Science.gov

Sample records for radio frequency energy

  1. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shawn M. Allan; Patricia M. Strickland; Holly S. Shulman

    2009-11-11

    Ceralink Inc. developed FastFuse™, a rapid, new, energy saving process for lamination of glass and composites using radio frequency (RF) heating technology. The Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate the innovation from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. The attached report provides an overview of the technical and commerical progress achieved for FastFuse™ during the course of the project. FastFuse™ has the potential to revolutionize the laminate manufacturing industries by replacing energy intensive, multi-step processes with an energy efficient, single-step process that allows higher throughput. FastFuse™ transmits RF energy directly into the interlayer to generate heat, eliminating the need to directly heat glass layers and the surrounding enclosures, such as autoclaves or vacuum systems. FastFuse™ offers lower start-up and energy costs (up to 90% or more reduction in energy costs), and faster cycles times (less than 5 minutes). FastFuse™ is compatible with EVA, TPU, and PVB interlayers, and has been demonstrated for glass, plastics, and multi-material structures such as photovoltaics and transparent armor.

  2. Radio-frequency energy quantification in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Leeor

    Mapping of radio frequency (RF) energy deposition has been challenging for 50+ years, especially, when scanning patients in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. As result, electromagnetic simulation software is often used for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR), the rate of RF energy deposition in tissue. The thesis work presents challenges associated with aligning information provided by electromagnetic simulation and MRI experiments. As result of the limitations of simulations, experimental methods for the quantification of SAR were established. A system for quantification of the total RF energy deposition was developed for parallel transmit MRI (a system that uses multiple antennas to excite and image the body). The system is capable of monitoring and predicting channel-by-channel RF energy deposition, whole body SAR and capable of tracking potential hardware failures that occur in the transmit chain and may cause the deposition of excessive energy into patients. Similarly, we demonstrated that local RF power deposition can be mapped and predicted for parallel transmit systems based on a series of MRI temperature mapping acquisitions. Resulting from the work, we developed tools for optimal reconstruction temperature maps from MRI acquisitions. The tools developed for temperature mapping paved the way for utilizing MRI as a diagnostic tool for evaluation of RF/microwave emitting device safety. Quantification of the RF energy was demonstrated for both MRI compatible and non-MRI-compatible devices (such as cell phones), while having the advantage of being noninvasive, of providing millimeter resolution and high accuracy.

  3. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  4. Radio-frequency and microwave energies, magnetic and electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaelson, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    The biological effects of radio frequency, including microwave, radiation are considered. Effects on body temperature, the eye, reproductive systems, internal organs, blood cells, the cardiovascular system, and the central nervous system are included. Generalized effects of electric and magnetic fields are also discussed. Experimentation with animals and clinical studies on humans are cited, and possible mechanisms of the effects observed are suggested.

  5. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio-Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, Holly S.; Allan, Shawn M.

    2009-11-11

    This Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate Ceralink's energy saving process for flat glass lamination from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. Radio-frequency heating was any un-explored option for laminating glass prior to this program. With significant commercial success through time and energy savings in the wood, paper, and plastics industries, RF heating was found to have significant promise for the energy intensive glass lamination industry. A major technical goal of the program was to demonstrate RF lamination across a wide range of laminate sizes and materials. This was successfully accomplished, dispelling many skeptics' concerns about the abilities of the technology. Ceralink laminated panels up to 2 ft x 3 ft, with four sets processed simultaneously, in a 3 minute cycle. All major categories of interlayer materials were found to work with RF lamination. In addition to laminating glass, other materials including photovoltaic silicon solar cells, light emitting diodes, metallized glass, plastics (acrylic and polycarbonate), and ceramics (alumina) were found compatible with the RF process. This opens up a wide range of commercial opportunities beyond the initially targeted automotive industry. The dramatic energy savings reported for RF lamination at the bench scale were found to be maintained through the scale up of the process. Even at 2 ft x 3 ft panel sizes, energy savings are estimated to be at least 90% compared to autoclaving or vacuum lamination. With targeted promotion through conference presentations, press releases and internet presence, RF lamination has gained significant attention, drawing large audiences at American Ceramic Society meetings. The commercialization success of the project includes the establishment of a revenue-generating business model for providing process development and demonstrations for potential RF lamination users. A path to industrial energy benefits and revenue through industrial equipment sales was established in a partnership with Thermex Thermatron, a manufacturer of RF equipment.

  6. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  7. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D. (Orinda, CA); Fugitt, Jock A. (Berkeley, CA); Howard, Donald R. (Danville, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  8. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Shawn M.

    2012-02-27

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less capital cost and smaller footprint. Concepts for curved lamination identifying castable molds for

  9. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Shawn M.; Baranova, Inessa; Poley, Joseph; Reis, Henrique

    2012-02-27

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North America. The second task dealt with a study of current lamination processes in the various laminate industries, and development of concepts for integrating RF lamination into new or existing processes. The third task explored the use of a non-destructive technique for analyzing laminate adhesion with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The fourth task focused on developing concepts for curved glass lamination using RF lamination. The fifth and sixth tasks together comprised an analysis of laminate product markets, ranking for applicability and commercialization potential, and the development of commercialization strategies for those products. In addition, throughout the project as new experimental data and conventional process data were obtained, the benefits analysis of RF lamination was refined. The goals of the project described above were achieved, positioning RF lamination for the next stage growth envisioned in the original Industrial Grand Challenge proposal. Working with Pilkington North America, lamination of flat autoglass with PVB was achieved, meeting all 16 stringent industry tests. In particular, PVB laminates made with RF lamination passed environmental tests including the high temperature, 120 ���°C bake test, without significant formation of bubbles (defects). The adhesion of PVB to glass was measured using the pummel method. Adhesion values ranging from 1 to 7 out of 10 were obtained. The significant process parameters affecting the environmental and adhesion performance were identified through a designed experiment. Pre-lamination process variables including PVB storage humidity and the de-airing process (vacuum or nip rolling) were significant, as well as the level of pressure applied to the laminate during the RF process. Analysis of manufacturing with RF lamination equipment, based on the processes developed indicated that 3 RF presses could replace a typical auto-industry autoclave to achieve equal or greater throughput with possibly less capital cost and smaller footprint. Concepts for curved lamination id

  10. Radio-frequency radiation energy transfer in an ionospheric layer with random small-scale inhomogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Zabotin, N.A.

    1994-06-01

    The equation of radiation energy balance in a randomly inhomogeneous plane-stratified plasma layer was derived based on the phenomenological approach. The use of the small-angle scattering approximation in the invariate ray coordinates allows it to be transformed into a drift-type equation. The latter describes the deformation of the spatial distribution of the radio-frequency radiation energy due to multiple scattering by anisotropic inhomogeneities. Two effects are investigated numerically: shift of the radio wave arrival angles under a slightly oblique propagation, and variation of the intensity of the radio-frequency radiation reflected from a plasma layer.

  11. Impact of Mobile Transmitter Sources on Radio Frequency Wireless Energy Harvesting

    E-print Network

    Sanyal, Sugata

    1 Impact of Mobile Transmitter Sources on Radio Frequency Wireless Energy Harvesting Antonio Organization, Tata Consultancy Services, India. Abstract--Wireless energy harvesting sensor networks consti battery resource, but are able to re-charge themselves through directed electromagnetic energy transfer

  12. METHODS OF RADIO-FREQUENCY CURRENT DRIVE

    E-print Network

    -670 Radio-frequency waves can penetrate thermonuclear plasmas, depositing momentum and energy with great. INTRODUCTION Using radio-frequency (rf) waves to drive the toroidal current in tokamak reactors is attractiveMETHODS OF RADIO-FREQUENCY CURRENT DRIVE N. J. FISCH* Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

  13. SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID)

    E-print Network

    May 2007 SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID) SYSTEMS SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID) SYSTEMS Karen Scarfone, EditorKaren Scarfone, Editor Computer Security Division of Standards and Technology National Institute of Standards and Technology RFID is a form of automatic

  14. Energy harvesting of radio frequency and vibration energy to enable wireless sensor monitoring of civil infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galchev, Tzeno; McCullagh, James; Peterson, Rebecca L.; Najafi, Khalil; Mortazawi, Amir

    2011-04-01

    To power distributed wireless sensor networks on bridges, traditional power cables or battery replacement are excessively expensive or infeasible. This project develops two power harvesting technologies. First, a novel parametric frequency-increased generator (PFIG) is developed. The fabricated PFIG harvests the non-periodic and unprecedentedly low frequency (DC to 30 Hz) and low acceleration (0.55-9.8 m/s2) mechanical energy available on bridges with an average power > 2 ?W. Prototype power conversion and storage electronics were designed and the harvester system was used to charge a capacitor from arbitrary bridge-like vibrations. Second, an RF scavenger operating at medium and shortwave frequencies has been designed and tested. Power scavenging at MHz frequencies allows for lower antenna directivities, reducing sensitivity to antenna positioning. Furthermore, ambient RF signals at these frequencies have higher power levels away from cities and residential areas compared to the UHF and SHF bands utilized for cellular communication systems. An RF power scavenger operating at 1 MHz along with power management and storage circuitry has been demonstrated. It powers a LED at a distance of 10 km from AM radio stations.

  15. Radio Frequency & Microwave Energy for the Petro Chemical Industry 

    E-print Network

    Raburn, R.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-Magnetic Energy has finally made its way into the Petro-Chemical market twenty-five years after market acceptance in the Food Processing Industry. Major factors influencing this change are tighter environmental regulations, price competition...

  16. Treatment protocol development for disinfesting legumes using radio frequency energy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A pilot-scale 27 MHz, 6 kW RF unit was used to investigate RF heating and consequent quality attributes in three treated legumes. Only 5-7 min was needed to raise the central temperature of 3 kg samples to 60°C using RF energy, compared to more than 275 min when using forced hot air at 60°C. RF heat...

  17. Transition radiation at radio frequencies from ultra-high energy neutrino-induced showers

    E-print Network

    Pavel Motloch; Jaime Alvarez-Muñiz; Paolo Privitera; Enrique Zas

    2015-09-04

    Coherent radiation at radio frequencies from high-energy showers fully contained in a dense radio-transparent medium - like ice, salt or regolith - has been extensively investigated as a promising technique to search for ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos. Additional emission in the form of transition radiation may occur when a neutrino-induced shower produced close to the Earth surface emerges from the ground into atmospheric air. We present the first detailed evaluation of transition radiation from high-energy showers crossing the boundary between two different media. We found that transition radiation is sizable over a wide solid angle and coherent up to $\\sim$ 1 GHz. These properties encourage further work to evaluate the potential of a large-aperture UHE neutrino experiment based on detection of transition radiation.

  18. LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF PICOFLARE CATEGORY ENERGY RELEASES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, R.; Sasikumar Raja, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Satya Narayanan, A.

    2013-01-10

    We report low-frequency (80 MHz) radio observations of circularly polarized non-thermal type I radio bursts ({sup n}oise storms{sup )} in the solar corona whose estimated energy is {approx}10{sup 21} erg. These are the weakest energy release events reported to date in the solar atmosphere. The plot of the distribution of the number of bursts (dN) versus their corresponding peak flux density in the range S to S+dS shows a power-law behavior, i.e., dN {proportional_to} S {sup {gamma}} dS. The power-law index {gamma} is in the range -2.2 to -2.7 for the events reported in the present work. The present results provide independent observational evidence for the existence of picoflare category energy releases in the solar atmosphere which are yet to be explored.

  19. Transition radiation at radio frequencies from ultra-high energy neutrino-induced showers

    E-print Network

    Motloch, Pavel; Privitera, Paolo; Zas, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Coherent radiation at radio frequencies from high-energy showers fully contained in a dense radio-transparent medium - like ice, salt or regolith - has been extensively investigated as a promising technique to search for ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos. Additional emission in the form of transition radiation may occur when a neutrino-induced shower produced close to the Earth surface emerges from the ground into atmospheric air. We present the first detailed evaluation of transition radiation from high-energy showers crossing the boundary between two different media. We found that transition radiation is sizable over a wide solid angle and coherent up to $\\sim$ 1 GHz. These properties encourage further work to evaluate the potential of a large-aperture UHE neutrino experiment based on detection of transition radiation.

  20. Antenna and rectifier designs for miniaturized radio frequency energy scavenging systems 

    E-print Network

    Ding, Yi

    2015-11-26

    With ample radio transmitters scattered throughout urban landscape, RF energy scavenging emerges as a promising approach to extract energy from propagating radio waves in the ambient environment to continuously charge ...

  1. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L. (Kingston, TN)

    1989-01-17

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  2. Development of Equipment to Separate Nonthermal and Thermal Effects of Radio Frequency Energy on Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Geveke; M. Kozempel; C. Brunkhorst

    1999-11-01

    A radio frequency (RF) dielectric heater has been developed for isolating thermal and nonthermal effects of RF energy on microorganisms in liquid foods. The modified heater enables the simultaneous application of RF energy and removal of thermal energy from the liquids. A double-pipe heat exchanger is an integral part of the heater. The outer pipe is made of Teflon. The inner pipe is made of stainless steel that is grounded in the RF circuit. Liquid food flows through the annular region between the two concentric pipes. Cooling water flows through the stainless steel pipe. The food in the annular region absorbs the RF energy. Concurrently, the cooling water flowing in the inner pipe removes the thermal energy from the food, thus controlling the temperature.

  3. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  4. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: IITRI RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radio frequency heating (RFH) technologies use electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency (RF) band to heat soil in situ, thereby potentially enhancing the performance of standard soil vapor extraction (SVE) technologies. Contaminants are removed from in situ soils and transfe...

  5. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Quentin A. (Bloomingdale, IL); Miller, Harold W. (Winfield, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  6. Modular System Concept For Soil Heating Using Radio-Frequency Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Frank; Lippik, Dirk; Heimbold, Tilo; Roland, Ulf; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Schenk, Joachim

    2010-06-01

    Soil is one of the most important natural resources and its exploitation, preservation and regeneration are huge challenges for modern industrial society. For this reason it is essential to have innovative, efficient, cost-effective and reliable technologies for the decontamination and soil remediation. These technologies should be flexibly applicable for a wide spectrum of contaminants. Beside other biological, physical and chemical methods, research on thermally-supported soil remediation methods has increased over the last years. Due to a controlled heating of soil, the mobility of pollutants, their water solubility and their vapor pressures can be enhanced. To support biodegradation of pollutants, the maximum activity of most microorganisms can be realized by moderate heating independent of ambient temperature and seasonal conditions. A new technological approach for direct heating of large volumes of contaminated soil using radio-frequency (RF) energy is described. This method can be used to thermally enhance a variety of remediation techniques such as biodegradation and soil vapor extraction. The technical basis, a container-based modular and mobile radio-frequency platform is presented and the benefits of this platform working under harsh field conditions are demonstrated. Additionally, aspects of electromagnetic compatibility, system reliability and safety are discussed.

  7. Tailoring electron energy distribution functions through energy confinement in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, C.; Waskoenig, J.; Gans, T.

    2012-10-08

    A multi-scale numerical model based on hydrodynamic equations with semi-kinetic treatment of electrons is used to investigate the influence of dual frequency excitation on the effective electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma. It is found that variations of power density, voltage ratio, and phase relationship provide separate control over the electron density and the mean electron energy. This is exploited to directly influence both the phase dependent and time averaged effective EEDF. This enables tailoring the EEDF for enhanced control of non-equilibrium plasma chemical kinetics at ambient pressure and temperature.

  8. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  9. On the comparison of energy sources: feasibility of radio frequency and ambient light harvesting

    E-print Network

    Korotkevich, Alexander O; Lavrova, Olga; Coutsias, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    With growing interest in multi source energy harvesting including integrated microchips we propose a comparison of radio frequency (RF) and solar energy sources in a typical city. Harvesting devices for RF and solar energy will be competing for space of a compact micro or nano device as well as for orientation with respect to the energy source. This is why it is important to investigate importance of every source of energy and make a decision whether it will be worthwhile to include such harvesters. We considered theoretically possible irradiance by RF signal in different situations, typical for the modern urban environment and compared it with ambient solar energy sources available through the night, including moon light. Our estimations show that solar light energy dominates by far margin practically all the time, even during the night, if there is a full moon in the absence of clouds. At the same time, in the closed compartments or at the new moon RF harvesting can be beneficial as a source of "free" energ...

  10. Improved fluid simulations of radio-frequency plasmas using energy dependent ion mobilities

    SciTech Connect

    Greb, Arthur; Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo; Ennis, Gerard J.; MacGearailt, Niall

    2013-05-15

    Symmetric and asymmetric capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasmas in oxygen at 40 Pa, 300 V voltage amplitude and a discharge gap of 40 mm are investigated by means of one-dimensional numerical semi-kinetic fluid modeling on the basis of a simplified reaction scheme including the dominant positive and negative ions, background gas, and electrons. An improved treatment, by accounting for the dependence of ion mobilities on E/N, is compared to the standard approach, based on using zero-field mobility values only. The charged particle dynamics as a result of direct electron impact ionization of oxygen, secondary electron release from the electrodes, the spatial distribution of all involved particles as well as impact of geometry and model modification on ion energies is analyzed and compared to independent simulations and experiments.

  11. Flying radio frequency undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Vikharev, A. A.; Savilov, A. V.

    2014-07-21

    A concept for the room-temperature rf undulator, designed to produce coherent X-ray radiation by means of a relatively low-energy electron beam and pulsed mm-wavelength radiation, is proposed. The “flying” undulator is a high-power short rf pulse co-propagating together with a relativistic electron bunch in a helically corrugated waveguide. The electrons wiggle in the rf field of the ?1st spatial harmonic with the phase velocity directed in the opposite direction in respect to the bunch velocity, so that particles can irradiate high-frequency Compton's photons. A high group velocity (close to the speed of light) ensures long cooperative motion of the particles and the co-propagating rf pulse.

  12. Flying radio frequency undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Savilov, A. V.; Vikharev, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    A concept for the room-temperature rf undulator, designed to produce coherent X-ray radiation by means of a relatively low-energy electron beam and pulsed mm-wavelength radiation, is proposed. The "flying" undulator is a high-power short rf pulse co-propagating together with a relativistic electron bunch in a helically corrugated waveguide. The electrons wiggle in the rf field of the -1st spatial harmonic with the phase velocity directed in the opposite direction in respect to the bunch velocity, so that particles can irradiate high-frequency Compton's photons. A high group velocity (close to the speed of light) ensures long cooperative motion of the particles and the co-propagating rf pulse.

  13. Industrial-scale radio frequency treatments for insect control in walnuts I. Heating uniformity and energy efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conducting industrial-scale confirmatory treatments is the final step in developing commercially and environmentally sound insect control technologies for in-shell walnuts using radio frequency (RF) energy as an alternative to chemical fumigation. Improving heating uniformity of in-shell walnuts in ...

  14. Heating uniformity and differential heating of insects in almonds associated with radio frequency energy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radio frequency (RF) treatments have potential as alternatives to chemical fumigation for phytosanitary disinfestation treatments in the dried nut industry. To develop effective RF treatment protocols for almonds, it is desirable to determine heating uniformity and the occurrence of differential hea...

  15. Radio Frequency Interference and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sierra

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) and radio astronomy have been closely linked since the emergence of radio astronomy as a scientific discipline in the 1930s. Even before the official establishment of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, protection against contemporary and future radio noise levels was seen as crucial to ensure success of any new observatory. My talk will examine the various local, regional, national, and international efforts enacted to protect NRAO and other American radio astronomy sites from RFI.

  16. Radio frequency power load and associated method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A radio frequency power load and associated method. A radio frequency power load apparatus includes a container and a fluid having an ion source therein, the fluid being contained in the container. Two conductors are immersed in the fluid. A radio frequency transmission system includes a radio frequency transmitter, a radio frequency amplifier connected to the transmitter and a radio frequency power load apparatus connected to the amplifier. The apparatus includes a fluid having an ion source therein, and two conductors immersed in the fluid. A method of dissipating power generated by a radio frequency transmission system includes the steps of: immersing two conductors of a radio frequency power load apparatus in a fluid having an ion source therein; and connecting the apparatus to an amplifier of the transmission system.

  17. Inactivation of foodborne pathogens in ground beef by cooking with highly controlled radio frequency energy.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Kler, Edna; Kalily, Emmanuel; Kisluk, Guy; Karniel, Ohad; Yaron, Sima

    2013-01-01

    The consumer demand for fresh tasting, high quality, low salt, preservative-free meals which require minimal preparation time magnifies the safety concern and emphasizes the need to use innovative technologies for food processing. A modern technique to uniformly heat and cook foods is based on a combination of convection and controlled radio frequency (RF) energy. However any advantage conferred on meat cooked by this method would be lost if application of the technology results in decreased safety. Our main goal was to study the inactivation efficacy of this method of cooking against pathogens in ground meat in comparison to standard convection cooking. Meat balls were artificially inoculated with GFP expressing Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes as well as spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis and cooked by convection heating (220°C, 40 min), by using energy generated from frequencies in the RF bandwidth (RF cooking, 7.5 min) or by combined heating (5.5 min), until the center temperature of each sample reached 73°C. The mean reductions in total indigenous bacteria obtained by RF and convection were 2.8 and 2.5 log CFU/g, respectively. Cooking of meat balls with convection reduced the E. coli population (8 log CFU/g) by 5.5 log CFU/g, whilst treatment with RF reduced E. coli population to undetectable levels. The mean reductions of S. Typhimurium obtained by RF and convection were 5.7 and 6.5 log CFU/g, respectively. The combined treatment reduced the Salmonella population to undetectable levels. In contrast, L. monocytogenes was poorly affected by RF cooking. The mean reduction of L. monocytogenes obtained by RF energy was 0.4 log CFU/g, while convection cooking resulted in undetectable levels. Interestingly, the combined treatment also resulted with undetectable levels of Listeria although time of cooking was reduced by 86%. One-step cooking had negligible effects on the Bacillus spores and therefore a 2-step treatment of RF or convection was applied. This 2-step treatment proved to be efficient with 4.5 log CFU/g reduction for both RF and convection. In conclusion, here we show that combination of RF with convection cooking resulted in similar or even better effects on selected foodborne pathogens compared to convection only, while the time required for safe cooking is cut down by up to 86%. The equal or better results in the levels of all investigated pathogens using RF with convection compared with convection only suggest that this technology looks promising and safe for ground beef cooking. PMID:23290228

  18. Tracing Ghost Cavities with Low Frequency Radio Observations

    E-print Network

    Tracy Clarke; Elizabeth Blanton; Craig Sarazin; Namir Kassim; Loren Anderson; Henrique Schmitt; Gopal-Krishna; Doris Neumann

    2006-12-20

    We present X-ray and multi-frequency radio observations of the central radio sources in several X-ray cavity systems. We show that targeted radio observations are key to determining if the lobes are being actively fed by the central AGN. Low frequency observations provide a unique way to study both the lifecycle of the central radio source as well as its energy input into the ICM over several outburst episodes.

  19. Radio Frequency Identification iny integrated circuits equipped with radio an-

    E-print Network

    Han, Richard Y.

    -called Radio Frequency Identification tags--better known as RFID--could help stamp out drug counterfeitingRadio Frequency Identification T iny integrated circuits equipped with radio an- tennas are fast,mostpopularpresscover- age of RFID tags has centered on the technology's po- tential for tracking consumers without

  20. Radio Frequency Power Load and Associated Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, V. Karthik (Inventor); Freestone, Todd M. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency power load and associated method. A radio frequency power load apparatus may include a container with an ionized fluid therein. The apparatus may include one conductor immersed in a fluid and another conductor electrically connected to the container. A radio frequency transmission system may include a radio frequency transmitter, a radio frequency amplifier connected to the transmitter and a radio frequency power load apparatus connected to the amplifier. The apparatus may include a fluid having an ion source therein, one conductor immersed in a fluid, and another conductor electrically connected to the container. A method of dissipating power generated by a radio frequency transmission system may include constructing a waveguide with ionized fluid in a container and connecting the waveguide to an amplifier of the transmission system.

  1. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: IITRI RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radio frequency heating (RFH) technologies use electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency i(RF) band to heat soil in-situ, thereby potentially enhancing the performances of standard soil vapor extraction (SVE) technologies. ontaminants are removed from in situ soils and transf...

  2. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING - KAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radio frequency heating (RFH) is a process that uses electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency (RF) band to heat soil in situ, thereby potentially enhancing the performance of standard soil vapor extraction (SVE) technologies. An RFH system developed by KAI Technologies, I...

  3. IN SITU AND SOIL DECONTAMINATION BY RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ radio frequency heating is performed by applying electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency band to an array of electrodes placed in bore holes drilled through the contaminated soil. he process removes organic contaminants from large volumes of soil by volatilization, ...

  4. High efficiency, oxidation resistant radio frequency susceptor

    DOEpatents

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Klett, James W.

    2004-10-26

    An article and method of producing an article for converting energy from one form to another having a pitch-derived graphitic foam carbon foam substrate and a single layer coating applied to all exposed surfaces wherein the coating is either silicon carbide or carbides formed from a Group IVA metal. The article is used as fully coated carbon foam susceptors that more effectively absorb radio frequency (RF) band energy and more effectively convert the RF energy into thermal band energy or sensible heat. The essentially non-permeable coatings also serve as corrosion or oxidation resistant barriers.

  5. Coping with Radio Frequency Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    The radio spectrum is a finite resource, on which humanity makes many demands. And pressure on it is ever increasing with the development of new technology and ideas for radio services. After all, we all benefit from wifi and cell phones. Radio astronomers have a small percentage of the spectrum allocated to them at octave intervals in the metre-centimetre bands, and at important frequencies, such as that of the 21cm line of HI. Signals from other services, as well as from our own poorly-engineered equipment, sometimes contaminate our bands: these signals constitute RFI. These may totally obliterate the astronomical signal, or, in the case of CLOUDSAT, may be capable of completely destroying a receiver, which introduces us to the new possibility of 'destructive interference'. A geo-stationary satellite can block access to a piece of sky from one site. Good equipment design eliminates self-inflicted interference, while physical separation often provides adequate practical mitigation at many frequencies. However, new observatories end up being located in the West Australian desert or Antarctica. In future they may be on the back side of the Moon. But there is no Earth-bound protection via physical separation against satellite signals. Some mitigation can be achieved by frequent data dumps and the excision of RFI, or by real-time detection and blanking of the receiver, or by more sophisticated algoriths. Astronomers of necessity aim to achieve mitigation via coordination, at the local level, and by participating in spectrum management at the national and international levels. This involves them spending a lot of time in Geneva at the International Telegraphic Union protecting their access to spectrum, and access to clean spectrum from the L3 point and the far side of the Moon.

  6. On the optimal frequency of observation of Cherenkov radiation in the radio astronomy method for measuring superhigh-energy cosmic-ray particle flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonenko, A. D.

    2008-09-01

    Possible reasons for the absence of direct observations of individual events in measuring the super-high-energy particle flux by the radio astronomy technique are considered. One of these reasons is probably associated with the choice of extremely high frequencies (˜1.5 GHz) for detecting radio pulses. Calculations show that the radiation intensity attains its peak value at frequencies ˜500 600 MHz and then sharply decreases so that it becomes three orders of magnitude lower even at a frequency of ˜1.5 GHz. The effectiveness of particle detection in the range of high (˜600 MHz) and low (˜60 MHz) frequencies is analyzed.

  7. A radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, T.L.

    1987-12-07

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feedthrough is provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflection from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits the voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  8. Precision phase control for the radio frequency system of K500 superconducting cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Som, Sumit; Ghosh, Surajit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Roy, Suprakash

    2013-11-15

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) has commissioned K500 Superconducting cyclotron (SCC) based on MSU and Texas A and M university cyclotrons. The radio frequency (RF) system of SCC has been commissioned with the stringent requirement of various RF parameters. The three-phase RF system of Superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9–27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.1°, respectively. The phase control system has the option to change the relative phase difference between any two RF cavities and maintain the phase stability within ±0.1° during round-the-clock cyclotron operation. The said precision phase loop consists of both analogue In-phase/Quadrature modulator to achieve faster response and also Direct Digital Synthesis based phase shifter to achieve wide dynamic range as well. This paper discusses detail insights into the various issues of phase control for the K500 SCC at VECC, Kolkata.

  9. Space and phase resolved electron energy distribution functions in an industrial dual-frequency capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Julian; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Ellingboe, Bert; Turner, Miles

    2006-10-01

    The excitation dynamics in a confined dual-frequency plane parallel CCRF discharge (Exelan, Lam Research Inc.), operated at 1.94 MHz and 27.12 MHz is investigated by phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The emission from different rare gas lines in a He-O2 plasma with small rare gas admixtures is measured during one low frequency RF-cycle resolving the dynamics within every high frequency cycle with one dimensional spatial resolution along the discharge axis. In a detailed analysis a time dependent model, based on rate equations, is developed, that describes the dynamics of the population density of excited levels. Electron impact excitation out of the ground state, quenching, reabsorption and cascades are taken into account. Based on this model and the comparison of the excitation of various rare gas states, with different excitation thresholds, time and space resolved electron temperature and propagation velocity of the high energetic, directed electrons, heated at the sheath edge, are determined. These parameters reveal the time and space resolved electron energy distribution function.

  10. Method and apparatus for radio frequency ceramic sintering

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, D.J.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1993-11-30

    Radio frequency energy is used to sinter ceramic materials. A coaxial waveguide resonator produces a TEM mode wave which generates a high field capacitive region in which a sample of the ceramic material is located. Frequency of the power source is kept in the range of radio frequency, and preferably between 60-80 MHz. An alternative embodiment provides a tunable radio frequency circuit which includes a series input capacitor and a parallel capacitor, with the sintered ceramic connected by an inductive lead. This arrangement permits matching of impedance over a wide range of dielectric constants, ceramic volumes, and loss tangents. 6 figures.

  11. Method and apparatus for radio frequency ceramic sintering

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Daniel J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kimrey, Jr., Harold D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01

    Radio frequency energy is used to sinter ceramic materials. A coaxial waveguide resonator produces a TEM mode wave which generates a high field capacitive region in which a sample of the ceramic material is located. Frequency of the power source is kept in the range of radio frequency, and preferably between 60-80 MHz. An alternative embodiment provides a tunable radio frequency circuit which includes a series input capacitor and a parallel capacitor, with the sintered ceramic connected by an inductive lead. This arrangement permits matching of impedance over a wide range of dielectric constants, ceramic volumes, and loss tangents.

  12. Nonthermal processing by radio frequency electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) processing is relatively new and has been shown to inactivate bacteria in apple juice, orange juice and apple cider at moderately low temperatures. Key equipment components of the process include a radio frequency power supply and a treatment chamber that is ca...

  13. Introduction to special section on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Introduction to special section on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy presented at the Workshop on the Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy (RFI2004), Introduction to special section on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy, Radio Sci

  14. Energy Efficient Radio Resource

    E-print Network

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    Energy Efficient Radio Resource Management in a Coordinated Multi-Cell Distributed Antenna System Omer HALILOGLU Introduction System Model Performance Evaluation Conclusion References Energy Efficient Hacettepe University 5 September 2014 Omer HALILOGLU (Hacettepe University) Energy Efficient Radio Resource

  15. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING - IIT RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radio frequency heating (RFH) is a process that uses electromagnetic energy generated by radio waves to heat soil in situ, thereby potentially enhancing the performance of standard soil vapor extraction (SVE) technologies. An RFH system developed by the IIT Research Institute ...

  16. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2.815 Section 2.815 ...External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which,...

  17. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2.815 Section 2.815 ...External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which,...

  18. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2.815 Section 2.815 ...External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which,...

  19. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2.815 Section 2.815 ...External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which,...

  20. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2.815 Section 2.815 ...External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which,...

  1. High-power radio-frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.; Miller, H.W.

    1981-12-30

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  2. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz-1 at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz-1 at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz-1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10-10 at 1-100 s integration time--orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  3. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10?GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60?dBc?Hz(-1) at 10?Hz, -90?dBc?Hz(-1) at 100?Hz and -170?dBc?Hz(-1) at 10?MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100?s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  4. Multi-mode radio frequency device

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, Ronald W. (Morgan Hill, CA); Carrender, Curtis Lee (Morgan Hill, CA); Anderson, Gordon A. (Benton City, WA); Steele, Kerry D. (Kennewick, WA)

    2007-02-13

    A transponder device having multiple modes of operation, such as an active mode and a passive mode, wherein the modes of operation are selected in response to the strength of a received radio frequency signal. A communication system is also provided having a transceiver configured to transmit a radio frequency signal and to receive a responsive signal, and a transponder configured to operate in a plurality of modes and to activate modes of operation in response to the radio frequency signal. Ideally, each mode of operation is activated and deactivated independent of the other modes, although two or more modes may be concurrently operational.

  5. Security approaches for Radio Frequency Identification systems

    E-print Network

    Foley, Joseph Timothy, 1976-

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, I explore the challenges related to the security of the Electronic Product Code (EPC) class of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags and associated data. RFID systems can be used to improve supply chain ...

  6. Radio Frequency Identification : regulating information privacy protection

    E-print Network

    Laufer, Deanna (Deanna Raquel)

    2007-01-01

    As applications of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) become more profuse, the technology itself is stirring up some controversy. Due to its potential for amassing large amounts of information about both people and ...

  7. Process protocols based on radio frequency energy to control field and storage pests in in-shell walnuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A practical process protocol was developed to control insect pests in in-shell walnuts using a 27 MHz pilot scale radio frequency (RF) system. Fifth-instars, that had been determined to be the most heat resistant life stage for navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella [Walker]) using a heating block s...

  8. Solar radioastronomy with the LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) radio telescope

    E-print Network

    White, Stephen

    Array (LOFAR) will be a radio astronomy interferometric array operating in the approximate fre­ quency and discuss the solar science that LOFAR will address. Keywords: Low­frequency radio astronomy, Solar radio discoveries of radio astronomy took place; radio astronomy only migrated to the higher microwave frequencies

  9. Solar radioastronomy with the LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) radio telescope

    E-print Network

    White, Stephen

    (LOFAR) will be a radio astronomy interferometric array operating in the approximate fre- quency range 10 the solar science that LOFAR will address. Keywords: Low-frequency radio astronomy, Solar radio astronomy discoveries of radio astronomy took place; radio astronomy only migrated to the higher microwave frequencies

  10. DEHYDRATION OF IN-SHELL PEANUTS USING RADIO FREQUENCY ENERGY WITH INTERMITTENT STIRRINGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both conventional wagon drying (curing) systems and batch/continuous flow dryer systems are time and energy consuming. RF dielectric heating has been used in drying many foods to take advantages of the effective, fast heat generated by the interaction between RF energy and biological products, reduc...

  11. Solar emission levels at low radio frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Solar radio emission could seriously interfere with observations made by a low frequency (1 to 10 MHz) array in space. International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) radio data were used to determine solar emission level. The results indicate that solar emission should seriously disturb less than ten percent of the data, even during the years of solar maximum. Thus it appears that solar emission should not cause a disastrous loss of data. The information needed to design procedures to excise solar interference from the data produced by any low-frequency array is provided.

  12. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  13. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  14. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  15. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  16. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  17. Intelligent Radio Frequency (RF) Monitoring 

    E-print Network

    Kimbrough, B.

    2010-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-10-05-35.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5133 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-10-05-35.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ? Intelligent Radio... Total Hours 8760 hr/hr *Max Flow Thru is Calculated Using a 7/64" Orifice @ 200 psig for Each Application Listed Above & Blow 1 Hour 1 Day 1 Week 1 Month 3 Months 1 Year Drip 97 2,328 16,296 69,840 209,520 849,720 Tracer 97 2,328 16,296 69,840 209...

  18. Monitoring Radio Frequency Interference in Southwest Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The radio signals received from astronomical objects are extremely weak. Because of this, radio sources are easily shrouded by interference from devices such as satellites and cell phone towers. Radio astronomy is very susceptible to this radio frequency interference (RFI). Possibly even worse than complete veiling, weaker interfering signals can contaminate the data collected by radio telescopes, possibly leading astronomers to mistaken interpretations. To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and RFI, an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project_the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)_encourages students to collect and analyze RFI data and develop conclusions as a team. Because the project focuses on electromagnetic radiation, it is appropriate for physics, physical science, chemistry, or general science classes. My class-about 50 students from 15 southwest Virginia high schools-participated in the Quiet Skies Project and were pioneers in the use of the beta version of the Quiet Skies Detector (QSD), which is used to detect RFI. Students have been involved with the project since 2005 and have collected and shared data with NRAO. In analyzing the data they have noted some trends in RFI in Southwest Virginia.

  19. Radio frequency interference at the geostationary orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    Growing demands on the frequency spectrum have increased the possibility of radio frequency interference (RFI). Various approaches to obtain in orbit RFI data are compared; this comparision indicates that the most practical way to obtain RFI data for a desired orbit (such as a geostationary orbit) is through the extrapolation of in orbit RFI measurements by a low orbit satellite. It is concluded that a coherent RFI program that uses both experimental data and analytical predictions provides accurate RFI data at minimal cost.

  20. Trirotron: triode rotating beam radio frequency amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Lebacqz, Jean V. (Stanford, CA)

    1980-01-01

    High efficiency amplification of radio frequencies to very high power levels including: establishing a cylindrical cloud of electrons; establishing an electrical field surrounding and coaxial with the electron cloud to bias the electrons to remain in the cloud; establishing a rotating electrical field that surrounds and is coaxial with the steady field, the circular path of the rotating field being one wavelength long, whereby the peak of one phase of the rotating field is used to accelerate electrons in a beam through the bias field in synchronism with the peak of the rotating field so that there is a beam of electrons continuously extracted from the cloud and rotating with the peak; establishing a steady electrical field that surrounds and is coaxial with the rotating field for high-energy radial acceleration of the rotating beam of electrons; and resonating the rotating beam of electrons within a space surrounding the second field, the space being selected to have a phase velocity equal to that of the rotating field to thereby produce a high-power output at the frequency of the rotating field.

  1. Radio Frequency Identification of Hurricane Katrina Victims

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    been implanting human cadavers with radio frequency identification (RFID) chips. Their efforts have, performance, and indi- vidual and societal implications of RFID. RFID is a non-line-of-sight (capable source) or passive (with no power source). An RFID chip consists of an integrated circuit of about 0

  2. Low Frequency Radio Astronomy from the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Burns, J. O.

    2015-10-01

    A low frequency lunar radio observatory is a desirable scientific investment. The stable surface offers advantages for antenna array deployment to image radio emission using aperture synthesis. A far-side array avoids terrestrial radio interference.

  3. Radio Frequency Name ITU Band # Frequency Range Ultra-low frequency (ULF) 1 3 -30 Hz

    E-print Network

    Hz - 30 kHz Low frequency (LF) 5 30 kHz - 300 kHz Medium frequency (MF) 6 300 kHz - 3 MHz High frequencyRadio Frequency Name ITU Band # Frequency Range Ultra-low frequency (ULF) 1 3 - 30 Hz Super low frequency(SLF) 2 30Hz - 300Hz Extremely low frequency (ELF) 3 300 Hz - 3 kHz Very low frequency (VLF) 4 3 k

  4. Low reflectance radio frequency load

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M

    2014-04-01

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  5. Tunable Radio-frequency Quantum Point Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anne-Marie; Saint-Jean Rondeau, Olivier; Camirand-Lemyre, Julien; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Manipulating the spin of single electrons in quantum dots is a promising avenue for quantum information processing. As the readout of the spins is performed via spin-to-charge conversion, establishing a charge sensing technique that is fast and highly sensitive is crucial. For this reason, radio-frequency quantum point contact charge sensors have become widespread. Here we present a tunable quantum point contact charge sensor using a cryogenic variable capacitor, tunable from 2 to 12 pF. We obtain optimal impedance matching for different quantum dot devices over a frequency range from 125 to 210 MHz. The flexibility of our setup allows the integration of radio-frequency charge sensors to a variety of nanostructures.

  6. Determining radio frequency heating uniformity in mixed beans for disinfestations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our laboratory collaborates with USDA-ARS in Parlier, CA in developing thermal treatments based on radio frequency (RF) energy for insect control in legumes to meet postharvest phytosanitary regulations for international market. Our current study focuses on lentils and chickpeas that are two importa...

  7. Development of radio frequency treatments for dried pulses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical fumigants are typically used to disinfest dried pulses of insect pests before shipment to importing countries, but the industry is exploring non-chemical alternatives. One possible alternative is the use of radio frequency (RF) energy to rapidly heat product to insecticidal levels. The cowp...

  8. Power Supplies and Radio Frequency Department at Culham

    E-print Network

    Power Supplies and Radio Frequency Department at Culham Culham Centre for Fusion Energy #12;We employ over 70 power electrical and power electronic engineers and technicians. The department supplies power to the JET and MAST nuclear fusion experiments at Culham. Culham is fed from the grid at 400k

  9. 48 CFR 211.275 - Radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Radio frequency identification....

  10. 78 FR 13893 - Certain Radio Frequency Identification (“RFID”) Products and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ...Certain Radio Frequency Identification (``RFID'') Products and Components Thereof...Certain Radio Frequency Identification (``RFID'') Products and Components Thereof...certain radio frequency identification (``RFID'') products and components...

  11. Energy resolved actinometry for simultaneous measurement of atomic oxygen densities and local mean electron energies in radio-frequency driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Greb, Arthur Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo

    2014-12-08

    A diagnostic method for the simultaneous determination of atomic oxygen densities and mean electron energies is demonstrated for an atmospheric pressure radio-frequency plasma jet. The proposed method is based on phase resolved optical emission measurements of the direct and dissociative electron-impact excitation dynamics of three distinct emission lines, namely, Ar 750.4?nm, O 777.4?nm, and O 844.6?nm. The energy dependence of these lines serves as basis for analysis by taking into account two line ratios. In this frame, the method is highly adaptable with regard to pressure and gas composition. Results are benchmarked against independent numerical simulations and two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence experiments.

  12. K-BAND RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE SURVEY OF SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN

    E-print Network

    Ruf, Christopher

    K-BAND RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE SURVEY OF SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN Shannon Curry1 , Michael Ahlers University of Denmark Orsteds Plads, Bldg. 348 DK 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, DENMARK Abstract ­ The Radio frequency of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) that can affect microwave radiometers. It consists of a combined

  13. SOME UNSOLVED CHALLENGES IN RADIO-FREQUENCY HEATING AND

    E-print Network

    in the electronic version. I. INTRODUCTION There are many methods by which radio-frequency (rf) waves driveSOME UNSOLVED CHALLENGES IN RADIO-FREQUENCY HEATING AND CURRENT DRIVE N. J. FISCH* Princeton Plasma, 2013 doi:10.13182/FST13-682 Several unsolved challenges in radio-frequency heating and current drive

  14. 48 CFR 252.211-7006 - Radio Frequency Identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio Frequency... of Provisions And Clauses 252.211-7006 Radio Frequency Identification. As prescribed in 211.275-3, use the following clause: Radio Frequency Identification (FEB 2007) (a) Definitions. As used in...

  15. CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE: RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY

    E-print Network

    . The study results showed that radio frequency (RF) sterilization of municipal biosolids is technically#12;CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE: RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY DIGESTED/DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS Vancouver, B.C. V7M 3H7 #12;S-1 CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY DIGESTED

  16. Sampling Downconverter For Radio-Frequency Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.; Rayhrer, B.; Young, L. E.

    1990-01-01

    Phase and delay errors reduced greatly. Proposed GaAs integrated-circuit for receiver of radio signals at gigahertz frequencies samples incoming signal in phase and in quadrature, digitizes it, and down-converts it to baseband in single step. Incorporates both digital and analog components in design offering improved stability, versatility, and sampling bandwidth. Eliminates need for several components found in conventional analog designs, including mixers, postmixer filters, and 90 degree phase shifter.

  17. Low Frequency Radio Astronomy with the existing and future radio telescopes

    E-print Network

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    Low Frequency Radio Astronomy with the existing and future radio telescopes A.A. Konovalenko Institute of Radio Astronomy, Kharkov, Ukraine LOFAR meeting, APC Laboratory, Paris, 17-18 January, 2008 #12 development of the low frequency radio astronomy. This program includes the further modernization of UTR-2

  18. Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 15, Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation for Detection

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 1­5, Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation for Detection of Extended Sources with an Interferometer Geoffrey C. Bower Radio Astronomy Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Radio frequency interference (RFI) is a significant problem for current

  19. "Magic" radio-frequency dressing for trapped atomic microwave clocks

    E-print Network

    Kazakov, Georgy A

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed to use magnetically trapped atomic ensembles to enhance the interrogation time in microwave clocks. To mitigate the perturbing effects of the magnetic trap, "near-magic field" configurations are employed, where the involved clock transition becomes independent of the atoms potential energy to first order. Still, higher order effects are a dominating source for dephasing, limiting the perfomance of this approach. Here we propose a simple method to cancel the energy dependence to both, first and second order, using weak radio-frequency dressing. We give values for dressing frequencies, amplitudes, and trapping fields for 87Rb atoms and investigate quantitatively the robustness of these "second-order magic" conditions to variations of the system parameters. We conclude that radio-frequency dressing can suppress field-induced dephasing by at least one order of magnitude for typical experimental parameters.

  20. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...Passenger Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The...

  1. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...Passenger Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The...

  2. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each...

  3. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each...

  4. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each...

  5. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...Passenger Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The...

  6. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...Passenger Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The...

  7. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each...

  8. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each...

  9. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927 Section...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES...Passenger Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The...

  10. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927 Section 80.927 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The transmitter must be equipped with a device...

  11. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927 Section 80.927 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The transmitter must be equipped with a device...

  12. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section 80.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each nonportable bridge-to-bridge transmitter must...

  13. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section 80.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each nonportable bridge-to-bridge transmitter must...

  14. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927 Section 80.927 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The transmitter must be equipped with a device...

  15. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927 Section 80.927 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The transmitter must be equipped with a device...

  16. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section 80.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each nonportable bridge-to-bridge transmitter must...

  17. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section 80.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each nonportable bridge-to-bridge transmitter must...

  18. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section 80.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each nonportable bridge-to-bridge transmitter must...

  19. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927 Section 80.927 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The transmitter must be equipped with a device...

  20. Optical generation of radio-frequency power

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Meyer, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    An optical technique for high-power radio-frequency (RF) signal generation is described. The technique uses a unique photodetector based on a traveling-wave design driven by an appropriately modulated light source. The traveling-wave photodetector (TWPD) exhibits simultaneously a theoretical quantum efficiency approaching 100 % and a very large electrical bandwidth. Additionally, it is capable of dissipating the high-power levels required for the RF generation technique. The modulated light source is formed by either the beating together of two lasers or by the direct modulation of a light source. A system example is given which predicts RF power levels of 100`s of mW`s at millimeter wave frequencies with a theoretical ``wall-plug`` efficiency approaching 34%.

  1. Application of disturbance observer-based control in low-level radio-frequency system in a compact energy recovery linac at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Feng; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miura, Takako; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Omet, Mathieu; Sigit, Basuki Wibowo

    2015-09-01

    A disturbance observer (DOB)-based control for a digital low-level radio-frequency (LLRF) system in a compact energy recovery linac (cERL) at KEK has been developed. The motivation for this control approach is to compensate for or suppress the disturbance signal in the rf system such as beam loading, power supply ripples, and microphonics. Disturbance signals in specified frequency ranges were observed and reconstructed accurately in the field-programmable gate array and were then removed in the feedforward model in real time. The key component in this DOB controller is a disturbance observer, which includes the inverse mathematical model of the rf plant. In this paper, we have designed a DOB control-based approach in order to improve the LLRF system performance in disturbance rejection. We have confirmed this approach in the cERL beam commissioning.

  2. Radio-Frequency Rectification on Membrane Bound Pores

    E-print Network

    Sujatha Ramachandran; Robert H. Blick; Daniel W. van der Weide

    2007-09-12

    We present measurements on direct radio-frequency pumping of ion channels and pores bound in bilipid membranes. We make use of newly developed microcoaxes, which allow delivering the high frequency signal in close proximity to the membrane bound proteins and ion channels. We find rectification of the radio-frequency signal, which is used to pump ions through the channels and pores.

  3. Radio Frequency Mass Gauging of Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Vaden, Karl R.; Herlacher, Michael D.; Buchanan, David A.; VanDresar, Neil T.

    2007-01-01

    A combined experimental and computer simulation effort was conducted to measure radio frequency (RF) tank resonance modes in a dewar partially filled with liquid oxygen, and compare the measurements with numerical simulations. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate that computer simulations of a tank's electromagnetic eigenmodes can be used to accurately predict ground-based measurements, thereby providing a computational tool for predicting tank modes in a low-gravity environment. Matching the measured resonant frequencies of several tank modes with computer simulations can be used to gauge the amount of liquid in a tank, thus providing a possible method to gauge cryogenic propellant tanks in low-gravity. Using a handheld RF spectrum analyzer and a small antenna in a 46 liter capacity dewar for experimental measurements, we have verified that the four lowest transverse magnetic eigenmodes can be accurately predicted as a function of liquid oxygen fill level using computer simulations. The input to the computer simulations consisted of tank dimensions, and the dielectric constant of the fluid. Without using any adjustable parameters, the calculated and measured frequencies agree such that the liquid oxygen fill level was gauged to within 2 percent full scale uncertainty. These results demonstrate the utility of using electromagnetic simulations to form the basis of an RF mass gauging technology with the power to simulate tank resonance frequencies from arbitrary fluid configurations.

  4. E4.18 Radio Frequency Electronics Copyright 2006 Dr Stepan Lucyszyn Frequency Spectrum

    E-print Network

    Papavassiliou, Christos

    Applications Phased-array radar Electronic warfare (e.g. Electronic Surveillance Measures, ECM, ECCM, decoysE4.18 Radio Frequency Electronics Copyright © 2006 Dr Stepan Lucyszyn Frequency Spectrum and Applications #12;E4.18 Radio Frequency Electronics Copyright © 2006 Dr Stepan Lucyszyn #12;E4.18 Radio

  5. Part-body and multibody effects on absorption of radio-frequency electromagnetic energy by animals and by models of man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandhi, O. P.; Hagmann, M. J.; Dandrea, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Fine structure in the whole-body resonant curve for radio-frequency energy deposition in man can be attributed to part-body resonances. As for head resonance, which occurs near 350 MHz in man, the absorptive cross section is nearly three times the physical cross section of the head. The arm has a prominent resonance at 150 MHz. Numerical solutions, antenna theory, and experimental results on animals have shown that whole-body energy deposition may be increased by 50 percent or more because of multiple bodies that are strategically located in the field. Empirical equations for SARs are also presented along with test data for several species of laboratory animals. Barbiturate anesthesia is sufficiently disruptive of thermoregulation that delta Ts of colonic temperature yield energy dose values in several mammals that compare quite favorably with those based on whole-body calorimetry.

  6. Imaging interplanetary CMEs at radio frequency from solar polar orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Hao; Yan, Jingye; Wang, Chi; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Shui

    2011-09-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) represent a great concentration of mass and energy input into the lower corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions change in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, observations of CMEs are important for understanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. This paper discusses a proposed mission, the Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) mission, which will observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs to distances of near 0.35 AU from the Sun. The orbit of SPORT is an elliptical solar polar orbit. The inclination angle between the orbit and ecliptic plane should be about 90°. The main payload on board SPORT will be an imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band (radio telescope), which can follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs. The images that are obtained by the radio telescope embody the brightness temperature of the objectives. Due to the very large size required for the antenna aperture of the radio telescope, we adopt interferometric imaging technology to reduce it. Interferometric imaging technology is based on indirect spatial frequency domain measurements plus Fourier transformation. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind ion instrument, an energetic particle detector, a magnetometer, a wave detector and a solar radio burst spectrometer.

  7. An improved integrally formed radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Abbott, S.R.

    1987-10-05

    An improved radio frequency quadrupole is provided having an elongate housing with an elongate central axis and top, bottom and two side walls symmetrically disposed about the axis, and vanes formed integrally with the walls, the vanes each having a cross-section at right angles to the central axis which tapers inwardly toward the axis to form electrode tips spaced from each other by predetermined distances. Each of the four walls, and the vanes integral therewith, is a separate structural element having a central lengthwise plane passing through the tip of the vane, the walls having flat mounting surfaces at right angles to and parallel to the control plane, respectively, which are butted together to position the walls and vane tips relative to each other. 4 figs.

  8. Nb3Sn for Radio Frequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.

    2006-12-18

    In this article, the suitability of Nb3Sn to improve theperformance of superconducting Radio-Frequency (RF)cavities is discussed.The use of Nb3Sn in RF cavitiesis recognized as an enabling technology toretain a veryhigh cavity quality factor (Q0) at 4.2 K and tosignificantly improve the cavity accelerating efficiency per unitlength(Eacc). This potential arises through the fundamental properties ofNb3Sn. The properties that are extensively characterized in theliterature are, however, mainly related to improvements in currentcarrying capacity (Jc) in the vortex state. Much less is available forthe Meissner state, which is of key importance to cavities. Relevantdata, available for the Meissner state is summarized, and it is shown howthis already validates the use of Nb3Sn. In addition, missing knowledgeis highlighted and suggestions are given for further Meissner statespecific research.

  9. Radio frequency multicusp ion source development (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-03-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider injector. It has been demonstrated that the source can meet the H{sup {minus}} beam current and emittance requirements for this application. By employing a porcelain-coated antenna, a clean plasma discharge with very long-life operation can be achieved. Today, the rf source is used to generate both positive and negative hydrogen ion beams and has been tested in various particle accelerator laboratories throughout the world. Applications of this ion source have been extended to other fields such as ion beam lithography, oil-well logging, ion implantation, accelerator mass spectrometry and medical therapy machines. This paper summarizes the latest rf ion source technology and development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Radio-frequency low-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R; Mora, José; Maestre, Haroldo; Corral, Pablo

    2014-06-15

    A method for retrieving low-coherence interferograms, based on the use of a microwave photonics filter, is proposed and demonstrated. The method is equivalent to the double-interferometer technique, with the scanning interferometer replaced by an analog fiber-optics link and the visibility recorded as the amplitude of its radio-frequency (RF) response. As a low-coherence interferometry system, it shows a decrease of resolution induced by the fiber's third-order dispersion (?3). As a displacement sensor, it provides highly linear and slope-scalable readouts of the interferometer's optical path difference in terms of RF, even in the presence of third-order dispersion. In a proof-of-concept experiment, we demonstrate 20-?m displacement readouts using C-band EDFA sources and standard single-mode fiber. PMID:24978555

  11. Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors Coskun Kocabas*, Hoon properties of individ- ual tubes. We have implemented solutions to some of these challenges to yield radio band with power gains as high as 14 dB. As a demon- stration, we fabricated nanotube transistor radios

  12. LowFrequency Solar Radio Bursts from Green Bank

    E-print Network

    White, Stephen

    Low­Frequency Solar Radio Bursts from Green Bank S. M. White (U. Md.), T. S. Bastian, R. Bradley, C at Green Bank, WV. Upgrades will add a 300­ 850 MHz feed and an 80­350 MHz log-periodic antenna on the 13 Bank Solar Radio Burst Spectrom- eter (GBSRBS), in the radio­quiet zone at NRAO's Green Bank site

  13. Planck early results: Spectral energy distributions and radio continuum spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    E-print Network

    Aatrokoski, J; Aghanim, N; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Angelakis, E; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Berdyugin, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Burrows, D N; Cabella, P; Capalbi, M; Cappellini, B; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cavazzuti, E; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Cutini, S; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Dickinson, C; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fuhrmann, L; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; King, O; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Krichbaum, T P; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lavonen, N; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Linden-V\\ornle, M; Lindfors, E; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Max-Moerbeck, W; Mazziotta, M N; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Michelson, P F; Mingaliev, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Monte, C; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Nestoras, I; Netterfield, C B; Nieppola, E; Nilsson, K; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pavlidou, V; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perri, M; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rainó, S; Reach, W T; Readhead, A; Rebolo, R; Reeves, R; Reinecke, M; Reinthal, R; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, J; Riller, T; Riquelme, D; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubi\; Rusholme, B; Saarinen, J; Sandri, M; Savolainen, P; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Sievers, A; Sillanpää, A; Smoot, G F; Sotnikova, Y; Starck, J -L; Stevenson, M; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sygnet, J -F; Takalo, L; Tammi, J; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Thompson, D J; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tornikoski, M; Torre, J -P; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Turunen, M; Umana, G; Ungerechts, H; Valenziano, L; Valtaoja, E; Varis, J; Verrecchia, F; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wandelt, B D; Wu, J; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zensus, J A; Zhou, X; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalog (ERCSC) and simultaneous multifrequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, moving in the relativistic jet, shape the radio spectra. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper, physical modelli...

  14. Adversarial Model for Radio Frequency Identification Gildas Avoine

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    February 2005) Abstract. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems aim to identify objects in open en is that authorised readers must be able to identify tags without an adversary being able to trace them. Traceability say that they are the super barcodes of the future. Indeed, identification by radio frequency

  15. Secure EPC Gen2 compliant Radio Frequency Identification

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Introduction Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a promising new technology that is widely deployedSecure EPC Gen2 compliant Radio Frequency Identification Mike Burmester1 , Breno de Medeiros2) is making this standard a de facto specification for inexpensive tags in the RFID industry. Recently three

  16. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  17. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  18. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  19. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  20. Radio frequency electromagnetic fields: mild hyperthermia and safety standards.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, John A; Ziriax, John M; Adair, Eleanor R

    2007-01-01

    This chapter is a short review of literature that serves as the basis for current safe exposure recommendations by ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, 1998). and the IEEE C95.1 (IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz, 2005) for exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMF). Covered here are topics on dosimetry, thermoregulatory responses, behavioral responses, and how these have been used to derive safe exposure limits for humans to RF-EMF. Energy in this portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, 3 kHz-300 GHz, can be uniquely absorbed and is different from ionizing radiation both in dosimetry and effects. The deposition of thermalizing energy deep in the body by exposure to RF-EMF fields provides a unique exception to the energy flows normally encountered by humans. Behavioral effects of RF-EMF exposure range from detection to complete cessation of trained behaviors. RF-EMF is detectable and can in most cases, presumably by thermal mechanisms, support aversion and disruption or complete cessation (work stoppage) of behavior. Safety standards are based on behavioral responses by laboratory animals to RF-EMF, enhanced by careful studies of human thermoregulatory responses at four specific RF frequencies, thereby providing a conservative level of protection from RF-EMF for humans. PMID:17645917

  1. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus.

    PubMed

    Nocente, M; Cazzaniga, C; Tardocchi, M; Binda, F; Eriksson, J; Giacomelli, L; Muraro, A; Rebai, M; Sharapov, S; Gorini, G

    2015-10-01

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices. PMID:26520949

  2. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Binda, F.; Eriksson, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Muraro, A.; Rebai, M.; Sharapov, S.; Gorini, G.

    2015-10-01

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices.

  3. Differentially-Enhanced Sideband Imaging via Radio-frequency Encoding

    E-print Network

    Fard, A M; Jalali, B

    2015-01-01

    We present a microscope paradigm that performs differential interference imaging with high sensitivity via optical amplification and radio-frequency (RF) heterodyne detection. This method, termed differentially-enhanced sideband imaging via radio-frequency encoding (DESIRE), uniquely exploits frequency-to-space mapping technique to encode the image of an object onto the RF sidebands of an illumination beam. As a proof-of-concept, we show validation experiment by implementing radio frequency (f = 15 GHz) phase modulation in conjunction with spectrally-encoded laser scanning technique to acquire one-dimensional image of a barcode-like object using a commercial RF spectrum analyzer.

  4. An in situ measurement of the radio-frequency attenuation in ice at Summit Station, Greenland

    E-print Network

    J. Avva; J. M. Kovac; C. Miki; D. Saltzberg; A. G. Vieregg

    2015-12-02

    We report an in situ measurement of the electric field attenuation length at radio frequencies for the bulk ice at Summit Station, Greenland, made by broadcasting radio-frequency signals vertically through the ice and measuring the relative power in the return ground bounce signal. We find the depth-averaged field attenuation length to be 947 +92/-85 meters at 75 MHz. While this measurement has clear radioglaciological applications, the radio clarity of the ice also has implications for the detection of ultra-high energy (UHE) astrophysical particles via their radio emission in dielectric media such as ice. Assuming a reliable extrapolation to higher frequencies, the measured attenuation length at Summit Station is comparable to previously measured radio-frequency attenuation lengths at candidate particle detector sites around the world, and strengthens the case for Summit Station as a promising northern site for UHE neutrino detection.

  5. Directional Radio-Frequency Identification Tag Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Taylor, John D.; Henderson, John J.

    2004-01-01

    A directional radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag reader has been designed to facilitate finding a specific object among many objects in a crowded room. The device could be an adjunct to an electronic inventory system that tracks RFID-tagged objects as they move through reader-equipped doorways. Whereas commercial RFID-tag readers do not measure directions to tagged objects, the device is equipped with a phased-array antenna and a received signal-strength indicator (RSSI) circuit for measuring direction. At the beginning of operation, it is set to address only the RFID tag of interest. It then continuously transmits a signal to interrogate that tag while varying the radiation pattern of the antenna. It identifies the direction to the tag as the radiation pattern direction of peak strength of the signal returned by the tag. An approximate distance to the tag is calculated from the peak signal strength. The direction and distance can be displayed on a screen. A prototype containing a Yagi antenna was found to be capable of detecting a 915.5-MHz tag at a distance of approximately equal to 15 ft (approximately equal to 4.6 m).

  6. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Jones, D. L.; Lanyi, G. E.; Lowe, S. T.; Naudet, C. J.; Resch, G. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Zhang, L. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    The ICRF forms the basis for all astrometry including use as the inertial coordinate system for navigating deep space missions. This frame was defined using S/X-band observations over the past 20+ years. In January 2002, the VLBA approved our proposal for observing time to extend the ICRF to K-band (24 GHz) and Q-band (43 GHz). The first step will be observations at K- and Q-bands on a subset of ICRF sources. Eventually, K- and Q-band multi-epoch observations will be used to estimate positions, flux density and source structure for a large fraction of the current S/X-band ICRF source list. This work will benefit the radio astronomy community by extending the VLBA calibrator list at these bands. In the longer term, we would also like to extend the ICRF to Ka-band (32 GHz). A celestial reference frame will be needed at this frequency to support deep space navigation. A navigation demonstration is being considered for NASA's Mars 2005 mission. The initial K- and Q-band work will serve to identify candidate sources at Ka-band for use with that mission.

  7. Radio Frequency Plasma Applications for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W., Jr.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Goulding, R.H.; Ilin, A.V.; Jaeger, E.F.; Sparks, D.O.; Squire, J.P.

    1999-09-13

    Recent developments in solid-state radio frequency (RF) power technologies allow for the practical consideration of RF heated plasmas for space propulsion. These technologies permit the use of any electrical power source, de-couple the power and propellant sources, and allow for the effcient use of both the propellant mass and power. Effcient use of the propellant is obtained by expelling the rocket exhaust at the highest possible velocity, which can be orders of magnitude higher than those achieved in chemical rockets. Handling the hot plasma exhaust requires the use of magnetic nozzles, and the basic physics of ion detachment from the magnetic #12;eld is discussed. The plasma can be generated by RF using helicon waves to heat electrons. Further direct heating of the ions helps to reduce the line radiation losses, and the magnetic geometry is tailored to allow ion cyclotron resonance heating. RF #12;eld and ion trajectory calculations are presented to give a reasonably self-consistent picture of the ion acceleration process.

  8. 47 CFR 2.805 - Operation of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Operation of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization...COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.805...

  9. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization...COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803...

  10. 48 CFR 552.211-92 - Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using passive tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using...Provisions and Clauses 552.211-92 Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using...11), insert the following clause: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)...

  11. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization...COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803...

  12. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization...COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803...

  13. 48 CFR 552.211-92 - Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using passive tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using...Provisions and Clauses 552.211-92 Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using...11), insert the following clause: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)...

  14. 48 CFR 552.211-92 - Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using passive tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using...Provisions and Clauses 552.211-92 Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using...11), insert the following clause: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)...

  15. 48 CFR 552.211-92 - Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using passive tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using...Provisions and Clauses 552.211-92 Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using...11), insert the following clause: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)...

  16. 47 CFR 2.805 - Operation of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Operation of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization...COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.805...

  17. 78 FR 19311 - Certain Radio Frequency Identification (“RFID”) Products And Components Thereof; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ...Certain Radio Frequency Identification (``RFID'') Products And Components Thereof...certain radio frequency identification (``RFID'') products and components thereof by...certain radio frequency identification (``RFID'') products and components thereof...

  18. 48 CFR 552.211-92 - Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using passive tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using passive tags. 552.211-92...211-92 Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using passive tags. As prescribed...clause: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Using Passive Tags (JAN...

  19. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications. 15.204...204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications. ...any external radio frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use...

  20. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications. 15.204...204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications. ...any external radio frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use...

  1. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications. 15.204...204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications. ...any external radio frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use...

  2. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications. 15.204...204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications. ...any external radio frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use...

  3. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications. 15.204...204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications. ...any external radio frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use...

  4. 77 FR 35426 - Certain Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits and Devices Containing Same; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ...Certain Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits and Devices Containing Same...of certain radio frequency integrated circuits and devices containing same...of certain radio frequency integrated circuits and devices containing...

  5. Radio frequency energy harvesting from a feeding source in a passive deep brain stimulation device for murine preclinical research.

    PubMed

    Hosain, Md Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah J; Samad, Mst Fateha; Kale, Rajas P; Bennet, Kevin E; Manciu, Felicia S; Berk, Michael

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the development of an energy harvesting circuit for use with a head-mountable deep brain stimulation (DBS) device. It consists of a circular planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) and a Schottky diode-based Cockcroft-Walton 4-voltage rectifier. The PIFA has the volume of ? × 10(2) × 1.5 mm(3), resonance frequency of 915 MHz, and bandwidth of 16 MHz (909-925 MHz) at a return loss of -10 dB. The rectifier offers maximum efficiency of 78% for the input power of -5 dBm at a 5 k? load resistance. The developed rectenna operates efficiently at 915 MHz for the input power within -15 dBm to +5 dBm. For operating a DBS device, the DC voltage of 2 V is recorded from the rectenna terminal at a distance of 55 cm away from a 26.77 dBm transmitter in free space. An in-vitro test of the DBS device is presented. PMID:26318799

  6. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: The electrical asymmetry effect in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges - measurements of dc self bias, ion energy and ion flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, J.; Schüngel, E.; Czarnetzki, U.

    2009-05-01

    The recently theoretically predicted electrical asymmetry effect (EAE) (Heil et al 2008 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36 1404, Heil et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 165202, Czarnetzki et al 2009 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. at press) in capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) discharges and the related separate control of ion energy and flux via the EAE (Czarnetzki et al 2009 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. at press, Donkó et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42 025205) are tested experimentally for the first time. A geometrically symmetric CCRF discharge (equal electrode surface areas) operated at 13.56 and 27.12 MHz with variable phase angle between the harmonics is operated in argon at different pressures. The dc self bias, the energy as well as the flux of ions at the grounded electrode, and the space and phase resolved optical emission are measured. The results verify the predictions of models and simulations: via the EAE a dc self bias is generated as an almost linear function of the phase. This variable dc self bias allows separate control of ion energy and flux in an almost ideal way under various discharge conditions.

  7. Radio Frequency (RF) Trap for Confinement of Antimatter Plasmas Using Rotating Wall Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Pearson, J. Boise

    2004-01-01

    Perturbations associated with a rotating wall electric field enable the confinement of ions for periods approaching weeks. This steady state confinement is a result of a radio frequency manipulation of the ions. Using state-of-the-art techniques it is shown that radio frequency energy can produce useable manipulation of the ion cloud (matter or antimatter) for use in containment experiments. The current research focuses on the improvement of confinement systems capable of containing and transporting antimatter.

  8. Solar observations with a low frequency radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myserlis, I.; Seiradakis, J.; Dogramatzidis, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have set up a low frequency radio monitoring station for solar bursts at the Observatory of the Aristotle University in Thessaloniki. The station consists of a dual dipole phased array, a radio receiver and a dedicated computer with the necessary software installed. The constructed radio receiver is based on NASA's Radio Jove project. It operates continuously, since July 2010, at 20.1 MHz (close to the long-wavelength ionospheric cut-off of the radio window) with a narrow bandwidth (~5 kHz). The system is properly calibrated, so that the recorded data are expressed in antenna temperature. Despite the high interference level of an urban region like Thessaloniki (strong broadcasting shortwave radio stations, periodic experimental signals, CBs, etc), we have detected several low frequency solar radio bursts and correlated them with solar flares, X-ray events and other low frequency solar observations. The received signal is monitored in ordinary ASCII format and as audio signal, in order to investigate and exclude man-made radio interference. In order to exclude narrow band interference and calculate the spectral indices of the observed events, a second monitoring station, working at 36 MHz, is under construction at the village of Nikiforos near the town of Drama, about 130 km away of Thessaloniki. Finally, we plan to construct a third monitoring station at 58 MHz, in Thessaloniki. This frequency was revealed to be relatively free of interference, after a thorough investigation of the region.

  9. Radio-frequency ion deflector for mass separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlösser, Magnus; Rudnev, Vitaly; Ureña, Ángel González

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic cylindrical deflectors act as energy analyzer for ion beams. In this article, we present that by imposing of a radio-frequency modulation on the deflecting electric field, the ion transmission becomes mass dependent. By the choice of the appropriate frequency, amplitude, and phase, the deflector can be used as mass filter. The basic concept of the new instrument as well as simple mathematic relations are described. These calculations and further numerical simulations show that a mass sensitivity is achievable. Furthermore, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle in experimental measurements, compare the results to those of from a 1 m linear time-of-flight spectrometer, and comment on the mass resolution of the method. Finally, some potential applications are indicated.

  10. Radio frequency identification (RFID) applications in semiconductor manufacturing

    E-print Network

    Cassett, David Ian, 1971-

    2004-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) has an enormous potential impact within the semiconductor supply chain, especially within semiconductor manufacturing. The end benefit of RFID will be in the mass serialization, and ...

  11. Radio-frequency spectroscopy of ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    E-print Network

    Schirotzek, Andre

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents experiments investigating the phase diagram of ultracold atomic Fermi gases using radio-frequency spectroscopy. The tunability of many experimental parameters including the temperature, the interparticle ...

  12. Multi-dimensional ultra-high frequency passive radio frequency identification tag antenna designs

    E-print Network

    Delichatsios, Stefanie Alkistis

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, we present the design, simulation, and empirical evaluation of two novel multi-dimensional ultra-high frequency (UHF) passive radio frequency identification (RFID) tag antennas, the Albano-Dipole antenna ...

  13. Solar system radio astronomy at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    The planetary radio-astronomy observations obtained with the two Voyager spacecraft since their launch in 1977 are briefly characterized and illustrated with graphs, diagrams, and sample spectra. Topics addressed include the spacecraft designs and trajectories, the wavelength coverage of the radio instruments, the Io-controlled LF emission of Jupiter, the solar-wind effect on the Saturn kilometric radiation, the Saturn electrostatic discharges, and the use of the clocklike feature of the Uranus emission to measure the planet's rotation period.

  14. Fiducialization of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cryomodules at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    C. J. Curtis; J. Dahlberg; W. Oren; J. Preble; K. Tremblay

    2006-09-26

    During the early 1990's the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), was under construction in Newport News, Virginia. The facility was to be the first of its kind in that it was to provide a continuous beam of electrons for experimental physics at energies of several GeV. One of the key elements of this unique machine was the 338 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities built into 42 cryomodules and arranged in two linacs. These were linked by arcs of conventional magnets which allowed recirculation through the linacs up to five times, in order to achieve the design energy of 4GeV. Within each cryomodule the cavities were aligned and referenced to external fiducials allowing alignment on the design beampath. This paper describes the process developed to achieve this, how it evolved with improving instrumentation, and the results obtained. Suggestions for alternative methods which may prove useful for future projects are also discussed.

  15. The Current Status of Low Frequency Radio Astronomy from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Weiler, K. W.

    Ground-based radio astronomy is severely limited by the Earth's ionosphere. Below 15 -- 20 MHz, space-based radio observations are superior or even mandatory. Three different areas of astronomical research manifest themselves at low radio frequencies: solar, planetary, and galactic-extragalactic. Space-based observations of solar phenomena at low frequencies are a natural extension of high-frequency ground-based observations that have been carried out since the beginnings of radio astronomy. Measurements of known solar phenomena such as Types II and III bursts have been extended from the few solar radii altitude range reachable by ground-based techniques out to 1 AU and beyond. These space-based solar measurements have become critical in our developing an understanding of ``space weather." In contrast, non-thermal planetary radio emissions are almost exclusively a space radio astronomy phenomenon. With the exception of two components of Jupiter's complex radio spectrum, the magnetospheric and Auroral radio emissions of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have all been discovered by space radio astronomy techniques. For astrophysical applications, the lack of angular resolution from space at low frequencies has thwarted progress such that most areas still remain to be fully exploited. Results to date have only included overall cosmic background spectra and extremely crude (~1 steradian resolution) ``maps." In this overview we will briefly summarize the current status of science in the three areas of research and outline some future concepts for low-frequency, space-based instruments for solar, planetary, and astrophysical problems.

  16. Solar radio astronomy at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, George A.

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of solar radio emissions at decametric to kilometric wavelengths are reviewed. Special attention is given to the radiation of the quiet sun at several metric and decametric wavelengths and to nonthermal radiation from the active sun, including radio bursts of type III (electron beams), type-III bursts from behind the sun, storms of type III bursts, the flare-associated radio bursts, type II bursts (shock waves), and shock-associated bursts. It is pointed out that almost no observations have been made so far of solar radiation between about 20 MHz and about 2 MHz. Below about 2 MHz, dynamic spectra of flux densities of solar burst have been recorded in space and observations were made of the directions of centroids and characteristic sizes of the emitting sources.

  17. Radio frequency overview of the high explosive radio telemetry project

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.; Dimsdle, J.; Rich, D.; Smith, F.

    1998-12-31

    High explosive radio telemetry (HERT) is a project that is being developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies. The ultimate goal is to develop a small, modular telemetry system capable of high-speed detection of explosive events, with an accuracy on the order of 10 nanoseconds. The reliable telemetry of this data, from a high-speed missile trajectory, is a very challenging opportunity. All captured data must be transmitted in less than 20 microseconds of time duration. This requires a high bits/Hertz microwave telemetry modulation code to insure transmission of the data with the limited time interval available.

  18. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE...certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  19. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE...certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  20. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE...certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  1. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE...certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  2. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76...COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE...certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  3. Dielectric properties of almond shells in the development of radio frequency and microwave pasteurization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop pasteurization treatments based on radio frequency (RF) or microwave energy, dielectric properties of almond shells were determined using an open-ended coaxial-probe with an impedance analyzer over a frequency range of 10 to 1800 MHz. Both the dielectric constant and loss factor of almond...

  4. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803 Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization. (a) Except...

  5. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency products prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803 Marketing of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization. (a) Marketing,...

  6. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803 Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization. (a) Except...

  7. 47 CFR 2.805 - Operation of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of radio frequency products prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.805 Operation of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization. (a) General...

  8. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803 Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization. (a) Except...

  9. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803 Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization. (a) Marketing,...

  10. Privacy versus Scalability in Radio Frequency Identification August 6, 2010

    E-print Network

    Poovendran, Radha

    Embedding a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tag into individual items enables the unique number of tags in a typical RFID system, the private identification of tags can be a challenging problem Frequency Identification (RFID), scalability, privacy, passive, active 1 Introduction 1.1 RFID systems

  11. INACTIVATION OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE USING RADIO FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The application of radio frequency (RF) electric fields was investigated as a nonthermal alternative to thermal inactivation of microorganisms in liquids. A novel RF system was developed and produced frequencies in the range of 20 kHz to 60 kHz. Electric field strengths of 20 kV/cm and 30 kV/cm we...

  12. Planck Early Results. XV. Spectral Energy Distributions and Radio Continuum Spectra of Northern Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Amaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Berdyugin, A.; Bernard, J. P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources. based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multi frequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper. physical modelling of the synchrotron bump using multiple components. Planck ERCSC data also suggest that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum could be much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The implications of this are discussed for the acceleration mechanisms effective in blazar shock. Furthermore in many cases the Planck data indicate that gamma-ray emission must originate in the same shocks that produce the radio emission.

  13. Energy fluxes in a radio-frequency magnetron discharge for the deposition of superhard cubic boron nitride coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornholdt, S.; Ye, J.; Ulrich, S.; Kersten, H.

    2012-12-01

    Energy flux measurements by a calorimetric probe in a rf-magnetron plasma used for the deposition of super-hard c-BN coatings are presented and discussed. Argon as working gas is used for sputtering a h-BN target. Adding a certain amount of N2 is essential for the formation of stoichiometric BN films, since a lack of nitrogen will lead to boron rich films. Subsequently, the contributions of different plasma species, surface reactions, and film growth to the resulting variation of the substrate temperature in dependence on nitrogen admixture are estimated and discussed. In addition, SRIM simulations are performed to estimate the energy influx by sputtered neutral atoms. The influence of magnetron target power and oxygen admixture (for comparison with nitrogen) to the process gas on the total energy flux is determined and discussed qualitatively, too. The results indicate that variation of the energy influx due to additional nitrogen flow, which causes a decrease of electron and ion densities, electron temperature and plasma potential, is negligible, while the admixture of oxygen leads to a drastic increase of the energy influx. The typical hysteresis effect which can be observed during magnetron sputtering in oxygen containing gas mixtures has also been confirmed in the energy influx measurements for the investigated system. However, the underlying mechanism is not understood yet, and will be addressed in further investigations.

  14. Characteristics of Radio-Frequency Circuits Utilizing Ferroelectric Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Michael; Gui, Xiao; MacLeod, Todd; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    Ferroelectric capacitors, most commonly used in memory circuits and variable components, were studied in simple analog radio-frequency circuits such as the RLC resonator and Colpitts oscillator. The goal was to characterize the RF circuits in terms of frequency of oscillation, gain, etc, using ferroelectric capacitors. Frequencies of oscillation of both circuits were measured and studied a more accurate resonant frequency can be obtained using the ferroelectric capacitors. Many experiments were conducted and data collected. A model to simulate the experimental results will be developed. Discrepancies in gain and frequency in these RF circuits when conventional capacitors are replaced with ferroelectric ones were studied. These results will enable circuit designers to anticipate the effects of using ferroelectric components in their radio- frequency applications.

  15. Radio-Frequency Spectroscopy of strongly interacting Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirotzek, Andre; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Sommer, Ariel; Zwierlein, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Strongly interacting Fermi gases exhibit a rich phase diagram in the BEC-BCS crossover. In recent experiments we have used radio frequency spectroscopy to probe two physically very different regimes: 1.) We have observed Spin-Polarons in a highly imbalanced Fermi mixture. A single spin down atom immersed in a spin up Fermi sea dresses itself with a cloud of majority atoms, thus forming a Spin-Polaron. rf spectroscopy can directly reveal the polaron and allows for an experimental measure of the quasiparticle residue Z and the chemical potential ? of this Fermi liquid. At a critical interaction strength, the transition to two-particle molecular binding is observed. 2.) rf spectroscopy of quasiparticles in a polarized superfluid allowed us to determine the superfluid gap ? and has demonstrated the importance of the Hartree energy U in rf spectra [1]. [1] Andre Schirotzek, Yong-il Shin, Christian H. Schunck and Wolfgang Ketterle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 140403 (2008)

  16. Radio-frequency electromagnetic fields associated with cellular-radio cell-site antennas.

    PubMed

    Petersen, R C; Testagrossa, P A

    1992-01-01

    Because of a heightened public awareness of issues pertaining to the use of electromagnetic energy, concurrent with a rapid growth of the cellular telephone industry, a study was initiated to characterize the electromagnetic environment associated with typical cell-site antennas. In particular, the radio-frequency electromagnetic (RF) fields in the vicinity of several antenna towers, ranging in height from 46-82 m, were characterized by measurement. In all cases, the antennas were omnidirectional co-linear arrays. The maximal power densities considered representative of public exposure were found to be less than 100 microW/m2 (10 nW/cm2) per radio channel. Comparison of measured values with the corresponding values that were calculated from the free-space transmission formula indicated that the analytical technique is conservative (i.e., overestimates field levels). The measured and corresponding analytical values were found to be well below accepted exposure limits even when extrapolated to simultaneous and continuous operation of the maximal number of transmitters that would be expected to be installed at a cell-site. Additional measurements were made in the near field of the same antenna type in a roof-mounted configuration. At a distance of 0.7 m from the antenna, the maximal power density in the main beam was found to be less than 30 W/m2 (3 mW/cm2) when normalized to sixteen radio channels (the maximal number used on a single antenna) and less than 30 mW/m2 (3 microW/m2) at 70 m. In all cases, the effective radiated power (ERP) by each radio channel was 100 W referenced to a half-wave dipole. This paper describes the instrumentation and measurement techniques used for this study and provides a summary of the results. PMID:1482416

  17. Dual radio frequency plasma source: Understanding via electrical asymmetry effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-04-21

    On the basis of the global model, the influences of driving voltage and frequency on electron heating in geometrically symmetrical dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma have been investigated. Consistent with the experimental and simulation results, non-monotonic behavior of dc self bias and plasma heating with increasing high frequency is observed. In addition to the local maxima of plasma parameters for the integer values of the ratio between the frequencies ({xi}), ourstudies also predict local maxima for odd integer values of 2{xi} as a consequence of the electrical asymmetry effect produced by dual frequency voltage sources.

  18. Radio frequency identification enabled wireless sensing for intelligent food logistics.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhuo; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Qing; Uysal, Ismail; Zheng, Lirong

    2014-06-13

    Future technologies and applications for the Internet of Things (IoT) will evolve the process of the food supply chain and create added value of business. Radio frequency identifications (RFIDs) and wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have been considered as the key technological enablers. Intelligent tags, powered by autonomous energy, are attached on objects, networked by short-range wireless links, allowing the physical parameters such as temperatures and humidities as well as the location information to seamlessly integrate with the enterprise information system over the Internet. In this paper, challenges, considerations and design examples are reviewed from system, implementation and application perspectives, particularly with focus on intelligent packaging and logistics for the fresh food tracking and monitoring service. An IoT platform with a two-layer network architecture is introduced consisting of an asymmetric tag-reader link (RFID layer) and an ad-hoc link between readers (WSN layer), which are further connected to the Internet via cellular or Wi-Fi. Then, we provide insights into the enabling technology of RFID with sensing capabilities. Passive, semi-passive and active RFID solutions are discussed. In particular, we describe ultra-wideband radio RFID which has been considered as one of the most promising techniques for ultra-low-power and low-cost wireless sensing. Finally, an example is provided in the form of an application in fresh food tracking services and corresponding field testing results. PMID:24797140

  19. Extending the ICRF to higher radio frequencies - first imaging results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fey, A. L.; Boboltz, D. A.; Charlot, P.; Fomalont, E. B.; Lanyi, G. E.; Zhang, L. D.

    2005-01-01

    We present first imaging results and source structure analysis of 65 extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of a joint NASA USNO NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory program to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The long term goals of this program are a) to develop higher frequency reference frames for improved deep space navigation b) to extend the VLBA calibrator catalog at 24 and 43 GHz c) to provide the benefit of the ICRF catalog to new applications at these higher frequencies and d) to study source structure variation at 24 and 43 GHz in order to improve the astrometric accuracy. Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  20. Low frequency radio spectrum and spectral turnover of LS 5039

    E-print Network

    Sagar Godambe; Subir Bhattacharyya; Nilay Bhatt; Manojendu Choudhury

    2008-07-15

    LS 5039, a possible black hole x-ray binary, was recently observed with Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope. The observed spectrum presented here shows that the spectrum is inverted at the low frequency. When combined with the archival data with orbital phase similar to the present observations, it shows a clear indication of a spectral turnover. The combined data are fitted with a broken power-law and the break frequency signifies a possible spectral turnover of the spectrum around 964 MHz. Truly simultaneous observations in radio wavelength covering a wide range of frequencies are required to fix the spectrum and the spectral turn over which will play a crucial role in developing a deeper understanding of the radio emitting jet in LS 5039.

  1. A low frequency radio array for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, K. W.; Johnston, K. J.; Simon, R. S.; Dennison, B. K.; Erickson, W. C.; Kaiser, M. L.; Cane, H. V.; Desch, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper considers the need for and the possibility of constructing and operating a low-frequency array in space, the Low Frequency Space Array (LFSA), which is presently in its developmental phase, to form an entirely space-based synthesis interferometer for high-resolution high-sensitivity sky surveying and source imaging over the frequency range from about 1 to about 30 MHz. It is emphasized that there is a wealth of new astronomical information to be found in the as yet unexplored frequency range below 30 MHz, the wavelengths at which only interferometry is practicable. A possible instrumental concept for an LFSA spacecraft is described together with orbits, hardware, and subsystems.

  2. Radio frequency dc-dc power conversion

    E-print Network

    Rivas, Juan, 1976-

    2007-01-01

    THIS THESIS addresses the development of system architectures and circuit topologies for dc-dc power conversion at very high frequencies. The systems architectures that are developed are structured to overcome limitations ...

  3. 78 FR 13893 - Certain Radio Frequency Identification (“RFID”) Products and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... Certain Radio Frequency Identification (``RFID'') Products and Components Thereof; Notice of Receipt of... received a complaint entitled Certain Radio Frequency Identification (``RFID'') Products and Components... frequency identification (``RFID'') products and components thereof. The complaint names as...

  4. Black phosphorus radio-frequency transistors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Wang, Xiaomu; Xia, Fengnian; Wang, Luhao; Jiang, Hao; Xia, Qiangfei; Chin, Matthew L; Dubey, Madan; Han, Shu-jen

    2014-11-12

    Few-layer and thin film forms of layered black phosphorus (BP) have recently emerged as a promising material for applications in high performance nanoelectronics and infrared optoelectronics. Layered BP thin films offer a moderate bandgap of around 0.3 eV and high carrier mobility, which lead to transistors with decent on-off ratios and high on-state current densities. Here, we demonstrate the gigahertz frequency operation of BP field-effect transistors for the first time. The BP transistors demonstrated here show respectable current saturation with an on-off ratio that exceeds 2 × 10(3). We achieved a current density in excess of 270 mA/mm and DC transconductance above 180 mS/mm for hole conduction. Using standard high frequency characterization techniques, we measured a short-circuit current-gain cutoff frequency fT of 12 GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency fmax of 20 GHz in 300 nm channel length devices. BP devices may offer advantages over graphene transistors for high frequency electronics in terms of voltage and power gain due to the good current saturation properties arising from their finite bandgap, thus can be considered as a promising candidate for the future high performance thin film electronics technology for operation in the multi-GHz frequency range and beyond. PMID:25347787

  5. The Low-Frequency Environment of the Murchison Widefield Array: Radio-Frequency Interference Analysis and Mitigation

    E-print Network

    Cappallo, Roger J.

    The Murchison Widefield Array is a new low-frequency interferometric radio telescope built in Western Australia at one of the locations of the future Square Kilometre Array. We describe the automated radio-frequency ...

  6. Methods, Systems and Apparatuses for Radio Frequency Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Brown, Dewey T. (Inventor); Byerly, Diane (Inventor); Boose, Haley C. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system for radio frequency identification (RFID) includes an enclosure defining an interior region interior to the enclosure, and a feed for generating an electromagnetic field in the interior region in response to a signal received from an RFID reader via a radio frequency (RF) transmission line and, in response to the electromagnetic field, receiving a signal from an RFID sensor attached to an item in the interior region. The structure of the enclosure may be conductive and may include a metamaterial portion, an electromagnetically absorbing portion, or a wall extending in the interior region. Related apparatuses and methods for performing RFID are provided.

  7. Radio Frequency Ablation Registration, Segmentation, and Fusion Tool

    PubMed Central

    McCreedy, Evan S.; Cheng, Ruida; Hemler, Paul F.; Viswanathan, Anand; Wood, Bradford J.; McAuliffe, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    The Radio Frequency Ablation Segmentation Tool (RFAST) is a software application developed using NIH's Medical Image Processing Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) API for the specific purpose of assisting physicians in the planning of radio frequency ablation (RFA) procedures. The RFAST application sequentially leads the physician through the steps necessary to register, fuse, segment, visualize and plan the RFA treatment. Three-dimensional volume visualization of the CT dataset with segmented 3D surface models enables the physician to interactively position the ablation probe to simulate burns and to semi-manually simulate sphere packing in an attempt to optimize probe placement. PMID:16871716

  8. Magic radio-frequency dressing of nuclear spins in high-accuracy optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zanon-Willette, Thomas; de Clercq, Emeric; Arimondo, Ennio

    2012-11-30

    A Zeeman-insensitive optical clock atomic transition is engineered when nuclear spins are dressed by a nonresonant radio-frequency field. For fermionic species as (87)Sr, (171)Yb, and (199)Hg, particular ratios between the radio-frequency driving amplitude and frequency lead to "magic" magnetic values where a net cancelation of the Zeeman clock shift and a complete reduction of first-order magnetic variations are produced within a relative uncertainty below the 10(-18) level. An Autler-Townes continued fraction describing a semiclassical radio-frequency dressed spin is numerically computed and compared to an analytical quantum description including higher-order magnetic field corrections to the dressed energies. PMID:23368116

  9. Low frequency radio synthesis imaging of the galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Michael Evans

    2005-11-01

    The Very Large Array radio interferometer has been equipped with new receivers to allow observations at 330 and 74 MHz, frequencies much lower than were previously possible with this instrument. Though the VLA dishes are not optimal for working at these frequencies, the system is successful and regular observations are now taken at these frequencies. However, new data analysis techniques are required to work at these frequencies. The technique of self- calibration, used to remove small atmospheric effects at higher frequencies, has been adapted to compensate for ionospheric turbulence in much the same way that adaptive optics is used in the optical regime. Faceted imaging techniques are required to compensate for the noncoplanar image distortion that affects the system due to the wide fields of view at these frequencies (~2.3° at 330 MHz and ~11° at 74 MHz). Furthermore, radio frequency interference is a much larger problem at these frequencies than in higher frequencies and novel approaches to its mitigation are required. These new techniques and new system are allowing for imaging of the radio sky at sensitivities and resolutions orders of magnitude higher than were possible with the low frequency systems of decades past. In this work I discuss the advancements in low frequency data techniques required to make high resolution, high sensitivity, large field of view measurements with the new Very Large Array low frequency system and then detail the results of turning this new system and techniques on the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. At 330 MHz I image the Galactic center region with roughly 10 inches resolution and 1.6 mJy beam -1 sensitivity. New Galactic center nonthermal filaments, new pulsar candidates, and the lowest frequency detection to date of the radio source associated with our Galaxy's central massive black hole result. At 74 MHz I image a region of the sky roughly 40° x 6° with, ~10 feet resolution. I use the high opacity of H II regions at 74 MHz to extract three-dimensional data on the distribution of Galactic cosmic ray emissivity, a measurement possible only at low radio frequencies.

  10. Low-frequency radio navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, D. E. (inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method of continuous wave navigation using four transmitters operating at sufficiently low frequencies to assure essentially pure groundwave operation is described. The transmitters are keyed to transmit constant bursts (1/4 sec) in a time-multiplexed pattern with phase modulation of at least one transmitter for identification of the transmitters and with the ability to identify the absolute phase of the modulated transmitter and the ability to modulate low rate data for transmission. The transmitters are optimally positioned to provide groundwave coverage over a service region of about 50 by 50 km for the frequencies selected in the range of 200 to 500 kHz, but their locations are not critical because of the beneficial effect of overdetermination of position of a receiver made possible by the fourth transmitter. Four frequencies are used, at least two of which are selected to provide optimal resolution. All transmitters are synchronized to an average phase as received by a monitor receiver.

  11. Detecting Rot in Power Poles with Radio Frequency Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, P. H.; Cooper, J. E.

    2004-02-01

    The potential for detecting rot in power poles with a radio frequency method was tested. Five pentachlorophenol-treated pole sections containing both sound and decayed wood were obtained from out-of-service power poles. Sections were conditioned in 12-percent equilibrium moisture content (EMC) conditions for 12 months prior to testing. Pole sections were scanned over their length by a laboratory prototype that applied 250, 500 and 2000 kHz radio frequency signals to opposed 1-inch diameter metal electrodes in contact with the pole surface. Each capacitor pair scanned each pole cross sectionally at multiple positions along pole longitudinal axis. Signal voltage attenuation and phase shift values for sound and decayed wood sections were recorded. Radio frequency signals for sound wood were compared to those of decayed wood. Radio frequency signals of 2000 kHz yielded the greatest difference in attenuation and phase shift response between sound and decayed wood. For even the best-performing 2000 kHz signal, evaluation of attenuation appeared to be an impractical means to differentiate sound from decayed wood. However, phase shift performed consistently in differentiating sound from decayed wood and, for signal frequencies of 2000 kHz and above, appears to have considerable potential for this purpose.

  12. Mapping the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex in Radio Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Lemly, C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to create a large-scale intensity map of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex at a radio frequency of 1420 MHz. A mapping frequency of 1420 MHz was chosen because neutral hydrogen, which is the primary component of the Orion Molecular Complex, naturally emits radio waves at this frequency. The radio spectral data for this project were gathered using a 4.6-m radio telescope whose spectrometer was tuned to 1420 MHz and whose beam width was 2.7 degrees. The map created for this project consisted of an eight-by-eight grid centered on M42 spanning 21.6 degrees per side. The grid consisted of 64 individual squares spanning 2.7 degrees per side (corresponding to the beam width of the telescope). Radio spectra were recorded for each of these individual squares at an IF gain of 18. Each spectrum consisted of intensity on an arbitrary scale from 0 to 10 plotted as a function frequencies ranging from -400 kHz to +100 kHz around the origin of 1420 MHz. The data from all 64 radio spectra were imported into Wolfram Alpha, which was used to fit Gaussian functions to the data. The peak intensity and the frequency at which this peak intensity occurs could then be extracted from the Gaussian functions. Other helpful quantities that could be calculated from the Gaussian functions include flux (integral of Gaussian function over frequency range), average value of intensity (flux integral divided by frequency range), and half maximum of intensity. Because all of the radio spectra were redshifted, the velocities of the hydrogen gas clouds of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex could be calculated using the Doppler equation. The data extracted from the Gaussian functions were then imported into Mathcad to create 2D grayscale maps with right ascension (RA) on the x-axis, declination on the y-axis, and intensity (or flux, etc.) represented on a scale from black to white (with white representing the highest intensities). These 2D maps were then imported into ImageJ to create 3D surface contour plots with RA on the x-axis, declination on the y-axis, and intensity (or flux, etc.) on the z-axis. The intensity map shows the best radio sources.

  13. A radio-frequency sheath model for complex waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, P.

    2014-04-21

    Plasma sheaths driven by radio-frequency voltages occur in contexts ranging from plasma processing to magnetically confined fusion experiments. An analytical understanding of such sheaths is therefore important, both intrinsically and as an element in more elaborate theoretical structures. Radio-frequency sheaths are commonly excited by highly anharmonic waveforms, but no analytical model exists for this general case. We present a mathematically simple sheath model that is in good agreement with earlier models for single frequency excitation, yet can be solved for arbitrary excitation waveforms. As examples, we discuss dual-frequency and pulse-like waveforms. The model employs the ansatz that the time-averaged electron density is a constant fraction of the ion density. In the cases we discuss, the error introduced by this approximation is small, and in general it can be quantified through an internal consistency condition of the model. This simple and accurate model is likely to have wide application.

  14. Computer simulations of ions in radio-frequency traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.; Djomehri, J.; Harabetian, E.

    1990-01-01

    The motion of ions in a trapped-ion frequency standard affects the stability of the standard. In order to study the motion and structures of large ion clouds in a radio-frequency (RF) trap, a computer simulation of the system that incorporates the effect of thermal excitation of the ions was developed. Results are presented from the simulation for cloud sizes up to 512 ions, emphasizing cloud structures in the low-temperature regime.

  15. 29. View of typical radio frequency monitor group electronic tubetype ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. View of typical radio frequency monitor group electronic tube-type cabinet. System is water-cooled with antenna assist. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. 75. Transmitter building no. 102, view of typical radio frequency ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. Transmitter building no. 102, view of typical radio frequency switching group for lower antenna A & B and upper antenna A & B and MIP/MWOC automated interface cabinet. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. Radio frequency excited CO/sub 2/ waveguide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.L.; Tulip, J.L.

    1984-10-01

    This paper reports on the operation of radio frequency (rf) excited carbon dioxide waveguide lasers. An efficiency of greater than 10% has been achieved with a maximum power of 21 W. The effects of bore size, waveguide fabrication techniques, and gas mixture are discussed.

  18. Modification of the DSN radio frequency angular tropospheric refraction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The previously derived DSN Radio Frequency Angular Tropospheric Refraction Model contained an assumption which was subsequently seen to be at a variance with the theoretical basis of angular refraction. The modification necessary to correct the model is minor in that the value of a constant is changed.

  19. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) System 333 [2] . RFID. , ,

    E-print Network

    Kovintavewat, Piya

    _.php?gov=1187 [26] . (2549). . Retrieved July 14, 2008, from http://www.nectec.or.th/info/posters/pdf/ food/rfid Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) System 333 [1] , , , 2548 [2] . RFID. , , 192 , 2549 [3 Identification (RFID) System334 [14] Retrieved July 14, 2008, from http://www.automaticleasing.com/images/ Cards

  20. How can radio frequency identification technology impact nursing practice?

    PubMed

    Billingsley, Luanne; Wyld, David

    2014-12-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can save nurses time, improve quality of care, en hance patient and staff safety, and decrease costs. However, without a better understanding of these systems and their benefits to patients and hospitals, nurses may be slower to recommend, implement, or adopt RFID technology into practice. PMID:25695118

  1. Authentication of Radio Frequency Identification Devices Using Electronic Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinnappa Gounder Periaswamy, Senthilkumar

    2010-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) tags are low-cost devices that are used to uniquely identify the objects to which they are attached. Due to the low cost and size that is driving the technology, a tag has limited computational capabilities and resources. This limitation makes the implementation of conventional security protocols to prevent…

  2. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING, KAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of KAI Technologies in-situ radio frequency heating system for soil treatment was conducted from January 1994 to July 1994 at Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. This demonstration was conducted as a joint effort between the USEPA and the USAF. The technol...

  3. Radio frequency and infrared drying of sized textile warp yarns

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddick, H.G. )

    1990-11-01

    Drying sized textile warp yarns without contacting the warp is easily accomplished by either radio frequency or infrared techniques. Although the process is more expensive than conventional drying, the substantial savings accrued during subsequent weaving and finishing of the cloth can help keep the US textile industry competitive and support electrical load. 5 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  4. RADIO FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELDS PROCESSING OF ORANGE JUICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nonthermal process of radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) has been shown to inactivate bacteria in apple juice at moderately low temperatures, but has yet to be extended to inactivate bacteria in orange juice. An 80 kW RFEF pasteurizer was used to process pulp-free orange juice at flow rates ...

  5. A Hybrid Radio Frequency and Broadcast Visible Light Communication System

    E-print Network

    Little, Thomas

    -efficient LED materials and devices will replace old incandescent and fluorescent lighting. Among multiple advantages, VLC uses a vast unregulated and free spectrum [3]. Light signals also have the abilityA Hybrid Radio Frequency and Broadcast Visible Light Communication System Michael B. Rahaim , Anna

  6. Actual Reflectometer on Fusion Experiment Emit radio frequency waves,

    E-print Network

    Budny, Robert

    Actual Reflectometer on Fusion Experiment Emit radio frequency waves, measure reflected waves waves downloaded from URL. Added interactive graphics & visualization without changing existing Fortran 1019 1 keV 1 T Visualize Input Plasma Cross Sections Wave Reflection Layer (Cut-off Location) Compute

  7. Localized radio frequency communication using asynchronous transfer mode protocol

    DOEpatents

    Witzke, Edward L. (Edgewood, NM); Robertson, Perry J. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierson, Lyndon G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-14

    A localized wireless communication system for communication between a plurality of circuit boards, and between electronic components on the circuit boards. Transceivers are located on each circuit board and electronic component. The transceivers communicate with one another over spread spectrum radio frequencies. An asynchronous transfer mode protocol controls communication flow with asynchronous transfer mode switches located on the circuit boards.

  8. Surface Studies on Niobium for Superconductivity Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Leah B.

    Surface Studies on Niobium for Superconductivity Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Hui Tian College Kelley, Professor of Applied Science Abstract Niobium rf superconductivity is a nanoscale, near employed treatment-BCP on polycrystalline niobium sheet over a range of realistic solution flow rates has

  9. Radio frequency telemetry system for sensors and actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches apparatus for combining Radio Frequency (RF) technology with novel micro-inductor antennas and signal processing circuits for RF telemetry of real time, measured data, from microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors, through electromagnetic coupling with a remote powering/receiving device. Such technology has many applications, but is especially useful in the biomedical area.

  10. 48 CFR 252.211-7006 - Passive Radio Frequency Identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passive Radio Frequency Identification. 252.211-7006 Section 252.211-7006 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses...

  11. Experimental study of a high intensity radio-frequency cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaid, Ramzi; Ban, G.; Cam, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Within the framework of the DESIR/SPIRAL-2 project, a radio-frequency quadrupole cooler named SHIRaC has been studied. SHIRaC is a key device of SPIRAL-2, designed to enhance the beam quality required by DESIR. The preliminary study and development of this device has been carried out at Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de CAEN (LPC Caen), France. The goal of this paper is to present the experimental studies conducted on a SHIRaC prototype. The main peculiarity of this cooler is its efficient handling and cooling of ion beams with currents going up as high as 1 ? A which has never before been achieved in any of the previous coolers. Much effort has been made lately into these studies for development of appropriate optics, vacuum and rf systems which allow cooling of beams of large emittance (˜80 ? mm mrad ) and high current. The dependencies of SHIRaC's transmission and the cooled beam parameters in terms of geometrical transverse emittance and the longitudinal energy spread have also been discussed. Investigation of beam purity at optimum cooling condition has also been done. Results from the experiments indicate that an emittance reduction of less than 2.5 ? mm mrad and a longitudinal energy spread reduction of less than 4 eV are obtained with more than 70% of ion transmission. The emittance is at expected values whereas the energy spread is not.

  12. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers and... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and... frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use with a part 15 intentional radiator. (b)...

  13. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers and... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and... frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use with a part 15 intentional radiator. (b)...

  14. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers and... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and... frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use with a part 15 intentional radiator. (b)...

  15. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers and... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and... frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use with a part 15 intentional radiator. (b)...

  16. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers and... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and... frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use with a part 15 intentional radiator. (b)...

  17. UTag: Long-range Ultra-wideband Passive Radio Frequency Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, F

    2007-03-14

    Long-range, ultra-wideband (UWB), passive radio frequency (RF) tags are key components in Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) system that will revolutionize inventory control and tracking applications. Unlike conventional, battery-operated (active) RFID tags, LLNL's small UWB tags, called 'UTag', operate at long range (up to 20 meters) in harsh, cluttered environments. Because they are battery-less (that is, passive), they have practically infinite lifetimes without human intervention, and they are lower in cost to manufacture and maintain than active RFID tags. These robust, energy-efficient passive tags are remotely powered by UWB radio signals, which are much more difficult to detect, intercept, and jam than conventional narrowband frequencies. The features of long range, battery-less, and low cost give UTag significant advantage over other existing RFID tags.

  18. A radio frequency compensated emissive probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jungwon; Carlile, Robert N.; O'Hanlon, John F.

    1996-05-01

    We discuss a technique for using an emissive probe to measure accurately the time-invariant plasma potential in a rf generated plasma, usually used in plasma processing. With an emissive probe, a short length of filament, heated to thermionic emission, is immersed in the plasma. We have introduced into each lead of the filament two LC circuits, one resonant at 13.6 MHz, the fundamental rf frequency, and the other at 27.2 MHz, the first harmonic. With the LC circuits in place a single peak of di/dv versus v occurs with a maximum at the time-invariant plasma potential. The inflection point method of measuring this potential described by Smith, Hershkowitz, and Coakley [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 50, 210 (1979)] in a dc plasma is now operative. The estimated error in measuring this potential is ±3.5%.

  19. Exploring the magnetized cosmic web through low frequency radio emission

    E-print Network

    N. Battaglia; C. Pfrommer; J. L. Sievers; J. R. Bond; T. A. Ensslin

    2009-08-07

    Recent improvements in the capabilities of low frequency radio telescopes provide a unique opportunity to study thermal and non-thermal properties of the cosmic web. We argue that the diffuse, polarized emission from giant radio relics traces structure formation shock waves and illuminates the large-scale magnetic field. To show this, we model the population of shock-accelerated relativistic electrons in high-resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters and calculate the resulting radio synchrotron emission. We find that individual shock waves correspond to localized peaks in the radio surface brightness map which enables us to measure Mach numbers for these shocks. We show that the luminosities and number counts of the relics strongly depend on the magnetic field properties, the cluster mass and dynamical state. By suitably combining different cluster data, including Faraday rotation measures, we are able to constrain some macroscopic parameters of the plasma at the structure formation shocks, such as models of turbulence. We also predict upper limits for the properties of the warm-hot intergalactic medium, such as its temperature and density. We predict that the current generation of radio telescopes (LOFAR, GMRT, MWA, LWA) have the potential to discover a substantially larger sample of radio relics, with multiple relics expected for each violently merging cluster. Future experiments (SKA) should enable us to further probe the macroscopic parameters of plasma physics in clusters.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Radio-frequency amplifiers based on dc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael; McDermott, Robert

    2010-09-01

    SQUIDs are an attractive candidate for the amplification of low-level rf and microwave signals. Compared to semiconductor amplifiers, they offer lower noise and much lower power dissipation. Especially at frequencies below 1 GHz, the improvement in noise temperature compared to the best cold semiconductor amplifiers can be as high as 50; noise temperatures only slightly above the quantum limit have been achieved in this frequency range. This article will review the current status of radio-frequency amplifiers based on dc SQUIDs and provide detailed discussions of amplifier noise temperature, input and output impedance, and nonlinearities.

  1. The radio astronomy explorer satellite, a low-frequency observatory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.; Alexander, J. K.; Stone, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    The RAE-1 is the first spacecraft designed exclusively for radio astronomical studies. It is a small, but relatively complex, observatory including two 229-meter antennas, several radiometer systems covering a frequency range of 0.2 to 9.2 MHz, and a variety of supporting experiments such as antenna impedance probes and TV cameras to monitor antenna shape. Since its launch in July, 1968, RAE-1 has sent back some 10 billion data bits per year on measurements of long-wavelength radio phenomena in the magnetosphere, the solar corona, and the Galaxy. In this paper we describe the design, calibration, and performance of the RAE-1 experiments in detail.

  2. The effect of radio frequency plasma processing reactor circuitry on plasma characteristics

    E-print Network

    Kushner, Mark

    The effect of radio frequency plasma processing reactor circuitry on plasma characteristics Shahid Raufa) and Mark J. Kushnerb) Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois strongly influence the performance of radio frequency rf plasma processing reactors. Seemingly minor

  3. Analysis, prediction and control of radio frequency interference with respect to DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    Susceptibility modeling, prediction of radio frequency interference from satellites, operational radio frequency interference control, and international regulations are considered. The existing satellite interference prediction program DSIP2 is emphasized. A summary status evaluation and recommendations for future work are given.

  4. Antarctic radio frequency albedo and implications for cosmic ray reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, D. Z.; Stockham, J.; Sullivan, M.; Allison, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Belov, K.; Binns, W. R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Gorham, P. W.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Liewer, K. M.; Matsuno, S.; Miki, C.; Mottram, M.; Nam, J.; Naudet, C. J.; Nichol, R. J.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Ruckman, L.; Saltzberg, D.; Seckel, D.; Shang, R. Y.; Stockham, M.; Varner, G. S.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We describe herein a measurement of the Antarctic surface "roughness" performed by the balloon-borne ANITA (Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna) experiment. Originally purposed for cosmic ray astrophysics, the radio frequency (RF) receiver ANITA gondola, from its 38 km altitude vantage point, can scan a disk of snow surface 600 km in radius. The primary purpose of ANITA is to detect RF emissions from cosmic rays incident on Antarctica, such as neutrinos which penetrate through the atmosphere and interact within the ice, resulting in signal directed upward which then refracts at the ice-air interface and up and out to ANITA, or high-energy nuclei (most likely irons or protons), which interact in the upper atmosphere (at altitudes below ANITA) and produce a spray of down-coming RF which reflects off the snow surface and back up to the gondola. The energy of such high-energy nuclei can be inferred from the observed reflected signal only if the surface reflectivity is known. We describe herein an attempt to quantify the Antarctic surface reflectivity, using the Sun as a constant, unpolarized RF source. We find that the reflectivity of the surface generally follows the expectations from the Fresnel equations, lending support to the use of those equations to give an overall correction factor to calculate cosmic ray energies for all locations in Antarctica. The analysis described below is based on ANITA-II data. After launching from McMurdo Station in December 2008, ANITA-II was aloft for a period of 31 days with a typical instantaneous duty cycle exceeding 95%.

  5. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trenikhina, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Kwon, J.; Zuo, J.-M.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

    2015-04-21

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ?100?nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120?°C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800?°C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120?°C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120?°C bake.

  6. Ion Dynamics Model for Collisionless Radio Frequency Sheaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T.R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full scale reactor model based on fluid equations is widely used to analyze high density plasma reactors. It is well known that the submillimeter scale sheath in front of a biased electrode supporting the wafer is difficult to resolve in numerical simulations, and the common practice is to use results for electric field from some form of analytical sheath model as boundary conditions for full scale reactor simulation. There are several sheath models in the literature ranging from Child's law to a recent unified sheath model [P. A. Miller and M. E. Riley, J. Appl. Phys. 82, 3689 (1997)l. In the present work, the cold ion fluid equations in the radio frequency sheath are solved numerically to show that the spatiotemporal variation of ion flux inside the sheath, commonly ignored in analytical models, is important in determining the electric field and ion energy at the electrode. Consequently, a semianalytical model that includes the spatiotemporal variation of ion flux is developed for use as boundary condition in reactor simulations. This semianalytical model is shown to yield results for sheath properties in close agreement with numerical solutions.

  7. A Graphical Approach to Radio Frequency Quadrupole Design

    E-print Network

    Turemen, G; Yasatekin, B

    2014-01-01

    The design of a radio frequency quadrupole, an important section of all ion accelerators, and the calculation of its beam dynamics properties can be achieved using the existing computational tools. These programs, originally designed in 1980s, show effects of aging in their user interfaces and in their output. The authors believe there is room for improvement in both design techniques using a graphical approach and in the amount of analytical calculations before going into CPU burning finite element analysis techniques. Additionally an emphasis on the graphical method of controlling the evolution of the relevant parameters using the drag-to-change paradigm is bound to be beneficial to the designer. A computer code, named DEMIRCI, has been written in C++ to demonstrate these ideas. This tool has been used in the design of Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK)'s 1.5 MeV proton beamline at Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM). DEMIRCI starts with a simple analytical model, calculates the RFQ b...

  8. A graphical approach to radio frequency quadrupole design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turemen, G.; Unel, G.; Yasatekin, B.

    2015-07-01

    The design of a radio frequency quadrupole, an important section of all ion accelerators, and the calculation of its beam dynamics properties can be achieved using the existing computational tools. These programs, originally designed in 1980s, show effects of aging in their user interfaces and in their output. The authors believe there is room for improvement in both design techniques using a graphical approach and in the amount of analytical calculations before going into CPU burning finite element analysis techniques. Additionally an emphasis on the graphical method of controlling the evolution of the relevant parameters using the drag-to-change paradigm is bound to be beneficial to the designer. A computer code, named DEMIRCI, has been written in C++ to demonstrate these ideas. This tool has been used in the design of Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK)'s 1.5 MeV proton beamline at Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM). DEMIRCI starts with a simple analytical model, calculates the RFQ behavior and produces 3D design files that can be fed to a milling machine. The paper discusses the experience gained during design process of SANAEM Project Prometheus (SPP) RFQ and underlines some of DEMIRCI's capabilities.

  9. Numerical studies of current generation by radio-frequency traveling waves

    E-print Network

    Karney, Charles

    Numerical studies of current generation by radio-frequency traveling waves Charles F. F. Karney January 1979; final manuscript received 7 May 1979) By injecting radio-frequency traveling waves of the fusion power output. Recently,' the damping of high-phase-velocity radio- frequency traveling waves has

  10. Verification of particle simulation of radio frequency waves in fusion Animesh Kuley,1,2,a)

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zhihong

    Verification of particle simulation of radio frequency waves in fusion plasmas Animesh Kuley,1,2,a (Received 14 May 2013; accepted 8 October 2013; published online 24 October 2013) Radio frequency (RF) waves. INTRODUCTION The importance of radio frequency (RF) waves as a source for heating and current drive has been

  11. Radio-frequency-mediated dipolar recoupling among half-integer quadrupolar spins

    E-print Network

    Griffin, Robert G.

    Radio-frequency-mediated dipolar recoupling among half-integer quadrupolar spins Marc Baldus quadrupolar spins in the presence of an appropriate radio-frequency field. Experimental and theoretical in close spatial proximity. Unfortunately, most spin-1/2 methods involving radio frequency rf irradiation

  12. Radio Frequency Charge Parity Meter M. D. Schroer,1,* M. Jung,1

    E-print Network

    Petta, Jason

    Radio Frequency Charge Parity Meter M. D. Schroer,1,* M. Jung,1 K. D. Petersson,1 and J. R. Petta1 measurement by detecting the radio frequency signal that is reflected by a lumped-element resonator coupled of the mesoscopic admittance of DQD devices. In this Letter, we probe spin-dependent effects in the radio frequency

  13. Dowsing can be interfered with by radio frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Paavo; Niinimaa, Ahti; Myllylä, Risto

    2012-04-01

    The soil radiation, watercourses and ores have been located for centuries by sensitive persons, dowsers. An ideomotoric explanation of the dowsing reaction, with no physical interaction, has been accepted. Our present re-analyses of some such results have shown, that there could be a physical phenomenon connecting the human reactions in field experiments, where the test subjects walked or were sitting in a slow-moving car, with the windows covered, and a dowsing rod in their hands was recorded. The correlations between the reaction points by test subjects in the moving car and the points by walking along the same path were highly significant. The correlation was not seen in all test locations. The distance between the test location and the radio tower, and the incidence angle of the transmitted radio wave, possibly had an effect on results. We hypothesize that the experiments carried out in the 20th century were interfered with by man-made radio frequency radiation, mainly FM radio and TV broadcasting, as test subjects' bodies absorbed the radio waves and unconscious hand movement reactions took place following the standing waves or intensity variations due to multipath propagation. PMID:22365422

  14. Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kocabas, Coskun; Kim, Hoon-sik; Banks, Tony; Rogers, John A.; Pesetski, Aaron A.; Baumgardner, James E.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.; Zhang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    The potential to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in advanced electronics represents a continuing, major source of interest in these materials. However, scalable integration of SWNTs into circuits is challenging because of difficulties in controlling the geometries, spatial positions, and electronic properties of individual tubes. We have implemented solutions to some of these challenges to yield radio frequency (RF) SWNT analog electronic devices, such as narrow band amplifiers operating in the VHF frequency band with power gains as high as 14 dB. As a demonstration, we fabricated nanotube transistor radios, in which SWNT devices provide all of the key functions, including resonant antennas, fixed RF amplifiers, RF mixers, and audio amplifiers. These results represent important first steps to practical implementation of SWNTs in high-speed analog circuits. Comparison studies indicate certain performance advantages over silicon and capabilities that complement those in existing compound semiconductor technologies. PMID:18227509

  15. An overview of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falinski, Wojciech

    2006-10-01

    RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) is the technology of wireless identification of tagged products. It is one of the fastest developing technologies in electronic market and it is predicted to replace soon the barcodes which are in common usage in today's economy. There are several advantages of RFID tags over barcode. The main are reading without must of scanning the product and the possibility to keep much more information on chip of the tag. In the article there are introduced the possible applications of RFID technology. There are also presented the classification of the RFID tags and the difference between working frequency. It is introduced every steps of manufacturing RFID tags with focus on the technology aspects (technologies of producing antenna, attaching the chip and creation of electrical connection between antenna and chip). Tele and Radio Research Institute is now starting to realize the project of manufacturing the RFID tags antenna. There is presented our guideline of the project.

  16. Predictions for high-frequency radio surveys of extragalactic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zotti, G.; Ricci, R.; Mesa, D.; Silva, L.; Mazzotta, P.; Toffolatti, L.; González-Nuevo, J.

    2005-03-01

    We present detailed predictions of the contributions of the various source populations to the counts at frequencies of tens of GHz. New evolutionary models are worked out for flat-spectrum radio quasars, BL Lac objects, and steep-spectrum sources. Source populations characterized by spectra peaking at high radio frequencies, such as extreme GPS sources, ADAF/ADIOS sources and early phases of ?-ray burst afterglows are also dealt with. The counts of different populations of star-forming galaxies (normal spirals, starbursts, high-z galaxies detected by SCUBA and MAMBO surveys, interpreted as proto-spheroidal galaxies) are estimated taking into account both synchrotron and free-free emission, and dust re-radiation. Our analysis is completed by updated counts of Sunyaev-Zeldovich effects in clusters of galaxies and by a preliminary estimate of galactic-scale Sunyaev-Zeldovich signals associated to proto-galactic plasma.

  17. Radio frequency communication system utilizing radiating transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Struven, Warren C. (San Carlos, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A radio communication system for use in tunnels, mines, buildings or other shielded locations in which a pair of radiating transmission lines (30), (31) extend through such location in spaced coextensive relation to each other. Each transmission line (30), (31) has at least one unidirectional amplifier (32), (33) interposed therein with the sense of the unidirectional amplifier (32) of one transmission line (30) being opposite to the sense of the unidirectional amplifier (33) of the other transmission line (31). Each of the amplifiers (32), (33) has a gain which is less than the coupling loss between the transmission lines (30), (31). Two or more mobile transceivers (35) in the location served by the system are coupled to the transmission lines (30), (31) by electromagnetic wave propagation in space in order to communicate directly with each other at a given radio frequency within the frequency range of the system.

  18. Large-N correlator systems for low frequency radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Griffin

    Low frequency radio astronomy has entered a second golden age driven by the development of a new class of large-N interferometric arrays. The low frequency array (LOFAR) and a number of redshifted HI Epoch of Reionization (EoR) arrays are currently undergoing commission and regularly observing. Future arrays of unprecedented sensitivity and resolutions at low frequencies, such as the square kilometer array (SKA) and the hydrogen epoch of reionization array (HERA), are in development. The combination of advancements in specialized field programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware for signal processing, computing and graphics processing unit (GPU) resources, and new imaging and calibration algorithms has opened up the oft underused radio band below 300 MHz. These interferometric arrays require efficient implementation of digital signal processing (DSP) hardware to compute the baseline correlations. FPGA technology provides an optimal platform to develop new correlators. The significant growth in data rates from these systems requires automated software to reduce the correlations in real time before storing the data products to disk. Low frequency, widefield observations introduce a number of unique calibration and imaging challenges. The efficient implementation of FX correlators using FPGA hardware is presented. Two correlators have been developed, one for the 32 element BEST-2 array at Medicina Observatory and the other for the 96 element LOFAR station at Chilbolton Observatory. In addition, calibration and imaging software has been developed for each system which makes use of the radio interferometry measurement equation (RIME) to derive calibrations. A process for generating sky maps from widefield LOFAR station observations is presented. Shapelets, a method of modelling extended structures such as resolved sources and beam patterns has been adapted for radio astronomy use to further improve system calibration. Scaling of computing technology allows for the development of larger correlator systems, which in turn allows for improvements in sensitivity and resolution. This requires new calibration techniques which account for a broad range of systematic effects.

  19. Radio-frequency dressing of multiple Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, A. M.; Anderson, R. P.; Hanna, Thomas M.; Tiesinga, E.; Julienne, P. S.; Hall, D. S.

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate and theoretically analyze the dressing of several proximate Feshbach resonances in R87b using radio-frequency (rf) radiation. We present accurate measurements and characterizations of the resonances, and the dramatic changes in scattering properties that can arise through the rf dressing. Our scattering theory analysis yields quantitative agreement with the experimental data. We also present a simple interpretation of our results in terms of rf-coupled bound states interacting with the collision threshold.

  20. Perforated-Layer Implementation Of Radio-Frequency Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1996-01-01

    Luneberg-type radio-frequency dielectric lenses made of stacked perforated circular dielectric sheets, according to proposal. Perforation pattern designed to achieve required spatial variation of permittivity. Consists of round holes distributed across face of each sheet in "Swiss-cheese" pattern, plus straight or curved slots that break up outer parts into petals in "daisy-wheel" pattern. Holes and slots made by numerically controlled machining.

  1. Radio detection of ultra high energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varner, Gary S.; ANITA Collaboration; SalSA Collaboration; IceRay Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    Recent evidence for observation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff in the cosmic ray spectrum has a number of profound implications for our understanding of high energy astroparticle physics. This GZK process itself produces neutrinos that are strongly believed to be both spectrally and spatially correlated to high energy cosmic ray particles above 100 EeV. In the 1960's Askaryan predicted that spatially compact nature of electromagnetic showers produced from the interaction of such high energy neutrinos would lead to coherent Cherenkov radiation. In June 2006 these Askaryan effect predictions were verified for emulated EeV showers in a 7 ton ice target at SLAC. A number of current and future experiments are now actively exploiting this radio detection method to search for the "guaranteed" GZK flux of high energy neutrinos. None have yet been observed, though the sensitivity of the detectors is just now approaching the predicted range. The ANtarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, a long-duration balloon operating at an altitude of 37 km, flew for over a month during December 2006-January 2007, and again December 2008-January 2009. In the longer term, a large-scale terrestrial radio array opens the possibility to probe deep inelastic neutrino-nucleon scattering at center of mass energies well above those of any proposed future collider. Prototype instrumentation stations have been evaluated. Essential to the realization of these experiments has been the development of affordable instrumentation with adequate radio frequency performance.

  2. Multiplexing of Radio-Frequency Single Electron Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Pellerano, F. A.; Stahle, C. M.; Aidala, K.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present results on wavelength division multiplexing of radio-frequency single electron transistors. We use a network of resonant impedance matching circuits to direct applied rf carrier waves to different transistors depending on carrier frequency. A two-channel demonstration of this concept using discrete components successfully reconstructed input signals with small levels of cross coupling. A lithographic version of the rf circuits had measured parameters in agreement with electromagnetic modeling, with reduced cross capacitance and inductance, and should allow 20 to 50 channels to be multiplexed.

  3. The highest frequency detection of a radio relic: 16 GHz AMI observations of the `Sausage' cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Rumsey, Clare; Harwood, Jeremy J.; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Saunders, Richard D. E.; Sobral, David; Perrott, Yvette C.; Schammel, Michel P.

    2014-06-01

    We observed the cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at 16 GHz and present the first high radio-frequency detection of diffuse, non-thermal cluster emission. This cluster hosts a variety of bright, extended, steep-spectrum synchrotron-emitting radio sources, associated with the intracluster medium, called radio relics. Most notably, the northern, Mpc-wide, narrow relic provides strong evidence for diffusive shock acceleration in clusters. We detect a puzzling, flat-spectrum, diffuse extension of the southern relic, which is not visible in the lower radio-frequency maps. The northern radio relic is unequivocally detected and measures an integrated flux of 1.2 ± 0.3 mJy. While the low-frequency (<2 GHz) spectrum of the northern relic is well represented by a power law, it clearly steepens towards 16 GHz. This result is inconsistent with diffusive shock acceleration predictions of ageing plasma behind a uniform shock front. The steepening could be caused by an inhomogeneous medium with temperature/density gradients or by lower acceleration efficiencies of high energy electrons. Further modelling is necessary to explain the observed spectrum.

  4. Imaging Interplanetary CMEs at Radio Frequency From Solar Polar Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Chi; Wang, C. B.; Wang, S.

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are violent discharges of plasma and magnetic fields from the Sun's corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, the detection of CMEs is important for un-derstanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. The Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) is a proposed mission to observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from solar polar orbit. The main payload (radio telescope) on board SPORT will be an in-terferometric imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band, which will follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from a distance of a few solar radii to near 1 AU from solar polar orbit. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind plasma experiment, a solar wind ion composition instrument, an energetic particle detector, a wave detector, a mag-netometer and an interplanetary radio burst tracker. In this paper, we first describe the current shortage of interplanetary CME observations. Next, the scientific motivation and objectives of SPORT are introduced. We discuss the basic specifications of the main radio telescope of SPORT with reference to the radio emission mechanisms and the radio frequency band to be observed. Finally, we discuss the key technologies of the SPORT mission, including the con-ceptual design of the main telescope, the image retrieval algorithm and the solar polar orbit injection. Other payloads and their respective observation objectives are also briefly discussed. Key words: Interplanetary CMEs; Interferometric imaging; Solar polar orbit; Radiometer.

  5. RFID Transponders' Radio Frequency Emissions in Aircraft Communication and Navigation Radio Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Williams, Reuben A.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2006-01-01

    Radiated emissions in aircraft communication and navigation bands are measured from several active radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. The individual tags are different in design and operations. They may also operate in different frequency bands. The process for measuring the emissions is discussed, and includes tag interrogation, reverberation chamber testing, and instrument settings selection. The measurement results are described and compared against aircraft emission limits. In addition, interference path loss for the cargo bays of passenger aircraft is measured. Cargo bay path loss is more appropriate for RFID tags than passenger cabin path loss. The path loss data are reported for several aircraft radio systems on a Boeing 747 and an Airbus A320.

  6. Physical properties of conventional explosives deduced from radio frequency emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Harlin, Jeremiah D; Nemzek, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory collected broadband radio frequency (RF) electric field change measurements from multiple detonations of high explosives (HE). Three types of HE were used: small cylinders of flake TNT, solid TNT, and PBX-9501. Low frequency signals (<80 MHz) were shot-to-shot repeatable and occurred within the first 100 {mu} s at measured amplitudes of about 2 V m{sup -1} at 35 m distance. High frequency signals (>290 MHz) occurred later, were an order of magnitude lower in signal strength, and were not repeatable. There is a positive correlation between the maximum electric field change and the shock velocity of the HE. The amount of free charge produced in the explosion estimated from the first RF pulse is between 10 and 150 {mu} C. This implies a weakly ionized plasma with temperatures between 2600 and 2900 K.

  7. Detection of NMR signals with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer I.M. Savukov 1

    E-print Network

    Romalis, Mike

    Detection of NMR signals with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer I.M. Savukov 1 , S.J. Seltzer of proton NMR signals with a radio-frequency (rf) atomic magnetometer tuned to the NMR frequency of 62 kHz. High-frequency operation of the atomic magnetometer makes it relatively insensitive to ambient magnetic

  8. A very low frequency radio astronomy observatory on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, James N.; Smith, Harlan J.

    1988-01-01

    Because of terrestrial ionospheric absorption, very little is known of the radio sky beyond 10 m wavelength. An extremely simple, low cost very low frequency radio telescope is proposed, consisting of a large array of short wires laid on the lunar surface, each wire equipped with an amplifier and a digitizer, and connected to a common computer. The telescope could do simultaneous multifrequency observations of much of the visible sky with high resolution in the 10 to 100 m wavelength range, and with lower resolution in the 100 to 1000 m range. It would explore structure and spectra of galactic and extragalactic point sources, objects, and clouds, and would produce detailed quasi-three-dimensional mapping of interstellar matter within several thousand parsecs of the Sun.

  9. Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation

    E-print Network

    Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

    2012-05-01

    We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

  10. Galactic synchrotron emission from WIMPs at radio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Lineros, Roberto A.; Taoso, Marco E-mail: rlineros@ific.uv.es E-mail: taoso@ific.uv.es

    2012-01-01

    Dark matter annihilations in the Galactic halo inject relativistic electrons and positrons which in turn generate a synchrotron radiation when interacting with the galactic magnetic field. We calculate the synchrotron flux for various dark matter annihilation channels, masses, and astrophysical assumptions in the low-frequency range and compare our results with radio surveys from 22 MHz to 1420 MHz. We find that current observations are able to constrain particle dark matter with ''thermal'' annihilation cross-sections, i.e. (?v) = 3 × 10{sup ?26} cm{sup 3} s{sup ?1}, and masses M{sub DM}?<10 GeV. We discuss the dependence of these bounds on the astrophysical assumptions, namely galactic dark matter distribution, cosmic rays propagation parameters, and structure of the galactic magnetic field. Prospects for detection in future radio surveys are outlined.

  11. Anomalies in Pendulum Periodicity and Spacecraft Radio Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartti, Shane

    2002-04-01

    During an eclipse of the Sun by the Moon on June 30, 1954, a Foucault pendulum in Paris, France experienced unexpected irregularities in periodicity. During transit from the shadow of the Moon on November 8, 1968, the Pioneer 6 spacecraft experienced unexpected irregularities in radio transmission frequency. These anomalies are presented as evidence of gravity wave interference events. Additional proposed tests include monitoring radio transmissions from along the path of total solar eclipses. R1. Allais, Maurice F.C.; "Should the Laws of Gravitation be Reconsidered?" Aerospace Engineering, 18:46, September 1959, and 18:51, October 1959. (X1) R2. Chastel, Arnaud A., and Heyvaerts, Jean F.; "Perturbations of Pioneer 6 Telemetry Signal durng Solar Occultation," Nature, 249, 249:21, 1974. (X1)

  12. NIST Special Publication 250-67 NIST Time and Frequency Radio Stations

    E-print Network

    of NIST Radio Stations 38 Chapter 2. Technical Description 39 A. How the NIST Radio Stations Work 39 BNIST Special Publication 250-67 NIST Time and Frequency Radio Stations: WWV, WWVH, and WWVB Glenn K Radio Stations: WWV, WWVH, and WWVB Glenn K. Nelson Michael A. Lombardi Dean T. Okayama Time

  13. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ˜38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ˜90%. H- beam pulses (˜1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ˜60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ˜0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ˜99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ˜75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ˜100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  14. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R; Roseberry, Ron T; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  15. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    PubMed

    Welton, R F; Dudnikov, V G; Gawne, K R; Han, B X; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Roseberry, R T; Santana, M; Stockli, M P; Turvey, M W

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ?38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ?90%. H(-) beam pulses (?1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ?60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ?0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ?99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ?75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance?installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ?100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence. PMID:22380234

  16. Radio frequency needle hyperthermia of normal and cancerous animal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalhav, Arieh; Ramon, J.; Goldwasser, Benad; Nativ, Ofer; Cherniack, Ramy; Zajdel, Liliana

    1994-12-01

    Capacitative radio frequency (RF) was met with little success when used to treat human cancer. Conductive rf needle hyperthermia (RFNH) is used successfully for human tissue ablation in neurosurgery, cardiology, and recently in urology. RFNH ablates tissue by causing thermal damage limited to the vicinity of the rf needle. We conducted a series of studies to evaluate the effect of RFNH on cancerous and normal tissue. RFNH was applied to normal porcine livers during open surgery. Liver function tests were elevated two days post treatment, then returned to normal. Pigs were sequentially sacrificed. RFNH induced lesions were found to be maximal in size on days 2 - 4 post treatment and later became smaller as liver regenerated. Phase 2 included mice bearing two subcutaneous murine bladder tumors (MBT2). The rf needle was inserted into both tumors of each mouse, but rf current was applied to one tumor only. Energies of 3 to 7.5 watts were applied for 30 seconds to 5 minutes using a 0.02 inch needle. Mice were sacrificed 0, 1, and 3 days after treatment. Necrotic lesions 0.5 - 1.2 cm in diameter were found within the treated tumors. In phase 3, mice bearing a single 8 - 18 mm subcutaneous tumor were treated by RFNH aiming for complete tumor destruction. All control mice died of huge tumors within 31 days. Treated mice were alive with no signs of tumor when sacrificed 60 days after treatment. In phase 3 RFNH is capable of complete tumor eradication with little damage to surrounding normal tissue. It may have clinical applications for percutaneous endoscopic and laparoscopic treatment of tumors.

  17. Radio Frequency Interference: Projects and Activities Developed for the High School Earth Science, Astronomy, and Physics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, S. K.; Brown, J.

    2003-12-01

    Radio Frequency Interference: Projects and Activities Developed for the High School Earth Science, Astronomy, and Physics Classroom Susan Dunn Tewksbury Memorial High School Jason Brown Tyngsboro High School Preethi Pratap MIT Haystack Observatory The Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program, funded by the NSF, brings teachers into research environments to interact with scientists and translate the experience into the classroom. We will describe a RET experience at the MIT Haystack Observatory which involved using an AR3000A communications receiver and a discone antenna as the basis for an Earth Science, Astronomy, and Physics classroom unit. The projects and activities in this unit were developed to help foster student learning and understanding of radio astronomy, the electromagnetic spectrum, wave dynamics, signal propagation, meteor detection, and radio frequency interference. Additionally, this RET project utilizes the SEARFE (Students Examining Australia???s Radio Frequency Environment) software developed for use with the AR3000A communications receiver to scan and monitor frequencies across the radio bandwidth to determine areas of low and high usage in the radio spectrum. Classroom activities include Scanning Protected Radio Astronomy Bandwidths, Investigating the Radio Environment, Time Variation of Signal Strength, Signal Strength vs. Location Studies, Detecting Meteors using the AR300A Receiver, Mapping the RFI Environment of Your School, AM Radio Interference, and Signal Propagation Effects. The primary focus of the unit???s activities is to address the Massachusetts State Science Frameworks for electromagnetic radiation, waves, cosmology, and matter and energy in the Earth system and foster an understanding of how everyday communications devices may cause radio frequency interference with sensitive radio astronomy equipment. The projects and activities in the unit will be used in the classroom, amended, and the results of the classroom experience will be discussed.

  18. Nonlinear Exothermic Contributions to RadioFrequency Bonding of Adhesives 1

    E-print Network

    Nonlinear Exothermic Contributions to Radio­Frequency Bonding of Adhesives 1 H.T. Banks 2 S This work describes an effort to model the radio­frequency curing of epoxy adhesives in bonding of an internal exothermic reaction which takes place as the adhesive cures. Key words: radio

  19. Verification of nonlinear particle simulation of radio frequency waves A. Kuley,1,a)

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zhihong

    Verification of nonlinear particle simulation of radio frequency waves in tokamak A. Kuley,1,a) Z://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4934606] I. INTRODUCTION Magnetic fusion devices rely on radio frequency (RF) waves 2015; accepted 13 October 2015; published online 27 October 2015) Nonlinear simulation model for radio

  20. The electrical asymmetry effect in capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, U.; Schulze, J.; Schüngel, E.; Donkó, Z.

    2011-04-01

    We present an analytical model to describe capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharges and the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE) based on the non-linearity of the boundary sheaths. The model describes various discharge types, e.g. single and multi-frequency as well as geometrically symmetric and asymmetric discharges. It yields simple analytical expressions for important plasma parameters such as the dc self-bias, the uncompensated charge in both sheaths, the discharge current and the power dissipated to electrons. Based on the model results the EAE is understood. This effect allows control of the symmetry of CCRF discharges driven by multiple consecutive harmonics of a fundamental frequency electrically by tuning the individual phase shifts between the driving frequencies. This novel class of capacitive radio-frequency (RF) discharges has various advantages: (i) A variable dc self-bias can be generated as a function of the phase shifts between the driving frequencies. In this way, the symmetry of the sheaths in geometrically symmetric discharges can be broken and controlled for the first time. (ii) Almost ideal separate control of ion energy and flux at the electrodes can be realized in contrast to classical dual-frequency discharges driven by two substantially different frequencies. (iii) Non-linear self-excited plasma series resonance oscillations of the RF current can be switched on and off electrically even in geometrically symmetric discharges. Here, the basics of the EAE are introduced and its main applications are discussed based on experimental, simulation, and modeling results.

  1. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Popovi?, S.; Upadhyay, J.; Nikoli?, M.; Vuškovi?, L.; Mammosser, J.

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on a microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency cryo-module. This discharge offers a mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the issues related to resonant detuning due to sustained multi-cell cavity plasma. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  2. Peak radiated power measurement of the DOE Mark II container tag with integrated ST-676 sensor radio frequency identification device.

    SciTech Connect

    Jursich, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The total peak radiated power of the Department of Energy Mark II container tag was measured in the electromagnetic reverberation chamber facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The tag's radio frequency content was also evaluated for possible emissions outside the intentional transmit frequency band. No spurious emissions of any significance were found, and the radiated power conformed to the manufacturer's specifications.

  3. Nonlinear frequency coupling in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Waskoenig, J.; Gans, T.

    2010-05-03

    Plasma ionization, and associated mode transitions, in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas are governed through nonlinear frequency coupling in the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. Ionization in low-power mode is determined by the nonlinear coupling of electron heating and the momentary local plasma density. Ionization in high-power mode is driven by electron avalanches during phases of transient high electric fields within the boundary sheath. The transition between these distinctly different modes is controlled by the total voltage of both frequency components.

  4. Radio-frequency-excited deep-UV copper ion laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianhua; Huang, Jianjun; Li, Jingzhen

    1999-09-01

    The copper ion laser generates CW UV (248 - 272 nm) and near IR (780 nm) laser radiation. This laser is usually excited by hollow cathode discharge. In recent years, a new discharge, so-called capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) discharge has been employed to pump the metal ion laser, in order to increase laser efficiency and improve its discharge stability and the lifetime of the laser. In this paper, the principle and nature of the CCRF discharge, and its application for the copper ion laser are reviewed.

  5. Terahertz encoding approach for secured chipless radio frequency identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Maxime; Garet, Frederic; Perret, Etienne; Duvillaret, Lionel; Tedjini, Smail

    2011-08-01

    In this article, we present a new family of chipless tags, which permit encoding of digital data in the terahertz domain. These devices consist of stacked dielectric media whose thicknesses are of the same order as terahertz wavelengths. Since the information is encoded in the volume of these multilayer terahertz tags, they can easily be associated with classical identification techniques (e.g., barcode, radio frequency identification), where information is encoded at the surface of the tag, to provide higher data security. The principle of this encoding approach is studied and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. A 2bit tag prototype has been realized and measured for validation purposes.

  6. Silicon nanowire based radio-frequency spectrum analyzer.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Bill; Vo, Trung D; Pelusi, Mark D; Monat, Christelle; Xu, Dan-Xia; Densmore, Adam; Ma, Rubin; Janz, Siegfried; Moss, David J; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2010-09-13

    We demonstrate a terahertz bandwidth silicon nanowire based radio-frequency spectrum analyzer using cross-phase modulation. We show that the device provides accurate characterization of 640Gbaud on-off-keyed data stream and demonstrate its potential for optical time-division multiplexing optimization and optical performance monitoring of ultrahigh speed signals on a silicon chip. We analyze the impact of free carrier effects on our device, and find that the efficiency of the device is not reduced by two-photon or free-carrier absorption, nor its accuracy compromised by free-carrier cross-chirp. PMID:20940910

  7. Novel integrated design framework for radio frequency quadrupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Simon; Easton, Matthew; Lawrie, Scott; Letchford, Alan; Pozimski, Jürgen; Savage, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A novel design framework for Radio Frequency Quadrupoles (RFQs), developed as part of the design of the FETS RFQ, is presented. This framework integrates several previously disparate steps in the design of RFQs, including the beam dynamics design, mechanical design, electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical modelling and beam dynamics simulations. Each stage of the design process is described in detail, including the various software options and reasons for the final software suite selected. Results are given for each of these steps, describing how each stage affects the overall design process, with an emphasis on the resulting design choices for the FETS RFQ.

  8. Occupational exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mild, K.H.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers occupational exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields in industrial processes in near-field situations where electric and magnetic field strengths are monitored to assess the health hazard. Plastic materials are joined by an RF machine whose electrodes are not shielded and which may produce high level RF fields in the immediate vicinity, exceeding the ANSI standard. A physiotherapist may be exposed to high E and H fields using RF shortwave therapy, the maintenance personnel in FM/TV broadcast towers are subject to intense RF fields, and induction heating equipment used for forging, annealing and brazing can expose operators' hands to magnetic fields.

  9. Plasma plume propagation characteristics of pulsed radio frequency plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. H.; Liu, X. Y.; Hu, K.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2011-04-11

    A 4 cm long helium cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet with pulsed radio frequency (rf) excitation was obtained by a copper electrode inside a quartz tube. The plasma bullet propagation characteristics common to the microseconds direct current pulse and kilohertz plasma jet is not observed in this case. The space-, time-, and wavelength-resolved optical emission profiles suggest the pulsed rf plasma channel out of the tube was strengthened by ions and metastables with longer life time than the rf period, and the plasma propagation was actually an illumination of the plasma channel caused by energetic electrons accelerated along the channel.

  10. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Dark Energy

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    National Radio Astronomy Observatory Dark Energy: Constraints from the Hubble Constant Jim Condon, 43, 625 #12;National Radio Astronomy Observatory UVa/NRAO DE Lunch Talk 2006 Jan. 25 What.086·1019 km H0 1.36 · 1010 years #12;National Radio Astronomy Observatory UVa/NRAO DE Lunch Talk 2006 Jan. 25

  11. An evolutionary sequence of low frequency radio astronomy missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    1990-01-01

    Many concepts for space-based low frequency radio astronomy missions are being developed, ranging from simple single-satellite experiments to large arrays on the far side of the moon. Each concept involves a different tradeoff between the range of scientific questions it can answer and the technical complexity of the experiment. Since complexity largely determines the development time, risk, launch vehicle requirements, cost, and probability of approval, it is important to see where the ability to expand the scientific return justifies a major increase in complexity. An evolutionary series of increasingly capable missions, similar to the series of missions for infrared or X-ray astronomy, is advocated. These would range from inexpensive 'piggy-back' experiments on near-future missions to a dedicated low frequency array in earth orbit (or possibly on the lunar nearside) and eventually to an array on the lunar farside.

  12. Anomalous Capacitive Sheath with Deep Radio Frequency Electric Field Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich

    2002-01-18

    A novel nonlinear effect of anomalously deep penetration of an external radio-frequency electric field into a plasma is described. A self-consistent kinetic treatment reveals a transition region between the sheath and the plasma. Because of the electron velocity modulation in the sheath, bunches in the energetic electron density are formed in the transition region adjusted to the sheath. The width of the region is of order V(subscript T)/omega, where V(subscript T) is the electron thermal velocity, and w is frequency of the electric field. The presence of the electric field in the transition region results in a cooling of the energetic electrons and an additional heating of the cold electrons in comparison with the case when the transition region is neglected.

  13. Radio-Frequency Spectroscopy of a Strongly Interacting Two-Dimensional Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Froehlich, Bernd; Feld, Michael; Vogt, Enrico; Koschorreck, Marco; Koehl, Michael; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2011-03-11

    We realize and study a strongly interacting two-component atomic Fermi gas confined to two dimensions in an optical lattice. Using radio-frequency spectroscopy we measure the interaction energy of the strongly interacting gas. We observe the confinement-induced Feshbach resonance on the attractive side of the 3D Feshbach resonance and find the existence of confinement-induced molecules in very good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  14. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-03-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC. Simulations studies and measurements were conducted that clearly show the correlation between RF noise and longitudinal bunch emittance, identify the major LLRF noise contributions, and determine the RF component dominating this effect. With these results, LHC upgrades and alternative algorithms are evaluated to reduce longitudinal emittance growth during operations. The applications of this work are described with regard to future machines and analysis of new technical implementations, as well as to possible future work which would continue the directions of this dissertation.

  15. On the Energy Efficiency of Cognitive Radios -A Study of the Ad Hoc Wireless LAN Scenario

    E-print Network

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    On the Energy Efficiency of Cognitive Radios - A Study of the Ad Hoc Wireless LAN Scenario Anm radios have been proposed in recent years to make more efficient use of the wireless spectrum and alleviate congestion on widely used frequency bands. A key aspect of these radios is the `cognition' gained

  16. Are Cognitive Radios Energy Efficient? A Study of the Wireless LAN Scenario

    E-print Network

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    Are Cognitive Radios Energy Efficient? A Study of the Wireless LAN Scenario Vinod Namboodiri.namboodiri}@wichita.edu Abstract-- Cognitive radios have been proposed in recent years to make more efficient use of the wireless spectrum and alleviate congestion on widely used frequency bands. A key aspect of these radios

  17. Radio frequency interference in solar monitoring using CALLISTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Anim, Norsuzian Mohd; Hamidi, Zety Sharizat; Monstein, Christian; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Umar, Roslan; Shariff, Nur Nafhatun Md; Ramli, Nabilah; Aziz, Noor Aqma Iryani; Sukma, Indriani

    2015-08-01

    Compact Astronomical Low-frequency, Low-cost Instrument for Spectroscopy in Transportable Observatories (CALLISTO) is a global network of spectrometer system with the purpose to observe the Sun's activities. There are 37 stations (using 68 instruments) forming this network from more than 96 countries. We investigate the radio frequency interference (RFI) affecting CALLISTO at these stations. We found that the RFI severely affecting CALLISTO within radio astronomical windows below 870 MHz are in the ranges of 80-110 MHz and 460-500 MHz. We also found that all stations are relatively free from RFI at 270-290 MHz. We investigate the general effect of RFI on detection of solar bursts. We considered type III solar bursts on 10th May, 28th June, 6th July and 8th July, type II on 24th April and type IV on 9th March (all in 2012) in order to measure the percentage of RFI level during solar burst in general. The SNR of the strong solar bursts in for these detections have maxima reaching up to 46.20 (for 6th July).

  18. Radio Frequency-Activated Nanoliposomes for Controlled Combination Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Malekar, Swapnil A; Sarode, Ashish L; Bach, Alvin C; Bose, Arijit; Bothun, Geoffrey; Worthen, David R

    2015-12-01

    This work was conducted in order to design, characterize, and evaluate stable liposomes containing the hydrophobic drug raloxifene HCl (RAL) and hydrophilic doxycycline HCl (DOX), two potentially synergistic agents for treating osteoporosis and other bone lesions, in conjunction with a radio frequency-induced, hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticle-dependent triggering mechanism for drug release. Both drugs were successfully incorporated into liposomes by lipid film hydration, although combination drug loading compromised liposome stability. Liposome stability was improved by reducing the drug load and by including Pluronics® (PL) in the formulations. DOX did not appear to interact with the phospholipid membranes comprising the liposomes, and its release was maximized in the presence of radio frequency (RF) heating. In contrast, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P-NMR) analysis revealed that RAL developed strong interactions with the phospholipid membranes, most notably with lipid phosphate head groups, resulting in significant changes in membrane thermodynamics. Likewise, RAL release from liposomes was minimal, even in the presence of RF heating. These studies may offer useful insights into the design and optimization of multidrug containing liposomes. The effects of RAL on liposome characteristics and drug release performance underscore the importance of appropriate physical-chemical analysis in order to identify and characterize drug-lipid interactions that may profoundly affect liposome properties and performance early in the formulation development process. PMID:25899799

  19. Hermetic aluminum radio frequency interconnection and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Kilgo, Riley D. (Albuquerque, NM); Kovacic, Larry (Albuquerque, NM); Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a light-weight, hermetic coaxial radio-frequency (RF) interconnection having an electrically conductive outer housing made of aluminum or an aluminum alloy, a central electrical conductor made of ferrous or non-ferrous material, and a cylinder of dielectric material comprising a low-melting-temperature, high-thermal-expansion aluminophosphate glass composition for hermetically sealing between the aluminum-alloy outer housing and the ferrous or non-ferrous center conductor. The entire RF interconnection assembly is made permanently hermetic by thermally fusing the center conductor, glass, and housing concurrently by bringing the glass to the melt point by way of exposure to an atmospheric temperature sufficient to melt the glass, less than 540.degree. C., but that does not melt the center conductor or the outer aluminum or aluminum alloy housing. The composition of the glass used is controlled to provide a suitable low dielectric constant so that an appropriate electrical characteristic impedance, for example 50 ohms, can be achieved for an electrical interconnection that performs well at high radio frequencies and also provides an interconnection maintaining a relatively small physical size.

  20. Radio-frequency identification: its potential in healthcare.

    PubMed

    2005-05-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology is just starting to make inroads into healthcare. RFID uses radio-frequency tags attached to people or objects to provide identification, tracking, security, and other functions that fall under the general heading of automatic identification and data capture (AIDC). In the retail supply chain, RFID is already well established as a way to reduce theft and track objects from manufacture through shipment to delivery. In healthcare, basic RFID is already being used to track patients for anti-elopement and anti-abduction programs. As more sophisticated systems move into hospitals, RFID is also beginning to see use to provide more extensive patient identification than traditional bar coding can, and to track and locate capital equipment within the hospital. In years to come, RFID could be used for a variety of applications, including tracking and matching blood for transfusions, tracking pharmaceuticals, and combating the counterfeiting of medical products. RFID may ultimately be used for many of the functions currently carried out using bar coding--but not until the cost of RFID comes down. For the foreseeable future, the two technologies are likely to be used in tandem in many hospitals. In this article, we describe the components and operation of RFID systems and detail the different ways in which these systems are being used, and could be used, in hospitals. PMID:16048121

  1. Subfemtotesla radio-frequency atomic magnetometer for detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance

    E-print Network

    Romalis, Mike

    Subfemtotesla radio-frequency atomic magnetometer for detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance S 20 November 2006 A radio-frequency tunable atomic magnetometer is developed for detection of nuclearHz 14 N NQR frequency of ammonium nitrate. A potential application of the magnetometer is detection

  2. Radio frequency heating of foods: principles, applications and related properties--a review.

    PubMed

    Piyasena, Punidadas; Dussault, Chantal; Koutchma, Tatiana; Ramaswamy, H S; Awuah, G B

    2003-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) heating is a promising technology for food applications because of the associated rapid and uniform heat distribution, large penetration depth and lower energy consumption. Radio frequency heating has been successfully applied for drying, baking and thawing of frozen meat and in meat processing. However, its use in continuous pasteurization and sterilization of foods is rather limited. During RF heating, heat is generated within the product due to molecular friction resulting from oscillating molecules and ions caused by the applied alternating electric field. RF heating is influenced principally by the dielectric properties of the product when other conditions are kept constant. This review deals with the current status of RF heating applications in food processing, as well as product and system specific factors that influence the RF heating. It is evident that frequency level, temperature and properties of food, such as viscosity, water content and chemical composition affect the dielectric properties and thus the RF heating of foods. Therefore, these parameters should be taken into account when designing a radio frequency heating system for foods. PMID:14669879

  3. Presented at "RFI2004: Workshop on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy"; Penticton, Canada, 16-18 July 2004

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Presented at "RFI2004: Workshop on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy Driel ICSU Scientific Committee on Frequency Allocations for Radio Astronomy and Space Science (IUCAF (ITU) for use by radio astronomy ­ for example for highly redshifted spectral lines. Besides

  4. Radio frequency reflectometry and charge sensing of a precision placed donor in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hile, Samuel J.; House, Matthew G.; Peretz, Eldad; Verduijn, Jan; Widmann, Daniel; Kobayashi, Takashi; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2015-08-01

    We compare charge transitions on a deterministic single P donor in silicon using radio frequency reflectometry measurements with a tunnel coupled reservoir and DC charge sensing using a capacitively coupled single electron transistor (SET). By measuring the conductance through the SET and comparing this with the phase shift of the reflected radio frequency (RF) excitation from the reservoir, we can discriminate between charge transfer within the SET channel and tunneling between the donor and reservoir. The RF measurement allows observation of donor electron transitions at every charge degeneracy point in contrast to the SET conductance signal where charge transitions are only observed at triple points. The tunnel coupled reservoir has the advantage of a large effective lever arm (˜35%), allowing us to independently extract a neutral donor charging energy ˜62 ± 17 meV. These results demonstrate that we can replace three terminal transistors by a single terminal dispersive reservoir, promising for high bandwidth scalable donor control and readout.

  5. Background radio-frequency radiation and its impact on radio astronomy Michelle C. Storey, Bruce MacA Thomas and John M. Sarkissian

    E-print Network

    Sarkissian, John M.

    of the radio-frequency background levels as they use the most sensitive radio-wave receivers in the world to study the sky at radio wavelengths. Radio waves can give us information about astronomical phenomena astronomy telescopes are the most sensitive radio-wave receivers in the world. For example, a mobile phone

  6. 78 FR 43916 - Certain Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Products and Components Thereof; Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-875] Certain Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Products and Components Thereof; Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial Determination Terminating...

  7. 77 FR 67833 - Certain Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits and Devices Containing Same; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ...INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-848] Certain Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits and Devices Containing Same; Notice of Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial Determination...

  8. Design, development, and acceleration trials of radio-frequency quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S. V. L. S.; Jain, Piyush; Pande, Rajni; Roy, Shweta; Mathew, Jose V.; Kumar, Rajesh; Pande, Manjiri; Krishnagopal, S.; Gupta, S. K.; Singh, P.

    2014-04-01

    A deuteron radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, fabricated, and tested at BARC, which will be used for neutron generation. The RFQ operates at a frequency of 350 MHz and needs an inter-vane voltage of 44 kV to accelerate the deuteron beam to 400 keV within a length of 1.03 m. The error analysis shows that the offset of two opposite vanes in the same direction by 100 ?m leads to a change in resonant frequency by 1.3 MHz and a significant change of fields in the quadrants (˜±40% with respect to average field). From the 3D analysis, we have observed that the unwanted dipole mode frequencies are very near to the quadrupole mode frequency which will make structure sensitive to the perturbations. In order to move the dipole modes away from the quadrupole modes, we have used the dipole stabilizer rods. The 5 wire transmission line theory was used to study the perturbative analysis of the RFQ and based on this a computer program has been written to tune the cavity to get required field distribution. Based on these studies, a 1.03 m long RFQ made of OFE copper has been fabricated and tested. Even though the RFQ was designed for deuteron (D+) beam, we tested it by accelerating both the proton (H+) and D+ beams. The RFQ was operated in pulsed mode and accelerated both H+ and D+ beams to designed values of 200 and 400 keV, respectively. The measured parameters are in good agreement with the designed values validating our simulations and fabrication processes. In this paper, simulations, RF measurements, and beam commissioning results are presented.

  9. Interplanetary type 3 radio bursts that approach the plasma frequency: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, S.; Dulk, G. A.; Leblanc, Y.

    1994-01-01

    We study a set of solar type 3 radio bursts where the emission is visible from the high-frequency limit of the radio astronomy receiver of the Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma wave (URAP) experiment down to low frequencies, sometimes near the plasma frequency, and where Langmuir wave spikes are recorded by the radio and/or plasma receivers. Our results pose questions regarding radio emission by Langmuir waves. When Langmuir waves are observed, why is it only sometimes that radio radiation is emitted at the fundamental? Put another way, why is there often a gap or a cutoff in the radiation at a frequency well above the plasma frequency? In the few cases where the radiation at times of Langmuir wave spikes is at the harmonic, why is there no fundamental?

  10. Point-to-point measurement of radio frequency attenuation in South Polar ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Michael; Hoffman, Kara

    2011-04-01

    For ultra high energy (UHE) electromagnetic showers in a dense medium, radio frequency Cherenkov emission is enhanced due to the Askaryan effect. Present and future detectors such as RICE, ANITA, ARIANNA and the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) exploit this effect to detect UHE neutrinos interacting with Antarctic ice. The radio frequency electromagnetic wave attenuation length (the distance over which signal amplitude diminishes by a factor of 1 / e due to absorption or scattering) is of tantamount importance as it determines the size scale and effective volume of these detectors. Previous attenuation measurements rely on reflections off the bedrock of signals from a surface-mounted transmitter. Using RICE in-ice transmitters and IceCube Radio Extension in-ice receivers, we are conducting a point-to-point attenuation measurement in the upper 1500 meters of South Polar ice, the region of interest for planned near-surface detectors such as ARA. We will present the analysis method as well as preliminary results.

  11. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle ? with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, ? assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numericallymore »to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.« less

  12. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle ? with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, ? assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  13. Technologies for Low Frequency Radio Observations of the Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is developing concepts and technologies for low frequency radio astronomy space missions aimed at observing highly redshifted neutral Hydrogen from the Dark Ages. This is the period of cosmic history between the recombination epoch when the microwave background radiation was produced and the re-ionization of the intergalactic medium by the first generation of stars (Cosmic Dawn). This period, at redshifts greater than about 20, is a critical epoch for the formation and evolution of large-scale structure in the universe. The 21-cm spectral line of Hydrogen provides the most promising method for directly studying the Dark Ages, but the corresponding frequencies at such large redshifts are only tens of MHz and thus require space-based observations to avoid terrestrial RFI and ionospheric absorption and refraction. This paper reports on the status of several low frequency technology development activities at JPL, including deployable bi-conical dipoles for a planned lunar-orbiting mission, and both rover-deployed and inflation-deployed long dipole antennas for use on the lunar surface.

  14. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle ? with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle ?, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  15. Quartz antenna for radio frequency ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Gough, R.A.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Vujic, J.; Wu, L.K.; Olivo, M.; Einenkel, H.

    1998-02-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp ion sources developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory use an internal induction coil (antenna) for plasma generation. The copper rf-antenna with a thin layer of porcelain coating, which is presently used, cannot fully satisfy the increasing demands on source cleanliness and antenna lifetime under high power cw or pulsed operation in applications where water cooling is not possible. A quartz antenna has been designed and operated in the multicusp ion source. It has been demonstrated that the overall performance of the new antenna exceeds that of the regular porcelain-coated antenna. It can be operated with a long lifetime in different discharge plasmas. The quartz antenna has also been tested at the Paul Scherrer Institute for cw source operation at rf power higher than 5 kW. Results demonstrated that the antenna can survive under dense plasma discharge operations. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Reactivable passive radio-frequency identification temperature indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windl, Roman; Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Suess, Dieter; Huber, Thomas; Vogler, Christoph; Satz, Armin

    2015-05-01

    A low cost, passive radio-frequency identification (RFID) temperature indicator with (re-) activation at any point of time is presented. The capability to detect a temperature excursion is realized by magnets and a solution with a melting point at the critical temperature. As the critical temperature is exceeded, a magnetic indicator switches to non-reversible and this can be monitored via a giant magnetoresistance sensor connected to a RFID tag. Depending on the solutions or metal alloys, detection of critical temperatures in a wide range from below 0 °C and up to more than 100 °C is possible. The information if a threshold temperature was exceeded (indicator state) as well as the identification number, current temperature, and user defined data can be obtained via RFID.

  17. Radio frequency plasma mediated dry functionalization of multiwall carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Leena G.; Mahapatra, Anirban S.; Gomathi, N.; Joseph, K.; Neogi, S.; Nair, C. P. Reghunadan

    2015-06-01

    Surface modification of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was carried out by radio frequency (RF) plasma discharges of oxygen and nitrogen gases to improve their dispersibility. Various oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups were incorporated as a result of plasma treatment and were confirmed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effect of plasma treatment on structural properties and morphology changes of MWCNTs was analyzed by Raman, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The morphological studies indicate that untreated MWCNT exists as closely packed with highly entangled bundle. During the plasma treatment, MWCNT tubes get disentangled. XRD, Raman and TEM confirmed the absence of any surface damage during plasma treatment. Functionalized carbon nanotubes exhibit high zeta potential values indicating their good dispersibility in water. The method offers a direct and dry means for functionalization of MWCNT without affecting the structure of MWCNT.

  18. Radio Frequency Interference Observations at IAR La Plata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, H.; Gancio, G.; Perilli, D.; Larrarte, J. J.; Guarrera, L.; Garcia, L.; Kronschnabl, G.; Plötz, C.

    2013-08-01

    The Wettzell RFI-Monitoring system was developed to monitor radio frequency interference at existing and potential VLBI sites. It was used at the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR) in La Plata, Argentina, to evaluate a future site for the Transportable Integrated Geodetic Observatory (TIGO). A 24h/7d survey was conducted during September and October 2012. This huge data set required the development of a specific analysis strategy and data representation. The results of this survey revealed, that IAR is a suitable site for geodetic VLBI observations: most of the present RFI signals occure sporadically and may take away less than 5% of the observation time; moreover VLBI receivers will not be saturated.

  19. Numerical model study of radio frequency vessel sealing thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, John

    2015-03-01

    Several clinically successful clinical radio frequency vessel-sealing devices are currently available. The dominant thermodynamic principles at work involve tissue water vaporization processes. It is necessary to thermally denature vessel collagen, elastin and their adherent proteins to achieve a successful fusion. Collagens denature at middle temperatures, between about 60 and 90 C depending on heating time and rate. Elastin, and its adherent proteins, are more thermally robust, and require temperatures in excess of the boiling point of water at atmospheric pressure to thermally fuse. Rapid boiling at low apposition pressures leads to steam vacuole formation, brittle tissue remnants and frequently to substantial disruption in the vessel wall, particularly in high elastin-content arteries. High apposition pressures substantially increase the equilibrium boiling point of tissue water and are necessary to ensure a high probability of a successful seal. The FDM numerical models illustrate the beneficial effects of high apposition pressures.

  20. Superconducting radio-frequency modules test faciilty operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R&D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service Fermilab SRF R&D needs. The first stage of the project has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

  1. Electron beam diagnostics for a superconducting radio frequency photoelectron injector

    SciTech Connect

    Kamps, Thorsten; Boehlick, Daniel; Dirsat, Marc; Lipka, Dirk; Quast, Torsten; Rudolph, Jeniffa; Schenk, Mario; Arnold, Andre; Staufenbiel, Friedrich; Teichert, Jochen; Klemz, Guido; Will, Ingo

    2008-09-15

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) photoelectron injector is currently under construction by a collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. The project aims at the design and setup of a continuous-wave SRF injector including a diagnostics beamline for the ELBE free electron laser (FEL) and to address R and D issues on low emittance injectors for future light sources such as the BESSY FEL. Of critical importance for the injector performance is the control of the electron beam parameters. For this reason a compact diagnostics beamline is under development, serving a multitude of operation settings. In this paper the layout and the rationale of the diagnostics beamline are described. Furthermore detailed information on specific components is given, together with results from laboratory tests and data taking.

  2. Radio Frequency Single Electron Transistors on Si/SiGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mingyun; Yang, Zhen; Rimberg, A. J.; Eriksson, M. A.; Savage, D. E.

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting single electron transistors (S-SETs) are ideal for charge state readout due to their high sensitivity and low back-action. Upon successful formation of quantum dots(QDs) on Si/SiGe, aluminum S-SETs are added in the vicinity of the QDs. Coupling of the S-SET to the QD is confirmed by using the S-SET to perform sensing of the QD charge state at 0.3 K. We have formed a matching network for an SET with an off-chip inductor. The reflection coefficient of the radio frequency(RF) signal is shown to be modulated by the SET resistance. Efforts to develop an on-chip matching network and perform charge sensing with the RF-SETs are in progress. Recent experimental results will be discussed. This research was supported by the NSA, LPS and ARO.

  3. Wireless Chalcogenide Nanoionic-Based Radio-Frequency Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Miranda, Felix

    2013-01-01

    A new nonvolatile nanoionic switch is powered and controlled through wireless radio-frequency (RF) transmission. A thin layer of chalcogenide glass doped with a metal ion, such as silver, comprises the operational portion of the switch. For the switch to function, an oxidizable electrode is made positive (anode) with respect to an opposing electrode (cathode) when sufficient bias, typically on the order of a few tenths of a volt or more, is applied. This action causes the metal ions to flow toward the cathode through a coordinated hopping mechanism. At the cathode, a reduction reaction occurs to form a metal deposit. This metal deposit creates a conductive path that bridges the gap between electrodes to turn the switch on. Once this conductive path is formed, no further power is required to maintain it. To reverse this process, the metal deposit is made positive with respect to the original oxidizable electrode, causing the dissolution of the metal bridge thereby turning the switch off. Once the metal deposit has been completely dissolved, the process self-terminates. This switching process features the following attributes. It requires very little to change states (i.e., on and off). Furthermore, no power is required to maintain the states; hence, the state of the switch is nonvolatile. Because of these attributes the integration of a rectenna to provide the necessary power and control is unique to this embodiment. A rectenna, or rectifying antenna, generates DC power from an incident RF signal. The low voltages and power required for the nanoionic switch control are easily generated from this system and provide the switch with a novel capability to be operated and powered from an external wireless device. In one realization, an RF signal of a specific frequency can be used to set the switch into an off state, while another frequency can be used to set the switch to an on state. The wireless, miniaturized, and nomoving- part features of this switch make it suitable for applications such as integration into garments, RFID (radio-frequency identification) tags, and conformal structures (e.g., aircraft wings, sounding rockets contours, etc). In the case of RFID tags the innovation will provide countermeasures to attempts for identity theft and other uninvited attempts for retrieval of information. It could also be applicable to the automotive industry as well as the aerospace industry for collision avoidance and phased array radar systems, respectively

  4. The Radio Frequency Health Node Wireless Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencia, J. Emilio; Stanley, Priscilla C.; Mackey, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The Radio Frequency Health Node (RFHN) wireless sensor system differs from other wireless sensor systems in ways originally intended to enhance utility as an instrumentation system for a spacecraft. The RFHN can also be adapted to use in terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for operational flexibility and integrability into higher-level instrumentation and data acquisition systems. As shown in the figure, the heart of the system is the RFHN, which is a unit that passes commands and data between (1) one or more commercially available wireless sensor units (optionally, also including wired sensor units) and (2) command and data interfaces with a local control computer that may be part of the spacecraft or other engineering system in which the wireless sensor system is installed. In turn, the local control computer can be in radio or wire communication with a remote control computer that may be part of a higher-level system. The remote control computer, acting via the local control computer and the RFHN, cannot only monitor readout data from the sensor units but can also remotely configure (program or reprogram) the RFHN and the sensor units during operation. In a spacecraft application, the RFHN and the sensor units can also be configured more nearly directly, prior to launch, via a serial interface that includes an umbilical cable between the spacecraft and ground support equipment. In either case, the RFHN wireless sensor system has the flexibility to be configured, as required, with different numbers and types of sensors for different applications. The RFHN can be used to effect realtime transfer of data from, and commands to, the wireless sensor units. It can also store data for later retrieval by an external computer. The RFHN communicates with the wireless sensor units via a radio transceiver module. The modular design of the RFHN makes it possible to add radio transceiver modules as needed to accommodate additional sets of wireless sensor units. The RFHN includes a core module that performs generic computer functions, including management of power and input, output, processing, and storage of data. In a typical application, the processing capabilities in the RFHN are utilized to perform preprocessing, trending, and fusion of sensor data. The core module also serves as the unit through which the remote control computer configures the sensor units and the rest of the RFHN.

  5. Benefits of three frequency ionospheric corrections in Radio Occultation soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntama, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) has assessed the potential benefits from using the third transmission frequency of the next generation GNSS systems in the sounding of the atmosphere with Radio Occultation (RO). This research has been performed in the framework of the Ionospheric Effects in GNSS Radio Occultation Data study funded by EUMETSAT. The objective of this study was to analyze the advantages of three frequency soundings as part of the planning of the future EUMETSAT satellite missions. The research has been performed by simulating the three frequency transmissions of the next generation GPS and GALILEO systems with the EGOPS (End-to-end GNSS Occultation Performance Simulator) software package developed by the international EGOPS consortium. EGOPS allows simulations of RO missions by propagating the orbits of the transmitting and receiving satellites, determining the geodetic locations and geometries of the soundings and ray tracings of the signals propagation paths. In the study we have ensured that all specified conditions are met by simulating over 1700 occultation soundings. The simulations included both the GPS and the future GALILEO constellations and signals. A LEO satellite at the orbit of the EUMETSAT Metop-A has been used to simulate an RO receiver. The global distribution of the occultations ensured that all occultation times and geometries of interest have been covered. Three solar activity levels have been used to simulated solar minimum, normal and solar maximum conditions. Two ionospheric correction techniques taking benefit of the third GNSS frequency have been tested in the study. The first tested method was a three-frequency linear combination technique. This method is an expansion of the two frequency linear combination that is currently widely used in GNSS navigation and in RO data processing. The disadvantage of this approach is that the noise level in the retrieved bending angle profile is significantly increased. The second tested methods is an ionospheric ambiguity removal with a combination of widelane (WL) and extra-widelane (EWL) signals. This method does not increase the noise level as much as the linear combination method, but is computationally slightly more complex and requires combining code phase observations with the carrier phase observations. The results of the simulations and the retrievals have been rigorously analyzed both statistically and by investigating selected individual observations. The results indicate that ionospheric correction with three frequencies can significantly reduce the ionospheric error in the neutral atmosphere sounding in the heights of 35 - 60 km. This can potentially increase the useful height range of RO soundings in operational NWP (Numerical Weather Prediction) and climate monitoring. This result is very important because very few atmospheric sounding techniques can provide global information from the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere region. This presentation will show the results of the performed study including descriptions of the simulations and the tested ionospheric correction techniques. The bending angle retrieval accuracy benefits will be quantified both statistically and by analysis of selected complex signal propagation cases. Finally, the presentation will also address the potential benefits of three frequency soundings in space weather observations by RO.

  6. Different modes of electron heating in dual-frequency capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, J.; Donkó, Z.; Luggenhölscher, D.; Czarnetzki, U.

    2009-08-01

    A systematic study of different modes of electron heating in dual-frequency capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) discharges is performed using a particle-in-cell simulation. Spatio-temporal distributions of the total excitation/ionization rates under variation of gas pressure, applied frequencies and gas species are discussed. Some results are compared qualitatively with an experiment (phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy) operated under conditions similar to a parameter set used in the simulation. Different modes of electron heating are identified and compared with ?- and ?-mode operation of single-frequency CCRF discharges. In this context the frequency coupling and its relation to the ion density profile in the sheath are discussed and quantified. In light gases the ion density in the sheath is time modulated. This temporal modulation is well described by an analytical model and is found to affect the excitation dynamics via the frequency coupling. It is shown that the frequency coupling strongly affects the generation of beams of highly energetic electrons by the expanding sheath and field reversals caused by the collapsing sheath. The role of secondary electrons at intermediate and high pressures is clarified and the transition from ?- to ?-mode operation is discussed. Depending on the gas and the corresponding cross sections for excitation/ionization the excitation does not generally probe the ionization as is usually assumed.

  7. Semianalytical ion current model for radio-frequency driven collisionless sheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2001-06-01

    We propose a semianalytical ion dynamics model for a collisionless radio-frequency biased sheath. The model uses bulk plasma and electrode boundary conditions to predict the ion impact energy distribution and electrical properties of the sheath. The proposed model accounts for ion inertia and ion current modulation at bias frequencies that are of the same order of magnitude as the ion plasma frequency. A relaxation equation for ion current oscillations is derived, which is coupled with a damped potential equation in order to model ion inertia effects. We find that inclusion of ion current modulation in the sheath model shows marked improvements in the predictions of the sheath electrical properties and ion energy distribution function. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  8. A Semianalytical Ion Current Model for Radio Frequency Driven Collisionless Sheaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We propose a semianalytical ion dynamics model for a collisionless radio frequency biased sheath. The model uses bulk plasma conditions and electrode boundary condition to predict ion impact energy distribution and electrical properties of the sheath. The proposed model accounts for ion inertia and ion current modulation at bias frequencies that are of the same order of magnitude as the ion plasma frequency. A relaxation equation for ion current oscillations is derived which is coupled with a damped potential equation in order to model ion inertia effects. We find that inclusion of ion current modulation in the sheath model shows marked improvements in the predictions of sheath electrical properties and ion energy distribution function.

  9. Enhancement of electromagnetic propagation through complex media for Radio Frequency Identification

    E-print Network

    Marti, Uttara P

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, I present and examine the fundamental limitations involved in Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) as well as provide a means to improve reader-tag communication in ultra high frequency RFID systems. The ...

  10. The driving frequency effects on the atmospheric pressure corona jet plasmas from low frequency to radio frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dan Bee; Jung, H.; Gweon, B.; Rhee, J. K.; Choe, W.; Moon, S. Y.

    2011-04-15

    Lately, the atmospheric pressure jet type corona plasma, which has been typically driven by dc to low frequency (LF: several tens of kHz), is often generated by using radio frequency of 13.56 MHz. Yet, the relationship between the plasma and its driving frequency has seldom been investigated. Hence, in this study, dependence of the atmospheric pressure corona plasma characteristics on the driving frequency was explored experimentally from LF to rf (5 kHz-13.56 MHz). The plasmas generated by the driving frequency under 2 MHz were cylindrical shape of several tens of millimeters long while the 13.56 MHz plasma is spherical and a few millimeters long. As the driving frequency was increased, the plasma length became shortened. At the lower driving frequencies (below 2 MHz), the plasmas existed as positive streamer and negative glow for each half period of the applied voltage, but the discharge was more continuous in time for the 13.56 MHz plasma. It was inferred from the measured I-V curves that the higher driving frequency induced higher discharge currents, and the gas temperature was increased as the driving frequency was increased.

  11. Improvement of isentropic efficiency of a magnetohydrodynamic power generator by radio-frequency preionization

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-15

    We describe the effect of a radio-frequency (rf) power application on the performance of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generator, as determined through shock-tunnel-based experiments and quasi-three-dimensional numerical simulations. The temporal plasma-fluid behavior, the one-dimensional plasma-fluid structure, the enthalpy-entropy diagram, the quality of the energy conversion efficiency, and the energy flow in the power-generating system are investigated. Preionization assistance by a small amount of rf power drastically changes the entire MHD power-generating system; the MHD extraction length is considerably extended and the isentropic efficiency is significantly improved.

  12. Frequency allocations for passive use of the radio spectrum to make scientific studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stull, M. A.; Alexander, G.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the legal implications of frequency allocations for passive use of the radio spectrum, which refer to receive-only radio services. Such receive-only services refer to the reception of radio signals generated by nonhuman agencies as in radio astronomy or in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Juridical interpretations of the public interest and of necessity are applied to these passive services.

  13. Mechanical properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Schmidt, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Singer, W.

    2015-07-02

    Radio-frequency cavities made of bulk niobium are one of the components used in modern particle accelerators. The mechanical stability is an important aspect of cavity design, which typically relies on finite-element analysis simulations using material properties from tensile tests on sample. This contribution presents the results of strain and resonant frequency measurements as a function of a uniform pressure up to 722 kPa, applied to single-cell niobium cavities with different crystallographic structure, purity and treatments. In addition, burst tests of high-purity multi-cell cavities with different crystallographic structure have been conducted up to the tensile strength of the material. Finite-element analysis of the single-cell cavity geometry is in good agreement with the observed behavior in the elastic regime assuming a Young's modulus value of 88.5 GPa and a Poisson's ratio of 0.4, regardless of crystallographic structure, purity or treatment. However, the measured yield strength and tensile strength depend on crystallographic structure, material purity and treatment. In particular, the results from this study show that the mechanical properties of niobium cavities with large crystals are comparable to those of cavities made of fine-grain niobium.

  14. Mechanical properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Schmidt, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Singer, W.

    2015-07-02

    Radio-frequency cavities made of bulk niobium are one of the components used in modern particle accelerators. The mechanical stability is an important aspect of cavity design, which typically relies on finite-element analysis simulations using material properties from tensile tests on sample. This contribution presents the results of strain and resonant frequency measurements as a function of a uniform pressure up to 722 kPa, applied to single-cell niobium cavities with different crystallographic structure, purity and treatments. In addition, burst tests of high-purity multi-cell cavities with different crystallographic structure have been conducted up to the tensile strength of the material. Finite-element analysismore »of the single-cell cavity geometry is in good agreement with the observed behavior in the elastic regime assuming a Young's modulus value of 88.5 GPa and a Poisson's ratio of 0.4, regardless of crystallographic structure, purity or treatment. However, the measured yield strength and tensile strength depend on crystallographic structure, material purity and treatment. In particular, the results from this study show that the mechanical properties of niobium cavities with large crystals are comparable to those of cavities made of fine-grain niobium.« less

  15. Microwave Sintering of Silver Nanoink for Radio Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Seok; Park, Bum-Geun; Jung, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Jong-Woong; Jeong, Myung Yung; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2015-03-01

    Microwave sintering is a promising method for low-temperature processes, as it provides advantages such as uniform, fast, and volumetric heating. In this study, we investigated the electrical characteristics of inkjet-printed silver (Ag) circuits sintered by microwaves. The microstructural evolutions of inkjet-printed Ag circuits sintered at various temperatures for different durations were observed with a field emission scanning electron microscope. The electrical properties of the inkjet-printed Ag circuits were analysed by electrical resistivity measurements and radio frequency properties including scattering-parameters in the frequency range of 20 MHz to 20 GHz. The experimental results show that the signal losses of the Ag circuits sintered by microwave heating were lower than those sintered by conventional heating as microwave heating led to granular films which were nearly fully sintered without pores on the surfaces. When the inkjet-printed Ag circuits were sintered by microwaves at 300 °C for 4 min, their electrical resistivity was 5.1 µ? cm, which is 3.2 times larger than that of bulk Ag. Furthermore, microwave sintering at 150 °C for 4 min achieved much lower signal losses (1.1 dB at 20 GHz) than conventional sintering under the same conditions. PMID:26413662

  16. Ultra High-Speed Radio Frequency Switch Based on Photonics.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jia; Fok, Mable P

    2015-01-01

    Microwave switches, or Radio Frequency (RF) switches have been intensively used in microwave systems for signal routing. Compared with the fast development of microwave and wireless systems, RF switches have been underdeveloped particularly in terms of switching speed and operating bandwidth. In this paper, we propose a photonics based RF switch that is capable of switching at tens of picoseconds speed, which is hundreds of times faster than any existing RF switch technologies. The high-speed switching property is achieved with the use of a rapidly tunable microwave photonic filter with tens of gigahertz frequency tuning speed, where the tuning mechanism is based on the ultra-fast electro-optics Pockels effect. The RF switch has a wide operation bandwidth of 12?GHz and can go up to 40?GHz, depending on the bandwidth of the modulator used in the scheme. The proposed RF switch can either work as an ON/OFF switch or a two-channel switch, tens of picoseconds switching speed is experimentally observed for both type of switches. PMID:26608349

  17. Ultra High-Speed Radio Frequency Switch Based on Photonics

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jia; Fok, Mable P.

    2015-01-01

    Microwave switches, or Radio Frequency (RF) switches have been intensively used in microwave systems for signal routing. Compared with the fast development of microwave and wireless systems, RF switches have been underdeveloped particularly in terms of switching speed and operating bandwidth. In this paper, we propose a photonics based RF switch that is capable of switching at tens of picoseconds speed, which is hundreds of times faster than any existing RF switch technologies. The high-speed switching property is achieved with the use of a rapidly tunable microwave photonic filter with tens of gigahertz frequency tuning speed, where the tuning mechanism is based on the ultra-fast electro-optics Pockels effect. The RF switch has a wide operation bandwidth of 12?GHz and can go up to 40?GHz, depending on the bandwidth of the modulator used in the scheme. The proposed RF switch can either work as an ON/OFF switch or a two-channel switch, tens of picoseconds switching speed is experimentally observed for both type of switches. PMID:26608349

  18. Frequency variations of solar radio zebras and their power-law spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.

    2014-01-01

    Context. During solar flares several types of radio bursts are observed. The fine striped structures of the type IV solar radio bursts are called zebras. Analyzing them provides important information about the plasma parameters of their radio sources. We present a new analysis of zebras. Aims: Power spectra of the frequency variations of zebras are computed to estimate the spectra of the plasma density variations in radio zebra sources. Methods: Frequency variations of zebra lines and the high-frequency boundary of the whole radio burst were determined with and without the frequency fitting. The computed time dependencies of these variations were analyzed with the Fourier method. Results: First, we computed the variation spectrum of the high-frequency boundary of the whole radio burst, which is composed of several zebra patterns. This power spectrum has a power-law form with a power-law index -1.65. Then, we selected three well-defined zebra-lines in three different zebra patterns and computed the spectra of their frequency variations. The power-law indices in these cases are found to be in the interval between -1.61 and -1.75. Finally, assuming that the zebra-line frequency is generated on the upper-hybrid frequency and that the plasma frequency ?pe is much higher than the electron-cyclotron frequency ?ce, the Fourier power spectra are interpreted to be those of the electron plasma density in zebra radio sources.

  19. Low Frequency Radio-wave System for subsurface investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Kudelya, Anatoliy; Denisov, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Low frequency radio-wave methods (RWM) allow subsurface investigations in terms of lithological structure characterization, detection of filtration flows of ground water, anthropogenic and natural cavities. In this contribution, we present a RWM that exploits two coils working at frequencies of few MHz as transmitting and receiving antennas. The basic principle of this inductive method is as follows. The primary alternating electromagnetic field radiated by the transmitting coil induces eddy currents in the subsurface mainly due to the conductivity anomalies. These eddy currents generate a secondary (scattered) magnetic field which overlaps to the incident magnetic field and is detected by the receiving coil. Despite the simple operation of the system, the complexity of the electromagnetic scattering phenomenon at hand must be properly modeled to achieve adequate performance. Therefore, an advanced data processing technique, belonging to the class of the inverse scattering approaches, has been developed by the authors in a full 3D geometry. The proposed method allows to deal with data collected on a scanning surface under a dipole inductive profiling (DIP) modality, where the transmitting/receiving coils are moved simultaneously with fixed offset (multi-bistatic configuration). The hardware, called Dipole Inductive Radio-wave System (DIRS), is composed by an electronic unit and transmitting and receiving loop antennas radiating at frequencies of few MHz (2-4 MHz), which are installed on theodolite supports. The compactness of DIRS and its robustness to external electromagnetic interference offers the possibility to perform geophysical research up to the depth of some tens of meters and under several types of ground and water surfaces, vegetation, and weather conditions. The light weight and small size of system (the single antenna with support weights about 5 kg and has a diameter of 0.5m) allows two operators to perform geophysical research without disturbing the surface integrity of investigated ground massif. The value of base and the value of voltage induced on the digital voltmeter of the receiver are stored in memory on a SD-card for a subsequent visualization and processing. Realistic cases of application of the DIRS system enhanced by the inverse scattering approach will be presented at the conference with regard to the geological characterization of a mine shaft and an archaeological site.

  20. 78 FR 19311 - Certain Radio Frequency Identification (“RFID”) Products And Components Thereof; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... Certain Radio Frequency Identification (``RFID'') Products And Components Thereof; Institution of... (``RFID'') products and components thereof by reason of infringement of U.S. Patent No. 7,081,819 (``the... sale within the United States after importation of certain radio frequency identification...

  1. Visible and Controllable RFID Tags Radio frequency identification (RFID) tags containing

    E-print Network

    Greenberg, Saul

    Visible and Controllable RFID Tags Abstract Radio frequency identification (RFID) tags containing;Introduction and Motivation Since its invention in the early 20th century, radio frequency identification (RFID associated with RFID, likely because the technology remains largely invisible and uncontrollable

  2. January 22, 2006 RFID: Radio Frequency IDentification: 4400:391-002

    E-print Network

    Ida, Nathan

    January 22, 2006 RFID: Radio Frequency IDentification: 4400:391-002 Texts: No text Time: W, 3 8. Manish Bhuptani, Shahram Moradpour, RFID Field Guide : Deploying Radio Frequency Identification:15-5:30 PM Room: CH-323 Dr. N. Ida (ASEC N252), e-mail: ida@uakron.edu, TEL: 972-6525 RFID: Outline 1

  3. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76.616 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....616 Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  4. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76.616 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....616 Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  5. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76.616 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....616 Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  6. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76.616 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....616 Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  7. 47 CFR 76.616 - Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. 76.616 Section 76.616 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....616 Operation near certain aeronautical and marine emergency radio frequencies. (a) The...

  8. Intracranial Boundary Detection and Radio Frequency Correction in Magnetic Resonance Images

    E-print Network

    Atkins, M. Stella

    Intracranial Boundary Detection and Radio Frequency Correction in Magnetic Resonance Images Boundary Detection and Radio Frequency Cor­ rection in Magnetic Resonance Images Examining Committee: Dr. A Date Approved: ii #12; Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive method for producing

  9. Technique for Predicting the Radio Frequency Field Strength Inside an Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, Michael P.; Reddell, Jerry P.

    1997-01-01

    This technical memo represents a simple analytical technique for predicting the Radio Frequency (RF) field inside an enclosed volume in which radio frequency occurs. The technique was developed to predict the RF field strength within a launch vehicle fairing in which some payloads desire to launch with their telemetry transmitter radiating. This technique considers both the launch vehicle and the payload aspects.

  10. Room temperature femtotesla radio-frequency atomic magnetometer W. Chalupczak,1

    E-print Network

    Room temperature femtotesla radio-frequency atomic magnetometer W. Chalupczak,1 R. M. Godun,1 S online 12 June 2012) A radio-frequency tunable atomic magnetometer with a sensitivity of about 1 fT/Hz1/2 in a range of 10­500 kHz is demonstrated. The magnetometer is operated in the orientation configuration

  11. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, S; Upadhyay, J; Mammosser, J; Nikolic, M; Vuskovic, L

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cryomodule (in situ operation). This discharge offers an efficient mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the problems related to generation and sustaining the multi-cell cavity plasma, which are breakdown and resonant detuning. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  12. Charge dynamics in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, J.; Schüngel, E.; Donkó, Z.; Czarnetzki, U.

    2010-06-01

    In a capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) discharge the number of positive and negative charges lost to each electrode must balance within one RF period to ensure a constant total uncompensated charge in the discharge, Qtot, on time average. This balance is the result of a compensation of electron and ion fluxes at each electrode within one RF period. Although Qtot is constant on temporal average, it is time dependent on time scales shorter than one RF period, since it results from a balance of the typically constant ion flux and the strongly time dependent electron flux at each electrode. Nevertheless, Qtot is assumed to be constant in various models. Here the dynamics of Qtot is investigated in a geometrically symmetric CCRF discharge operated in argon at 13.56 and 27.12 MHz with variable phase shift ? between the driving voltages by a PIC simulation and an analytical model. Via the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE) a variable dc self-bias is generated as a function of ?. It is found that Qtot is not temporally constant within the low frequency period, but fluctuates by about 10% around its time average value. This modulation is understood by an analytical model. It is demonstrated that this charge dynamics leads to a phase shift of the dc self-bias not captured by models neglecting the charge dynamics. This dynamics is not restricted to dual frequency discharges. It is a general phenomenon in all CCRF discharges and can generally be described by the model introduced here. Finally, Qtot is split into the uncompensated charges in each sheath. The sheath charge dynamics and the self-excitation of non-linear plasma series resonance oscillations of the RF current via the EAE at low pressures of a few pascals are discussed.

  13. Compatibility of the Radio Frequency Mass Gauge with Composite Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Greg; Mueller, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The radio frequency mass gauge (RFMG) is a low-gravity propellant quantity gauge being developed at NASA for possible use in long-duration space missions utilizing cryogenic propellants. As part of the RFMG technology development process, we evaluated the compatibility of the RFMG with a graphite-epoxy composite material used to construct propellant tanks. The key material property that can affect compatibility with the RFMG is the electrical conductivity. Using samples of 8552IM7 graphite-epoxy composite, we characterized the resistivity and reflectivity over a range of frequencies. An RF impedance analyzer was used to characterize the out-of-plane electrical properties (along the sample thickness) in the frequency range 10 to 1800 MHZ. The resistivity value at 500 MHz was 4.8 ohm-cm. Microwave waveguide measurements of samples in the range 1.7 2.6 GHz, performed by inserting the samples into a WR-430 waveguide, showed reflectivity values above 98. Together, these results suggested that a tank constructed from graphite-epoxy composite would produce good quality electromagnetic tank modes, which is needed for the RFMG. This was verified by room-temperature measurements of the electromagnetic modes of a 2.4 m diameter tank constructed by Boeing from similar graphite-epoxy composite material. The quality factor Q of the tank electromagnetic modes, measured via RF reflection measurements from an antenna mounted in the tank, was typically in the range 400 Q 3000. The good quality modes observed in the tank indicate that the RFMG is compatible with graphite-epoxy tanks, and thus the RFMG could be used as a low-gravity propellant quantity gauge in such tanks filled with cryogenic propellants.

  14. Nanoionics-Based Switches for Radio-Frequency Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Lee, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Nanoionics-based devices have shown promise as alternatives to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and semiconductor diode devices for switching radio-frequency (RF) signals in diverse systems. Examples of systems that utilize RF switches include phase shifters for electronically steerable phased-array antennas, multiplexers, cellular telephones and other radio transceivers, and other portable electronic devices. Semiconductor diode switches can operate at low potentials (about 1 to 3 V) and high speeds (switching times of the order of nanoseconds) but are characterized by significant insertion loss, high DC power consumption, low isolation, and generation of third-order harmonics and intermodulation distortion (IMD). MEMS-based switches feature low insertion loss (of the order of 0.2 dB), low DC power consumption (picowatts), high isolation (>30 dB), and low IMD, but contain moving parts, are not highly reliable, and must be operated at high actuation potentials (20 to 60 V) generated and applied by use of complex circuitry. In addition, fabrication of MEMS is complex, involving many processing steps. Nanoionics-based switches offer the superior RF performance and low power consumption of MEMS switches, without need for the high potentials and complex circuitry necessary for operation of MEMS switches. At the same time, nanoionics-based switches offer the high switching speed of semiconductor devices. Also, like semiconductor devices, nanoionics-based switches can be fabricated relatively inexpensively by use of conventional integrated-circuit fabrication techniques. More over, nanoionics-based switches have simple planar structures that can easily be integrated into RF power-distribution circuits.

  15. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Dark Energy

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    National Radio Astronomy Observatory Dark Energy: Constraints from Astronomy, Answers from Physics? Jim Condon #12;National Radio Astronomy Observatory UVa/NRAO DE Lunch Talk 2005 Nov. 30 Constraining Astronomy Observatory UVa/NRAO DE Lunch Talk 2005 Nov. 30 Friedmann Equations for Expansion a = distance

  16. Near-field effects in radio-frequency emission from particle showers in a dense medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyneman, Rachel; Wissel, Stephanie; Belov, Konstantin; Vahle, Patricia; Salzberg, David; Romero-Wolf, Andres; SLAC T-510 Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Two mechanisms are expected to produce radio-frequency emission in ultra-high energy cosmic ray air showers. Askaryan emission, generated by an overall charge excess, has been studied in beam experiments previously. The emission due to Earth's magnetic field has been inferred from observations by cosmic-ray observatories, but not yet studied in a controlled laboratory environment. The SLAC T-510 experiment recently studied the effects of a magnetic field upon the radio-frequency emission from particle showers in high-density polyethylene as a way to model cosmic ray air showers. Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) and Very High Frequency (VHF) antennas were used to measure the signal from particle showers in the target at different positions. For an overview, see the talk by K. Mulrey in this conference. Several near-field runs were performed with the UHF antenna array closer to the target than in the majority of the data taking. Signal from the two mechanisms, Askaryan and Magnetic, were separated into orthogonal polarizations by the geometry of the system. We report on studies of the electric field for several positions in the near field. Initial results indicate that the electric field as a function of angle behaves consistently as the antennas are moved further from the target.

  17. Industrial-scale radio frequency treatments for insect control in walnuts II. Insect mortality and product quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports on the 2nd part of a scaling-up study investigating the technical feasibility of using radio frequency (RF) energy in commercial postharvest insect control in in-shell walnuts as an alternative to chemical fumigation. A large scale treatment for conveyorized walnuts was designed b...

  18. Phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy on an industrial confined dual frequency capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, P. D.; Turner, M. M.; Gans, T.; Faulkner, R.

    2004-09-01

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) has been used to investigate an industrial etch reactor (Exelan, Lam Research Inc.). The reactor is a confined dual frequency capacitively coupled radio frequency (DF-CCRF) discharge. The discharge is operated with one electrode grounded and the second electrode driven simultaneously with two rf voltages (2 MHz and 27 MHz). PROES yields detailed insight into the electron dynamics within both rf cycles. A high speed ICCD camera (LaVision GmbH) allows us to use every rf cycle for phase resolved measurements with spatial resolution along the discharge axis. The high sampling rate of the ICCD camera allows us to measure even faint emission lines with temporal resolution. Spectral resolution is achieved using a 2m-spectrometer. First experimental results on the sheath dynamics in the Exelan reactor are discussed and compared to a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation for a neon discharge.

  19. THE LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO CATALOG OF FLAT-SPECTRUM SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Giroletti, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Cowperthwaite, Philip S.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Funk, S.

    2014-07-01

    A well known property of the ?-ray sources detected by Cos-B in the 1970s, by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the 1990s, and recently by the Fermi observations is the presence of radio counterparts, particularly for those associated with extragalactic objects. This observational evidence is the basis of the radio-?-ray connection established for the class of active galactic nuclei known as blazars. In particular, the main spectral property of the radio counterparts associated with ?-ray blazars is that they show a flat spectrum in the GHz frequency range. Our recent analysis dedicated to search blazar-like candidates as potential counterparts for the unidentified ?-ray sources allowed us to extend the radio-?-ray connection in the MHz regime. We also showed that blazars below 1 GHz maintain flat radio spectra. Thus, on the basis of these new results, we assembled a low-frequency radio catalog of flat-spectrum sources built by combining the radio observations of the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey and of the Westerbork in the southern hemisphere catalog with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky survey (NVSS). This could be used in the future to search for new, unknown blazar-like counterparts of ?-ray sources. First, we found NVSS counterparts of Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope radio sources, and then we selected flat-spectrum radio sources according to a new spectral criterion, specifically defined for radio observations performed below 1 GHz. We also described the main properties of the catalog listing 28,358 radio sources and their logN-logS distributions. Finally, a comparison with the Green Bank 6 cm radio source catalog was performed to investigate the spectral shape of the low-frequency flat-spectrum radio sources at higher frequencies.

  20. The Low-frequency Radio Catalog of Flat-spectrum Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; Giroletti, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Masetti, N.; Paggi, A.; Cowperthwaite, Philip S.; Tosti, G.; Funk, S.

    2014-07-01

    A well known property of the ?-ray sources detected by Cos-B in the 1970s, by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the 1990s, and recently by the Fermi observations is the presence of radio counterparts, particularly for those associated with extragalactic objects. This observational evidence is the basis of the radio-?-ray connection established for the class of active galactic nuclei known as blazars. In particular, the main spectral property of the radio counterparts associated with ?-ray blazars is that they show a flat spectrum in the GHz frequency range. Our recent analysis dedicated to search blazar-like candidates as potential counterparts for the unidentified ?-ray sources allowed us to extend the radio-?-ray connection in the MHz regime. We also showed that blazars below 1 GHz maintain flat radio spectra. Thus, on the basis of these new results, we assembled a low-frequency radio catalog of flat-spectrum sources built by combining the radio observations of the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey and of the Westerbork in the southern hemisphere catalog with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky survey (NVSS). This could be used in the future to search for new, unknown blazar-like counterparts of ?-ray sources. First, we found NVSS counterparts of Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope radio sources, and then we selected flat-spectrum radio sources according to a new spectral criterion, specifically defined for radio observations performed below 1 GHz. We also described the main properties of the catalog listing 28,358 radio sources and their logN-logS distributions. Finally, a comparison with the Green Bank 6 cm radio source catalog was performed to investigate the spectral shape of the low-frequency flat-spectrum radio sources at higher frequencies.

  1. Radio-frequency excitation of harmonic microwave radiation from a Penning reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, J.P.; Wharton, C.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Experimental results on multiple-harmonic emission at 8.8 GHz from a Penning reflex discharge (PRD) are reported. Observations of the frequency spectra of microwave emission showed copius harmonic generation of frequencies having two completely different origins: (1) spontaneously excited high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency and (2) high harmonics of the frequency of an injected signal independent of the magnetic field strength, a phenomenon reported here for the first time. For spontaneous harmonic emission there was a current threshold, whose magnitude depended on gas pressure and magnetic field strength. When a signal was injected, however, high harmonics (up to the 18th) could be seen at discharge currents well below this threshold value. Comparisons between the two types of radiation are made and discussion of possible mechanisms is provided. It is concluded that the coupling efficiency of the radio-frequency (rf)-excited emission is dependent on the relationship between the rf drive frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency. Finite Larmor radius effects may also influence this coupling. The plasma sheath size will also be a factor in the transfer of energy from the probe to the bulk plasma. Results which seek to elucidate these effects are presented.

  2. Radio frequency coil technology for small-animal MRI.

    PubMed

    Doty, F David; Entzminger, George; Kulkarni, Jatin; Pamarthy, Kranti; Staab, John P

    2007-05-01

    A review of the theory, technology, and use of radio frequency (RF) coils for small-animal MRI is presented. It includes a brief overview of MR signal-to-noise (S/N) analysis and discussions of the various coils commonly used in small-animal MR: surface coils, linear volume coils, birdcages, and their derivatives. The scope is limited to mid-range coils, i.e. coils where the product (fd) of the frequency f and the coil diameter d is in the range 2-30 MHz-m. Common applications include mouse brain and body coils from 125 to 750 MHz, rat body coils up to 500 MHz, and small surface coils at all fields. In this regime, all the sources of loss (coil, capacitor, sample, shield, and transmission lines) are important. All such losses may be accurately captured in some modern full-wave 3D electromagnetics software, and new simulation results are presented for a selection of surface coils using Microwave Studio 2006 by Computer Simulation Technology, showing the dramatic importance of the "lift-off effect". Standard linear circuit simulators have been shown to be useful in optimization of complex coil tuning and matching circuits. There appears to be considerable potential for trading S/N for speed using phased arrays, especially for a larger field of view. Circuit simulators are shown to be useful for optimal mismatching of ultra-low-noise preamps based on the enhancement-mode pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistor for optimal coil decoupling in phased arrays. Cryogenically cooled RF coils are shown to offer considerable opportunity for future gains in S/N in smaller samples. PMID:17451180

  3. Radio-frequency capacitance spectroscopy of metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Frake, James C.; Kano, Shinya; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Griffiths, Jonathan; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Majima, Yutaka; Smith, Charles G.; Buitelaar, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen great progress in our understanding of the electronic properties of nanomaterials in which at least one dimension measures less than 100?nm. However, contacting true nanometer scale materials such as individual molecules or nanoparticles remains a challenge as even state-of-the-art nanofabrication techniques such as electron-beam lithography have a resolution of a few nm at best. Here we present a fabrication and measurement technique that allows high sensitivity and high bandwidth readout of discrete quantum states of metallic nanoparticles which does not require nm resolution or precision. This is achieved by coupling the nanoparticles to resonant electrical circuits and measurement of the phase of a reflected radio-frequency signal. This requires only a single tunnel contact to the nanoparticles thus simplifying device fabrication and improving yield and reliability. The technique is demonstrated by measurements on 2.7?nm thiol coated gold nanoparticles which are shown to be in excellent quantitative agreement with theory. PMID:26042729

  4. Three-dimensional effects for radio frequency antenna modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.D.; Batchelor, D.B.; Stallings, D.C. )

    1994-10-15

    Electromagnetic field calculations for radio frequency (rf) antennas in two dimensions (2-D) neglect finite antenna length effects as well as the feeders leading to the main current strap. The 2-D calculations predict that the return currents in the sidewalls of the antenna structure depend strongly on the plasma parameters, but this prediction is suspect because of experimental evidence. To study the validity of the 2-D approximation, the Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS) has been used to perform three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of the power spectrum, plasma loading, and inductance for a relevant loop antenna design. Effects on antenna performance caused by feeders to the main current strap and conducting sidewalls are considered. The modeling shows that the feeders affect the launched power spectrum in an indirect way by forcing the driven rf current to return in the antenna structure rather than the plasma, as in the 2-D model. It has also been found that poloidal dependencies in the plasma impedance matrix can reduce the loading predicted from that predicted in the 2-D model. For some plasma parameters, the combined 3-D effects can lead to a reduction in the predicted loading by as much as a factor of 2 from that given by the 2-D model, even with end-effect corrections for the 2-D model.

  5. Spheroidization of molybdenum powder by radio frequency thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-ping; Wang, Kuai-she; Hu, Ping; Chen, Qiang; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2015-11-01

    To control the morphology and particle size of dense spherical molybdenum powder prepared by radio frequency (RF) plasma from irregular molybdenum powder as a precursor, plasma process parameters were optimized in this paper. The effects of the carrier gas flow rate and molybdenum powder feeding rate on the shape and size of the final products were studied. The molybdenum powder morphology was examined using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. The powder phases were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The tap density and apparent density of the molybdenum powder were investigated using a Hall flow meter and a Scott volumeter. The optimal process parameters for the spherical molybdenum powder preparation are 50 g/min powder feeding rate and 0.6 m3/h carrier gas rate. In addition, pure spherical molybdenum powder can be obtained from irregular powder, and the tap density is enhanced after plasma processing. The average size is reduced from 72 to 62 µm, and the tap density is increased from 2.7 to 6.2 g/cm3. Therefore, RF plasma is a promising method for the preparation of high-density and high-purity spherical powders.

  6. Method of making radio frequency ion source antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA); Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1988-01-01

    In the method, the radio frequency (RF) antenna is made by providing a clean coil made of copper tubing or other metal conductor, which is coated with a tacky organic binder, and then with a powdered glass frit, as by sprinkling the frit uniformly over the binder. The coil is then heated internally in an inert gas atmosphere, preferably by passing an electrical heating current along the coil. Initially, the coil is internally heated to about 200.degree. C. to boil off the water from the binder, and then to about 750.degree. C.-850.degree. C. to melt the glass frit, while also burning off the organic binder. The melted frit forms a molten glass coating on the metal coil, which is then cooled to solidify the glass, so that the metal coil is covered with a thin continuous homogeneous impervious glass coating of substantially uniform thickness. The glass coating affords complete electrical insulation and complete dielectric protection for the metal coil of the RF antenna, to withstand voltage breakdown and to prevent sputtering, while also doubling the plasma generating efficiency of the RF antenna, when energized with RF power in the vacuum chamber of an ion source for a particle accelerator or the like. The glass frit preferably contains apprxoimately 45% lead oxide.

  7. Manufacture of radio frequency micromachined switches with annealing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Yang; Dai, Ching-Liang

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of a radio frequency (RF) micromachined switch with annealing were presented. The structure of the RF switch consists of a membrane, coplanar waveguide (CPW) lines, and eight springs. The RF switch is manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The switch requires a post-process to release the membrane and springs. The post-process uses a wet etching to remove the sacrificial silicon dioxide layer, and to obtain the suspended structures of the switch. In order to improve the residual stress of the switch, an annealing process is applied to the switch, and the membrane obtains an excellent flatness. The finite element method (FEM) software CoventorWare is utilized to simulate the stress and displacement of the RF switch. Experimental results show that the RF switch has an insertion loss of 0.9 dB at 35 GHz and an isolation of 21 dB at 39 GHz. The actuation voltage of the switch is 14 V. PMID:24445415

  8. Radio-frequency dressed state potentials for neutral atoms

    E-print Network

    S. Hofferberth; I. Lesanovsky; B. Fischer; J. Verdu; J. Schmiedmayer

    2006-08-29

    Potentials for atoms can be created by external fields acting on properties like magnetic moment, charge, polarizability, or by oscillating fields which couple internal states. The most prominent realization of the latter is the optical dipole potential formed by coupling ground and electronically excited states of an atom with light. Here we present an experimental investigation of the remarkable properties of potentials derived from radio-frequency (RF) coupling between electronic ground states. The coupling is magnetic and the vector character allows to design state dependent potential landscapes. On atom chips this enables robust coherent atom manipulation on much smaller spatial scales than possible with static fields alone. We find no additional heating or collisional loss up to densities approaching $10^{15}$ atoms / cm$^3$ compared to static magnetic traps. We demonstrate the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates in RF potentials and investigate the difference in the interference between two independently created and two coherently split condensates in identical traps. All together this makes RF dressing a powerful new tool for micro manipulation of atomic and molecular systems.

  9. Radio frequency leakage current from unipolar laparoscopic electrocoagulators.

    PubMed

    DiNovo, J A

    1983-09-01

    Radio frequency (RF) leakage current has been suspected of causing accidental tissue burns associated with laparoscopic electrocoagulation used for tubal sterilization. A study was done to determine the levels of capacitively coupled RF leakage current from six unipolar laparoscopes manufactured by five companies. Leakage current values ranging from less than 100 mA to over 550 mA were measured at electrosurgical unit power settings of up to 150 w into 1,000 ohms. These levels represent 24-62% of the total electrosurgical current generated by the electrosurgical units. Using a criterion for tissue injury of 100 mA/sq cm applied for ten seconds, leakage current levels exceeding 400 mA are capable of producing burns either at the abdominal wall or to internal organs that accidentally come into contact with the body of the laparoscope. One of the six devices tested had leakage current levels higher than 400 mA at power settings lower than 100 w. Capacitance measurements between the unipolar laparoscope body and the forceps ranged from 53 to 140 picofarads. PMID:6226780

  10. Development of A Pulse Radio-Frequency Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shou-Guo; Zhao, Ling-Li; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2013-09-01

    A small pulse plasma jet was driven by new developed radio-frequency (RF) power supply of 6.78 MHz. In contrast to the conventional RF 13.56 MHz atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), the power supply was highly simplified by eliminating the matching unit of the RF power supply and using a new circuit, moreover, a pulse controller was added to the circuit to produce the pulse discharge. The plasma jet was operated in a capacitively coupled manner and exhibited low power requirement of 5 W at atmospheric pressure using argon as a carrier gas. The pulse plasma plume temperature remained at less than 45 °C for an extended period of operation without using water to cool the electrodes. Optical emission spectrum measured at a wide range of 200-1000 nm indicated various excited species which were helpful in applying the plasma jet for surface sterilization to human skin or other sensitive materials. Institude of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, China.

  11. Power efficiency improvements with the radio frequency H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J.; Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M.

    2016-02-01

    CW 13.56 MHz radio frequency-driven H- ion source is under development at the University of Jyväskylä for replacing an existing filament-driven ion source at the MCC30/15 cyclotron. Previously, production of 1 mA H- beam, which is the target intensity of the ion source, has been reported at 3 kW of RF power. The original ion source front plate with an adjustable electromagnet based filter field has been replaced with a new front plate with permanent magnet filter field. The new structure is more open and enables a higher flux of ro-vibrationally excited molecules towards the plasma electrode and provides a better control of the potential near the extraction due to a stronger separation of the main plasma from the plasma electrode. While the original system provided better control over the e-/H- ratio, the new configuration has led to a higher production efficiency of 1 mA H- at 1.75 kW RF power. The latest results and upgrade plans are presented.

  12. Noninvasive radio frequency for skin tightening and body contouring.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robert A

    2013-03-01

    The medical use of radio frequency (RF) is based on an oscillating electrical current forcing collisions between charged molecules and ions, which are then transformed into heat. RF heating occurs irrespective of chromophore or skin type and is not dependent on selective photothermolysis. RF can be delivered using monopolar, bipolar, and unipolar devices, and each method has theoretical limits of depth penetration. A variant of bipolar delivery is fractional RF delivery. In monopolar configurations, RF will penetrate deeply and return via a grounding electrode. Multiple devices are available and are detailed later in the text. RF thermal stimulation is believed to result in a microinflammatory process that promotes new collagen. By manipulating skin cooling, RF can also be used for heating and reduction of fat. Currently, the most common uses of RF-based devices are to noninvasively manage and treat skin tightening of lax skin (including sagging jowls, abdomen, thighs, and arms), as well as wrinkle reduction, cellulite improvement, and body contouring. PMID:24049924

  13. Spectroscopic Measurements of Radio Frequency Plasmas in Supercritical Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, Tsunehiro; Iwamae, Atsushi; Kawashima, Ayato

    2010-10-29

    Spectroscopic measurements of radio frequency (rf) plasma were performed under high pressure CO{sub 2} conditions (5 and 7 MPa) and supercritical (sc)CO{sub 2} conditions (8-20 MPa). The temperatures evaluated from C{sub 2} Swan bands increased from 3600 K to 4600 K with increasing pressure. The broadening and shifting of the O I line profile ({approx}777 nm) of rf plasma was observed under scCO{sub 2} conditions. The width of the line profile increased with increasing pressure. The reason for the broadening and shifting is still unclear because the present theory used to explain them is not valid for such high pressure conditions. Further, the broadening of the Ar I line profile ({approx}811.5 nm) in rf plasmas was observed under atmospheric Ar (0.1 MPa), high pressure Ar conditions (1-4 MPa), and scAr condition (5 MPa); the observation of the O I line profile in CO{sub 2} plasmas is difficult in this pressure range owing to its weak intensity therein. Similar to the case of the O I line in CO{sub 2} plasmas, the reason for the broadening of the Ar I line profile at 5 MPa is unclear.

  14. Radio Frequency Generation of an Electron Plasma in a Malmberg-Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Paroli, B.; De Luca, F.; Pozzoli, R.; Rome, M.; Maero, G.

    2010-06-16

    The generation of an electron plasma via low-power Radio Frequency (RF) excitation has been observed in the Malmberg-Penning trap ELTRAP under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The process is sensitive to the RF parameters as well as to the trapping length. The electron heating mechanism necessary to reach the ionization energy of the residual gas has been modeled with the use of a simple one-dimensional iterative map, whose properties show a behavior similar to that of the Fermi acceleration map.

  15. Tuning the work function of graphene by nitrogen plasma treatment with different radio-frequency powers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jian-Jhou; Lin, Yow-Jon

    2014-06-09

    Graphene prepared by the chemical vapor deposition method was treated with nitrogen plasma under different radio-frequency (rf) power conditions in order to experimentally study the change in the work function. Control of the rf power could change the work function of graphene from 4.91?eV to 4.37?eV. It is shown that the increased rf power may lead to the increased number of graphitic nitrogen, increasing the electron concentration, and shifting the Fermi level to higher energy. The ability to controllably tune the work function of graphene is essential for optimizing the efficiency of optoelectronic and electronic devices.

  16. Magnetoreception in the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus): influence of weak frequency-modulated radio frequency fields

    PubMed Central

    Malkemper, E. Pascal; Eder, Stephan H. K.; Begall, Sabine; Phillips, John B.; Winklhofer, Michael; Hart, Vlastimil; Burda, Hynek

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian magnetic sense is predominantly studied in species with reduced vision such as mole-rats and bats. Far less is known about surface-dwelling (epigeic) rodents with well-developed eyes. Here, we tested the wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus for magnetoreception using a simple behavioural assay in which mice are allowed to build nests overnight in a visually symmetrical, circular arena. The tests were performed in the ambient magnetic field or in a field rotated by 90°. When plotted with respect to magnetic north, the nests were bimodally clustered in the northern and southern sectors, clearly indicating that the animals used magnetic cues. Additionally, mice were tested in the ambient magnetic field with a superimposed radio frequency magnetic field of the order of 100?nT. Wood mice exposed to a 0.9 to 5?MHz frequency sweep changed their preference from north-south to east-west. In contrast to birds, however, a constant frequency field tuned to the Larmor frequency (1.33?MHz) had no effect on mouse orientation. In sum, we demonstrated magnetoreception in wood mice and provide first evidence for a radical-pair mechanism in a mammal. PMID:25923312

  17. Fast radio-frequency amplitude modulation in multiple-quantum magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance: Theory and experiments

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Fast radio-frequency amplitude modulation in multiple-quantum magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic of this experiment has been the poor efficiency of the radio-frequency pulses used in converting multiple-modulated radio-frequency pulses, and which can yield substantial signal and even resolution enhancements over

  18. Quantum mechanics in rotating-radio-frequency traps and Penning traps with a quadrupole rotating field

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, T.

    2010-03-15

    Quantum-mechanical analysis of ion motion in a rotating-radio-frequency (rrf) trap or in a Penning trap with a quadrupole rotating field is carried out. Rrf traps were introduced by Hasegawa and Bollinger [Phys. Rev. A 72, 043404 (2005)]. The classical motion of a single ion in this trap is described by only trigonometric functions, whereas in the conventional linear radio-frequency (rf) traps it is by the Mathieu functions. Because of the simple classical motion in the rrf trap, it is expected that the quantum-mechanical analysis of the rrf traps is also simple compared to that of the linear rf traps. The analysis of Penning traps with a quadrupole rotating field is also possible in a way similar to the rrf traps. As a result, the Hamiltonian in these traps is the same as the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator, and energy levels and wave functions are derived as exact results. In these traps, it is found that one of the vibrational modes in the rotating frame can have negative energy levels, which means that the zero-quantum-number state (''ground'' state) is the highest energy state.

  19. Radio Frequency Phototube, Optical Clock and Precise Measurements in Nuclear Physics

    E-print Network

    Amur Margaryan

    2009-10-24

    Recently a new experimental program of novel systematic studies of light hypernuclei using pionic decay was established at JLab (Study of Light Hypernuclei by Pionic Decay at JLab, JLab Experiment PR-08-012). The highlights of the proposed program include high precision measurements of binding energies of hypernuclei by using a high resolution pion spectrometer, HpiS. The average values of binding energies will be determined within an accuracy of ~10 keV or better. Therefore, the crucial point of this program is an absolute calibration of the HpiS with accuracy 10E-4 or better. The merging of continuous wave laser-based precision optical-frequency metrology with mode-locked ultrafast lasers has led to precision control of the visible frequency spectrum produced by mode-locked lasers. Such a phase-controlled mode-locked laser forms the foundation of an optical clock or femtosecond optical frequency comb (OFC) generator, with a regular comb of sharp lines with well defined frequencies. Combination of this technique with a recently developed radio frequency (RF) phototube results in a new tool for precision time measurement. We are proposing a new time-of-flight (TOF) system based on an RF phototube and OFC technique. The proposed TOF system achieves 10 fs instability level and opens new possibilities for precise measurements in nuclear physics such as an absolute calibration of magnetic spectrometers within accuracy 10E-4 - 10E-5.

  20. Three-dimensional effects for radio frequency antenna modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.D.; Batchelor, D.B.; Stallings, D.C.

    1993-09-01

    Electromagnetic field calculations for radio frequency (rf) antennas in two dimensions (2-D) neglect finite antenna length effects as well as the feeders leading to the main current strap. Comparisons with experiments indicate that these 2-D calculations can overestimate the loading of the antenna and fail to give the correct reactive behavior. To study the validity of the 2-D approximation, the Multiple Antenna Implementation System (MAntIS) has been used to perform 3-D modeling of the power spectrum, plasma loading, and inductance for a relevant loop antenna design. Effects on antenna performance caused by feeders to the main current strap, conducting sidewalls, and finite phase velocity are considered. The plasma impedance matrix for the loading calculation is generated by use of the ORION-1D code. The 3-D model is benchmarked with the 2-D model in the 2-D limit. For finite-length antennas, inductance calculations are found to be in much more reasonable agreement with experiments for 3-D modeling than for the 2-D estimates. The modeling shows that the feeders affect the launched power spectrum in an indirect way by forcing the driven rf current to return in the antenna sidewalls rather than in the plasma as in the 2-D model. Thus, the feeders have much more influence than the plasma on the currents that return in the sidewall. It has also been found that poloidal dependencies in the plasma impedance matrix can reduce the loading from that predicted in the 2-D model. For some plasma parameters, the combined 3-D effects can lead to a reduction in the predicted loading by as much as a factor of 2 from that given by the 2-D model.

  1. Pulsed radio frequency therapy of experimentally induced arthritis in ponies.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, W H; Houge, J C; Neirby, D T; Di Mino, A; Di Mino, A A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of pulsed radio frequency therapy (PRFT) was evaluated on seven ponies with no arthritis and in 28 ponies in which arthritis was created using intra-articular amphotericin B to induce synovitis in the right middle carpal joint. The ponies were divided into five treatment and two control groups. Two levels of arthritis were created and two dosage levels of PRFT were evaluated. The effect of PRFT on arthritic and nonarthritic joints was measured by comparing synovial fluid parameters, the degree and duration of lameness, the range of carpal motion, and carpus circumference, for treated and untreated groups. Lesions seen radiographically, at gross pathology, and by histopathology were also compared between the treated and control groups. In the ponies with a mild form of induced arthritis, PRFT significantly (p less than 0.05) reduced the severity and duration of lameness, swelling of the carpus, and the severity of gross pathological and radiographic changes. In these ponies the synovial acid phosphatase levels were lower, the mucin clot quality was superior, and the synovial protein levels were lower for the ponies receiving PRFT as compared to the arthritic ponies receiving no treatment. A dose response effect was evident. In ponies with a slightly more severe form of arthritis, PRFT was evaluated at one dosage level. The treated ponies were significantly improved over the untreated ponies with respect to carpal range of motion, degree of lameness, carpus swelling, and radiographic lesions. No deleterious effects were noted when normal, PRFT treated, middle carpal joints were compared to contralateral untreated, normal joints. It was concluded that significant beneficial effects resulted when affected ponies were treated with PRFT. PMID:1884288

  2. Scattering of radio frequency waves by blobs in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Kominis, Yannis

    2013-05-15

    The density fluctuations and blobs present in the edge region of magnetic fusion devices can scatter radio frequency (RF) waves through refraction, reflection, diffraction, and coupling to other plasma waves. This, in turn, affects the spectrum of the RF waves and the electromagnetic power that reaches the core of the plasma. The usual geometric optics analysis of RF scattering by density blobs accounts for only refractive effects. It is valid when the amplitude of the fluctuations is small, of the order of 10%, compared to the background density. In experiments, density fluctuations with much larger amplitudes are routinely observed, so that a more general treatment of the scattering process is needed. In this paper, a full-wave model for the scattering of RF waves by a blob is developed. The full-wave approach extends the range of validity well beyond that of geometric optics; however, it is theoretically and computationally much more challenging. The theoretical procedure, although similar to that followed for the Mie solution of Maxwell's equations, is generalized to plasmas in a magnetic field. Besides diffraction and reflection, the model includes coupling to a different plasma wave than the one imposed by the external antenna structure. In the model, it is assumed that the RF waves interact with a spherical blob. The plasma inside and around the blob is cold, homogeneous, and imbedded in a uniform magnetic field. After formulating the complete analytical theory, the effect of the blob on short wavelength electron cyclotron waves and longer wavelength lower hybrid waves is studied numerically.

  3. Radio-Frequency Plasma Cleaning of a Penning Malmberg Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Martin, James; Pearson, J. Boise; Lewis, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Radio-frequency-generated plasma has been demonstrated to be a promising means of cleaning the interior surfaces of a Penning-Malmberg trap that is used in experiments on the confinement of antimatter. {Such a trap was reported in Modified Penning-Malmberg Trap for Storing Antiprotons (MFS-31780), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 3 (March 2005), page 66.} Cleaning of the interior surfaces is necessary to minimize numbers of contaminant atoms and molecules, which reduce confinement times by engaging in matter/antimatter-annihilation reactions with confined antimatter particles. A modified Penning-Malmberg trap like the one described in the cited prior article includes several collinear ring electrodes (some of which are segmented) inside a tubular vacuum chamber, as illustrated in Figure 1. During operation of the trap, a small cloud of charged antiparticles (e.g., antiprotons or positrons) is confined to a spheroidal central region by means of a magnetic field in combination with DC and radiofrequency (RF) electric fields applied via the electrodes. In the present developmental method of cleaning by use of RF-generated plasma, one evacuates the vacuum chamber, backfills the chamber with hydrogen at a suitable low pressure, and uses an RF-signal generator and baluns to apply RF voltages to the ring electrodes. Each ring is excited in the polarity opposite that of the adjacent ring. The electric field generated by the RF signal creates a discharge in the low-pressure gas. The RF power and gas pressure are adjusted so that the plasma generated in the discharge (see Figure 2) physically and chemically attacks any solid, liquid, and gaseous contaminant layers on the electrode surfaces. The products of the physical and chemical cleaning reactions are gaseous and are removed by the vacuum pumps.

  4. Radio Frequency Field Calculations for Plasma Heating Simulations in VASIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, A. V.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Squire, J. P.; Carter, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    (VASIMR)1 is plasma heating by ion-cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). Mathematical simulation helps to design an ICRF antenna, i.e. make maximal absorption of RF power into the plasma in the resonance area. Another goal of a particle simulation is design of a magnetic nozzle and optimize the performance of VASIMR2. field in the plasma, 2) ion density and velocity, 3) ion-cyclotron radio-frequency electromagnetic field. The assumptions of quasineutral and collisionless plasma are based on the range of operating VASIMR parameters. Carlo simulations for systems of million of particles in a reasonable time and without the need for a powerful supercomputer. The particle to grid weighting method is used for calculating the ion density, which is used for recalculation of the electric potential and RF field. dimensional problem to a weighted sum over two-dimensional solutions. Absorption is introduced in the cold plasma model by adding an imaginary collision frequency to the RF driven frequency, which is equivalent to adding an imaginary particle mass in the dielectric tensor elements. static and RF fields using the VASIMR code2. The VASIMR and EMIR codes are then iterated to estimate the ICRF effects on the plasma density. The iteration is performed by calculating the RF fields with the EMIR code, and using these fields to follow nonlinear ion trajectories with the VASIMR code on the gyro-frequency time scale. The ion trajectories are used to generate RF power absorption values and a density input for the next EMIR calculation. The codes are iterated until the density profile becomes reasonably stable, then the collisional absorption parameter in the EMIR code is adjusted and the iteration is continued until the power deposited by the RF system matches the power absorbed by the ion trajectories in a global sense. electric field. The solved algebraic system of equations is represented by ill-conditioned 18-diagonal matrix with complex elements. Since early development of the EMIR code, the frontal method direct solver was used. That solver requires large CPU time and RAM, which both are proportional to Nr Nz2, for a grid of the size Nr x Nz. These requirements make almost impossible to use existent EMIR solver on PC to obtain RF fields with good accuracy. system. The suggested iterative method is Modified Incomplete Cholesky Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Squared solver4. The solver involves a couple of the control parameters, which let a user tune the code to make iterations converge as fast as possible for a particular grid. Since the iterative solver does not require large RAM, and works much faster than the direct solver, the new algorithm lets us resolve RF fields on a PC with required accuracy. REFERENCES 1. Chang Díaz F.R., "Research Status of The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket", Proc. 39th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics (Pittsburgh, PA, 1997), Bulletin of APS, 42 2057. 2. Ilin A.V., Chang Díaz F.R., Squire J.P. and Carter M.D. "Monte Carlo Particle Dynamics in a Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket", (Proceedings of Open Systems' 98), Transactions of Fusion Technology, 35 330 - 334 (1999). 3. Jaeger E.F., Batchelor D.B., Weitzner H. and Whealton J.H. "ICRF Wave Propagation And Absorption in Tokamak And Mirror Magnetic Fields - A Full-wave Calculation", Computer Physics Com., 40 33 - 64 (1986). 4. Ilin, A. V., Bagheri, B., Scott, L. R., Briggs, J. M., and McCammon, J. A. "Parallelization of Poisson-Boltzmann and Brownian Dynamics calculation", Parallel Computing in Computational Chemistry, ACB Books, Washington D.C., (1995) 170-185.

  5. Sounds energetic: the radio producer's energy minibook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The Minibook will be expanded into the final Radio Producer's Energy Sourcebook. Radio producers and broadcasters are asked to contribute ideas for presenting energy knowledge to the public and to be included in the Sourcebook. Chapter One presents a case study suggesting programming and promotion ideas and sample scripts for a radio campaign that revolves around no-cost or low-cost steps listeners can take to increase their home energy efficiency and save money. A variety of other energy topics and suggestions on ways to approach them are addressed in Chapter Two. Chapter Three contains energy directories for Baltimore, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, and Washington, DC. The directories will be expanded in the Sourcebook and will consist of a selection of local public and private sector energy-related organizations and list local experts and organizations and the best Federal, state, and local government programs that can provide consumers and citizens groups with information, technical assistance, and financial support. (MCW)

  6. Coupling effects in inductive discharges with radio frequency substrate biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, J.; Schuengel, E.; Czarnetzki, U.

    2012-01-09

    Low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) operated in neon at 27.12 MHz with capacitive substrate biasing (CCP) at 13.56 MHz are investigated by phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy, voltage, and current measurements. Three coupling mechanisms are found potentially limiting the separate control of ion energy and flux: (i) Sheath heating due to the substrate biasing affects the electron dynamics even at high ratios of ICP to CCP power. At fixed CCP power, (ii) the substrate sheath voltage and (iii) the amplitude as well as frequency of plasma series resonance oscillations of the RF current are affected by the ICP power.

  7. Supplying the Power Requirements to a Sensor Network Using Radio Frequency Power Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; Cooray, Francis; Smart, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Wireless power transmission is a method of supplying power to small electronic devices when there is no wired connection. One way to increase the range of these systems is to use a directional transmitting antenna, the problem with this approach is that power can only be transmitted through a narrow beam and directly forward, requiring the transmitter to always be aligned with the sensor node position. The work outlined in this article describes the design and testing of an autonomous radio frequency power transfer system that is capable of rotating the base transmitter to track the position of sensor nodes and transferring power to that sensor node. The system's base station monitors the node's energy levels and forms a charge queue to plan charging order and maintain energy levels of the nodes. Results show a radio frequency harvesting circuit with a measured S11 value of ?31.5 dB and a conversion efficiency of 39.1%. Simulation and experimentation verified the level of power transfer and efficiency. The results of this work show a small network of three nodes with different storage types powered by a central base node. PMID:23012506

  8. Floating low-temperature radio-frequency plasma oxidation of polycrystalline silicon-germanium

    E-print Network

    Floating low-temperature radio-frequency plasma oxidation of polycrystalline silicon at low temperature by floating plasma oxidation using an inductively coupled radio fre- quency rf source Received 26 March 1998; accepted for publication 16 May 1998 Low temperature oxide formation

  9. Calculus, Radio Dials and the Straight-Line Frequency Variable Capacitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyadzhiev, Khristo N.

    2010-01-01

    Most often radio dials of analogue radios are not uniformly graded; the frequencies are cramped on the left side or on the right side. This makes tuning more difficult. Why are dials made this way? We shall see here that simple calculus can help understand this problem and solve it. (Contains 7 figures.)

  10. Cut-off Rate based Outage Probability Analysis of Frequency Hopping Mobile Radio under Jamming

    E-print Network

    Yýlmaz, Özgür

    Cut-off Rate based Outage Probability Analysis of Frequency Hopping Mobile Radio under Jamming hopping (FH) mobile radios under heavy jamming scenarios. With the use of outage probability analysis, and outage metric is obtained depending on the jamming state, fading, number of RFB and constellation. On

  11. A Low-Frequency Radio Spectropolarimeter for Observations of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, P.; Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Rajalingam, M.

    2015-09-01

    A new spectropolarimeter for dedicated ground-based observations of radio emission from the solar corona at low frequencies ({< }100 MHz) has recently been commissioned at the Gauribidanur Radio Observatory near Bengaluru, India. We report the observational setup, the calibration scheme, and first results.

  12. Portable radio frequency hyperthermia instrumentation. [For heating tumor tissues in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, J.D.; McCabe, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    Portable radio frequency hyperthermia instrumentation has been constructed for application in the localized heating of human and animal tumors. Tissue temperature is regulated by electronic feedback techniques. Audible and visual monitoring of tissue temperature is provided.

  13. Adaptive-rate techniques for frequency-hop multiple-access packet-radio networks

    E-print Network

    Block, Frederick J., IV

    The effects of adaptive-rate transmissions and routing on the total throughput of a slow-frequency-hop packet-radio network are considered. Adaptive rates are achieved through the use of error-control coding with perfect ...

  14. Computer simulation of a novel technique for Radio-Frequency Ablation of ventricular arrhythmias

    E-print Network

    Rosbury, Tamara S

    2006-01-01

    Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) is a rapid arrhythmia, most commonly due to reentrant electrical activity in the heart. A common treatment for VT is Radio-Frequency Ablation (RFA), which is minimally invasive, but requires ...

  15. The Astronomical Low Frequency Array: A Proposed Explorer Mission for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D.; Allen, R.; Basart, J.; Bastian, T.; Bougeret, J. L.; Dennison, B.; Desch, M.; Dwarakanath, K.; Erickson, W.; Finley, D.; Kaiser, M.; Kassim, N.; Kuiper, T.; MacDowall, R.; Mahoney, M.; Perley, R.; Preston, R.; Reiner, M.; Rodriguez, P.; Stone, R.; Unwin, S.; Weiler, K.; Woan, G.; Woo, R.

    1999-01-01

    A radio interferometer array in space providing high dynamic range images with unprecedented angular resolution over the broad frequency range from 0.030 - 30 MHz will open new vistas in solar, terrestial, galactic, and extragalactic astrophysics.

  16. 78 FR 43916 - Certain Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Products and Components Thereof; Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...,690,264. 78 FR 19311 (Mar. 29, 2013). The respondents are Federal Signal Corporation of Oakbrook... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Products and Components Thereof; Commission...

  17. A Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) evaluation strategy for customer fulfillment centers

    E-print Network

    Shen, Howard H. (Howard Hao)

    2006-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a wireless technology that can be used to track inventory labeled with microchip-embedded identifiers communicating passively with scanners without operator involvement. This ...

  18. A systems approach to the evaluation of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) in the defense industry

    E-print Network

    Shah, Ronak R

    2005-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a wireless technology with possible applications in the supply chain. RFID tags' fast read rates, non-line-of-sight identification and large storage capacity may revolutionize supply ...

  19. Integrating Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) data with Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) business processes

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yan (Yan Henry), 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, an important component in the enterprise IT infrastructure, must be integrated into the legacy IT system. This thesis studies how RFID technology can be integrated into the ...

  20. Base-level management of radio-frequency radiation-protection program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rademacher, S.E.; Montgomery, N.D.

    1989-04-01

    AFOEHL developed this report to assist the base-level aerospace medical team manage their radio-frequency radiation-protection program. This report supersedes USAFOEHL Report 80-42, 'A Practical R-F Guide for BEES.'

  1. Base-level management of radio-frequency radiation-protection program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rademacher, S.E.; Montgomery, N.D.

    1989-04-01

    AFOEHL developed this report to assist the base-level aerospace medical team manage their radio-frequency radiation protection program. This report supersedes USAFOEHL Report 80-42, 'A practical R-F Guide for BEES.'

  2. Industrial-scale radio frequency treatments for insect control in lentils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radio frequency (RF) treatments are considered as a potential postharvest technology for disinfesting legumes. After treatment protocols are validated to control postharvest insects without significant quality degradation, it is important to scale-up laboratory RF treatments to industrial applicatio...

  3. POTENTIAL HUMAN STUDY POPULATIONS FOR NON-IONIZING (RADIO FREQUENCY) RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project was initiated to identify potential human populations for future epidemiological studies of the health effects of radio frequency radiation. Through a literature search and contacts with various groups and organizations, numerous occupations and applications...

  4. Impedance matching and DC-DC converter designs for tunable radio frequency based mobile telecommunication systems 

    E-print Network

    Wong, Yan Chiew

    2014-06-30

    Tunability and adaptability for radio frequency (RF) front-ends are highly desirable because they not only enhance functionality and performance but also reduce the circuit size and cost. This thesis presents a number ...

  5. 75 FR 54790 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...requesting use of the radio frequency spectrum. DATES: Effective Date: This regulation...effect, is available in the Office of Spectrum Management, 1401 Constitution Avenue...CONTACT: William Mitchell, Office of Spectrum Management at (202) 482-8124 or...

  6. 78 FR 52097 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ...when requesting use of radio frequency spectrum. DATES: This regulation is effective...effect, is available in the Office of Spectrum Management, 1401 Constitution Avenue...CONTACT: William Mitchell, Office of Spectrum Management at (202) 482-8124 or...

  7. 75 FR 6818 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-11

    ...requesting use of the radio frequency spectrum. EFFECTIVE DATE: This regulation is...effect, is available in the Office of Spectrum Management, 1401 Constitution Avenue...CONTACT: William Mitchell, Office of Spectrum Management at (202) 482-8124 or...

  8. 76 FR 18652 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ...requesting use of the radio frequency spectrum. DATES: Effective Date: This regulation...effect, is available in the Office of Spectrum Management, 1401 Constitution Avenue...CONTACT: William Mitchell, Office of Spectrum Management, at (202) 482-8124...

  9. Automatic design tool for robust radio frequency decoupling matrices in magnetic resonance imaging

    E-print Network

    Mahmood, Zohaib

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we study the design of robust decoupling matrices for coupled transmit radio frequency arrays used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In a coupled parallel transmit array, because of the coupling itself, ...

  10. Indium-Vanadium Oxides Deposited by Radio Frequency Sputtering: New Thin Film Transparent

    E-print Network

    Artuso, Florinda

    agreement with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements. The material structure has beenIndium-Vanadium Oxides Deposited by Radio Frequency Sputtering: New Thin Film Transparent Materials obtained by reactive RF sputtering. Their optical and electrochemical performances have been investigated

  11. Encoding, application and association of radio frequency identification tags on high speed manufacturing lines

    E-print Network

    Fonseca, Herbert Moreti, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    One of the entry points of radio frequency identification technology in supply chain applications is at the manufacturing line, after production, as packaged goods leave for the next link of the network of suppliers, ...

  12. Collisionless electron heating by radio frequency bias in low gas pressure inductive discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2012-12-10

    We show experimental observations of collisionless electron heating by the combinations of the capacitive radio frequency (RF) bias power and the inductive power in low argon gas pressure RF biased inductively coupled plasma (ICP). With small RF bias powers in the ICP, the electron energy distribution (EED) evolved from bi-Maxwellian distribution to Maxwellian distribution by enhanced plasma bulk heating and the collisionless sheath heating was weak. In the capacitive RF bias dominant regime, however, high energy electrons by the RF bias were heated on the EEDs in the presence of the ICP. The collisionless heating mechanism of the high energy electrons transited from collisionless inductive heating to capacitive coupled collisionless heating by the electron bounce resonance in the RF biased ICP.

  13. Sympathetic Cooling of 4 Ions in a Radio-Frequency Trap

    E-print Network

    Schiller, Stephan

    Sympathetic Cooling of 4 He Ions in a Radio-Frequency Trap B. Roth, U. Fro¨hlich, and S. Schiller in a linear radio-frequency trap, by sympathetic cooling via laser-cooled 9Be. Stable crystals containing up as coolant. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.053001 PACS numbers: 32.80.Pj, 42.50.­p The two-body Coulomb system

  14. IS THE OBSERVED HIGH-FREQUENCY RADIO LUMINOSITY DISTRIBUTION OF QSOs BIMODAL?

    SciTech Connect

    Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Murphy, Tara; Ekers, Ronald D.; Feain, Ilana J.

    2012-07-20

    The distribution of QSO radio luminosities has long been debated in the literature. Some argue that it is a bimodal distribution, implying that there are two separate QSO populations (normally referred to as 'radio-loud' and 'radio-quiet'), while others claim it forms a more continuous distribution characteristic of a single population. We use deep observations at 20 GHz to investigate whether the distribution is bimodal at high radio frequencies. Carrying out this study at high radio frequencies has an advantage over previous studies as the radio emission comes predominantly from the core of the active galactic nucleus, and hence probes the most recent activity. Studies carried out at lower frequencies are dominated by the large-scale lobes where the emission is built up over longer timescales (10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} yr), thereby confusing the sample. Our sample comprises 874 X-ray-selected QSOs that were observed as part of the 6dF Galaxy Survey. Of these, 40% were detected down to a 3{sigma} detection limit of 0.2-0.5 mJy. No evidence of bimodality is seen in either the 20 GHz luminosity distribution or in the distribution of the R{sub 20} parameter: the ratio of the radio to optical luminosities traditionally used to classify objects as being either radio-loud or radio-quiet. Previous results have claimed that at low radio luminosities, star formation processes can dominate the radio emission observed in QSOs. We attempt to investigate these claims by stacking the undetected sources at 20 GHz and discuss the limitations in carrying out this analysis. However, if the radio emission was solely due to star formation processes, we calculate that this corresponds to star formation rates ranging from {approx}10 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} to {approx}2300 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  15. Power supply and impedance matching to drive technological radio-frequency plasmas with customized voltage waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franek, James; Brandt, Steven; Berger, Birk; Liese, Martin; Barthel, Matthias; Schüngel, Edmund; Schulze, Julian

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel radio-frequency (RF) power supply and impedance matching to drive technological plasmas with customized voltage waveforms. It is based on a system of phase-locked RF generators that output single frequency voltage waveforms corresponding to multiple consecutive harmonics of a fundamental frequency. These signals are matched individually and combined to drive a RF plasma. Electrical filters are used to prevent parasitic interactions between the matching branches. By adjusting the harmonics' phases and voltage amplitudes individually, any voltage waveform can be approximated as a customized finite Fourier series. This RF supply system is easily adaptable to any technological plasma for industrial applications and allows the commercial utilization of process optimization based on voltage waveform tailoring for the first time. Here, this system is tested on a capacitive discharge based on three consecutive harmonics of 13.56 MHz. According to the Electrical Asymmetry Effect, tuning the phases between the applied harmonics results in an electrical control of the DC self-bias and the mean ion energy at almost constant ion flux. A comparison with the reference case of an electrically asymmetric dual-frequency discharge reveals that the control range of the mean ion energy can be significantly enlarged by using more than two consecutive harmonics.

  16. Unprecedentedly Strong and Narrow Electromagnetic Emissions Stimulated by High-Frequency Radio Waves in the Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Norin, L.; Leyser, T. B.; Nordblad, E.; Thide, B.; McCarrick, M.

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA.

  17. Unprecedentedly strong and narrow electromagnetic emissions stimulated by high-frequency radio waves in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Norin, L; Leyser, T B; Nordblad, E; Thidé, B; McCarrick, M

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA. PMID:19257596

  18. Radio-frequency emission and currents from showers and muons produced in a medium by a beam of high-energy neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Askar'yan, G.A.

    1984-04-10

    The current produced by muons and showers in a beam of high-energy neutrinos is analyzed. This current is calculated, as is the electromagnetic field which arises during its flow and modulation. A deep underground source of electromagnetic fields could be developed for use in detecting the neutrino beam and for rf subsurface imaging of rock formations.

  19. Lunar radio detection of ultra-high-energy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, J. D.

    2013-08-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and their expected counterpart neutrinos, are the most energetic particles in nature, and their origin remains unknown. The detection of these particles is key to identifying their origin, but is complicated by their low flux, which necessitates the use of extremely large detectors. The largest potential aperture for detecting the most energetic of these particles is offered by the lunar radio technique, which makes use of the Moon as a detector, using ground-based radio telescopes to search for nanosecond-scale radio pulses from particles interacting in the lunar regolith, and it is this technique that is the subject of this thesis. In this thesis I present a description of the most sensitive lunar radio experiment to date, conducted in 2010 with the Parkes radio telescope as part of the LUNASKA project, including a comprehensive test of the purpose-built Bedlam backend used in this experiment. The signal-processing strategy is explored in great detail, with an extensive discussion of the statistics of stochastic signals, and an optimal strategy is described which compensates both for known effects such as ionospheric dispersion and for previously-unidentified effects such as phase ambiguity from frequency downconversion. A series of cuts is outlined which successfully removes all anthropogenic radio interference, the first time this has been accomplished for a lunar radio experiment without the benefit of a coincidence filter operating between multiple channels. After these cuts, no radio pulses are observed; this null detection allows limits to be placed on the fluxes of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. To place this experiment in context, I perform a review of the null detections published for previous lunar radio experiments, including detailed analyses of their experimental techniques, based on the rigorous treatment applied in the above work. In several cases, I find previously-unidentified problems which significantly limit the sensitivity of previous experiments. Finally, I improve on existing analytic models for calculating the sensitivity of lunar radio experiments to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos, allowing a comparison with a range of possible future experiments, and comment on future prospects for this technique.

  20. Coincidently Searching for Gravitational Waves and Low Frequency Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Yancey, C.; Shawhan, P. S.; Cutchin, S.; Simonetti, J. H.; Bear, B.; Tsai, J.

    2014-01-01

    The transient sky has become an important area of astrophysical study, especially with the appearance of recent fast transients, but little is known about the sources of these transients. One possible approach which can shed light on this area is multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves and prompt emission meter-wavelength radio to observe fast transients. This is made possible with gravitational-wave detectors such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO (IndIGO and KAGRA proposed or under construction) and phased-array radio-telescopes such LWA, LOFAR, LoFASM, and MWA. This talk presents a method for coincidence of gravitational wave and meter-wavelength radio observations to enable multi-messenger astronomy and discusses the optimization of gravitational-wave and radio sensitivities to attain effective combined observational sensitivities. It is shown that coincidence provides a 52.9% increase to the sensitivity distance for LIGO and a 200% increase to the SNR of radio arrays for particular cases.

  1. Radio frequency models of novae in eruption. I. The free-free process in bipolar morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Simon, T.; Woudt, P. A.; Chomiuk, L.; Munari, U.; Steffen, W.; Koning, N.; O'Brien, T. J.; Bode, M. F.

    2014-09-01

    Observations of novae at radio frequencies provide us with a measure of the total ejected mass, density profile, and kinetic energy of a nova eruption. The radio emission is typically well characterized by the free-free emission process. Most models to date have assumed spherical symmetry for the eruption, although for as long as there have been radio observations of these systems, it has been known that spherical eruptions are too simplistic a geometry. In this paper, we build bipolar models of the nova eruption, assuming the free-free process, and show the effects of varying different parameters on the radio light curves. The parameters considered include the ratio of the minor- to major-axis, the inclination angle, and shell thickness. We also show the uncertainty introduced when fitting spherical-model synthetic light curves to bipolar-model synthetic light curves. We find that the optically thick phase rises with the same power law (S {sub ?}?t {sup 2}) for both the spherical and bipolar models. In the bipolar case, there is a 'plateau' phase—depending on the thickness of the shell as well as the ratio of the minor- to major-axis—before the final decline, which follows the same power law (S {sub ?}?t {sup –3}) as in the spherical case. Finally, fitting spherical models to the bipolar-model synthetic light curves requires, in the worst-case scenario, doubling the ejected mass, more than halving the electron temperature, and reducing the shell thickness by nearly a factor of 10. This implies that in some systems we have been over-predicting the ejected masses and under-predicting the electron temperature of the ejecta.

  2. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in a radio-frequency driven negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, D.; Tarnev, Kh.; Paunska, Ts.; Lishev, St.; Shivarova, A.

    2014-02-01

    Results from initial stage of modeling of the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions currently under development in Consorzio RFX (Padova) regarding ITER are presented. A 2D model developed within the fluid plasma theory for low-pressure discharges (free-fall regime maintenance) is applied to the gas-discharge conditions planned and required for the SPIDER source: gas pressure of 0.3 Pa and radio-frequency (rf) power of 100 kW absorbed in a single driver. The results are for the spatial distribution of the plasma characteristics (charged particle densities, electron temperature and electron energy flux, plasma potential, and dc electric field) with conclusions for the role of the electron energy flux in the formation of the discharge structure.

  3. Laboratory performance of the BEAR (Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket) RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, P.G.; Schrage, D.L.; Young, L.M.; Zaugg, T.J.; Lynch, M.T.; McKenna, K.F.; Hansborough, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    The BEAR (Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket) accelerator will be part of an experiment to demonstrate the operation of an ion accelerator in space and to characterize the exoatmospheric propagation of a neutral particle beam. The RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) has been designed to produce a 25-mA H/sup /minus// beam with an emittance of 0.01 cm-mrad (rms normalized) at an energy of 1 MeV. Because of the rigors of spaceflight, the accelerator design has been constrained by factors not normally applicable to conventional terrestrial accelerators. These factors and the mechanical features are described in a companion paper in these proceedings. The design techniques developed for BEAR would be applicable whenever, rugged, lightweight, or power-efficient systems are required. The BEAR RFQ has been operated under power with beam in the laboratory. This paper details of measured beam transport, emittance, and energy spectra. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Spontaneous Radio Frequency Emissions from Natural Aurora. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBelle, J.

    2009-01-01

    At high latitudes, suitably sensitive radio experiments tuned below 5 MHz detect up to three types of spontaneous radio emissions from the Earth s ionosphere. In recent years, ground-based and rocket-borne experiments have provided strong evidence for theoretical explanations of the generation mechanism of some of these emissions, but others remain unexplained. Achieving a thorough understanding of these ionospheric emissions, accessible to ground-based experiments, will not only bring a deeper understanding of Earth s radio environment and the interactions between waves and particles in the ionosphere but also shed light on similar spontaneous emissions occurring elsewhere in Earth s environment as well as other planetary and stellar atmospheres.

  5. Influences of electrode configurations in dual capacitively coupled radio frequency glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, B.; Soto, L.

    2015-03-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) glow discharge plasma is widely studied in the laboratory because of its simpler design and high efficiency for different material processing applications such as thin-film deposition, plasma etching, sputtering of insulating materials etc. A negative dc potential develops between the bulk plasma and the powered electrodes, which is termed as ‘self-bias’ in RF plasma. This self-bias is generated as a consequences of the geometrical asymmetry of the electrodes, which can be achieved by appropriately design the area of the powered and the grounded electrodes. However, independent control of the dc self-bias in single frequency CCRF plasma is not possible, since the changing in any operating parameters including geometrical asymmetry will also change the plasma parameters. A study on the dual frequency CCRF plasma could be useful in understanding the separate control of the dc self-bias and plasma density, which respectively determine the ion energy and ion flux. In this work, a dual frequency CCRF plasma have been studied on the basis on nonlinear global model to understand the influences of electrode sizes and proper optimization of the CCRF plasma for specific applications.

  6. Modelling of radio emisson from Milky Way-like galaxies and M51 at low radio frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurusik, Wojciech; Chyzy, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    We present results from modelling of the low frequency radio emission from Milky Way-like galaxies and M51. In modelling we take into account observational effects (inclination) as well as spatial distributions of ionized gas and non-thermal emitting gas, and thermal fractions in galaxies. Results are presented in the form of global and local (from galaxy centre) spectrum in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz. According to our results ionized gas similar to the Galaxy’s ionized gas is responsible for flattening of radio spectra. We argue that global spectra from the Milky Way - like galaxies and M51 do not change their shape at higher frequencies with disk orientation along the line of sight even in galaxies with higher thermal fractions. Only the low frequency part of total spectrum is sensitive to galaxy inclination. The flattening of total radio spectrum seems to be more visible in edge-on than face-on galaxies. We also show that the local spectrum from galaxy center has clear turn-over at a few MHz only for galaxies with higher inclination.

  7. Low Frequency Radio Polarization Sensor with Applications in Attitude Estimation

    E-print Network

    Maguire, Sean; Robertson, Paul

    2015-08-19

    -based systems in high-acceleration, cost-constrained environments such as small fixed-wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. In order to validate this method, a sensor system is presented which is capable of determining the H-field polarization of LF radio signals from...

  8. Low Frequency Radio Data in the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; Hess, Sébastien L. G.; Le Sidaner, Pierre; Erard, Stéphane; Coffre, Andrée; Thétas, Emmanuel; André, Nicolas; Génot, Vincent; Thieman, Jim; Typinsky, Dave; Sky, Jim; Higgins, Chuck

    2015-08-01

    In the frame of the preparation of the NASA/JUNO and ESA/JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) missions, and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet-VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nancay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol. Amateur radio data from the RadioJOVE project is also available. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets.

  9. Endotoxin removal by radio frequency gas plasma (glow discharge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Angela

    2011-12-01

    Contaminants remaining on implantable medical devices, even following sterilization, include dangerous fever-causing residues of the outer lipopolysaccharide-rich membranes of Gram-negative bacteria such as the common gut microorganism E. coli. The conventional method for endotoxin removal is by Food & Drug Administration (FDA)-recommended dry-heat depyrogenation at 250°C for at least 45 minutes, an excessively time-consuming high-temperature technique not suitable for low-melting or heat-distortable biomaterials. This investigation evaluated the mechanism by which E. coli endotoxin contamination can be eliminated from surfaces during ambient temperature single 3-minute to cumulative 15-minute exposures to radio-frequency glow discharge (RFGD)-generated residual room air plasmas activated at 0.1-0.2 torr in a 35MHz electrodeless chamber. The main analytical technique for retained pyrogenic bio-activity was the Kinetic Chromogenic Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) Assay, sufficiently sensitive to document compliance with FDA-required Endotoxin Unit (EU) titers less than 20 EU per medical device by optical detection of enzymatic color development corresponding to < 0.5 EU/ml in sterile water extracts of each device. The main analytical technique for identification of chemical compositions, amounts, and changes during sequential reference Endotoxin additions and subsequent RFGD-treatment removals from infrared (IR)-transparent germanium (Ge) prisms was Multiple Attenuated Internal Reflection (MAIR) infrared spectroscopy sensitive to even monolayer amounts of retained bio-contaminant. KimaxRTM 60 mm x 15 mm and 50mm x 15mm laboratory glass dishes and germanium internal reflection prisms were inoculated with E. coli bacterial endotoxin water suspensions at increments of 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, and 5 EU, and characterized by MAIR-IR spectroscopy of the dried residues on the Ge prisms and LAL Assay of sterile water extracts from both glass and Ge specimens. The Ge prism MAIR-IR measurements were repeated after employing 3-minute RFGD treatments sequentially for more than 10 cycles to observe removal of deposited matter that correlated with diminished EU titers. The results showed that 5 cycles, for a total exposure time of 15 minutes to low-temperature gas plasma, was sufficient to reduce endotoxin titers to below 0.05 EU/ml, and correlated with concurrent reduction of major endotoxin reference standard absorption bands at 3391 cm-1, 2887 cm-1, 1646 cm -1 1342 cm-1, and 1103 cm-1 to less than 0.05 Absorbance Units. Band depletion varied from 15% to 40% per 3-minute cycle of RFGD exposure, based on peak-to-peak analyses. In some cases, 100% of all applied biomass was removed within 5 sequential 3-minute RFGD cycles. The lipid ester absorption band expected at 1725 cm-1 was not detectable until after the first RFGD cycle, suggesting an unmasking of the actual bacterial endotoxin membrane induced within the gas plasma environment. Future work must determine the applicability of this low-temperature, quick depyrogenation process to medical devices of more complicated geometry than the flat surfaces tested here.

  10. High-temperature superconducting multi-band radio-frequency metamaterial atoms

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    High-temperature superconducting multi-band radio-frequency metamaterial atoms Behnood G. Ghamsari-fabricated compact high-temperature superconducting (HTS) metamaterial atom operating at a frequency as low as $53 not compromised the quality of our spiral metamaterial atom and a Q as high as $1000 for the fundamental mode

  11. HEATING THE HOT ATMOSPHERES OF GALAXY GROUPS AND CLUSTERS WITH CAVITIES: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN JET POWER AND LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, E.; Raychaudhury, S.; Ponman, T. J.; Giacintucci, S.; David, L. P.; Gitti, M.; Vrtilek, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    We present scaling relations between jet power and radio power measured using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), Chandra, and XMM-Newton, for a sample of nine galaxy groups combined with the BIrzan et al. sample of clusters. Cavity power is used as a proxy for mechanical jet power. Radio power is measured at 235 MHz and 1.4 GHz, and the integrated 10 MHz-10 GHz radio luminosity is estimated from the GMRT 610-235 MHz spectral index. The use of consistently analyzed, high-resolution low-frequency radio data from a single observatory makes the radio powers for the groups more reliable than those used by previous studies, and the combined sample covers 6-7 decades in radio power and 5 decades in cavity power. We find a relation of the form P{sub jet}{proportional_to} L{approx}0.7{sub radio} for integrated radio luminosity, with a total scatter of {sigma}{sub Lrad} = 0.63 and an intrinsic scatter of {sigma}{sub i,Lrad} = 0.59. A similar relation is found for 235 MHz power, but a slightly flatter relation with greater scatter is found for 1.4 GHz power, suggesting that low-frequency or broadband radio measurements are superior jet power indicators. We find our low-frequency relations to be in good agreement with previous observational results. Comparison with jet models shows reasonable agreement, which may be improved if radio sources have a significant low-energy electron population. We consider possible factors that could bias our results or render them more uncertain, and find that correcting for such factors in those groups we are able to study in detail leads to a flattening of the P{sub jet}:L{sub radio} relation.

  12. Reconfigurable radio-frequency arbitrary waveforms synthesized in a silicon photonic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Shen, Hao; Fan, Li; Wu, Rui; Niu, Ben; Varghese, Leo T.; Xuan, Yi; Leaird, Daniel E.; Wang, Xi; Gan, Fuwan; Weiner, Andrew M.; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    Photonic methods of radio-frequency waveform generation and processing can provide performance advantages and flexibility over electronic methods due to the ultrawide bandwidth offered by the optical carriers. However, bulk optics implementations suffer from the lack of integration and slow reconfiguration speed. Here we propose an architecture of integrated photonic radio-frequency generation and processing and implement it on a silicon chip fabricated in a semiconductor manufacturing foundry. Our device can generate programmable radio-frequency bursts or continuous waveforms with only the light source, electrical drives/controls and detectors being off-chip. It modulates an individual pulse in a radio-frequency burst within 4?ns, achieving a reconfiguration speed three orders of magnitude faster than thermal tuning. The on-chip optical delay elements offer an integrated approach to accurately manipulating individual radio-frequency waveform features without constraints set by the speed and timing jitter of electronics, and should find applications ranging from high-speed wireless to defence electronics.

  13. Reconfigurable radio-frequency arbitrary waveforms synthesized in a silicon photonic chip

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Shen, Hao; Fan, Li; Wu, Rui; Niu, Ben; Varghese, Leo T.; Xuan, Yi; Leaird, Daniel E.; Wang, Xi; Gan, Fuwan; Weiner, Andrew M.; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    Photonic methods of radio-frequency waveform generation and processing can provide performance advantages and flexibility over electronic methods due to the ultrawide bandwidth offered by the optical carriers. However, bulk optics implementations suffer from the lack of integration and slow reconfiguration speed. Here we propose an architecture of integrated photonic radio-frequency generation and processing and implement it on a silicon chip fabricated in a semiconductor manufacturing foundry. Our device can generate programmable radio-frequency bursts or continuous waveforms with only the light source, electrical drives/controls and detectors being off-chip. It modulates an individual pulse in a radio-frequency burst within 4?ns, achieving a reconfiguration speed three orders of magnitude faster than thermal tuning. The on-chip optical delay elements offer an integrated approach to accurately manipulating individual radio-frequency waveform features without constraints set by the speed and timing jitter of electronics, and should find applications ranging from high-speed wireless to defence electronics. PMID:25581847

  14. Motion of free spins and NMR imaging without a radio-frequency magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Kees van Schenk Brill; Jassem Lahfadi; Tarek Khalil; Daniel Grucker

    2015-04-19

    NMR imaging without any radio-frequency magnetic field is explained by a quantum treatment of independent spin~$\\tfrac 12$. The total magnetization is determined by means of their individual wave function. The theoretical treatment, based on fundamental axioms of quantum mechanics and solving explicitly the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with the kinetic energy part which gives the motion of free spins, is recalled. It explains the phase shift of the spin noise spectrum with its amplitude compared to the conventional NMR spectrum. Moreover it explains also the relatively good signal to noise ratio of NMR images obtained without a RF pulse. This derivation should be helpful for new magnetic resonance imaging sequences or for developing quantum computing by NMR.

  15. Simulation of direct plasma injection for laser ion beam acceleration with a radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Q. Y.; Li, Zh. M.; Liu, W.; Zhao, H. Y. Zhang, J. J.; Sha, Sh.; Zhang, Zh. L.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-07-15

    The direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) has been being studied at Institute of Modern Physics since several years ago. A C{sup 6+} beam with peak current of 13 mA, energy of 593 keV/u has been successfully achieved after acceleration with DPIS method. To understand the process of DPIS, some simulations have been done as follows. First, with the total current intensity and the relative yields of different charge states for carbon ions measured at the different distance from the target, the absolute current intensities and time-dependences for different charge states are scaled to the exit of the laser ion source in the DPIS. Then with these derived values as the input parameters, the extraction of carbon beam from the laser ion source to the radio frequency quadrupole with DPIS is simulated, which is well agreed with the experiment results.

  16. Design of high power radio frequency radial combiner for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Akhilesh; Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2009-01-15

    A simplified design method has been proposed for systematic design of novel radio frequency (rf) power combiner and divider, incorporating radial slab-line structure, without using isolation resistor and external tuning mechanism. Due to low insertion loss, high power capability, and rigid mechanical configuration, this structure is advantageous for modern solid state rf power source used for feeding rf energy to superconducting accelerating structures. Analysis, based on equivalent circuit and radial transmission line approximation, provides simple design formula for calculating combiner parameters. Based on this method, novel 8-way and 16-way power combiners, with power handling capability of 4 kW, have been designed, as part of high power solid state rf amplifier development. Detailed experiments showed good performance in accordance with theory.

  17. High power water load for microwave and millimeter-wave radio frequency sources

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence (Saratoga, CA); Mizuhara, Yosuke M. (Palo Alto, CA); Schumacher, Richard V. (Sunnyvale, CA); Pendleton, Rand P. (Saratoga, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A high power water load for microwave and millimeter wave radio frequency sources has a front wall including an input port for the application of RF power, a cylindrical dissipation cavity lined with a dissipating material having a thickness which varies with depth, and a rear wall including a rotating reflector for the reflection of wave energy inside the cylindrical cavity. The dissipation cavity includes a water jacket for removal of heat generated by the absorptive material coating the dissipation cavity, and this absorptive material has a thickness which is greater near the front wall than near the rear wall. Waves entering the cavity reflect from the rotating reflector, impinging and reflecting multiple times on the absorptive coating of the dissipation cavity, dissipating equal amounts of power on each internal reflection.

  18. Radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions with magnetic field tangency points along the sheath surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2013-08-15

    Computer simulations of radio-frequency (RF) waves propagating across a two-dimensional (2D) magnetic field into a conducting boundary are described. The boundary condition for the RF fields at the metal surface leads to the formation of an RF sheath, which has previously been studied in one-dimensional models. In this 2D study, it is found that rapid variation of conditions along the sheath surface promote coupling of the incident RF branch (either fast or slow wave) to a short-scale-length sheath-plasma wave (SPW). The SPW propagates along the sheath surface in a particular direction dictated by the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the surface, and the wave energy in the SPW accumulates near places where the background magnetic field is tangent to the surface.

  19. Strong Meissner screening change in superconducting radio frequency cavities due to mild baking

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A. Grassellino, A.; Barkov, F.; Suter, A.; Salman, Z.; Prokscha, T.

    2014-02-17

    We investigate “hot” regions with anomalous high field dissipation in bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators by using low energy muon spin rotation (LE-?SR) on corresponding cavity cutouts. We demonstrate that superconducting properties at the hot region are well described by the non-local Pippard/BCS model for niobium in the clean limit with a London penetration depth ?{sub L}=23±2 nm. In contrast, a cutout sample from the 120??C baked cavity shows a much larger ?>100?nm and a depth dependent mean free path, likely due to gradient in vacancy concentration. We suggest that these vacancies can efficiently trap hydrogen and hence prevent the formation of hydrides responsible for rf losses in hot regions.

  20. Observation of solar radio bursts using swept-frequency radiospectrograph in 20-40 MHz Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Takashi; Oya, Hiroshi

    A new station for the observation of solar decametric radio bursts has been developed at Miyagi Vocational Training College in Tsukidate, Miyagi, Japan. Using the swept frequency radiospectrograph covering a frequency range from 20 MHz to 40 MHz within 200 msec, with bandwidth of 30 KHz, the radio outbursts from the sun have been currently monitored with colored dynamic spectrum display. After July 1982, successful observations provide the data which include all types of solar radio bursts such as type I, II, III, IV and V in the decametric wavelength range. In addition to these typical radio bursts, rising tone bursts with fast drift rate followed by strong type III bursts and a series of bursts repeating rising and falling tone bursts with slow drift rate have been observed.

  1. A review of organizations influencing radio frequency allocations to deep space research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The charters and functions of various national and international scientific organizations were examined to identify those which have a direct or indirect influence on the allocation of radio frequencies for use in deep space research. Those organizations identified as having the ability to influence frequency allocations are described. A brief description of each organization is provided, and the members who are influential specifically in frequency allocations are listed. The interrelations between the organizations and how they influence allocations are explained.

  2. Radio-frequency driven dipole-dipole interactions in spatially separated volumes

    E-print Network

    Atreju Tauschinsky; C. S. E. van Ditzhuijzen; L. D. Noordam; H. B. van Linden van den Heuvell

    2008-10-14

    Radio-frequency (rf) fields in the MHz range are used to induce resonant energy transfer between cold Rydberg atoms in spatially separated volumes. After laser preparation of the Rydberg atoms, dipole-dipole coupling excites the 49s atoms in one cylinder to the 49p state while the 41d atoms in the second cylinder are transferred down to the 42p state. The energy exchanged between the atoms in this process is 33 GHz. An external rf-field brings this energy transfer into resonance. The strength of the interaction has been investigated as a function of amplitude (0-1 V/cm) and frequency (1-30 MHz) of the rf-field and as a function of a static field offset. Multi-photon transitions up to fifth order as well as selection rules prohibiting the process at certain fields have been observed. The width of the resonances has been reduced compared to earlier results by switching off external magnetic fields of the magneto-optical trap, making sub-MHz spectroscopy possible. All features are well reproduced by theoretical calculations taking the strong ac-Stark shift due to the rf-field into account.

  3. Radio frequency circuits for wireless receiver front-ends 

    E-print Network

    Xin, Chunyu

    2005-11-01

    (LNA) and mixer. The intermediate frequency was chosen to be 2MHz to save battery power and alleviate the low frequency noise problem. A conventional LNA architecture was used for reliability. The mixer is a modi?ed Gilbert-cell using the current...

  4. Energy Efficient Transmissions in MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianwei

    Energy Efficient Transmissions in MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks Liqun Fu The Institute of Network@ie.cuhk.edu.hk Abstract--In this paper, we consider energy efficient transmis- sions for MIMO cognitive radio networks on the traffic load of the secondary system. Index Terms--Cognitive radio networks, MIMO, Energy- efficiency. I

  5. Offset, tilted dipole models of Uranian smooth high-frequency radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweitzer, Andrea E.; Romig, Joseph H.; Evans, David R.; Sawyer, Constance B.; Warwick, James W.

    1990-01-01

    The smooth high-frequency (SHF) component of the radio emission detected during the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus (January 1986) is studied. An offset tilted dipole (OTD) investigation of the SHF emission at L shells is carried out within the range of the bursty source locations. A viable high L shell model is presented. It is suggested that Miranda, which reaches a minimum L shell at L = 5, may be related to the timing of several types of radio emissions.

  6. WWVB: A Half Century of Delivering Accurate Frequency and Time by Radio

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Michael A; Nelson, Glenn K

    2014-01-01

    In commemoration of its 50th anniversary of broadcasting from Fort Collins, Colorado, this paper provides a history of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) radio station WWVB. The narrative describes the evolution of the station, from its origins as a source of standard frequency, to its current role as the source of time-of-day synchronization for many millions of radio controlled clocks. PMID:26601026

  7. Radio wave propagation at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 in the short wave band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkaliyev, Y. F.; Bocharov, V. I.

    1972-01-01

    The results of measurements of field strength and signal/noise ratio on experimental ionospheric-scattering short wave radio links are presented. It is shown that the seasonal and diurnal variations of field strength are determined by features of solar and meteoric activity. The role of the sporadic E-layer in propagation of short radio waves at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 is noted.

  8. Numerical analysis of radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2012-01-15

    A new finite element numerical scheme for analyzing self-consistent radio-frequency (RF) sheath-plasma interaction problems in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is applied to various problems represented by simplified models for the tokamak scrape-off layer. The present code incorporates a modified boundary condition, which is called a sheath boundary condition, that couples the radio-frequency waves and sheaths at the material boundaries by treating the sheath as a thin vacuum layer. A series of numerical analyses in one- and two-dimensional domains show several important physical properties, such as the existence of multiple roots, hysteresis effects, presence and characteristics of the sheath-plasma waves, and the phase shift of a reflected slow wave, some of which are newly identified by introducing a spatially varying plasma density and background magnetic field.

  9. Inhibition of a Demand Pacemaker and Interference with Monitoring Equipment by Radio-frequency Transmissions

    PubMed Central

    Pickers, Bryan A.; Goldberg, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    During the initial testing of Radio Leicester a swept-frequency technique for testing radio antennae was shown to affect demand pacemakers by inhibition of the pacing impulse and to interfere with physiological monitoring equipment. Adequate filtering of demand pacemakers is necessary to eliminate this interference. There is no evidence that such testing has any effect on the function of fixed-rate pacemakers. There is also a potential danger to implanted demand pacemakers by the use of similar polyscope generators used for servicing radio and television apparatus in industry. PMID:5771585

  10. Measurements of time average series resonance effect in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Chuaqui, H.; Kakati, M.

    2011-10-01

    Self-excited plasma series resonance is observed in low pressure capacitvely coupled radio frequency discharges as high-frequency oscillations superimposed on the normal radio frequency current. This high-frequency contribution to the radio frequency current is generated by a series resonance between the capacitive sheath and the inductive and resistive bulk plasma. In this report, we present an experimental method to measure the plasma series resonance in a capacitively coupled radio frequency argon plasma by modifying the homogeneous discharge model. The homogeneous discharge model is modified by introducing a correction factor to the plasma resistance. Plasma parameters are also calculated by considering the plasma series resonances effect. Experimental measurements show that the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance, which arises in capacitive discharge due to the nonlinear interaction of plasma bulk and sheath, significantly enhances both the Ohmic and stochastic heating. The experimentally measured total dissipation, which is the sum of the Ohmic and stochastic heating, is found to increase significantly with decreasing pressure.

  11. Measurements of time average series resonance effect in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Chuaqui, H.; Kakati, M.

    2011-10-15

    Self-excited plasma series resonance is observed in low pressure capacitvely coupled radio frequency discharges as high-frequency oscillations superimposed on the normal radio frequency current. This high-frequency contribution to the radio frequency current is generated by a series resonance between the capacitive sheath and the inductive and resistive bulk plasma. In this report, we present an experimental method to measure the plasma series resonance in a capacitively coupled radio frequency argon plasma by modifying the homogeneous discharge model. The homogeneous discharge model is modified by introducing a correction factor to the plasma resistance. Plasma parameters are also calculated by considering the plasma series resonances effect. Experimental measurements show that the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance, which arises in capacitive discharge due to the nonlinear interaction of plasma bulk and sheath, significantly enhances both the Ohmic and stochastic heating. The experimentally measured total dissipation, which is the sum of the Ohmic and stochastic heating, is found to increase significantly with decreasing pressure.

  12. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sebastien; Salvade, Yves; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10{sup -7} or better, resulting in a resolution of {+-}25 {mu}m for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented.

  13. Studies on the effect of finite geometrical asymmetry in dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, B.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, dual capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) glow discharge plasma has been widely studied in the laboratory because of its simpler design and high efficiency for different material processing applications such as thin-film deposition, plasma etching, sputtering of insulating materials etc. The main objective of studies on dual frequency CCRF plasma has been the independent control of ion energy and ion flux using an electrical asymmetry effect (EAE). Most studies have been reported in electrode configurations that are either geometrically symmetric (both electrodes are equal) or completely asymmetric (one electrode is infinitely bigger than the other). However, it seems that most of the laboratory CCRF plasmas have finite electrode geometry. In addition, plasma series resonance (PSR) and electron bounce resonance (EBR) heating also come into play as a result of geometrical asymmetry as well as EAE. In this study, a dual frequency CCRF plasma has been studied in which the dual frequency CCRF has been coupled to the lumped circuit model of the plasma and the time-independent fluid model of the plasma sheath, in order to study the effect of finite geometrical asymmetry on the generation of dc-self bias and plasma heating. The dc self-bias is found to strongly depend on the ratio of the area between the electrodes. The dc self-bias is found to depend on the phase angle between the two applied voltage waveforms. The EAE and geometrical asymmetry are found to work differently in controlling the dc self-bias. It can be concluded that the phase angle between the two voltage waveforms in dual CCRF plasmas has an important role in determining the dc self-bias and may be used for controlling the plasma properties in the dual frequency CCRF plasma.

  14. Monitoring radio-frequency heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1993-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a radio-frequency heating process for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. A dipole antenna located in a horizontal well in the unsaturated zone was used to heat a contaminated clay layer. The heat-induced changes were tomographically imaged by their effects on the formation electrical resistivity. The resistivity changes observed appear to be related to heating and vaporization of the pore water, formation of steam condensate, and infiltration of rainwater through the heated zones and adjacent areas. There is a clear asymmetry downward in the resistivity decreases associated with the heating process. The resistivity decreases observed in the vicinity of the heating well are believed to be caused by the heating and downward migration of warm water originally located within a radius of a few feet around the heating well; the magnitude of the change is between 10--20%. The decreasing resistivity implies an increasing rate of radio wave attenuation as heating progressed; therefore, the rate of energy deposition around the heating well increased while the penetration distance of the radio waves decreased. Saturation changes in the clay near the antenna during heating were estimated to be 50--55% based on the observed resistivity decreases. Resistivity changes observed at distances greater than 3 meters to one side of the antenna appear to be related to rainwater infiltration. We propose that gaps in near surface clay layers allow rainwater to migrate downward and reach the top of clay rich zone penetrated by the antenna borehole. The water may then accumulate along the top of the clay.

  15. Detection of erosion/deposition depth using a low frequency passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakidis, Iordanis Vlasios

    This thesis presents an experimental study both in the laboratory and field to develop and test a method for continuously measuring and monitoring scour using an automated identification technology known as Radio Frequency Identification (RFID). RFID systems consist of three main components, namely (a) the reader which controls the system, (b) the transponder (derived from transmitter/responder) that transmits data to the reader and (c) the excitation antenna that allows the communication between the reader and the transponder. The study provides an insight into the RFID technology and develops the framework for using this technology to eventually address two central themes in river mechanics and sediment transport; (a) the determination of the active layer thickness and (b) the scour/deposition depth around a hydraulic structure. In particular, this study develops the methodology for relating the signal strength of a radio frequency (RF) device with the distance between an excitation antenna and the RF device. The experiments presented herein are classified into two main groups, (1) the laboratory and (2) the RF signal vs. the detection distance experiments (field experiments). The laboratory experiments were designed to understand the effect of key RFID parameters (e.g., transponder orientation with respect to the excitation antenna plane, maximum antenna-transponder detection distance), measured in terms of the transponder return RF signal strength for various antenna-transponder distances, transponder orientations with respect to the excitation antenna plane and different mediums in between the excitation antenna and the transponder, on the overall performance of the RFID system. On the other hand, the RF signal vs. the detection distance experiments were based on the results obtained during the laboratory experiments and focused on developing calibration curves by relating the transponder return RF signal strength with the distance between the excitation antenna and a transponder. The laboratory results show that the dominant RFID parameters affecting the system performance are (a) the transponder orientation towards the excitation antenna plane and (b) the medium type in between the excitation antenna and the transponder. The differences in reading distances were attributed to the transponder inner antenna type, while the effect of the medium was related with the void ratio, where higher porosity materials have, less RF signal strength decay. The parameter that governs the RF signal strength decay was found to be the distance between the excitation antenna and the transponder (erosion process experiments). The RF signal strength decays almost linearly with distance, while the rate of the RF signal strength decay is controlled by the material type in between the excitation antenna and the transponder (deposition process experiments). The RF signal vs. the detection distance experiments demonstrate that the reading distance of the RFID system can be significantly increased by using a custom made excitation antenna. The custom made excitation antenna not only increases the reading distance between the antenna and the transponder to nearly 20 ft., but also allows the user to manipulate the excitation antenna's shape and size to meet the specific landscape requirements at the monitoring site.

  16. Graphene for radio frequency electronics and infrared thermal imaging

    E-print Network

    Hsu, Allen Long

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is two-fold: The first is to develop a reliable processing technology for CVD graphene devices for applications in graphene circuits, i.e. mixers, frequency multipliers and phase key shifters. The ...

  17. JUICE/RPWI/JENRAGE: a low frequency radio imager at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Kasaba, Y.; Bergman, J. E. S.; Zarka, P.; Lamy, L.; Hess, S. L. G.; Rothkaehl, H.

    2015-10-01

    The JENRAGE (Jovian Environment Radio Astronomy and Ganymede Exploration) experiment of the Radio and Plasma Waves Instrument (RPWI) on-board JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) is a sensitive, and versatile radio instrument. It will observe radio waves ranging from 80 kHz to 45 MHz at a 100 Msample per second aquisition rate. The instrument is composed of set of 3 electrical dipoles (developed by the Polish team), connected to low noise preamplifiers and conditioning analog filters (built by the Japanese team), then sampled and digitally filtererd into ~300 kHz bands (digital part developed by the Swedish team). This international project is coordinated by B. Cecconi and Y. Kasaba, both co-PI of JUICE/RPWI. Although the radio antenna connected to this instrument have no intrinsic directivity, the JENRAGE measurements can provide instantaneous direction of arrival, flux density and polarization degree of the observed radio waves. Hence, the JENRAGE can be described as an full-sky radio imager. As the instrument provides direction of arrival, radio sources can be located with some assumption on the propagation between the source and the observer. Hence, it is possible to produce radio source maps and correlate them with observations at other wavelengths, such as UV or IR observations of the auroral regions of Jupiter. The flux and polarization measurements together with the time- frequency shape of the radio emissions can also be used to identify the radio emission processes. These features have shown their capabilities on Cassini, with the RPWS/HFR instrument. We will present the JUICE/RPWI/JENRAGE design and the science objectives. Additional science topics linked to the icy satellites, which are currently being assessed, will also be presented.

  18. The electrical asymmetry effect in geometrically asymmetric capacitive radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüngel, E.; Eremin, D.; Schulze, J.; Mussenbrock, T.; Czarnetzki, U.

    2012-09-01

    The electrical asymmetry effect (EAE) allows an almost ideal separate control of the mean ion energy, , and flux, ?i, at the electrodes in capacitive radio frequency discharges with identical electrode areas driven at two consecutive harmonics with adjustable phase shift, ?. In such geometrically symmetric discharges, a DC self bias is generated as a function of ?. Consequently, can be controlled separately from ?i by adjusting the phase shift. Here, we systematically study the EAE in low pressure dual-frequency discharges with different electrode areas operated in argon at 13.56 MHz and 27.12 MHz by experiments, kinetic simulations, and analytical modeling. We find that the functional dependence of the DC self bias on ? is similar, but its absolute value is strongly affected by the electrode area ratio. Consequently, the ion energy distributions change and can be controlled by adjusting ?, but its control range is different at both electrodes and determined by the area ratio. Under distinct conditions, the geometric asymmetry can be compensated electrically. In contrast to geometrically symmetric discharges, we find the ratio of the maximum sheath voltages to remain constant as a function of ? at low pressures and ?i to depend on ? at the smaller electrode. These observations are understood by the model. Finally, we study the self-excitation of non-linear plasma series resonance oscillations and its effect on the electron heating.

  19. Radio-frequency spectroscopy of weakly bound molecules in spin-orbit-coupled atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Pu, Han; Zhang, Jing; Peng, Shi-Guo; Liu, Xia-Ji

    2012-11-01

    We investigate theoretically radio-frequency spectroscopy of weakly bound molecules in an ultracold spin-orbit-coupled atomic Fermi gas. We consider two cases with either equal Rashba and Dresselhaus coupling or pure Rashba coupling. The former system has been realized very recently at Shanxi University [Wang , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.109.095301 109, 095301 (2012)] and MIT [Cheuk , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.109.095302 109, 095302 (2012)]. We predict realistic radio-frequency signals for revealing the unique properties of anisotropic molecules formed by spin-orbit coupling.

  20. Layer-like Structure of Radio-Frequency Discharge with Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, O. Y.; Vakulenko, A. V.; Lisitchenko, T. Y.; Levada, G. I.

    2008-09-07

    In this paper we are carried out the computer simulation of the dust particles dynamics in the radio frequency discharges at the microgravity conditions using PIC/MCC method for electrons and ions and hydrodynamics model for dust particles. The moving of dust particles is governed by the electrostatic force, ion and neutral drag forces, which are averaged over period of RF discharge. The obtained results show that dust particles form layers with sharp boundaries in the discharge chamber that is response on the instability of the radio-frequency discharge.

  1. Radio Observations of Explosive Energy Releases on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Mukul R.; White, S. M.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter is devoted to a discussion of the radio observations of explosive energy releases (normal flares and small-scale energy releases) on the Sun. Radio imaging observations of solar flares and coronal transients and the relationship of radio phenomena with those observed in hard and soft X-rays and underlying physics are discussed.

  2. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. L.; Wang, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = A?{sup ?} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, ? = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have ? < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ?? ? 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have ? > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  3. Mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio-frequency sheath potentials on edge localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, B.; Xu, X. Q.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2014-11-01

    The mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio frequency (RF) sheath potentials on the peeling-ballooning modes is studied non-linearly by employing a two-fluid three-field simulation model based on the BOUT++ framework. Additional shear flow and the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect due to the thermal and rectified RF sheath potential are induced. It is found that the shear flow increases the growth rate while the K-H effect decreases the growth rate slightly when there is a density gradient, but the energy loss of these cases is suppressed in the nonlinear phase. The stronger external electrostatic field due to the sheaths has a more significant effect on the energy loss suppression. From this study, it is found the growth rate in the linear phase mainly determines the onset of edge-localized modes, while the mode spectrum width in the nonlinear phase has an important impact on the turbulent transport. The wider mode spectrum leads to weaker turbulent transport and results in a smaller energy loss. Due to the thermal sheath and rectified RF sheath potential in the scrape-off-layer, the modified shear flow tears apart the peeling-ballooning filament and makes the mode spectrum wider, resulting in less energy loss. The perturbed electric potential and the parallel current near the sheath region is also suppressed locally due to the sheath boundary condition.

  4. Mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio-frequency sheath potentials on edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, B.; Xu, X. Q.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    The mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio frequency (RF) sheath potentials on the peeling-ballooning modes is studied non-linearly by employing a two-fluid three-field simulation model based on the BOUT++ framework. Additional shear flow and the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect due to the thermal and rectified RF sheath potential are induced. It is found that the shear flow increases the growth rate while the K-H effect decreases the growth rate slightly when there is a density gradient, but the energy loss of these cases is suppressed in the nonlinear phase. The stronger external electrostatic field due to the sheaths has a more significant effect on the energy loss suppression. From this study, it is found the growth rate in the linear phase mainly determines the onset of edge-localized modes, while the mode spectrum width in the nonlinear phase has an important impact on the turbulent transport. The wider mode spectrum leads to weaker turbulent transport and results in a smaller energy loss. Due to the thermal sheath and rectified RF sheath potential in the scrape-off-layer, the modified shear flow tears apart the peeling-ballooning filament and makes the mode spectrum wider, resulting in less energy loss. The perturbed electric potential and the parallel current near the sheath region is also suppressed locally due to the sheath boundary condition.

  5. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jiali; Tiedt, Douglas

    2013-05-23

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  6. Ion Acoustic Wave Frequencies and Onset Times During Type 3 Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Conflicting interpretations exist for the low-frequency ion acoustic (S) waves often observed by ISEE 3 in association with intense Langmuir (L) waves in the source regions of type III solar radio bursts near 1 AU. Two indirect lines of observational evidence, as well as plasma theory, suggest they are produced by the electrostatic (ES) decay L yields L(PRIME) + S. However, contrary to theoretical predictions, an existing analysis of the wave frequencies instead favors the electromagnetic (EM) decays L yields T + S, where T denotes an EM wave near the plasma frequency. This conflict is addressed here by comparing the observed wave frequencies and onset times with theoretical predictions for the ES and EM decays, calculated using the time-variable electron beam and magnetic field orientation data, rather than the nominal values used previously. Field orientation effects and beam speed variations are shown analytically to produce factor-of-three effects, greater than the difference in wave frequencies predicted for the ES and EM decays; effects of similar magnitude occur in the events analyzed here. The S-wave signals are extracted by hand from a sawtooth noise background, greatly improving the association between S waves and intense L waves. Very good agreement exists between the time-varying predictions for the ES decay and the frequencies of most (but not all) wave bursts. The waves occur only after the ES decay becomes kinematically allowed, which is consistent with the ES decay proceeding and producing most of the observed signals. Good agreement exists between the EM decay's predictions and a significant fraction of the S-wave observations while the EM decay is kinematically allowed. The wave data are not consistent, however, with the EM decay being the dominant nonlinear process. Often the observed waves are sufficiently broadband to overlap simultaneously the frequency ranges predicted for the ES and EM decays. Coupling the dominance of the ES decay with this frequency overlap provides support for a previous suggestion that fundamental emission occurs when the EM decay is stimulated by the ES decay product waves. The periods in which the ES and EM decays produce observable S waves are consistent with the observed and (independently) predicted times of fundamental and harmonic radio emission. This supports interpretation of fundamental emission as stimulated EM decay and harmonic emission as the coalescence L + L(prime) yields T of beam-generated L waves and L(prime) waves produced by the ES decay, where T denotes an electromagnetic wave at twice the plasma frequency. Analysis of the electron beam data reveals that the time-varying beam speed is consistent with ballistic beam propagation with minimal energy loss, implying that the beam propagates in a state close to time- and volume-averaged marginal stability. This confirms a central tenet of the stochastic growth theory for type III bursts.

  7. Radio frequency interference protection of communications between the Deep Space Network and deep space flight projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing density of electrical and electronic circuits in Deep Space Station systems for computation, control, and numerous related functions has combined with the extension of system performance requirements calling for higher speed circuitry along with broader bandwidths. This has progressively increased the number of potential sources of radio frequency interference inside the stations. Also, the extension of spectrum usage both in power and frequency as well as the greater density of usage at all frequencies for national and international satellite communications, space research, Earth resource operations and defense, and particularly the huge expansion of airborne electronic warfare and electronic countermeasures operations in the Mojave area have greatly increased the potential number and severity of radio frequency interference incidents. The various facets of this problem and the efforts to eliminate or minimize the impact of interference on Deep Space Network support of deep space flight projects are described.

  8. Packet error probabilities in frequency-hopped spread spectrum packet radio networks. Markov frequency hopping patterns considered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiopoulos, M.; Kazakos, P.

    1987-09-01

    We compute the packet error probability induced in a frequency-hopped spread spectrum packet radio network, which utilizes first order Markov frequency hopping patterns. The frequency spectrum is divided into q frequency bins and the packets are divided into M bytes each. Every user in the network sends each of the M bytes of his packet at a frequency bin, which is different from the frequency bin used by the previous byte, but equally likely to be any one of the remaining q-1 frequency bins (Markov frequency hopping patterns). Furthermore, different users in the network utilize statistically independent frequency hopping patterns. Provided that, K users have simultaneously transmitted their packets on the channel, and a receiver has locked on to one of these K packets, we present a method for the computation of P sub e (K) (i.e. the probability that this packet is incorrectly decoded). Furthermore, we present numerical results (i.e. P sub e (K) versus K) for various values of the multiple access interference K, when Reed Solomon (RS) codes are used for the encoding of packets. Finally, some useful comparisons, with the packet error probability induced, if we assume that the byte errors are independent, are made; based on these comparisons, we can easily evaluate the performance of our spread spectrum system.

  9. Source location of the smooth high-frequency radio emissions from Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Calvert, W.

    1989-01-01

    The source location of the smooth high-frequency radio emissions from Uranus has been determined. Specifically, by fitting the signal dropouts which occurred as Voyager traversed the hollow center of the emission pattern to a symmetrical cone centered on the source magnetic field direction at the cyclotron frequency, a southern-hemisphere (nightside) source was found at approximately 56 deg S, 219 deg W. The half-angle for the hollow portion of the emission pattern was found to be 13 deg.

  10. Computer simulations for a deceleration and radio frequency quadrupole instrument for accelerator ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliades, J. A.; Kim, J. K.; Song, J. H.; Yu, B. Y.

    2015-10-01

    Radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) technology incorporated into the low energy ion beam line of an accelerator system can greatly broaden the range of applications and facilitate unique experimental capabilities. However, ten's of keV kinetic energy negative ion beams with large emittances and energy spreads must first be decelerated down to <100 eV for ion-gas interactions, placing special demands on the deceleration optics and RFQ design. A system with large analyte transmission in the presence of gas has so far proven challenging. Presented are computer simulations using SIMION 8.1 for an ion deceleration and RFQ ion guide instrument design. Code included user-defined gas pressure gradients and threshold energies for ion-gas collisional losses. Results suggest a 3 mm diameter, 35 keV 36Cl- ion beam with 8 eV full-width half maximum Gaussian energy spread and 35 mrad angular divergence can be efficiently decelerated and then cooled in He gas, with a maximum pressure of 7 mTorr, to 2 eV within 450 mm in the RFQs. Vacuum transmissions were 100%. Ion energy distributions at initial RFQ capture are shown to be much larger than the average value expected from the deceleration potential and this appears to be a general result arising from kinetic energy gain in the RFQ field. In these simulations, a potential for deceleration to 25 eV resulted in a 30 eV average energy distribution with a small fraction of ions >70 eV.

  11. The Murchison Widefield Array: the Square Kilometre Array Precursor at low radio frequencies

    E-print Network

    Tingay, S J; Bowman, J D; Emrich, D; Ord, S M; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Booler, T; Crosse, B; Pallot, D; Wicenec, A; Arcus, W; Barnes, D; Bernardi, G; Briggs, F; Burns, S; Bunton, J D; Cappallo, R J; Colegate, T; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A; deSouza, L; Gaensler, B M; Greenhill, L J; Hall, J; Hazelton, B J; Herne, D; Hewitt, J N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kincaid, B B; Koenig, R; Kratzenberg, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Pathikulangara, J; Prabu, T; Remillard, R A; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Salah, J E; Sault, R J; Udaya-Shankar, N; Schlagenhaufer, F; Srivani, K S; Stevens, J; Subrahmanyan, R; Tremblay, S; Wayth, R B; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wyithe, J S B

    2012-01-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is one of three Square Kilometre Array Precursor telescopes and is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in the Murchison Shire of the mid-west of Western Australia, a location chosen for its extremely low levels of radio frequency interference. The MWA operates at low radio frequencies, 80-300 MHz, with a processed bandwidth of 30.72 MHz for both linear polarisations, and consists of 128 aperture arrays (known as tiles) distributed over a ~3 km diameter area. Novel hybrid hardware/software correlation and a real-time imaging and calibration systems comprise the MWA signal processing backend. In this paper the as-built MWA is described both at a system and sub-system level, the expected performance of the array is presented, and the science goals of the instrument are summarised.

  12. Radio Frequency Attenuation Length Estimate in Antarctic Ice from Radar Depth Sounding Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockham, Mark

    2012-03-01

    The balloon-borne ANITA experiment in Antarctica seeks detection of in-ice neutrino collisions, which generate radio waves propagating upwards to the suite of 32 horn antennas that constitute ANITA. The primary virtuate of ANITA is the ability to simultaneously observe 20,000 cubic kilometers of ice from its 38-km altitude vantage point. The radio frequency signal strength observed at the balloon, however, depends on the radio frequency attenuation length of the ice through which the neutrino-generated signal must pass. Ice attenuation length varies as a function of surface temperature, depth, bedrock depth, and ice chemistry (imperfections). The CReSIS project has data from several locations on the Antarctic continent gathered from radar depth sounding. An approximation to the attenuation length, as a function of location, in Antarctic ice derived from comparing the bedrock reflection strength at different depths is presented.

  13. Heating mechanisms for electron swarms in radio-frequency electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujko, S.; Bošnjakovi?, D.; White, R. D.; Petrovi?, Z. Lj

    2015-10-01

    Starting from analytical and numerical solutions of the equation for collisionless motion of a single electron in time-varying electric and magnetic fields, we investigate the possible mechanisms for power absorption of electron swarms in neutral gases. A multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation is used to investigate the power absorption of electrons in radio-frequency (rf) electric and magnetic fields in collision-dominated regime for Reid’s inelastic ramp model gas and molecular oxygen. It is found that the effect of resonant absorption of energy in oscillating rf electric and magnetic fields observed under conditions when collisions do not occur, carries directly over to the case where collisions control the swarm behavior. In particular, we have observed the periodic structures in the absorbed power versus amplitude of the applied rf magnetic field curve which have a physical origin similar to the oscillatory phenomena observed for collisionless electron motion. The variation of the absorbed power and other transport properties with the field frequency and field amplitudes in varying configurations of rf electric and magnetic fields is addressed using physical arguments.

  14. Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities as Axion Dark Matter Detectors

    E-print Network

    P. Sikivie

    2013-01-20

    A modification of the cavity technique for axion dark matter detection is described in which the cavity is driven with input power instead of being permeated by a static magnetic field. A small fraction of the input power is pumped by the axion field to a receiving mode of frequency $\\omega_1$ when the resonance condition $\\omega_1 = \\omega_0 \\pm m_a$ is satisfied, where $\\omega_0$ is the frequency of the input mode and $m_a$ the axion mass. The relevant form factor is calculated for any pair of input and output modes in a cylindrical cavity. The overall search strategy is discussed and the technical challenges to be overcome by an actual experiment are listed.

  15. Multifrequency light curves of low-frequency variable radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, D. R.; Broderick, J. J.; Dennison, B.; Mitchell, K. J.; Odell, S. L.; Condon, J. J.; Payne, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Light curves for the low-frequency variable sources AO 0235 + 16, NRAO 140, PKS 1117 + 14, DA 406, CTA 102, and 3C 454.3, obtained in monthly observations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz using the 305-m telescope at Arecibo and in bimonthly observations at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz using the 91-m Green Bank transit telescope during 1980-1983, are presented and analyzed. AO 0235 + 16 is found to have basically canonical variability which is attributed to relativistically moving evolving synchrotron components; but in the other sources, strong simultaneous variations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz are observed to be greatly diminished in amplitude at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz, confirming the existence of the intermediate-frequency gap at about 1 GHz proposed by Spangler and Cotton (1981). The possibility that a second variability mechanism is active in these sources is explored.

  16. Nonlinear nonresonant forces by radio-frequency waves in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhe; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Qin, Hong; Myra, J. R.

    2007-08-15

    Nonresonant forces by applied rf waves in plasmas are analyzed. Along the background dc magnetic field, the force arises from the gradient of the ponderomotive potential. Only when the dc magnetic field is straight, however, is this parallel force completely consistent with that from the single particle picture, where the ponderomotive force depends on the gradients of rf fields only. Across the dc magnetic field, besides the ponderomotive force from the particle picture, additional Reynolds stress and polarization stress contribute to the total force. For waves with frequency much lower than the cyclotron frequency, the perpendicular forces from the particle and fluid pictures can have opposite signs. In plasmas with a symmetry angle (e.g., toroidal systems), nonresonant forces cannot drive net flow or current in the flux surface, but the radial force may influence macroscopic behavior of plasma. Moreover, nonresonant forces may drive flow or current in linear plasmas or in a localized region of toroidal plasmas.

  17. The low-frequency environment of the Murchison Widefield Array: radio-frequency interference analysis and mitigation

    E-print Network

    Offringa, A R; Hurley-Walker, N; Kaplan, D L; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Bell, M E; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Callingham, J R; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Deshpande, A A; Dillon, J S; Dwarakanath, K S; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; For, B -Q; Gaensler, B M; Greenhill, L J; Hancock, P; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Jacobs, D C; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kapi?ska, A D; Kim, H -S; Kittiwisit, P; Lenc, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Morgan, J; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Paul, S; Pindor, B; Pober, J C; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Shankar, N Udaya; Sethi, S; Srivani, K S; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R; Sullivan, I S; Tegmark, M; Thyagarajan, N; Tingay, S J; Trott, C M; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Wyithe, J S; Zheng, Q

    2015-01-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency interferometric radio telescope built in Western Australia at one of the locations of the future Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We describe the automated radio-frequency interference (RFI) detection strategy implemented for the MWA, which is based on the AOFlagger platform, and present 72-231-MHz RFI statistics from 10 observing nights. RFI detection removes 1.1% of the data. RFI from digital TV (DTV) is observed 3% of the time due to occasional ionospheric or atmospheric propagation. After RFI detection and excision, almost all data can be calibrated and imaged without further RFI mitigation efforts, including observations within the FM and DTV bands. The results are compared to a previously published Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) RFI survey. The remote location of the MWA results in a substantially cleaner RFI environment compared to LOFAR's radio environment, but adequate detection of RFI is still required before data can be analysed. We include speci...

  18. Method for Automated Monitoring of Hand Hygiene Adherence without Radio-Frequency Identification

    PubMed Central

    Polgreen, Philip M.; Hlady, Christopher S.; Severson, Monica A.; Segre, Alberto M.; Herman, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Many efforts to automatically measure hand hygiene activity depend on radio-frequency identification equipment or similar technology that can be expensive to install. We have developed a method for automatically tracking the use of hand hygiene dispensers before healthcare workers enter (or after they exit) patient rooms that is easily and quickly deployed without permanent hardware. PMID:20973724

  19. 76 FR 18652 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... Federal Radio Frequency Management, 75 FR 54790, 54791 (Sept. 9, 2010) (revising the Manual through May... Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1 (b) is...

  20. 76 FR 56984 - Revision to the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... 47 U.S.C. 901 et seq., Executive Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. at 158... Radio Frequency Management, 76 FR 18652, 18652-53 (April 5, 2011) (revising the Manual through September... Order 12046 (March 27, 1978), 43 FR 13349, 3 CFR 1978 Comp., p. 158. 0 2. Section 300.1(b) is revised...

  1. A Two-Dimensional Model of Chemical Vapor Infiltration With Radio Frequency Heating

    E-print Network

    Economou, Demetre J.

    gases into a porous preform at constant temperature. Reactants under- go chemical reactions- ing temperature is increased, diffusional limitations force the pores at the surface of the preformA Two-Dimensional Model of Chemical Vapor Infiltration With Radio Frequency Heating Vikas Midha

  2. Faraday Acceleration with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge Edgar Y. Choueiri and Kurt A. Polzin

    E-print Network

    Faraday Acceleration with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge Edgar Y. Choueiri and Kurt A. Polzin Abstract A new electrodeless accelerator concept that relies on an RF-assisted discharge, an applied magnetic eld, and electromagnetic acceleration using an inductive coil is presented. The presence

  3. Faraday Acceleration with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge (FARAD) Edgar Y. Choueiri

    E-print Network

    Faraday Acceleration with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge (FARAD) Edgar Y. Choueiri and Kurt A electrodeless accelerator concept that relies on an RF-assisted discharge, an applied magnetic field, and electromagnetic acceleration using an inductive coil is presented. The advantages of this concept include

  4. Effect of thermal and radio frequency electric fields treatments on Escherichia coli bacteria in apple juice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for a non-thermal intervention technology that can achieve microbial safety without altering nutritional quality of liquid foods led to the development of the radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) process. However, insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by this technology is ...

  5. Dynamics of ion-ion plasmas under radio frequency bias Vikas Midhaa)

    E-print Network

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Dynamics of ion-ion plasmas under radio frequency bias Vikas Midhaa) and Demetre J. Economoub-dimensional fluid model was developed to study the dynamics of a positive ion-negative ion ion-ion plasma under the influence of a rf bias voltage. The full ion momentum and continuity equations were coupled to the Poisson

  6. Surface reconstructions of cubic gallium nitride ,,001... grown by radio frequency nitrogen plasma molecular beam epitaxy

    E-print Network

    Surface reconstructions of cubic gallium nitride ,,001... grown by radio frequency nitrogen plasma molecular beam epitaxy under gallium-rich conditions Muhammad B. Haider, Rong Yang, Costel Constantin; published online 27 October 2006 Cubic GaN has been grown under gallium Ga -rich growth conditions using

  7. Radio Frequency Heat Treatments to Disinfest Dried Pulses of Cowpea Weevil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To explore the potential of radio frequency (RF) heat treatments as an alternative to chemical fumigants for disinfestation of dried pulses, the relative heat tolerance and dielectric properties of different stages of the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus) was determined. Among the immature st...

  8. 77 FR 67833 - Certain Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits and Devices Containing Same; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... Diego, California. 77 FR 35427 (Jun. 13, 2012). The complaint alleges violations of Section 337 of the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits and Devices Containing Same; Notice of...

  9. Radio Frequency Identification of Katrina Hurricane Victims Rajit Gadh and B.S. Prabhu

    E-print Network

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    in Mississippi's Harrison County have been implanting human cadavers with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID on the technology, applications, challenges, performance, individual and societal implications of RFID. RFID can be active (with on-board power source) or passive (with no power source). An RFID chip consists

  10. The Diffusion and Impact of Radio Frequency Identification in Supply Chains: A Multi-Method Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xiaoran

    2012-01-01

    As a promising and emerging technology for supply chain management, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a new alternative to existing tracking technologies and also allows a range of internal control and supply chain coordination. RFID has generated a significant amount of interest and activities from both practitioners and researchers in…

  11. Improvement of the lifetime of radio frequency antenna for plasma generation

    E-print Network

    , boron­nitride shielded copper antenna, single loop antenna, and double tube antenna consistingImprovement of the lifetime of radio frequency antenna for plasma generation J. Reijonen,a) M At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory different antenna protection schemes have been investigated

  12. THE HUYGENS DOPPLER WIND EXPERIMENT Titan Winds Derived from Probe Radio Frequency Measurements

    E-print Network

    THE HUYGENS DOPPLER WIND EXPERIMENT Titan Winds Derived from Probe Radio Frequency Measurements M., Univ. Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, 53121 Bonn, Germany 2NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York) will be performed during the Titan atmospheric des- cent of the ESA Huygens Probe. The direction and strength

  13. Modeling the Radio Frequency Environment of Mars for Future Wireless, Networked Rovers and Sensor Webs

    E-print Network

    De Leon, Phillip

    Modeling the Radio Frequency Environment of Mars for Future Wireless, Networked Rovers and Sensor-3771 {vchukkal, pdeleon, shoran, vvijay}@nmsu.edu Abstract-- NASA's long-term goals for the exploration of Mars include the use of rovers and sensors which intercom- municate through proximity wireless networks

  14. Determining radio frequency heating uniformity of mixed beans for disinfestation treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chickpeas and lentils are two important legumes grown in the US and need phytosanitary treatments before exportation, but it is difficult to artificially infest them with live cowpea weevil for radio frequency (RF) treatment validation. To evaluate the more readily infested black-eyed peas and mung ...

  15. Plasma acceleration from radio-frequency discharge in dielectric capillary A. Dunaevskya

    E-print Network

    electromagnetic noise is required.6 The present work suggests a steady-state cathode- less plasma thruster, whichPlasma acceleration from radio-frequency discharge in dielectric capillary A. Dunaevskya Department Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 Received 19 August 2005; accepted 22

  16. Fast deposition of diamond-like carbon films by radio frequency hollow cathode method

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    is attributed to high plasma density in RF hollow cathode method, discussed in this paper. Scanning electronFast deposition of diamond-like carbon films by radio frequency hollow cathode method Xiaolu Pang February 2013 Available online 6 March 2013 Keywords: Diamond-like carbon films Hollow cathode Deposition

  17. Radio Frequency Electric Fields Inactivation of Escherichia coli in Apple Cider

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple cider has been implicated in several outbreaks. Thermal pasteurization eliminates this threat, but it can detrimentally affect the quality of the cider. A nonthermal process using radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) was developed to pasteurize cider. An 80 kW RFEF pilot plant system was ...

  18. Inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum in apple cider using radio frequency electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) processing is effective at inactivating Gram negative bacteria in fruit juices at moderately low temperatures, but has yet to be shown to be effective at reducing Gram positive bacteria. Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 49445, a Gram positive bacterium, was inocula...

  19. KINETICS OF RADIO FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELDS INACTIVATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI IN APPLE CIDER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nonthermal radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) have recently been shown to be effective at reducing E. coli in fruit juices using pilot scale equipment. While considerable effort and progress have been made in scaling up the process and in achieving 5 log reductions, there is a lack of research ...

  20. Focused excimer laser initiated, radio frequency sustained high pressure air plasmas

    E-print Network

    Scharer, John E.

    gases, medical sterilization,2 and drag and radar cross-section reduction of aircraft.3­6 Air plasmasFocused excimer laser initiated, radio frequency sustained high pressure air plasmas Ryan Giara processes and plasma production by focusing 193 nm, 300 mJ, 15 MW high power laser radiation inside a 6 cm