts. So far, the SAM has been calibrated on laboratory data, but field tests are rare. Here, we exploit the availability of high-quality field data at the Erlenbach bedload observatory to test and calibrate the SAM. The Erlenbach is a small, steep stream in the Swiss Prealps that hosts a well-instrumented observatory for bedload transport and erosion. Bedload samples can be taken during floods with automatic basket samplers and bedload transport rates are measured continuously with Swiss plate geophones, a surrogate method for bedload monitoring. The geophone plates can also be used to measure the energy transferred to the bed by passingbedload. Thus, we can calibrate the SAM by exploiting independent data on particle impacts, the energy they transfer to the bed, and bedload samples including grain size distributions. We find that the dimensionless pre-factor to the model is dependent on grain size. Predictions of bedrock erosion can be compared to spatial erosion data obtained from successive scans of bedrock slabs installed in the channel bed immediately upstream of the plate geophones.

  14. Calibration of the visible and near-infrared channels of the NOAA-9 AVHRR using high-altitude aircraft measurements from August 1985 and October 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gilbert R.; Levin, Robert H.; Koyanagi, Robert S.; Wrigley, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    Visible and near infrared wavelength sensors mounted on operational satellites now in use do not have onboard absolute calibration devices. One means of establishing an in-orbit calibration for a satellite sensor is to make simultaneous measurement of a bright, relatively uniform scene along the satellite view vector from a calibrated instrument on board a high altitude aircraft. Herein, aircraft data were recorded over White Sands, New Mexico at satellite overpass time. Comparison of the coincident aircraft and orbiting satellite data for the visible and near infrared wavelength channels of the NOAA-9 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer shows that the calibration of the visible channel was unchanged from prelaunch values, but that the near infrared channel has degraded 6 percent by Aug. 1985. By Oct. 1986 the visible channel had degraded 13 percent and the near infrared channel had degraded 19 percent.

  15. Simultaneous X-ray and Radio Monitoring of the Unusual Binary LSI+61 303: Measurements of the Lightcurve and High-Energy Spectrum

    E-print Network

    F. A. Harrison; P. S. Ray; D. A. Leahy; E. B. Waltman; G. G. Pooley

    1999-08-06

    The binary system, LSI+61 303, is unusual both because of the dramatic, periodic, radio outbursts, and because of its possible association with the 100 MeV gamma-ray source, 2CG135+01. We have performed simultaneous radio and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer X-ray observations at eleven intervals over the 26.5 day orbit, and in addition searched for variability on timescales ranging from milliseconds to hours. We confirm the modulation of the X-ray emission on orbital timescales originally reported by Taylor et al. (1996), and in addition we find a significant offset between the peak of the X-ray and radio flux. We argue that based on these results, the most likely X-ray emission mechanism is inverse Compton scattering of stellar photons off of electrons accelerated at the shock boundary between the relativistic wind of a young pulsar and the Be star wind. In these observations we also detected 2 -- 150 keV flux from the nearby low-redshift quasar QSO~0241+622. Comparing these measurements to previous hard X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the region containing both LSI+61 303 and QSO~0241+622, it is clear that emission from the QSO dominates.

  16. Game Theoretic Issues in Cognitive Radio Systems (Invited Paper)

    E-print Network

    Krishnamurthy, Vikram

    . This work presents several results in game theory and their applications in cognitive radio systems. FirstGame Theoretic Issues in Cognitive Radio Systems (Invited Paper) Jane Wei Huang and Vikram methods to cognitive radio networks for power control, rate adaptation and channel access schemes

  17. Multi-channel optical sensor-array for measuring ballistocardiograms and respiratory activity in bed.

    PubMed

    Brüser, Christoph; Kerekes, Anna; Winter, Stefan; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Our work covers improvements in sensors and signal processing for unobtrusive, long-term monitoring of cardiac (and respiratory) rhythms using only non-invasive vibration sensors. We describe a system for the unobtrusive monitoring of vital signs by means of an array of novel optical ballistocardiography (BCG) sensors placed underneath a regular bed mattress. Furthermore, we analyze the systems spatial sensitivity and present proof-of-concept results comparing our system to a more conventional BCG system based on a single electromechanical-film (EMFi) sensor. Our preliminary results suggest that the proposed optical multi-channel system could have the potential to reduce beat-to-beat heart rate estimation errors, as well as enable the analysis of more complex breathing patterns. PMID:23367061

  18. Design and test of a 64-channel charge measurement ASIC developed in CMOS 0.35 ?m technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.; Mazza, G.; Donetti, M.; Marchetto, F.; Luetto, L.; Attili, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Iliescu, S.; Pardo, J.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.

    2007-12-01

    A 64-channel charge measurement (Application-Specific Integrated Circuit) ASIC has been designed and tested: it is intended to serve as a front-end electronic read-out for detectors to monitor and measure radiotherapeutical beams. The ASIC has been designed in a CMOS 0.35 ?m technology with particular attention to the linearity over a wide input range and can accept currents of both polarities. The linearity is better than 1.5% for a dynamic range of the input current between 500 pA and 3 ?A. For a charge resolution of 350 fC, the spread (r.m.s.) of the gain is less than 1%.

  19. Cognitive Radio: A path in the Evolution of Public Wireless Networks The concept of cognitive radio has arisen as a generalization of the principle of multiple

    E-print Network

    Jafar, Syed A.

    Cognitive Radio: A path in the Evolution of Public Wireless Networks The concept of cognitive radio has arisen as a generalization of the principle of multiple access in radio channels initially layer including fixed modulation and error control coding algorithms. The cognitive radio is supposed

  20. Optical single sideband modulation of 60-GHz radio over fiber (ROF) system using ultra compact photonic crystal ring-shaped channel drop filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weijia; Tian, Huiping; Ji, Yuefeng; Xu, Kun

    2013-07-01

    An ultra compact photonic crystal (PC) ring-shaped channel drop filter (RSCDF) is proposed to generate single side band (SSB) signal for 60 GHz ROF system. This PC-RSCDF contains a bus waveguide, a resonant cavity, a ring-shaped waveguide (RSW) and a coupled cavity output waveguide. The notch depth and notch bandwidth of CDF can get 98% and 0.4 nm respectively by inducing RSW and shifting the center defect rod of cavity and the rod around the cavity. Then, a method of fine tuning the resonant frequency of PC-RSCDF is proposed by adjusting the radius of insensitive rods which have weak coupling interaction with the light and the sensitivity of structure can be decreased, and the resonant frequency can be shifted to the sideband frequency of double side band (DSB) signal accurately. Finally, a 60 GHz ROF SSB modulation system is demonstrated by using designed PC-RSCDF that can filter lower or upper sideband by changing its structure parameters. The extinction ratio (ER) of lower and upper sideband can get 20.9 dB and 18.6 dB respectively.

  1. Measurement of the Coolant Channel Temperatures and Pressures of a Cooled Radial-Inflow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1994-01-01

    Instrumentation has been installed on the surface of a cooled radial-inflow turbine. Thermocouples and miniature integrated sensor pressure transducers were installed to measure steady state coolant temperatures, blade wall temperatures, and coolant pressures. These measurements will eventually be used to determine the heat transfer characteristics of the rotor. This paper will describe the procedures used to install and calibrate the instrumentation and the testing methods followed. A limited amount of data will compare the measured values to the predicted values.

  2. RadioBOT: A spatial cognitive radio testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Brian M.; Kim, Joseph H.; Baxley, Robert J.; Walkenhorst, Brett T.

    This paper introduces RadioBOT, a flexible system of mobile robots for acquisition of radio frequency data. The motivation for such a test system is described, namely the difficulty in acquiring real world data for the purpose of spatial cognitive radio (CR) research. Some current areas of CR research are presented for which RadioBOT can gather data. We then describe the hardware and software components of our system. As a demonstration of the system's capability, we present here the results of a spectrum mapping experiment. In this experiment, we uniformly sample average signal power in a laboratory hallway where an emitter is present. From this data, we form an interpolated spectrum map of the signal power as a function of space. Knowledge of the area's spectrum map is then used to optimize the relay channel communication rate between a transmitter and receiver, by optimally positioning the relay node.

  3. Development of the RF Front-end of a Multi-Channel Microwave Radiometer for Internal Body Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabetsos, Sotiris; Koulouras, Grigorios; Charamis, Panagiotis; Adamidis, George; Vardiambasis, Ioannis O.; Nassiopoulos, Athanasios

    2015-09-01

    Microwave Thermograph (MT) is based on measuring the electromagnetic field spontaneously emitted by a body in micro-wave frequency range. In microwave radiometers, temperature measurement is made by measuring the thermal noise power. The primary module that is used for detecting this thermal noise power is the RF Front-end, which must meet very challenging requirements in terms of accuracy for measuring the noise power at the input of the receiver. The work that will be presented here will exhibit the design approaches and specifications as well as the trade-offs and performance criteria towards the development and prototyping of the RF Front-end for a Multi-Channel Microwave Radiometer for internal body temperature measurements in the l-4GHz frequency bands. The RF Front-end is intended to be integrated and be a part of a full Microwave Radiometer device that targets early detection of malignant tumours. The latter relate with the increase of temperature in cancerous cells and the precise detection of the temperature difference, which is the goal of the radiometer.

  4. Locating Radio Noise from Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Watson, R.; Gaffet, S.; Astin, I.; Evans, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sprites are composed of individual streamer discharges (e.g., Pasko, 2010) which split into exponentially growing streamer tips (McHarg et al., 2010). The acceleration of the electrons to a few eV results in the radiation of a small amount of electromagnetic energy. The incoherent superposition of many streamers causes the low frequency radio noise from sprites near ~40 km height (Qin et al., 2012). The presence of this theoretically predicted radiation was recently confirmed by low frequency radio noise measurements during dancing sprites with a very sensitive radio receiver (Fullekrug et al., 2013). To locate the radio noise from sprites in the sky, an interferometric network of low frequency radio receivers was developed (Mezentsev and Fullekrug, JGR, 2013). The key parameter for the interferometric signal processing is the frequency dependent wave propagation velocity of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere. This wave propagation velocity is determined by the wave number vector which needs to be inferred from the measurements. Here we adapt and subsequently apply array analyses which have been developed for seismic and infrasound arrays to determine the horizontal wave number vectors of ~20-24 kHz radio waves measured with an array of ten radio receivers distributed over an area of ~1 km × 1 km. It is found that the horizontal slowness of ~20-24 kHz radio waves ranges from ~2.7 ns/m to ~4.1 ns/m depending on the arrival azimuth of the radio wave. For comparison, an electromagnetic wave in vacuum has a slowness of ~3.34 ns/m. A larger slowness indicates an apparent velocity which is smaller than the speed of light and a smaller slowness indicates that the radio wave arrives at the array from an elevation angle. The observed variability of the observed slowness almost certainly results from the distance dependent superposition of the transverse electric and magnetic TEn and TMn radio wave propagation modes.

  5. Measurement and Analysis of Radio-frequency Radiation Exposure Level from Different Mobile Base Transceiver Stations in Ajaokuta and Environs, Nigeria

    E-print Network

    Ushie, P O; Bolaji, Ayinmode; Osahun, O D

    2013-01-01

    We present the result of a preliminary assessment of radio-frequency radiation exposure from selected mobile base stations in Ajaokuta environs. The Power density of RF radiation within a radial distance of 125m was measured. Although values fluctuated due to the influence of other factors, including wave interference from other electromagnetic sources around reference base stations, we show from analysis that radiation exposure level is below the standard limit (4.5W/sqm for 900MHz and 9W/sqm for 18000MHz) set by the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and other regulatory agencies.

  6. A Survey on Leader Election Protocols for Radio Networks Koji Nakano y Stephan Olariu z

    E-print Network

    Nakano, Koji

    of the station as leader. In this work, we focus on single-channel, single-hop radio networks. We assume communicate over a unique radio frequency channel known to all the sta- #3; Work supported, in partA Survey on Leader Election Protocols for Radio Networks #3; Koji Nakano y Stephan Olariu z

  7. An ensemble average method to estimate absolute TEC using radio beacon-based differential phase measurements: Applicability to regions of large latitudinal gradients in plasma density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, Smitha V.; Bagiya, Mala S.; Chakrabarty, D.; Acharya, Y. B.; Yamamoto, M.

    2014-12-01

    A GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) system for total electron content (TEC) measurements using 150 and 400 MHz transmissions from Low-Earth Orbiting Satellites (LEOS) is fabricated in house and made operational at Ahmedabad (23.04°N, 72.54°E geographic, dip latitude 17°N) since May 2013. This system receives the 150 and 400 MHz transmissions from high-inclination LEOS. The first few days of observations are presented in this work to bring out the efficacy of an ensemble average method to convert the relative TECs to absolute TECs. This method is a modified version of the differential Doppler-based method proposed by de Mendonca (1962) and suitable even for ionospheric regions with large spatial gradients. Comparison of TECs derived from a collocated GPS receiver shows that the absolute TECs estimated by this method are reliable estimates over regions with large spatial gradient. This method is useful even when only one receiving station is available. The differences between these observations are discussed to bring out the importance of the spatial differences between the ionospheric pierce points of these satellites. A few examples of the latitudinal variation of TEC during different local times using GRBR measurements are also presented, which demonstrates the potential of radio beacon measurements in capturing the large-scale plasma transport processes in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  8. Burying of channel optical waveguides: relation between near-field measurement and Ag concentration profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wan-Shao; Liu, Yen-Huang; Barkman, Ondrej; Prajzler, Vaclav; Stanek, Stanislav; Nekvindova, Pavla

    2015-01-01

    Two-step field-assisted ion-exchanged waveguides have been fabricated on a glass substrate. The concentration profiles of the exchanged ions were measured with electron microprobe. The waveguides were characterized under scanning electron microscope and optical microscope for the investigation of burying structures. Guiding mode patterns were characterized with near-field measurement, where symmetric profiles were observed for the burying-type waveguide. The refractive index profiles were also measured with a modified end-fire coupling method. The relation between ion concentration profiles and index profiles were compared for the waveguides with different fabrication process.

  9. Measurement of damping and temperature: Precision bounds in Gaussian dissipative channels

    SciTech Connect

    Monras, Alex; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2011-01-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the performance of different classes of Gaussian states in the estimation of Gaussian phase-insensitive dissipative channels. In particular, we investigate the optimal estimation of the damping constant and reservoir temperature. We show that, for two-mode squeezed vacuum probe states, the quantum-limited accuracy of both parameters can be achieved simultaneously. Moreover, we show that for both parameters two-mode squeezed vacuum states are more efficient than coherent, thermal, or single-mode squeezed states. This suggests that at high-energy regimes, two-mode squeezed vacuum states are optimal within the Gaussian setup. This optimality result indicates a stronger form of compatibility for the estimation of the two parameters. Indeed, not only the minimum variance can be achieved at fixed probe states, but also the optimal state is common to both parameters. Additionally, we explore numerically the performance of non-Gaussian states for particular parameter values to find that maximally entangled states within d-dimensional cutoff subspaces (d{<=}6) perform better than any randomly sampled states with similar energy. However, we also find that states with very similar performance and energy exist with much less entanglement than the maximally entangled ones.

  10. Measurement of damping and temperature: Precision bounds in Gaussian dissipative channels

    E-print Network

    A. Monras; F. Illuminati

    2010-10-03

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the performance of different classes of Gaussian states in the estimation of Gaussian phase-insensitive dissipative channels. In particular, we investigate the optimal estimation of the damping constant and reservoir temperature. We show that, for two-mode squeezed vacuum probe states, the quantum-limited accuracy of both parameters can be achieved simultaneously. Moreover, we show that for both parameters two-mode squeezed vacuum states are more efficient than either coherent, thermal or single-mode squeezed states. This suggests that at high energy regimes two-mode squeezed vacuum states are optimal within the Gaussian setup. This optimality result indicates a stronger form of compatibility for the estimation of the two parameters. Indeed, not only the minimum variance can be achieved at fixed probe states, but also the optimal state is common to both parameters. Additionally, we explore numerically the performance of non-Gaussian states for particular parameter values to find that maximally entangled states within D-dimensional cutoff subspaces perform better than any randomly sampled states with similar energy. However, we also find that states with very similar performance and energy exist with much less entanglement than the maximally entangled ones.

  11. Measuring temperature - dependent propagating disturbances in coronal fan loops using multiple SDO/AIA channels and surfing transform technique

    E-print Network

    Uritsky, Vadim M; Viall, Nicholeen M; Ofman, Leon

    2013-01-01

    A set of co-aligned high resolution images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is used to investigate propagating disturbances (PDs) in warm fan loops at the periphery of a non-flaring active region NOAA AR 11082. To measure PD speeds at multiple coronal temperatures, a new data analysis methodology is proposed enabling quantitative description of subvisual coronal motions with low signal-to-noise ratios of the order of 0.1 %. The technique operates with a set of one-dimensional "surfing" signals extracted from position-time plots of several AIA channels through a modified version of Radon transform. The signals are used to evaluate a two-dimensional power spectral density distribution in the frequency - velocity space which exhibits a resonance in the presence of quasi-periodic PDs. By applying this analysis to the same fan loop structures observed in several AIA channels, we found that the traveling velocity of PDs increases with the temperature of the c...

  12. Trunked 900-mhz radio clears offshore communications

    SciTech Connect

    Richoux, R.J. )

    1993-10-11

    Increased two-way radio congestion among Gulf of Mexico offshore operations prompted Amoco Production Co. to design and build a 900-mhz trunked radio system for its gulf operations. Trunked radio, which resembles trunked lines used in telephone networks, is a method by which several radio users share relatively few channels. It offers clear, uninterrupted communications with highly efficient channel usage. The multi-net trunking system selected by Amoco provides wide area coverage across the gulf, with a variety of sophisticated features. The system gives Amoco ample room to expand both voice and data communications. The trunking system currently covers Amoco's Gulf operations through eight offshore and four coastal repeater sites, and hundreds of mobile, portable, and base-station radios. The paper describes the communications system, trunking option, testing concept, multi-net trunking, planning the system, and future applications.

  13. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  14. Radio-frequency-spectroscopy measurement of the Landé gJ factor of the 5D5/2 state of Ba+ with a single trapped ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Matthew R.; Noel, Thomas W.; Auchter, Carolyn; Jayakumar, Anupriya; Williams, Spencer R.; Blinov, Boris B.; Fortson, E. N.

    2013-08-01

    We report an improved measurement of the Landé gJ factor of the 5D5/2 state of singly ionized barium. Measurements were performed on single Doppler-cooled 138Ba+ ions in linear Paul traps using two similar, independent apparatuses. Transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the 6S1/2 and 5D5/2 states were driven with two independent, stabilized radio-frequency synthesizers using a dedicated electrode within each ion trap chamber. State detection within each Zeeman manifold was achieved with a frequency-stabilized fiber laser operating at 1.76 ?m. By calculating the ratio of the two Zeeman splittings, and using the measured Landé gJ factor of the 6S1/2 state, we find a value of 1.200 372(4stat)(7sys) for gD5/2.

  15. 77 FR 33972 - Channel Spacing and Bandwidth Limitations for Certain Economic Area (EA)-based 800 MHz...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ...EA)-based 800 MHz Specialized Mobile Radio (SMR) Licensees AGENCY: Federal Communications...EA)-based 800 MHz Specialized Mobile Radio (SMR) licensees to exceed a legacy channel...EA)-based 800 MHz Specialized Mobile Radio (SMR) licensees in the...

  16. Comprehensive measurements of t-channel single top-quark production cross sections at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This article presents measurements of the t-channel single top-quark (t) and top-antiquark ([bar over t]) total production cross sections ?(tq) and ?(t¯q), their ratio R[subscript t]=?(tq)/?([bar over t] q), and a measurement ...

  17. Radio Hazard Safety Assessment for Marine Ship Transmitters: Measurements Using a New Data Collection Method and Comparison with ICNIRP and ARPANSA Limits.

    PubMed

    Halgamuge, Malka N

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the levels of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMFs) emitted from marine ship transmitters. In this study, we recorded the radio frequency (RF) electric field (EF) levels emitted from transmitters from a marine vessel focusing on the areas normally occupied by crew members and passengers. Previous studies considered radiation hazard safety assessment for marine vessels with a limited number of transmitters, such as very high-frequency (VHF) transceivers, radar and communication transmitters. In our investigation, EF levels from seven radio transmitters were measured, including: VHF, medium frequency/high frequency (MF/HF), satellite communication (Sat-Com C), AISnavigation, radar X-band and radar S-band. Measurements were carried out in a 40 m-long, three-level ship (upper deck, bridge deck and bridge roof) at 12 different locations. We developed a new data-collection protocol and performed it under 11 different scenarios to observe and measure the radiation emissions from all of the transmitters. In total, 528 EF field measurements were collected and averaged over all three levels of the marine ship with RF transmitters: the measured electric fields were the lowest on the upper deck (0.82-0.86 V/m), the highest on the bridge roof (2.15-3.70 V/m) and in between on the bridge deck (0.47-1.15 V/m). The measured EF levels were then assessed for compliance with the occupational and general public reference levels of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) standards. The ICNIRP and the ARPANSA limits for the general public were exceeded on the bridge roof; nevertheless, the occupational limits were respected everywhere. The measured EF levels, hence, complied with the ICNIRP guidelines and the ARPANSA standards. In this paper, we provide a new data collection model for future surveys, which could be conducted with larger samples to verify our observations. Furthermore, this new method could be useful as a reference for researchers and industry professionals without direct access to the necessary equipment. PMID:25996887

  18. Radio Hazard Safety Assessment for Marine Ship Transmitters: Measurements Using a New Data Collection Method and Comparison with ICNIRP and ARPANSA Limits

    PubMed Central

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the levels of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMFs) emitted from marine ship transmitters. In this study, we recorded the radio frequency (RF) electric field (EF) levels emitted from transmitters from a marine vessel focusing on the areas normally occupied by crew members and passengers. Previous studies considered radiation hazard safety assessment for marine vessels with a limited number of transmitters, such as very high-frequency (VHF) transceivers, radar and communication transmitters. In our investigation, EF levels from seven radio transmitters were measured, including: VHF, medium frequency/high frequency (MF/HF), satellite communication (Sat-Com C), AISnavigation, radar X-band and radar S-band. Measurements were carried out in a 40 m-long, three-level ship (upper deck, bridge deck and bridge roof) at 12 different locations. We developed a new data-collection protocol and performed it under 11 different scenarios to observe and measure the radiation emissions from all of the transmitters. In total, 528 EF field measurements were collected and averaged over all three levels of the marine ship with RF transmitters: the measured electric fields were the lowest on the upper deck (0.82–0.86 V/m), the highest on the bridge roof (2.15–3.70 V/m) and in between on the bridge deck (0.47–1.15 V/m). The measured EF levels were then assessed for compliance with the occupational and general public reference levels of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) standards. The ICNIRP and the ARPANSA limits for the general public were exceeded on the bridge roof; nevertheless, the occupational limits were respected everywhere. The measured EF levels, hence, complied with the ICNIRP guidelines and the ARPANSA standards. In this paper, we provide a new data collection model for future surveys, which could be conducted with larger samples to verify our observations. Furthermore, this new method could be useful as a reference for researchers and industry professionals without direct access to the necessary equipment. PMID:25996887

  19. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  20. Integrated microchip incorporating atomic magnetometer and microfluidic channel for NMR and MRI

    DOEpatents

    Ledbetter, Micah P. (Oakland, CA); Savukov, Igor M. (Los Alamos, NM); Budker, Dmitry (El Cerrito, CA); Shah, Vishal K. (Plainsboro, NJ); Knappe, Svenja (Boulder, CO); Kitching, John (Boulder, CO); Michalak, David J. (Berkeley, CA); Xu, Shoujun (Houston, TX); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-08-09

    An integral microfluidic device includes an alkali vapor cell and microfluidic channel, which can be used to detect magnetism for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Small magnetic fields in the vicinity of the vapor cell can be measured by optically polarizing and probing the spin precession in the small magnetic field. This can then be used to detect the magnetic field of in encoded analyte in the adjacent microfluidic channel. The magnetism in the microfluidic channel can be modulated by applying an appropriate series of radio or audio frequency pulses upstream from the microfluidic chip (the remote detection modality) to yield a sensitive means of detecting NMR and MRI.

  1. 47 CFR 73.21 - Classes of AM broadcast channels and stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Classes of AM broadcast channels and stations. 73.21 Section 73.21 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.21 Classes of AM broadcast channels and stations. (a) Clear channel. A clear channel...

  2. A search for ultrahigh-energy neutrinos and measurement of cosmic ray radio emission with the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Stephen Lam Douglas

    2010-11-01

    New astronomical messengers may reveal unexpected aspects of the Universe and have often provided a unique source of fresh physical insights. Neutrinos are a promising new messenger particle, capable of carrying information from otherwise inaccessible sources. The ANtarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) seeks to make the first detection of an ultrahigh-energy (E > 1018 eV) neutrino flux. Such a neutrino flux almost certainly exists, produced in interactions of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays with photons from the cosmic microwave background. ANITA is a balloon payload which monitors large volumes of the Antarctic ice sheet from an altitude of 38 km. An ultrahigh-energy neutrino which interacts in the ice sheet will produce a particle shower which will coherently radiate Cherenkov radiation in radio wavelengths (<3 GHz). Antennas on the balloon payload can then detect the resulting impulsive radio signal. The full ANITA flew for the first time from 15 December 2006 to 19 January 2007. In this dissertation, I will describe the ground calibration system used to transmit calibration signals to the payload in-flight. I will then describe techniques for analysis of ANITA data and give limits on the ultrahigh-energy neutrino flux implied by the null result of that analysis. Finally, I will demonstrate that ANITA is also sensitive to ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and show the detection of 16 ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray events during ANITA's first flight. This constitutes the highest frequency and widest bandwidth radio observations of cosmic-ray emission to date I show the average waveform and spectrum of these events and describe their polarization properties, which are strongly correlated with the geomagnetic field.

  3. A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion for Z pinch plasmas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qingguo; Li Zeren; Chen Guanhua; Ye Yan; Huang Xianbin; Cai Hongchun; Li Jing; Xiao Shali

    2012-01-15

    A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion (i.e., the linear dispersion of this spectrograph is a constant) is described for measuring the x-ray spectra emission from the hot, dense Al Z pinch plasmas. The spectrograph uses double uniform-dispersed crystals (e.g., a Quartz 1010 crystal and a Mica 002 crystal) as dispersion elements and a double-film box as detector to achieve the simultaneous recording of the time integrated spectrum covering a wide spectral range of {approx}5-9 A. Since this spectrograph disperse the x-rays on the detector plane with uniform spacing for every wavelength, it needs not the calibration of the wavelength with spatial coordinate, thereby own the advantages of easiness and veracity for spectra identification. The design of this spectrograph and the example of experiment on the ''Yang'' accelerator are presented.

  4. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Han, X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. Li, E. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-07-15

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104–168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ?500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented.

  5. A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion for Z pinch plasmas measurement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingguo; Li, Zeren; Chen, Guanhua; Ye, Yan; Huang, Xianbin; Cai, Hongchun; Li, Jing; Xiao, Shali

    2012-01-01

    A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion (i.e., the linear dispersion of this spectrograph is a constant) is described for measuring the x-ray spectra emission from the hot, dense Al Z pinch plasmas. The spectrograph uses double uniform-dispersed crystals (e.g., a Quartz 1010 crystal and a Mica 002 crystal) as dispersion elements and a double-film box as detector to achieve the simultaneous recording of the time integrated spectrum covering a wide spectral range of ~5-9 A?. Since this spectrograph disperse the x-rays on the detector plane with uniform spacing for every wavelength, it needs not the calibration of the wavelength with spatial coordinate, thereby own the advantages of easiness and veracity for spectra identification. The design of this spectrograph and the example of experiment on the "Yang" accelerator are presented. PMID:22299928

  6. Measurement of the lifetime of the Bc+/- meson in the semileptonic decay channel.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G

    2009-03-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, we measure the lifetime of the Bc+/- meson in the Bc-/+-->J/psimicro+/-+X final state. A simultaneous unbinned likelihood fit to the J/psi+micro invariant mass and lifetime distributions yields a signal of 881+/-80(stat) candidates and a lifetime measurement of tau(Bc+/-)=0.448(-0.036)(+0.038)(stat)+/-0.032(syst) ps. PMID:19392512

  7. Laboratory measurements of wave height variations and currents along a steep-sided channel 

    E-print Network

    Way, Francis

    2000-01-01

    surface piercing wave gages. Particle velocities were measured at 49 positions with a side looking three-dimensional acoustic Doppler velocimeter. A spectral analysis was performed on each free surface time series to obtain H[m]?, as well as first...

  8. Measurement of the electronic thermal conductance channels and heat capacity of graphene at low temperature

    E-print Network

    opto-electronics, plasmonics, and ultra-sensitive bolometry. Here we present measurements of bipolar con- ductance over a temperature range of 300 mK to 100 K, using three different sample configurations of 10-20 J/K at 300 mK, which is 9 times smaller than the previous record[15]. For higher temperatures

  9. Measuring the impedance of the active electrode of a single channel cochlear implant in situ.

    PubMed

    Hrubý, J; Klier, E; Picka, J; Sedlák, S; Betka, J; Valvoda, M

    1988-10-01

    A number of failures of extracochlear implants are caused by a bad contact between the active electrode and the tissue. A novel and simple method has been developed to enable the impedance of the active electrode to be measured before completion of surgery. PMID:3236876

  10. Top quark mass measurement in the lepton plus jets channel using a modified matrix element method

    E-print Network

    Xie, Si

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass, m_t, obtained from pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. We analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ...

  11. 78 FR 27306 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, Arkansas, and Cleveland, Mississippi

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, Arkansas, and Cleveland, Mississippi AGENCY... Delta Radio Network, LLC, substitutes FM Channel 224A for 289A at Dermott, Arkansas, and substitutes FM... CFR part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez,...

  12. Throughput Optimal Switching in Multi-channel WLANs

    E-print Network

    Liu, Mingyan

    policy, stability region, throughput optimality ! 1 INTRODUCTION Advances in software defined radio in recent years have motivated numerous studies on building agile, channel-aware transceivers of making effec- tive opportunistic channel access and transmission scheduling decisions, as well

  13. Dual-channel photoacoustic hygrometer for airborne measurements: background, calibration, laboratory and in-flight intercomparison tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tátrai, D.; Bozóki, Z.; Smit, H.; Rolf, C.; Spelten, N.; Krämer, M.; Filges, A.; Gerbig, C.; Gulyás, G.; Szabó, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a tunable diode laser-based dual-channel photoacoustic (PA) humidity measuring system primarily designed for aircraft-based environment research. It is calibrated for total pressure and water vapor (WV) volume mixing ratios (VMRs) possible during airborne applications. WV VMR is calculated by using pressure-dependent calibration curves and a cubic spline interpolation method. Coverage of the entire atmospheric humidity concentration range that might be encountered during airborne measurements is facilitated by applying an automated sensitivity mode switching algorithm. The calibrated PA system was validated through laboratory and airborne intercomparisons, which proved that the repeatability, the estimated accuracy and the response time of the system are 0.5 ppmV or 0.5% of the actual reading (whichever value is the greater), 5% of the actual reading within the VMR range of 1-12 000 ppmV and 2 s, respectively. The upper detection limit of the system is theoretically about 85 000 ppmV, limited only by condensation of water vapor on the walls of the 318 K heated PA cells and inlet lines, and was experimentally verified up to 20 000 ppmV. The unique advantage of the presented system is its applicability for simultaneous water vapor and total water volume mixing ratio measurements.

  14. Dual channel photoacoustic hygrometer for airborne measurements: background, calibration, laboratory and in-flight inter-comparison tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tátrai, D.; Bozóki, Z.; Smit, H.; Rolf, C.; Spelten, N.; Krämer, M.; Filges, A.; Gerbig, C.; Gulyás, G.; Szabó, G.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes a tunable diode laser based dual channel photoacoustic (PA) humidity measuring system called WaSul-Hygro primarily designed for aircraft based environment research. It is calibrated for total pressures and water vapor (WV) volume mixing ratios (VMRs) possible during airborne applications. WV VMR is calculated by using pressure dependent calibration curves and a cubic spline interpolation method. Coverage of the entire atmospheric humidity concentration range which might be encountered during airborne measurements is facilitated by applying an automated sensitivity mode switching algorithm. The calibrated PA system was validated through laboratory and airborne inter-comparisons, which proved that the repeatability, the estimated accuracy and the response time of the system is 0.5 ppmV or 0.5% of the actual reading (whichever value is the greater), 5% of the actual reading within the VMR range of 1-12 000 ppmV and 2 s, respectively. The upper detection limit of the system is about 85 000 ppmV, limited only by condensation of water vapor on the walls of the 318 K heated PA cells and inlet lines. The unique advantage of the presented system is its applicability for simultaneous water vapor and total water volume mixing ratio measurements.

  15. Increasing Accuracy: A New Design and Algorithm for Automatically Measuring Weights, Travel Direction and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) of Penguins.

    PubMed

    Afanasyev, Vsevolod; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Dunn, Michael J; Robst, Jeremy; Preston, Mark; Bremner, Steve F; Briggs, Dirk R; Brown, Ruth; Adlard, Stacey; Peat, Helen J

    2015-01-01

    A fully automated weighbridge using a new algorithm and mechanics integrated with a Radio Frequency Identification System is described. It is currently in use collecting data on Macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) at Bird Island, South Georgia. The technology allows researchers to collect very large, highly accurate datasets of both penguin weight and direction of their travel into or out of a breeding colony, providing important contributory information to help understand penguin breeding success, reproductive output and availability of prey. Reliable discrimination between single and multiple penguin crossings is demonstrated. Passive radio frequency tags implanted into penguins allow researchers to match weight and trip direction to individual birds. Low unit and operation costs, low maintenance needs, simple operator requirements and accurate time stamping of every record are all important features of this type of weighbridge, as is its proven ability to operate 24 hours a day throughout a breeding season, regardless of temperature or weather conditions. Users are able to define required levels of accuracy by adjusting filters and raw data are automatically recorded and stored allowing for a range of processing options. This paper presents the underlying principles, design specification and system description, provides evidence of the weighbridge's accurate performance and demonstrates how its design is a significant improvement on existing systems. PMID:25894763

  16. Increasing Accuracy: A New Design and Algorithm for Automatically Measuring Weights, Travel Direction and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) of Penguins

    PubMed Central

    Afanasyev, Vsevolod; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Dunn, Michael J.; Robst, Jeremy; Preston, Mark; Bremner, Steve F.; Briggs, Dirk R.; Brown, Ruth; Adlard, Stacey; Peat, Helen J.

    2015-01-01

    A fully automated weighbridge using a new algorithm and mechanics integrated with a Radio Frequency Identification System is described. It is currently in use collecting data on Macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) at Bird Island, South Georgia. The technology allows researchers to collect very large, highly accurate datasets of both penguin weight and direction of their travel into or out of a breeding colony, providing important contributory information to help understand penguin breeding success, reproductive output and availability of prey. Reliable discrimination between single and multiple penguin crossings is demonstrated. Passive radio frequency tags implanted into penguins allow researchers to match weight and trip direction to individual birds. Low unit and operation costs, low maintenance needs, simple operator requirements and accurate time stamping of every record are all important features of this type of weighbridge, as is its proven ability to operate 24 hours a day throughout a breeding season, regardless of temperature or weather conditions. Users are able to define required levels of accuracy by adjusting filters and raw data are automatically recorded and stored allowing for a range of processing options. This paper presents the underlying principles, design specification and system description, provides evidence of the weighbridge’s accurate performance and demonstrates how its design is a significant improvement on existing systems. PMID:25894763

  17. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one- and two-proton transfer reactions for the 28Si + 90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Sandal, Rohit; Chakraborty, Santosh; Verma, Shashi; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one- and two-proton stripping reactions for 28Si + 90,94Zr systems were performed at 120 MeV. The experiment was carried out with the 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. The theoretical calculations were performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code fresco. The distorted wave Born approximation calculations reproduced the experimental angular distributions for the one-proton transfer channel for both the systems reasonably well but failed for the two-proton transfer channel. Coupled channels calculations including various intermediate states (involving target and projectile inelastic excitations before and/or after transfer) along with the sequential transfer were able to reproduce the two-proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It seems that at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, there is significant contribution of the indirect multistep and sequential transfer to the two-proton stripping reaction.

  18. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  19. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus.

    PubMed

    Nocente, M; Cazzaniga, C; Tardocchi, M; Binda, F; Eriksson, J; Giacomelli, L; Muraro, A; Rebai, M; Sharapov, S; Gorini, G

    2015-10-01

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices. PMID:26520949

  20. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Binda, F.; Eriksson, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Muraro, A.; Rebai, M.; Sharapov, S.; Gorini, G.

    2015-10-01

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices.

  1. Measurement of macroscopic plasma parameters with a radio experiment: Interpretation of the quasi-thermal noise spectrum observed in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couturier, P.; Hoang, S.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Steinberg, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The ISEE-3 SBH radio receiver has provided the first systematic observations of the quasi-thermal (plasma waves) noise in the solar wind plasma. The theoretical interpretation of that noise involves the particle distribution function so that electric noise measurements with long antennas provide a fast and independent method of measuring plasma parameters: densities and temperatures of a two component (core and halo) electron distribution function have been obtained in that way. The polarization of that noise is frequency dependent and sensitive to the drift velocity of the electron population. Below the plasma frequency, there is evidence of a weak noise spectrum with spectral index -1 which is not yet accounted for by the theory. The theoretical treatment of the noise associated with the low energy (thermal) proton population shows that the moving electrical antenna radiates in the surrounding plasma by Carenkov emission which becomes predominant at the low frequencies, below about 0.1 F sub P.

  2. Analysis of type 3 solar radio bursts observed at kilometric wavelengths from the OGO-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, H.

    1971-01-01

    Research was conducted to analyze the data on solar radio bursts obtained by the OGO-5 satellite. Since the wavelengths corresponding to the three lowest frequencies of observations exceeded one kilometer, the bursts detected in those channels were designated as kilometer-waves. The data search covered approximately 9200 hours between March 1968 and February 1970, and included the maximum of solar cycle No. 20. The study concentrated on 64 Type 3 solar radio events reaching frequencies equal or lower than 0.35 MHz. This selection criteria led to the choice of the most intense radio events. Measurements included: times of start, times of decay, and amplitudes of the 64 events. The consistency of the results, within the accuracy of the measurements, lends support to some of the assumptions made for the analysis, notably, the validity of the local plasma hypothesis, the constancy of the exciter particles velocity, and spiral shape of their trajectory.

  3. Measurement of the top quark mass with the template method in the tbar{t} tolepton+jets channel using ATLAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.

    2012-06-01

    The top quark mass has been measured using the template method in the tbar{t}tolepton+jets channel based on data recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The data were taken at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of ?{s}=7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb-1. The analyses in the e+jets and ?+jets decay channels yield consistent results. The top quark mass is measured to be m top=174.5±0.6stat±2.3syst GeV.

  4. 77 FR 2241 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... by Rocket Radio, Inc., proposes the allotment of FM Channel 287C2 at Williams, Arizona, as the..., Flour Mill Building, Washington, DC 20007-3501 (Counsel to Rocket Radio, Inc.); and Scott R. Flick,...

  5. Do car-mounted mobile measurements used for radio-frequency spectrum regulation have an application for exposure assessments in epidemiological studies?

    PubMed

    Bolte, John F B; Maslanyj, Myron; Addison, Darren; Mee, Terry; Kamer, Jos; Colussi, Loek

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the spatial and temporal trends in environmental exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields is important in studies investigating whether there are associated health effects on humans and ecological effects on plants and animals. The main objective of this study is to assess whether the RFeye car-mounted mobile measurement system used for radio frequency spectrum monitoring in The Netherlands and the United Kingdom could be of value in assessing exposure over large areas as an alternative to measuring exposure with personal exposure meters or using complex modelling techniques. We evaluated the responses of various body-worn personal exposure meters in comparison with the mobile measurement system for spectrum monitoring. The comparison was restricted to downlink mobile communication in the GSM900 and GSM1800 frequency bands. Repeated measurements were performed in three areas in Cambridge, United Kingdom and in three areas in Amersfoort, The Netherlands. We found that exposure assessments through the car-mounted measurements are at least of similar quality to exposure modelling and better than the body worn exposimeter data due to the absence of the shielding effect. The main conclusion is that the mobile measurements provide an efficient and low cost alternative particularly in mapping large areas. PMID:26540087

  6. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, L. Peebles, W. A.; Ruskov, E.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Tuszewski, M.; Douglass, J.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2014-11-15

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range k?{sub s} ? 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ? f ? 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3–5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10{sup 13} ? n{sub e} ? 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup ?3}, and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  7. Comparison of the PLTEMP code flow instability predictions with measurements made with electrically heated channels for the advanced test reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, E.

    2011-06-09

    When the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) was designed in the 1960s the potential for fuel element burnout by a phenomenon referred to at that time as 'autocatalytic vapor binding' was of serious concern. This type of burnout was observed to occur at power levels considerably lower than those that were known to cause critical heat flux. The conversion of the MURR from HEU fuel to LEU fuel will probably require significant design changes, such as changes in coolant channel thicknesses, that could affect the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor core. Therefore, the redesign of the MURR to accommodate an LEU core must address the same issues of fuel element burnout that were of concern in the 1960s. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was designed at about the same time as the MURR and had similar concerns with regard to fuel element burnout. These concerns were addressed in the ATR by two groups of thermal-hydraulic tests that employed electrically heated simulated fuel channels. The Croft (1964), Reference 1, tests were performed at ANL. The Waters (1966), Reference 2, tests were performed at Hanford Laboratories in Richland Washington. Since fuel element surface temperatures rise rapidly as burnout conditions are approached, channel surface temperatures were carefully monitored in these experiments. For self-protection, the experimental facilities were designed to cut off the electric power when rapidly increasing surface temperatures were detected. In both the ATR reactor and in the tests with electrically heated channels, the heated length of the fuel plate was 48 inches, which is about twice that of the MURR. Whittle and Forgan (1967) independently conducted tests with electrically heated rectangular channels that were similar to the tests by Croft and by Walters. In the Whittle and Forgan tests the heated length of the channel varied among the tests and was between 16 and 24 inches. Both Waters and Whittle and Forgan show that the cause of the fuel element burnout is due to a form of flow instability. Whittle and Forgan provide a formula that predicts when this flow instability will occur. This formula is included in the PLTEMP/ANL code.Error! Reference source not found. Olson has shown that the PLTEMP/ANL code accurately predicts the powers at which flow instability occurs in the Whittle and Forgan experiments. He also considered the electrically heated tests performed in the ANS Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop at ORNL and report by M. Siman-Tov et al. The purpose of this memorandum is to demonstrate that the PLTEMP/ANL code accurately predicts the Croft and the Waters tests. This demonstration should provide sufficient confidence that the PLTEMP/ANL code can adequately predict the onset of flow instability for the converted MURR. The MURR core uses light water as a coolant, has a 24-inch active fuel length, downward flow in the core, and an average core velocity of about 7 m/s. The inlet temperature is about 50 C and the peak outlet is about 20 C higher than the inlet for reactor operation at 10 MW. The core pressures range from about 4 to about 5 bar. The peak heat flux is about 110 W/cm{sup 2}. Section 2 describes the mechanism that causes flow instability. Section 3 describes the Whittle and Forgan formula for flow instability. Section 4 briefly describes both the Croft and the Waters experiments. Section 5 describes the PLTEMP/ANL models. Section 6 compares the PLTEMP/ANL predictions based on the Whittle and Forgan formula with the Croft measurements. Section 7 does the same for the Waters measurements. Section 8 provides the range of parameters for the Whittle and Forgan tests. Section 9 discusses the results and provides conclusions. In conclusion, although there is no single test that by itself closely matches the limiting conditions in the MURR, the preponderance of measured data and the ability of the Whittle and Forgan correlation, as implemented in PLTEMP/ANL, to predict the onset of flow instability for these tests leads one to the conclusion that the same method should be able to predict the

  8. Optimal Performance Monitoring of Hybrid Mid-Infrared Wavelength MIMO Free Space Optical and RF Wireless Networks in Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Barnet Michael

    An optimal performance monitoring metric for a hybrid free space optical and radio-frequency (RF) wireless network, the Outage Capacity Objective Function, is analytically developed and studied. Current and traditional methods of performance monitoring of both optical and RF wireless networks are centered on measurement of physical layer parameters, the most common being signal-to-noise ratio, error rate, Q factor, and eye diagrams, occasionally combined with link-layer measurements such as data throughput, retransmission rate, and/or lost packet rate. Network management systems frequently attempt to predict or forestall network failures by observing degradations of these parameters and to attempt mitigation (such as offloading traffic, increasing transmitter power, reducing the data rate, or combinations thereof) prior to the failure. These methods are limited by the frequent low sensitivity of the physical layer parameters to the atmospheric optical conditions (measured by optical signal-to-noise ratio) and the radio frequency fading channel conditions (measured by signal-to-interference ratio). As a result of low sensitivity, measurements of this type frequently are unable to predict impending failures sufficiently in advance for the network management system to take corrective action prior to the failure. We derive and apply an optimal measure of hybrid network performance based on the outage capacity of the hybrid optical and RF channel, the outage capacity objective function. The objective function provides high sensitivity and reliable failure prediction, and considers both the effects of atmospheric optical impairments on the performance of the free space optical segment as well as the effect of RF channel impairments on the radio frequency segment. The radio frequency segment analysis considers the three most common RF channel fading statistics: Rayleigh, Ricean, and Nakagami-m. The novel application of information theory to the underlying physics of the gamma-gamma optical channel and radio fading channels in determining the joint hybrid channel outage capacity provides the best performance estimate under any given set of operating conditions. It is shown that, unlike traditional physical layer performance monitoring techniques, the objective function based upon the outage capacity of the hybrid channel at any combination of OSNR and SIR, is able to predict channel degradation and failure well in advance of the actual outage. An outage in the information-theoretic definition occurs when the offered load exceeds the outage capacity under the current conditions of OSNR and SIR. The optical channel is operated at the "long" mid-infrared wavelength of 10000 nm. which provides improved resistance to scattering compared to shorter wavelengths such as 1550 nm.

  9. The use of visible-channel data from NOAA satellites to measure total ozone amount over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boime, Robert D.; Warren, Steven G.; Gruber, Arnold

    1994-01-01

    Accurate, detailed maps of total ozone were not available until the launch of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) in late 1978. However, the Scanning Radiometer (SR), an instrument on board the NOAA series satellites during the 1970s, had a visible channel that overlapped closely with the Chappuis absorption band of ozone. We are investigating whether data from the SR can be used to map Antarctic ozone prior to 1978. The method is being developed with 1980s data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), which succeeded the SR on the NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. Visible-derived total ozone maps can then be compared able on the NOAA satellites, which precludes the use of a differential absorption technique to measure ozone. Consequently, our method works exclusively over scenes whose albedos are large and unvarying, i.e. scenes that contain ice sheets and/or uniform cloud-cover. Initial comparisons of time series for October-December 1987 at locations in East Antarctica show that the visible absorption by ozone in measurable and that the technique may be usable for the 1970s, but with much less accuracy than TOMS. This initial test assumes that clouds, snow, and ice all reflect the same percentage of visible light towards the satellite, regardless of satellite position or environmental conditions. This assumption is our greatest source of error. To improve the accuracy of ozone retrievals, realistic anisotropic reflectance factors are needed, which are strongly influenced by cloud and snow surface features.

  10. Direct measurement of volume flux in the Faroe-Shetland Channel and over the Iceland-Faroe Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossby, T.; Flagg, C. N.

    2012-04-01

    Determining the exchange of water across the Iceland-Faroe-Scotland ridge is of fundamental interest because it measures the rate of transformation of North Atlantic water into dense water and thus the strength of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). Here we study this exchange by monitoring all water flowing through the area east of Iceland to near the bottom or ˜600 m depth using a 75 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mounted on the high-seas ferry M/F Norröna. Starting in March 2008, currents have been measured in the Faroe-Shetland Channel (FSC) and along the Iceland-Faroe Ridge (IFR) on the ferry's weekly round-trips between Iceland and Denmark. The detided average transports (to the north) across the two sections are 4.1 ± 0.1 Sv (106 m2s-1) through the FSC and 4.4 ± 0.25 Sv across the IFR (this excludes ˜1.6 Sv circulating around the Faroes). The Norröna program is ongoing.

  11. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  12. 76 FR 13524 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications... FM Channel 258A at Willow Creek, California. Channel 258A can be allotted at Willow Creek, consistent... of FM Allotments under California, is amended by adding Channel 258A at Willow Creek....

  13. 47 CFR 95.1011 - Channel use policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channel use policy. 95.1011 Section 95.1011... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1011 Channel use policy. (a) The channels... channels in order to reduce interference and make the most effective use of the authorized...

  14. 47 CFR 95.625 - CB transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CB transmitter channel frequencies. 95.625... SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.625 CB transmitter channel frequencies. (a) The CB transmitter channel frequencies are: Channel No. (MHz) 1 26.965 2 26.975 3 26.985 4...

  15. 47 CFR 95.1309 - Channel use policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channel use policy. 95.1309 Section 95.1309... SERVICES Multi-Use Radio Service (MURS) General Provisions § 95.1309 Channel use policy. (a) The channels... channels in order to reduce interference and make the most effective use of authorized facilities....

  16. 47 CFR 95.627 - FRS unit channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FRS unit channel frequencies. 95.627 Section 95... PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.627 FRS unit channel frequencies. (a) The FRS unit channel frequencies are: Channel No. (MHz) 1 462.5625 2 462.5875 3 462.6125 4 462.6375...

  17. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton plus Jets Channel Using a Modified Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-12-01

    The authors report a measurement of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. They analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 rfb{sup -1}. They select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. They calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter JES that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. They use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. They also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, they find m{sub t} = 172.7 {+-} 1.8 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.2(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. Dynamics and aggregation of the peptide ion channel alamethicin. Measurements using spin-labeled peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, S J; Ellena, J F; Cafiso, D S

    1991-01-01

    Two spin-labeled derivatives of the ion conductive peptide alamethicin were synthesized and used to examine its binding and state of aggregation. One derivative was spin labeled at the C-terminus and the other, a leucine analogue, was spin labeled at the N-terminus. In methanol, both the C and N terminal labeled peptides were monomeric. In aqueous solution, the C-terminal derivative was monomeric at low concentrations, but aggregated at higher concentrations with a critical concentration of 23 microM. In the membrane, the C-terminal label was localized to the membrane-aqueous interface using 13C-NMR, and could assume more than one orientation. The membrane binding of the C-terminal derivative was examined using EPR, and it exhibited a cooperativity seen previously for native alamethicin. However, this cooperativity was not the result of an aggregation of the peptide in the membrane. When the spectra of either the C or N-terminal labeled peptide were examined over a wide range of membrane lipid to peptide ratios, no evidence for aggregation could be found and the peptides remained monomeric under all conditions examined. Because electrical measurements on this peptide provide strong evidence for an ion-conductive aggregate, the ion-conductive form of alamethicin likely represents a minor fraction of the total membrane bound peptide. PMID:1717016

  19. Top quark mass measurement in the lepton plus jets channel using a modified matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Krop, D.; Kwang, S.; Lee, H. S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Wilbur, S.

    2009-04-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, obtained from pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. We analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1}. We select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. We calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. Our event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter JES (jet energy scale) that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. We use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. We also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, we find m{sub t}=172.7{+-}1.8(stat+JES){+-}1.2(syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. 47 CFR 74.702 - Channel assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.702 Channel assignments. (a) An applicant for a new low power TV or...