Science.gov

Sample records for radio frequency transmitter

  1. 75. Transmitter building no. 102, view of typical radio frequency ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. Transmitter building no. 102, view of typical radio frequency switching group for lower antenna A & B and upper antenna A & B and MIP/MWOC automated interface cabinet. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  2. Radio-frequency radiation exposure from AM radio transmitters and childhood leukemia and brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mina; Im, Hyoungjune; Lee, Mihye; Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Byung-Chan; Gimm, Yoon-Myoung; Pack, Jeong-Ki

    2007-08-01

    Leukemia and brain cancer patients under age 15 years, along with controls with respiratory illnesses who were matched to cases on age, sex, and year of diagnosis (1993-1999), were selected from 14 South Korean hospitals using the South Korean Medical Insurance Data System. Diagnoses were confirmed through the South Korean National Cancer Registry. Residential addresses were obtained from medical records. A newly developed prediction program incorporating a geographic information system that was modified by the results of actual measurements was used to estimate radio-frequency radiation (RFR) exposure from 31 amplitude modulation (AM) radio transmitters with a power of 20 kW or more. A total of 1,928 leukemia patients, 956 brain cancer patients, and 3,082 controls were analyzed. Cancer risks were estimated using conditional logistic regression adjusted for residential area, socioeconomic status, and community population density. The odds ratio for all types of leukemia was 2.15 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00, 4.67) among children who resided within 2 km of the nearest AM radio transmitter as compared with those resided more than 20 km from it. For total RFR exposure from all transmitters, odds ratios for lymphocytic leukemia were 1.39 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.86) and 1.59 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.11) for children in the second and third quartiles, respectively, versus the lowest quartile. Brain cancer and infantile cancer were not associated with AM RFR. PMID:17556764

  3. Micro-miniature radio frequency transmitter for communication and tracking applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, R.I.; Emery, M.S.; Falter, K.G.; Nowlin, C.H.; Rochelle, J.M.; Clonts, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    A micro-miniature radio frequency (rf) transmitter has been developed and demonstrated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the rf transmitter development was to maximize the transmission distance while drastically shrinking the overall transmitter size, including antenna. Based on analysis and testing, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with a 16-GHz gallium arsenide (GaAs) oscillator and integrated on-chip antenna was designed and fabricated using microwave monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC) technology. Details of the development and the results of various field tests will be discussed. The rf transmitter is applicable to covert surveillance and tracking scenarios due to its small size of 2.2 x 2.2 mm, including the antenna. Additionally, the 16-GHz frequency is well above the operational range of consumer-grade radio scanners, providing a degree of protection from unauthorized interception. Variations of the transmitter design have been demonstrated for tracking and tagging beacons, transmission of digital data, and transmission of real-time analog video from a surveillance camera. Preliminary laboratory measurements indicate adaptability to direct-sequence spread-spectrum transmission, providing a low probability of intercept and/or detection. Concepts related to law enforcement applications will be presented.

  4. System efficiency analysis for high power solid state radio frequency transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Akhilesh Sharma, D. K.; Gupta, A. K.; Lad, M. R.; Hannurkar, P. R.; Pathak, S. K.

    2014-02-15

    This paper examines some important relationships, related with the system efficiency, for very high power, radio frequency solid-state transmitter; incorporating multiple solid-state power amplifier modules, power combiners, dividers, couplers, and control/interlock hardware. In particular, the characterization of such transmitters, at the component as well as the system level, is discussed. The analysis for studying the influence of the amplitude and phase imbalance, on useful performance parameters like system efficiency and power distribution is performed. This analysis is based on a scattering parameter model. This model serves as a template for fine-tuning the results, with the help of a system level simulator. For experimental study, this approach is applied to a recently designed modular and scalable solid-state transmitter, operating at the centre frequency of 505.8 MHz and capable of delivering a continuous power of 75 kW. Such first time presented, system level study and experimental characterization for the real time operation will be useful for the high power solid-state amplifier designs, deployed in particle accelerators.

  5. System efficiency analysis for high power solid state radio frequency transmitter.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akhilesh; Sharma, D K; Gupta, A K; Lad, M R; Hannurkar, P R; Pathak, S K

    2014-02-01

    This paper examines some important relationships, related with the system efficiency, for very high power, radio frequency solid-state transmitter; incorporating multiple solid-state power amplifier modules, power combiners, dividers, couplers, and control/interlock hardware. In particular, the characterization of such transmitters, at the component as well as the system level, is discussed. The analysis for studying the influence of the amplitude and phase imbalance, on useful performance parameters like system efficiency and power distribution is performed. This analysis is based on a scattering parameter model. This model serves as a template for fine-tuning the results, with the help of a system level simulator. For experimental study, this approach is applied to a recently designed modular and scalable solid-state transmitter, operating at the centre frequency of 505.8 MHz and capable of delivering a continuous power of 75 kW. Such first time presented, system level study and experimental characterization for the real time operation will be useful for the high power solid-state amplifier designs, deployed in particle accelerators. PMID:24593383

  6. System efficiency analysis for high power solid state radio frequency transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Akhilesh; Sharma, D. K.; Gupta, A. K.; Lad, M. R.; Hannurkar, P. R.; Pathak, S. K.

    2014-02-01

    This paper examines some important relationships, related with the system efficiency, for very high power, radio frequency solid-state transmitter; incorporating multiple solid-state power amplifier modules, power combiners, dividers, couplers, and control/interlock hardware. In particular, the characterization of such transmitters, at the component as well as the system level, is discussed. The analysis for studying the influence of the amplitude and phase imbalance, on useful performance parameters like system efficiency and power distribution is performed. This analysis is based on a scattering parameter model. This model serves as a template for fine-tuning the results, with the help of a system level simulator. For experimental study, this approach is applied to a recently designed modular and scalable solid-state transmitter, operating at the centre frequency of 505.8 MHz and capable of delivering a continuous power of 75 kW. Such first time presented, system level study and experimental characterization for the real time operation will be useful for the high power solid-state amplifier designs, deployed in particle accelerators.

  7. SHIELDED-NEEDLE TECHNIQUE FOR SURGICALLY IMPLANTING RADIO-FREQUENCY TRANSMITTERS IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protruding whip antenna radio transmitters were implanted in fish with abdominal pelvic fins. This surgical technique enables the transmitter to be positioned anywhere in the peritoneal cavity without piercing vital organs through the use of a shielded needle to guide an antenna ...

  8. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  9. 47 CFR 95.628 - MedRadio transmitters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false MedRadio transmitters. 95.628 Section 95.628 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.628 MedRadio transmitters. (a) Frequency...

  10. 47 CFR 95.625 - CB transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CB transmitter channel frequencies. 95.625 Section 95.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.625 CB transmitter...

  11. 47 CFR 95.625 - CB transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CB transmitter channel frequencies. 95.625 Section 95.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.625 CB transmitter...

  12. 47 CFR 95.625 - CB transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CB transmitter channel frequencies. 95.625 Section 95.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.625 CB transmitter...

  13. 47 CFR 95.625 - CB transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CB transmitter channel frequencies. 95.625 Section 95.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.625 CB transmitter...

  14. 47 CFR 95.625 - CB transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CB transmitter channel frequencies. 95.625 Section 95.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.625 CB transmitter...

  15. 47 CFR 80.209 - Transmitter frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmitter frequency tolerances. 80.209 Section 80.209 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.209 Transmitter frequency tolerances. (a) The frequency...

  16. 47 CFR 80.209 - Transmitter frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmitter frequency tolerances. 80.209 Section 80.209 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.209 Transmitter frequency tolerances. (a) The frequency...

  17. A radio transmitter attachment technique for soras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haramis, G.M.; Kearns, G.D.

    2000-01-01

    We modified a figure-8 leg-loop harness designed for small passerines to attach successfully 1.8-g radio transmitters over the synsacrum of migrant Soras (Porzana carolina). Because of the short caudal region of Soras, addition of a waist loop was critical to securing the transmitter while leg loops were maintained to center the package. Thin gauge (0.6-mm diameter) elastic thread proved ideal for transmitter attachment and allowed for freedom of movement and girth expansion associated with fattening during a 6-10 week stopover. Of 110 Soras radio tagged during three field seasons, only a single mortality was observed and only a single bird lost its transmitter. Migration from the study area was confirmed for 76 (69%) and suspected for another 25 birds (total 92%).

  18. 47 CFR 80.209 - Transmitter frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmitter frequency tolerances. 80.209 Section 80.209 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.209 Transmitter...

  19. 47 CFR 80.209 - Transmitter frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmitter frequency tolerances. 80.209 Section 80.209 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.209 Transmitter...

  20. Implanting radio transmitters in wintering canvasbacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Dein, F.J.; Haramis, G.M.; Jorde, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    To conduct telemetry studies of wintering canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) on Chesapeake Bay, we needed to devise a suitable method of radio transmitter attachment. We describe an aseptic, intra-abdominal surgical technique, using the inhalation anesthetic isoflurane, to implant 20-g radio transmitters in free-ranging canvasbacks. We evaluated the technique over 3 winters (1987-89), when an annual average of 83 female canvasbacks received implant surgery during a 9-day period in mid-December. Of 253 ducks, 248 (98%) were implanted successfully, and 200 (80.6%) completed the 70-day study until early March. No mortality or abnormal behavior from surgery was identified post-release.

  1. Radio frequency power load and associated method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A radio frequency power load and associated method. A radio frequency power load apparatus includes a container and a fluid having an ion source therein, the fluid being contained in the container. Two conductors are immersed in the fluid. A radio frequency transmission system includes a radio frequency transmitter, a radio frequency amplifier connected to the transmitter and a radio frequency power load apparatus connected to the amplifier. The apparatus includes a fluid having an ion source therein, and two conductors immersed in the fluid. A method of dissipating power generated by a radio frequency transmission system includes the steps of: immersing two conductors of a radio frequency power load apparatus in a fluid having an ion source therein; and connecting the apparatus to an amplifier of the transmission system.

  2. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-02-15

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HF heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave approach

  3. Radio Frequency Power Load and Associated Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, V. Karthik (Inventor); Freestone, Todd M. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency power load and associated method. A radio frequency power load apparatus may include a container with an ionized fluid therein. The apparatus may include one conductor immersed in a fluid and another conductor electrically connected to the container. A radio frequency transmission system may include a radio frequency transmitter, a radio frequency amplifier connected to the transmitter and a radio frequency power load apparatus connected to the amplifier. The apparatus may include a fluid having an ion source therein, one conductor immersed in a fluid, and another conductor electrically connected to the container. A method of dissipating power generated by a radio frequency transmission system may include constructing a waveguide with ionized fluid in a container and connecting the waveguide to an amplifier of the transmission system.

  4. Effects of implanted radio transmitters with percutaneous antennas on the behavior of Canada Geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, J.W.; Ruhl, G.A.; Pearce, J.M.; Mulcahy, D.M.; Tomeo, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We examined whether surgically-implanted radio transmitters with percutaneous antennas affected behavior of Lesser Canada Geese (Branta canadensis parvipes) in Anchorage, Alaska. We implanted either a 26-g VHF radio transmitter or a larger VHF radio that was the same mass (35 g) and shape as a satellite transmitter in the coelom of adult females captured during molt in 2000. A control group of females was marked with leg bands. We simultaneously observed behavior of radio-marked and control females from 4-62 d following capture. We observed no differences in the proportion of time birds in different treatments allocated among grazing, resting, comfort, walking, and alert behavior. Females in different treatments spent a similar proportion of time in the water. Implantation of radio transmitters did not affect the frequency of agonistic interactions. We conclude that coelomic radio transmitters with percutaneous antennas had minimal effects on the behavior of Canada Geese.

  5. BioRadioTransmitter: A Self-Powered Wireless Glucose-Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Hanashi, Takuya; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Tsugawa, Wakako; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Sode, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Background Although an enzyme fuel cell can be utilized as a glucose sensor, the output power generated is too low to power a device such as a currently available transmitter and operating system, and an external power source is required for operating an enzyme-fuel-cell-based biosensing system. We proposed a novel biosensor that we named BioCapacitor, in which a capacitor serves as a transducer. In this study, we constructed a new BioCapacitor-based system with an added radio-transmitter circuit and a miniaturized enzyme fuel cell. Methods A miniaturized direct-electron-transfer-type compartmentless enzyme fuel cell was constructed with flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase complex-based anode and a bilirubin-oxidase-based cathode. For construction of a BioRadioTransmitter wireless sensing system, a capacitor, an ultra-low-voltage charge-pump-integrated circuit, and Hartley oscillator circuit were connected to the miniaturized enzyme fuel cell. A radio-receiver circuit, comprising two field-effect transistors and a coil as an antenna, was used to amplify the signal generated from the biofuel cells. Results Radio wave signals generated by the BioRadioTransmitter were received, amplified, and converted from alternate to direct current by the radio receiver. When the capacitor discharges in the presence of glucose, the BioRadioTransmitter generates a radio wave, which is monitored by a radio receiver connected wirelessly to the sensing device. Magnitude of the radio wave transmission frequency change observed at the radio receiver was correlated to glucose concentration in the fuel cells. Conclusions We constructed a stand-alone, self-powered, wireless glucose-sensing system called a BioRadioTransmitter by using a radio transmitter in which the radio wave transmission frequency changes with the glucose concentration in the fuel cell. The BioRadioTransmitter is a significant advance toward construction of an implantable continuous glucose monitor

  6. 1. VIEW TO NORTHWEST WITH RADIO CONTROL HOUSE (RIGHT), TRANSMITTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW TO NORTHWEST WITH RADIO CONTROL HOUSE (RIGHT), TRANSMITTER TOWER (CENTER), AND NORTH BREAKWATER LIGHT IN DISTANCE AT LEFT - Frankfort Coast Guard Station, Radio Control House, Second Street at ship channel, Frankfort, Benzie County, MI

  7. The Frequency Spectrum Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on the frequency spectrum used in radio communication and on the World Administrative Radio Conference, sponsored by the International Telecommunication Union, held in Geneva, Switzerland, in the fall of 1979. Articles describe the World Administrative Radio Conference as the most important radio communication conference…

  8. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  9. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  10. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  11. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  12. 47 CFR 2.815 - External radio frequency power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers. 2... External radio frequency power amplifiers. (a) As used in this part, an external radio frequency power amplifier is any device which, (1) when used in conjunction with a radio transmitter as a signal source...

  13. 47 CFR 95.623 - R/C transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false R/C transmitter channel frequencies. 95.623... SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.623 R/C transmitter channel frequencies. (a) The R/C transmitter channel frequencies are: MHz 26.995 27.045 27.095 27.145 27.195 27.255...

  14. 47 CFR 95.623 - R/C transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false R/C transmitter channel frequencies. 95.623... SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.623 R/C transmitter channel frequencies. (a) The R/C transmitter channel frequencies are: MHz 26.995 27.045 27.095 27.145 27.195 27.255...

  15. 47 CFR 95.623 - R/C transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false R/C transmitter channel frequencies. 95.623... SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.623 R/C transmitter channel frequencies. (a) The R/C transmitter channel frequencies are: MHz 26.995 27.045 27.095 27.145 27.195 27.255...

  16. 47 CFR 95.623 - R/C transmitter channel frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false R/C transmitter channel frequencies. 95.623... SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.623 R/C transmitter channel frequencies. (a) The R/C transmitter channel frequencies are: MHz 26.995 27.045 27.095 27.145 27.195 27.255...

  17. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927... Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The transmitter must be equipped with a device which provides visual indication whenever the transmitter is supplying power to the antenna....

  18. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927... Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The transmitter must be equipped with a device which provides visual indication whenever the transmitter is supplying power to the antenna....

  19. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927... Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The transmitter must be equipped with a device which provides visual indication whenever the transmitter is supplying power to the antenna....

  20. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927... Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The transmitter must be equipped with a device which provides visual indication whenever the transmitter is supplying power to the antenna....

  1. 47 CFR 80.927 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.927... Boats § 80.927 Antenna radio frequency indicator. The transmitter must be equipped with a device which provides visual indication whenever the transmitter is supplying power to the antenna....

  2. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  3. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  4. Solar radio-transmitters on snail kites in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, N.F.R.; Beissinger, S.R.; Fuller, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness and safety of one- and two-stage solar radio-transmitters in tracking the movements and survival of adult and fledgling Snail Kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis) were evaluated between 1979 and 1983 in southern Florida. Transmitters were attached to birds with back-pack arrangements using teflon ribbon straps. Accessory plastic shields minimized feather coverage of the solar cells. Intact transmitters were seen on birds up to 47 mo after installation. Operating lives ranged from 8 to 21 mo for one-stage, and 10 to 14 mo for two-stage transmitters. Because survival of adult and nestling radio-marked kites was high, we conclude that our transmitter-attachment method had little effect on the birds.

  5. 47 CFR 95.627 - MedRadio transmitters in the 401-406 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false MedRadio transmitters in the 401-406 MHz band... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.627 MedRadio transmitters in the 401-406 MHz band. The following provisions apply only to MedRadio transmitters operating...

  6. 47 CFR 95.627 - MedRadio transmitters in the 401-406 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false MedRadio transmitters in the 401-406 MHz band... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.627 MedRadio transmitters in the 401-406 MHz band. The following provisions apply only to MedRadio transmitters operating...

  7. 47 CFR 80.209 - Transmitter frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmitter frequency tolerances. 80.209... SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.209 Transmitter frequency tolerances. (a) The frequency tolerance requirements applicable to transmitters in the maritime services...

  8. Evaluation of 3 radio transmitters and collar designs for Amazona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyers, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    I evaluated 3 radio transmitter attachments and designs for adult parrots. Two of the transmitters and attachments were similar to those used previously in the study on fledgling and adult parrots. I designed, in collaboration with the manufacturer, a third transmitter and attachment that provided protection of key areas from chewing and eventual destruction of the attachment or transmitter. This design was used successfully to radio-track parrots an average of 43.4 weeks (range = 35.9-51.6 weeks). It was the only transmitter of the 3 tested to operate without failure (>36 weeks) caused by chewing damage to the transmitter, antenna, collar, or attachment mechanism (Fisher's exact test, 3 df, P = 0.0003). Its adjustable collar, made from 59 kg-test stainless steel wire covered with plastic heat-shrink tubing, was sturdy and easy to apply. Transmitters for parrots should be enclosed in a protective metal case (brass) and have metal crimped tubes (brass or copper) protecting key areas, such as the base of the antenna and mechanism for attachment of the collar.

  9. Frequency agile OPO-based transmitters for multiwavelength DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S.P.; Ruggiero, A.; Herman, M.

    1996-09-01

    We describe a first generation mid-infrared transmitter with pulse to pulse frequency agility and both wide and narrow band capability. This transmitter was used to make multicomponent Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) measurements in the field.

  10. Radio-Frequency Electronics, Circuits and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Jon B.

    This accessible and comprehensive book provides an introduction to the basic concepts and key circuits of radio frequency systems, covering fundamental principles which apply to all radio devices, from wireless data transceivers on semiconductor chips to high-power broadcast transmitters. Topics covered include filters, amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, low-noise amplifiers, phase-locked loops, and transformers. Applications of radio frequency systems are described in such areas as communications, radio and television broadcasting, radar, and radio astronomy. The book contains many exercises, and assumes only a knowledge of elementary electronics and circuit analysis. It will be an ideal textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in electrical engineering, as well as an invaluable reference for researchers and professional engineers in this area, or for those moving into the field of wireless communications.

  11. Influence of radio transmitters on prairie falcons (Falco mexicanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vekasy, M.S.; Marzluff, J.M.; Kochert, Michael N.; Lehman, Robert N.; Steenhof, Karen

    1996-01-01

    We examined the effects of backpack radio transmitters on Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) reproduction (percentage of occupied territories producing young and number of nestlings produced) over four years. In addition, we observed falcon aeries during brood-rearing to determine attendance at the nest and in the territory, prey delivery rates, and prey composition. We found no effect of radio tagging on Prairie Falcon productivity (nesting success and brood size) among years, although productivity varied significantly among years. The sex of the falcon tagged did not affect productivity. Radio-tagged members of pairs did not differ significantly from un-tagged members of pairs in territory attendance, nest attendance, prey delivery rates, or caching rates. Nestlings raised by radio-tagged parents attained masses similar to those reared by control parents. During low prey years, radio-tagged males brought a greater proportion of small birds and reptiles, and fewer mammals to the nest area than control males.

  12. 47 CFR 95.627 - MedRadio transmitters in the 401-406 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Radio programmer/control transmitters operating in the 401-406 MHz band must operate under the control... used by the programmer/control transmitter for a communications session. Before the monitoring system of a MedRadio programmer/control transmitter initiates a MedRadio communications session,...

  13. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  14. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Section 80.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio frequency indicator. Each nonportable bridge-to-bridge transmitter must...

  15. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1989-01-17

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  16. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  17. Technique for implanting radio transmitters subcutaneously in day-old ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korschgen, C.E.; Kenow, K.P.; Green, W.L.; Samuel, M.D.; Sileo, L.

    1996-01-01

    We developed and evaluated a surgical procedure for implanting radio transmitters in 1-d-old Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) ducklings. Transmitters (1.5 g) were implanted subcutaneously on the back of ducklings while under a general anesthetic, isoflurane, within a few hours of hatching. Evaluations indicate that the procedure is a reliable method for radio-marking ducklings.

  18. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  19. Multi-Band Multi-Tone Tunable Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer For Satellite Beacon Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a multi-band multi-tone tunable millimeter-wave frequency synthesizer, based on a solid-state frequency comb generator. The intended application of the synthesizer is in a satellite beacon transmitter for radio wave propagation studies at K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz), Q-band (37 to 42 GHz), and E-band (71 to 76 GHz). In addition, the architecture for a compact beacon transmitter, which includes the multi-tone synthesizer, polarizer, horn antenna, and power/control electronics, has been investigated for a notional space-to-ground radio wave propagation experiment payload on a small satellite. The above studies would enable the design of robust high throughput multi-Gbps data rate future space-to-ground satellite communication links.

  20. Propagation from ground transmitters to the ePOP/Radio Receiver Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Gordon

    2016-07-01

    Since its launch in 2013 as part of the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) payload on the Canadian CASSIOPE small satellite, the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) has been successfully commanded to participate in a number of transionospheric collaborative electromagnetic-wave experiments. The RRI is a digital receiver connected to two orthogonal 6-m dipoles and operating in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 18 MHz. The elliptical (325 km - 1500 km) high-inclination (81°) orbit has presented a variety of experimental opportunities in plasma-wave studies. These have involved the reception of EM signals from coordinated ground transmitters in the very-low-frequency to high-frequency range, such as VLF communication transmitters, HF ionospheric heaters, HF over-the-horizon radars, HF coherent-backscatter radars, ionosondes, and amateur radio sources. At the front of this list are powerful sources presenting the RRI with high signal-to-noise transmissions; in these cases, the characteristics of transionospheric propagation observed by the RRI in the ionosphere may be used to test interpretive assumptions about such propagation that hitherto may have been observed only when reflected or scattered back to the ground. In some cases, the RRI measurements are part of studies exploiting simultaneous coordinated measurements by instruments on the ground.

  1. Low-frequency radio navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, D. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method of continuous wave navigation using four transmitters operating at sufficiently low frequencies to assure essentially pure groundwave operation is described. The transmitters are keyed to transmit constant bursts (1/4 sec) in a time-multiplexed pattern with phase modulation of at least one transmitter for identification of the transmitters and with the ability to identify the absolute phase of the modulated transmitter and the ability to modulate low rate data for transmission. The transmitters are optimally positioned to provide groundwave coverage over a service region of about 50 by 50 km for the frequencies selected in the range of 200 to 500 kHz, but their locations are not critical because of the beneficial effect of overdetermination of position of a receiver made possible by the fourth transmitter. Four frequencies are used, at least two of which are selected to provide optimal resolution. All transmitters are synchronized to an average phase as received by a monitor receiver.

  2. Blazars at Low Radio Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trüstedt, J.; Kadler, M.; Brüggen, M.; Falcke, H.; Heald, G.; McKean, J.; Mueller, C.; Ros, E.; Schulz, R.; Wilms, J.

    We explore the low radio-frequency properties of the MOJAVE 1 blazar sample using the LOFAR Multi-Frequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS). We find the characteristically flat blazar spectrum to extend down to the LOFAR bands, demonstrating that the emission at these low radio frequencies is still dominated by relativistically beamed emission. As most sources remain unresolved at the MSSS angular resolution, we are reimaging these data using LOFAR baselines beyond the standard MSSS uv-range resulting in an angular resolution of ~24 arcsec. We present first LOFAR images of MOJAVE sources from this project.

  3. Evaluation of a new miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Haner, P.V.; Maule, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter (tag) was evaluated and field tested as a tool for determining the depths of juvenile salmonids. The tag had an effective radiated power of −19.7 decibels (1 mW reference), dimensions of 23 mm × 7 mm, and a weight of 2.2 g in air. The pulse rate of the tag increased with pressure, resulting in an expected tag life of approximately 11 d at the water surface and 7.5 d at 10.5 m. The tags were accurate to within 16 mm with 95% of observations within ±0.32 m of the true depth. The resolution of the tags was 0.2 m. Errors in indicated depth resulting from differences between the calibration and operating temperatures were minimized by means of a correction factor. Tags surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss indicated a depth 0.2 m less than the same tags in water. This difference was not affected by pressure or temperature and was rectified by adjusting data from tags in fish. A test tag in a Columbia River reservoir was detected from distances of 1,133 m at a depth of 2 m and 148 m at a depth of 14 m. Results ind

  4. Effects of antenna length and material on output power and detection of miniature radio transmitters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Bower, N.; Juhnke, S.; Dingmon, L.; Van Den, Tillaart, M.; Thomas, T.

    2007-01-01

    The optimal antenna of transmitters used in small aquatic animals is often a compromise between efficient radio wave propagation and effects on animal behavior. Radio transmission efficiency generally increases with diameter and length of the conductor, but increased antenna length or weight can adversely affect animal behavior. We evaluated the effects of changing antenna length and material on the subsequent tag output power, reception, and detection of tagged fish. In a laboratory, we compared the relative signal strengths in water of 150 MHz transmitters over a range of antenna lengths (from 6 to 30 cm) and materials (one weighing about half of the other). The peak relative signal strengths were at 20 and 22 cm, which are approximately one wavelength underwater at the test frequency. The peak relative signal strengths at these lengths were approximately 50% greater than those of 30 cm antennas, a length commonly used in fisheries research. Few significant differences were present in distances for the operator to hear or the telemetry receiver to decode transmitters from a boat-mounted receiving system based on antenna length, but the percent of tagged fish detected passing a hydroelectric dam fitted with an array of receiving systems was significantly greater at the antenna length with peak output power in laboratory tests. This study indicates careful choice of antenna length and material of small transmitters can be used to reduce weight and possible antenna effects on animal behavior, to maximize tag output power and detection, or to balance these factors based on the needs of the application. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  5. Loss from harlequin ducks of abdominally implanted radio transmitters equipped with percutaneous antennas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.M.; Esler, Daniel; Stoskopf, M.K.

    1999-01-01

    We documented extrusion and loss of abdominally implanted radio transmitters with percutaneous antennas from adult female Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus). Birds were captured during wing molt (late August to mid-September) in 1995-1997. Of 44 Harlequin Ducks implanted with radios and recaptured, 7 (16%) had lost their transmitters and 5 (11%) had radios in the process of extruding. Most (11 of 12) extrusions and losses occurred in birds implanted with radios in 1996 and recaptured in 1997. We suggest that transmitter extrusions and losses were due largely to changes in transmitter design made between 1095 and 1996. Transmitters implanted in 1996 were cylindrical rather than spherical, had a flat end with an abrupt edge, and the lower portion of the antenna was reinforced. Radio losses occurred after the 7-mo monitoring period and caused no apparent harm to the birds. Investigators using implanted radios with percutaneous antennas for long-term projects should be aware of the potential for radio extrusion and should minimize the problem by using transmitters that have no sharp edges and that are wide, rather than narrow.

  6. 'Soft' harness for external attachment of large radio transmitters to northern pike (Esox lucius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herke, S.W.; Moring, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    We developed a 'soft' harness for dorsally attaching large, external radio transmitters to northern pike (Esox lucius). The key harness component was a soft, flexible, thick-walled tubing that prevented tissue abrasion by the attachment lines which passed through the tubing. Six field-tagged fish (1.5-7.5 kg) were monitored for 45-115 days before tracking was terminated. Tracking patterns of fish indicated no apparent effect of these large, external transmitters on movement behavior; further, the transmitters did not appear to entangle the fish in vegetation. One fish with its transmitter still secure was recaptured after 54 days, and there was minimal tissue erosion under the transmitter. With minor improvements for the attachment lines and the transmitter saddle, the method is suitable for externally attaching large telemetry transmitters to fish.

  7. Effect of relative volume on radio transmitter expulsion in subadult common carp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penne, C.R.; Ahrens, N.L.; Summerfelt, R.C.; Pierce, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    Expulsion of surgically implanted radio transmitters is a problem in some fish telemetry studies. We conducted a 109-d experiment to test the hypothesis that variation in relative volume of transmitters surgically implanted in subadult common carp Cyprinus carpio would affect transmitter expulsion. We also necropsied fish at the end of the experiment to evaluate histological evidence for the mechanism of expulsion. Survival rate was high during our experiment; all control fish and 88% of the fish subjected to the implantation surgery survived. Expulsion rate was low; of the 23 fish that received transmitters and survived the experiment, only two (9%) expelled the transmitters. One of these expulsions occurred through a rupture of the incision and the other occurred via the intestine. Retained transmitters were all encapsulated by tissue, and most exhibited multiple adhesions to the intestine, gonads, and body wall. Adhesions were more numerous in fish that received larger transmitters. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  8. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun; Joshi, B. C.; Roy, Jayashree; Kate, G.; Pethe, Kaiwalya; Galande, Shridhar; Jamadar, Sachin; Mahajan, S. P.; Patil, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii, i.e., at frequencies below 30 MHz. The LORE can be complimentary to the planned Indian solar mission, “Aditya-L1” and its other payloads as well as synergistic to ground-based interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, which are routinely carried out by the Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and its particular suitability for providing measurements on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting type-III and slow drifting type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolutions. We also brief the gonio-polarimetry, which is possible with better-designed antennas and state-of-the-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. These would enable us to make a wide range of studies, such as nonlinear plasma processes in the Sun-Earth distance, in-situ radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary CME driven shocks, nature of ICMEs driving decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of solar wind interaction regions.

  9. Flying radio frequency undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Vikharev, A. A.; Savilov, A. V.

    2014-07-21

    A concept for the room-temperature rf undulator, designed to produce coherent X-ray radiation by means of a relatively low-energy electron beam and pulsed mm-wavelength radiation, is proposed. The “flying” undulator is a high-power short rf pulse co-propagating together with a relativistic electron bunch in a helically corrugated waveguide. The electrons wiggle in the rf field of the −1st spatial harmonic with the phase velocity directed in the opposite direction in respect to the bunch velocity, so that particles can irradiate high-frequency Compton's photons. A high group velocity (close to the speed of light) ensures long cooperative motion of the particles and the co-propagating rf pulse.

  10. Radio Frequency Interference and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sierra

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) and radio astronomy have been closely linked since the emergence of radio astronomy as a scientific discipline in the 1930s. Even before the official establishment of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, protection against contemporary and future radio noise levels was seen as crucial to ensure success of any new observatory. My talk will examine the various local, regional, national, and international efforts enacted to protect NRAO and other American radio astronomy sites from RFI.

  11. Technique for Predicting the Radio Frequency Field Strength Inside an Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, Michael P.; Reddell, Jerry P.

    1997-01-01

    This technical memo represents a simple analytical technique for predicting the Radio Frequency (RF) field inside an enclosed volume in which radio frequency occurs. The technique was developed to predict the RF field strength within a launch vehicle fairing in which some payloads desire to launch with their telemetry transmitter radiating. This technique considers both the launch vehicle and the payload aspects.

  12. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Periasamy K.; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Naidu, Arun Kumar

    High temporal and frequency resolution observations of solar generated disturbances below 15 MHz in the near-Sun region and at Sun-Earth distances in conjunction with optical and high energy observations of Sun are essential to understand the structure and evolution of eruptions, such as, flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and their associated solar wind disturbances at heights above the photosphere and their consequences in the interplanetary medium. This talk presents a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii below 30 MHz. The LORE, although not part of Aditya-L1 mission, can be complimentary to planned Aditya-L1 coronagraph and its other on-board payloads as well as synergistic to ground based observations, which are routinely carried out by Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and it is particularly suitable for providing data on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting Type-III and slow drifting Type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolution as well as goniopolarimetry, made possible with better designed antennas and state-of-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. This would enable wide ranging studies such as studies of nonlinear plasma processes, CME in-situ radio emission, CME driven phenomena, interplanetary CME driven shocks, ICMEs driven by decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of Solar Wind interaction regions. The talk will highlight the science objectives as well as the proposed technical design features.

  13. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough device

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.; Baity, Frederick W.; Hoffman, Daniel J.; Whealton, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A radio frequency coaxial vacuum feedthrough is provided which utilizes a cylindrical ceramic vacuum break formed of an alumina ceramic. The cylinder is coaxially disposed and brazed between tapered coaxial conductors to form a vacuum sealed connection between a pressurized upstream coaxial transmission line and a utilization device located within a vacuum container. The feedthrough provides 50 ohm matched impedance RF feedthrough up to about 500 MHz at power levels in the multimegawatt range.

  14. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  15. Magnetic-azimuth dependence of D-layer radio reflectivity, using lightning sferics as radio transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Holzworth, R. H.; Lay, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Very Low Frequency (3-30 kHz) and Low-Frequency (30-300 kHz) radiation from lightning strokes provides a convenient intense source for studying radio propagation in the ionospheric D-region [Cheng and Cummer, 2005; Cheng et al., 2006; Cheng et al., 2007; Cummer et al., 1998; Jacobson et al., 2010; Shao and Jacobson, 2009]. In this poster we present a new study of the magnetic-azimuth dependence of D-layer radio reflectivity at relatively short ranges (r < 1000 km). This range regime is poorly adapted to a waveguide approach but is well treated by our discrete-reflection approach [Jacobson et al., 2009]. We use cloud-to-ground strokes, which are ~100X more numerous than the Narrow Bipolar Pulse sferics to which our method had previously been confined. Cheng, Z., and S. A. Cummer (2005), Broadband VLF measurements of lightning-induced ionospheric perturbations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L08804, doi:08810.01029/02004GL022187. Cheng, Z., S. A. Cummer, D. N. Baker, and S. G. Kanekal (2006), Nighttime D region electron density profiles and variabilities inferred from broadband measurements using VLF radio emissions from lightning, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A05302, doi:05310.01029/02005JA011308. Cheng, Z., S. A. Cummer, H.-T. Su, and R.-R. Hsu (2007), Broadband very low frequency measurement of D region ionospheric perturbations caused by lightning electromagnetic pulses, J. Geophys. Res., 112, A06318. Cummer, S. A., U. S. Inan, and T. F. Bell (1998), Ionospheric D region remote sensing using VLF radio atmospherics, Radio Sci., 33, 1781-1792. Jacobson, A. R., X. Shao, and R. H. Holzworth (2009), Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D-region: Numerical model, J. Geophys. Res.- Space, 114, A03303, doi:03310.01029/02008JA013642. Jacobson, A. R., R. Holzworth, and X.-M. Shao (2010), Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D-region: Comparison with midday observations of broadband lightning signals

  16. Low Radio Frequency Picosatellite Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    2014-06-01

    The dramatic advances in cubesat and other picosatellite capabilities are opening the door for scientifically important observations at low radio frequencies. Because simple antennas are effective at low frequencies, and receiver technology allows low mass and low power instruments, these observations are an ideal match for very small spacecraft. A workshop on cubesat missions for low frequency radio astronomy was held at the Kiss Institute for Space Sciences, Caltech, to explore mission concepts involving one up to hundreds of picosatellites. One result from this workshop was that there are opportunities for viable missions throughout this large range. For example, the sky-integrated spectral signature of highly redshifted neutral hydrogen from the dark ages and cosmic dawn epochs can be measured by a single antenna on a single spacecraft. There are challenging issues of calibration, foreground removal, and RF interference that need to be solved, but the basic concept is appealingly simple. At the other extreme, imaging of angular structure in the high-redshift hydrogen signal will require an interferometer array with a very large number of antennas. In this case the primary requirement is a sufficiently low individual spacecraft mass that hundreds can be launched affordably. The technical challenges for large arrays are long-term relative station keeping and high downlink data rates. Missions using several to a few tens of picosatellites can image and track bright sources such as solar and planetary radio bursts, and will provide essential validation of technologies needed for much larger arrays.This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Effects of radio transmitters on the behavior of Red-headed Woodpeckers.

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovich, Mark; Kilgo, John, C.

    2009-05-01

    ABSTRACT. Previous studies have revealed that radio-transmitters may affect bird behaviors, including feeding rates, foraging behavior, vigilance, and preening behavior. In addition, depending on the method of attachment, transmitters can potentially affect the ability of cavity-nesting birds to use cavities. Our objective was to evaluate effects of transmitters on the behavior of and use of cavities byRed-headedWoodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus). Using backpack harnesses, we attached 2.1-g transmitter packages that averaged 3.1% of body weight (range = 2.5–3.6%) to Red-headed Woodpeckers. We observed both radio-tagged (N = 23) and nonradio-tagged (N = 28) woodpeckers and determined the percentage of time spent engaged in each of five behaviors: flight, foraging, perching, preening, and territorial behavior. We found no difference between the two groups in the percentage of time engaged in each behavior. In addition, we found that transmitters had no apparent effect on use of cavities for roosting by radio-tagged woodpeckers (N = 25).We conclude that backpack transmitters weighing less than 3.6% of body weight had no impact on either their behavior or their ability to use cavities.

  18. Remote sensing planetary waves in the midlatitude mesosphere using low frequency transmitter signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitter, E. D.

    2011-07-01

    Very low and low radio frequency (VLF/LF) propagation responds sensitively to the electron density distribution in the lower ionosphere (upper mesosphere). Whereas propagation paths crossing subpolar and polar regions are frequently affected by forcing from above by particle precipitations, mid- and lowlatitude paths let forcing from below be more prominent. Our observations (2009-2011) show, that the low frequency propagation conditions along the midlatitude path from Sicily to Germany (52° N 8° E) using the NSY 45.9 kHz transmitter (37° N 14° E) prove to be a good proxy of mesosphere planetary wave activity along the propagation path. High absorption events with VLF/LF propagation correlate to the well known winter time D-layer anomaly observed with high frequency (HF) radio waves. VLF/LF propagation calculations are presented which show that the radio signal amplitude variations can be modeled by planetary wave modulated collison frequency and electron density profiles. The other way around wave pressure amplitudes can be inferred from the VLF/LF data.

  19. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  20. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  1. Coping with Radio Frequency Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    The radio spectrum is a finite resource, on which humanity makes many demands. And pressure on it is ever increasing with the development of new technology and ideas for radio services. After all, we all benefit from wifi and cell phones. Radio astronomers have a small percentage of the spectrum allocated to them at octave intervals in the metre-centimetre bands, and at important frequencies, such as that of the 21cm line of HI. Signals from other services, as well as from our own poorly-engineered equipment, sometimes contaminate our bands: these signals constitute RFI. These may totally obliterate the astronomical signal, or, in the case of CLOUDSAT, may be capable of completely destroying a receiver, which introduces us to the new possibility of 'destructive interference'. A geo-stationary satellite can block access to a piece of sky from one site. Good equipment design eliminates self-inflicted interference, while physical separation often provides adequate practical mitigation at many frequencies. However, new observatories end up being located in the West Australian desert or Antarctica. In future they may be on the back side of the Moon. But there is no Earth-bound protection via physical separation against satellite signals. Some mitigation can be achieved by frequent data dumps and the excision of RFI, or by real-time detection and blanking of the receiver, or by more sophisticated algoriths. Astronomers of necessity aim to achieve mitigation via coordination, at the local level, and by participating in spectrum management at the national and international levels. This involves them spending a lot of time in Geneva at the International Telegraphic Union protecting their access to spectrum, and access to clean spectrum from the L3 point and the far side of the Moon.

  2. Legislated emergency locating transmitters and emergency position indicating radio beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, William R. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An emergency locating transmitting (ELT) system is disclosed which comprises a legislated ELT modified with an interface unit and connected by a multiwire cable to a remote control monitor (RCM), typically located at the pilot position. The RCM can remotely test the ELT by disabling the legislated swept tone and allowing transmission of a single tone, turn the ELT on for legislated ELT transmission, and reset the ELT to an armed condition. The RCM also provides visual and audio indications of transmitter operating condition as well as ELT battery condition. Removing the RCM or shorting or opening the interface input connections will not affect traditional ELT operation.

  3. Legislated emergency locating transmitters and emergency position indicating radio beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, William R.

    1988-10-01

    An emergency locating transmitting (ELT) system is disclosed which comprises a legislated ELT modified with an interface unit and connected by a multiwire cable to a remote control monitor (RCM), typically located at the pilot position. The RCM can remotely test the ELT by disabling the legislated swept tone and allowing transmission of a single tone, turn the ELT on for legislated ELT transmission, and reset the ELT to an armed condition. The RCM also provides visual and audio indications of transmitter operating condition as well as ELT battery condition. Removing the RCM or shorting or opening the interface input connections will not affect traditional ELT operation.

  4. Comfortable, lightweight safety helmet holds radio transmitter, receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, N. D.

    1964-01-01

    For two-way radio communication where safety gear is required, a lightweight helmet with few protrusions has been designed. The electronics components and power supply are mounted between the inner and outer shells, and resilient padding is used for the lining.

  5. Application of a modified harness design for attachment of radio transmitters to shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzenbacher, Peter; Haig, Susan M.; Oring, L.W.

    2000-01-01

    Radio transmitter attachment methodology is important to the design of radio telemetry studies. In 1998, we attached 5 transmitters to a captive population of Western Sandpipers(Calidris mauri) and 7 transmitters to wild Killdeer (Charadriusv ociferus) using a modified version of the Rappolea nd Tipton (1991) figure-8 leg-loop harness. Captive birds fitted with harnesses did not exhibit quantifiable differences in behavior relative to control birds. Based on initial success in using the leg-loop harnesses, we used harnesses to attach transmitters in the wild to 30 Killdeer and 49 Dunlin (Calidris alpina) during the winters of 1998-1999 and 1999-2000. This was part of a study on movements of wintering shorebirds in the Willamette Valley of Oregon,USA. Wild birds showed no adverse effects of the harnesses.Thus, the described harness is a practical method for attachment of transmitters to shorebirds. Advantages of this harness method include a reduction in handling time at capture, elimination of the need to clip feathers for attachment, and increased transmitter retention time.

  6. 47 CFR 95.628 - MedRadio transmitters in the 413-419 MHz, 426-432 MHz, 438-444 MHz, and 451-457 MHz bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... band as part of a Medical Body Area Network (MBAN). (a) Operating frequencies. A MedRadio station...) Requirements for Medical Body Area Networks. A MedRadio programmer/control transmitter shall not commence... 451-457 MHz bands as part of a Medical Micropower Network (MMN). (a) Operating frequency. Only...

  7. A radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, T.L.

    1987-12-07

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feedthrough is provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflection from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits the voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  8. Radio frequency sustained ion energy

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Hooke, William M.

    1977-01-01

    Electromagnetic (E.M.) energy injection method and apparatus for producing and sustaining suprathermal ordered ions in a neutral, two-ion-species, toroidal, bulk equilibrium plasma. More particularly, the ions are produced and sustained in an ordered suprathermal state of existence above the average energy and velocity of the bulk equilibrium plasma by resonant rf energy injection in resonance with the natural frequency of one of the ion species. In one embodiment, the electromagnetic energy is injected to clamp the energy and velocity of one of the ion species so that the ion energy is increased, sustained, prolonged and continued in a suprathermal ordered state of existence containing appreciable stored energy that counteracts the slowing down effects of the bulk equilibrium plasma drag. Thus, selective deuteron absorption may be used for ion-tail creation by radio-frequency excitation alone. Also, the rf can be used to increase the fusion output of a two-component neutral injected plasma by selective heating of the injected deuterons.

  9. Nonlethal gill biopsy does not affect juvenile chinook salmon implanted with radio transmitters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinelli-Liedtke, T. L.; Shively, R.S.; Holmberg, G.S.; Sheer, M.B.; Schrock, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Using gastric and surgical transmitter implantation, we compared radio-tagged juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (T(O)) with tagged fish also having a gill biopsy (T(B)) to determine biopsy effects on fish implanted with radio transmitters. We found no evidence during the 21-d period to suggest that a gill biopsy reduced survival, growth, or gross condition of the tagged-biopsy group, regardless of transmitter implantation technique. We recorded 100% survival of all treatment groups. Relative growth rates of T(O) and T(B) fish did not differ significantly. Leukocrit and lysozyme levels were not significantly different among groups, suggesting that no signs of infection were present. Our findings suggest that small chinook salmon can tolerate the combination of transmitter implantation and gill biopsy without compromising condition relative to fish receiving only the transmitter. We believe a gill biopsy can be used in field telemetry studies, especially when physiological data are needed in addition to behavioral data.

  10. Nonthermal processing by radio frequency electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) processing is relatively new and has been shown to inactivate bacteria in apple juice, orange juice and apple cider at moderately low temperatures. Key equipment components of the process include a radio frequency power supply and a treatment chamber that is ca...

  11. Integrally formed radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Abbott, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    An improved radio frequency quadrupole (10) is provided having an elongate housing (11) with an elongate central axis (12) and top, bottom and two side walls (13a-d) symmetrically disposed about the axis, and vanes (14a-d) formed integrally with the walls (13a-d), the vanes (14a-d) each having a cross-section at right angles to the central axis (12) which tapers inwardly toward the axis to form electrode tips (15a-d) spaced from each other by predetermined distances. Each of the four walls (13a-d), and the vanes (14a-d) integral therewith, is a separate structural element having a central lengthwise plane (16) passing through the tip of the vane, the walls (13a-d) having flat mounting surfaces (17, 18) at right angles to and parallel to the control plane (16), respectively, which are butted together to position the walls and vane tips relative to each other.

  12. Demonstration of Space Optical Transmitter Development for Multiple High Frequency Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung; Simons, Rainee; Wintucky, Edwin; Freeman, Jon

    2013-01-01

    As the demand for multiple radio frequency carrier bands continues to grow in space communication systems, the design of a cost-effective compact optical transmitter that is capable of transmitting selective multiple RF bands is of great interest, particularly for NASA Space Communications Network Programs. This paper presents experimental results that demonstrate the feasibility of a concept based on an optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technique that enables multiple microwave bands with different modulation formats and bandwidths to be combined and transmitted all in one unit, resulting in many benefits to space communication systems including reduced size, weight and complexity with corresponding savings in cost. Experimental results will be presented including the individual received RF signal power spectra for the L, C, X, Ku, Ka, and Q frequency bands, and measurements of the phase noise associated with each RF frequency. Also to be presented is a swept RF frequency power spectrum showing simultaneous multiple RF frequency bands transmission. The RF frequency bands in this experiment are among those most commonly used in NASA space environment communications.

  13. Spotforming with an Array of Ultra-Wideband Radio Transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, F; Spiridon, A

    2003-09-29

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) array signal processing has the distinct advantage in that it is possible to illuminate or focus on ''spots'' at distant points in space, as opposed to just illuminating or steering at certain directions for narrowband array processing. The term ''spotforming'' is used to emphasize the property that point-focusing techniques with UWB waveforms can be viewed as a generalization of the well-known narrowband beamforming techniques. Because methods in spotforming can lead to powerful applications for UWB systems, in this paper we derive, simulate and experimentally verify UWB spot size as a function of frequency, bandwidth and array aperture.

  14. Spotforming with an array of ultra-wideband radio transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, F; Spiridon, A

    2004-02-05

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) array signal processing has the distinct advantage in that it is possible to illuminate or focus on ''spots'' at distant points in space, as opposed to just illuminating or steering at certain directions for narrowband array processing. The term ''spotforming'' is used to emphasize the property that point-focusing techniques with UWB waveforms can be viewed as a generalization of the well-known narrowband beamforming techniques. Because methods in spotforming can lead to powerful applications for UWB systems, in this paper we derive, simulate and experimentally verify UWB spot size as a function of frequency, bandwidth and array aperture.

  15. Multi-mode radio frequency device

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, Ronald W.; Carrender, Curtis Lee; Anderson, Gordon A.; Steele, Kerry D.

    2007-02-13

    A transponder device having multiple modes of operation, such as an active mode and a passive mode, wherein the modes of operation are selected in response to the strength of a received radio frequency signal. A communication system is also provided having a transceiver configured to transmit a radio frequency signal and to receive a responsive signal, and a transponder configured to operate in a plurality of modes and to activate modes of operation in response to the radio frequency signal. Ideally, each mode of operation is activated and deactivated independent of the other modes, although two or more modes may be concurrently operational.

  16. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Quentin A.; Miller, Harold W.

    1984-01-01

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  17. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  18. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  19. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz-1 at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz-1 at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz-1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10-10 at 1-100 s integration time--orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  20. Method of and system for classifying emergency locating transmitters and emergency positions indicating radio beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wren, Paul E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    During a distress call, a distress location transmitter 10 generates a high frequency carrier signal 40 that is modulated by a predetermined distress waveform characteristic 29. The classification of user associated with the distress call is identified by periodically interrupting modulation 42; user classification is determined by the repetition rate of the interruptions, the interruption periods, or both.

  1. Monitoring Radio Frequency Interference: The Quiet Skies Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, S.; Gear, C.; Maddalena, R. J.; Heatherly, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Quiet Skies Project is a result of the Research Experience for Teacher (RET) program during the summer of 2004. Teachers were involved in discovering the relationship between radio frequency interference (RFI) and radio astronomy observations. S. Rapp participated in astronomy observations with the Green Bank Telescope in order to characterize RFI issues at radio observatories and worked closely with the Green Bank Interference Protection Group. This work included such tasks as mitigation of locally-generated RFI from power poles and running radiation propagation studies for transmitters within the National Radio Quiet Zone. A curriculum was created to allow high school students to participate in a research effort to determine RFI levels in their communities. The aim of the project is to promote student awareness of radio astronomy and radio frequency interference through an inquiry-based science curriculum. It is hoped that the project will go national by 2007. A prototype RFI detector was created and tested at four wavelengths; 850, 900, 1425, and 1675 MHz. High school students used a beta version of the RFI detector to explore the occurrence of RFI at their schools and in their communities. The student goals of the Quiet Skies Project are to: Measure interference levels at their schools and in their communities; Reduce and transmit their data to an NRAO data base; Use online spectrum allocation data, and local information to determine possible causes of interference in their area; Analyze the complex trade-offs between radio astronomy's need for quiet skies, and other commercial, and non-commercial uses of the spectrum and share their insights with others. This work was funded by the NSF-RET program and a grant from the NASA-IDEAS program

  2. Wind tunnel experiments to assess the effect of back-mounted radio transmitters on bird body drag

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obrecht, H.H., III; Pennycuick, C.J.; Fuller, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag of bird bodies was measured in a wind tunnel, with and without back-mounted dummy radio transmitters. Flight performance estimates indicate that the drag of a large transmitter can cause a substantial reduction of a migrant's range, that is, the distance it can cover in non-stop flight. The drag of the transmitter can be reduced by arranging the components in an elongated shape, so minimizing the frontal area. The addition of a rounded fairing to the front end, and a pointed fairing behind, was found to reduce the drag of the transmitter by about onethird, as compared with an unfaired rectangular box.

  3. An evaluation of exposure metrics in an epidemiologic study on radio and television broadcast transmitters and the risk of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schmiedel, Sven; Brüggemeyer, Hauke; Philipp, Johannes; Wendler, Jost; Merzenich, Hiltrud; Schüz, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    Electric field strength values calculated by wave propagation modeling were applied as an exposure metric in a case-control study conducted in Germany to investigate a possible association between radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) emitted from television and radio broadcast transmitters and the risk of childhood leukemia. To validate this approach it was examined at 850 measurement sites whether calculated RF-EMF are an improvement to an exposure proxy based on distance from the place of residence to a transmitter. Further, the agreement between measured and calculated RF-EMF was explored. For dichotomization at the 90% quantiles of the exposure distributions it was found that distance agreed less with measured RF-EMF (Kappa coefficient: 0.55) than did calculated RF-EMF (Kappa coefficient: 0.74). Distance was a good exposure proxy for a single transmitter only which uses the frequency bands of amplitude modulated radio, whereas it appeared to be of limited informative value in studies involving several transmitters, particularly if these are operating in different frequency bands. The analysis of the agreement between calculated RF-EMF and measured RF-EMF showed a sensitivity of 76.6% and a specificity of 97.4%, leading to an exposure misclassification that still allows one to detect a true odds ratio as low as 1.4 with a statistical power of >80% at a two-sided significance level of 5% in a study with 2,000 cases and 6,000 controls. Thus, calculated RF-EMF is confirmed to be an appropriate exposure metric in large-scale epidemiological studies on broadcast transmitters. PMID:19025781

  4. Radio frequency nonionizing radiation in a community exposed to radio and television broadcasting.

    PubMed

    Burch, James B; Clark, Maggie; Yost, Michael G; Fitzpatrick, Cole T E; Bachand, Annette M; Ramaprasad, Jaya; Reif, John S

    2006-02-01

    Exposure to radio frequency (RF) nonionizing radiation from telecommunications is pervasive in modern society. Elevated disease risks have been observed in some populations exposed to radio and television transmissions, although findings are inconsistent. This study quantified RF exposures among 280 residents living near the broadcasting transmitters for Denver, Colorado. RF power densities outside and inside each residence were obtained, and a global positioning system (GPS) identified geographic coordinates and elevations. A view-shed model within a geographic information system (GIS) characterized the average distance and percentage of transmitters visible from each residence. Data were collected at the beginning and end of a 2.5-day period, and some measurements were repeated 8-29 months later. RF levels logged at 1-min intervals for 2.5 days varied considerably among some homes and were quite similar among others. The greatest differences appeared among homes within 1 km of the transmitters. Overall, there were no differences in mean residential RF levels compared over 2.5 days. However, after a 1- to 2-year follow-up, only 25% of exterior and 38% of interior RF measurements were unchanged. Increasing proximity, elevation, and line-of-sight visibility were each associated with elevated RF exposures. At average distances from > 1-3 km, exterior RF measurements were 13-30 times greater among homes that had > 50% of the transmitters visible compared with homes with < or = 50% visibility at those distances. This study demonstrated that both spatial and temporal factors contribute to residential RF exposure and that GPS/GIS technologies can improve RF exposure assessment and reduce exposure misclassification. PMID:16451862

  5. Radio Hazard Safety Assessment for Marine Ship Transmitters: Measurements Using a New Data Collection Method and Comparison with ICNIRP and ARPANSA Limits.

    PubMed

    Halgamuge, Malka N

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the levels of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMFs) emitted from marine ship transmitters. In this study, we recorded the radio frequency (RF) electric field (EF) levels emitted from transmitters from a marine vessel focusing on the areas normally occupied by crew members and passengers. Previous studies considered radiation hazard safety assessment for marine vessels with a limited number of transmitters, such as very high-frequency (VHF) transceivers, radar and communication transmitters. In our investigation, EF levels from seven radio transmitters were measured, including: VHF, medium frequency/high frequency (MF/HF), satellite communication (Sat-Com C), AISnavigation, radar X-band and radar S-band. Measurements were carried out in a 40 m-long, three-level ship (upper deck, bridge deck and bridge roof) at 12 different locations. We developed a new data-collection protocol and performed it under 11 different scenarios to observe and measure the radiation emissions from all of the transmitters. In total, 528 EF field measurements were collected and averaged over all three levels of the marine ship with RF transmitters: the measured electric fields were the lowest on the upper deck (0.82-0.86 V/m), the highest on the bridge roof (2.15-3.70 V/m) and in between on the bridge deck (0.47-1.15 V/m). The measured EF levels were then assessed for compliance with the occupational and general public reference levels of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) standards. The ICNIRP and the ARPANSA limits for the general public were exceeded on the bridge roof; nevertheless, the occupational limits were respected everywhere. The measured EF levels, hence, complied with the ICNIRP guidelines and the ARPANSA standards. In this paper, we provide a new data collection model for future surveys, which could be conducted with larger

  6. Radio Hazard Safety Assessment for Marine Ship Transmitters: Measurements Using a New Data Collection Method and Comparison with ICNIRP and ARPANSA Limits

    PubMed Central

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the levels of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMFs) emitted from marine ship transmitters. In this study, we recorded the radio frequency (RF) electric field (EF) levels emitted from transmitters from a marine vessel focusing on the areas normally occupied by crew members and passengers. Previous studies considered radiation hazard safety assessment for marine vessels with a limited number of transmitters, such as very high-frequency (VHF) transceivers, radar and communication transmitters. In our investigation, EF levels from seven radio transmitters were measured, including: VHF, medium frequency/high frequency (MF/HF), satellite communication (Sat-Com C), AISnavigation, radar X-band and radar S-band. Measurements were carried out in a 40 m-long, three-level ship (upper deck, bridge deck and bridge roof) at 12 different locations. We developed a new data-collection protocol and performed it under 11 different scenarios to observe and measure the radiation emissions from all of the transmitters. In total, 528 EF field measurements were collected and averaged over all three levels of the marine ship with RF transmitters: the measured electric fields were the lowest on the upper deck (0.82–0.86 V/m), the highest on the bridge roof (2.15–3.70 V/m) and in between on the bridge deck (0.47–1.15 V/m). The measured EF levels were then assessed for compliance with the occupational and general public reference levels of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) standards. The ICNIRP and the ARPANSA limits for the general public were exceeded on the bridge roof; nevertheless, the occupational limits were respected everywhere. The measured EF levels, hence, complied with the ICNIRP guidelines and the ARPANSA standards. In this paper, we provide a new data collection model for future surveys, which could be conducted with

  7. Studies of the propagation of Low Frequency (LF) radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, E. M.; Jones, T. B.

    1993-05-01

    Low frequency (30-300 kHz) radio waves can propagate to great distances with little attenuation in the cavity formed by the earth and the ionosphere. Because of the relatively high frequency at LF, many active propagation modes can occur between the transmitter and receiver. Changes in the ionospheric conductivity or reflection height can influence the phase and amplitude of these modes and, hence, produce mutual interference. Because of these interference effects, the propagation is less stable than at VLF and the received field strength becomes more difficult to predict. In the present investigation, the WAVEHOP program was employed in conjunction with a range of ionospheric models to estimate the receiver field strength over a number of experimental paths. The predicted values were compared with those measured in an attempt to validate the ionospheric models and the method of calculation.

  8. Frequency monitoring a LIDAR transmitter for pulse-by-pulse analysis and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esproles, Carlos

    1992-01-01

    An electronic technique is described whereby the heterodyne mixing frequency of a pulsed LIDAR transmitter is displayed on a color-coded linear bar graph. The technique is of great utility for manually fine tuning the laser output frequency when the use of conventional frequency counters and spectrum analyzers is impractical in a rapidly firing system.

  9. Solar emission levels at low radio frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Solar radio emission could seriously interfere with observations made by a low frequency (1 to 10 MHz) array in space. International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) radio data were used to determine solar emission level. The results indicate that solar emission should seriously disturb less than ten percent of the data, even during the years of solar maximum. Thus it appears that solar emission should not cause a disastrous loss of data. The information needed to design procedures to excise solar interference from the data produced by any low-frequency array is provided.

  10. Long-term health effects of harness-mounted radio transmitters in red kites (Milvus milvus) in England.

    PubMed

    Peniche, G; Vaughan-Higgins, R; Carter, I; Pocknell, A; Simpson, D; Sainsbury, A

    2011-09-17

    In 1989, the Nature Conservancy Council and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds commenced reintroduction of the red kite (Milvus milvus) according to International Union for Conservation of Nature criteria. Following 22 years of intensive effort, the red kite reintroduction programme has been a success with an estimated 1000 pairs now breeding in England. Post-release health surveillance is ongoing and has been achieved through radio-tracking, monitoring breeding at nest sites and pathological examinations of any red kites found dead. Tail-mounted radio transmitters were fitted from 1989 with harness-mounted radio transmitters being preferentially used since 2000. Since 2000, 180 individuals have been recovered for postmortem examination. Eighteen of these birds had previously had a harness-mounted radio transmitter fitted and four of these (22 per cent) had moderate to severe lesions associated with the presence of the harness and radio transmitter including chronic necrogranulomatous inflammation, deep muscular exposure and distorted muscular conformation. Failure to breed was also reported in two of these individuals over the preceding year(s), although it is not known whether the presence of the harness contributed to this failure. Duration of deployment may have been a significant factor in the formation of these lesions as those with lesions (n=4) had a statistically significant (P=0.009) longer duration of deployment compared to those without lesions (n=14). No lesions were reported in those red kites fitted with tail-transmitters. PMID:21846683

  11. A Low Complexity Architecture for OFCDM Downlink Transmitter Using Joint Time-Frequency Spreading and IFFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Lilin; Xiao, Yue; Ni, Wei; Li, Shaoqian

    In this letter, a low complexity transmitter is proposed for the downlinks of orthogonal frequency code division multiplexing (OFCDM) systems. The principle is based on a joint time-frequency spreading and inverse fast Fourier transform (TFS-IFFT), which combines the frequency spreading with partial stages of IFFT, so as to simplify the real-time processing. Compared with the conventional one, the proposed OFCDM transmitter is of lower real-time computational complexity, especially for those with large spreading factor or low modulation level. Furthermore, the proposed TFS-IFFT can also be applied to other frequency spreading systems, such as MC-CDMA, for complexity reduction.

  12. Monitoring Radio Frequency Interference in Southwest Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The radio signals received from astronomical objects are extremely weak. Because of this, radio sources are easily shrouded by interference from devices such as satellites and cell phone towers. Radio astronomy is very susceptible to this radio frequency interference (RFI). Possibly even worse than complete veiling, weaker interfering signals can contaminate the data collected by radio telescopes, possibly leading astronomers to mistaken interpretations. To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and RFI, an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project_the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)_encourages students to collect and analyze RFI data and develop conclusions as a team. Because the project focuses on electromagnetic radiation, it is appropriate for physics, physical science, chemistry, or general science classes. My class-about 50 students from 15 southwest Virginia high schools-participated in the Quiet Skies Project and were pioneers in the use of the beta version of the Quiet Skies Detector (QSD), which is used to detect RFI. Students have been involved with the project since 2005 and have collected and shared data with NRAO. In analyzing the data they have noted some trends in RFI in Southwest Virginia.

  13. Radio Frequency-Tomography of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.

    2002-05-01

    The Frequency-Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) is designed to produce simultaneous images of solar phenomena at many frequencies. A data cube with a stack of multiple frequency images can be used for tomographic reconstruction of the 3D density and temperature distribution of flares, based on the free-free emission at cm and mm wavelengths. We simulate a set of multi-frequency images for the Bastille-Day flare of 2000-July-14, based on EUV observations from TRACE and soft X-ray observations from Yohkoh. The 3D model consists of some 200 postflare loops with observationally constrained densities and temperatures. The temporal evolution involves flare plasma heating, a phase of conductive cooling, followed by a phase of radiative cooling. The images simulated at different microwave frequencies reveal a sequence of optically-thick free-free emission layers, which can be "pealed off" like onion shells with increasing radio frequency. We envision a tomographic method that yields information on the density and temperature structure of flare systems and their evolution. Comparison with EUV and soft X-ray based 3D models will also allow to quantify wave scattering at radio frequencies and provide information on small-scale inhomogeneities and wave turbulence. Besides the thermal free-free emission, radio images contain also information on coherent emission processes, such as plasma emission from electron beams and loss-cone emission from gyroresonant trapped particles, conveying information on particle acceleration processes.

  14. Radio frequency interference at the geostationary orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    Growing demands on the frequency spectrum have increased the possibility of radio frequency interference (RFI). Various approaches to obtain in orbit RFI data are compared; this comparision indicates that the most practical way to obtain RFI data for a desired orbit (such as a geostationary orbit) is through the extrapolation of in orbit RFI measurements by a low orbit satellite. It is concluded that a coherent RFI program that uses both experimental data and analytical predictions provides accurate RFI data at minimal cost.

  15. Single Frequency, Pulsed Laser Diode Transmitter for Dial Water Vapor Measurements at 935nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, Gregg W.; Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.; Rall, Johnathan A. R.

    1998-01-01

    We report a tunable, single frequency, narrow linewidth, pulsed laser diode transmitter at 935.68nm for remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. The transmitter consists of a CW, tunable, external cavity diode laser whose output is amplified 2OdB using a tapered diode amplifier. The output is pulsed for range resolved DIAL lidar by pulsing the drive current to the diode amplifier at 4kHz with a .5% duty cycle. The output from the transmitter is 36OnJ/pulse and is single spatial mode. It maintains a linewidth of less than 25MHz as its wavelength is tuned across the water vapor absorption line at 935.68nm. The transmitter design and its use in a water vapor measurement will be discussed.

  16. GTAG: architecture and design of miniature transmitter with position logging for radio telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řeřucha, Šimon; Bartonička, Tomáš; Jedlička, Petr

    2011-10-01

    The radio telemetry is a well-known technique used within zoological research to exploit the behaviour of animal species. A usage of GPS for a frequent and precise position recording gives interesting possibility for a further enhancement of this method. We present our proposal of an architecture and design concepts of telemetry transmitter with GPS module, called GTAG, that is suited for study of the Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus). The model group we study set particular constrains, especially the weight limit (9 g) and prevention of any power resources recharging technique. We discuss the aspect of physical realization and the energyconsumption issues. We have developed a reference implementation that has been already deployed during telemetry sessions and we evaluate the experience and compare the estimated performance of our device to a real data.

  17. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: IITRI RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radio frequency heating (RFH) technologies use electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency (RF) band to heat soil in situ, thereby potentially enhancing the performance of standard soil vapor extraction (SVE) technologies. Contaminants are removed from in situ soils and transfe...

  18. 48 CFR 211.275 - Radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Radio frequency identification....

  19. Digital avionics susceptibility to high energy radio frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, William E.

    Generally, noncritical avionic systems for transport category aircraft have been designed to meet radio frequency (RF) susceptibility requirements set forth in RTCA DO 160B, environmental conditions and test procedures for airborne equipment. Section 20 of this document controls the electromagnetic interference (EMI) hardening for avionics equipment to levels of 1 and 2 V/m. Currently, US equipment manufacturers are designing flight-critical fly-by-wire avionics to a much higher level. The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has requested that the RTCA SC-135 high-energy radio frequency (HERF) working group develop appropriate testing procedures for section 20 of RTCA DO 160B for radiated and conducted susceptibility at the box and systems level. The FAA has also requested the SAE AE4R committee to address installed systems testing, airframe shielding effects and RF environment monitoring. Emitters of interest include radar (ground, ship, and aircraft) commercial broadcast and TV station, mobile communication, and other transmitters that could possibly affect commercial aircraft.

  20. Digital avionics susceptibility to high energy radio frequency fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, William E.

    1988-01-01

    Generally, noncritical avionic systems for transport category aircraft have been designed to meet radio frequency (RF) susceptibility requirements set forth in RTCA DO 160B, environmental conditions and test procedures for airborne equipment. Section 20 of this document controls the electromagnetic interference (EMI) hardening for avionics equipment to levels of 1 and 2 V/m. Currently, US equipment manufacturers are designing flight-critical fly-by-wire avionics to a much higher level. The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has requested that the RTCA SC-135 high-energy radio frequency (HERF) working group develop appropriate testing procedures for section 20 of RTCA DO 160B for radiated and conducted susceptibility at the box and systems level. The FAA has also requested the SAE AE4R committee to address installed systems testing, airframe shielding effects and RF environment monitoring. Emitters of interest include radar (ground, ship, and aircraft) commercial broadcast and TV station, mobile communication, and other transmitters that could possibly affect commercial aircraft.

  1. Inflammatory reaction to fabric collars from percutaneous antennas attached to intracoelomic radio transmitters implanted in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.M.; Burek, K.A.; Esler, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    In wild birds implanted intracoelomically with radio transmitters, a synthetic fabric collar placed around the base of a percutaneous antenna is believed to function as a barrier to contamination of the coelom. We examined 13 fabric collars recovered from percutaneous antennas of radio transmitters implanted intracoelomically in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) 12 months earlier. Both the transmitters and antenna collars were encapsulated in fibrous connective tissue, with adhesions to internal organs. Histologically, bacteria were evident at the fabric-plastic interface in 8 of 10 collars examined in cross section and along the length of the collar in 3 collars examined longitudinally. Bacteria were confined within the fibrotic sheath surrounding the transmitter and the antenna collar in all birds. No evidence of chronic systemic effects secondary to implantation was present on hematologic or serum biochemical testing. These findings indicate that antenna collars do not prevent the entry of bacteria along the percutaneous antenna but may help stabilize the antenna and minimize coelomic contamination. We conclude that radio transmitters implanted into the coelom of harlequin ducks do not appear to cause significant health problems for at least 1 year after implantation.

  2. Sampling Downconverter For Radio-Frequency Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.; Rayhrer, B.; Young, L. E.

    1990-01-01

    Phase and delay errors reduced greatly. Proposed GaAs integrated-circuit for receiver of radio signals at gigahertz frequencies samples incoming signal in phase and in quadrature, digitizes it, and down-converts it to baseband in single step. Incorporates both digital and analog components in design offering improved stability, versatility, and sampling bandwidth. Eliminates need for several components found in conventional analog designs, including mixers, postmixer filters, and 90 degree phase shifter.

  3. Passive radio frequency peak power multiplier

    DOEpatents

    Farkas, Zoltan D.; Wilson, Perry B.

    1977-01-01

    Peak power multiplication of a radio frequency source by simultaneous charging of two high-Q resonant microwave cavities by applying the source output through a directional coupler to the cavities and then reversing the phase of the source power to the coupler, thereby permitting the power in the cavities to simultaneously discharge through the coupler to the load in combination with power from the source to apply a peak power to the load that is a multiplication of the source peak power.

  4. Radio frequency interference at QUASAR Network Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, Gennadii

    2011-07-01

    Different sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) at Quasar-network observatories and their affect on VLBIsessions are discussed. For example, the stronger of them registered last time are UMTS mobile phone base stations which were built not far from Quasar-network observatories location. These stations emit signals near 2100MHz and produce RFI of critical level. To control RFI level regular spectral measurements of the intermediate frequency signals at the outputs of the receivers are conducted. As a result, real spread of RFI sources, including DORIS, have to be taken into account in planning of VLBI observation sessions and especially it is concerned VLBI 2010 project realization.

  5. Effects of surgically and gastrically implanted radio transmitters on growth and feeding behavior of juvenile chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, N.S.; Rondorf, D.W.; Evans, S.D.; Kelly, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the effects of surgically and gastrically implanted radio transmitters (representing 2.3-5.5% of body weight) on the growth and feeding behavior of 192 juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (114-159 mm in fork length). Throughout the 54-d study, the 48 fish with transmitters in their stomachs (gastric fish) consistently grew more slowly than fish with surgically implanted transmitters (surgery fish), fish with surgery but no implanted transmitter (sham-surgery fish), or fish exposed only to handling (control fish). Growth rates of surgery fish were also slightly impaired at day 21, but by day 54 they were growing at rates comparable with those of control fish. Despite differences in growth, overall health was similar among all test fish. However, movement of the transmitter antenna caused abrasions at the corner of the mouth in all gastric fish, whereas only 22% of the surgery fish had inflammation around the antenna exit wound. Feeding activity was similar among groups, but gastric fish exhibited a coughing behavior and appeared to have difficulty retaining swallowed food. Because growth and feeding behavior were less affected by the presence of surgically implanted transmitters than by gastric implants, we recommend surgically implanting transmitters for biotelemetry studies of juvenile chinook salmon between 114 and 159 mm fork length.

  6. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kemiktarak, U; Ndukum, T; Schwab, K C; Ekinci, K L

    2007-11-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) relies on localized electron tunnelling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. In the 25-year period since its invention, the STM has helped uncover a wealth of phenomena in diverse physical systems--ranging from semiconductors to superconductors to atomic and molecular nanosystems. A severe limitation in scanning tunnelling microscopy is the low temporal resolution, originating from the diminished high-frequency response of the tunnel current readout circuitry. Here we overcome this limitation by measuring the reflection from a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit in which the tunnel junction is embedded, and demonstrate electronic bandwidths as high as 10 MHz. This approximately 100-fold bandwidth improvement on the state of the art translates into fast surface topography as well as delicate measurements in mesoscopic electronics and mechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM have allowed us to perform thermometry at the nanometre scale. Furthermore, we have detected high-frequency mechanical motion with a sensitivity approaching approximately 15 fm Hz(-1/2). This sensitivity is on par with the highest available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection techniques, and the radio-frequency STM is expected to be capable of quantum-limited position measurements. PMID:17972882

  7. Testing the Susceptibility of GNSS Receivers to Radio Frequency Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, H. T.; Blume, F.; Gallaher, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Global Navigational Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers are employed by the scientific community for measuring a variety of geodetic, geophysical and atmospheric phenomena. Data acquisition frequently occurs in a variety of challenging environments, which include locations with high Radio Frequency (RF) noise characteristics. Tracking the relatively low powered GNSS carrier signals broadcast from space becomes even more challenging in the presence of adjacent band RF noise. The demand for terrestrial RF spectrum use for a variety of non-GNSS applications is ever increasing, which poses potential challenges for GNSS site operators who would like to acquire the highest quality data possible. In recent years, UNAVCO has observed an increase in the number of GNSS sites which are negatively impacted by RF interference. In previous work, we have shown that telemetry systems utilizing the Iridium satellite constellation can degrade GNSS data quality, as the adjacent-band (1610-1616 Mhz) signals transmitted by Iridium data transmitters are close in proximity to the L1 frequency of GNSS. The impact of RF interference from Iridium data transmitters on GNSS receivers can cause reduced Signal-to-Noise (SNR), increased cycle slips, and in worst case scenarios, prevent the receiver from tracking. To better characterize GNSS receiver susceptibility to RF interference, UNAVCO has performed a variety of tests with Continuous Wave (CW) noise sources in RF bands adjacent to the GNSS spectrum. We simulate a subset of discrete noise frequencies commonly observed in the field using a frequency generator, which supplies a signal with varying power output from a transmitter located within 1 m of the GNSS antenna. Signal power is incremented in small steps until receiver tracking fails. All receivers are simultaneously evaluated using an 8-way splitter. In addition, we investigate receiver tracking performance with a simulated increase in the RF noise floor. To analyze the results we use

  8. Acquisition signal transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Morton L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An encoded information transmitter which transmits a radio frequency carrier that is amplitude modulated by a constant frequency waveform and thereafter amplitude modulated by a predetermined encoded waveform, the constant frequency waveform modulated carrier constituting an acquisition signal and the encoded waveform modulated carrier constituting an information bearing signal, the acquisition signal providing enhanced signal acquisition and interference rejection favoring the information bearing signal. One specific application for this transmitter is as a distress transmitter where a conventional, legislated audio tone modulated signal is transmitted followed first by the acquisition signal and then the information bearing signal, the information bearing signal being encoded with, among other things, vehicle identification data. The acquistion signal enables a receiver to acquire the information bearing signal where the received signal is low and/or where the received signal has a low signal-to-noise ratio in an environment where there are multiple signals in the same frequency band as the information bearing signal.

  9. Radio frequency selection and interference prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    The bands available for deep-space communications, and the choice of particular mission frequencies are discussed. The more general susceptibility of deep-space Earth stations to various kinds of interference is then presented. An associated topic is the development of protection criteria that specify maximum allowable levels of interference. Next, the prediction of interference from near-Earth satellites is described, with particular emphasis on the problems and uncertainties of such predictions. Finally, a brief description of other activities aimed at the prevention or avoidance of interference to deep-space radio communications is given.

  10. Inductive coupled radio frequency plasma bridge neutralizer.

    PubMed

    Scholze, F; Tartz, M; Neumann, H

    2008-02-01

    A 13.56 MHz radio frequency plasma bridge neutralizer (rf-PBN) for ion thruster applications as well as ion beam surface processing of insulating materials is presented. The energy for the plasma excitation is inductively coupled into the plasma chamber. Because no components are located inside the plasma, the lifetime of the rf-PBN is expected to be very long. A compact tuning system adapts the input power to the plasma impedance. The electron current may be controlled over a wide range by the rf input power. An electron current of up to 1.6 A has been extracted. PMID:18315215

  11. The Mariner Mars 1971 radio frequency subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    The radio frequency subsystem (RFS) for the Mariner Mars 1971 (MM'71) spacecraft is described. The MM'69 RFS was used as the baseline design for the MM'71 RFS, and the report describes the design changes made to the 1969 RFS for use on MM'71. It also cites various problems encountered during the fabrication and testing of the RFS, as well as the types of tests to which the RFS was subjected. In areas where significant problems were encountered, a detailed description of the problem and its solution is presented. In addition, some recommendations are given for modifications to the RFS and test techniques for future programs.

  12. High efficiency, oxidation resistant radio frequency susceptor

    DOEpatents

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Klett, James W.

    2004-10-26

    An article and method of producing an article for converting energy from one form to another having a pitch-derived graphitic foam carbon foam substrate and a single layer coating applied to all exposed surfaces wherein the coating is either silicon carbide or carbides formed from a Group IVA metal. The article is used as fully coated carbon foam susceptors that more effectively absorb radio frequency (RF) band energy and more effectively convert the RF energy into thermal band energy or sensible heat. The essentially non-permeable coatings also serve as corrosion or oxidation resistant barriers.

  13. Radio frequency identification applications in hospital environments.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Angela M; Visich, John K; Li, Suhong

    2006-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has recently begun to receive increased interest from practitioners and academicians. This interest is driven by mandates from major retailers such as Wal-Mart, Target and Metro Group, and the United States Department of Defense, in order to increase the efficiency and visibility of material and information flows in the supply chain. However, supply chain managers do not have a monopoly on the deployment of RFID. In this article, the authors discuss the potential benefits, the areas of applications, the implementation challenges, and the corresponding strategies of RFID in hospital environments. PMID:16913301

  14. Optical generation of radio-frequency power

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Meyer, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    An optical technique for high-power radio-frequency (RF) signal generation is described. The technique uses a unique photodetector based on a traveling-wave design driven by an appropriately modulated light source. The traveling-wave photodetector (TWPD) exhibits simultaneously a theoretical quantum efficiency approaching 100 % and a very large electrical bandwidth. Additionally, it is capable of dissipating the high-power levels required for the RF generation technique. The modulated light source is formed by either the beating together of two lasers or by the direct modulation of a light source. A system example is given which predicts RF power levels of 100`s of mW`s at millimeter wave frequencies with a theoretical ``wall-plug`` efficiency approaching 34%.

  15. Radio Frequency Mass Gauging of Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Vaden, Karl R.; Herlacher, Michael D.; Buchanan, David A.; VanDresar, Neil T.

    2007-01-01

    A combined experimental and computer simulation effort was conducted to measure radio frequency (RF) tank resonance modes in a dewar partially filled with liquid oxygen, and compare the measurements with numerical simulations. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate that computer simulations of a tank's electromagnetic eigenmodes can be used to accurately predict ground-based measurements, thereby providing a computational tool for predicting tank modes in a low-gravity environment. Matching the measured resonant frequencies of several tank modes with computer simulations can be used to gauge the amount of liquid in a tank, thus providing a possible method to gauge cryogenic propellant tanks in low-gravity. Using a handheld RF spectrum analyzer and a small antenna in a 46 liter capacity dewar for experimental measurements, we have verified that the four lowest transverse magnetic eigenmodes can be accurately predicted as a function of liquid oxygen fill level using computer simulations. The input to the computer simulations consisted of tank dimensions, and the dielectric constant of the fluid. Without using any adjustable parameters, the calculated and measured frequencies agree such that the liquid oxygen fill level was gauged to within 2 percent full scale uncertainty. These results demonstrate the utility of using electromagnetic simulations to form the basis of an RF mass gauging technology with the power to simulate tank resonance frequencies from arbitrary fluid configurations.

  16. Ultra-stable radio frequency dissemination in free space.

    PubMed

    Miao, J; Wang, B; Gao, C; Bai, Y; Zhu, X; Wang, L J

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate an ultra-stable radio frequency (RF) dissemination scheme over 80 m free space. The frequency dissemination stability is 3.2 × 10(-13)/s and 4.4 × 10(-17)/day, which can be applied to transfer frequency signal without compromising its stability in a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) or radio astronomy. PMID:24182140

  17. Surgical and immediate postrelease mortality of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) implanted with abdominal radio transmitters with percutaneous antennae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.M.; Esler, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Radiotelemetry is an essential tool in the study of free-ranging bird populations, and a variety of transmitter-attachment methods have been developed. A promising new method is abdominal implantation of a transmitter with a percutaneous antenna. Researchers using this technique should be concerned about and aware of mortality during surgery and during the immediate postrelease period (the 14-day period following surgery). Of 307 radio-implant surgeries performed between 1995 and 1997 in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus), 7 (2.3%) deaths were documented during surgery or anesthetic recovery. Of 295 birds released with implanted radios, 10 (3.4%) died during the immediate postrelease period. Modifications to anesthetic procedures used in the 204 surgeries performed in 1996 and 1997 reduced mortality to 1.5% during surgery and 1.5% during the immediate postrelease period. Anesthetic modifications included intubation of all birds, placement of birds on an elevated platform that allowed the head to rest at a level lower than the body during surgery, placement of a heated water blanket under the birds during surgery, monitoring of body temperature, and use of electrocardiogram and Doppler ultrasound to monitor heart rates and arrhythmias. Low levels of mortality associated with abdominal implantation of radio transmitters may be unavoidable, but mortality can be minimized with adjustments to anesthetic technique. Copyright 1999 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.

  18. Radio frequency multicusp ion source development (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-03-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider injector. It has been demonstrated that the source can meet the H{sup {minus}} beam current and emittance requirements for this application. By employing a porcelain-coated antenna, a clean plasma discharge with very long-life operation can be achieved. Today, the rf source is used to generate both positive and negative hydrogen ion beams and has been tested in various particle accelerator laboratories throughout the world. Applications of this ion source have been extended to other fields such as ion beam lithography, oil-well logging, ion implantation, accelerator mass spectrometry and medical therapy machines. This paper summarizes the latest rf ion source technology and development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Radio-frequency low-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R; Mora, José; Maestre, Haroldo; Corral, Pablo

    2014-06-15

    A method for retrieving low-coherence interferograms, based on the use of a microwave photonics filter, is proposed and demonstrated. The method is equivalent to the double-interferometer technique, with the scanning interferometer replaced by an analog fiber-optics link and the visibility recorded as the amplitude of its radio-frequency (RF) response. As a low-coherence interferometry system, it shows a decrease of resolution induced by the fiber's third-order dispersion (β3). As a displacement sensor, it provides highly linear and slope-scalable readouts of the interferometer's optical path difference in terms of RF, even in the presence of third-order dispersion. In a proof-of-concept experiment, we demonstrate 20-μm displacement readouts using C-band EDFA sources and standard single-mode fiber. PMID:24978555

  20. Hybrid optical radio frequency airborne communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagley, Zachary C.; Hughes, David H.; Juarez, Juan C.; Kolodzy, Paul; Martin, Todd; Northcott, Malcolm; Pike, H. Alan; Plasson, Ned D.; Stadler, Brian; Stotts, Larry B.; Young, David W.

    2012-05-01

    Optical RF Communications Adjunct Program flight test results provide validation of the theoretical models and hybrid optical radio frequency (RF) airborne system concepts developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory. Theoretical models of the free-space optical communications (FSOC), RF, and network components accurately predict the flight test results under a wide range of day and night operating conditions. The FSOC system, including the adaptive optics and optical modem, can operate under high turbulence conditions. The RF and network mechanisms of Layer 2 retransmission and failover provide increased reliability, reducing end-to-end packet error rates. Overall the test results show that stable, long-range FSOC is possible and practical for near-term operations.

  1. Radio frequency field assisted cold collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yijue; D'Incao, Jose; Greene, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The radio frequency (RF) field is a promising but less developed tool to control cold collisions. From the few-body perspective, we study cold atom collisions in an external magnetic field and a single-color RF field. We employ the multi-channel quantum defect theory and the hyperspherical toolkit to solve the two-body and three-body Schrödinger equations. Our results show that RF fields can effectively control the two-body scattering length through Feshbach resonances. Such RF induced Feshbach resonances can be applied to quenching experiments or spinor condensates. Analogous to photo association, RF fields can also associate cold atoms into molecules with a reasonable rate. Moreover, we will discuss the feasibility of using RF fields to control three-body recombination, which may improve the experimental timescale by suppressing three-body losses. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  2. An improved integrally formed radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Abbott, S.R.

    1987-10-05

    An improved radio frequency quadrupole is provided having an elongate housing with an elongate central axis and top, bottom and two side walls symmetrically disposed about the axis, and vanes formed integrally with the walls, the vanes each having a cross-section at right angles to the central axis which tapers inwardly toward the axis to form electrode tips spaced from each other by predetermined distances. Each of the four walls, and the vanes integral therewith, is a separate structural element having a central lengthwise plane passing through the tip of the vane, the walls having flat mounting surfaces at right angles to and parallel to the control plane, respectively, which are butted together to position the walls and vane tips relative to each other. 4 figs.

  3. Radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stokes, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is a new linear accelerator concept in which rf electric fields are used to focus, bunch, and accelerate the beam. Because the RFQ can provide strong focusing at low velocities, it can capture a high-current dc ion beam from a low-voltage source and accelerate it to an energy of 1 MeV/nucleon within a distance of a few meters. A recent experimental test at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has confirmed the expected performance of this structure and has stimulated interest in a wide variety of applications. The general properties of the RFQ are reviewed and examples of applications of this new accelerator are presented.

  4. Heating of the nighttime D region by very low frequency transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Juan V.; Inan, Umran S.; Bell, Timothy F.

    1994-01-01

    VLF signals propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide are used to probe the heated nighttime D region over three U.S. Navy very low frequency (VLF,3-30 kHz) transmitters. Ionospheric cooling and heating are observed when a transmitter turns off and on in the course of normal operations. Heating by the 24.0-kHz NAA transmitter in Cutler, Maine, (1000 kW radiated power) was observed by this method in 41 of 52 off/on episodes during December 1992, increasing the amplitude and retarding the phase of the 21.4-kHz NSS probe wave propagating from Annapolis, Maryland, to Gander, Newfoundland, by as much as 0.84 dB and 5.3 deg, respectively. In 6 of these 41 episodes, the amplitude of the 28.5-kHz NAU probe wave propagating from Puerto Rico to Gander was also perturbed by as much as 0.29 dB. The latter observations were unexpected due to the greater than 770 km distance between NAA and the NAU-Gander great circle path. Heating by the NSS (21.4 kHz, 265 kW) and NLK (24.8 kHz, 850 kW) transmitters was observed serendipitously in data from earlier measurements of the amplitudes of VLF signals propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. A three-dimensional model of wave absorption and electron heating in a magnetized, weakly ionized plasma is used to calculate the extent nad shape of the collision frequency (i.e., electron temperature) enhancement above a VLF transmitter. The enhancements are annular, with a geomagnetic north-south asymmetry and a radius at the outer half-maximum of the collision frequency enhancement of about 150 km. Heating by the NAA transmitter is predicted to increase the nighttime D region electron temperature by as much as a factor of 3. The calculated changes in the D region conductivity are used in a three-dimensional model of propagation in the Earth-ionosphere wavelength to predict the effect of the heated patch on a subionospheric VLF probe wave. The range of predicted scattered field amplitudes is in general consistent with the observed

  5. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section 80.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio...

  6. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section 80.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio...

  7. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section 80.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio...

  8. 47 CFR 80.1019 - Antenna radio frequency indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna radio frequency indicator. 80.1019 Section 80.1019 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1019 Antenna radio...

  9. Demeter/ICE Experiment: Study of low frequency transmitter intensity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Moldovan, I.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Al-Haddad, E.; Biagi, P. F.; Parrot, M.

    2012-04-01

    We report on low frequency (LF) transmitter signal recorded by the 'Instrument Capteur Electrique' (ICE) experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We mainly consider the signal emitted by the Brasov broadcasting station (25.60E, 45.75N) at frequency of about 153 kHz. We analyze the reception conditions of this transmitter several weeks before the occurrence of the Vrancea earthquakes, on October, 27th, 2004. Ground-based observations revealed the presence of sudden decrease of the Y-component of the magnetic field at Muntele Rosu Observatory (Romania), at about 68 km from the epicenter, as reported by Moldovan et al. (Rom. Journ. Phys., Vol. 54, Nos. 1-2, p. 249-261, Bucharest, 2009). In this contribution we attempt to check if the LF Brasov signal was also subject to similar disturbances as observed by the ground-station. We focus on the variation of the LF transmitter intensity levels, several weeks before and after the Vrancea earthquake occurrence. We discuss the physical parameters which may disturb the signal reception in particular the geomagnetic activity and the signal to noise ratios.

  10. Trirotron: triode rotating beam radio frequency amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Lebacqz, Jean V.

    1980-01-01

    High efficiency amplification of radio frequencies to very high power levels including: establishing a cylindrical cloud of electrons; establishing an electrical field surrounding and coaxial with the electron cloud to bias the electrons to remain in the cloud; establishing a rotating electrical field that surrounds and is coaxial with the steady field, the circular path of the rotating field being one wavelength long, whereby the peak of one phase of the rotating field is used to accelerate electrons in a beam through the bias field in synchronism with the peak of the rotating field so that there is a beam of electrons continuously extracted from the cloud and rotating with the peak; establishing a steady electrical field that surrounds and is coaxial with the rotating field for high-energy radial acceleration of the rotating beam of electrons; and resonating the rotating beam of electrons within a space surrounding the second field, the space being selected to have a phase velocity equal to that of the rotating field to thereby produce a high-power output at the frequency of the rotating field.

  11. Polarimetric Observations at Low Radio Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnes, J. S.

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in the evolution of astrophysical systems. These fields can be studied through wide-field spectropolarimetry, which allows for faint polarised signals to be detected at relatively low radio frequencies. An interferometric polarisation mode has recently become available at the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). A detailed analysis of the GMRT's instrumental response is presented. The findings are used to create a polarisation pipeline, which in combination with rotation measure (RM) Synthesis is used for the detection of extended linearly polarised emission at 610 MHz. A number of compact sources are detected and their Faraday depth and polarisation fraction are reported. New holography observations of the GMRT's primary beam are presented. Instantaneous off-axis polarisation is substantial and scales with the Stokes I beam. The developed beam models are used to reduce direction-dependent instrumental polarisation, and the Stokes I beam is shown to deviate from circular symmetry. A new technique for electric vector polarisation angle calibration is developed that removes the need for known sources on the sky, eliminates ionospheric effects, and avoids a flaw in current methods which could erroneously yield multiple Faraday components for sources that are well-parameterised by a single RM. A sample of nine galaxies from two Southern Compact Groups are then presented, with constraints being placed on the polarised fraction, RM, spectral index, star formation rate, companion sources, and hydrodynamical state. One galaxy has a displaced peak of radio emission that is extended beyond the disk in comparison to the near-IR disk - suggesting the radio disturbance may be a consequence of ram pressure stripping. Linear polarisation is detected from the core of NGC 7552 at 610 MHz, while another three galaxies ESO 0353-G036, NGC 7590, and NGC 7599 are found to be unpolarised. An analysis of additional extended sources allows for an

  12. Experimental radio frequency link for Ka-band communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Conray, Martin J.; Saunders, Alan L.; Pope, Dale E.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental radio frequency link has been demonstrated to provide two-way communication between a remote user ground terminal and a ground-based Ka-band transponder. Bit-error-rate performance and radio frequency characteristics of the communication link were investigated.

  13. IN SITU AND SOIL DECONTAMINATION BY RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ radio frequency heating is performed by applying electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency band to an array of electrodes placed in bore holes drilled through the contaminated soil. he process removes organic contaminants from large volumes of soil by volatilization, ...

  14. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  15. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  16. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  17. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  18. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING - KAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radio frequency heating (RFH) is a process that uses electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency (RF) band to heat soil in situ, thereby potentially enhancing the performance of standard soil vapor extraction (SVE) technologies. An RFH system developed by KAI Technologies, I...

  19. Multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves inferred from high-resolution array analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Smith, Nathan; Mezentsev, Andrew; Watson, Robert; Astin, Ivan; Gaffet, Stéphane; Evans, Adrian; Rycroft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The low-frequency radio sky shows the locations of electromagnetic radio sources with a characteristic dilution of precision. Here we report a thorough high-resolution analysis of radio waves from low-frequency (˜20-150 kHz) radio communication transmitters which are recorded with a small aperture array of radio receivers during the day. It is found that the observed dilution of precision results from the array geometry of the radio receivers, a birefringent wave propagation, and the correlated multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves. The influence of the array geometry on the dilution of precision is reduced by taking into account the impulse response of the array. This procedure reveals for the very first time the splitting of one single radio source into two distinct source locations separated by ˜0.2°-1.9° which result from a birefringent wave propagation. The two locations are yet more clearly identified by using the polarity of the modulated wave number vectors of the radio waves. This polarity is also used to quantify the dilution of precision arising from correlated multipath propagation which is discriminated against wave number fluctuations arising from the timing accuracy of the radio receivers. It is found that ˜69% of the wave number variability is of natural origin and ˜31% originates from the timing accuracy of the receivers. The wave number variability from correlated multipath propagation results in a standard deviation ˜2-8% relative to the source location. This compact measurement of correlated multipath propagation is used to characterize the uncertainty of source locations in the radio sky. The identification of correlated multipath propagation strongly suggests the existence of very fast processes acting on time scales <1 ms in the D region ionosphere with physically meaningful effects on low-frequency radio wave propagation. This important result has implications for practical applications in that the observed multipath

  20. Radio Frequency Ablation for Primary Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of radio frequency ablation (RFA) compared with other treatments for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Ontario. Background Liver cancer is the fifth most common type of cancer globally, although it is most prevalent in Asia and Africa. The incidence of liver cancer has been increasing in the Western world, primarily because of an increased prevalence of hepatitis B and C. Data from Cancer Care Ontario from 1998 to 2002 suggest that the age-adjusted incidence of liver cancer in men rose slightly from 4.5 cases to 5.4 cases per 100,000 men. For women, the rates declined slightly, from 1.8 cases to 1.4 cases per 100,000 women during the same period. Most people who present with symptoms of liver cancer have a progressive form of the disease. The rates of survival in untreated patients in the early stage of the disease range from 50% to 82% at 1 year and 26% to 32% at 2 years. Patients with more advanced stages have survival rates ranging from 0% to 36% at 3 years. Surgical resection and transplantation are the procedures that have the best prognoses; however, only 15% to 20% of patients presenting with liver cancer are eligible for surgery. Resection is associated with a 50% survival rate at 5 years. The Technology: Radio Frequency Ablation RFA is a relatively new technique for the treatment of small liver cancers that cannot be treated with surgery. This technique applies alternating high-frequency electrical currents to the cancerous tissue. The intense heat leads to thermal coagulation that can kill the tumour. RFA is done under general or local anesthesia and can be done percutaneously (through the skin with a small needle), laparoscopically (microinvasively, using a small video camera), or intraoperatively. Percutaneous RFA is usually a day procedure. Methods The leading international

  1. Wideband micromachined microphones with radio frequency detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Sean Thomas

    There are many commercial, scientific, and military applications for miniature wideband acoustic sensors, including monitoring the condition or wear of equipment, collecting scientific data, and identifying and localizing military targets. The application of semiconductor micromachining techniques to sensor fabrication has the potential to transform acoustic sensing with small, reproducible, and inexpensive silicon-based microphones. However, such sensors usually suffer from limited bandwidth and from non-uniformities in their frequency response due to squeeze-film damping effects and narrow air gaps. Furthermore, they may be too fragile to be left unattended in a humid or dusty outdoor environment. Silicon microphones that incorporate capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer membranes overcome some of the drawbacks of conventional microphones. These micromachined membranes are small and robust enough to be vacuum-sealed, and can withstand atmospheric pressure and submersion in water. In addition, the membrane mechanical response is flat from dc up to ultrasonic frequencies, resulting in a wideband sensor for accurate spectral analysis of acoustic signals. However, a sensitive detection scheme is necessary to detect the small changes in membrane displacement that result from using smaller, stiffer membranes than do conventional microphones. We propose a radio frequency detection technique, in which the capacitive membranes are incorporated into a transmission line. Variations in membrane capacitance due to impinging sound pressure are sensed through the phase variations of a carrier signal that propagates along the line. This dissertation examines the design, fabrication, modeling, and experimental measurements of wideband micromachined microphones using sealed ultrasonic membranes and RF detection. Measurements of fabricated microphones demonstrate less than 0.5 dB variation in their output responses between 0.1 Hz to 100 kHz under electrostatic actuation of

  2. Assessment of Barotrauma Resulting from Rapid Decompression of Depth Acclimated Juvenile Chinook Salmon Bearing Radio Telemetry Transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Welch, Abigail E.; Stephenson, John R.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Theriault, Marie-Helene

    2007-09-06

    A multifactor study was conducted by Battelle for the US Army Corps of Engineers to assess the significance of the presence of a radio telemetry transmitter on the effects of rapid decompression from simulated hydro turbine passage on depth acclimated juvenile run-of-the-river Chinook salmon. Study factors were: (1) juvenile chinook salmon age;, subyearling or yearling, (2) radio transmitter present or absent, (3) three transmitter implantation factors: gastric, surgical, and no transmitter, and (4) four acclimation depth factors: 1, 10, 20, and 40 foot submergence equivalent absolute pressure, for a total of 48 unique treatments. Exposed fish were examined for changes in behavior, presence or absence of barotrauma injuries, and immediate or delayed mortality. Logistic models were used to test hypotheses that addressed study objectives. The presence of a radio transmitter was found to significantly increase the risk of barotrauma injury and mortality at exposure to rapid decompression. Gastric implantation was found to present a higher risk than surgical implantation. Fish were exposed within 48 hours of transmitter implantation so surgical incisions were not completely healed. The difference in results obtained for gastric and surgical implantation methods may be the result of study design and the results may have been different if tested fish had completely healed surgical wounds. However, the test did simulate the typical surgical-release time frame for in-river telemetry studies of fish survival so the results are probably representative for fish passing through a turbine shortly following release into the river. The finding of a significant difference in response to rapid decompression between fish bearing radio transmitters and those not implies a bias may exist in estimates of turbine passage survival obtained using radio telemetry. However, the rapid decompression (simulated turbine passage) conditions used for the study represented near worst case exposure

  3. Detection of radio frequency interference over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoxu

    The geostationary satellite television (TV) signals that are reflected off the ocean surfaces could enter the AMSR-E antenna, resulting in RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) contamination in AMSR-E 10.65 and 18.7 GHz channels. If not detected, the presence of RFI signals can result in false retrievals of oceanic environmental parameters (e.g., sea surface temperature, sea surface wind speed, rain water path) from microwave imaging radiance measurements. This study first examined the geometric relationship between the RFI source, geostationary TV satellite, and AMSR-E observation. Then a normalized Principal Component Analysis (NPCA) method is proposed and applied for RFI detection over oceans in Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR)-E observations. It is found that the RFI-contaminated observations on AMSR-E descending node at 10.65 and 18.7 GHz can be successively detected near coastal areas surrounding Europe and United States continents. The results yielded from the geometric examination at another angle verify those signals detected with NPCA. The proposed NPCA algorithm is applicable in an operational environment for fast data processing and data dissemination, and is different from earlier methods, which often require a priori information.

  4. Radio Frequency Plasma Applications for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W., Jr.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Goulding, R.H.; Ilin, A.V.; Jaeger, E.F.; Sparks, D.O.; Squire, J.P.

    1999-09-13

    Recent developments in solid-state radio frequency (RF) power technologies allow for the practical consideration of RF heated plasmas for space propulsion. These technologies permit the use of any electrical power source, de-couple the power and propellant sources, and allow for the effcient use of both the propellant mass and power. Effcient use of the propellant is obtained by expelling the rocket exhaust at the highest possible velocity, which can be orders of magnitude higher than those achieved in chemical rockets. Handling the hot plasma exhaust requires the use of magnetic nozzles, and the basic physics of ion detachment from the magnetic eld is discussed. The plasma can be generated by RF using helicon waves to heat electrons. Further direct heating of the ions helps to reduce the line radiation losses, and the magnetic geometry is tailored to allow ion cyclotron resonance heating. RF eld and ion trajectory calculations are presented to give a reasonably self-consistent picture of the ion acceleration process.

  5. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Jones, D. L.; Lanyi, G. E.; Lowe, S. T.; Naudet, C. J.; Resch, G. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Zhang, L. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    The ICRF forms the basis for all astrometry including use as the inertial coordinate system for navigating deep space missions. This frame was defined using S/X-band observations over the past 20+ years. In January 2002, the VLBA approved our proposal for observing time to extend the ICRF to K-band (24 GHz) and Q-band (43 GHz). The first step will be observations at K- and Q-bands on a subset of ICRF sources. Eventually, K- and Q-band multi-epoch observations will be used to estimate positions, flux density and source structure for a large fraction of the current S/X-band ICRF source list. This work will benefit the radio astronomy community by extending the VLBA calibrator list at these bands. In the longer term, we would also like to extend the ICRF to Ka-band (32 GHz). A celestial reference frame will be needed at this frequency to support deep space navigation. A navigation demonstration is being considered for NASA's Mars 2005 mission. The initial K- and Q-band work will serve to identify candidate sources at Ka-band for use with that mission.

  6. Directional Radio-Frequency Identification Tag Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Taylor, John D.; Henderson, John J.

    2004-01-01

    A directional radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag reader has been designed to facilitate finding a specific object among many objects in a crowded room. The device could be an adjunct to an electronic inventory system that tracks RFID-tagged objects as they move through reader-equipped doorways. Whereas commercial RFID-tag readers do not measure directions to tagged objects, the device is equipped with a phased-array antenna and a received signal-strength indicator (RSSI) circuit for measuring direction. At the beginning of operation, it is set to address only the RFID tag of interest. It then continuously transmits a signal to interrogate that tag while varying the radiation pattern of the antenna. It identifies the direction to the tag as the radiation pattern direction of peak strength of the signal returned by the tag. An approximate distance to the tag is calculated from the peak signal strength. The direction and distance can be displayed on a screen. A prototype containing a Yagi antenna was found to be capable of detecting a 915.5-MHz tag at a distance of approximately equal to 15 ft (approximately equal to 4.6 m).

  7. Method and apparatus for radio frequency ceramic sintering

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Daniel J.; Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.

    1993-01-01

    Radio frequency energy is used to sinter ceramic materials. A coaxial waveguide resonator produces a TEM mode wave which generates a high field capacitive region in which a sample of the ceramic material is located. Frequency of the power source is kept in the range of radio frequency, and preferably between 60-80 MHz. An alternative embodiment provides a tunable radio frequency circuit which includes a series input capacitor and a parallel capacitor, with the sintered ceramic connected by an inductive lead. This arrangement permits matching of impedance over a wide range of dielectric constants, ceramic volumes, and loss tangents.

  8. Method and apparatus for radio frequency ceramic sintering

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, D.J.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1993-11-30

    Radio frequency energy is used to sinter ceramic materials. A coaxial waveguide resonator produces a TEM mode wave which generates a high field capacitive region in which a sample of the ceramic material is located. Frequency of the power source is kept in the range of radio frequency, and preferably between 60-80 MHz. An alternative embodiment provides a tunable radio frequency circuit which includes a series input capacitor and a parallel capacitor, with the sintered ceramic connected by an inductive lead. This arrangement permits matching of impedance over a wide range of dielectric constants, ceramic volumes, and loss tangents. 6 figures.

  9. Effects of radio-transmitter methods on pileated woodpeckers: an improved technique for large woodpeckers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We captured and radio-marked 64 Dryocopus pileatus (Pileated Woodpecker)in bottomland hardwood forests from February 2007 to June 2010. At least 12 (35.3%) of the first 34 birds radio-tagged died within 43 d of capture (x¯ = 8.2 d). Thus, we adjusted our radio-attachment techniques adaptively from a...

  10. Dynamics Of Ions In A Radio-Frequency Quadrupole Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Williams, Angelyn P.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1994-01-01

    Report describes computer-simulation study of motions of various numbers of ions in Paul trap. Study part of continuing effort to understand motions of trapped charged particles (atoms, ions, molecules, or dust particles). Motions characterized in terms of heating by radio-frequency fields, formation of crystallike structures in cold clouds of trapped particles, and other phenomena important in operation of radio-frequency traps in frequency standards.

  11. Deposition of a conductive near-infrared cutoff filter by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Hyu; Yoo, Kwang-Lim; Kim, Nam-Young; Hwangbo, Chang Kwon

    2002-06-01

    We have designed a conductive near-infrared (NIR) cutoff filter for display application, i.e., a modified low-emissivity filter based on the three periods of the basic design of [TiO2[Ti]Ag] TiO2] upon a glass substrate and investigated the optical, structural, chemical, and electrical properties of the conductive NIR cutoff filter prepared by a radio frequency magnetron sputtering system. The results show that the average transmittance is 61.1% in the visible, that the transmittance in the NIR is less than 6.6%, and that the sheet resistance and emissivity are 0.9 ohms/square (where square stands for a square film) and 0.012, respectively, suggesting that the conductive NIR cutoff filter can be employed as a shield against the hazard of electromagnetic waves as well as to cut off the NIR. PMID:12064381

  12. Deposition of transparent, conductive tin oxide films on glass using a radio-frequency induction heater.

    PubMed

    Solano, I; Schwoebel, P R

    2009-12-01

    Tin oxide films are often used as transparent, conductive coatings on glass in the scientific research setting. The standard approach of depositing these films in an oven leads to poor visibility of the substrate and thus inhibits the ready formation of uniform, low resistivity films. In this note we describe a simple tin oxide film deposition technique using a radio-frequency induction heater that allows for in situ visualization of the deposition process and resulting film. Uniform films having resistivities as low as 2 mohm cm with transmittances of approximately 85% in the visible light spectrum were readily deposited. PMID:20059179

  13. High-power radio-frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.; Miller, H.W.

    1981-12-30

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  14. 78 FR 19311 - Certain Radio Frequency Identification (“RFID”) Products And Components Thereof; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... COMMISSION Certain Radio Frequency Identification (``RFID'') Products And Components Thereof; Institution of... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain radio frequency identification... sale within the United States after importation of certain radio frequency identification...

  15. Parallel PWMs Based Fully Digital Transmitter with Wide Carrier Frequency Range

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Kun; Zhou, Wenbiao; Zhang, Yanjun; Liu, Dake

    2013-01-01

    The carrier-frequency (CF) and intermediate-frequency (IF) pulse-width modulators (PWMs) based on delay lines are proposed, where baseband signals are conveyed by both positions and pulse widths or densities of the carrier clock. By combining IF-PWM and precorrected CF-PWM, a fully digital transmitter with unit-delay autocalibration is implemented in 180 nm CMOS for high reconfiguration. The proposed architecture achieves wide CF range of 2 M–1 GHz, high power efficiency of 70%, and low error vector magnitude (EVM) of 3%, with spectrum purity of 20 dB optimized in comparison to the existing designs. PMID:24223503

  16. Ion cyclotron radio frequency systems and performance on the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade (TMX-U)

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.L.; Molvik, A.W.; Cummins, W.F.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Henderson, A.L.; Karsner, P.G.; Scofield, D.W.; Brooksby, C.A.

    1983-12-01

    High power ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) systems are now gaining greater attention than before as prime driver ion heating systems. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has installed a 200 kW high frequency (HF) transmitter system on its Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). This paper describes the system, antenna, controls, and monitoring apparatus. The transmitter operates into a high Q antenna installed in the central cell region of the experiment. It incorporates a dual-port feedback system to automatically adjust the transmitter's output power and allow the maximum consistent with the plasma loading of the antenna. Special techniques have been used to measure, in real-time, the dynamically changing loading values presented by the plasma. From the measurements, the antenna impedance can be optimized for specified plasma density.

  17. Commissioning of helium injector for coupled radio frequency quadrupole and separated function radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Shixiang Chen, Jia; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Wenlong; Gao, Shuli; Wang, Zhi; Luo, Yuting; Guo, Zhiyu; Zhang, Ailing; Chen, Jia'er; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049

    2014-02-15

    A project to study a new type of acceleration structure has been launched at Peking University, in which a traditional radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a separated function radio frequency quadrupole are coupled in one cavity to accelerate the He+ beam. A helium injector for this project is developed. The injector consists of a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a 1.16 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT). The commissioning of this injector was carried out and an onsite test was held in June 2013. A 14 mA He+ beam with the energy of 30 keV has been delivered to the end of the LEBT, where a diaphragm with the diameter of 7 mm is located. The position of the diaphragm corresponds to the entrance of the RFQ electrodes. The beam emittance and fraction were measured after the 7 mm diaphragm. Its rms emittance is about 0.14 π mm mrad and the fraction of He+ is about 99%.

  18. Solar system radio astronomy at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    The planetary radio-astronomy observations obtained with the two Voyager spacecraft since their launch in 1977 are briefly characterized and illustrated with graphs, diagrams, and sample spectra. Topics addressed include the spacecraft designs and trajectories, the wavelength coverage of the radio instruments, the Io-controlled LF emission of Jupiter, the solar-wind effect on the Saturn kilometric radiation, the Saturn electrostatic discharges, and the use of the clocklike feature of the Uranus emission to measure the planet's rotation period.

  19. Energy harvesting from radio frequency propagation using piezoelectric cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Alshareef, H. N.

    2012-02-01

    This work reports an induced strain in a piezoelectric cantilever due to radio frequency signal propagation. The piezoelectric actuator is coupled to radio frequency (RF) line through a gap of 0.25 mm. When a voltage signal of 10 Vpp propagates in the line it sets an alternating current in the actuator electrodes. This flowing current drives the piezoelectric cantilever to mechanical movement, especially when the frequency of the RF signal matches the mechanical resonant frequency of the cantilever. Output voltage signals versus frequency for both mechanical vibrational and RF signal excitations have been measured using different loads.

  20. Assessment of gaseous CO2 and AQUI-S as anesthetics when surgically implanting radio transmitters into cutthroat trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanderson, T.B.; Hubert, W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) and CO2 are anesthetics that can be legally used in fisheries work in the United States, but they are limited in their field applications. A mandatory 21-d withdrawal period is required for fish exposed to MS-222. Carbon dioxide is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but it is a "low regulatory priority drug" that can be used legally for fish anesthesia. However, stressful induction and lengthy recovery times have been associated with CO2. AQUI-S is a clove oil derivative that has the potential to become an approved anesthetic without the limitations of MS-222 or CO2. We compared the efficacy of CO2 with that of AQUI-S when surgically implanting radio transmitters into cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii. A 20% survival rate was observed when CO2 was used in combination with silk sutures, but a 100% survival rate was observed when CO2 was used in combination with surgical staples to shorten the duration of the surgical procedure. A 100% survival rate was observed when AQUI-S was used in combination with either silk sutures or surgical staples. Carbon dioxide in combination with surgical staples seemed to provide a reasonable option when surgically implanting radio transmitters into cutthroat trout, but AQUI-S may be the preferred anesthesia because high pH and dissolved oxygen levels and low free-CO2 concentrations are maintained during surgical procedures.

  1. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING - IIT RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radio frequency heating (RFH) is a process that uses electromagnetic energy generated by radio waves to heat soil in situ, thereby potentially enhancing the performance of standard soil vapor extraction (SVE) technologies. An RFH system developed by the IIT Research Institute ...

  2. Solar observations with a low frequency radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myserlis, I.; Seiradakis, J.; Dogramatzidis, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have set up a low frequency radio monitoring station for solar bursts at the Observatory of the Aristotle University in Thessaloniki. The station consists of a dual dipole phased array, a radio receiver and a dedicated computer with the necessary software installed. The constructed radio receiver is based on NASA's Radio Jove project. It operates continuously, since July 2010, at 20.1 MHz (close to the long-wavelength ionospheric cut-off of the radio window) with a narrow bandwidth (~5 kHz). The system is properly calibrated, so that the recorded data are expressed in antenna temperature. Despite the high interference level of an urban region like Thessaloniki (strong broadcasting shortwave radio stations, periodic experimental signals, CBs, etc), we have detected several low frequency solar radio bursts and correlated them with solar flares, X-ray events and other low frequency solar observations. The received signal is monitored in ordinary ASCII format and as audio signal, in order to investigate and exclude man-made radio interference. In order to exclude narrow band interference and calculate the spectral indices of the observed events, a second monitoring station, working at 36 MHz, is under construction at the village of Nikiforos near the town of Drama, about 130 km away of Thessaloniki. Finally, we plan to construct a third monitoring station at 58 MHz, in Thessaloniki. This frequency was revealed to be relatively free of interference, after a thorough investigation of the region.

  3. Radio frequency overview of the high explosive radio telemetry project

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.; Dimsdle, J.; Rich, D.; Smith, F.

    1998-12-31

    High explosive radio telemetry (HERT) is a project that is being developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies. The ultimate goal is to develop a small, modular telemetry system capable of high-speed detection of explosive events, with an accuracy on the order of 10 nanoseconds. The reliable telemetry of this data, from a high-speed missile trajectory, is a very challenging opportunity. All captured data must be transmitted in less than 20 microseconds of time duration. This requires a high bits/Hertz microwave telemetry modulation code to insure transmission of the data with the limited time interval available.

  4. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  5. An Investigation of Radio Frequency Auditory Training Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matkin, Noel D.; Olsen, Wayne

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated were the performances of eight radio frequency systems by means of a measurement procedure said to be applicable to the evaluation of auditory training systems in classrooms for the aurally handicapped. (DB)

  6. Searching for Low-Frequency Radio Transients from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai-Wei, Jr.; Cutchin, Sean; Kothari, Manthan; Schmitt, Christian; Kavic, Michael; Simonetti, John

    2011-10-01

    Supernovae events may be accompanied by prompt emission of a low-frequency electromagnetic transient. These transient events are created by the interaction of a shock wave of charged particles created by SN core-collapse with a stars ambient magnetic field. Such events can be detected in low-frequency radio array. Here we discuss an ongoing search for such events using two radio arrays: the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA).

  7. Solar radio astronomy at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, George A.

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of solar radio emissions at decametric to kilometric wavelengths are reviewed. Special attention is given to the radiation of the quiet sun at several metric and decametric wavelengths and to nonthermal radiation from the active sun, including radio bursts of type III (electron beams), type-III bursts from behind the sun, storms of type III bursts, the flare-associated radio bursts, type II bursts (shock waves), and shock-associated bursts. It is pointed out that almost no observations have been made so far of solar radiation between about 20 MHz and about 2 MHz. Below about 2 MHz, dynamic spectra of flux densities of solar burst have been recorded in space and observations were made of the directions of centroids and characteristic sizes of the emitting sources.

  8. New method for recovering weak coherent radio frequency signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.

    1985-03-01

    A single radio frequency lock-in amplifier reduces broadband noise, but not rf pickup of the same frequency as the signal. If this pickup noise is at least 14 dB stronger than broadband noise, after both have passed through the lock-in, then the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved by applying the lock-in output to a second, low frequency lock-in which is synchronized to an independent modulation of the signal. Weak coherent radio frequency signals buried in both rf pickup and broadband nise can be recovered by using this double lock-in method, as demonstrated in a plasma diagnostics experiment.

  9. Photonic radio frequency phase-shift amplification by radio frequency interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ayun, Moshe Ben; Schwarzbaum, Arye; Rosenberg, Seva; Pinchas, Monika; Sternklar, Shmuel

    2015-11-01

    We present a new technique for radio frequency (RF) phase-shift amplification based on RF interferometry and demonstrate it in an optical system. A striking feature of this amplifier is that the input phase noise is not amplified together with the input phase signal, so the phase sensitivity improves with higher phase amplification. We also predict that in the case of correlated amplitude noise, the sensitivity is not affected by the amplitude noise. With 600 MHz of modulated light and a phase amplification of 100, we demonstrate a phase resolution of 0.2 mrad, giving a distance resolution of 8 μm. We postulate that nanometric distance resolution can be achieved with sub-gigahertz modulation. PMID:26512469

  10. An overview of DREV's activities on pulsed CO2 laser transmitters: Frequency stability and lifetime aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruickshank, James; Pace, Paul; Mathieu, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    After introducing the desired features in a transmitter for laser radar applications, the output characteristics of several configurations of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers are reviewed. Based on work carried out at the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV), output pulses are examined from short cavity lasers, CW-TEA hybrid lasers, and amplifiers for low power pulses. It is concluded that the technique of injecting a low-power laser beam into a TEA laser resonator with Gaussian reflectivity mirrors should be investigated because it appears well adapted to producing high energy, single mode, low chirp pulses. Finally, a brief report on tests carried out on catalysts composed of stannic oxide and noble metals demonstrates the potential of these catalysts, operating at close to room temperature, to provide complete closed-cycle laser operation.

  11. Time accuracy of a radio frequency identification patient tracking system for recording operating room timestamps.

    PubMed

    Marjamaa, Riitta A; Torkki, Paulus M; Torkki, Markus I; Kirvelä, Olli A

    2006-04-01

    A patient tracking system is a promising tool for managing patient flow and improving efficiency in the operating room. Wireless location systems, using infrared or radio frequency transmitters, can automatically timestamp key events, thereby decreasing the need for manual data input. In this study, we measured the accuracy and precision of automatically documented timestamps compared with manual recording. Each patient scheduled for urgent surgery was given an active radio frequency/infrared transmitter. The prototype software tracked the patient throughout the perioperative process, automatically documenting the timestamps. Both automatic and traditional data entry were compared with the reference data. The absolute value of median error was 64% smaller (P < 0.01), and the average quartile deviation of error was 69% smaller in automatic documentation. The average delay between an activity and the documentation was 80 seconds in automatic documentation and 735 seconds in manual documentation. Both the accuracy and the precision were better in automatic documentation and the data were immediately available. Automatic documentation with the Indoor Positioning System can help in managing patient flow and in increasing transparency with faster availability and better accuracy of data. PMID:16551921

  12. Supplying the power requirements to a sensor network using radio frequency power transfer.

    PubMed

    Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; Cooray, Francis; Smart, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Wireless power transmission is a method of supplying power to small electronic devices when there is no wired connection. One way to increase the range of these systems is to use a directional transmitting antenna, the problem with this approach is that power can only be transmitted through a narrow beam and directly forward, requiring the transmitter to always be aligned with the sensor node position. The work outlined in this article describes the design and testing of an autonomous radio frequency power transfer system that is capable of rotating the base transmitter to track the position of sensor nodes and transferring power to that sensor node. The system's base station monitors the node's energy levels and forms a charge queue to plan charging order and maintain energy levels of the nodes. Results show a radio frequency harvesting circuit with a measured S11 value of -31.5 dB and a conversion efficiency of 39.1%. Simulation and experimentation verified the level of power transfer and efficiency. The results of this work show a small network of three nodes with different storage types powered by a central base node. PMID:23012506

  13. Low-Frequency Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency radio phenomena are due to the presence of nonthermal electrons in the interplanetary (IP) medium. Understanding these phenomena is important in characterizing the space environment near Earth and other destinations in the solar system. Substantial progress has been made in the past two decades, because of the continuous and uniform data sets available from space-based radio and white-light instrumentation. This paper highlights some recent results obtained on IP radio phenomena. In particular, the source of type IV radio bursts, the behavior of type III storms, shock propagation in the IP medium, and the solar-cycle variation of type II radio bursts are considered. All these phenomena are closely related to solar eruptions and active region evolution. The results presented were obtained by combining data from the Wind and SOHO missions.

  14. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803 Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization. (a) Except...

  15. 47 CFR 2.805 - Operation of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of radio frequency devices prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.805 Operation of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization. (a) General rule....

  16. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803 Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization. (a) Except...

  17. 47 CFR 2.805 - Operation of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of radio frequency products prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.805 Operation of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization. (a) General...

  18. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803 Marketing of radio frequency devices prior to equipment authorization. (a) Except...

  19. 47 CFR 2.803 - Marketing of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Marketing of radio frequency products prior to... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Marketing of Radio-frequency Devices § 2.803 Marketing of radio frequency products prior to equipment authorization. (a) Marketing,...

  20. Magnetoreception in birds: the effect of radio-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Thalau, Peter; Gehring, Dennis; Nießner, Christine; Ritz, Thorsten; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    The avian magnetic compass, probably based on radical pair processes, works only in a narrow functional window around the local field strength, with cryptochrome 1a as most likely receptor molecule. Radio-frequency fields in the MHz range have been shown to disrupt the birds' orientation, yet the nature of this interference is still unclear. In an immuno-histological study, we tested whether the radio-frequency fields interfere with the photoreduction of cryptochrome, but this does not seem to be the case. In behavioural studies, birds were not able to adjust to radio-frequency fields like they are able to adjust to static fields outside the normal functional range: neither a 2-h pre-exposure in a 7.0 MHz field, 480 nT, nor a 7-h pre-exposure in a 1.315 MHz field, 15 nT, allowed the birds to regain their orientation ability. This inability to adjust to radio-frequency fields suggests that these fields interfere directly with the primary processes of magnetoreception and therefore disable the avian compass as long as they are present. They do not have lasting adverse after-effects, however, as birds immediately after exposure to a radio-frequency field were able to orient in the local geomagnetic field. PMID:25540238

  1. Magnetoreception in birds: the effect of radio-frequency fields

    PubMed Central

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Thalau, Peter; Gehring, Dennis; Nießner, Christine; Ritz, Thorsten; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The avian magnetic compass, probably based on radical pair processes, works only in a narrow functional window around the local field strength, with cryptochrome 1a as most likely receptor molecule. Radio-frequency fields in the MHz range have been shown to disrupt the birds' orientation, yet the nature of this interference is still unclear. In an immuno-histological study, we tested whether the radio-frequency fields interfere with the photoreduction of cryptochrome, but this does not seem to be the case. In behavioural studies, birds were not able to adjust to radio-frequency fields like they are able to adjust to static fields outside the normal functional range: neither a 2-h pre-exposure in a 7.0 MHz field, 480 nT, nor a 7-h pre-exposure in a 1.315 MHz field, 15 nT, allowed the birds to regain their orientation ability. This inability to adjust to radio-frequency fields suggests that these fields interfere directly with the primary processes of magnetoreception and therefore disable the avian compass as long as they are present. They do not have lasting adverse after-effects, however, as birds immediately after exposure to a radio-frequency field were able to orient in the local geomagnetic field. PMID:25540238

  2. Characteristics of Radio-Frequency Circuits Utilizing Ferroelectric Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Michael; Gui, Xiao; MacLeod, Todd; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    Ferroelectric capacitors, most commonly used in memory circuits and variable components, were studied in simple analog radio-frequency circuits such as the RLC resonator and Colpitts oscillator. The goal was to characterize the RF circuits in terms of frequency of oscillation, gain, etc, using ferroelectric capacitors. Frequencies of oscillation of both circuits were measured and studied a more accurate resonant frequency can be obtained using the ferroelectric capacitors. Many experiments were conducted and data collected. A model to simulate the experimental results will be developed. Discrepancies in gain and frequency in these RF circuits when conventional capacitors are replaced with ferroelectric ones were studied. These results will enable circuit designers to anticipate the effects of using ferroelectric components in their radio- frequency applications.

  3. Progress on radio frequency auxiliary heating system designs in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, M.; Bosia, G.; Elio, F.

    1996-09-01

    ITER will require over 100 MW of auxiliary power for heating, on- and off-axis current drive, accessing the H-mode, and plasma shut-down. The Electron Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ECRF) and Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) are two forms of Radio Frequency (RF) auxiliary power being developed for these applications. Design concepts for both the ECRF and ICRF systems are presented, key features and critical design issues are discussed, and projected performances outlined.

  4. Radio frequency interference measurements in Indonesia. A survey to establish a radio astronomy observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Taufiq; Munir, Achmad; Dermawan, Budi; Jaelani, Anton Timur; Léon, Stéphane; Nugroho, Dading Hadi; Suksmono, Andriyan Bayu; Mahasena, Putra; Premadi, Premana Wardayanti; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Kunjaya, Chatief; Dupe, Zadrach Ledoufij; Brahmantyo, Budi; Mandey, Denny; Yusuf, Muhammad; Tri Wulandari, Hesti Retno; Arief, Falahuddin; Irfan, Muhammad; Puri Jatmiko, Agus Triono; Akbar, Evan Irawan; Sianturi, Hery Leo; Tanesib, Jehunias Leonidas; Warsito, Ali; Utama, Judhistira Aria

    2014-02-01

    We report the first measurements of radio frequency spectrum occupancy performed at sites aimed to host the future radio astronomy observatory in Indonesia. The survey is intended to obtain the radio frequency interference (RFI) environment in a spectral range from low frequency 10 MHz up to 8 GHz. The measurements permit the identification of the spectral occupancy over those selected sites in reference to the allocated radio spectrum in Indonesia. The sites are in close proximity to Australia, the future host of Square Kilometre Array (SKA) at low frequency. Therefore, the survey was deliberately made to approximately adhere the SKA protocol for RFI measurements, but with lower sensitivity. The RFI environment at Bosscha Observatory in Lembang was also measured for comparison. Within the sensitivity limit of the measurement equipment, it is found that a location called Fatumonas in the surrounding of Mount Timau in West Timor has very low level of RFI, with a total spectrum occupancy in this measured frequency range being about 1 %, mostly found at low frequency below 20 MHz. More detailed measurements as well as a strategy for a radio quiet zone must be implemented in the near future.

  5. Nonreciprocal Radio Frequency Transduction in a Parametric Mechanical Artificial Lattice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pu; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Jingwei; Tian, Tian; Yin, Peiran; Duan, Changkui; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Generating nonreciprocal radio frequency transduction plays important roles in a wide range of research and applications, and an aspiration is to integrate this functionality into microcircuits without introducing a magnetic field, which, however, remains challenging. By designing a 1D artificial lattice structure with a neighbor interaction engineered parametrically, we predicted a nonreciprocity transduction with a large unidirectionality. We then experimentally demonstrated the phenomenon on a nanoelectromechanical chip fabricated by conventional complementary metal-silicon processing. A unidirectionality with isolation as high as 24 dB is achieved, and several different transduction schemes are realized by programing the control voltage topology. Apart from being used as a radio frequency isolator, the system provides a way to build a practical on-chip programmable device for broad research and applications in the radio frequency domain. PMID:27419591

  6. Nonreciprocal Radio Frequency Transduction in a Parametric Mechanical Artificial Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pu; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Jingwei; Tian, Tian; Yin, Peiran; Duan, Changkui; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Generating nonreciprocal radio frequency transduction plays important roles in a wide range of research and applications, and an aspiration is to integrate this functionality into microcircuits without introducing a magnetic field, which, however, remains challenging. By designing a 1D artificial lattice structure with a neighbor interaction engineered parametrically, we predicted a nonreciprocity transduction with a large unidirectionality. We then experimentally demonstrated the phenomenon on a nanoelectromechanical chip fabricated by conventional complementary metal-silicon processing. A unidirectionality with isolation as high as 24 dB is achieved, and several different transduction schemes are realized by programing the control voltage topology. Apart from being used as a radio frequency isolator, the system provides a way to build a practical on-chip programmable device for broad research and applications in the radio frequency domain.

  7. Dual radio frequency plasma source: Understanding via electrical asymmetry effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-04-21

    On the basis of the global model, the influences of driving voltage and frequency on electron heating in geometrically symmetrical dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma have been investigated. Consistent with the experimental and simulation results, non-monotonic behavior of dc self bias and plasma heating with increasing high frequency is observed. In addition to the local maxima of plasma parameters for the integer values of the ratio between the frequencies ({xi}), ourstudies also predict local maxima for odd integer values of 2{xi} as a consequence of the electrical asymmetry effect produced by dual frequency voltage sources.

  8. Methods, Systems and Apparatuses for Radio Frequency Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Brown, Dewey T. (Inventor); Byerly, Diane (Inventor); Boose, Haley C. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system for radio frequency identification (RFID) includes an enclosure defining an interior region interior to the enclosure, and a feed for generating an electromagnetic field in the interior region in response to a signal received from an RFID reader via a radio frequency (RF) transmission line and, in response to the electromagnetic field, receiving a signal from an RFID sensor attached to an item in the interior region. The structure of the enclosure may be conductive and may include a metamaterial portion, an electromagnetically absorbing portion, or a wall extending in the interior region. Related apparatuses and methods for performing RFID are provided.

  9. SYNCHROTRON RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Plotkin, M.; Raka, E.C.; Snyder, H.S.

    1963-05-01

    A system for canceling varying phase changes introduced by connecting cables and control equipment in an alternating gradient synchrotron is presented. In a specific synchrotron embodiment twelve spaced accelerating stations for the proton bunches are utilized. In order to ensure that the protons receive their boost or kick at the exact instant necessary it is necessary to compensate for phase changes occurring in the r-f circuitry over the wide range of frequencies dictated by the accelerated velocities of the proton bunches. A constant beat frequency is utilized to transfer the r-f control signals through the cables and control equipment to render the phase shift constant and readily compensable. (AEC)

  10. Site selection for a radio astronomy observatory in Turkey: atmospherical, meteorological, and radio frequency analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küçük, Ibrahim; Üler, Ipek; Öz, Şükriye; Onay, Sedat; Özdemir, Ali Rıza; Gülşen, Mehmet; Sarıkaya, Mikail; Dag˜Tekin, Nazlı Derya; Özeren, Ferhat Fikri

    2012-03-01

    Selecting the future site for a large Turkish radio telescope is a key issue. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is now in the stage of construction at a site near Karaman City, in Turkey. A single-dish parabolic radio antenna of 30-40 m will be installed near a building that will contain offices, laboratories, and living accommodations. After a systematic survey of atmospheric, meteorological, and radio frequency interference (RFI) analyses, site selection studies were performed in a predetermined location in Turkey during 2007 and 2008. In this paper, we described the experimental procedure and the RFI measurements on our potential candidate's sites in Turkey, covering the frequency band from 1 to 40 GHz.

  11. Radio frequency noise from clinical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Burke, B; Lamey, M; Rathee, S; Murray, B; Fallone, B G

    2009-04-21

    There is a great deal of interest in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), and to advance the state of IGRT, an integrated linear accelerator-magnetic resonance (linac-MR) system has been proposed. Knowledge of the radiofrequency (RF) emissions near a linac is important for the design of appropriate RF shielding to facilitate the successful integration of these two devices. The frequency spectra of both electric and magnetic fields of RF emission are measured using commercially available measurement probes near the treatment couch in three clinical linac vaults with distinct physical layouts. The magnitude spectrum of the RF power emitted from these three linacs is then estimated. The electric field spectrum was also measured at several distances from the linac modulator in order to assess the effects of variations in spatial location in the treatment vault. A large fraction of RF power is emitted at frequencies below 5 MHz. However, the measured RF power at the Larmor frequency (8.5 MHz) of the proposed 0.2 T MR in the linac-MR (0.4-14.6 microW m(-2)) is still large enough to cause artifacts in MR images. Magnetron-based linacs generally emit much larger RF power than klystron-based linacs. In the frequency range of 1-50 MHz, only slight variation in the measured electric field is observed as a function of measurement position. This study suggests that the RF emissions are strong enough to cause image artifacts in MRI systems. PMID:19336849

  12. Radio frequency interference at Jodrell Bank Observatory within the protected 21 cm band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1989-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) will provide one of the most difficult challenges to systematic Searches for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) at microwave frequencies. The SETI-specific equipment is being optimized for the detection of signals generated by a technology rather than those generated by natural processes in the universe. If this equipment performs as expected, then it will inevitably detect many signals originating from terrestrial technology. If these terrestrial signals are too numerous and/or strong, the equipment will effectively be blinded to the (presumably) weaker extraterrestrial signals being sought. It is very difficult to assess how much of a problem RFI will actually represent to future observations, without employing the equipment and beginning the search. In 1983 a very high resolution spectrometer was placed at the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories at Jodrell Bank, England. This equipment permitted an investigation of the interference environment at Jodrell Bank, at that epoch, and at frequencies within the 21 cm band. This band was chosen because it has long been "protected" by international agreement; no transmitters should have been operating at those frequencies. The data collected at Jodrell Bank were expected to serve as a "best case" interference scenario and provide the minimum design requirements for SETI equipment that must function in the real and noisy environment. This paper describes the data collection and analysis along with some preliminary conclusions concerning the nature of the interference environment at Jodrell Bank.

  13. Radio frequency interference at Jodrell Bank Observatory within the protected 21 cm band.

    PubMed

    Tarter, J

    1989-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) will provide one of the most difficult challenges to systematic Searches for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) at microwave frequencies. The SETI-specific equipment is being optimized for the detection of signals generated by a technology rather than those generated by natural processes in the universe. If this equipment performs as expected, then it will inevitably detect many signals originating from terrestrial technology. If these terrestrial signals are too numerous and/or strong, the equipment will effectively be blinded to the (presumably) weaker extraterrestrial signals being sought. It is very difficult to assess how much of a problem RFI will actually represent to future observations, without employing the equipment and beginning the search. In 1983 a very high resolution spectrometer was placed at the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories at Jodrell Bank, England. This equipment permitted an investigation of the interference environment at Jodrell Bank, at that epoch, and at frequencies within the 21 cm band. This band was chosen because it has long been "protected" by international agreement; no transmitters should have been operating at those frequencies. The data collected at Jodrell Bank were expected to serve as a "best case" interference scenario and provide the minimum design requirements for SETI equipment that must function in the real and noisy environment. This paper describes the data collection and analysis along with some preliminary conclusions concerning the nature of the interference environment at Jodrell Bank. PMID:11537747

  14. Mapping the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex in Radio Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Lemly, C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to create a large-scale intensity map of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex at a radio frequency of 1420 MHz. A mapping frequency of 1420 MHz was chosen because neutral hydrogen, which is the primary component of the Orion Molecular Complex, naturally emits radio waves at this frequency. The radio spectral data for this project were gathered using a 4.6-m radio telescope whose spectrometer was tuned to 1420 MHz and whose beam width was 2.7 degrees. The map created for this project consisted of an eight-by-eight grid centered on M42 spanning 21.6 degrees per side. The grid consisted of 64 individual squares spanning 2.7 degrees per side (corresponding to the beam width of the telescope). Radio spectra were recorded for each of these individual squares at an IF gain of 18. Each spectrum consisted of intensity on an arbitrary scale from 0 to 10 plotted as a function frequencies ranging from -400 kHz to +100 kHz around the origin of 1420 MHz. The data from all 64 radio spectra were imported into Wolfram Alpha, which was used to fit Gaussian functions to the data. The peak intensity and the frequency at which this peak intensity occurs could then be extracted from the Gaussian functions. Other helpful quantities that could be calculated from the Gaussian functions include flux (integral of Gaussian function over frequency range), average value of intensity (flux integral divided by frequency range), and half maximum of intensity. Because all of the radio spectra were redshifted, the velocities of the hydrogen gas clouds of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex could be calculated using the Doppler equation. The data extracted from the Gaussian functions were then imported into Mathcad to create 2D grayscale maps with right ascension (RA) on the x-axis, declination on the y-axis, and intensity (or flux, etc.) represented on a scale from black to white (with white representing the highest intensities). These 2D maps were then imported

  15. Low frequency radio synthesis imaging of the galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Michael Evans

    2005-11-01

    The Very Large Array radio interferometer has been equipped with new receivers to allow observations at 330 and 74 MHz, frequencies much lower than were previously possible with this instrument. Though the VLA dishes are not optimal for working at these frequencies, the system is successful and regular observations are now taken at these frequencies. However, new data analysis techniques are required to work at these frequencies. The technique of self- calibration, used to remove small atmospheric effects at higher frequencies, has been adapted to compensate for ionospheric turbulence in much the same way that adaptive optics is used in the optical regime. Faceted imaging techniques are required to compensate for the noncoplanar image distortion that affects the system due to the wide fields of view at these frequencies (~2.3° at 330 MHz and ~11° at 74 MHz). Furthermore, radio frequency interference is a much larger problem at these frequencies than in higher frequencies and novel approaches to its mitigation are required. These new techniques and new system are allowing for imaging of the radio sky at sensitivities and resolutions orders of magnitude higher than were possible with the low frequency systems of decades past. In this work I discuss the advancements in low frequency data techniques required to make high resolution, high sensitivity, large field of view measurements with the new Very Large Array low frequency system and then detail the results of turning this new system and techniques on the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. At 330 MHz I image the Galactic center region with roughly 10 inches resolution and 1.6 mJy beam -1 sensitivity. New Galactic center nonthermal filaments, new pulsar candidates, and the lowest frequency detection to date of the radio source associated with our Galaxy's central massive black hole result. At 74 MHz I image a region of the sky roughly 40° x 6° with, ~10 feet resolution. I use the high opacity of H II regions at 74

  16. Analysis of Jovian low frequency radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The density of ions in the Io plasma torus and the scattering of these ions by low frequency electromagnetic emissions detected by Voyager 1 were studied. The ion density profile was investigated using whistler dispersion measurements provided by the Voyager plasma instrument. The scale height and absolute density of H+ ions in the vicinity of the plasma torus were determined by combining the measured plasma densities with the whistler dispersion measurements. A theoretical analysis of the modes of propagation of low frequency electromagnetic emissions in the torus was undertaken. Polarization reversal effects and rough estimates of the ion diffusion coefficient were utilized. Numerical evaluation of the ion diffusion coefficients in the torus were made using the observed Voyager 1 wave intensities. Results show that the observed wave intensities produce significant ion diffusion effects in the ion torus.

  17. The Use of a Solid State Analog Television Transmitter as a Superconducting Electron Gun Power Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Kulpin, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    A solid state analog television transmitter designed for 200 MHz operation is being commissioned as a radio frequency power amplifier on the Wisconsin superconducting electron gun cavity. The amplifier consists of three separate radio frequency power combiner cabinets and one monitor and control cabinet. The transmitter employs rugged field effect transistors built into one kilowatt drawers that are individually hot swappable at maximum continuous power output. The total combined power of the transmitter system is 33 kW at 200 MHz, output through a standard coaxial transmission line. A low level radio frequency system is employed to digitally synthesize the 200 MHz signal and precisely control amplitude and phase.

  18. Systems and methods for determining radio frequency interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannsen, K. G.; Sabaroff, S.; Henry, V. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The presence, frequency and amplitude of radio frequency interference superimposed on communication links originating from a terrestrial region and including a relay in a geostationary spacecraft are determined by pointing a narrow beam antenna on the satellite at the terrestrial region. The level of noise radiated from the region to the antenna is measured at a terrestrial station that is usually remote from the region. Calibrating radio signals having a plurality of predetermined EIRP's (Effective Isotropic Radiated Power) and frequencies in the spectrum are transmitted from the region through the spacecraft narrow beam antenna back to the station. At the station, the levels of the received calibrating signals are separately measured for each of the frequency bands and EIRP's.

  19. A radio-frequency sheath model for complex waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, P.

    2014-04-21

    Plasma sheaths driven by radio-frequency voltages occur in contexts ranging from plasma processing to magnetically confined fusion experiments. An analytical understanding of such sheaths is therefore important, both intrinsically and as an element in more elaborate theoretical structures. Radio-frequency sheaths are commonly excited by highly anharmonic waveforms, but no analytical model exists for this general case. We present a mathematically simple sheath model that is in good agreement with earlier models for single frequency excitation, yet can be solved for arbitrary excitation waveforms. As examples, we discuss dual-frequency and pulse-like waveforms. The model employs the ansatz that the time-averaged electron density is a constant fraction of the ion density. In the cases we discuss, the error introduced by this approximation is small, and in general it can be quantified through an internal consistency condition of the model. This simple and accurate model is likely to have wide application.

  20. Eddy current imaging with an atomic radio-frequency magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Leefer, Nathan; Blanchard, John W.; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    We use a radio-frequency 85Rb alkali-vapor cell magnetometer based on a paraffin-coated cell with long spin-coherence time and a small, low-inductance driving coil to create highly resolved conductivity maps of different objects. We resolve sub-mm features in conductive objects, we characterize the frequency response of our technique, and by operating at frequencies up to 250 kHz we are able to discriminate between differently conductive materials based on the induced response. The method is suited to cover a wide range of driving frequencies and can potentially be used for detecting non-metallic objects with low DC conductivity.

  1. Simulation study on radio frequency safety of electric explosive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peijie; Tan, Zhiliang; Liu, Chaoyang; Du, Zhide

    2013-03-01

    Radio frequency (RF) is a great danger to the electric explosive device (EED) of typical ordnance. This paper introduced the RF firing mechanism of the EED and the measuring method of its RF impedance. Through the professional antenna simulation software CST, a dipole antenna model of the EED was set up, the gain coefficient of the antenna model was obtained, and the RF power penetrating into the EED was calculated. The multi-frequency analysis of the emulation indicates that in the certain frequency range of 0.5-2 GHz, the gain coefficient of the antenna model increases as the frequency does.

  2. Radio-frequency single-electron refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Pekola, Jukka P; Giazotto, Francesco; Saira, Olli-Pentti

    2007-01-19

    We propose a cyclic refrigeration principle based on mesoscopic electron transport. Synchronous sequential tunneling of electrons in a Coulomb-blockaded device, a normal metal-superconductor single-electron box, results in a cooling power of approximately k(B)T x f at temperature T over a wide range of cycle frequencies f. Electrostatic work, done by the gate voltage source, removes heat from the Coulomb island with an efficiency of approximately k(B)T/Delta, where Delta is the superconducting gap parameter. The performance is not affected significantly by nonidealities, for instance by offset charges. We propose ways of characterizing the system and of its practical implementation. PMID:17358719

  3. Computer simulations of ions in radio-frequency traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.; Djomehri, J.; Harabetian, E.

    1990-01-01

    The motion of ions in a trapped-ion frequency standard affects the stability of the standard. In order to study the motion and structures of large ion clouds in a radio-frequency (RF) trap, a computer simulation of the system that incorporates the effect of thermal excitation of the ions was developed. Results are presented from the simulation for cloud sizes up to 512 ions, emphasizing cloud structures in the low-temperature regime.

  4. Four-Sector Cylindrical Radio-Frequency Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, Ruthann K.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1992-01-01

    Proposed linear radio-frequency ion trap consists of closed metal cylinder partitioned into four equal cylindrical-sector electrodes and two circular end electrodes. Features include relatively large ion-storage capacity and shielding against external fields. Used in frequency-standard laboratories to confine 199Hg+ ions electrodynamically in isolation from external environment. Similar to device described in "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock" (NPO-17758).

  5. Effect of Radio Frequency Waves on Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, S.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of Radio Frequency waves on low frequency plasma instabilities and turbulence is studied. It is shown that the ponderomotive force can stabilize or destabilize instabilities depending on the power deposition profile and no RF induced flow generation hypothesis is required. Its possible consequence on space and fusion plasma will be discussed. Collaborations with George Vahala from William & Mary, Julio Martinell from UNAM and Atsushi Fukuyama from Kyoto University are acknowledged.

  6. Radio frequency telemetry system for sensors and actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches apparatus for combining Radio Frequency (RF) technology with novel micro-inductor antennas and signal processing circuits for RF telemetry of real time, measured data, from microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors, through electromagnetic coupling with a remote powering/receiving device. Such technology has many applications, but is especially useful in the biomedical area.

  7. Radio Frequency Telemetry System for Sensors and Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches apparatus for combining Radio Frequency (RF) technology with novel micro-inductor antennas and signal processing circuits for RF telemetry of real time, measured data, from microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors, through electromagnetic coupling with a remote poweringheceiving device. Such technology has many applications, but is especially useful in the biomedical area.

  8. Determining radio frequency heating uniformity in mixed beans for disinfestations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our laboratory collaborates with USDA-ARS in Parlier, CA in developing thermal treatments based on radio frequency (RF) energy for insect control in legumes to meet postharvest phytosanitary regulations for international market. Our current study focuses on lentils and chickpeas that are two importa...

  9. Radio frequency and infrared drying of sized textile warp yarns

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddick, H.G. )

    1990-11-01

    Drying sized textile warp yarns without contacting the warp is easily accomplished by either radio frequency or infrared techniques. Although the process is more expensive than conventional drying, the substantial savings accrued during subsequent weaving and finishing of the cloth can help keep the US textile industry competitive and support electrical load. 5 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. Development of radio frequency treatments for dried pulses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical fumigants are typically used to disinfest dried pulses of insect pests before shipment to importing countries, but the industry is exploring non-chemical alternatives. One possible alternative is the use of radio frequency (RF) energy to rapidly heat product to insecticidal levels. The cowp...

  11. Radio frequency electric fields as a nonthermal process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview is presented of the current state of art in microbial inactivation in food products by radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) processing. Critical process parameters determining inactivation are discussed. Some issues are offered that need further investigation in order to commercialize ...

  12. Localized radio frequency communication using asynchronous transfer mode protocol

    DOEpatents

    Witzke, Edward L.; Robertson, Perry J.; Pierson, Lyndon G.

    2007-08-14

    A localized wireless communication system for communication between a plurality of circuit boards, and between electronic components on the circuit boards. Transceivers are located on each circuit board and electronic component. The transceivers communicate with one another over spread spectrum radio frequencies. An asynchronous transfer mode protocol controls communication flow with asynchronous transfer mode switches located on the circuit boards.

  13. Radio frequency excited CO/sub 2/ waveguide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.L.; Tulip, J.L.

    1984-10-01

    This paper reports on the operation of radio frequency (rf) excited carbon dioxide waveguide lasers. An efficiency of greater than 10% has been achieved with a maximum power of 21 W. The effects of bore size, waveguide fabrication techniques, and gas mixture are discussed.

  14. 29. View of typical radio frequency monitor group electronic tubetype ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. View of typical radio frequency monitor group electronic tube-type cabinet. System is water-cooled with antenna assist. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. Modification of the DSN radio frequency angular tropospheric refraction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The previously derived DSN Radio Frequency Angular Tropospheric Refraction Model contained an assumption which was subsequently seen to be at a variance with the theoretical basis of angular refraction. The modification necessary to correct the model is minor in that the value of a constant is changed.

  16. Radio-frequency and microwave energies, magnetic and electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaelson, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    The biological effects of radio frequency, including microwave, radiation are considered. Effects on body temperature, the eye, reproductive systems, internal organs, blood cells, the cardiovascular system, and the central nervous system are included. Generalized effects of electric and magnetic fields are also discussed. Experimentation with animals and clinical studies on humans are cited, and possible mechanisms of the effects observed are suggested.

  17. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING, KAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of KAI Technologies in-situ radio frequency heating system for soil treatment was conducted from January 1994 to July 1994 at Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. This demonstration was conducted as a joint effort between the USEPA and the USAF. The technol...

  18. Authentication of Radio Frequency Identification Devices Using Electronic Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinnappa Gounder Periaswamy, Senthilkumar

    2010-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) tags are low-cost devices that are used to uniquely identify the objects to which they are attached. Due to the low cost and size that is driving the technology, a tag has limited computational capabilities and resources. This limitation makes the implementation of conventional security protocols to prevent…

  19. Fabrication of the APS Storage Ring radio frequency accelerating cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Primdahl, K.; Bridges, J.; DePaola, F.; Kustom, R.; Snee, D.

    1993-07-01

    Specification, heat treatment, strength, and fatigue life of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Storage Ring 352-MHz radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity copper is discussed. Heat transfer studies, including finite element analysis, and configuration of water cooling is described. Requirements for and techniques of machining are considered. Braze and electron beam joint designs are compared. Vacuum considerations during fabrication are discussed.

  20. Low Frequency Radio Astronomy Summary: A Festschrift For Bill Erickson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. G.; Kassim, N. E.; Perez, M. R.

    2005-12-01

    The science and technological issues presented at this workshop in honor of Bill Erickson's 74th birthday, are certainly opening up a new window of astronomical observations at the low end of the radio frequency spectrum. We briefly review some of the contributions concentrating our comments on the topics of science, technology, and history.

  1. Range and movement of resident holdover and hatchery brown trout tagged with radio transmitters in the Farmington River, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Popoff, N.D.; Neumann, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    The 5.8-km West Branch Farmington River Trout Management Area (TMA) is one of Connecticut's premier catch-and-release fisheries for brown trout Salmo trutta. However, little is known about the behavior of brown trout in this system and to what extent brown trout emigrate from the TMA. The objectives of this study were to determine the movement, range, and emigration of resident holdover and newly stocked brown trout tagged with radio transmitters in the TMA. Transmitters were implanted into 22 first-year (mean total length = 314 mm) and 25 second-year (mean total length = 432 mm) holdover brown trout. Twenty catchable-size (mean total length = 290 mm) brown trout were also implanted with transmitters and released into the TMA. The mean range (distance between the extreme upstream and downstream locations) was greater for second-year holdover brown trout than for first-year holdover brown trout, and it was greater in fall than in winter. The movement (distance moved between successive locations) of holdover brown trout was greater in fall than in winter. Movement of first-year holdover brown trout was significantly related to discharge, water temperature, and the number of days between successive locations. Newly stocked brown trout exhibited the two largest ranges (5.3 and 4.7 km). The range of newly stocked brown trout was not different between seasons, but movement was greater in spring than in summer. Through 16 weeks poststocking, there was no discernable difference in the percentage of stocked brown trout dispersing in a predominantly upstream or downstream direction. Mean dispersal distances from the stocking location were 0.5 and 0.9 km at 2 and 12 weeks poststocking, respectively. Movement of newly stocked brown trout was positively related to discharge and negatively related to water temperature. A known 6% (4 of 67) of the tagged brown trout emigrated from the TMA, but up to 21% (14 of 67) of tagged fish could have left the study area if all missing fish

  2. Radio-frequency Plasma Sheath Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Nathaniel

    2015-09-01

    The response of ion-electron plasma as well as two-component plasma to RF fields is studied via PIC simulation. In each case, the light species responds strongly to the RF and the heavy species does not. By varying the external electrode geometry, RF waveform, and driving voltage and frequency, light species of certain charge-to-mass ratios may experience a trapping effect within the RF structure. The space charge of this species creates a potential well for the oppositely-charged, heavy species. Simulation results are presented, as well as plans for experimental investigation of the same effect. Applications to plasma processes in which a plasma boundary is subjected to external RF fields are discussed.

  3. The Low-Frequency Environment of the Murchison Widefield Array: Radio-Frequency Interference Analysis and Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, A. R.; Wayth, R. B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Kaplan, D. L.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bell, M. E.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Callingham, J. R.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dillon, J. S.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; For, B.-Q.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hindson, L.; Jacobs, D. C.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kim, H.-S.; Kittiwisit, P.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Morgan, J.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, S.; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, S.; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Thyagarajan, N.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S.; Zheng, Q.

    2015-03-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array is a new low-frequency interferometric radio telescope built in Western Australia at one of the locations of the future Square Kilometre Array. We describe the automated radio-frequency interference detection strategy implemented for the Murchison Widefield Array, which is based on the aoflagger platform, and present 72-231 MHz radio-frequency interference statistics from 10 observing nights. Radio-frequency interference detection removes 1.1% of the data. Radio-frequency interference from digital TV is observed 3% of the time due to occasional ionospheric or atmospheric propagation. After radio-frequency interference detection and excision, almost all data can be calibrated and imaged without further radio-frequency interference mitigation efforts, including observations within the FM and digital TV bands. The results are compared to a previously published Low-Frequency Array radio-frequency interference survey. The remote location of the Murchison Widefield Array results in a substantially cleaner radio-frequency interference environment compared to Low-Frequency Array's radio environment, but adequate detection of radio-frequency interference is still required before data can be analysed. We include specific recommendations designed to make the Square Kilometre Array more robust to radio-frequency interference, including: the availability of sufficient computing power for radio-frequency interference detection; accounting for radio-frequency interference in the receiver design; a smooth band-pass response; and the capability of radio-frequency interference detection at high time and frequency resolution (second and kHz-scale respectively).

  4. Optical, thermal, and electrical monitoring of radio-frequency tissue modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy; Syms, Richard R. A.; Darzi, Ara W.; Hanna, George B.

    2010-01-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) tissue fusion involves the sealing of tissue between two electrodes delivering rf currents. Applications include small bowel fusion following anastomosis. The mechanism of adhesion is poorly understood, but one hypothesis is that rf modification is correlated to thermal damage and dehydration. A multimodal monitoring system capable of acquiring tissue temperature, electrical impedance, and optical transmittance at 1325-nm wavelength during rf delivery by a modified Ligasure™ fusion tool is presented. Measurements carried out on single layers of ex vivo porcine small bowel tissue heated at ~500-kHz frequency are correlated with observation of water evaporation and histological studies on full seals. It is shown that the induced current generates a rapid quasilinear rise of temperature until the boiling point of water, that changes in tissue transmittance occur before impedance control is possible, and that a decrease in transmission occurs at typical denaturation temperatures. Experimental results are compared with a biophysical model for tissue temperature and a rate equation model for thermal damage.

  5. A morphological algorithm for improving radio-frequency interference detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, A. R.; van de Gronde, J. J.; Roerdink, J. B. T. M.

    2012-03-01

    A technique is described that is used to improve the detection of radio-frequency interference in astronomical radio observatories. It is applied on a two-dimensional interference mask after regular detection in the time-frequency domain with existing techniques. The scale-invariant rank (SIR) operator is defined, which is a one-dimensional mathematical morphology technique that can be used to find adjacent intervals in the time or frequency domain that are likely to be affected by RFI. The technique might also be applicable in other areas in which morphological scale-invariant behaviour is desired, such as source detection. A new algorithm is described, that is shown to perform quite well, has linear time complexity and is fast enough to be applied in modern high resolution observatories. It is used in the default pipeline of the LOFAR observatory.

  6. Addressed qubit manipulation in radio-frequency dressed lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinuco-León, G. A.; Garraway, B. M.

    2016-03-01

    Precise control over qubits encoded as internal states of ultracold atoms in arrays of potential wells is a key element for atomtronics applications in quantum information, quantum simulation and atomic microscopy. Here we theoretically study atoms trapped in an array of radio-frequency dressed potential wells and propose a scheme for engineering fast and high-fidelity single-qubit gates with low error due to cross-talk. In this proposal, atom trapping and qubit manipulation relies exclusively on long-wave radiation making it suitable for atom-chip technology. We demonstrate that selective qubit addressing with resonant microwaves can be programmed by controlling static and radio-frequency currents in microfabricated conductors. These results should enable studies of neutral-atom quantum computing architectures, powered by low-frequency electromagnetic fields with the benefit of simple schemes for controlling individual qubits in large ensembles.

  7. The radio astronomy explorer satellite, a low-frequency observatory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.; Alexander, J. K.; Stone, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    The RAE-1 is the first spacecraft designed exclusively for radio astronomical studies. It is a small, but relatively complex, observatory including two 229-meter antennas, several radiometer systems covering a frequency range of 0.2 to 9.2 MHz, and a variety of supporting experiments such as antenna impedance probes and TV cameras to monitor antenna shape. Since its launch in July, 1968, RAE-1 has sent back some 10 billion data bits per year on measurements of long-wavelength radio phenomena in the magnetosphere, the solar corona, and the Galaxy. In this paper we describe the design, calibration, and performance of the RAE-1 experiments in detail.

  8. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers and... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and... frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use with a part 15 intentional radiator. (b)...

  9. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers and... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and... frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use with a part 15 intentional radiator. (b)...

  10. 47 CFR 15.204 - External radio frequency power amplifiers and antenna modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External radio frequency power amplifiers and... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.204 External radio frequency power amplifiers and... frequency power amplifier or amplifier kit intended for use with a part 15 intentional radiator. (b)...