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Sample records for radio galaxies massive

  1. The Massive Hosts of Radio Galaxies Across Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Nick; SHzRG Collaboration

    2007-05-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive Spitzer survey of 69 radio galaxies across 1galaxy stellar emission at rest-frame H-band. Stellar masses derived from rest-frame near-IR data, where AGN and young star contributions are minimized, are significantly more reliable than those derived from rest-frame optical and UV data. We find that the fraction of emitted light at rest-frame H-band from stars is >60% for 75% the high redshift radio galaxies. As expected from unified models of AGN, the stellar fraction of the rest-frame H-band luminosity has no correlation with redshift, radio luminosity, or rest-frame mid-IR (5um) luminosity. Additionally, while the stellar H-band luminosity does not vary with stellar fraction, the total H-band luminosity anti-correlates with the stellar fraction as would be expected if the underlying hosts of these radio galaxies comprise a homogeneous population. The resultant stellar luminosities imply stellar masses of 10^{11-11.5}Msun even at the highest redshifts. Powerful radio galaxies tend to lie in a similar region of mid-IR color-color space as unobscured AGN, despite the stellar contribution to their mid-IR SEDs at shorter-wavelengths. The mid-IR luminosities alone classify most HzRGs as LIRGs or ULIRGs with even higher total-IR luminosities. As expected, these exceptionally high mid-IR luminosities are consistent with an obscured, highly-accreting AGN. Sub-mm observed starformation rates imply very high specific starformation rates, higher than other massive galaxies at these redshift ranges, suggesting we are watching the final formation of massive galaxies and black holes. We also present new evidence that the blackhole accretion rate (from mid-IR luminosity) correlates with radio lobe size and anti

  2. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  3. Massive Elliptical Galaxies at High Redshift: NICMOS Imaging of z~1 Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirm, Andrew W.; Dickinson, Mark; Dey, Arjun

    2003-03-01

    We present deep, ~1.6 μm, continuum images of 11 high-redshift (0.811radio galaxies observed with NICMOS on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our NICMOS images probe the rest-frame optical light where stars are expected to dominate the galaxy luminosity. The rest-frame ultraviolet light of eight of these galaxies demonstrates the well-known ``alignment effect,'' with extended and often complex morphologies elongated along an axis close to that of the Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) radio source. As has been previously noted from ground-based near-infrared imaging, most of the radio galaxies have rounder, more symmetric morphologies at rest-frame optical wavelengths. Here we show the most direct evidence that in most cases the stellar hosts are normal elliptical galaxies with r1/4-law light profiles. For a few galaxies, very faint traces (less than 4% of the total H-band light) of the UV-bright aligned component are also visible in the infrared images. We derive both the effective radius and surface brightness for nine of 11 sample galaxies by fitting one- and two-dimensional surface-brightness models to them. We compare the high-redshift radio galaxies to lower redshift counterparts. We find that their sizes are similar to those of local FRII radio source hosts and are in general larger than other local galaxies. The derived host galaxy luminosities are very high and lie at the bright end of luminosity functions constructed at similar redshifts. This indicates that the high-redshift radio galaxies are likely rare, massive sources. The galaxies in our sample are also brighter than the rest-frame size-surface-brightness locus defined by the low-redshift sources. Passive evolution roughly aligns the z~1 galaxies with the low-redshift samples with a slope equal to 4.7. This value is intermediate between the canonical Kormendy relation (~3.5) and a constant luminosity line (=5). The optical host is sometimes centered on a local minimum in the rest-frame UV

  4. THE UBIQUITOUS RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION FROM THE MOST MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael J. I.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Floyd, David J. E.; Mould, Jeremy R.

    2011-04-20

    We have measured the radio continuum emission of 396 early-type galaxies brighter than K = 9, using 1.4 GHz imagery from the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey, Green Bank 300 ft Telescope, and 64 m Parkes Radio Telescope. For M{sub K} < -24 early-type galaxies, the distribution of radio powers at fixed absolute magnitude spans four orders of magnitude and the median radio power is proportional to K-band luminosity to the power 2.78 {+-} 0.16. The measured flux densities of M{sub K} < -25.5 early-type galaxies are greater than zero in all cases. It is thus highly likely that the most massive galaxies always host an active galactic nucleus or have recently undergone star formation.

  5. Radio galaxies in ZFOURGE/NMBS: no difference in the properties of massive galaxies with and without radio-AGN out to z = 2.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, G. A.; Spitler, L. R.; Norris, R. P.; Cowley, M. J.; Papovich, C.; Glazebrook, K.; Quadri, R. F.; Straatman, C. M. S.; Allen, R.; Kacprzak, G. G.; Labbe, I.; Nanayakkara, T.; Tomczak, A. R.; Tran, K.-V.

    2016-01-01

    In order to reproduce the high-mass end of the galaxy mass distribution, some process must be responsible for the suppression of star formation in the most massive of galaxies. Commonly active galactic nuclei (AGN) are invoked to fulfil this role, but the exact means by which they do so is still the topic of much debate, with studies finding evidence for both the suppression and enhancement of star formation in AGN hosts. Using the ZFOURGE (FourStar Galaxy Evolution) and NMBS (Newfirm Medium Band Survey) galaxy surveys, we investigate the host galaxy properties of a mass-limited (M ≥ 1010.5 M⊙), high-luminosity (L1.4 > 1024 W Hz-1) sample of radio-loud AGN to a redshift of z = 2.25. In contrast to low-redshift studies, which associate radio-AGN activity with quiescent hosts, we find that the majority of z > 1.5 radio-AGN are hosted by star-forming galaxies. Indeed, the stellar populations of radio-AGN are found to evolve with redshift in a manner that is consistent with the non-AGN mass-similar galaxy population. Interestingly, we find that the radio-AGN fraction is constant across a redshift range of 0.25 ≤ z < 2.25, perhaps indicating that the radio-AGN duty cycle has little dependence on redshift or galaxy type. We do however see a strong relation between the radio-AGN fraction and stellar mass, with radio-AGN becoming rare below ˜1010.5 M⊙ or a halo mass of 1012 M⊙. This halo-mass threshold is in good agreement with simulations that initiate radio-AGN feedback at this mass limit. Despite this, we find that radio-AGN host star formation rates are consistent with the non-AGN mass-similar galaxy sample, suggesting that while radio-AGN are in the right place to suppress star formation in massive galaxies they are not necessarily responsible for doing so.

  6. Low-frequency radio emission in the massive galaxy cluster MACS J0717.5 + 3745

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey-Pommier, M.; Richard, J.; Combes, F.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Guiderdoni, B.; Ferrari, C.; Sirothia, S.; Narasimha, D.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: To investigate the nonthermal emission mechanism and their interaction during cluster mergers, we analyze multiple low-frequency radio data for the X-ray luminous massive galaxy cluster MACS J0717.5 + 3745, located at z = 0.5548. Large-scale structure-formation models in the Universe suggest that galaxy clusters grow via constant accretion of gas and the merger of galaxy groups and smaller clusters. Low-frequency radio observations trace these mergers in the form of relics and halos. The dual frequency observations were performed on MACS J0717.5 + 3745 to investigate the spectral index pattern of the nonthermal emission and its interaction within the intracluster medium (ICM), during merger process. Methods: Continuum observations were carried out using GMRT at 0.235 and 0.61 GHz on MACS J0717.5 + 3745 and archival data from the VLA (0.074 and 1.42 GHz) and WSRT (0.325 GHz) was used to complement the results. Furthermore, to explore the thermal and nonthermal interactions within the ICM and the morphological distribution, Chandra X-ray and HST data were used. Results: A highly complex nonthermal radio emission distribution is seen in the cluster at very low frequencies, with a global spectral index α0.2350.61˜-1.17±0.37. We have detected a giant radio halo within the cluster system with a linear size of 1.58 Mpc and a "Chair-shaped" filament structure between the merging subclusters of linear size 853 kpc at 0.235 GHz. This is the most powerful halo ever observed with P1.4 = 9.88 × 1025 WHz-1 and an equipartition magnetic field estimate of ~6.49 μG. The bright filament structure is well located in the central merging region of subclusters with enhanced temperature, as shown by Chandra and HST data analysis, further indicating the formation of this structure due to shock waves encountered within the ICM during the merger events.

  7. Very high redshift radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.J.M., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) provide unique targets for the study of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters at very high redshifts. We discuss how efficient HzRG samples ae selected, the evidence for strong morphological evolution at near-infracd wavelengths, and for jet-induced star formation in the z = 3 800 HzRG 4C41 17

  8. AO Observations of Three Powerful Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W; van Bruegel, W; Quirrenbach, A

    2002-08-01

    The host galaxies of powerful radio sources are ideal laboratories to study active galactic nuclei (AGN). The galaxies themselves are among the most massive systems in the universe, and are believed to harbor supermassive black holes (SMBH). If large galaxies are formed in a hierarchical way by multiple merger events, radio galaxies at low redshift represent the end-products of this process. However, it is not clear why some of these massive ellipticals have associated radio emission, while others do not. Both are thought to contain SMBHs, with masses proportional to the total luminous mass in the bulge. It either implies every SMBH has recurrent radio-loud phases, and the radio-quiet galaxies happen to be in the ''low'' state, or that the radio galaxy nuclei are physically different from radio-quiet ones, i.e. by having a more massive SMBH for a given bulge mass. Here we present the first results from our adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy pilot program on three nearby powerful radio galaxies. Initiating a larger, more systematic AO survey of radio galaxies (preferentially with Laser Guide Star equipped AO systems) has the potential of furthering our understanding of the physical properties of radio sources, their triggering, and their subsequent evolution.

  9. The Cosmic History of Hot Gas Cooling and Radio AGN Activity in Massive Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, A. L. R.; Lehmer, B. D.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. M.; Luo, B.; Miller, N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Stott, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the X-ray properties of 393 optically selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) over the redshift range of z approx equals 0.0-1.2 in the Chandra Deep Fields. To measure the average X-ray properties of the ETG population, we use X-ray stacking analyses with a subset of 158 passive ETGs (148 of which were individually undetected in X-ray). This ETG subset was constructed to span the redshift ranges of z = 0.1-1.2 in the approx equals 4 Ms CDF-S and approx equals 2 Ms CDF-N and z = 0.1-0.6 in the approx equals 250 ks E-CDF-S where the contribution from individually undetected AGNs is expected to be negligible in our stacking. We find that 55 of the ETGs are detected individually in the X-rays, and 12 of these galaxies have properties consistent with being passive hot-gas dominated systems (i.e., systems not dominated by an X-ray bright Active Galactic Nucleus; AGN). On the basis of our analyses, we find little evolution in the mean 0.5-2 keY to B-band luminosity ratio (L(sub x) /L(sub Beta) varies as [1 +z]) since z approx equals 1.2, implying that some heating mechanism prevents the gas from cooling in these systems. We consider that feedback from radio-mode AGN activity could be responsible for heating the gas. We select radio AGNs in the ETG population using their far-infrared/radio flux ratio. Our radio observations allow us to constrain the duty cycle history of radio AGN activity in our ETG sample. We estimate that if scaling relations between radio and mechanical power hold out to z approx equals 1.2 for the ETG population being studied here, the average mechanical power from AGN activity is a factor of approx equals1.4 -- 2.6 times larger than the average radiative cooling power from hot gas over the redshift range z approx equals 0-1.2. The excess of inferred AGN mechanical power from these ETGs is consistent with that found in the local Universe for similar types of galaxies.

  10. An Overdensity of Massive, Dusty Starbursts Associated with the High-Redshift Radio Galaxy MRC1138-262 at z = 2.16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, Bruno; Dannerbauer, Helmut

    We present Herschel and APEX LABOCA 870 μm imaging of the field of the high-redshift radio galaxy MRC1138 at z = 2.16. We detect 16 submillimeter galaxies in this ˜140 arcmin2 large bolometer map, with flux densities in the range 3-11 mJy. The pure number counts indicate an overdensity of SMGs by a factor of five compared to blank field surveys. Based on an exquisite multi-wavelength database including VLA 1.4 GHz radio and infrared observations, we verifiy whether these sources are members of the proto-cluster structure at z = 2.2 or not. Based on Herschel PACS+ SPIRE and Spitzer MIPS photometry, we derived reliable far-infrared photometric redshifts for all of our sources. VLT-ISAAC near-infrared spectroscopic observations confirmed redshifts of z ≈ 2.2 for four of these SMGs. We conclude that in total at least seven sources are part of this proto-cluster at z = 2.16. We measure a star formation rate density S FRD ˜ 1500 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3, four magntiudes higher compared to the global SFRD at this redshift. Striklingly, these seven sources are concentrated within a region of 2 Mpc (the typical size of clusters in the local universe) and are not distributed in the filaments as predicted by theories and traced by the Hα emitters at z ≈ 2.2. This concentration of massive, dusty starbursts is not centered on the radio galaxy which is submm bright. A significant fraction, six out of 11 SMGs with z ≈ 2.2 Hα imaging coverage are associated with Hα emitters, demonstrating the potential of tracing SMG counterparts with this source population. Our results demonstrate that indeed submm observations enable us to reveal clusters of massive, dusty starbursts and will pave the road for systematic and detailed investigations with this technique in the future.

  11. SCUBA Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Reuland, M; Rottgering, H; van Breugel, W

    2003-03-11

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) are key targets for studies of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.The role of dust in these processes is uncertain. We have therefore observed the dust continuum emission from a sample of z > 3 radio galaxies with the SCUBA bolometer array. We confirm and strengthen the result found by Archibald et al. (1), that HzRGs are massive starforming systems and that submillimeter detection rate appears to be primarily a strong function of redshift. We also observed HzRG-candidates that have so far eluded spectroscopic redshift determination. Four of these have been detected, and provide evidence that they may be extremely obscured radio galaxies, possibly in an early stage of their evolution.

  12. Spiderwebs and Flies: Observing Massive Galaxy Formation in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George

    2009-07-01

    Distant luminous radio galaxies are among the brightest known galaxies in the early Universe, pinpoint likely progenitors of dominant cluster galaxies and are unique laboratories for studying massive galaxy formation. Spectacular images with the ACS and NICMOS of one such object, the "Spiderweb Galaxy" at z = 2.2, show in exquisite detail, hierarchical merging occurring 11 Gyr ago. By imaging 3 additional Spiderweb-like galaxies we wish to study this potentially crucial phase of massive galaxy evolution, when hierarchical merging, galaxy downsizing and AGN feedback are all likely to be occurring. Properties of the complete sample of Spiderweb galaxies will be used to {i} constrain models for the formation and evolution of the most massive galaxies that dominate rich clusters and {ii} investigate the nature of chain and tadpole galaxies, a fundamental but poorly understood constituent of the early Universe. We shall image rest-frame UV and optical continuum emission from 3 radio galaxies with 2.4 < z < 3.8 that appear clumpy and large in shallow WFPC/PC observations. The new observations will typically reach 2 magnitudes fainter over 20-40 times larger area than previously. Photometric and morphological parameters will be measured for satellite galaxies {"flies"} in the clumpy massive hosts and for galaxies in 1.5 Mpc x 1.5 Mpc regions of surrounding protoclusters. Locations, sizes, elongations, clumpiness, masses, and star formation rates of the merging satellite and protocluster galaxies will be compared with new state of the art simulations. Combination of ACS and WFC3 images will help disentangle the properties of the young and old populations.Specific goals include: {i} investigating star formation histories of the satellite galaxies and the extended emission, {ii} studying "downsizing" and merging scenarios and {iii} measuring the statistics of linear galaxies and relating them to models for the formation of massive galaxies and to the properties of the

  13. Jets and Outflows in Radio Galaxies: Implications for AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, Eleonora; Grandi, Paola; Costantini, Elisa; Palumbo, Giorgio G. C.

    One of the main debated astrophysical problems is the role of the AGN feedback in galaxy formation. It is known that massive black holes have a profound effect on the formation and evolution of galaxies, but how black holes and galaxies communicate is still an unsolved problem. For Radio Galaxies, feedback studies have mainly focused on jet/cavity systems in the most massive and X-ray luminous galaxy clusters. The recent high-resolution detection of warm absorbers in some Broad Line Radio Galaxies allow us to investigate the interplay between the nuclear engine and the surrounding medium from a different perspective. We report on the detection of warm absorbers in two Broad Line Radio Galaxies, 3C 382 and 3C 390.3, and discuss the physical and energetic properties of the absorbing gas. Finally, we attempt a comparison between radio-loud and radio-quiet outflows.

  14. Radio jet interactions with massive clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiita, Paul J.; Wang, Zhongxiang; Hooda, Jagbir S.

    2002-05-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of light hydrodynamic jets are computed using the Zeus-3D code. We employ parameters corresponding to moderate to high power radio jets emerging through a galactic atmosphere or halo, and eventually crossing a tilted pressure matched interface with a hotter intracluster medium. These simulations aim the jets so that they hit massive dense clouds within the galactic halo. Such clouds are set up with radii several times that of the jet, and nominally correspond to giant molecular cloud complexes or small cannibalized galaxies. We find that powerful jets eventually disperse the clouds, but that, for the off-center collisions considered, non-axisymmetric instabilities are induced in those jets. Those instabilities grow faster for lower Mach number jets, and can produce disruptions substantially sooner than occurred in our earlier work on jets in the absence of collisions with massive clouds. Such interactions could be related to some Compact Steep Spectrum source morphologies. Very weak jets can be effectively halted by reasonably massive clouds, and this may have relevance for the paucity of radio jets in spiral galaxies. Slow, dense jets may be bent, yet remain stable for fairly extended times, thereby explaining some Wide-Angle-Tail and most "dog-leg" morphologies.

  15. Radio Jet Interactions with Massive Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Wiita, P. J.; Joyce, J.; Hooda, J. S.

    1998-12-01

    Rather high resolution three-dimensional simulations of hydrodynamical jets are computed using the Zeus-3D code. The parameters we employ are suitable for moderate to high power radio jets emerging through a galactic atmosphere or halo, and eventually crossing a tilted pressure matched interface with a hotter intracluster medium. Before they cross this interface, these simulations aim the jets so that they hit massive clouds within the galactic halo, with densities 10 or more times higher than the ambient atmospheric density, and 100's of times the jet density. Such clouds are set up with radii several times that of the jet, and could correspond to giant molecular cloud complexes or small cannibalized galaxies. We find that powerful jets eventually disperse the clouds, but that, for off-center collisions, non-axisymmetric instabilities are induced in those jets. Those instabilities grow faster for lower Mach number jets, and can produce disruptions substantially sooner than occurred in our earlier work on jets crossing tilted interfaces in the absence of collisions with massive clouds. Such interactions, particularly with weaker jets, could be related to some Compact Steep Spectrum source morphologies. Very weak jets can be effectively halted by reasonably massive clouds, and this may have relevance for the paucity of radio jets in spiral galaxies. The possibility of jets being bent, yet remaining stable, after such collisions is also investigated. This work was supported by NPACI allocation GSU200 on the Cray T90 and by RPE funds at Georgia State University.

  16. HOW MASSIVE ARE MASSIVE COMPACT GALAXIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Marchesini, Danilo; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo

    2009-11-20

    Using a sample of nine massive compact galaxies at zapprox 2.3 with rest-frame optical spectroscopy and comprehensive U -> 8 mum photometry, we investigate how assumptions in spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling change the stellar mass estimates of these galaxies, and how this affects our interpretation of their size evolution. The SEDs are fitted to tau-models with a range of metallicities, dust laws, and different stellar population synthesis codes. These models indicate masses equal to, or slightly smaller than, our default masses. The maximum difference is 0.16 dex for each parameter considered, and only 0.18 dex for the most extreme combination of parameters. Two-component populations with a maximally old stellar population superposed with a young component provide reasonable fits to these SEDs using the models of Bruzual and Charlot; however, when using models with updated treatment of TP-AGB stars, the fits are poorer. The two-component models predict masses that are 0.08-0.22 dex larger than the tau-models. We also test the effect of a bottom-light initial mass function (IMF) and find that it would reduce the masses of these galaxies by 0.3 dex. Considering the range of allowable masses from the tau-models, two-component fits, and IMF, we conclude that on average these galaxies lie below the mass-size relation of galaxies in the local universe by a factor of 3-9, depending on the SED models used.

  17. BRIGHT Lights, BIG City: Massive Galaxies, Giant Ly-A Nebulae, and Proto-Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Reuland, M; de Vries, W; Stanford, A; Dey, A; Kurk, J; Venemans, B; Rottgering, H; Miley, G; De Breuck, C; Dopita, M; Sutherland, R; Bland-Hawthorn, J

    2002-08-01

    High redshift radio galaxies are great cosmological tools for pinpointing the most massive objects in the early Universe: massive forming galaxies, active super-massive black holes and proto-clusters. They report on deep narrow-band imaging and spectroscopic observations of several z > 2 radio galaxy fields to investigate the nature of giant Ly-{alpha} nebulae centered on the galaxies and to search for over-dense regions around them. They discuss the possible implications for our understanding of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters.

  18. Dark matter in massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Ortwin

    2013-07-01

    The spatial distributions of luminous and dark matter in massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) reflect the formation processes which shaped these systems. This article reviews the predictions of cosmological simulations for the dark and baryonic components of ETGs, and the observational constraints from lensing, hydrostatic X-ray gas atmospheres, and outer halo stellar dynamics.

  19. Radio galaxies and their environment

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.

    1993-02-24

    The relationships between radio galaxies and their environment are varied, complex, and evolve with cosmic epoch. Basic questions are what role the environment plays in triggering and fuelling (radio) galaxy activity what the effects of this activity are on its environment, and how radio galaxies and environment evolve. Clearly, this could be the topic of a workshop all in itself and the scope of this review will necessarily be limited. A review of the connections between environment and galaxy activity in general has been given by Heckman. First, I will briefly summarize the relationships between parent galaxy and cluster environments, and radio galaxies. A more detailed discussion of various aspects of this will be given elsewhere by F. Owen, J.0. Burns and R. Perley. I will then discuss the current status of investigations of extended emission-line regions in radio galaxies, again referring elsewhere in this volume for more detailed discussions of some particular aspects (kinematics and ionization mechanisms by K. Meisenheimer; polarization and spectral index lobe asymmetries by G. Pooley). I will conclude with a brief discussion of the current status of observations of high redshift radio galaxies.

  20. Dying radio galaxies in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Parma, P.; Mack, K.-H.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Fanti, R.; Govoni, F.; Tarchi, A.; Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We present a study of five "dying" nearby (z ≤ 0.2) radio galaxies belonging to both the WENSS minisurvey and the B2 bright catalogs WNB1734+6407, WNB1829+6911, WNB1851+5707, B2 0120+33, and B2 1610+29. Methods: These sources have been selected on the basis of their extremely steep broad-band radio spectra, which strongly indicates that either these objects belong to the rare class of dying radio galaxies or we are observing "fossil" radio plasma remaining from a previous instance of nuclear activity. We derive the relative duration of the dying phase from the fit of a synchrotron radiative model to the radio spectra of the sources. Results: The modeling of the integrated spectra and the deep spectral index images obtained with the VLA confirmed that in these sources the central engine has ceased to be active for a significant fraction of their lifetime, although their extended lobes have not yet completely faded away. We found that WNB1851+5707 is in reality composed of two distinct dying galaxies, which appear blended together as a single source in the WENSS. In the cases of WNB1829+6911 and B2 0120+33, the fossil radio lobes are seen in conjunction with a currently active core. A very faint core is also detected in a MERLIN image of WNB1851+5707a, one of the two dying sources composing WNB1851+5707. We found that all sources in our sample are located (at least in projection) at the center of an X-ray emitting cluster. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the duration of the dying phase for a radio source in a cluster can be significantly higher than that of a radio galaxy in the field, although no firm conclusions can be drawn because of the small number statistics involved. The simplest interpretation of the tendency for dying galaxies to be found in clusters is that the low-frequency radio emission from the fading radio lobes lasts longer if their expansion is somewhat reduced or even stopped. Another possibility is that the occurrence of dying

  1. Centaurus A galaxy, type EO peculiar elliptical, also radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Centaurus A galaxy, type EO peculiar elliptical, also radio source. CTIO 4-meter telescope, 1975. NGC 5128, a Type EO peculiar elliptical galaxy in the constellation Centaurus. This galaxy is one of the most luminous and massive galaxies known and is a strong source of both radio and X-ray radiation. Current theories suggest that the nucleus is experiencing giant explosions involving millions of stars and that the dark band across the galactic disk is material being ejected outward. Cerro Toloto 4-meter telescope photo. Photo credit: National Optical Astronomy Observatories

  2. Massive relic galaxies prefer dense environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta de Arriba, Luis; Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio; Cebrián, María; Balcells, Marc

    2016-09-01

    We study the preferred environments of z ˜ 0 massive relic galaxies (M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ galaxies with little or no growth from star formation or mergers since z ˜ 2). Significantly, we carry out our analysis on both a large cosmological simulation and an observed galaxy catalogue. Working on the Millennium I-WMAP7 simulation we show that the fraction of today massive objects which have grown less than 10 per cent in mass since z ˜ 2 is ˜0.04 per cent for the whole massive galaxy population with M⋆ > 1010 M⊙. This fraction rises to ˜0.18 per cent in galaxy clusters, confirming that clusters help massive galaxies remain unaltered. Simulations also show that massive relic galaxies tend to be closer to cluster centres than other massive galaxies. Using the New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalogue, and defining relics as M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ early-type galaxies with colours compatible with single-stellar population ages older than 10 Gyr, and which occupy the bottom 5-percentile in the stellar mass-size distribution, we find 1.11 ± 0.05 per cent of relics among massive galaxies. This fraction rises to 2.4 ± 0.4 per cent in high-density environments. Our findings point in the same direction as the works by Poggianti et al. and Stringer et al. Our results may reflect the fact that the cores of the clusters are created very early on, hence the centres host the first cluster members. Near the centres, high-velocity dispersions and harassment help cluster core members avoid the growth of an accreted stellar envelope via mergers, while a hot intracluster medium prevents cold gas from reaching the galaxies, inhibiting star formation.

  3. The new class of FR 0 radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, R. D.; Capetti, A.; Giovannini, G.

    2016-02-01

    Are the FRI and FRII radio galaxies representative of the radio-loud (RL) AGN population in the local Universe? Recent studies on the local low-luminosity radio sources cast lights on an emerging population of compact radio galaxies which lack extended radio emission. In a pilot JVLA project, we study the high-resolution images of a small but representative sample of this population. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc. We find that these RL AGN live in red massive early-type galaxies, with large black hole masses (≳ 108 M⊙), and spectroscopically classified as Low Excitation Galaxies, all characteristics typical of FRI radio galaxies which they also share the same nuclear luminosity with. However, they are more core dominated (by a factor of ˜ 30) than FRIs and show a clear deficit of extended radio emission. We call these sources ``FR0'' to emphasize their lack of prominent extended radio emission. A posteriori, other compact radio sources found in the literature fulfill the requirements for a FR0 classification. Hence, the emerging FR0 population appears to be the dominant radio class of the local Universe. Considering their properties we speculate on their possible origins and the possible cosmological scenarios they imply.

  4. Imaging Radio Galaxies with Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, W. H.; van Breugel, W. J. M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Roberts, J.; Fidkowski, K.

    2000-12-01

    We present 42 milli-arcsecond resolution Adaptive Optics near-infrared images of 3C 452 and 3C 294, two powerful radio galaxies at z=0.081 and z=1.79 respectively, obtained with the NIRSPEC/SCAM+AO instrument on the Keck telescope. The observations provide unprecedented morphological detail of radio galaxy components like nuclear dust-lanes, off-centered or binary nuclei, and merger induced starforming structures; all of which are key features in understanding galaxy formation and the onset of powerful radio emission. Complementary optical HST imaging data are used to construct high resolution color images, which, for the first time, have matching optical and near-IR resolutions. Based on these maps, the extra-nuclear structural morphologies and compositions of both galaxies are discussed. Furthermore, detailed brightness profile analysis of 3C 452 allows a direct comparison to a large literature sample of nearby ellipticals, all of which have been observed in the optical and near-IR by HST. Both the imaging data and the profile information on 3C 452 are consistent with it being a relative diminutive and well-evolved elliptical, in stark contrast to 3C 294 which seems to be in its initial formation throes with an active AGN off-centered from the main body of the galaxy. These results are discussed further within the framework of radio galaxy triggering and the formation of massive ellipticals. The work of WdV and WvB was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. The work at UCSD has been supported by the NSF Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, under agreement No. AST-98-76783.

  5. Radio Galaxies in Abell Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, M. J.

    1994-05-01

    We have defined a complete sample of radio galaxies chosen from Abell's northern catalog consisting of all clusters with measured redshifts < 0.09. This sample consists of nearly 300 clusters. A multiwavelength survey including optical CCD R-Band imaging, optical spectroscopy, and VLA 20 cm radio maps has been compiled. I have used this database to study the optical/radio properties of radio galaxies in the cluster environment. In particular, optical properties have been compared to a radio-quiet selected sample to look for optical signatures which may distinguish radio galaxies from normal radio-quiet ellipticals. The correlations between radio morphology and galaxy type, the optical dependence of the FR I/II break, and the univariate and bivariate luminosity functions have been examined for this sample. This study is aimed at understanding radio galaxies as a population and examining their status in the AGN heirarchy. The results of this work will be applied to models of radio source evolution. The results from the optical data analysis suggest that radio galaxies, as a class, cannot be distinguished from non-radio selected elliptical galaxies. The magnitude/size relationship, the surface-brightness profiles, the fundamental plane, and the intrinsic shape of the radio galaxies are consistent between our radio galaxy and control sample. The radio galaxies also trace the elliptical galaxy optical luminosity function in clusters very well; with many more L(*) galaxies than brightest cluster members. Combined with the results of the spectroscopy, the data are consistent with the idea that all elliptical galaxies may at some point in their lifetimes become radio sources. In conclusion, I present a new observational picture for radio galaxies and discuss the important properties which may determine the evolution of individual sources.

  6. Dwarf Galaxies with Active Massive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Greene, J. E.; Geha, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) live at the heart of essentially all massive galaxies with bulges, power AGN, and are thought to be important agents in the evolution of their hosts. However, the birth and growth of the first supermassive BH "seeds" is far from understood. While direct observations of these distant BHs in the infant Universe are unobtainable with current capabilities, massive BHs in present-day dwarf galaxies can place valuable constraints on the masses, formation path, and hosts of supermassive BH seeds. Using optical spectroscopy from the SDSS, we have systematically assembled the largest sample of dwarf galaxies hosting active massive BHs to date. These dwarf galaxies have stellar masses comparable to the Magellanic Clouds and contain some of the least-massive supermassive BHs known.

  7. Radio emission in peculiar galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demellorabaca, Dulia F.; Abraham, Zulema

    1990-01-01

    During the last decades a number of surveys of peculiar galaxies have been carried out and accurate positions become available. Since peculiarities are a possible evidence of radio emission (Wright, 1974; Sulentic, 1976; Stocke et al., 1978), the authors selected a sample of 24 peculiar galaxies with optical jet-like features or extensions in different optical catalogues, mainly the Catalogue of Southern Peculiar Galaxies and Associations (Arp and Madore, 1987) and the ESO/Uppsala Survey of the ESO(B) Atlas (Lauberts, 1982) for observation at the radio continuum frequency of 22 GHz. The sample is listed in a table. Sol (1987) studied this sample and concluded that the majority of the jet-like features seem to admit an explanation in terms of interactive galaxies with bridges and/or tails due to tidal effects. Only in a few cases do the jets seem to be possibly linked to some nuclear activity of the host galaxy. The observations were made with the 13.7m-radome enclosed Itapetinga Radiotelescope (HPBW of 4.3 arcmin), in Brazil. The receiver was a 1 GHz d.s.b. super-heterodine mixer operated in total-power mode, with a system temperature of approximately 800 K. The observational technique consisted in scans in right ascention, centralized in the optical position of the galaxy. The amplitude of one scan was 43 arcmin, and its duration time was 20 seconds. The integration time was at least 2 hours (12 ten-minute observations) and the sensibility limit adopted was an antenna temperature greater than 3 times the r.m.s. error of the baseline determination. Virgo A was used as the calibrator source. Three galaxies were detected for the first time as radio sources and four other known galaxies at low frequencies had their flux densities measured at 22 GHz. The results for these sources are presented.

  8. Epsiodic Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, D.J.; Konar, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Machalski, J.; Gupta, Neeraj; Stawarz, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-10-15

    One of the interesting issues in our understanding of active galactic nuclei is the duration of their active phase and whether such activity is episodic. In this paper we summarize our recent results on episodic activity in radio galaxies obtained with the GMRT and the VLA.

  9. Photoelectric spectrophotometry of radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. K. C.; Oke, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    The absolute energy distributions from 3200 to 10,000 A of 26 3CR radio galaxies are determined on the basis of spectrophotometric observations with the multichannel spectrometer of the Hale 5-m telescope. It is found that there is a continuous range of emission-line characteristics and UV excess in the sample and that a strong correlation exists between the nonthermal component luminosity and hydrogen emission, which favors the hypothesis that direct photoionization by the nuclear radiation is responsible for the emission lines observed. Calculations are performed which show that in almost all cases the power-law component model provides sufficient UV photons to produce the observed H-beta line. Indications are obtained that the optical nuclear component is related to the radio emission in some complex manner and that strong radio galaxies tend to be accompanied by UV excess and emission lines.

  10. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN WINGS LOCAL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-03-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 have been found to have small physical sizes, and hence to be superdense. Several mechanisms, including minor mergers, have been proposed for increasing galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. We search for superdense massive galaxies in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) of X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.04 < z < 0.07. We discover a significant population of superdense massive galaxies with masses and sizes comparable to those observed at high redshift. They approximately represent 22% of all cluster galaxies more massive than 3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, are mostly S0 galaxies, have a median effective radius (R{sub e} ) = 1.61 +- 0.29 kpc, a median Sersic index (n) = 3.0 +- 0.6, and very old stellar populations with a median mass-weighted age of 12.1 +- 1.3 Gyr. We calculate a number density of 2.9 x 10{sup -2} Mpc{sup -3} for superdense galaxies in local clusters, and a hard lower limit of 1.3 x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} in the whole comoving volume between z = 0.04 and z = 0.07. We find a relation between mass, effective radius, and luminosity-weighted age in our cluster galaxies, which can mimic the claimed evolution of the radius with redshift, if not properly taken into account. We compare our data with spectroscopic high-z surveys and find that-when stellar masses are considered-there is consistency with the local WINGS galaxy sizes out to z {approx} 2, while a discrepancy of a factor of 3 exists with the only spectroscopic z > 2 study. In contrast, there is strong evidence for a large evolution in radius for the most massive galaxies with M{sub *} > 4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} compared to similarly massive galaxies in WINGS, i.e., the brightest cluster galaxies.

  11. Superdense Massive Galaxies in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Cenarro, A. Javier; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, Adriana; Vazdekis, Alexandre; de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; Cava, Antonio

    2009-02-01

    Superdense massive galaxies (re ~ 1 kpc; M ~ 1011 M sun) were common in the early universe (z gsim 1.5). Within some hierarchical merging scenarios, a non-negligible fraction (1%-10%) of these galaxies is expected to survive since that epoch, retaining their compactness and presenting old stellar populations in the present universe. Using the NYU Value-Added Galaxy Catalog from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6, we find only a tiny fraction of galaxies (~0.03%) with re lsim 1.5 kpc and M sstarf gsim 8 × 1010 M sun in the local universe (z < 0.2). Surprisingly, they are relatively young (~2 Gyr) and metal-rich ([Z/H] ~0.2). The consequences of these findings within the current two competing size evolution scenarios for the most massive galaxies ("dry" mergers vs. "puffing up" due to quasar activity) are discussed.

  12. Radio Galaxy Zoo: host galaxies and radio morphologies derived from visual inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Wong, O. I.; Willett, K. W.; Norris, R. P.; Rudnick, L.; Shabala, S. S.; Simmons, B. D.; Snyder, C.; Garon, A.; Seymour, N.; Middelberg, E.; Andernach, H.; Lintott, C. J.; Jacob, K.; Kapińska, A. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Masters, K. L.; Jarvis, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Paget, E.; Simpson, R.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Bamford, S.; Burchell, T.; Chow, K. E.; Cotter, G.; Fortson, L.; Heywood, I.; Jones, T. W.; Kaviraj, S.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Maksym, W. P.; Polsterer, K.; Borden, K.; Hollow, R. P.; Whyte, L.

    2015-11-01

    We present results from the first 12 months of operation of Radio Galaxy Zoo, which upon completion will enable visual inspection of over 170 000 radio sources to determine the host galaxy of the radio emission and the radio morphology. Radio Galaxy Zoo uses 1.4 GHz radio images from both the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) and the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) in combination with mid-infrared images at 3.4 μm from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and at 3.6 μm from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present the early analysis of the WISE mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies. For images in which there is >75 per cent consensus among the Radio Galaxy Zoo cross-identifications, the project participants are as effective as the science experts at identifying the host galaxies. The majority of the identified host galaxies reside in the mid-infrared colour space dominated by elliptical galaxies, quasi-stellar objects and luminous infrared radio galaxies. We also find a distinct population of Radio Galaxy Zoo host galaxies residing in a redder mid-infrared colour space consisting of star-forming galaxies and/or dust-enhanced non-star-forming galaxies consistent with a scenario of merger-driven active galactic nuclei (AGN) formation. The completion of the full Radio Galaxy Zoo project will measure the relative populations of these hosts as a function of radio morphology and power while providing an avenue for the identification of rare and extreme radio structures. Currently, we are investigating candidates for radio galaxies with extreme morphologies, such as giant radio galaxies, late-type host galaxies with extended radio emission and hybrid morphology radio sources.

  13. Morphological Evolution in High-Redshift Radio Galaxies and the Formation of Giant Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breugel, Wil J. M.; Stanford, S. A.; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel; Graham, James R.

    1998-08-01

    We present deep near-infrared images of high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) obtained with the near-infrared camera (NIRC) on the Keck I telescope. In most cases, the near-IR data sample rest wavelengths that are free of contamination from strong emission lines and at λrest > 4000 Å, where older stellar populations, if present, might dominate the observed flux. At z > 3, the rest-frame optical morphologies generally have faint, large-scale (~50 kpc) emission surrounding multiple, ~10 kpc components. The brightest of these components are often aligned with the radio structures. These morphologies change dramatically at 2 < z < 3, where the K-band images show single, compact structures without bright, radio-aligned features. The linear sizes (~10 kpc) and luminosities [M(Brest) ~ -20 to -22] of the individual components in the z > 3 HzRGs are similar to the total sizes and luminosities of normal radio-quiet star forming galaxies at z = 3-4. For objects where such data are available, our observations show that the line-free, near-IR colors of the z > 3 galaxies are very blue, consistent with models in which recent star formation dominates the observed light. Direct spectroscopic evidence for massive star formation in one of the z > 3 HzRGs exists (4C 41.17). Our results suggest that the z > 3 HzRGs evolve into much more massive systems than the radio-quiet galaxies and that they are qualitatively consistent with models in which massive galaxies form in hierarchical fashion through the merging of smaller star-forming systems. The presence of relatively luminous subcomponents along the radio axes of the z > 3 galaxies suggests a causal connection with the AGN. We compare the radio and near-IR sizes as a function of redshift and suggest that this parameter may be a measure of the degree to which the radio sources have induced star formation in the parent objects. We also discuss the Hubble diagram of radio galaxies, the possibility of a radio power dependence in the K

  14. Hyper massive black holes in evolved galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Cruz, Fernando J.

    2015-09-01

    From the SDSS DR7 we took a sample of 16733 galaxies which do not show all of the emission lines required to classify their activity according to the classical BPT diagram (Baldwin et al. 1981 PASP). Since they do not show these emission lines they are thought to be evolved enough so to host Hyper Massive Black holes. We compared their statistical properties with other galaxies from the SDSS DR7 which do show emission lines and confirmed that their M-sigma relationship correspond to HMBHs (Gutelkin et al. 2009 ApJ) and also that their SFH confirms evolution. We also analyzed them with a new Diagnostic Diagram in the IR (Coziol et al. 2015 AJ) and found that their position in the IR color space (W3W4 vs W2W3) correspond to AGN activity with current low SF, another confirmation of an evolved galaxy. The position of our final sample in the IR diagram is in the same region in which Holm 15A lies, this galaxy is considered to host the most massive BHs in the nearby universe (Lopez-Cruz et al. 2014 ApJL). The morphology of these galaxies (all of them are classified as elliptical) confirms that they are very evolved. We claim that the hyper massive BH lie in galaxies very evolved and with very low SF and without clear AGN activity in the BPT diagram.

  15. Evolution of radio galaxies to z = 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Neff, S. G.; Weadock, J.; Roberts, L.; Ryneveld, S.; Gower, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    We report Very Large Array (VLA) A-configuration studies of a sample of 49 radio galaxies at redshift less than 1. These were selected with no prior knowledge of their morphology and were chosen to match the redshift and luminosity distribution of a previously studied sample of radio-loud quasars. We compare the radio galaxies with the quasar sample and also with a sample of 29 radio galaxies selected for steep spectrum and double-lobe structure. We find that the radio galaxies have more luminous lobes and mostly weaker cores, and there is no population of one-sided sources associated with the galaxies. The radio galaxies' lobe length ratios and lobe power ratios differ from quasars. The overall sizes of the two types of sources are similar, but the radio galaxies have a 3 times larger upper envelope. The distribution of bend angles is similar but the radio galaxies have fewer very bent and straight sources. We discuss these and other comparisons in detail and suggest that while quasars appear to be viewed within a cone and radio galaxies outside it, the two types of source also have intrinsic differences, and both have individual growth and evolution scenarios. This is supported by previously observed differences in optical properties between the two source types.

  16. Dwarf galaxy evolution within the environments of massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arraki, Kenza S.; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Ceverino, Daniel; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Primack, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding galaxy evolution depends on connecting large-scale structure determined by the ΛCDM model with, at minimum, the small-scale physics of gas, star formation, and stellar feedback. Formation of galaxies within dark matter halos is sensitive to the physical phenomena occurring within and around the halo. This is especially true for dwarf galaxies, which have the smallest potential wells and are more susceptible to the effects of gas ionization and removal than larger galaxies. At dwarf galaxies scales comparisons of dark matter-only simulations with observations has unveiled various differences including the core-cusp, the missing satellites, and the too-big-to-fail problems. We have run a new suite of hydrodynamical simulations using the ART code to examine the evolution of dwarf galaxies in massive host environments. These are cosmological zoom-in simulations including deterministic star formation and stellar feedback in the form of supernovae feedback, stellar winds, radiation pressure, and photoionization pressure. We simulates galaxies with final halo masses on the order of 1012 M⊙ with high resolution, allowing us to examine the satellite dwarf galaxies and local isolated dwarf galaxies around each primary galaxy. We analyzed the abundance and structure of these dwarfs specifically the velocity function, their star formation rates, core creation and the circumgalactic medium. By reproducing observations of dwarf galaxies in simulations we show how including baryons in simulations relieves tensions seen in comparing dark matter only simulations with observations.

  17. Multiwavelength Study of Massive Galaxies at z~2. I. Star Formation and Galaxy Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi, E.; Dickinson, M.; Morrison, G.; Chary, R.; Cimatti, A.; Elbaz, D.; Frayer, D.; Renzini, A.; Pope, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Giavalisco, M.; Huynh, M.; Kurk, J.; Mignoli, M.

    2007-11-01

    Examining a sample of massive galaxies at 1.4radio, and rest-frame UV wavelengths, to test the agreement between different tracers of star formation rates (SFRs) and to explore the implications for galaxy assembly. For z~2 galaxies with moderate luminosities (L8μm<1011 Lsolar), we find that the SFR can be estimated consistently from the multiwavelength data based on local luminosity correlations. However, 20%-30% of massive galaxies, and nearly all those with L8μm>1011 Lsolar, show a mid-IR excess that is likely due to the presence of obscured active nuclei, as shown in a companion paper. There is a tight and roughly linear correlation between stellar mass and SFR for 24 μm-detected galaxies. For a given mass, the SFR at z=2 was larger by a factor of ~4 and ~30 relative to that in star-forming galaxies at z=1 and 0, respectively. Typical ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z=2 are relatively ``transparent'' to ultraviolet light, and their activity is long lived (>~400 Myr), unlike that in local ULIRGs and high-redshift submillimeter-selected galaxies. ULIRGs are the common mode of star formation in massive galaxies at z=2, and the high duty cycle suggests that major mergers are not the dominant trigger for this activity. Current galaxy formation models underpredict the normalization of the mass-SFR correlation by about a factor of 4 and the space density of ULIRGs by an order of magnitude but give better agreement for z>1.4 quiescent galaxies.

  18. Discovery of rare double-lobe radio galaxies hosted in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veeresh; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Sievers, Jonathan; Wadadekar, Yogesh; Hilton, Matt; Beelen, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Double-lobe radio galaxies in the local Universe have traditionally been found to be hosted in elliptical or lenticular galaxies. We report the discovery of four spiral-host double-lobe radio galaxies (J0836+0532, J1159+5820, J1352+3126, and J1649+2635) that are discovered by cross-matching a large sample of 187 005 spiral galaxies from SDSS DR7 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7) to the full catalogues of FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm) and NVSS (NRAO VLA Sky Survey). J0836+0532 is reported for the first time. The host galaxies are forming stars at an average rate of 1.7-10 M⊙ yr-1 and possess supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with masses of a few times 108 M⊙. Their radio morphologies are similar to Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies with total projected linear sizes ranging from 86 to 420 kpc, but their total 1.4-GHz radio luminosities are only in the range 1024-1025 W Hz-1. We propose that the formation of spiral-host double-lobe radio galaxies can be attributed to more than one factor, such as the occurrence of strong interactions, mergers, and the presence of unusually massive SMBHs, such that the spiral structures are not destroyed. Only one of our sources (J1649+2635) is found in a cluster environment, indicating that processes other than accretion through cooling flows e.g. galaxy-galaxy mergers or interactions could be plausible scenarios for triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei activity in spiral galaxies.

  19. The growth of massive galaxies and clusters at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Robert Raymond

    Massive galaxies and galaxy clusters gain much of their mass by merging with their neighbors; this hierarchical structure formation is the foundation of our understanding of galaxy evolution. Nevertheless, the detailed evolutionary processes needed to form the structures we see in the local Universe remain poorly understood. This thesis comprises four projects examining the growth of galaxies and clusters at high redshift by using radio, sub/millimeter, and X-ray observations to provide empirical constraints on their cosmic evolution. Chapter 2 presents deep 1.2mm imaging of the inner 20' x 20' of the Lockman Hole North (LHN) field to search for submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), rapidly star-forming, high-redshift galaxy mergers. We detect 41 SMGs with S/N>4.0 and use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate their number counts and angular clustering properties. Chapter 3 investigates the nuclear accretion properties of the LHN SMGs. In the sample's average rest-frame X-ray spectrum, we detect strong Fe K alpha emission (equivalent width EW >=1 keV) from highly-ionized Fe species -- evidence that beneath the galaxies' heavy obscuration, supermassive black holes may be growing rapidly. Chapter 4 describes a new 345 GHz and 2.1 GHz imaging campaign to study the intracluster media (ICM) of eleven massive Sunyaev Zel'dovich Effect (SZE)-detected clusters from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) southern survey. In six of eleven, 345 GHz SZE increments are detected and used to characterize the spatial distribution and energy content of the ICM at high (19.2") resolution. This work helps us understand how SZE-mass scaling relations are affected by contamination from other sources along the line of sight and by dynamical properties of the ICM. Chapter 5 studies the non-thermal radio emission in one exceptional z=0.870 binary cluster merger (ACTJ0102-4915, ``El Gordo'') with the help of newly-acquired radio observations. El Gordo is the highest-redshift cluster known to host

  20. Empirical measurements of massive galaxy and active galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Richard Jacob

    Using new wide-area galaxy redshift surveys, we explore the evolution of the most massive galaxies and the most luminous quasars in the universe over much of cosmic history. Quasars and massive red galaxies both are extremes; the most luminous high redshift quasars likely play a key role in shaping their nearby environment and the universe as a whole. The most massive galaxies represent the end points of galaxy evolution and contain a fossil record of the galaxy evolution process. Using the AGES redshift survey completed with the MMT and the Hectospec multi- object spectrograph as well as new z -band observations of the NOAO Deep Wide- Field Survey Bootes field, we report the discovery of three new quasars at z > 5. We explore new mid-infrared selection in light of these three new quasars and place constraints on the slope of the high-redshift quasar luminosity function. At lower redshift (0.1< z <0.4) we measure the scatter in red galaxy colors around the optical red-sequence using imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. With our sample of nearly 20,000 massive early-type galaxies ( L [Special characters omitted.] 2.2 L *), we find that the scatter around the color-magnitude relation is quite small in colors studied. Each of three model star formation histories can reproduce the scatter we measure, none of the models produce color distributions matching those observed. We measure the evolution of the LRG luminosity function in the redshift range 0.1< z <0.9. We find that the LRG population has evolved little beyond the passive fading of its stellar populations since z ~ 0.9. The most massive (L > 3 L *) red galaxies have grown by less than 50% (at 99% confidence) since z = 0.9 in stark contrast to the factor of 2 to 4 growth observed in the L * red galaxy population over the same epoch. Finally, we introduce the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS), a new redshift survey aimed at collecting ~300,000 galaxy spectra over 10 deg 2 to z ~ 1. We

  1. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Adams, Joshua J.

    2012-05-01

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) on the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope to search for the chemical signatures of massive elliptical galaxy assembly. The Mitchell Spectrograph is an integral-field spectrograph with a uniquely wide field of view (107'' Multiplication-Sign 107''), allowing us to achieve remarkably high signal-to-noise ratios of {approx}20-70 pixel{sup -1} in radial bins of 2-2.5 times the effective radii of the eight galaxies in our sample. Focusing on a sample of massive elliptical galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub *} > 150 km s{sup -1}, we study the radial dependence in the equivalent widths (EW) of key metal absorption lines. By twice the effective radius, the Mgb EWs have dropped by {approx}50%, and only a weak correlation between {sigma}{sub *} and Mgb EW remains. The Mgb EWs at large radii are comparable to those seen in the centers of elliptical galaxies that are {approx} an order of magnitude less massive. We find that the well-known metallicity gradients often observed within an effective radius continue smoothly to 2.5 R{sub e} , while the abundance ratio gradients remain flat. Much like the halo of the Milky Way, the stellar halos of our galaxies have low metallicities and high {alpha}-abundance ratios, as expected for very old stars formed in small stellar systems. Our observations support a picture in which the outer parts of massive elliptical galaxies are built by the accretion of much smaller systems whose star formation history was truncated at early times.

  2. Radio Map of the Andromeda Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Macleod, J M

    1964-07-24

    The University of Illinois radio telescope has resolved the 610.5 Mcy/sec disk component of radio emission from the large galaxy M 31 into several discrete concentrations. In two cases, these correspond to the crossing of the optical major axis by spiral arms. A spur of emission extends southeast from the galaxy near the minor axis. PMID:17816977

  3. Radio Galaxies in Cooling Cores: Insights from a Complete Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilek, J. A.; Owen, F. N.

    We have observed a new, complete, cooling-core sample with the VLA, in order to understand how the massive black hole in the central galaxy interacts with the local cluster plasma. We find that every cooling core is currently being energized by an active radio jet, which has probably been destabilized by its interaction with the cooling core. We argue that current models of cooling-core radio galaxies need to be improved before they can be used to determine the rate at which the jet is heating the cooling core. We also argue that the extended radio haloes we see in many cooling-core clusters need extended, in situ re-energization, which cannot be supplied solely by the central galaxy.

  4. Radio luminosity function of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. S.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    By cross-matching the currently largest optical catalogue of galaxy clusters and the NVSS radio survey data base, we obtain a large complete sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the redshift range of 0.05 < z ≤ 0.45, which have radio emission and redshift information. We confirm that more powerful radio BCGs tend to be these optically very bright galaxies located in more relaxed clusters. We derived the radio luminosity functions of the largest sample of radio BCGs, and find that the functions depend on the optical luminosity of BCGs and the dynamic state of galaxy clusters. However, the radio luminosity function does not show significant evolution with redshift.

  5. Radio structures in QSO-galaxy pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akujor, Chidi E.

    1990-01-01

    It is now generally agreed that if quasars and nearby low redshift galaxies are associated, then there should be luminous connections between them. However, most of the observational evidence being presented is in the optical domain, whereas such evidence should also exist at radio frequencies. The author is, therefore, investigating some quasar-galaxy pairs at radio frequencies to search for luminous connections and other structural peculiarities. Radio maps of some of these sources are presented.

  6. SEYFERT GALAXIES: NUCLEAR RADIO STRUCTURE AND UNIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Dharam V.; Shastri, Prajval; Gabuzda, Denise C.

    2011-04-10

    A radio study of a carefully selected sample of 20 Seyfert galaxies that are matched in orientation-independent parameters, which are measures of intrinsic active galactic nucleus power and host galaxy properties, is presented to test the predictions of the unified scheme hypothesis. Our sample sources have core flux densities greater than 8 mJy at 5 GHz on arcsec scales due to the feasibility requirements. These simultaneous parsec-scale and kiloparsec-scale radio observations reveal (1) that Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies have an equal tendency to show compact radio structures on milliarcsecond scales, (2) the distributions of parsec-scale and kiloparsec-scale radio luminosities are similar for both Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies, (3) there is no evidence for relativistic beaming in Seyfert galaxies, (4) similar distributions of source spectral indices in spite of the fact that Seyferts show nuclear radio flux density variations, and (5) the distributions of the projected linear size for Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies are not significantly different as would be expected in the unified scheme. The latter could be mainly due to a relatively large spread in the intrinsic sizes. We also find that a starburst alone cannot power these radio sources. Finally, an analysis of the kiloparsec-scale radio properties of the CfA Seyfert galaxy sample shows results consistent with the predictions of the unified scheme.

  7. MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN CENTRAL CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Volonteri, Marta; Ciotti, Luca

    2013-05-01

    We explore how the co-evolution of massive black holes (MBHs) and galaxies is affected by environmental effects, addressing in particular MBHs hosted in the central cluster galaxies (we will refer to these galaxies in general as ''CCGs''). Recently, the sample of MBHs in CCGs with dynamically measured masses has increased, and it has been suggested that these MBH masses (M{sub BH}) deviate from the expected correlations with velocity dispersion ({sigma}) and mass of the bulge (M{sub bulge}) of the host galaxy: MBHs in CCGs appear to be ''overmassive''. This discrepancy is more pronounced when considering the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation than the M{sub BH}-M{sub bulge} one. We show that this behavior stems from a combination of two natural factors: (1) CCGs experience more mergers involving spheroidal galaxies and their MBHs and (2) such mergers are preferentially gas poor. We use a combination of analytical and semi-analytical models to investigate the MBH-galaxy co-evolution in different environments and find that the combination of these two factors is in accordance with the trends observed in current data sets.

  8. The life cycle of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Andrew

    2004-06-01

    This thesis will examine some key issues in the life history of radio galaxies. The evolution of radio galaxies can be understood in terms of the history of their relativistic particle distributions and morphologies. Using radio data from the Very Large Array, I examine the relativistic particle acceleration processes in several Fanaroff-Riley I sources. 1116+28, 1243+26, and 1553+24 all show dual spectral components known as jets and sheaths. These and other radio galaxies show that the strength of the acceleration mechanism approaches the strong shock limit for first order Fermi acceleration. Active radio galaxies accelerate electrons that then undergo energy losses by way of synchrotron, adiabatic, and inverse-Compton mechanisms. 3C386 and 3C98 has structure which may indicate that the acceleration process has recently ceased or is coming to an end. An examination of these possibly dying radio sources with large, bright, and diffuse lobes reveals that the shape of the spectra indicates that their acceleration mechanisms approach the strong shock limit. With these derived low frequency spectral indices, an estimate of the true magnetic field strength in the lobes can be made should X-ray observations be available. This will alleviate the need to invoke equipartition assumptions. A radio galaxy will eventually lose almost all of its relativistic electron energy through radiative and adiabatic losses and evolve into a relic state. In this state, there may have no discernible radio core, radio jet, or optical counterpart. However, mechanisms such as cluster merger shocks or re-started radio galaxies could re-energize these relic plasmas. Relic radio sources in the clusters Abell 85 and MKW 3s show that these processes do occur and reveal spectra that are consistent with weak shocks. The sources studied here can be viewed as a snapshot in the timeline of a radio galaxy. The life cycles of radio galaxies have broad implications not just for themselves but also on the

  9. Gamma-ray detected radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Volker; Soldi, Simona; De Jong, Sandra; Kretschmer, Karsten; Savchenko, Volodymyr

    2016-07-01

    So far 15 radio galaxies have been detected in the gamma-ray domain by CGRO/EGRET and Fermi/LAT, with a few detections also in the VHE range. We search for distinguishing parameters and estimate the total number of gamma-ray emitting radio galaxies that are potentially detectable by Fermi/LAT. We use Fermi/LAT data in comparison with X-ray and hard X-ray data in order to constrain basic parameters such as the total power of the inverse Compton branch and the position of its peak. We search for possible correlations between the radio, UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray domain and derive the number counts distribution. We then compare their properties with those of the radio galaxies in the 3CRR and SMS4 catalogues. The data show no correlation between the peak of the inverse Compton emission and its luminosity. For the gamma-ray detected radio galaxies the luminosities in the various bands are correlated, except for the UV band, but there is no indication of a correlation of peak frequency or luminosity with the spectral slopes in the X-ray or gamma-ray band. The comparison with other bright radio galaxies shows that the gamma-ray detected objects are among those that have the largest X-ray but rather moderate radio fluxes. Their UV and X-ray luminosities are similar, but gamma-ray detected radio galaxies are predominantly of type FR-I, while the 3CRR sample contains mainly FR-II objects. The number counts of the so far gamma-ray detected radio galaxies shows a very shallow slope, indicating that potentially a fraction of radio galaxies has been missed so far or has not been identified as such, although the predicted number of 22 ± 7 is consistent with the observed 15 objects.

  10. SEGUE 2: THE LEAST MASSIVE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Cohen, Judith G.; Geha, Marla

    2013-06-10

    Segue 2, discovered by Belokurov et al., is a galaxy with a luminosity of only 900 L{sub Sun }. We present Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of 25 members of Segue 2-a threefold increase in spectroscopic sample size. The velocity dispersion is too small to be measured with our data. The upper limit with 90% (95%) confidence is {sigma}{sub v} < 2.2 (2.6) km s{sup -1}, the most stringent limit for any galaxy. The corresponding limit on the mass within the three-dimensional half-light radius (46 pc) is M{sub 1/2} < 1.5 (2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. Segue 2 is the least massive galaxy known. We identify Segue 2 as a galaxy rather than a star cluster based on the wide dispersion in [Fe/H] (from -2.85 to -1.33) among the member stars. The stars' [{alpha}/Fe] ratios decline with increasing [Fe/H], indicating that Segue 2 retained Type Ia supernova ejecta despite its presently small mass and that star formation lasted for at least 100 Myr. The mean metallicity, ([Fe/H]) = -2.22 {+-} 0.13 (about the same as the Ursa Minor galaxy, 330 times more luminous than Segue 2), is higher than expected from the luminosity-metallicity relation defined by more luminous dwarf galaxy satellites of the Milky Way. Segue 2 may be the barest remnant of a tidally stripped, Ursa Minor-sized galaxy. If so, it is the best example of an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy that came to be ultra-faint through tidal stripping. Alternatively, Segue 2 could have been born in a very low mass dark matter subhalo (v{sub max} < 10 km s{sup -1}), below the atomic hydrogen cooling limit.

  11. Gamma-Rays from Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madejski, Greg

    2016-07-01

    In this presentation, I will overview the properties of radio galaxies gleaned from observations of their gamma-ray emission, including that arising from the nuclear, and extended components. The gamma-ray spectra of radio galaxies measured by the Fermi-LAT and ground based Air Cerenkov telescopes will be considered in the context of their broad-band emission. The presentation will cover the most compelling models for emission processes, and will attempt to constrain the location of the nuclear gamma-ray emission. This will be compared to the observational properties of blazars, which are believed to be radio galaxies with jets pointing along our line of sight. Finally, I will discuss our best estimates for the contribution of unresolved radio galaxies to the diffuse gamma-ray emission.

  12. WHIM Environment of Giant Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyan, R.; Saripalli, L.; Safouris, V.; Hunstead, R. W.

    2008-08-01

    Simulation studies of the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) suggest that about half of the baryons at low redshifts---the `missing baryons'---reside in a warm-hot phase. This gas is expected to occupy the intergalactic space in unvirialized and moderate overdensities associated with the large scale structure in the universe. Direct detection of these baryons is difficult, and progress in our understanding of the state of the WHIM requires observational probes of the diffuse gas associated with filaments and sheets. Radio continuum images of the radio galaxy MSH J0505-2835 have been made using the Very Large Array (VLA). The double radio structure of this giant radio source has a projected linear size of 1.8 Mpc, extends well beyond the interstellar medium and any coronal halo associated with the host elliptical galaxy and is interacting with the ambient intergalactic medium. We have examined the 3-D structure in the large scale galaxy distribution in the vicinity of the radio source. The host elliptical galaxy is a member of a sheet-like galaxy overdensity that has a fractional density contrast of order 10. The radio source is located at the boundary between this moderate overdensity and an adjacent void and, therefore, the radio lobes of this giant radio source represent an interaction with ambient WHIM gas. We present a novel method for estimating the properties of the WHIM. The radio data have been used to infer the evolution in the radio source. A lower limit of 4 × 10-15 N m-2 is derived for the pressure in the synchrotron-emitting gas in the lobes of the radio source, which leads to an estimate of 3 × 108 K m-3 for the density-temperature product in the ambient WHIM. Assuming that galaxies trace the unseen WHIM gas in these large-scale structures that represent moderate overdensities, the densities and temperatures we may expect for the ambient WHIM environment---based on the local galaxy overdensity and assuming that the WHIM gas is heated by

  13. Multicolor surface photometry of powerful radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    CCD images of 72 powerful radio galaxies have been obtained with the KPNO 2.1m, 4m and CTIO 4m telescopes utilizing B, V, and R filters to study the colors and other photometric properties of these large systems. The GASP software package was used for the data reduction and detailed 2-d surface photometry. In addition, image modeling techniques were employed to investigate the contributions to galaxy properties by point-like nuclear sources seen in some of these galaxies. It was found that powerful radio galaxies show a much higher frequency than normal bright ellipticals of having optical morphologies which deviate from elliptical symmetry. Approximately 50% of the sample exhibit non-elliptically symmetric isophotes. These prominent distortions are present at surface brightness levels of {le} 25 V mag/(arc sec){sup 2}. In addition, a large fraction ({approximately}50%) of the remaining radio galaxies without the aforementioned morphological peculiarities have large isophotal twists ({Delta}P.A. {ge} 10{degree}) or ellipticity gradients. Significantly {approximately}50% of the galaxies with strong optical emission lines in their spectra display optically peculiar structures very similar to those found by Toomre and Toomre (1972) in their simulations of interacting disk galaxies. The galaxies with weak emission lines in their spectra are less frequently ({approximately}10%) distorted from elliptical shape. Those that are exhibit features like isophote twists, double nuclei and close companion galaxies embedded in the radio galaxy optical isophotes. The (B-V) colors of many of the powerful radio galaxies with strong emission lines are blue relative to normal giant ellipticals at the same redshift.

  14. The ultraviolet spectra of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    1991-01-01

    New and archival IUE SWP spectra are reported for nine nearby radio galaxies (V is less than 15 mag), together with optical emissionlike data for these galaxies as well as a number of candidates with weaker line emission. Both their UV line and continuum properties, as well as their UV and UV-optical line ratios, are examined. Ly-alpha emission is found to be common among local radio galaxies, at modest luminosities (typically 10 exp 41-42 erg/s). No apparent relation is found between L(Ly-alpha) and radio power for the nearby radio galaxies alone. The Ly-alpha/H-alpha ratio in low power nearby radio galaxies is 2-5 times lower than the prediction for case B recombination. The destruction of Ly-alpha photons by grains during resonant scattering can explain the observed deficiency for reasonable metallicities. The nearby radio galaxies have in general a small C IV/Ly-alpha ratio (less than 0.1). Comparison of the C IV and Ly-alpha strengths with those in luminous AGN suggests that most of the UV continuum comes from the stellar population, and not from the AGN.

  15. The hydrodynamics of dead radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Heinz, Sebastian; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2002-05-01

    We present a numerical investigation of dead, or relic, radio galaxies and the environmental impact that radio galaxy activity has on the host galaxy or galaxy cluster. We perform axisymmetric hydrodynamical calculations of light, supersonic, back-to-back jets propagating in a β -model galaxy/cluster atmosphere. We then shut down the jet activity and let the resulting structure evolve passively. The dead source undergoes an initial phase of pressure driven expansion until it achieves pressure equilibrium with its surroundings. Thereafter, buoyancy forces drive the evolution and lead to the formation of two oppositely directed plumes that float high into the galaxy/cluster atmosphere. These plumes entrain a significant amount of low entropy material from the galaxy/cluster core and lift it high into the atmosphere. An important result is that a large fraction (at least half) of the energy injected by the jet activity is thermalized in the interstellar medium (ISM)/intracluster medium (ICM) core. The whole ISM/ICM atmosphere inflates in order to regain hydrostatic equilibrium. This inflation is mediated by an approximately spherical disturbance which propagates into the atmosphere at the sound speed. The fact that such a large fraction of the injected energy is thermalized suggests that radio galaxies may have an important role in the overall energy budget of rich ISM/ICM atmospheres. In particular, they may act as a strong and highly time-dependent source of negative feedback for galaxy/cluster cooling flows.

  16. Evolution of luminous IRAS galaxies: Radio imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Hutchings, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    In a recent study of IRAS galaxies' optical morphologies, we found that luminous IR sources lie in the IR color-luminosity plane in groups which separate out by optical spectroscopic type and also by degree of tidal disturbance. We found that the most luminous steep-IR-spectrum sources are generally galaxies in the initial stages of a major tidal interaction. Galaxies with active nuclei were generally found to have flatter IR spectra, to cover a range of IR luminosity, and to be in the later stages of a tidal interaction. We proposed a sequence of events by which luminous IR sources evolve: they start as interacting or merging galaxies, some develop active nuclei, and most undergo extensive star-formation in their central regions. Another way to study these objects and their individual evolution is to study their radio morphologies. Radio emission may arise at a detectable level from supernovae in star-forming regions and/or the appearance of an active nucleus can be accompanied by a nuclear radio source (which may develop extended structure). Therefore, the compact radio structure may trace the evolution of the inner regions of IRAS-luminous sources. If the radio sources are triggered by the interactions, we would expect to find the radio morphology related to the optical 'interactivity' of the systems. Here, we explore using the radio emission of IRAS galaxies as a possible tracer of galaxy evolution. We present and discuss observations of the compact radio morphology of 111 luminous IRAS-selected active galaxies covering a wide range of IR and optical properties.

  17. RADIO GALAXY FEEDBACK IN X-RAY-SELECTED GROUPS FROM COSMOS: THE EFFECT ON THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Giodini, S.; Finoguenov, A.; Boehringer, H.; Pierini, D.; Smolcic, V.; Massey, R.; BIrzan, L.; Zamorani, G.; Oklopcic, A.; Pratt, G. W.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Thompson, D.

    2010-05-01

    We quantify the importance of the mechanical energy released by radio galaxies inside galaxy groups. We use scaling relations to estimate the mechanical energy released by 16 radio-active galactic nuclei located inside X-ray-detected galaxy groups in the COSMOS field. By comparing this energy output to the host groups' gravitational binding energy, we find that radio galaxies produce sufficient energy to unbind a significant fraction of the intragroup medium. This unbinding effect is negligible in massive galaxy clusters with deeper potential wells. Our results correctly reproduce the breaking of self-similarity observed in the scaling relation between entropy and temperature for galaxy groups.

  18. Brightest cluster galaxies in the extended GMRT radio halo cluster sample. Radio properties and cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Venturi, T.; Cassano, R.; Giacintucci, S.; Bardelli, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Zucca, E.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: First-ranked galaxies in clusters, usually referred to as brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), show exceptional properties over the whole electromagnetic spectrum. They are the most massive elliptical galaxies and show the highest probability to be radio loud. Moreover, their special location at the centres of galaxy clusters raises the question of the role of the environment in shaping their radio properties. In the attempt to separate the effect of the galaxy mass and of the environment on their statistical radio properties, we investigate the possible dependence of the occurrence of radio loudness and of the fractional radio luminosity function on the dynamical state of the hosting cluster. Methods: We studied the radio properties of the BCGs in the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS), which consists of 65 clusters in the redshift range 0.2-0.4, with X-ray luminosity LX ≥ 5 × 1044 erg s-1, and quantitative information on their dynamical state from high-quality Chandra imaging. We obtained a statistical sample of 59 BCGs, which we divided into two classes, depending on whether the dynamical state of the host cluster was merging (M) or relaxed (R). Results: Of the 59 BCGs, 28 are radio loud and 31 are radio quiet. The radio-loud sources are favourably located in relaxed clusters (71%), while the reverse is true for the radio-quiet BCGs, which are mostly located in merging systems (81%). The fractional radio luminosity function for the BCGs in merging and relaxed clusters is different, and it is considerably higher for BCGs in relaxed clusters, where the total fraction of radio loudness reaches almost 90%, to be compared to the ~30% in merging clusters. For relaxed clusters, we found a positive correlation between the radio power of the BCGs and the strength of the cool core, consistent with previous studies on local samples. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the radio loudness of the BCGs strongly depends on the cluster dynamics; their fraction is

  19. Star formation and feedback from radio galaxies: Insights from large multiwavelength surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Cameron J.

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to play an important role in the evolution of their host galaxies by influencing the galaxy's gas reservoirs. This may affect the growth of the galaxy's massive black hole and star formation in the host galaxy. I address two unanswered questions central to our understanding of AGN: what triggers AGN, and how and to what extent do they affect their host and neighboring galaxies? I study radio galaxies, which are a subset of AGN, because their radio jets may provide a natural feedback mechanism between the AGN and the host and neighboring galaxies. Previous studies, which were limited to small samples, produce conflicting results as to whether mergers or environmental effects lead to triggering. It is also uncertain whether radio galaxies have a net positive (via gas cloud collapse) or negative (via gas heating) effect on star formation. I use a large (˜7,200), statistically significant sample of radio galaxies, for which I extract photometric information from several large-scale, multiwavelength surveys. The radio galaxies are compared to a sample of control galaxies whose properties match those of the radio galaxies, except for their lack of radio activity. This approach allows me to determine the frequency of feedback events and whether radio galaxies are responsible. I derive and compare composite spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the radio galaxies and control sample, and find a deficit of ultraviolet and infrared emission for slow accreting radio galaxies, suggesting that they may suppress star formation in their hosts. Fast accreting radio galaxies are found to have an infrared excess, which is characteristic of their high accretion rate and not a result of AGN feedback on star formation. I compare the populations of neighbor galaxies of the two samples and find that radio galaxies have an excess of neighbors within 100 kpc, which must play a role in triggering. My results also show that radio galaxies rarely

  20. Radio Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters: Feedback, Merger Signatures, and Signposts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, Scott W.; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Ashby, Matthew; Brodwin, Mark; Bulbul, Esra; Clarke, Tracy E.; Golden-Marx, Emmet; Johnson, Ryan; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Wing, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Extended, double-lobed radio sources are often located in rich galaxy clusters. I will present results of an optical and X-ray analysis of two nearby clusters with such radio sources - one of the clusters is relaxed (A2029) and one of the clusters is undergoing a merger (A98). Because of their association with clusters, extended radio sources can be used to locate clusters at a wide range of distances. The number of spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters with is very low compared to the number of well-studied low-redshift clusters. In the Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) survey, we use bent, double-lobed radio sources as signposts to efficiently locate high-redshift clusters. Using a Spitzer Snapshot Survey of our sample of 653 bent, double-lobed radio sources (selected from the FIRST survey and with galaxy hosts too faint to be detected in the SDSS), we have the potential to identify approximately 400 new clusters and groups with redshifts. I will present results from the Spitzer observations regarding the efficiency of the method for finding new clusters. These newly identified clusters will be used to study galaxy formation and evolution, as well as the effect that feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) has on galaxies and their environments.

  1. A Massive Molecular Gas Reservoir in the Z = 2.221 Type-2 Quasar Host Galaxy SMM J0939+8315 Lensed by the Radio Galaxy 3C220.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, T. K. Daisy; Riechers, Dominik A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the detection of CO(J = 3 \\to 2) line emission in the strongly lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J0939+8315 at z = 2.221, using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. SMM J0939+8315 hosts a type-2 quasar, and is gravitationally lensed by the radio galaxy 3C220.3 and its companion galaxy at z = 0.685. The 104 GHz continuum emission underlying the CO line is detected toward 3C220.3 with an integrated flux density of Scont = 7.4 ± 1.4 mJy. Using the CO(J = 3 \\to 2) line intensity of ICO(3-2) = (12.6 ± 2.0) Jy km s-1, we derive a lensing- and excitation-corrected CO line luminosity of {L}{{CO(1-0)}}\\prime = (3.4 ± 0.7) × 1010 (10.1/μL) K km s-1 pc2 for the SMG, where μL is the lensing magnification factor inferred from our lens modeling. This translates to a molecular gas mass of Mgas = (2.7 ± 0.6) × 1010 (10.1/μL) M⊙. Fitting spectral energy distribution models to the (sub)-millimeter data of this SMG yields a dust temperature of T = 63.1{}-1.3+1.1 K, a dust mass of Mdust = (5.2 ± 2.1) × 108 (10.1/μL) M⊙, and a total infrared luminosity of LIR = (9.1 ± 1.2) ×1012 (10.1/μL) L⊙. We find that the properties of the interstellar medium of SMM J0939+8315 overlap with both SMGs and type-2 quasars. Hence, SMM J0939+8315 may be transitioning from a starbursting phase to an unobscured quasar phase as described by the “evolutionary link” model, according to which this system may represent an intermediate stage in the evolution of present-day galaxies at an earlier epoch.

  2. Radio continuum polarimetric imaging of high redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Owen, F. N.; Harris, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Multifrequency images of total and polarized radio continuum emission from the two high redshift radio galaxies 0902+343 (z = 3.40) and 0647+415 (4C 41.17, z = 3.80) are presented. These images represent the most sensitive polarimetric study of high redshift ratio galaxies to date. The emission from both galaxies is substantially polarized, up to 30% in some regions, and both sources sit behind deep 'Faraday screens,' producing large rotation measures, over 10(exp 3) rad/sq. m in magnitude, and large rotation measure gradients across the sources. Such large rotation measures provide further evidence that high redshift radio galaxies are situated in very dense environments. Drawing the analogy to a class of low redshift powerful radio galaxies with similarly large rotation measures, we suggest that 0902+343 and 0647+415 are situated at the centers of dense, x-ray 'colling flow' clusters, and that the cluster gas is substantially magnetized. The remarkable similarity between the optical and radio morphologies of 0647+415 on scales as small as 0.1 sec is presented. We consider, and reject, both synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation as possible sources of the optical emission. We also consider both scattering of light out of a 'cone' of radiation from an obscured nucleus, and jet-induced star formation, and find that both models encounter difficulties in explaining this remarkably close radio-optical alignment. High resolution spectral index images reveal compact, flat spectrum components in both sources. We suggest that these components are the active nuclei of the galaxies. Lastly, high resolution images of 0902+343 show that the southernmost component forms a 'ring' of 0.2 sec radius. We discuss the possibility that this ring is the result of gravitational lensing, along the lines proposed by Kochanek & Lawrence (1990).

  3. The environments of high-redshift radio galaxies and quasars: probes of protoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, Álvaro A.; Fanidakis, Nikos; Lacey, Cedric G.; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2016-03-01

    We use the GALFORM semi-analytical model to study high-density regions traced by radio galaxies and quasars at high redshifts. We explore the impact that baryonic physics has upon the properties of galaxies in these environments. Star-forming emission-line galaxies (Ly α and H α emitters) are used to probe the environments at high redshifts. Radio galaxies are predicted to be hosted by more massive haloes than quasars, and this is imprinted on the amplitude of galaxy overdensities and cross-correlation functions. We find that Ly α radiative transfer and active galactic nucleus feedback indirectly affect the clustering on small scales and also the stellar masses, star formation rates and gas metallicities of galaxies in dense environments. We also investigate the relation between protoclusters associated with radio galaxies and quasars, and their present-day cluster descendants. The progenitors of massive clusters associated with radio galaxies and quasars allow us to determine an average protocluster size in a simple way. Overdensities within the protoclusters are found to correlate with the halo descendant masses. We present scaling relations that can be applied to observational data. By computing projection effects due to the wavelength resolution of modern spectrographs and narrow-band filters, we show that the former have enough spectral resolution to map the structure of protoclusters, whereas the latter can be used to measure the clustering around radio galaxies and quasars over larger scales to determine the mass of dark matter haloes hosting them.

  4. A VERY LARGE ARRAY RADIO SURVEY OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Capetti, Alessandro; Kharb, Preeti; Axon, David J.; Merritt, David; Baldi, Ranieri D.

    2009-12-15

    We present the results of an 8.4 GHz Very Large Array radio survey of early-type galaxies extracted from the sample selected by Cote and collaborators for the Advanced Camera for Surveys Virgo Cluster Survey. The aim of this survey is to investigate the origin of radio emission in early-type galaxies and its link with the host properties in an unexplored territory toward the lowest levels of both radio and optical luminosities. Radio images, available for all 63 galaxies with B {sub T} < 14.4, show the presence of a compact radio source in 12 objects, with fluxes spanning from 0.13 mJy to 2700 mJy. The remaining 51 galaxies, undetected at a flux limit of {approx}0.1 mJy, have radio luminosities L {approx}< 4 x 10{sup 18} W Hz{sup -1}. The fraction of radio-detected galaxies are a strong function of stellar mass, in agreement with previous results: none of the 30 galaxies with M {sub *} < 1.7 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} is detected, while 8 of the 11 most massive galaxies have radio cores. There appears to be no simple relation between the presence of a stellar nucleus and radio emission. In fact, we find radio sources associated with two nucleated galaxies, but the majority of nucleated objects are not a radio emitter above our detection threshold. A multiwavelength analysis of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission, combining radio and X-ray data, confirms the link between optical surface brightness profile and radio loudness in the sense that the bright core galaxies are associated with radio-loud AGNs, while non-core galaxies host radio-quiet AGNs. Not all radio-detected galaxies have an X-ray nuclear counterpart (and vice versa). A complete census of AGNs (and supermassive black holes, SMBHs) thus requires observations, at least, in both bands. Nonetheless, there are massive galaxies in the sample, expected to host a large SMBH (M {sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} M {sub sun}), whose nuclear emission eludes detection despite their proximity and the depth and the

  5. A CANDIDATE MASSIVE BLACK HOLE IN THE LOW-METALLICITY DWARF GALAXY PAIR MRK 709

    SciTech Connect

    Reines, Amy E.; Condon, James J.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Russell, Thomas D.; Mezcua, Mar; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.

    2014-06-01

    The incidence and properties of present-day dwarf galaxies hosting massive black holes (BHs) can provide important constraints on the origin of high-redshift BH seeds. Here we present high-resolution X-ray and radio observations of the low-metallicity, star-forming, dwarf-galaxy system Mrk 709 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. These data reveal spatially coincident hard X-ray and radio point sources with luminosities suggesting the presence of an accreting massive BH (M {sub BH} ∼ 10{sup 5-7} M {sub ☉}). Based on imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that Mrk 709 consists of a pair of compact dwarf galaxies that appear to be interacting with one another. The position of the candidate massive BH is consistent with the optical center of the southern galaxy (Mrk 709 S), while no evidence for an active BH is seen in the northern galaxy (Mrk 709 N). We derive stellar masses of M {sub *} ∼ 2.5 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} and M {sub *} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} for Mrk 709 S and Mrk 709 N, respectively, and present an analysis of the SDSS spectrum of the BH host Mrk 709 S. At a metallicity of just ∼10% solar, Mrk 709 is among the most metal-poor galaxies with evidence for an active galactic nucleus. Moreover, this discovery adds to the growing body of evidence that massive BHs can form in dwarf galaxies and that deep, high-resolution X-ray and radio observations are ideally suited to reveal accreting massive BHs hidden at optical wavelengths.

  6. The dynamical fingerprint of core scouring in massive elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Erwin, P.; Fabricius, M.

    2014-02-10

    The most massive elliptical galaxies have low-density centers or cores that differ dramatically from the high-density centers of less massive ellipticals and bulges of disk galaxies. These cores have been interpreted as the result of mergers of supermassive black hole binaries, which depopulate galaxy centers by gravitationally slingshotting central stars toward large radii. Such binaries naturally form in mergers of luminous galaxies. Here, we analyze the population of central stellar orbits in 11 massive elliptical galaxies that we observed with the integral field spectrograph SINFONI at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. Our dynamical analysis is orbit-based and includes the effects of a central black hole, the mass distribution of the stars, and a dark matter halo. We show that the use of integral field kinematics and the inclusion of dark matter is important to conclude on the distribution of stellar orbits in galaxy centers. Six of our galaxies are core galaxies. In these six galaxies, but not in the galaxies without cores, we detect a coherent lack of stars on radial orbits in the core region and a uniform excess of radial orbits outside of it: when scaled by the core radius r{sub b} , the radial profiles of the classical anisotropy parameter β(r) are nearly identical in core galaxies. Moreover, they quantitatively match the predictions of black hole binary simulations, providing the first convincing dynamical evidence for core scouring in the most massive elliptical galaxies.

  7. Giant Radio Jet Coming From Wrong Kind of Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    black holes at their cores. The discovery that the jet was coming from a spiral galaxy dubbed 0313-192 required using a combination of radio, optical and infrared observations to examine the galaxy and its surroundings. The story began more than 20 years ago, when Owen began a survey of 500 galaxy clusters using the National Science Foundation's then-new VLA to make radio images of the clusters. In the 1990s, Ledlow joined the project, making optical-telescope images of the same clusters as part of his research for a Ph.D dissertation at the University of New Mexico. An optical image from Kitt Peak National Observatory gave a hint that this galaxy, clearly seen with a jet in the VLA images, might be a spiral. Nearly a billion light-years from Earth, 0313-192 proved an elusive target, however. Subsequent observations with the VLA and the 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory supported the idea that the galaxy might be a spiral but still were inconclusive. In the Spring of 2002, astronauts installed the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This new facility produced a richly-detailed image of 0313-192, showing that it is a dust-rich spiral seen almost exactly edge-on. "The finely-detailed Hubble image resolved any doubt and proved that this galaxy is a spiral," Ledlow said. Infrared images with the Gemini-South telescope complemented the Hubble images and further confirmed the galaxy's spiral nature. Now, the astronomers seek to understand why this one spiral galaxy, unlike all others seen so far, is producing the bright jets seen with the VLA and other radio telescopes. Several factors may have combined, the researchers feel. "This galaxy's disk is twisted, and that may indicate that it has been disturbed by a close passage of another galaxy or may have swallowed up a companion dwarf galaxy," Keel said. He added, "This galaxy shows signs of having a very massive black hole at its core, and the jets are taking the shortest path out of the

  8. The progenitors of the most massive galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Nina; Brodwin, Mark; Cooke, Elizabeth; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony; Muldrew, Stuart; Noirot, Gael; Smith, Daniel; Stern, Daniel; Vernet, Joel; Wylezalek, Dominika

    2016-08-01

    This project will locate and characterize the progenitors of the most massive galaxy clusters in our Universe at z ~ 2. These rare, massive objects are cosmological probes that test the validity of Lambda-CDM, and open a window into the early formation of the oldest and most massive galaxies in the most extreme overdensities in the Universe. Searching across 10,000 square degrees of the SDSS BOSS survey we have located 27 spectroscopically confirmed groups of radio-loud quasars at 1.3 < z < 3.2. Radio-loud quasars are preferentially located in high-redshift clusters and protoclusters (Wylezalek et al. 2013; Hatch et al. 2014), but the association of several radio-loud quasars implies the presence of an agglomeration of several >10^13 solar mass dark matter haloes that will eventually combine to form some of the most massive clusters in the Universe (Orsi et al. 2016; see Fig. 1). In this proposal we request 119.1 hours to observe all 27 radio-loud quasar groups in order to identify the associated galaxy overdensities that makes up the collapsing clusters.

  9. The origin of the α-enhancement of massive galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segers, Marijke C.; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-09-01

    We study the origin of the stellar α-element-to-iron abundance ratio, [α/Fe]*, of present-day central galaxies, using cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations from the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) project. For galaxies with stellar masses of M* > 1010.5 M⊙, [α/Fe]* increases with increasing galaxy stellar mass and age. These trends are in good agreement with observations of early-type galaxies, and are consistent with a `downsizing' galaxy formation scenario: more massive galaxies have formed the bulk of their stars earlier and more rapidly, hence from an interstellar medium that was mostly α-enriched by massive stars. In the absence of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), however, [α/Fe]* in M* > 1010.5 M⊙ galaxies is roughly constant with stellar mass and decreases with mean stellar age, extending the trends found for lower mass galaxies in both simulations with and without AGN. We conclude that AGN feedback can account for the α-enhancement of massive galaxies, as it suppresses their star formation, quenching more massive galaxies at earlier times, thereby preventing the iron from longer lived intermediate-mass stars (supernova Type Ia) from being incorporated into younger stars.

  10. Recurrent Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Jamrozy, Marek; Konar, Chiranjib; Machalski, Jerzy; Mack, Karl-Heinz; Saikia, Dhruba; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U.

    2007-10-15

    One of the outstanding issues concerning extragalactic radio sources is the total duration of their active phase and the possible existence of duty cycles of their nuclear activity. A duty cycle can be recognized if there is a mechanism which preserves the information of past activity for a sufficiently long time after a new activity has started up. If a new cycle starts before the radio lobes created during a former activity period have faded, we can recognize this by the observations of a young radio source embedded in an old relic structure.

  11. A faint galaxy redshift survey behind massive clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Brenda

    1999-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with the gravitational lensing effect by massive galaxy clusters. We have explored a new technique for measuring galaxy masses and for detecting high-z galaxies by their optical colors. A redshift survey has been obtained at the Keck for a magnitude limited sample of objects (I<23) behind three clusters, A1689, A2390, and A2218 within a radius of 0.5M pc. For each cluster we see both a clear trend of increasing flux and redshift towards the center. This behavior is the result of image magnifications, such that at fixed redshift one sees further down the luminosity function. The gradient of this magnification is, unlike measurements of image distortion, sensitive to the mass profile, and found to depart strongly from a pure isothermal halo. We have found that V RI color selection can be used effectively as a discriminant for finding high-z galaxies behind clusters and present five 4.1 < z < 5.1 spectra which are of very high quality due to their high mean magnification of {approximately}20, showing strong, visibly-saturated interstellar metal lines in some cases. We have also investigated the radio ring lens PKS 1830-211, locating the source and multiple images and detected molecular absorption at mm wavelengths. Broad molecular absorption of width 1/40kms is found toward the southwest component only, where surprisingly it does not reach the base of the continuum, which implies incomplete coverage of the SW component by molecular gas, despite the small projected size of the source, less than 1/8h pc at the absorption redshift.

  12. Kinematic signatures of AGN feedback in moderately powerful radio galaxies at z ~ 2 observed with SINFONI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, C.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; De Breuck, C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Best, P.; Bryant, J. J.; Hunstead, R.; Dicken, D.; Johnston, H.

    2016-02-01

    Most successful galaxy formation scenarios now postulate that the intense star formation in massive, high-redshift galaxies during their major growth period was truncated when powerful AGNs launched galaxy-wide outflows of gas that removed large parts of the interstellar medium. SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the most powerful radio galaxies at z ~ 2 show clear signatures of such winds, but are too rare to be good representatives of a generic phase in the evolution of all massive galaxies at high redshift. Here we present SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the rest-frame optical emission-line gas in 12 radio galaxies at redshifts ~2. Our sample spans a range in radio power that is intermediate between the most powerful radio galaxies with known wind signatures at these redshifts and vigorous starburst galaxies, and are about two orders of magnitude more common than the most powerful radio galaxies. Thus, if AGN feedback is a generic phase of massive galaxy evolution for reasonable values of the AGN duty cycle, these are just the sources where AGN feedback should be most important. Our sources show a diverse set of gas kinematics ranging from regular velocity gradients with amplitudes of Δv = 200-400 km s-1 consistent with rotating disks to very irregular kinematics with multiple velocity jumps of a few 100 km s-1. Line widths are generally high, typically around FWHM = 800 km s-1, more similar to the more powerful high-z radio galaxies than mass-selected samples of massive high-z galaxies without bright AGNs, and consistent with the velocity range expected from recent hydrodynamic models. A broad Hα line in one target implies a black hole mass of a few 109 M⊙. Velocity offsets of putative satellite galaxies near a few targets suggest dynamical masses of a few 1011 M⊙ for our sources, akin to the most powerful high-z radio galaxies. Ionized gas masses are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than in the most powerful radio galaxies, and the extinction in the gas is

  13. Alignments of radio galaxies in deep radio imaging of ELAIS N1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. R.; Jagannathan, P.

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the distribution of radio jet position angles of radio galaxies over an area of 1 square degree in the ELAIS N1 field. ELAIS N1 was observed with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 612 MHz to an rms noise level of 10 μJy and angular resolution of 6 arcsec × 5 arcsec. The image contains 65 resolved radio galaxy jets. The spatial distribution reveals a prominent alignment of jet position angles along a `filament' of about 1°. We examine the possibility that the apparent alignment arises from an underlying random distribution and find that the probability of chance alignment is less than 0.1 per cent. An angular covariance analysis of the data indicates the presence of spatially coherence in position angles on scales >0 .^{circ}5. This angular scales translates to a comoving scale of >20 Mpc at a redshift of 1. The implied alignment of the spin axes of massive black holes that give rise to the radio jets suggest the presence of large-scale spatial coherence in angular momentum. Our results reinforce prior evidence for large-scale spatial alignments of quasar optical polarization position angles.

  14. Massive star-forming regions across the galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygl, Kazi Lucie Jessica

    2010-04-01

    Star-forming regions trace the spiral structure of the Galaxy. They are regions of increased column density and therefore traced well by the extinction in the mid-infrared based on the Spitzer/GLIMPSE 3.6-4.5 micron color excess maps. A sample of 25 high extinction clouds (HECs) was studied in the 1.2 mm dust continuum emission, and followed up by observations of ammonia plus several other molecules using the Effelsberg 100m, IRAM 30m and APEX telescopes. With these data we want to investigate the most early stages of massive star formation, which are currently still largely unknown. Three cloud classes were defined from their morphology in the 1.2 mm continuum maps: the early diffuse HECs, with a low contrast between the clump and cloud emission; the peaked HECs, with an increased contrast; the late multiply peaked HECs, with more than one clump and a high contrast between the clump and the cloud emission. The clouds are cold (T 16 K) and massive (M 800 M_sun) and contain dense clumps (n 10^5 cm^{-3}) of 0.3 pc in size. These clumps were investigated for evidence of gravitational collapse or expansion, for high velocity outflows, and for the presence of young stellar objects. Based on these results we interpret the three cloud classes as an evolutionary sequence of star-forming clouds. Accurate distances are a crucial parameter for establishing the mass, size, and luminosity of an object. Also, for understanding the spiral structure of the Galaxy trustworthy distances are necessary. The most accurate method to measure these is the trigonometric parallax. Using the European Very Large Baseline Interferometry Network of radio antennas we measured, for the first time, parallaxes of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. This transition belongs to the strongest maser species in the Galaxy, it is stable and observed toward numerous massive star-forming regions. We measured distances and proper motions toward L 1287, L 1206, NGC 281-W, ON 1 and S 255, and obtained their 3-dimensional

  15. Integrated Radio Continuum Spectra of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvil, Joshua; Owen, Frazer; Eilek, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spectral shape of the total continuum radiation, between 74 MHz and 5 GHz (400-6 cm in wavelength), for a large sample of bright galaxies. We take advantage of the overlapping survey coverage of the VLA Low-Frequency Sky Survey, the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, and the Green Bank 6 cm Survey to achieve significantly better resolution, sensitivity, and sample size compared to prior efforts of this nature. For our sample of 250 bright galaxies we measure a mean spectral index, α, of -0.69 between 1.4 and 4.85 GHz, -0.55 between 325 MHz and 1.4 GHz, and -0.45 between 74 and 325 MHz, which amounts to a detection of curvature in the mean spectrum. The magnitude of this curvature is approximately Δα = -0.2 per logarithmic frequency decade when fit with a generalized function having constant curvature. No trend in low-frequency spectral flattening versus galaxy inclination is evident in our data, suggesting that free-free absorption is not a satisfying explanation for the observed curvature. The ratio of thermal to non-thermal emission is estimated through two independent methods: (1) using the IRAS far-IR fluxes and (2) with the value of the total spectral index. Method (1) results in a distribution of 1.4 GHz thermal fractions of 9% ± 3%, which is consistent with previous studies, while method (2) produces a mean 1.4 GHz thermal fraction of 51% with dispersion 26%. The highly implausible values produced by method (2) indicate that the sum of typical power-law thermal and non-thermal components is not a viable model for the total spectral index between 325 and 1.4 GHz. An investigation into relationships between spectral index, infrared-derived quantities, and additional source properties reveals that galaxies with high radio luminosity in our sample are found to have, on average, a flatter radio spectral index, and early types tend to have excess radio emission when compared to the radio-infrared ratio of later types

  16. Integrated radio continuum spectra of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Marvil, Joshua; Owen, Frazer; Eilek, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spectral shape of the total continuum radiation, between 74 MHz and 5 GHz (400-6 cm in wavelength), for a large sample of bright galaxies. We take advantage of the overlapping survey coverage of the VLA Low-Frequency Sky Survey, the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, and the Green Bank 6 cm Survey to achieve significantly better resolution, sensitivity, and sample size compared to prior efforts of this nature. For our sample of 250 bright galaxies we measure a mean spectral index, α, of –0.69 between 1.4 and 4.85 GHz, –0.55 between 325 MHz and 1.4 GHz, and –0.45 between 74 and 325 MHz, which amounts to a detection of curvature in the mean spectrum. The magnitude of this curvature is approximately Δα = –0.2 per logarithmic frequency decade when fit with a generalized function having constant curvature. No trend in low-frequency spectral flattening versus galaxy inclination is evident in our data, suggesting that free-free absorption is not a satisfying explanation for the observed curvature. The ratio of thermal to non-thermal emission is estimated through two independent methods: (1) using the IRAS far-IR fluxes and (2) with the value of the total spectral index. Method (1) results in a distribution of 1.4 GHz thermal fractions of 9% ± 3%, which is consistent with previous studies, while method (2) produces a mean 1.4 GHz thermal fraction of 51% with dispersion 26%. The highly implausible values produced by method (2) indicate that the sum of typical power-law thermal and non-thermal components is not a viable model for the total spectral index between 325 and 1.4 GHz. An investigation into relationships between spectral index, infrared-derived quantities, and additional source properties reveals that galaxies with high radio luminosity in our sample are found to have, on average, a flatter radio spectral index, and early types tend to have excess radio emission when compared to the radio-infrared ratio of later

  17. Radio haloes in Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-selected clusters of galaxies: the making of a halo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonafede, A.; Intema, H.; Brüggen, M.; Vazza, F.; Basu, K.; Sommer, M.; Ebeling, H.; de Gasperin, F.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Cassano, R.

    2015-12-01

    Radio haloes are synchrotron radio sources detected in some massive galaxy clusters. Their size of Mpc indicates that (re)acceleration processes are taking place in the host cluster. X-ray catalogues of galaxy clusters have been used in the past to search for radio haloes and to understand their connection with cluster-cluster mergers and with the thermal component of the intracluster medium. More recently, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect has been proven to be a better route to search for massive clusters in a wider redshift range. With the aim of discovering new radio haloes and understanding their connection with cluster-cluster mergers, we have selected the most massive clusters from the Planck early source catalogue and we have observed with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 323 MHz those objects for which deep observations were not available. We have discovered new peculiar radio emission in three of the observed clusters, finding (i) a radio halo in the cluster RXCJ0949.8+1708, (ii) extended emission in Abell 1443 that we classify as a radio halo plus a radio relic, with a bright filament embedded in the radio halo, and (iii) low-power radio emission in CIZA J1938.3+5409 that is ten times below the radio-X-ray correlation and represents the first direct detection of the radio emission in the `upper-limit' region of the radio-X-ray diagram. We discuss the properties of these new radio haloes in the framework of theoretical models for the radio emission.

  18. THE MID-INFRARED ENVIRONMENTS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Galametz, Audrey; Stern, Daniel; De Breuck, Carlos; Vernet, Joeel; Hatch, Nina; Mayo, Jack; Miley, George; Rettura, Alessandro; Seymour, Nick; Adam Stanford, S.

    2012-04-20

    Taking advantage of the impressive sensitivity of Spitzer to detect massive galaxies at high redshift, we study the mid-infrared environments of powerful, high-redshift radio galaxies at 1.2 < z < 3. Galaxy cluster member candidates were isolated using a single Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared color criterion, [3.6]-[4.5] > -0.1 (AB), in the fields of 48 radio galaxies at 1.2 < z < 3. Using a counts-in-cell analysis, we identify a field as overdense when 15 or more red IRAC sources are found within 1' (i.e., 0.5 Mpc at 1.2 < z < 3) of the radio galaxy to the 5{sigma} flux density limits of our IRAC data (f{sub 4.5} = 13.4 {mu}Jy). We find that radio galaxies lie preferentially in medium to dense regions, with 73% of the targeted fields denser than average. Our (shallow) 120 s data permit the rediscovery of previously known clusters and protoclusters associated with radio galaxies as well as the discovery of new promising galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.2.

  19. Probing dust-obscured star formation in the most massive gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Jochen; Michałowski, Michał J.; Klose, Sylvio; Hunt, Leslie K.; Gentile, Gianfranco; Kamphuis, Peter; Herrero-Illana, Rubén; Wieringa, Mark; Krühler, Thomas; Schady, Patricia; Elliott, Jonathan; Graham, John F.; Ibar, Eduardo; Knust, Fabian; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, Ana; Palazzi, Eliana; Rossi, Andrea; Savaglio, Sandra

    2016-08-01

    Context. As a result of their relation to massive stars, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow the pinpointing of star formation in galaxies independent of redshift, dust obscuration, or galaxy mass/size, thus providing a unique tool to investigate star formation history over cosmic time. Aims: About half of the optical afterglows of long-duration GRBs are missed owing to dust extinction and are primarily located in the most massive GRB hosts. It is important to investigate the amount of obscured star formation in these GRB host galaxies to understand this bias. Methods: Radio emission of galaxies correlates with star formation, but does not suffer extinction as do the optical star formation estimators. We selected 11 GRB host galaxies with either large stellar mass or large UV-based and optical-based star formation rates (SFRs) and obtained radio observations of these with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array. Results: Despite intentionally selecting GRB hosts with expected high SFRs, we do not find any radio emission related to star formation in any of our targets. Our upper limit for GRB 100621A implies that the earlier reported radio detection was due to afterglow emission. We detect radio emission from the position of GRB 020819B, but argue that it is in large part, if not completely, due to afterglow contamination. Conclusions: Half of our sample has radio-derived SFR limits, which are only a factor 2-3 above the optically measured SFRs. This supports other recent studies that the majority of star formation in GRB hosts is not obscured by dust. Based on observations collected with ATCA under ID C2718, and at VLA under ID 13B-017.

  20. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10.

    PubMed

    Reines, Amy E; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Johnson, Kelsey E; Brogan, Crystal L

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first 'seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize 2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize 2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids. PMID:21217688

  1. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize2-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brogan, Crystal L.

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first `seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids.

  2. The massive star content of blue irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Gallagher, J. S., III

    1986-01-01

    Three regions of recent star formation in blue irregular galaxies were observed with the IUE in the short wavelength, low dispersion mode. The spectra indicate that the massive star content is similar in 2 of the 3 regions and is best fit by a synthesized spectrum of a burst of massive stars 2.5 to 3.0 million yr old.

  3. Radiative versus Jet Mode in Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the local universe, the vast majority of radio-loud active galaxies show none of the conventional AGN apparatus of accretion disk, torus, corona, or broad/narrow-line regions. Instead such nuclear emission as they have appears to be completely dominated by emission directly from the jet; the accretion, which must be present to drive the jet, appears to be highly radiatively inefficient. However, the most radio-luminous objects in the universe are almost all quasars (type I or type II) which behave in the textbook manner, appearing as a normal radiatively efficient AGN with the addition of a jet. The past decade has seen a substantial evolution in our understanding of the physical origins of these differences, their relation to the host galaxy and environment, and their interpretation in terms of completely unified models of AGN, and I will review our current understanding of these issues in my talk.

  4. The formation of massive, quiescent galaxies at cosmic noon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Robert; Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2016-05-01

    The cosmic noon (z ˜ 1.5-3) marked a period of vigorous star formation for most galaxies. However, about a third of the more massive galaxies at those times were quiescent in the sense that their observed stellar populations are inconsistent with rapid star formation. The reduced star formation activity is often attributed to gaseous outflows driven by feedback from supermassive black holes, but the impact of black hole feedback on galaxies in the young Universe is not yet definitively established. We analyse the origin of quiescent galaxies with the help of ultrahigh resolution, cosmological simulations that include feedback from stars but do not model the uncertain consequences of black hole feedback. We show that dark matter haloes with specific accretion rates below ˜0.25-0.4 Gyr-1 preferentially host galaxies with reduced star formation rates and red broad-band colours. The fraction of such haloes in large dark matter only simulations matches the observed fraction of massive quiescent galaxies (˜1010-1011 M⊙). This strongly suggests that halo accretion rate is the key parameter determining which massive galaxies at z ˜ 1.5-3 become quiescent. Empirical models that connect galaxy and halo evolution, such as halo occupation distribution or abundance matching models, assume a tight link between galaxy properties and the masses of their parent haloes. These models will benefit from adding the specific accretion rate of haloes as a second model parameter.

  5. X-Shaped Radio Galaxies and the Gravitational Wave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall Roberts, David; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Coalescence of super massive black holes (SMBH's) in galactic mergers is potentially the dominant contributor to the low frequency gravitational wave background (GWB). It was proposed by Merritt and Ekers (2002) that X-shaped radio galaxies are signposts of such coalescences, and that their abundance might be used to predict the magnitude of the gravitational wave background. In Roberts et al. (2015) we presented radio images of all 52 X-shaped radio source candidates out of the sample of 100 selected by Cheung (2007) for which archival VLA data were available. These images indicate that at most 21% of the candidates might be genuine X-shaped radio sources that were formed by a restarting of beams in a new direction following a major merger. This suggests that fewer than 1.3% of extended radio sources appear to be candidates for genuine axis reorientations, much smaller than the 7% suggested by Leahy & Parma (1992). Thus the associated gravitational wave background may be substantially smaller than previous estimates. These results can be used to normalize detailed calculations of the SMBH coalescence rate and the GWB.

  6. The peculiar radio galaxy 3C 433

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Breugel, W.; Helfand, D.; Balick, B.; Heckman, T.; Miley, G.

    1983-01-01

    Radio, optical and X-ray observations are presented of the peculiar radio galaxy 3C 433, a Seyfert 2 object with luminosity an order of magnitude greater than that expected from its complex, shell-type morphology. Observations conducted at 6 and 12 cm with the VLA and at 21 cm with the Westerbork telescope show a striking asymmetry between the northern and southern radio emissions, and an overall X-shaped morphology. Optical observations using the Video Camera and High Gain Video Spectrometer on the 4-m telescope and the Intensified Image Dissector Scanner on the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak confirm the identification of the source with a pair of bright galaxies. Observations in the X-ray from the Einstein Observatory IPC reveal an unresolved source at the position of 3C 433, as well as two serendipitous X-ray sources. The observations may be used to explain the overall structure of the source either in terms of tidal torquing or precessing models of double galaxies; however, it is argued that the tidal torquing model requires fewer assumptions to account for the brightness asymmetry.

  7. Understanding the size growth of massive galaxies through stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    The growth of massive galaxies remains an open problem. The observational evidence seems to converge on a two-stage scenario, where a compact massive core is formed during an early, intense burst, followed by a more extended process of mass and size growth at intermediate redshift (z<2). This talk focuses on the latter, exploring the growth of massive galaxies through a detailed analysis of the stellar populations in close pairs, to study their formation history. Two surveys are explored (SHARDS and GAMA), probing the stellar populations of pre-merging systems out to z~1.3, and down to a mass ratio ~1:100. We will compare the results between medium band spectral fitting (SHARDS) and those from a more targeted analysis of line strengths in the GAMA data. The combination of the two datasets provide a unique insight of the growth channel of massive galaxies via mergers.

  8. The Radio Properties of Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. T.

    2014-09-01

    Energetic feedback from the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) is required to prevent catastrophic cooling of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters. Evidence for this is seen through the inflation of cavities in the ICM by AGN-launched, radio-emitting jets, and understanding this process is an active area of research. Radio observations play an integral role in this, as they trace the active stages of the feedback cycle. Understanding the radio properties of BCGs is therefore paramount for understanding both galaxy clusters and AGN feedback processes globally. Within this thesis, the BCGs in a large (>700) sample of X-ray selected clusters are studied. We observe these BCGs with a wide variety of facilities, building a census of their radio properties across a range of frequencies, timescales and angular resolutions. Radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are built for over 200 BCGs, and then decomposed into two components; a core, attributable to ongoing nuclear activity, and a non-core, attributable to historical accretion. Both components are not only more common, but also significantly more powerful in cool-core (CC) clusters than non-cool core (NCC) clusters. However, it is the presence of an active core that shows BCGs in CC clusters are constantly `on' - explaining how they regulate their environments over gigayear timescales. We observe 35 currently active BCGs at high (15-353 GHz) radio frequencies, and monitor their variability. Self-absorbed, active components are found to be common at high frequency. Little variability is seen on < year timescales, although longer term variation of ~10% annually over few-decade timescales is observed. Evidence is presented for a hitherto unseen component in BCG spectra that may be attributable to a naked Advection Dominated Accretion Flow (ADAF). The milli-arcsecond scale radio properties of 59 sources are studied, with a large range of morphologies recovered although no

  9. Most Massive Globular Cluster in Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    Far down in the southern sky, in the constellation of Centaurus, a diffuse spot of light can be perceived with the unaided eye. It may be unimpressive, but when seen through a telescope, it turns out to be a beautiful, dense cluster of innumerable stars [1]. Omega Centauri, as this object is called, is the brightest of its type in the sky. We refer to it as a "globular cluster", due to its symmetric form. It belongs to our Milky Way galaxy and astrophysical investigations have shown that it is located at a distance of about 16,500 light-years (1 light-year = 9,460,000,000,000 km). Nobody knows for sure how many individual stars it contains, but recent estimates run into the millions. Most of these stars are more than 10,000 million years old and it is generally agreed that Omega Centauri has a similar age. Measurements of its motion indicate that Omega Centauri plows through the Milky Way in an elongated orbit. It is not easy to understand how it has managed to keep its stars together during such an extended period. MEASURING STELLAR VELOCITIES IN OMEGA CENTAURI A group of astronomers [2] have recently carried through a major investigation of Omega Centauri. After many nights of observations at the ESO La Silla observatory, they now conclude that not only is this globular cluster the brightest, it is indeed by far the most massive known in the Milky Way. The very time-consuming observations were made during numerous observing sessions over a period of no less than 13 years (1981-1993), with the photoelectric spectrometer CORAVEL mounted on the 1.5-m Danish telescope at La Silla. The CORAVEL instrument (COrelation RAdial VELocities) was built in a joint effort between the Geneva (Switzerland) and Marseilles (France) observatories. It functions according to the cross-correlation technique, by means of which the spectrum of the observed star is compared with a "standard stellar spectrum" [3]. HOW HEAVY IS OMEGA CENTAURI? In the present study, a total of 1701

  10. ON THE ASSEMBLY HISTORY OF STELLAR COMPONENTS IN MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaehyun; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2013-03-20

    Matsuoka and Kawara showed that the number density of the most massive galaxies (log M/M{sub Sun} = 11.5-12.0) increases faster than that of the next massive group (log M/M{sub Sun} = 11.0-11.5) during 0 < z < 1. This appears to be in contradiction to the apparent 'downsizing effect'. We attempt to understand the two observational findings in the context of the hierarchical merger paradigm using semi-analytic techniques. Our models closely reproduce the result of Matsuoka and Kawara. Downsizing can also be understood as larger galaxies have, on average, smaller assembly ages but larger stellar ages. Our fiducial models further reveal details of the history of the stellar mass growth of massive galaxies. The most massive galaxies (log M/M{sub Sun} = 11.5-12.0 at z = 0), which are mostly the brightest cluster galaxies, obtain roughly 70% of their stellar components via merger accretion. The role of merger accretion monotonically declines with galaxy mass: 40% for log M/M{sub Sun} = 11.0-11.5 and 20% for log M/M{sub Sun} = 10.5-11.0 at z = 0. The specific accreted stellar mass rates via galaxy mergers decline very slowly during the whole redshift range, while specific star formation rates sharply decrease with time. In the case of the most massive galaxies, merger accretion becomes the most important channel for the stellar mass growth at z {approx} 2. On the other hand, in situ star formation is always the dominant channel in L{sub *} galaxies.

  11. Tracing the Formation and Evolution of Massive Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davari, Roozbeh

    Massive galaxies at higher redshift, z > 2, show different characteristics than their local counterparts. They are compact and most likely have a disk. Understanding the evolutionary path of these massive galaxies can give us some clues on how the universe has been behaving in the last 10 billion years. How well can we measure the bulge and disk properties of these systems? We perform two sets of comprehensive simulations in order to systematically quantify the effects of non-homology in structures and the methods employed. For the first set of simulations, by accurately capturing the detailed substructures of nearby elliptical galaxies and then rescaling their sizes and signal-to-noise to mimic galaxies at different redshifts, we confirm that the massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 are significantly more compact intrinsically than their local counterparts. Their observed compactness is not a result of missing faint outer light due to systematic errors in modeling. For the second set of simulations, we employ empirical scaling relations to produce realistic-looking two-component local galaxies with a uniform and wide range of bulge-to-total ratios (B/T), and then rescale them to mimic the signal-to-noise ratios and sizes of observed galaxies at z ≈ 2. This provides the first set of simulations for which we can examine the robustness of two-component decomposition of compact disk galaxies at different B/T . We can measure B/T accurately without imposing any constraints on the light profile shape of the bulge, but, due to the small angular sizes of bulges at high redshift, their detailed properties can only be recovered for galaxies with B/T ≥ 0.2. The disk component, by contrast, can be measured with little difficulty. Next, we trace back the evolution of local massive galaxies but performing detailed morphological analysis: namely, single Swrsic fitting and bulge+disk decomposition. CANDELS images and catalogues offer an ideal dataset for this study. We

  12. The fate of high-redshift massive compact galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; La Barbera, Francesco; Ferreras, Ignacio; Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Martínez-Valpuesta, Inma; Stringer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies (nicknamed red nuggets) have been traditionally connected to present-day elliptical galaxies, often overlooking the relationships that they may have with other galaxy types. We use large bulge-disc decomposition catalogues based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to check the hypothesis that red nuggets have survived as compact cores embedded inside the haloes or discs of present-day massive galaxies. In this study, we designate a compact core as the bulge component that satisfies a prescribed compactness criterion. Photometric and dynamic mass-size and mass-density relations are used to show that, in the inner regions of galaxies at z ˜ 0.1, there are abundant compact cores matching the peculiar properties of the red nuggets, an abundance comparable to that of red nuggets at z ˜ 1.5. Furthermore, the morphology distribution of the present-day galaxies hosting compact cores is used to demonstrate that, in addition to the standard channel connecting red nuggets with elliptical galaxies, a comparable fraction of red nuggets might have ended up embedded in discs. This result generalizes the inside-out formation scenario; present-day massive galaxies can begin as dense spheroidal cores (red nuggets), around which either a spheroidal halo or a disc is formed later.

  13. Massive Quiescent Disk Galaxies in the CANDELS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesseli, Aurora; McGrath, E. J.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the GOODS-S field of the CANDELS survey, we find evidence for an increasing fraction of disk-dominated galaxies at high-redshift ( 2) among the quiescent, or non-star-forming galaxy population, in agreement with a growing body of evidence from recent results in the literature. We selected all galaxies with mass M>1010 Msun within the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 2.5, and imposed a two-color selection criteria using rest-frame U, V, and J-band flux to separate quiescent from star-forming galaxies. From this sample, we performed a qualitative visual classification and a quantitative classification using the galaxy-fitting program Galfit. Of the original 140 quiescent galaxies, 23 have a disk component that contributes 50% or more of the total integrated galaxy light, and most of these are at high-redshift. At a redshift of z ~ 2 a significant fraction of all quiescent galaxies showed strong disk components with 30% being disk-dominated. We also find that massive disk galaxies seem to live in less densely populated environments while massive ellipticals live in environments with more neighbors, which leads us to believe that there are two mechanisms for the creation of massive quiescent galaxies. For the disks, the lower density environment and the disk nature of these galaxies lead us to favor cold streams over the major merger model of galaxy formation. The ellipticals, which live in higher density environments, could be assembled through major mergers of already aged stellar populations (e.g., dry mergers). This research is supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Foundation.

  14. Spectroscopic Confirmation of A Radio-Selected Galaxy Overdensity at z = 1.11

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, S; Stern, D; Holden, B; Spinrad, H

    2004-02-26

    We report the discovery of a galaxy overdensity at z = 1.11 associated with the z = 1.110 high-redshift radio galaxy MG 0442+0202. The group, CL 0442+0202, was found in a near-infrared survey of z > 1 radio galaxies undertaken to identify spatially-coincident regions with a high density of objects red in I - K' color, typical of z > 1 elliptical galaxies. Spectroscopic observations from the Keck I telescope reveal five galaxies within 35'' of MG 0442+0202 at 1.10 < z < 1.11. These member galaxies have broad-band colors and optical spectra consistent with passively-evolving elliptical galaxies formed at high redshift. Archival ROSAT observations reveal a 3{sigma} detection of soft X-ray emission coincident with CL 0442+0202 at a level five times greater than expected for the radio galaxy. These data are suggestive of a rich galaxy cluster and inspired a 45 ks Chandra X-Ray Observatory observation. As expected, the radio galaxy is unresolved to Chandra, but is responsible for approximately half of the observed X-ray flux. The remaining ROSAT flux is resolved into four point sources within 15'' of the radio galaxy, corresponding to a surface density two orders of magnitude higher than average for X-ray sources at these flux levels (S{sub 0.5-2keV} > 5x10{sup -16} ergs cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}). One of these point sources is identified with a radio-quiet, type II quasar at z = 1.863, akin to sources recently reported in deep Chandra surveys. The limit on an extended hot intracluster medium in the Chandra data is S{sub 1-6keV} < 1.9 x 10{sup -15} ergs cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (3{sigma}, 30'' radius aperture). Though the X-ray observations do not confirm the existence of a massive, bound cluster at z > 1, the success of the optical/near-infrared targeting of early-type systems near the radio galaxy validates searches using radio galaxies as beacons for high-redshift large-scale structure. We interpret CL 0442+0202 to be a massive cluster in the process of formation.

  15. Global and radial variations in the efficiency of massive star formation among galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Lori E.; Young, Judith S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine the regions within galaxies which give rise to the most efficient star formation and to test the hypothesis that galaxies with high infrared luminosities per unit molecular mass are efficiently producing high mass stars, researchers have undertaken an H alpha imaging survey in galaxies whose CO distributions have been measured as part of the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) Extragalactic CO Survey. From these images researchers have derived global H alpha fluxes and distributions for comparison with far infrared radiation (FIR) fluxes and CO fluxes and distributions. Here, researchers present results on the global massive star formation efficiency (SFE = L sub H sub alpha/M(H2)) as a function of morphological type and environment, and on the radial distribution of the SFE within both peculiar and isolated galaxies. On the basis of comparison of the global L sub H sub alpha/M(H2) and L sub FIR/M(H2) for 111 galaxies, researchers conclude that environment rather than morphological type has the strongest effect on the global efficiency of massive star formation. Based on their study of a small sample, they find that the largest radial gradients are observed in the interacting/peculiar galaxies, indicating that environment affects the star formation efficiency within galaxies as well.

  16. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, G. R.; Patten, Brian M.

    1991-01-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals.

  17. The Radio Luminosity Function and Galaxy Evolution of Abell 2256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootaninia, Zahra

    2015-05-01

    This thesis presents a study of the radio luminosity function and the evolution of galaxies in the Abell 2256 cluster (z=0.058, richness class 2). Using the NED database and VLA deep data with an rms sensitivity of 18 mu Jy.beam--1, we identified 257 optical galaxies as members of A2256, of which 83 are radio galaxies. Since A2256 is undergoing a cluster-cluster merger, it is a good candidate to study the radio activity of galaxies in the cluster. We calculated the Univariate and Bivariate radio luminosity functions for A2256, and compared the results to studies on other clusters. We also used the SDSS parameter fracDev to roughly classify galaxies as spirals and ellipticals, and investigated the distribution and structure of galaxies in the cluster. We found that most of the radio galaxies in A2256 are faint, and are distributed towards the outskirts of the cluster. On the other hand, almost all very bright radio galaxies are ellipticals which are located at the center of the cluster. We also found there is an excess in the number of radio spiral galaxies in A2256 compared to the number of radio ellipticals, counting down to a radio luminosity of log(luminosity)=20.135 W/Hz..

  18. Pilot study of the radio-emitting AGN population: the emerging new class of FR 0 radio-galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Capetti, Alessandro; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of a pilot JVLA project aimed at studying the bulk of the radio-emitting AGN population, that was unveiled by the NVSS/FIRST and SDSS surveys. The key questions are related to the origin of their radio-emission and to its connection with the properties of their hosts. We obtained A-array observations at the JVLA at 1.4, 4.5, and 7.5 GHz for 12 sources, a small but representative subsample. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or only slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc, with the one exception of a hybrid FR I/FR II source extended over ~40 kpc. Thanks to either the new high-resolution maps or to the radio spectra, we isolated the radio core component in most of them. We split the sample into two groups. Four sources have low black hole (BH) masses (mostly ~107 M⊙) and are hosted by blue galaxies, often showing evidence of a contamination from star formation to their radio emission, and are associated with radio-quiet (RQ) AGN. The second group consists in seven radio-loud (RL) AGN, which are located in red massive (~1011 M⊙) early-type galaxies, have high BH masses (≳108 M⊙), and are spectroscopically classified as low excitation galaxies (LEG). These are all characteristics typical of FR I radio galaxies. They also lie on the correlation between radio core power and [O III] line luminosity defined by FR Is. However, they are more core-dominated (by a factor of ~30) than FR Is and show a deficit of extended radio emission. We dub these sources "FR 0" to emphasize their lack of prominent extended radio emission, which is their single distinguishing feature with respect to FR Is. The differences in radio properties between FR 0s and FR Is might be ascribed to an evolutionary effect, with the FR 0 sources undergoing rapid intermittency that prevents the growth of large-scale structures. However, this contrasts with the scenario in which low-luminosity radio-galaxies are fed by continuous accretion of gas from

  19. The evolution of galaxy star formation activity in massive haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popesso, P.; Biviano, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Wilman, D.; Salvato, M.; Magnelli, B.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Rodighiero, G.; Ziparo, F.; Berta, S.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Lutz, D.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Cimatti, A.; Fadda, D.; Ilbert, O.; Le Floch, E.; Nordon, R.; Poglitsch, A.; Xu, C. K.

    2015-02-01

    Context. There is now a large consensus that the current epoch of the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) is dominated by low mass galaxies while the most active phase, between redshifts 1 and 2, is dominated by more massive galaxies, which evolve more quickly. Aims: Massive galaxies tend to inhabit very massive haloes, such as galaxy groups and clusters. We aim to understand whether the observed "galaxy downsizing" could be interpreted as a "halo downsizing", whereas the most massive haloes, and their galaxy populations, evolve more rapidly than the haloes with lower mass. Methods: We studied the contribution to the CSFH of galaxies inhabiting group-sized haloes. This is done through the study of the evolution of the infra-red (IR) luminosity function of group galaxies from redshift 0 to redshift ~1.6. We used a sample of 39 X-ray-selected groups in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN), and the COSMOS field, where the deepest available mid- and far-IR surveys have been conducted with Spitzer MIPS and with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on board the Herschel satellite. Results: Groups at low redshift lack the brightest, rarest, and most star forming IR-emitting galaxies observed in the field. Their IR-emitting galaxies contribute ≤10% of the comoving volume density of the whole IR galaxy population in the local Universe. At redshift ≳1, the most IR-luminous galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) are mainly located in groups, and this is consistent with a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR) vs. density anti-correlation observed in the nearby Universe. At these redshifts, group galaxies contribute 60-80% of the CSFH, i.e. much more than at lower redshifts. Below z ~ 1, the comoving number and SFR densities of IR-emitting galaxies in groups decline significantly faster than those of all IR-emitting galaxies. Conclusions: Our results are consistent with a "halo downsizing" scenario and highlight the

  20. A study of the x ray environment of radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, George F.; Burns, Jack O.; Owen, Frazer

    1993-01-01

    We are currently working on a program to use extensive x-ray and radio databases to investigate the relationship between extended radio emission and environment in clusters of galaxies. The radio galaxy morphology is determined using VLA imaging and the x-ray properties are determined from Einstein IPC images. This study is motivated by the hypothesis that the key to understanding radio galaxies lies in the local environment. To test this hypothesis we have studied the detailed relationship between galaxy radio emission and the x-ray morphology of their parent clusters. In this pilot study we have used 35 radio sources found in 27 clusters. We have determined the position angle of the x-ray and radio emission, and x-ray and radio luminosities. The x-ray position was taken to be the position of peak flux of the subclump containing the radio galaxy. The radio position was taken to be the position of the galaxy. We do not find a correlation between the x-ray and radio source position angle. This remains true when the sample is divided into subsamples according to radio morphology (wide angle tail, twin jet, narrow angle tail galaxies). We find a weak correlation between the radio source luminosity and the x-ray luminosity. We have computed the distance from the radio galaxy position to the center of the x-ray clump. We find a mean distance from the x-ray clump center of 0.16 Mpc for the radio galaxies in this sample. The mean distance to the nearest clump of x-ray emission is typically half the distance to the optical cluster center. We thus find strong evidence that radio galaxies are located very close to clumps of x-ray emission. These subclumps are not always affiliated with the central cluster x-ray emission. This supports our hypothesis that x-ray emission may provide a key to understanding radio galaxy morphology. We find evidence that radio galaxies occur in clusters that contain prominent substructures. Radio galaxies may thus provide an added diagnostic of

  1. An evolutionary sequence of young radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, J. D.; Norris, R. P.; Filipović, M. D.; Tothill, N. F. H.

    2016-02-01

    We have observed the faintest sample of Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources to date, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We test the hypothesis that GPS and CSS sources are the youngest radio galaxies, place them into an evolutionary sequence along with a number of other young active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates, and search for evidence of the evolving accretion mode and its relationship to star formation. GPS/CSS sources have very small radio jets that have been recently launched from the central supermassive black hole and grow in linear size as they evolve, which means that the linear size of the jets is an excellent indicator of the evolutionary stage of the AGN. We use high-resolution radio observations to determine the linear size of GPS/CSS sources, resolve their jets and observe their small-scale morphologies. We combine this with other multi-wavelength age indicators, including the spectral age, colours, optical spectra, and spectral energy distribution of the host galaxy, in an attempt to assemble all age indicators into a self-consistent model. We observe the most compact sources with Very Large Baseline Interferometry, which reveals their parsec-scale structures, giving us a range of source sizes and allowing us to test what fraction of GPS/CSS sources are young and evolving.

  2. The stellar populations of massive galaxies in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.

    2013-07-01

    I present a brief review of the stellar population properties of massive galaxies, focusing on early-type galaxies in particular, with emphasis on recent results from the ATLAS3D Survey. I discuss the occurence of young stellar ages, cold gas, and ongoing star formation in early-type galaxies, the presence of which gives important clues to the evolutionary path of these galaxies. Consideration of empirical star formation histories gives a meaningful picture of galaxy stellar population properties, and allows accurate comparison of mass estimates from populations and dynamics. This has recently provided strong evidence of a non-universal IMF, as supported by other recent evidences. Spatially-resolved studies of stellar populations are also crucial to connect distinct components within galaxies to spatial structures seen in other wavelengths or parameters. Stellar populations in the faint outer envelopes of early-type galaxies are a formidable frontier for observers, but promise to put constraints on the ratio of accreted stellar mass versus that formed `in situ' - a key feature of recent galaxy formation models. Galaxy environment appears to play a key role in controlling the stellar population properties of low mass galaxies. Simulations remind us, however, that current day galaxies are the product of a complex assembly and environment history, which gives rise to the trends we see. This has strong implications for our interpretation of environmental trends.

  3. Early assembly of the most massive galaxies.

    PubMed

    Collins, Chris A; Stott, John P; Hilton, Matt; Kay, Scott T; Stanford, S Adam; Davidson, Michael; Hosmer, Mark; Hoyle, Ben; Liddle, Andrew; Lloyd-Davies, Ed; Mann, Robert G; Mehrtens, Nicola; Miller, Christopher J; Nichol, Robert C; Romer, A Kathy; Sahlén, Martin; Viana, Pedro T P; West, Michael J

    2009-04-01

    The current consensus is that galaxies begin as small density fluctuations in the early Universe and grow by in situ star formation and hierarchical merging. Stars begin to form relatively quickly in sub-galactic-sized building blocks called haloes which are subsequently assembled into galaxies. However, exactly when this assembly takes place is a matter of some debate. Here we report that the stellar masses of brightest cluster galaxies, which are the most luminous objects emitting stellar light, some 9 billion years ago are not significantly different from their stellar masses today. Brightest cluster galaxies are almost fully assembled 4-5 billion years after the Big Bang, having grown to more than 90 per cent of their final stellar mass by this time. Our data conflict with the most recent galaxy formation models based on the largest simulations of dark-matter halo development. These models predict protracted formation of brightest cluster galaxies over a Hubble time, with only 22 per cent of the stellar mass assembled at the epoch probed by our sample. Our findings suggest a new picture in which brightest cluster galaxies experience an early period of rapid growth rather than prolonged hierarchical assembly. PMID:19340075

  4. Understanding the size growth of massive galaxies through stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, I.; Trujillo, I.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Pérez-González, P.

    Massive early-type galaxies undergo a significant process of evolution with redshift on the stellar mass vs size plane. Furthermore, this trend does not depend on the age of their stellar populations. Therefore, such an evolution should involve processes that do not include a significant amount of star formation, leaving (mostly) dry mergers as the main growth channel. By studying close pairs involving a massive galaxy, one can quantify the role of mergers on the growth of massive galaxies. A recent study based on the SHARDS dataset reveals that minor mergers cannot be the dominant mechanism to explain the bulk of size growth in these systems. Merging is found to provide a constant fractional growth rate of ~10% per Gyr from redshift z=1, corresponding to an overall stellar mass increase of 2× between z=1 and z=0.

  5. Correlations between the far-infrared, radio, and blue luminosities of spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, J. J.; Anderson, M. L.; Helou, G.

    1991-01-01

    FIR-radio luminosity correlations are presently derived for two statistically complete samples spanning a wide luminosity range. While observed correlations are tight, they are not linear; the observed scattering is mostly intrinsic. An empirical correction to the radio luminosities, based on observed blue luminosities, makes the corrected FIR-radio correlation linear and eliminates most of the residual variance. A two-component model that is consistent with the improved correlation is proposed for the heating luminosity within galaxies. The first, radio-loud component contains young massive stars that heat the dust, while contributing to the cool cirrus dust-heating interstellar radiation field. The second, radio-quiet component is made up of less massive older stars.

  6. Massive Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Soeren

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies are often characterized by very high globular cluster specific frequencies, in some cases exceeding that of the Milky Way by a factor of 100 or more. Moreover, the GCs are typically much more metal-poor than the bulk of the field stars, so that a substantial fraction (up to 20-25% or more) of all metal-poor stars in some dwarf galaxies are associated with GCs. The metal-poor components of these galaxies thus represent an extreme case of the "specific frequency problem". In this talk I will review the current status of our understanding of GC systems in dwarf galaxies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the implications of the high GC specific frequencies for the amount of mass loss the clusters could have experienced and the constraints this provides on theories for the origin of multiple populations in globular clusters.

  7. FIR galaxies with compact radio cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, R.; Biermann, P. L.; Kreysa, E.; Kuhr, H.; Mezger, P. G.; Schmidt, J.; Witzel, A.; Zensus, J. A.

    1987-07-01

    Comparing the IRAS point-source catalog (1985) with sources detected in a VLBI extragalactic radio source survey (Zensus et al., 1984), five FIR sources are found which all show compact radio cores. These objects have been observed with the 30-m MRT at Pico Veleta (Spain) at 1.2-mm wavelength to provide spectral coverage between IRAS and radio bands. The two galaxies among the five sources have luminosities of order 10 to the 12th solar luminosities in the FIR and thus may be super star bursters similar to Arp 220. On the other hand, all five objects have active galactic nuclei, and so the FIR luminosities may be powered by the nuclear activity. Since flat-spectrum radio sources have compact nuclear components, the 1-Jy catalog and its extension to lower flux densities (Kuehr et al., 1979 and 1981) are compared with the IRAS catalog, and a small number of additional active nuclei with strong emission in the FIR are identified. These objects can serve to study the competition between starbursts and nuclear activity to explain high FIR luminosities.

  8. The relation between infrared and radio emission in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helou, George

    1991-01-01

    A remarkable correlation between the far infrared and the radio continuum emission of star forming galaxies was one of the early results based on IRAS data, and has remained one of the most intriguing. Recent work has extended the correlation to early type galaxies, revealing a slightly different ratio in lenticulars. When radio and infrared maps of disk galaxies are compared, the radio disks appear systematically more diffuse. This has been interpreted as a manifestation of the diffusion of cosmic-ray electrons, and has allowed a fresh look at the behavior of magnetic fields and cosmic rays in spiral galaxies, and at their relation to the rest of the interstellar medium.

  9. Radio Sources Toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Bonamente, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Dawson, K.; Hasler, N.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    Extra-galactic radio sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio sources toward massive galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of mJy source fluxes from 89 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 non-cluster fields. We find that source counts in the inner regions of the cluster fields (within 0.5 arcmin of the cluster center) are a factor of 8.9 (+4.2 to -3.8) times higher than counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields (radius greater than 0.5 arcmin). Counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields are in turn a factor of 3.3 (+4.1 -1.8) greater than those in the noncluster fields. Counts in the non-cluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We compute spectral indices of mJy sources in cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz and find a mean spectral index of al[ja = 0.66 with an rms dispersion of 0.36, where flux S varies as upsilon(sup -alpha). The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.72 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.51 and 0.92, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of stronger field sources measured by other surveys.

  10. Radio Sources toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Bonamente, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Dawson, K.; Hasler, N.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    Extragalactic radio sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio sources toward massive galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of millijansky source fluxes from 89 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 noncluster fields. We find that source counts in the inner regions of the cluster fields (within 0.5' of the cluster center) are a factor of 8.9 (sup +4.3)(sub -2.8) times higher than counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields (radius greater than 0.5'). Counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields are, in turn, a factor of 3.3 (sup +4.1) (sub -1.8) greater than those in the noncluster fields. Counts in the noncluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We compute the spectral indices of millijansky sources in the cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz and find a mean spectral index of alpha = 0.66 with an rms dispersion of 0.36, where flux S proportional to nu(sup -alpha). The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.72 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.51 and 0.92, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of stronger field sources measured by other surveys.

  11. Compact radio sources in luminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Rodrigo

    2007-08-01

    Radio interferometry is an observational technique of high sensitivity and incomparably high spatial resolution. Moreover, because radio waves can freely propagate through interstellar dust and gas, it allows the study of regions of the universe completely obscured at other wavelengths. This thesis reports the observational and theoretical results of my research during the past four years which are mostly based on interferometric radio data. The COLA sample is an infrared selected sample of active star forming galaxies. We conducted 6 cm VLA and VLBI snapshot observations of the northern half of this sample. The radio emission seen at VLA scales is consistent with being powered by star formation activity because it follows the far infrared to radio correlation. We detect 22% of the sample sources in our VLBI snapshots. Based on luminosity arguments, we argue that these sub-parsec VLBI sources are powered by AGN activity. Furthermore, we find that VLBI detections are preferentially found in sources whose VLA scale structures have the highest peak brightnesses suggesting a strong correlation between compact starburst and AGN activity. This observational result is consistent with the theoretical picture of an Eddington-limited nuclear starburst acting as the last valve in the pipeline transporting the gas from kiloparsec scales onto the accretion disc of a buried AGN. Arp 220 is the archetypical ultra luminous infrared galaxy. For many years this source has been known to harbour a compact (~100 pc) cluster of unresolved 18 cm bright sources believed to be bright core collapse supernovae. Using multiwavelength VLBI observations, we obtained for the first time radio spectra for 18 of these sources. We find that over a half of them have spectra consistent with young supernovae. The rest can be better explained as older supernova remnants interacting with the high density starburst ISM. This finding allowed us to constrain the number of possible scenarios for the Arp 220

  12. A study of massive and evolved galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Nayyeri, H.; Mobasher, B.; Hemmati, S.; De Barros, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Wiklind, T.; Dahlen, T.; Kassin, S.; Koekemoer, A.; Dickinson, M.; Giavalisco, M.; Fontana, A.; Paris, D.; Ashby, M.; Willner, S.; Barro, G.; Guo, Y.; Hathi, N. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Targett, T. A.

    2014-10-10

    We use data taken as part of Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) to identify massive and evolved galaxies at 3 < z < 4.5. This is performed using the strength of the Balmer break feature at rest-frame 3648 Å, which is a diagnostic of the age of the stellar population in galaxies. Using the WFC3 H-band-selected catalog for the CANDELS GOODS-S field and deep multi-waveband photometry from optical (HST) to mid-infrared (Spitzer) wavelengths, we identify a population of old and evolved post-starburst galaxies based on the strength of their Balmer breaks (Balmer break galaxies, BBGs). The galaxies are also selected to be bright in rest-frame near-IR wavelengths and hence massive. We identify a total of 16 BBGs. Fitting the spectral energy distribution of the BBGs shows that the candidate galaxies have average estimated ages of ∼800 Myr and average stellar masses of ∼5 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, consistent with being old and massive systems. Two of our BBG candidates are also identified by the criteria that are sensitive to star-forming galaxies (Lyman break galaxy selection). We find a number density of ∼3.2 × 10{sup –5} Mpc{sup –3} for the BBGs, corresponding to a mass density of ∼2.0 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3} in the redshift range covering the survey. Given the old age and the passive evolution, it is argued that some of these objects formed the bulk of their mass only a few hundred million years after the big bang.

  13. Massive neutrinos and the pancake theory of galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1984-01-01

    Three problems encountered by the pancake theory of galaxy formation in a massive neutrino-dominated universe are discussed. A nonlinear model for pancakes is shown to reconcile the data with the predicted coherence length and velocity field, and minimal predictions are given of the contribution from the large-scale matter distribution.

  14. FRESH ACTIVITY IN OLD SYSTEMS: RADIO AGNs IN FOSSIL GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Kelley M.; Wilcots, Eric M.; Hartwick, Victoria L. E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu

    2012-08-15

    We present the first systematic 1.4 GHz Very Large Array radio continuum survey of fossil galaxy group candidates. These are virialized systems believed to have assembled over a gigayear in the past through the merging of galaxy group members into a single, isolated, massive elliptical galaxy and featuring an extended hot X-ray halo. We use new photometric and spectroscopic data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to determine that three of the candidates are clearly not fossil groups. Of the remaining 30 candidates, 67% contain a radio-loud (L{sub 1.4GHz} > 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at the center of their dominant elliptical galaxy. We find a weak correlation between the radio luminosity of the AGN and the X-ray luminosity of the halo suggesting that the AGN contributes to energy deposition into the intragroup medium. We only find a correlation between the radio and optical luminosity of the central elliptical galaxy when we include X-ray-selected, elliptically dominated non-fossil groups, indicating a weak relationship between AGN strength and the mass assembly history of the groups. The dominant elliptical galaxy of fossil groups is on average roughly an order of magnitude more luminous than normal group elliptical galaxies in optical, X-ray, and radio luminosities and our findings are consistent with previous results that the radio-loud fraction in elliptical galaxies is linked to the stellar mass of a population. The current level of activity in fossil groups suggests that AGN fueling continues long after the last major merger. We discuss several possibilities for fueling the AGN at the present epoch.

  15. Evolution of clouds in radio galaxy cocoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellema, G.; Kurk, J. D.; Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2002-11-01

    This letter presents a numerical study of the evolution of an emission line cloud of initial density 10 cm-3, temperature 104 K, and size 200 pc, being overtaken by a strong shock wave. Whereas previous simple models proposed that such a cloud would either be completely destroyed, or simply shrink in size, our results show a different and more complex behaviour: due to rapid cooling, the cloud breaks up into many small and dense fragments, which can survive for a long time. We show that such rapid cooling behaviour is expected for a wide range of cloud and shock properties. This process applies to the evolution of emission line clouds being overtaken by the cocoon of a radio jet. The resulting small clouds would be Jeans unstable, and form stars. Our results thus give theoretical credibility to the process of jet induced star formation, one of the explanations for the alignment of the optical/UV and radio axis observed in high redshift radio galaxies.

  16. GALAXY ENVIRONMENTS OVER COSMIC TIME: THE NON-EVOLVING RADIAL GALAXY DISTRIBUTIONS AROUND MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z = 1.6

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Tomer; Franx, Marijn; Wake, David A.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2013-05-20

    We present a statistical study of the environments of massive galaxies in four redshift bins between z = 0.04 and z = 1.6, using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey. We measure the projected radial distribution of galaxies in cylinders around a constant number density selected sample of massive galaxies and utilize a statistical subtraction of contaminating sources. Our analysis shows that massive primary galaxies typically live in group halos and are surrounded by 2-3 satellites with masses more than one-tenth of the primary galaxy mass. The cumulative stellar mass in these satellites roughly equals the mass of the primary galaxy itself. We further find that the radial number density profile of galaxies around massive primaries has not evolved significantly in either slope or overall normalization in the past 9.5 Gyr. A simplistic interpretation of this result can be taken as evidence for a lack of mergers in the studied groups and as support for a static evolution model of halos containing massive primaries. Alternatively, there exists a tight balance between mergers and accretion of new satellites such that the overall distribution of galaxies in and around the halo is preserved. The latter interpretation is supported by a comparison to a semi-analytic model, which shows a similar constant average satellite distribution over the same redshift range.

  17. DWARF GALAXIES WITH OPTICAL SIGNATURES OF ACTIVE MASSIVE BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Reines, Amy E.; Greene, Jenny E.; Geha, Marla

    2013-10-01

    We present a sample of 151 dwarf galaxies (10{sup 8.5} ∼< M{sub *} ∼< 10{sup 9.5} M{sub ☉}) that exhibit optical spectroscopic signatures of accreting massive black holes (BHs), increasing the number of known active galaxies in this stellar-mass range by more than an order of magnitude. Utilizing data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 and stellar masses from the NASA-Sloan Atlas, we have systematically searched for active BHs in ∼25,000 emission-line galaxies with stellar masses comparable to the Magellanic Clouds and redshifts z < 0.055. Using the narrow-line [O III]/Hβ versus [N II]/Hα diagnostic diagram, we find photoionization signatures of BH accretion in 136 galaxies, a small fraction of which also exhibit broad Hα emission. For these broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates, we estimate BH masses using standard virial techniques and find a range of 10{sup 5} ∼< M{sub BH} ∼< 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉} and a median of M{sub BH} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉}. We also detect broad Hα in 15 galaxies that have narrow-line ratios consistent with star-forming galaxies. Follow-up observations are required to determine if these are true type 1 AGN or if the broad Hα is from stellar processes. The median absolute magnitude of the host galaxies in our active sample is M{sub g} = –18.1 mag, which is ∼1-2 mag fainter than previous samples of AGN hosts with low-mass BHs. This work constrains the smallest galaxies that can form a massive BH, with implications for BH feedback in low-mass galaxies and the origin of the first supermassive BH seeds.

  18. HOST GALAXIES OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Springmann, A.; Cheung, C.

    2007-01-01

    Most radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, active galaxies that emit much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies has an “X”-or winged-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being a realignment of the black hole within the AGN and the second positing that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium, causing backflow and producing secondary wings. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, the distribution of the stellar mass is compared to the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN. Results show elliptical host galaxies with an orthogonal offset between the semi-major axis of the host galaxy and the secondary radio wings, which lends support to the hydrodynamical model. However, results also show circular host galaxies with radio wings, making the realignment scenario a more likely model to describe the formation of these X-shaped radio sources.

  19. Gas Accretion and Mergers in Massive Galaxies at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conselice, C. J.; Ownsworth, Jamie; Mortlock, Alice; Bluck, Asa F. L.

    2013-07-01

    Galaxy assembly is an unsolved problem, with ΛCDM theoretical models unable to easily account for among other things, the abundances of massive galaxies, and the observed merger history. We show here how the problem of galaxy formation can be addressed in an empirical way without recourse to models. We discuss how galaxy assembly occurs at 1.5 < z < 3 examining the role of major and minor mergers, and gas accretion from the intergalactic medium in forming massive galaxies with log M* > 11 found within the GOODS NICMOS Survey (GNS). We find that major mergers, minor mergers and gas accretion are roughly equally important in the galaxy formation process during this epoch, with 64% of the mass assembled through merging and 36% through accreted gas which is later converted to stars, while 58% of all new star formation during this epoch arises from gas accretion. We also discuss how the total gas accretion rate is measured as Ṁ = 90+/-40 M⊙ yr-1 at this epoch, a value close to those found in some hydrodynamical simulations.

  20. Constructing massive blue elliptical galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Tim

    Over cosmic time, galaxy mass assembly has transitioned from low-mass, star-forming disk galaxies to massive, quiescent elliptical galaxies. The merger hypothesis for the formation of new elliptical galaxies provides one physical explanation to the observed buildup of this population, a key prediction of which is a brief phase of morphological transformation from highly-disturbed remnant to blue elliptical. We study 12 plausible new ellipticals with varying degrees of morphological peculiarities visually selected from a larger parent sample of nearby (0.01 ≤ z ≤ 0.04), massive (M* ≥ 10 10 M⊙ ), concentrated (Petrosian R90/R50 ≥ 2.6), and optically blue galaxies from the SDSS DR4 catalog. Using integral field spectroscopy, we construct two-dimensional spectra of the stellar populations and azimuthally bin them into concentric annuli to determine the relative ages of the stellar populations as a function of radius. Using this data and conclusions from simulations, we seek to distinguish post-mergers from galaxies undergoing other modes of mass assembly. We find that 1/3 of our sample is consistent with having undergone a recent, gas-rich major merger. Another 1/3 of our sample is consistent with having undergone a 'frosting' of recent star formation. The final 1/3 of our sample is either inconsistent with or inconclusive of having undergone a recent, gas-rich major merger.

  1. Steep radio spectra in high-redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.; Chen, Wan

    1991-01-01

    The generic spectrum of an optically thin synchrotron source steepens by 0.5 in spectral index from low frequencies to high whenever the source lifetime is greater than the energy-loss timescale for at least some of the radiating electrons. Three effects tend to decrease the frequency nu(b) of this spectral bend as the source redshift increases: (1) for fixed bend frequency nu* in the rest frame, nu(b) = nu*/(1 + z); (2) losses due to inverse Compton scattering the microwave background rise with redshift as (1 + z) exp 4, so that, for fixed residence time in the radiating region, the energy of the lowest energy electron that can cool falls rapidly with increasing redshift; and (3) if the magnetic field is proportional to the equipartition field and the emitting volume is fixed or slowly varying, flux-limited samples induce a selection effect favoring low nu* at high z because higher redshift sources require higher emissivity to be included in the sample, and hence have stronger implied fields and more rapid synchrotron losses. A combination of these effects may explain the trend observed in the 3CR sample for higher redshift radio galaxies to have steeper spectra, and the successful use of ultrasteep spectrum surveys to locate high-redshift galaxies.

  2. MAJOR MERGING: THE WAY TO MAKE A MASSIVE, PASSIVE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Wel, Arjen; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Robaina, Aday R.; Holden, Bradford P.

    2009-11-20

    We analyze the projected axial ratio distribution, p(b/a), of galaxies that were spectroscopically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR6) to have low star formation rates. For these quiescent galaxies we find a rather abrupt change in p(b/a) at a stellar mass of approx10{sup 11} M{sub sun}: at higher masses there are hardly any galaxies with b/a < 0.6, implying that essentially none of them have disk-like intrinsic shapes and must be spheroidal. This transition mass is approx3-4 times higher than the threshold mass above which quiescent galaxies dominate in number over star-forming galaxies, which suggests that these mass scales are unrelated. At masses lower than approx10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, quiescent galaxies show a large range in axial ratios, implying a mix of bulge- and disk-dominated galaxies. Our result strongly suggests that major merging is the most important, and perhaps only relevant, evolutionary channel to produce massive (>10{sup 11} M{sub sun}), quiescent galaxies, as it inevitably results in spheroids.

  3. Infrared Color Selection of Massive Galaxies at z > 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Elbaz, D.; Schreiber, C.; Pannella, M.; Shu, X.; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Huang, J.-S.; Fontana, A.; Dekel, A.; Daddi, E.; Ferguson, H. C.; Dunlop, J.; Ciesla, L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Giavalisco, M.; Boutsia, K.; Finkelstein, S.; Juneau, S.; Barro, G.; Koo, D. C.; Michałowski, M. J.; Orellana, G.; Lu, Y.; Castellano, M.; Bourne, N.; Buitrago, F.; Santini, P.; Faber, S. M.; Hathi, N.; Lucas, R. A.; Pérez-González, P. G.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new color selection technique to identify high-redshift, massive galaxies that are systematically missed by Lyman-break selection. The new selection is based on the H160 (H) and Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 4.5 μm bands, specifically H-[4.5]\\gt 2.25 mag. These galaxies, called “HIEROs,” include two major populations that can be separated with an additional J - H color. The populations are massive and dusty star-forming galaxies at z\\gt 3 ({JH}-{blue}) and extremely dusty galaxies at z≲ 3 ({JH}-{red}). The 350 arcmin2 of the GOODS-North and GOODS-South fields with the deepest Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-infrared and IRAC data contain as many as 285 HIEROs down to [4.5]\\lt 24 mag. Inclusion of the most extreme HIEROs, not even detected in the H band, makes this selection particularly complete for the identification of massive high-redshift galaxies. We focus here primarily on {JH}-{blue} (z\\gt 3) HIEROs, which have a median photometric redshift < z> ˜ 4.4 and stellar mass {M}*˜ {10}10.6 {M}⊙ and are much fainter in the rest-frame UV than similarly massive Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Their star formation rates (SFRs), derived from their stacked infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), reach ˜240 {M}⊙ yr-1, leading to a specific SFR, {{sSFR}}\\equiv {{SFR}}/{M}*˜ 4.2 Gyr-1, suggesting that the sSFRs for massive galaxies continue to grow at z\\gt 2 but at a lower growth rate than from z = 0 to z = 2. With a median half-light radius of 2 kpc, including ˜ 20% as compact as quiescent (QS) galaxies at similar redshifts, {JH}-{blue} HIEROs represent perfect star-forming progenitors of the most massive ({M}*≳ {10}11.2 {M}⊙ ) compact QS galaxies at z˜ 3 and have the right number density. HIEROs make up ˜ 60% of all galaxies with {M}*\\gt {10}10.5 {M}⊙ identified at z\\gt 3 from their photometric redshifts. This is five times more than LBGs with nearly no overlap between the two populations

  4. Pair Cascades in Blazars and Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roustazadeh Sheikhyousefi, Parisa

    2012-05-01

    Recently some intermediate BL Lac objects (IBL), low frequency peak BL Lac objects (LBL) and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) were detected as very high energy gamma-ray sources (VHE; E > 100 GeV) by the Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov Telescope (MAGIC), the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S) and the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). These discoveries suggest that VHE gamma-rays may be produced in all types of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and that this is not only a common property of high frequency peaked BL Lac objects (HBL). The detection of the radio galaxies M87, Cen A and NGC 1275 supports this idea. In those AGN, VHE photons may interact with low energy photons from the broadline region (BLR), accretion disk around the black hole or thermal infrared photons form a dust torus by photon-photon pair production if the total center-of-momentum frame energy is above threshold to produce an electron-positron pair. These particles can produce new high energy photons by Compton up-scattering, and again these high energy photons can interact with soft photons to produce a pair of particles. This process will continue, leading to a shower (cascade) of particles and radiation. As the shower develops, it will expand laterally. This may explain the detection of the radio galaxies as VHE gamma-ray sources. The central part of my Ph.D. research work deals with the theoretical simulation of very high energy gamma-ray induced pair cascades in blazars and radio galaxies. Gamma-rays from the core of the AGN interact with low energy photons from the AGN environment and produce pairs of electrons and positrons resulting in Compton supported pair cascades. I developed a Monte Carlo code which treats the processes of gamma-gamma absorption and pair production, gamma-ray and electron/positron propagation, and Compton scattering, tracking particle trajectories in full 3-dimensional geometry. I showed that even for a very weak

  5. Host Galaxies of X-Shaped Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springmann, Alessondra; Cheung, C. C.

    2007-05-01

    The majority of radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, the active galaxies emitting much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Classical double-lobed radio galaxies are characterized by a single pair of "active" radio lobes. A small subset show an additional pair of lower surface brightness 'wings' of emission, thus forming an overall winged or X-shaped appearance. Two competing mechanisms have been proposed to explain the "winged" morphology. One model posits that these are the remnants left over from a relatively recent merger of a binary supermassive black hole system. Others have argued that they result naturally from strong backflow in a radio jet cocoon expanding into an asymmetric medium. We used available Sloan Digital Sky Survey r-band images of 11 X-shaped sources to measure the host galaxy ellipticities. By analyzing the host galaxy shapes, we trace the surrounding gas distribution. The radio morphologies are compared to the host galaxy parameters to analogize between differing model expectations. This work was funded by the Department of Energy's Student Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  6. THE GROWTH OF MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z = 2

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Bezanson, Rachel; Muzzin, Adam; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David; Franx, Marijn; Quadri, Ryan; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Illingworth, Garth D.

    2010-02-01

    We study the growth of massive galaxies from z = 2 to the present using data from the NOAO/Yale NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey. The sample is selected at a constant number density of n = 2 x 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3}, so that galaxies at different epochs can be compared in a meaningful way. We show that the stellar mass of galaxies at this number density has increased by a factor of approx2 since z = 2, following the relation log M{sub n} (z) = 11.45 - 0.15z. In order to determine at what physical radii this mass growth occurred, we construct very deep stacked rest-frame R-band images of galaxies with masses near M{sub n} (z), at redshifts (z) = 0.6, 1.1, 1.6, and 2.0. These image stacks of typically 70-80 galaxies enable us to characterize the stellar distribution to surface brightness limits of approx28.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We find that massive galaxies gradually built up their outer regions over the past 10 Gyr. The mass within a radius of r = 5 kpc is nearly constant with redshift, whereas the mass at 5 kpc < r < 75 kpc has increased by a factor of approx4 since z = 2. Parameterizing the surface brightness profiles, we find that the effective radius and Sersic n parameter evolve as r{sub e} propor to (1 + z){sup -1.3} and n propor to (1 + z){sup -1.0}, respectively. The data demonstrate that massive galaxies have grown mostly inside-out, assembling their extended stellar halos around compact, dense cores with possibly exponential radial density distributions. Comparing the observed mass evolution to the average star formation rates of the galaxies we find that the growth is likely dominated by mergers, as in situ star formation can only account for approx20% of the mass buildup from z = 2 to z = 0. A direct consequence of these results is that massive galaxies do not evolve in a self-similar way: their structural profiles change as a function of redshift, complicating analyses which (often implicitly) assume self-similarity. The main uncertainties in this study are

  7. Accretion processes of radio galaxies at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    AGN are the luminous (L>10^42 erg/s) cores of active galaxies, powered by accretion onto the central super massive black hole, either via an accretion disk or via a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. There are still several open questions, for example on the launching of jets, which are present in about 10% of the AGN. Another question appeared with the Fermi/LAT gamma-ray survey, which detected many blazars but also a small group of radio galaxies. Radio galaxies are postulated to be blazars where the observer sees the jet at an angle θ>10 degrees allowing a view of both jet and core, rather than only the jet as is the case with blazars. Radio galaxies are divided into two classes, depending on the radio luminosity of the jets. The Fanaroff-Riley I (FR-I) sources have jets that are bright near the core, where the FR-IIs display extended edge-brightened jets. The FR-I sources are connected to the BL Lacs, which are low-luminosity blazars. FR-II types are thought to be the parent population of the luminous FSRQ, which are also blazars. This thesis presents a study of gamma-ray bright radio galaxies. By analysing X-ray and gamma-ray data in addition to creating broad-band spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we studied two examples of this new class of sources. For the FR-II source 3C 111 we analysed Suzaku/XIS and PIN and INTEGRAL IBIS/ISGRI observations to create a X-ray spectrum. We also used a Swift/BAT spectrum from the 58-month survey. The 0.4-200 keV spectrum of the source shows both thermal, Seyfert-like signatures such as an iron K-α line, and non-thermal jet features. We also analysed gamma-ray data from Fermi/LAT. The gamma-ray and X-ray data are combined with historical radio, infrared and optical observations to build the SED, which can be well represented with a non-thermal jet model. The bolometric luminosity of 3C111 is rather low, and the SED model shows rather a BL Lac type than the expected FSRQ. The next source we studied is the nearby FR

  8. Spectrophotometry of Seyfert 2 galaxies and narrow-line radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koski, A. T.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for a spectrophotometric survey of several Seyfert 2 galaxies, intermediate Seyferts, and narrow-line radio galaxies. The emission-line spectra of the galaxies are analyzed, emphasizing line intensities, reddening, temperatures, densities, line strength correlations, line widths, and redshift differences. The continuous spectra are examined, and possible ionization sources are considered. It is found that: (1) there are no distinguishing differences between the spectra of Seyfert 2 galaxies and narrow-line radio galaxies; (2) the emission spectra are rich in lines from a wide range of ionization levels; (3) the continuum is starlight diluted by an underlying continuous spectrum; (4) the line widths of both classes of galaxies have the same distribution; (5) there appear to be regions of high and low ionization in the Seyfert 2 and narrow-line radio galaxies; (6) photoionization seems quite likely as the energy input to the gas; and (7) all the galaxies show a UV excess in their spectra.

  9. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the

  10. Radio Point Sources Toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Bonamente, M.; Dawson, K.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Reese, E. D.

    2006-01-01

    Extra-galactic point sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio point sources toward galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of mJy point source fluxes from 90 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 non-cluster fields. Counts in the non-cluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We also compute counts towards clusters as a function of luminosity in three redshift bins out to z = 1.0 and see no clear evidence for evolution with redshift. We compute spectral indices of mJy sources in cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz. The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.76 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.55 and 0.95, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of brighter field point sources measured by other surveys.

  11. Starbursts and dusty tori in distant 3CR radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podigachoski, Pece; Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte; Barthel, Peter; Drouart, Guillaume; Fioc, Michel

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the complete ultraviolet to submillimetre spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of twelve 3CR radio galaxy hosts in the redshift range 1.0 < z < 2.5, which were all detected in the far-infrared by the Herschel Space Observatory. The study employs the new spectro-chemical evolutionary code PÉGASE.3, in combination with recently published clumpy AGN torus models. We uncover the properties of the massive host galaxy stellar populations, the AGN torus luminosities, and the properties of the recent starbursts, which had earlier been inferred in these objects from their infrared SEDs. The PÉGASE.3 fitting yields very luminous (up to 1013 L⊙) young stellar populations with ages of several hundred million years in hosts with masses exceeding 1011 M⊙. Dust masses are seen to increase with redshift, and a surprising correlation - or better upper envelope behaviour - is found between the AGN torus luminosity and the starburst luminosity, as revealed by their associated dust components. The latter consistently exceeds the former by a constant factor, over a range of one order of magnitude in both quantities.

  12. Host Galaxies of X-Shaped Radio Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Springmann, Alessondra; /Wellesley Coll. /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    The majority of radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, the active galaxies emitting much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies have an ''X''-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being through the merger of a binary supermassive black hole system and the second being that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, we probe the distribution of the stellar mass to compare the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN.

  13. The impact of compact radio sources on their host galaxies: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadhunter, C.

    2016-02-01

    I review the observational evidence that CSS/GPS radio sources have a significant impact on the evolution of their host galaxies, particularly on the kpc-scales of the galaxy bulges. Starting with an overview of the observational evidence for jet-cloud interactions and warm ionised outflows in CSS/GPS sources, I then consider the challenges involved in quantifying the feedback effect of the warm outflows in terms of their mass outflow rates and kinetic powers. For the best-observed cases it is shown that the warm outflows may have a major negative feedback effect in the very central regions, but probably lack the power to heat and eject the full cool ISM contents of the host galaxies. In contrast, the recently-discovered neutral and molecular outflows are more massive and powerful and therefore carry more destructive potential. However, the feedback effect of such outflows is not necessarily negative: there is now clear observational evidence that the molecular outflows are formed as the hot, compressed gas cools behind fast shocks driven into the ISM by the relativistic jets. The natural endpoint of this process is the formation of stars. Therefore, jet-induced star formation may be a significant process in CSS/GPS radio galaxies. Finally, I discuss whether CSS/GPS sources are ``imposters'' in flux-limited radio samples, due the flux boosting of the radio sources by strong jet-cloud interactions in the early stages of radio source evolution.

  14. Relaxation and tidal stripping in rich clusters of galaxies. III. Growth of a massive central galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, D.

    1985-02-01

    The rate at which a massive galaxy (''cannibal'') grows by capturing other galaxies at the center of a rich, relaxed cluster is calculated. It is shown that the orbital decay preceding capture tends to leave the distribution of orbital velocities isotropic. As a result, most captures occur from nearly radial orbits, and relatively few from circular orbits. The capture rate is initially very low, due to the paucity of low-velocity galaxies, and to the fact that orbital decay times are comparable to a Hubble time. Encounters between galaxies further inhibit their orbital decay; this effect is important when the fraction of a cluster's mass that is bound to galaxies exceeds approx.15%. Assuming that less than approx.20% of a cluster's mass is attached to galaxies, and that the cluster velocity dispersion exceeds approx.500 km s/sup -1/, the typical rate of growth of a central galaxy by capture is rather small, amounting to somewhat less than 1 L* in a cluster lifetime. It is suggested (as in a previous paper) that most cD galaxies formed relatively rapidly, during the collapse and virialization of compact groups or poor clusters, and not during the quieter postcollapse stages as previous authors have advocated. The peculiar object V Zw 311 may be an example of a cD galaxy that is presently forming in this way. Subject headings: clustering-galaxies: evolution-galaxies: structure

  15. Dual Stellar Halos in Early-type Galaxies and Formation of Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung

    2016-08-01

    M105 in the Leo I Group is a textbook example of a standard elliptical galaxy. It is only one of the few elliptical galaxies for which we can study their stellar halos using the resolved stars. It is an ideal target to study the structure and composition of stellar halos in elliptical galaxies. We present photometry and metallicity of the resolved stars in the inner and outer regions of M105. These provide strong evidence that there are two distinct stellar halos in this galaxy, a metal-poor (blue) halo and a metal-rich (red) halo. Then we compare them with those in other early-type galaxies and use the dual halo mode formation scenario to describe how massive galaxies formed.

  16. Characterizing the radio continuum emission from intense starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, T. J.; Seymour, N.; Filipović, M. D.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Marvil, J.; Drouart, G.; Symeonidis, M.; Huynh, M. T.

    2016-09-01

    The intrinsic thermal (free-free) and non-thermal (synchrotron) emission components that comprise the radio continuum of galaxies represent unique, dust-free measures of star formation rates (SFR). Such high SFR galaxies will dominate the deepest current and future radio surveys. We disentangle the thermal and non-thermal emission components of the radio continuum of six ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LFIR > 1012.5 L⊙) at redshifts of 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 0.5 and 22 IR selected galaxies. Radio data over a wide frequency range (0.8 < ν < 10 GHz) are fitted with a star-forming galaxy model comprising of thermal and non-thermal components. The luminosities of both radio continuum components are strongly correlated to the 60 μm luminosity across many orders of magnitude (consistent with the far-IR to radio correlation). We demonstrate that the spectral index of the radio continuum spectral energy distribution is a useful proxy for the thermal fraction. We also find that there is an increase in mean and scatter of the thermal fraction with FIR to radio luminosity ratio which could be influenced by different time-scales of the thermal and non-thermal emission mechanisms.

  17. Radio afterglows and host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Biao; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Huang, Yong-Feng; Wu, Xue-Feng; Kong, Si-Wei; Li, Di; Chang, Heon-Young; Choi, Chul-Sung

    2015-08-01

    Considering the contribution of emission from the host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to radio afterglows, we investigate the effect of host galaxies on observations statistically. For the three types of event, i.e. low-luminosity, standard and high-luminosity GRBs, it is found that a tight correlation exists between the ratio of the radio flux (RRF) of the host galaxy to the total radio peak emission and the observational frequency. Towards lower frequencies, in particular, the contribution from the host increases significantly. The correlation can be used to obtain a useful estimate for the radio brightness of those host galaxies that only have very limited radio afterglow data. Using this prediction, we reconsidered the theoretical radio afterglow light curves for four kinds of event: high-luminosity, low-luminosity, standard and failed GRBs, taking into account the contribution from host galaxies and aiming to explore the detectability of these events by the Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST). Lying at a typical redshift of z = 1, most of the events can be detected easily by FAST. For the less fierce low-luminosity GRBs, their radio afterglows are not strong enough to exceed the sensitivity limit of FAST at such distances. However, since a large number of low-luminosity bursts actually happen very near to us, it is expected that FAST will still be able to detect many of them.

  18. Millimeter and submillimeter observations of nearby radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.R.; Patten, B.M. Hawaii, University, Honolulu )

    1991-05-01

    Radio galaxies are often observed to be strong long wavelength infrared sources. Twenty-six radio galaxies with strong compact cores were observed at wavelengths near 1 mm with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The detections and upper limits establish the presence of excess infrared emission for almost all of the galaxies in the sample. The exceptions are the BL Lac objects, which have smooth continuous spectra from radio to infrared wavelengths. The spectral energy distributions of the infrared emission from the radio galaxies favor a thermal origin due to emission from cool interstellar dust. The amounts of dust inferred to be present approach those observed in large spirals. 55 refs.

  19. The Trivariate / Radio Optical X-Ray / Luminosity Function CD Galaxies - Part Two - the Fuelling of Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentijn, E. A.; Bijleveld, W.

    1983-09-01

    the relations between cluster richness R, Lx, Mv, and P1.4 are discussed in detail. Several lines of evidence suggest gravitational binding of the X-ray gas to the cD galaxies. It is argued that the observed relation between Lx and P1.4 is not caused by confinement of the radio emitting plasmas by the X-ray gas, but instead by gas accretion into the galaxies. A gravitationally driven radiative accretion flow of the X-ray gas is fuelling the central non-thermal radio source. The observed correlations are interpreted according to the following scheme, (see also Fig. 7): (i) R - Mv: more massive cDs are formed in richer clusters. (ii) Mv - Lx: more massive galaxies are able to bind gravitationally more intergalactic gas and hence produce more luminous X-ray haloes. (iii) Lx - P1.4: in galaxies with more luminous X-ray babes the central engine, which generates the radio source, is fuelled at a higher rate. Other relations between the four parameters are thought to originate dominantly from these three principal relations. E.g. the result of Auriemma et al. (t977) that optically more luminous elliptical galaxies have a higher probability of becoming a radio source, is an indirect result of the combination of relations (ii) + (iii). Our study shows on three different and fully independent occasions an agreement between observed correlations and the predictions from Bondi's solution for spherical accretion of gas on consequently massive galaxies, where a fraction of that mass is fuelling radio sources (the Mv - Lx relation, the dependence of the RLF on Mv, the P0.6 - Vgal relation for Coma cluster galaxies). Finally, it is suggested that gas accretion into normal and giant elliptical galaxies might be a very general phenomenon, which provides a natural explanation of the radio, optical and X-ray properties of ellipticals.

  20. Clustering of galaxies in the overdense regions of radio galaxies at z>0.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Nedelia A.

    2007-05-01

    Photometric redshifts technique and red sequence technique are used in order to analyze the clustering of galaxies in the environments of 5 radio galaxies with redshifts z>0.6. The optical and near infrared photometric data, completed with HST morphological data, for radio galaxies 3C220.1, 3C34, 3C61, 3C184, 3C210 are considered (Stanford et al. 2002). The presence of clustering features of galaxies with similar redshifts is revealed in the field of 3C220.1 (z=0.62), 3C34 (z=0.689) and 3C210 (z=1.169) radio galaxies. The comparison of the HST morphology of galaxies with the model spectral galaxy type (determined by means of Z-PEG software - Damien Le Borgne and Brigitte Rocca-Volmerange, 2002) is in a good agreement, confirming the importance of the photometric redshifts determinations.

  1. COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF MASSIVE COMPACT HIGH-z GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer-Larsen, J.; Toft, S. E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.d

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the structure and dynamics of the recently discovered massive (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) compact z {approx} 2 galaxies, cosmological hydrodynamical/N-body simulations of a {approx}50,000 Mpc{sup 3} comoving (Lagrangian), proto-cluster region have been undertaken. At z = 2, the highest resolution simulation contains {approx}5800 resolved galaxies, of which 509, 27, and 5 have M{sub *}>10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, M{sub *}>10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, and M{sub *}>4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, respectively. Total stellar masses, effective radii, and characteristic stellar densities have been determined for all galaxies. At z = 2, for the definitely well-resolved mass range of M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, we fit the relation R{sub eff} = R{sub eff,12} M {sup 1/3}{sub *,12} to the data, where M{sub *,12} is the total stellar mass in units of 10{sup 12} M{sub sun}. This yields R{sub eff,12} = (1.20 {+-} 0.04) kpc, in line with observational findings for compact z {approx} 2 galaxies, though somewhat more compact than the observed average. The only line-of-sight velocity dispersion measured for a z {approx} 2 compact galaxy is very large, {sigma}{sub *,p} = 510{sup +165}{sub -95} km s{sup -1}. This value can be matched at about the 1{sigma} level, although a somewhat larger mass than the estimated M{sub *} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} is indicated. For the above mass range, the galaxies have an average axial ratio (b/a) = 0.64 {+-} 0.02 with a dispersion of 0.1, and an average rotation to one-dimensional velocity-dispersion ratio (v/{sigma}) = 0.46 {+-} 0.06 with a dispersion of 0.3, and a maximum value of v/{sigma} {approx_equal} 1.1. Both rotation and velocity anisotropy contribute significantly in flattening the compact galaxies. Some of the observed compact galaxies appear flatter than any of the simulated galaxies. Finally, it is found that the massive compact galaxies are strongly baryon dominated in their inner

  2. Radio spectra of intermediate-luminosity broad-line radio galaxies .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelakis, E.; Kadler, M.; Lewis, K.; Sambruna, R. M.; Eracleous, M.; Zensus, J. A.

    Within the context of investigating possible differences between the mechanisms at play in Radio Loud AGN and those in Radio Quiet ones, we study the spectral characteristics of a selected sample of Intermediate-Luminosity Broad-Line Radio Galaxies in X-rays, optical, IR and radio. Here, we present the radio spectra acquired with the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg between 2.6 and 32 GHz. These measurements reveal a large variety of spectral shapes urging for radio imaging that would disclose the source morphology. Such studies could potentially discriminate between different mechanisms.

  3. Sampling Studies Of Quasars, Radio-loud Galaxies, & Radio-quiet Galaxies -- Searching For The Cause Of Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldwell, G.; Salois, Amee; Soechting, I.; Smith, M.

    2011-01-01

    Comparing the environments of Radio-Loud Galaxies, Radio-Quiet Galaxies, and Quasars offers an opportunity to study the evolution of these objects. Our samples have been carefully chosen from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which also includes samples studied in the FIRST survey, and have been cut to determine the best possible results. Our study includes three samples. The Quasar sample currently contains 69 objects, the Radio-Loud Galaxy (RLG) sample has 1,335 objects, and the Radio-Quiet Galaxy (RQG) sample contains 2,436 objects (any updates will be given at the meeting). A number of trims were made to produce (smaller) samples with characteristics suited for precise results. By comparing the environments of these three samples we will be able to see any similarities or differences between them. If similarities are detected it suggests that the central object has evolved according to 'nature' - in an isolated manner with little environmental feedback, which may or may not have an effect on its evolution, as supposed by Coldwell et al. (2009). If differences are detected it suggests that the central object has evolved according to `nurture’ and that the environment may have played an important role in the development of their properties. We employ similar procedures used by Coldwell et al. (2009) in their study of blue and red AGNs. Upon the completion of an accurate sample, future work will be pursued studying a number of properties of the environments including studies of: the stellar masses, star formation rates, sersic morphologies, as well as densities and ages of the environments.

  4. Diffuse Radio Emission in the Galaxy Cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a low frequency (<1.4GHz) study of the diffuse radio halo and relic emission in the galaxy cluster Abell 0754. Images at 150 MHz made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) revealed 4 diffuse features; 3 of which are new. Images at 330 and 1363 MHz were created using archival data from the GMRT and the VLA respectively. These yield synchrotron spectral indices, α (S ∝ν-α), steeper than 2 for the new features. Adiabatic compression of fossil radio galaxy cocoon by shocks can lead to the formation of radio relics (Ensslin & Gopal-Krishna, 2001). In the framework of this model we find that the relic in A754 can be explained as a lurking cocoon of a radio galaxy; no shock compression is required to produce this emission. The implications of this result to the merger scenario in A754 are discussed.

  5. A powerful radio galaxy at z=3.6 in a giant rotating Lyman α halo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ojik, R.; Roettgering, H. J. A.; Carilli, C. L.; Miley, G. K.; Bremer, M. N.; Macchetto, F.

    1996-09-01

    its kinematics must predate the radio source. The ordered motion may be large-scale rotation caused by the accretion of gas from the environment of the radio galaxy or by a merger. Although alternatively the halo may be caused by a massive outflow, we argue that bulk inflow of the emission line gas is inconsistent with the most likely orientation of the radio source. The large velocity-width of the Lyα gas contained within the radio source compared to that of the outer halo suggest a direct interaction of the radio source with the gas. The spatial correlation of enhanced, blue-shifted Lyα emission and the sharp bend of the radio structure suggest that the emission line gas could have deflected the radio jet. The impact of the jet could have accelerated the gas at this position and may have locally enhanced the Lyα emission. Extended faint optical continuum emission is aligned with the principal radio axis, a phenomenon commonly observed in high redshift radio galaxies. This emission does not follow the bending of the radio jet, indicating that, at least in 1243+036, models invoking scattering of continuum radiation from the AGN as the cause of this alignment are favoured.

  6. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  7. THE MASSIVE SATELLITE POPULATION OF MILKY-WAY-SIZED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Aldo; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Drory, Niv

    2013-08-20

    Several occupational distributions for satellite galaxies more massive than m{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} around Milky-Way (MW)-sized hosts are presented and used to predict the internal dynamics of these satellites as a function of m{sub *}. For the analysis, a large galaxy group mock catalog is constructed on the basis of (sub)halo-to-stellar mass relations fully constrained with currently available observations, namely the galaxy stellar mass function decomposed into centrals and satellites, and the two-point correlation functions at different masses. We find that 6.6% of MW-sized galaxies host two satellites in the mass range of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC, respectively). The probabilities of the MW-sized galaxies having one satellite equal to or larger than the LMC, two satellites equal to or larger than the SMC, or three satellites equal to or larger than Sagittarius (Sgr) are Almost-Equal-To 0.26, 0.14, and 0.14, respectively. The cumulative satellite mass function of the MW, N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}) , down to the mass of the Fornax dwarf is within the 1{sigma} distribution of all the MW-sized galaxies. We find that MW-sized hosts with three satellites more massive than Sgr (as the MW) are among the most common cases. However, the most and second most massive satellites in these systems are smaller than the LMC and SMC by roughly 0.7 and 0.8 dex, respectively. We conclude that the distribution N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}) for MW-sized galaxies is quite broad, the particular case of the MW being of low frequency but not an outlier. The halo mass of MW-sized galaxies correlates only weakly with N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}). Then, it is not possible to accurately determine the MW halo mass by means of its N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}); from our catalog, we constrain a lower limit of 1.38 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} at the 1{sigma} level. Our analysis strongly suggests that the abundance of massive

  8. Satellite galaxies around present-day massive ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo; Trujillo, Ignacio; Mármol-Queraltó, Esther

    2014-07-01

    Using the spectroscopic New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalogue and the photometric photo-z catalogues of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we have explored the satellite distribution around ˜1000 massive (M⋆ ≳ 2 × 1011 M⊙) visually classified elliptical galaxies down to a satellite mass ratio of 1:400 (i.e. 5 × 108 ≲ Msat ≲ 2 × 1011 M⊙). Our host galaxies were selected to be representative of a mass complete sample. The satellites of these galaxies were searched within a projected radial distance of 100 kpc to their hosts. We have found that only 20-23 per cent of the massive ellipticals have at least a satellite down to a mass ratio 1:10. This number increases to 45-52 per cent if we explore satellites down to 1:100 and is >60-70 per cent if we go further down to 1:400. The average projected radial distance of the satellites to their hosts for our whole sample down to 1:400 is ˜59 kpc (which can be decreased at least down to 50 kpc if we account for incompleteness effects). The number of satellites per galaxy host only increases very mildly at decreasing the satellite mass. The fraction of mass which is contained in the satellites down to a mass ratio of 1:400 is 8 per cent of the total mass contained by the hosts. Satellites with a mass ratio from 1:2 to 1:5 (with ˜28 per cent of the total mass of the satellites) are the main contributor to the total satellite mass. If the satellites eventually infall into the host galaxies, the merger channel will be largely dominated by satellites with a mass ratio down to 1:10 (as these objects have 68 per cent of the total mass in satellites).

  9. Nuclear activity and the environments of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, Arjun; Vanbreugel, Wil

    1993-01-01

    Much of our present understanding of galaxy evolution over a large redshift range is based on the study of samples selected on the basis of non-thermal radio emission. It is therefore necessary to understand the relationship between radio source activity and the host galaxy. Recent observations suggest that there is a connection between radio galaxy (RG) activity and radio galaxy evolution. For example, high-redshift RGs (z approx. greater than 0.7) show evidence for significant populations of young stars, and have optical continuum morphologies nearly always aligned with the radio axis (McCarthy et al. 1987; Chambers et al. 1987). This phenomenon is generally attributed to radio jet induced star formation (DeYoung 1989), but the lack of high S/N spectra of the galaxy continua, and recent detections of polarized light in a few objects make it hard to rule out other processes such as scattering or synchrotron radiation. A detailed study of the continuum light in the distant RGs is difficult as they are optically very faint. However, nearby RGs (z approx. less than 0.1) have bluer B-V colors than radio-quiet ellipticals, presumably due to the presence of young stellar populations (Smith and Heckman 1989) and several have extended UV continuum emitting regions along their radio axes (van Bruegel et al. 1985a, b, di Serego Alighieri et al. 1989), reminiscent of the alignment effect seen in the high redshift RGs. We have almost completed a continuum imaging survey of nearby (and therefore optically brighter), powerful RGs to study any possible relationships between the optical continuum light and radio source activity. In particular we are interested in (1) whether these lower redshift RGs shown any evidence of the alignment effect (in their rest-frame UV light) that is seen in the distant RGs, and (2) the effects that the radio source has on the environment of the host galaxy.

  10. The size and mass evolution of the massive galaxies over cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ignacio

    2013-07-01

    Once understood as the paradigm of passively evolving objects, the discovery that massive galaxies experienced an enormous structural evolution in the last ten billion years has opened an active line of research. The most significant pending question in this field is the following: which mechanism has made galaxies to grow largely in size without altering their stellar populations properties dramatically? The most viable explanation is that massive galaxies have undergone a significant number of minor mergers which have deposited most of their material in the outer regions of the massive galaxies. This scenario, although appealing, is still far from be observationally proved since the number of satellite galaxies surrounding the massive objects appears insufficient at all redshifts. The presence also of a population of nearby massive compact galaxies with mixture stellar properties is another piece of the puzzle that still does not nicely fit within a comprehensive scheme. I will review these and other intriguing properties of the massive galaxies in this contribution.

  11. The Spiderweb Galaxy: A Forming Massive Cluster Galaxy at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George K.; Overzier, Roderik A.; Zirm, Andrew W.; Ford, Holland C.; Kurk, Jaron; Pentericci, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D.; Postman, Marc; Rosati, Piero; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Venemans, Bram P.; Helder, Eveline

    2006-10-01

    We present a deep image of the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at a redshift of z=2.2. The galaxy is known to have properties of a cD galaxy progenitor and be surrounded by a 3 Mpc-sized structure, identified with a protocluster. The morphology shown on the new deep HST ACS image is reminiscent of a spider's web. More than 10 individual clumpy features are observed, apparently star-forming satellite galaxies in the process of merging with the progenitor of a dominant cluster galaxy 11 Gyr ago. There is an extended emission component, implying that star formation was occurring over a 50×40 kpc region at a rate of more than 100 Msolar yr-1. A striking feature of the newly named ``Spiderweb galaxy'' is the presence of several faint linear galaxies within the merging structure. The dense environments and fast galaxy motions at the centers of protoclusters may stimulate the formation of these structures, which dominate the faint resolved galaxy populations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The new image provides a unique testbed for simulations of forming dominant cluster galaxies.

  12. Chemical Pollution and Evolution of Massive Starbursts: Cleaning up the Environment in Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobulnicky, C.

    1996-12-01

    I present the results of a research program seeking to characterize the impact of massive star-clusters on the chemical and dynamical evolution of metal-poor, irregular and blue compact galaxies. The evolution of high mass stars is thought to contribute the bulk of heavy element enrichment in the interstellar medium, especially alpha -process elements like O, Si, etc. Yet, in actively star-forming galaxies, localized chemical inhomogeneities are seldom observed. Spatially-resolved optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observatories is used to search for chemical enrichment in the vicinity of young star clusters in nearby galaxies. VLA aperture synthesis maps are used to examine the neutral hydrogen content, dynamics, and local environment of the sample galaxies. Despite the spread in evolutionary state of the starbursts determined by the EW of Balmer emission lines and the radio continuum spectral index, few instances of localized enrichment are found. In light of these data, the ``instantaneous enrichment'' scenario for extragalactic HII regions appears less probable than one which operates on long timescales and global spatial scales. The results are consistent with the idea that starburst driven winds expel freshly synthesized metals in a hot 10(6) K phase into the halos of galaxies where they cool, condense into globules, and mix homogeneously with the rest of the galaxy on long (dynamical) timescales. The C/O and N/O ratios of the galaxies are used as new tools for measuring the recent star formation history. Implications for chemical evolution of galaxies both locally and cosmologically are developed.

  13. Radio brightening of FRB 150418 host galaxy candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. K. G.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.

    2016-02-01

    Keane et al. (2016 Nature 530 453) reported a fading radio transient in the z=0.498 galaxy WISE J071634.59-190039.2 (WISE 0716-19; Williams & Berger, arxiv:1602.08434) that they associated with the fast radio burst FRB 150418.

  14. Radioactive 26Al from massive stars in the Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Roland; Halloin, Hubert; Kretschmer, Karsten; Lichti, Giselher G; Schönfelder, Volker; Strong, Andrew W; von Kienlin, Andreas; Wang, Wei; Jean, Pierre; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Roques, Jean-Pierre; Weidenspointner, Georg; Schanne, Stephane; Hartmann, Dieter H; Winkler, Christoph; Wunderer, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-rays from radioactive 26Al (half-life approximately 7.2 x 10(5) years) provide a 'snapshot' view of continuing nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy. The Galaxy is relatively transparent to such gamma-rays, and emission has been found concentrated along its plane. This led to the conclusion that massive stars throughout the Galaxy dominate the production of 26Al. On the other hand, meteoritic data show evidence for locally produced 26Al, perhaps from spallation reactions in the protosolar disk. Furthermore, prominent gamma-ray emission from the Cygnus region suggests that a substantial fraction of Galactic 26Al could originate in localized star-forming regions. Here we report high spectral resolution measurements of 26Al emission at 1808.65 keV, which demonstrate that the 26Al source regions corotate with the Galaxy, supporting its Galaxy-wide origin. We determine a present-day equilibrium mass of 2.8 (+/- 0.8) solar masses of 26Al. We use this to determine that the frequency of core collapse (that is, type Ib/c and type II) supernovae is 1.9 (+/- 1.1) events per century. PMID:16397491

  15. Gas and radio galaxies: a story of love and hate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganti, Rafaella

    2011-07-01

    Gas in radio galaxies is an important component that plays different roles. Gas can feed the AGN and make it active but dense gas can also be an obstacle for radio jets and (temporarily) destroy their flow. The characteristics of the different phases of gas in the circumnuclear regions of active nuclei hold clear signatures of the influences that the black hole activity has on its surroundings. I will review these effects based on some recent results obtained in the study of neutral hydrogen and CO. In particular, I will concentrate on the effects of radio jets in generating the strong negative feedback of the kind invoked in current scenarios for galaxy evolution.

  16. Most Massive Spiral Galaxy Known in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    The VLT Observes Rapid Motion in Distant Object Summary The most massive spiral galaxy known so far in the Universe has been discovered by a team of astronomers from Garching, Padova, Leiden, ESO and London [1]. They base their conclusion on recent observations with ISAAC , an infrared-sensitive, multi-mode instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope at the Paranal Observatory. This galaxy has been designated ISOHDFS 27 and is located at a distance of approx. 6 billion light-years (the redshift is 0.58). Its measured mass is more than 1000 billion times that of the Sun [2]. It is thus about four times more massive than our own galaxy, the Milky Way, and twice as heavy as the heaviest spiral galaxy known so far. The determination of the mass of ISOHDFS 27 is based on a unique measurement of the motions of its stars and nebulae around the center. The faster the motion is, the greater is the mass. It is, in essence, the same method that allows determining the mass of the Earth from the orbital speed and distance of the Moon. This is the first time a "rotation curve" has been observed in such a distant galaxy by means of infrared observations, allowing a very detailed dynamical study. Other observations by the team concern a pair of distant, interacting galaxies that were also found to possess comparably high masses. They also have observations of a third galaxy at a distance of about 10 billion light-years, with a mass that approaches that of ISOHDFS 27 . The new result has important cosmological implications, as it demonstrates that very heavy structures had already been formed in the Universe at a comparatively early epoch . PR Photo 33a/00 : ISOHDFS 27 , the heaviest spiral galaxy known. PR Photo 33b/00 : The "raw" ISAAC spectrum of ISOHDFS 27 . PR Photo 33c/00 : H-alpha profile of ISOHDFS 27 . Star formation in young galaxies It is of fundamental importance to current cosmological studies to understand how stars evolve within galaxies and how the galaxies themselves

  17. Jet Directions in Seyfert Galaxies: Radio Continuum Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, H. R.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Antonucci, R. R. J.; Kinney, A. L.

    2001-02-01

    We present the results of VLA A-array 8.46 GHz continuum imaging of 55 Seyfert galaxies (19 Seyfert 1's and 36 Seyfert 2's). These galaxies are part of a larger sample of 88 Seyfert galaxies, selected from mostly isotropic properties, the flux at 60 μm, and warm infrared 25-60 μm colors. These images are used to study the structure of the radio continuum emission of these galaxies and their position angles, in the case of extended sources. These data, combined with information from broadband B and I observations, have been used to study the orientation of radio jets relative to the plane of their host galaxies (Kinney et al.).

  18. Investigating star formation properties of galaxies in massive clusters with Herschel and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, John F.; Baker, Andrew J.; Aguirre, Paula; Barkats, D.; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hughes, John Patrick; Infante, Leopoldo; Lindner, Robert; Marriage, Tobias; Menanteau, Felipe; Sifon, Cristobal; Weiss, Axel; ACT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    I will present results from an investigation of star formation properties of galaxies residing in two massive z ~ 1 clusters (including the 'El Gordo' merger) that were initially selected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich decrements by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) southern survey. This study uses new Herschel Space Observatory and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 2 observations, which provide information about the dust and cold gas content of galaxies in our targeted clusters. We have detected CO (4-3) and [CI] in individual star-forming cluster galaxies, and also measured stacked continuum and spectral line fluxes at long (e.g., far-infrared, submillimeter, and radio) wavelengths. We use these results to explore the relations between star formation and local environment and cluster dynamical state.This work has been supported by (i) an award issued by JPL/Caltech in association with Herschel, which is a European Space Agency Cornerstone Mission with significant participation by NASA, and (ii) the National Science Foundation through award GSSP SOSPA2-018 from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which is operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  19. Quiescent Compact Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift in the COSMOS Field. II. The Fundamental Plane of Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, H. Jabran; Damjanov, Ivana; Geller, Margaret J.; Chilingarian, Igor

    2015-06-01

    We examine the relation between surface brightness, velocity dispersion, and size—the fundamental plane (FP)—for quiescent galaxies at intermediate redshifts in the COSMOS field. The COSMOS sample consists of ˜150 massive quiescent galaxies with an average velocity dispersion of σ ˜ 250 km s-1 and redshifts between 0.2 < z < 0.8. More than half of the galaxies in the sample are compact. The COSMOS galaxies exhibit a tight relation (˜0.1 dex scatter) between surface brightness, velocity dispersion, and size. At a fixed combination of velocity dispersion and size, the COSMOS galaxies are brighter than galaxies in the local universe. These surface brightness offsets are correlated with the rest-frame g - z color and Dn4000 index; bluer galaxies and those with smaller Dn4000 indices have larger offsets. Stellar population synthesis models indicate that the massive COSMOS galaxies are younger and therefore brighter than similarly massive quiescent galaxies in the local universe. Passive evolution alone brings the massive compact quiescent (MCQ) COSMOS galaxies onto the local FP at z = 0. Therefore, evolution in size or velocity dispersion for MCQ galaxies since z ˜ 1 is constrained by the small scatter observed in the FP. We conclude that MCQ galaxies at z ≲ 1 are not a special class of objects but rather the tail of the mass and size distribution of the normal quiescent galaxy population.

  20. The Ubiquity of Coeval Starbursts in Massive Galaxy Cluster Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Caitlin M.

    2016-06-01

    The universe’s largest galaxy clusters likely built the majority of their massive >1011 M {}ȯ galaxies in simultaneous, short-lived bursts of activity well before virialization. This conclusion is reached based on emerging data sets for z\\gt 2 proto-clusters and the characteristics of their member galaxies, in particular, rare starbursts and ultraluminous active galactic nuclei (AGN). The most challenging observational hurdle in identifying such structures is their very large volumes, ∼104 comoving Mpc3 at z\\gt 2, subtending areas of approximately half a degree on the sky. Thus, the contrast afforded by an overabundance of very rare galaxies in comparison to the background can more easily distinguish overdense structures from the surrounding, normal density field. Five 2≲ z≲ 3 proto-clusters from the literature are discussed in detail and are found to contain up to 12 dusty starbursts or luminous AGN galaxies each, a phenomenon that is unlikely to occur by chance even in overdense environments. These are contrasted with three higher-redshift (4≲ z≲ 5.5) dusty star-forming galaxy (DSFG) groups, whose evolutionary fate is less clear. Measurements of DSFGs’ gas depletion times suggest that they are indeed short-lived on ∼100 Myr timescales, and accordingly the probability of finding a structure containing more than 8 such systems is ∼0.2%, unless their “triggering” is correlated on very large spatial scales, ∼10 Mpc across. The volume density of DSFG-rich proto-clusters is found to be comparable to all of the >1015 M {}ȯ galaxy clusters in the nearby universe, which is a factor of five larger than expected in some simulations. Some tension still exists between measurements of the volume density of DSFG-rich proto-clusters and the expectation that they are generated via short-lived episodes, as the latter suggests that only a fraction (\\lt \\tfrac{1}{2}) of all proto-clusters should be rich with DSFGs. However, improved observations of

  1. Applying galactic archeology to massive galaxies using deep imaging surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2015-04-01

    Various programs aimed at exploring the still largely unknown low surface brightness Universe with deep imaging optical surveys have recently started. They open a new window for studies of galaxy evolution, pushing the technique of galactic archeology outside the Local Group (LG). The method, based on the detection and analysis of the diffuse light emitted by collisional debris or extended stellar halos (rather than on stellar counts as done for LG systems), faces however a number of technical difficulties, like the contamination of the images by reflection halos and Galactic cirrus. I review here the on-going efforts to address them and highlight the preliminary promising results obtained with a systematic survey with MegaCam on the CFHT of nearby massive early-type galaxies done as part of the ATLAS3D, NGVS and MATLAS collaborations.

  2. The host galaxy of a fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Keane, E F; Johnston, S; Bhandari, S; Barr, E; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Eatough, R P; Stappers, B W; Totani, T; Honma, M; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Morokuma, T; Niino, Y; Sugai, H; Terai, T; Tominaga, N; Yamasaki, S; Yasuda, N; Allen, R; Cooke, J; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Tingay, S J; Williams, A; Wayth, R; Chandra, P; Perrodin, D; Berezina, M; Mickaliger, M; Bassa, C

    2016-02-25

    In recent years, millisecond-duration radio signals originating in distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called fast radio bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity, which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. Every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, but none before now have had a redshift measurement, because of the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we report the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting ~6 days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be z = 0.492 ± 0.008. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionized baryons in the intergalactic medium of ΩIGM = 4.9 ± 1.3 per cent, in agreement with the expectation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and including all of the so-called 'missing baryons'. The ~6-day radio transient is largely consistent with the radio afterglow of a short γ-ray burst, and its existence and timescale do not support progenitor models such as giant pulses from pulsars, and supernovae. This contrasts with the interpretation of another recently discovered fast radio burst, suggesting that there are at least two classes of bursts. PMID:26911781

  3. Very-long-baseline radio interferometry observations of low power radio galaxies.

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, G; Cotton, W D; Feretti, L; Lara, L; Venturi, T; Marcaide, J M

    1995-01-01

    The parsec scale properties of low power radio galaxies are reviewed here, using the available data on 12 Fanaroff-Riley type I galaxies. The most frequent radio structure is an asymmetric parsec-scale morphology--i.e., core and one-sided jet. It is shared by 9 (possibly 10) of the 12 mapped radio galaxies. One (possibly 2) of the other galaxies has a two-sided jet emission. Two sources are known from published data to show a proper motion; we present here evidence for proper motion in two more galaxies. Therefore, in the present sample we have 4 radio galaxies with a measured proper motion. One of these has a very symmetric structure and therefore should be in the plane of the sky. The results discussed here are in agreement with the predictions of the unified scheme models. Moreover, the present data indicate that the parsec scale structure in low and high power radio galaxies is essentially the same. PMID:11607596

  4. The Hot Atmospheres of X-Shaped Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund

    2011-01-01

    We present an observational and numerical study of X-shaped radio galaxies, a subset of the double-lobed radio galaxies with a second set of lobes or "wings". These sources have been proposed as the "smoking gun" of supermassive black hole mergers, in which case the secondary lobes would be fossil remnants following a black hole spin-flip jet reorientation. However, they may instead originate in the interplay between giant radio lobes and their hot plasma environments, since radio lobes can be considered as bubbles of light fluid in the heavier intracluster medium. Circumstantial evidence from studies of the host galaxies at optical wavelengths indicates that this may indeed be the case, leading to two important questions we attempt to answer in this work: (1) Does it appear that X-shaped radio galaxies are aware of their environments? (2) Can radio galaxies respond to their environments in such a way as to form X-shaped morphology? We use radio, optical, and X-ray imaging data to investigate the first question, finding that, in general, X-shaped sources have jets co-aligned with the major axes of their hot (X-ray emitting) atmospheres and wings co-aligned with their minor axes. However, in at least one case (where the jet clearly does not follow this trend), a deep X-ray observation suggests that rapid reorientation of the jet axis is the best explanation. Moreover,despite the trend we discover, the hydrodynamic models of wing formation have significant theoretical problems. Thus, the second major component of this thesis is concerned with using hydrodynamical simulations to determine whether X-shaped radio galaxies can be produced in response to asymmetries in the atmosphere. We inject jets as light fluids into a model cluster or galactic atmosphere previously in hydrostatic equilibrium, thereby forming bubbles similar to those observed in radio galaxies. Since we inject the jet along the major axis of an asymmetric atmosphere, distortions to the canonical double

  5. An X-ray Study of the Nearby Massive Early-Type Galaxy NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Ralph; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Evans, D. A.; Raychaudhury, S.; Sivakoff, G.; Sarazin, C.; Murray, S. S.

    2009-09-01

    We present results from a deep archival XMM-Newton observation of the nearby massive early-type galaxy NGC 4472. This galaxy is in the early stages of merging with the Virgo cluster (1.35 Mpc from M87), and is the most optically luminous galaxy in the local Universe. Our earlier Chandra observations (Biller et al. 2004) showed a complex morphology in the X-ray emitting gas including cavities associated with twin radio lobes, a surface brightness discontinuity presumable due to an interaction with the Virgo cluster gas, and a filamentary arm similar to structures seen in M87. The deep XMM-Newton observation clearly demonstrates the existence of a ram pressure stripped tail anti-coincident to M87 and a surface brightness discontinuity, presumably the contact discontinuity between two moving fluids, between the core of NGC 4472 and the Virgo cluster gas. A temperature map of the NGC 4472 gas shows complex temperature variations in the core, perhaps indicative of non-azimuthally symmetric gas motions induced by the merger. Such motions have been predicted in various hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy/cluster mergers (Heinz et al. 2003). We also detect four filaments of cold gas in the temperature map extending roughly 25 kpc from the nucleus, one of which is coincident with the feature seen in the short Chandra observation. We discuss the implications of these results in terms of our understanding of group/cluster merger dynamics.

  6. Induced star formation and morphological evolution in very high redshift radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.J.M., LLNL

    1997-10-01

    Near-infrared, sub-arcsecond seeing images obtained with the W M Keck I Telescope of show strong evolution at rest-frame optical wavelengths in the morphologies of high redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) with 1 9 < z < 4 4 The structures change from large-scale low surface brightness regions surrounding bright, multiple component and often radio-aligned features at z > 3, to much more compact and symmetrical shapes at z < 3 The linear sizes ({approximately} 10 kpc) and luminosities (M{sub B} {approximately} -20 to -22) of the individual components in the z > 3 HzRGs are similar to the total sizes and luminosities of normal, radio-quiet, star forming galaxies seen at z = 3 - 4 `R`-band, 0 1`` resolution images with the Hubble Space Telescope of one of these HzRGs, 4C41 17 at z = 3 800, show that at rest-frame UV wavelengths the galaxy morphology breaks up in even smaller, {approximately} 1 kpc-sized components embedded in a large halo of low suface brightness emission The brightest UV emission is from a radio-aligned, edge-brightened feature (4C41 17.North) downstream from a bright radio knot A narrow-band Ly-{alpha} image, also obtained with HST, shows an arc-shaped Ly-{alpha} feature at this same location, suggestive of a strong jet/cloud collision Deep spectropolarimetric observations with the W M Keck II Telescope of 4C41 17 show that the radio-aligned UV continuum is unpolarized Instead the total light spectrum shows ahsorption lines and P-Cygni type features that are similar to the radio-quiet z = 3 - 4 star forming galaxies This shows that the rest-frame UV light in 4C41 17 is dominated by starlight, not scattered light from a hidden AGN The combined HST and Keck data suggest that the radio--aligned rest-frame UV continuum is probably caused by jet-induced star formation The strong morphological evolution suggests that we see the first evidence for the assemblage of massive ellipticals, the parent population of very powerful radio sources at much lower redshifts

  7. Global Cosmological Parameters Determined Using Classical Double Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Erick J.; Daly, Ruth A.; Wan, Lin

    2000-12-01

    A sample of 20 powerful extended radio galaxies with redshifts between zero and 2 were used to determine constraints on global cosmological parameters. Data for six radio sources were obtained from the VLA archive, analyzed, and combined with the sample of 14 radio galaxies used previously by Guerra & Daly to determine cosmological parameters. The new results are consistent with our previous results, and indicate that the current value of the mean mass density of the universe is significantly less than the critical value. A universe with Ωm of unity in matter is ruled out at 99.0% confidence, and the best-fitting values of Ωm in matter are 0.10+0.25-0.10 and -0.25+0.35-0.25 assuming zero space curvature and zero cosmological constant, respectively. Note that identical results obtain when the low-redshift bin, which includes Cygnus A, is excluded; these results are independent of whether the radio source Cygnus A is included. The method does not rely on a zero-redshift normalization. The radio properties of each source are also used to determine the density of the gas in the vicinity of the source, and the beam power of the source. The six new radio sources have physical characteristics similar to those found for the original 14 sources. The density of the gas around these radio sources is typical of gas in present-day clusters of galaxies. The beam powers are typically about 1045 ergs s-1.

  8. Fermi gamma-ray imaging of a radio galaxy.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Georganopoulos, M; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sambruna, R; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stawarz, Ł; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; Hardcastle, M J; Kazanas, D

    2010-05-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The gamma-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton-scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. These measurements provide gamma-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields. PMID:20360067

  9. THE CHANDRA VIEW OF NEARBY X-SHAPED RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Miller, M. Coleman; Cheung, Chi C.

    2010-02-20

    We present new and archival Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of X-shaped radio galaxies (XRGs) within z {approx} 0.1 alongside a comparison sample of normal double-lobed FR I and II radio galaxies. By fitting elliptical distributions to the observed diffuse hot X-ray emitting atmospheres (either the interstellar or intragroup medium), we find that the ellipticity and the position angle of the hot gas follow that of the stellar light distribution for radio galaxy hosts in general. Moreover, compared to the control sample, we find a strong tendency for X-shaped morphology to be associated with wings directed along the minor axis of the hot gas distribution. Taken at face value, this result favors the hydrodynamic backflow models for the formation of XRGs which naturally explain the geometry; the merger-induced rapid reorientation models make no obvious prediction about orientation.

  10. Galactic interaction as the trigger for the young radio galaxy MRC B1221-423

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. S.; Johnston, H. M.; Hunstead, R. W.

    2013-06-01

    Mergers between a massive galaxy and a small gas-rich companion (minor mergers) have been proposed as a viable mechanism for triggering radio emission in an active galaxy. Until now the problem has been catching this sequence of events as they occur. With MRC B1221-423, we have an active radio galaxy that has only recently been triggered, and a companion galaxy that provides the `smoking gun'. Using spectroscopic data taken with the VIsible Multi Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) integral field unit detector on the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope, we have examined the distribution, ionization state and kinematics of ionized gas in this interacting system. We have also modelled the stellar continuum with synthesized spectra of stellar populations of different ages. From our study of the ionized gas, we have derived preliminary models for the geometry of the interaction, analysed the kinematic behaviour of the ionized gas, and examined the ionization mechanisms at work throughout the system. Our modelling of the stellar continuum allowed us to identify and date distinct stellar populations within the galaxy pair. We find evidence of multiple episodes of widespread starburst activity, and by dating these populations, we provide tentative insight into the history of the interaction.

  11. Massive Emission-Line Stars in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, P. L.; Holtzman, J. A.; Walterbos, R. A. M.

    2003-12-01

    The evolution of massive stars is still poorly understood because of critical effects of mass loss during the post-main sequence phase. Of particular relevance is the Luminous Blue Variable phase, during which high mass loss may occur over a brief period. It would be useful to know the mass range of stars that enter this phase, and the life time of the phase. For that, better estimates of the numbers of LBVs in different environments is crucial. In a study of M31, we detected candidate LBVs as luminous stars with strong Hα emission-lines and no nebular [SII] emission. (King, N.L., Walterbos, R.A.M., & Braun, R., 1998, ApJ, 507:210-220). HST's sensitivity offers the capability to identify these candidate LBVs in galaxies beyond the Local Group. We identify massive Hα emmision-line stars in nearby spiral galaxies within 10 Mpc, using data from the HST WFPC2 archive. We obtained stellar photometry in Hα (F656N) and various broadband filters, with methods developed for the HST Local Group Stellar Photometry archive (Holtzman, J., Afonso, C., & Dolphin, A., 2003, ApJS, submitted). We identify candidates based on the amount of Hα excess in two-color plots. We also require an absolute magnitude MV ≤ -5, and photometry fit parameters consistent with point source characteristics. Candidates are inspected visually on the images for verification purpose. We find promising candidates in several nearby galaxies. We will present a catalog of the objects, and discuss their properties and the environments in which they are found. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant numbers AR-08372.01-97A and HST-AR-08749.01-A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc. under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  12. Radio observations of a hard X-ray selected sample of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, S. W.; Lawrence, A.; Wilson, A. S.; Elvis, M.; Wright, A. E.

    1987-01-01

    Radio observations of a hard X-ray selected sample of active galaxies obtained with the VLA and Parkes radio telescopes are discussed, and the ratio of the radio to X-ray flux density is used to determine the degree of radio-loudness of the galaxies. A continuous distribution of the degree of radio loudness is found amongst the sample galaxies, and no evidence for distinct radio-quiet and radio-loud populations is noted. The X-ray and radio luminosity is shown to be nonlinearly correlated, with the radio-loud objects all having high X-ray luminosity.

  13. Testing the CMB Quenching for High-Redshift Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Gallo, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The identification of a dozen of high-redshift (z > 4) blazars implies that a much larger population of powerful, but mis-aligned jetted AGNs already exists in the early Universe. However, this parent population remains elusive, although they are expected to be within the sensitivity threshold of modern wide-field radio surveys. One appealing mechanism is that the CMB photons upscatter the diffuse synchrotron radio emission in the lobes to the X-ray band. In this scenario, the lobes will turn into luminous X-ray sources. We analyzed the extended X-ray emission around several radio galaxies at z~4 and constructed their broad-band spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Modeling their SEDs will test this CMB quenching scenario for high-redshift radio galaxies.

  14. Surface photometry of radio galaxies. II - Cluster sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Frazer N.; White, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    R-band CCD photometric observations are reported for 52 radio galaxies in clusters for which good radio maps are available. Data obtained with the No. 1 0.9-m telescope at KPNO (following the procedures described by Owen and Laing, 1989) are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. Optical and radio luminosity are found to be well correlated in twin-jet, fat-double, narrow-angle-tail, and small-twin-jet sources, all of which are clearly distinguished from the classical doubles as in the scheme of Fanaroff and Riley (1974). It is also shown that the elliptical parent galaxies of the extended radio sources form a one-parameter family with the optical luminosity as the key parameter.

  15. Jet Feedback on the Hosts of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, L.; Ogle, P. M.; Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback due to active galactic nuclei is one of the key components of the current paradigm of galaxy evolution; however our understanding of the process remains incomplete. Radio galaxies with strong rotational H_2 emission provide an interesting window into the effect of radio jet feedback on their host galaxies, since the large masses of warm (>100 K) H_2 cannot solely be heated by star formation, instead requiring jet-driven ISM turbulence to power the molecular emission. I will discuss the insights multiwavelength (X-ray to submm) observations of 22 H_2 luminous radio galaxies yield on the process of jet feedback in these galaxies and the impact on star formation activity. Specifically, I find that the diffuse X-ray and warm H_2 emission are consistent with both being powered by dissipation of the jet's mechanical energy into the interstellar medium (ISM) and that the resulting turbulence injected into the ISM by this process results in the suppression of star formation activity by a factor of 3--6. The hosts of these galaxies show a wide range of star formation activity and optical and IR colors, indicating a diversity of evolutionary states in which this process may be active.

  16. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEARBY RADIO ACTIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mould, Jeremy; Reynolds, Tristan; Readhead, Tony; Matthews, Keith; Floyd, David; Brown, Michael; Jannuzi, Buell; Atlee, David; Cotter, Garret; Ferrarese, Laura

    2012-11-15

    In preparation for a study of their circumnuclear gas we have surveyed 60% of a complete sample of elliptical galaxies within 75 Mpc that are radio sources. Some 20% of our nuclear spectra have infrared emission lines, mostly Paschen lines, Brackett {gamma}, and [Fe II]. We consider the influence of radio power and black hole mass in relation to the spectra. Access to the spectra is provided here as a community resource.

  17. Radio Galaxy Zoo: discovery of a poor cluster through a giant wide-angle tail radio galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Andernach, H.; Kapińska, A. D.; Rudnick, L.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Cotter, G.; Vaughan, S.; Jones, T. W.; Heywood, I.; Wing, J. D.; Wong, O. I.; Matorny, T.; Terentev, I. A.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Norris, R. P.; Seymour, N.; Shabala, S. S.; Willett, K. W.

    2016-08-01

    We have discovered a previously unreported poor cluster of galaxies (RGZ-CL J0823.2+0333) through an unusual giant wide-angle tail radio galaxy found in the Radio Galaxy Zoo project. We obtained a spectroscopic redshift of $z=0.0897$ for the E0-type host galaxy, 2MASX J08231289+0333016, leading to M$_r = -22.6$ and a $1.4\\,$GHz radio luminosity density of $L_{\\rm 1.4} = 5.5\\times10^{24}$ W Hz$^{-1}$. These radio and optical luminosities are typical for wide-angle tailed radio galaxies near the borderline between Fanaroff-Riley (FR) classes I and II. The projected largest angular size of $\\approx8\\,$arcmin corresponds to $800\\,$kpc and the full length of the source along the curved jets/trails is $1.1\\,$Mpc in projection. X-ray data from the XMM-Newton archive yield an upper limit on the X-ray luminosity of the thermal emission surrounding RGZ J082312.9+033301,at $1.2-2.6\\times10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$ for assumed intra-cluster medium temperatures of $1.0-5.0\\,$keV. Our analysis of the environment surrounding RGZ J082312.9+033301 indicates that RGZ J082312.9+033301 lies within a poor cluster. The observed radio morphology suggests that (a) the host galaxy is moving at a significant velocity with respect to an ambient medium like that of at least a poor cluster, and that (b) the source may have had two ignition events of the active galactic nucleus with $10^7\\,$yrs in between. This reinforces the idea that an association between RGZ J082312.9+033301, and the newly discovered poor cluster exists.

  18. Radio Galaxy Zoo: discovery of a poor cluster through a giant wide-angle tail radio galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Andernach, H.; Kapińska, A. D.; Rudnick, L.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Cotter, G.; Vaughan, S.; Jones, T. W.; Heywood, I.; Wing, J. D.; Wong, O. I.; Matorny, T.; Terentev, I. A.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Norris, R. P.; Seymour, N.; Shabala, S. S.; Willett, K. W.

    2016-08-01

    We have discovered a previously unreported poor cluster of galaxies (RGZ-CL J0823.2+0333) through an unusual giant wide-angle tail radio galaxy found in the Radio Galaxy Zoo project. We obtained a spectroscopic redshift of z = 0.0897 for the E0-type host galaxy, 2MASX J08231289+0333016, leading to Mr = -22.6 and a 1.4 GHz radio luminosity density of L1.4 = 5.5 × 1024 W Hz-1. These radio and optical luminosities are typical for wide-angle tailed radio galaxies near the borderline between Fanaroff-Riley classes I and II. The projected largest angular size of ≈8 arcmin corresponds to 800 kpc and the full length of the source along the curved jets/trails is 1.1 Mpc in projection. X-ray data from the XMM-Newton archive yield an upper limit on the X-ray luminosity of the thermal emission surrounding RGZ J082312.9+033301 at 1.2-2.6 × 1043 erg s-1 for assumed intracluster medium temperatures of 1.0-5.0 keV. Our analysis of the environment surrounding RGZ J082312.9+033301 indicates that RGZ J082312.9+033301 lies within a poor cluster. The observed radio morphology suggests that (a) the host galaxy is moving at a significant velocity with respect to an ambient medium like that of at least a poor cluster, and that (b) the source may have had two ignition events of the active galactic nucleus with 107 yr in between. This reinforces the idea that an association between RGZ J082312.9+033301 and the newly discovered poor cluster exists.

  19. Radio Galaxy Zoo: discovery of a poor cluster through a giant wide-angle tail radio galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, J. K.; Andernach, H.; Kapińska, A. D.; Rudnick, L.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Cotter, G.; Vaughan, S.; Jones, T. W.; Heywood, I.; Wing, J. D.; Wong, O. I.; Matorny, T.; Terentev, I. A.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Norris, R. P.; Seymour, N.; Shabala, S. S.; Willett, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We have discovered a previously unreported poor cluster of galaxies (RGZ-CL J0823.2+0333) through an unusual giant wide-angle tail radio galaxy found in the Radio Galaxy Zoo project. We obtained a spectroscopic redshift of z = 0.0897 for the E0-type host galaxy, 2MASX J08231289+0333016, leading to Mr = -22.6 and a 1.4 GHz radio luminosity density of L1.4 = 5.5 × 1024 W Hz-1. These radio and optical luminosities are typical for wide-angle tailed radio galaxies near the borderline between Fanaroff-Riley (FR) classes I and II. The projected largest angular size of ≈8' corresponds to 800 kpc and the full length of the source along the curved jets/trails is 1.1 Mpc in projection. X-ray data from the XMM-Newton archive yield an upper limit on the X-ray luminosity of the thermal emission surrounding RGZ J082312.9+033301 at 1.2 - 2.6 × 1043 erg s-1 for assumed intra-cluster medium temperatures of 1.0 - 5.0 keV. Our analysis of the environment surrounding RGZ J082312.9+033301 indicates that RGZ J082312.9+033301 lies within a poor cluster. The observed radio morphology infers that (a) the host galaxy is moving at a significant velocity with respect to an ambient medium like that of at least a poor cluster, and that (b) the source may have had two ignition events of the active galactic nucleus with 107 yrs in between. This reinforces the idea that an association between RGZ J082312.9+033301 and the newly discovered poor cluster exists.

  20. Multiwavelength Study of Radio Loud Early-Type Galaxies from the B2 Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sheetal Kumar; Chaware, Laxmikant; Pandey, S. K.; Kulkarni, Samridhi; Pandge, M. B.; Chakradhari, N. K.

    2014-07-01

    We present multiwavelength study of a sample of radio loud early-type galaxies chosen from the B2 sample. We performed surface photometry in BVR broad band filters and Hα narrow band filter on CCD images of sample galaxies using IGO 2m telescope, Pune (INDIA), to get radial profiles of various photometric and geometrical parameters that describe elliptical isophotes fitted to the 2D light distribution of the galaxies. The analysis of radial profiles of quantities such as the (local) surface brightness, the ellipticity, and the deviations from elliptical isophotes parametrized by the Fourier coefficients are main focus of our study. We generated color maps, residual maps, and dust extinction maps, Hα emission maps of the galaxies to study the morphology of the dust and ionized gas content present in the galaxies. We carried out detailed analysis of the properties of the dust present in our sample galaxies. Additionaly, we investigated properties of the dust in the central ~10 arcsec region of our sample galaxies using optical images available from the HST (WFPC2) data archive. We estimated mass and temperature of the dust, molecular gas mass, in the sample galaxies using FIR fluxes of the galaxies obtained from IRAS. We used spectroscopic data available from the SDSS (DR7) to get an estimate of the mass of the central super massive black-hole for B2 1257+28 (NGC 4874). We plotted rotation curve for coma cluster (Abell 1656), which indicates the presence of dark matter halo around the galaxy B2 1257+28.

  1. The MASSIVE Survey. IV. The X-ray Halos of the Most Massive Early-type Galaxies in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, Andy D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Veale, Melanie; Bogdan, Akos; Nyland, Kristina; Blakeslee, John P.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Thomas, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Studies of the physical properties of local elliptical galaxies are shedding new light on galaxy formation. Here we present the hot-gas properties of 33 early-type systems within the MASSIVE galaxy survey that have archival Chandra X-ray observations, and we use these data to derive X-ray luminosities ({L}{{X,gas}}) and plasma temperatures ({T}{{gas}}) for the diffuse gas components. We combine this with the {{ATLAS}}{{3D}} survey to investigate the X-ray–optical properties of a statistically significant sample of early-type galaxies across a wide range of environments. When X-ray measurements are performed consistently in apertures set by the galaxy stellar content, we deduce that all early types (independent of galaxy mass, environment, and rotational support) follow a universal scaling law such that {L}{{X,gas}}\\propto {T}{{gas}}˜ 4.5. We further demonstrate that the scatter in {L}{{X,gas}} around both K-band luminosity (L K ) and the galaxy stellar velocity dispersion ({σ }e) is primarily driven by {T}{{gas}}, with no clear trends with halo mass, radio power, or angular momentum of the stars. It is not trivial to tie the gas origin directly to either stellar mass or galaxy potential. Indeed, our data require a steeper relation between {L}{{X,gas}},{L}K, and {σ }e than predicted by standard mass-loss models. Finally, we find that {T}{{gas}} is set by the galaxy potential inside the optical effective radius. We conclude that within the innermost 10–30 kpc region, early types maintain pressure-supported hot gas, with a minimum {T}{{gas}} set by the virial temperature, but the majority show evidence for additional heating.

  2. The MASSIVE Survey. IV. The X-ray Halos of the Most Massive Early-type Galaxies in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, Andy D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Veale, Melanie; Bogdan, Akos; Nyland, Kristina; Blakeslee, John P.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Thomas, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Studies of the physical properties of local elliptical galaxies are shedding new light on galaxy formation. Here we present the hot-gas properties of 33 early-type systems within the MASSIVE galaxy survey that have archival Chandra X-ray observations, and we use these data to derive X-ray luminosities ({L}{{X,gas}}) and plasma temperatures ({T}{{gas}}) for the diffuse gas components. We combine this with the {{ATLAS}}{{3D}} survey to investigate the X-ray–optical properties of a statistically significant sample of early-type galaxies across a wide range of environments. When X-ray measurements are performed consistently in apertures set by the galaxy stellar content, we deduce that all early types (independent of galaxy mass, environment, and rotational support) follow a universal scaling law such that {L}{{X,gas}}\\propto {T}{{gas}}∼ 4.5. We further demonstrate that the scatter in {L}{{X,gas}} around both K-band luminosity (L K ) and the galaxy stellar velocity dispersion ({σ }e) is primarily driven by {T}{{gas}}, with no clear trends with halo mass, radio power, or angular momentum of the stars. It is not trivial to tie the gas origin directly to either stellar mass or galaxy potential. Indeed, our data require a steeper relation between {L}{{X,gas}},{L}K, and {σ }e than predicted by standard mass-loss models. Finally, we find that {T}{{gas}} is set by the galaxy potential inside the optical effective radius. We conclude that within the innermost 10–30 kpc region, early types maintain pressure-supported hot gas, with a minimum {T}{{gas}} set by the virial temperature, but the majority show evidence for additional heating.

  3. Multiphase ISM in Radio Loud Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sheetal Kumar; Chaware, Laxmikant; Pandey, S. K.

    We present optical, IR and X-ray photometric study of a sample of radio loud early type galaxies chosen from B2 sample. To get radial profiles of various photometric and geometrical parameters, We per- formed multiband surface photometry on CCD images of our sample gala- xies in ’BVR’ broad band filter and Hα narrow band filter obtained from IUCAA Girawali Observatory(IGO 2m telescope) Pune(INDIA),that descri- be elliptical isophotes fitted to the 2D light distribution of the galaxies. The main focus of our study is to analyze radial profiles of quantities such as the (local) surface brightness, the ellipticity, and the deviations from elliptical isophotes parametrized by the Fourier coefficients. We generated color maps,residual maps,dust extinction maps, Hα emission maps and x-ray diffuse maps (obtained from CHANDRA data archive) of the galaxies to study the morphology of the dust, ionized and hot gas content present in the galaxies. We carried out detailed analysis of the dust properties(mass and temperature of the dust) for sample galaxies. We also made use of the HST(WFPC2) archival optical images to investigate properties of the dust in the central region(˜10 arcsec) of our sample galaxies, including this we also estimated molecular gas mass, mass loss by red giant stars and mass loss rate from evolved stars in the sample galaxies obtained from IRAS fluxes. This multiwavelength study of our sample galaxies enabled us to find physical correlation among different phases of ISM also to address various issues related to dust i.e origin, nature and ate(evolution)of dust in radio-loud early type galaxies, coexistence of multiphase ISM in extra-galactic environment and its possible implications for the scenarios of formation and evolution of galaxies.

  4. Star Formation Suppression Due to Jet Feedback in Radio Galaxies with Shocked Warm Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Lauranne; Ogle, Patrick M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Appleton, Philip N.

    2016-07-01

    We present Herschel observations of 22 radio galaxies, selected for the presence of shocked, warm molecular hydrogen emission. We measured and modeled spectral energy distributions in 33 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared to investigate the impact of jet feedback on star formation activity. These galaxies are massive, early-type galaxies with normal gas-to-dust ratios, covering a range of optical and infrared colors. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) is suppressed by a factor of ˜3–6, depending on how molecular gas mass is estimated. We suggest that this suppression is due to the shocks driven by the radio jets injecting turbulence into the interstellar medium (ISM), which also powers the luminous warm H2 line emission. Approximately 25% of the sample shows suppression by more than a factor of 10. However, the degree of SFR suppression does not correlate with indicators of jet feedback including jet power, diffuse X-ray emission, or intensity of warm molecular H2 emission, suggesting that while injected turbulence likely impacts star formation, the process is not purely parameterized by the amount of mechanical energy dissipated into the ISM. Radio galaxies with shocked warm molecular gas cover a wide range in SFR–stellar mass space, indicating that these galaxies are in a variety of evolutionary states, from actively star-forming and gas-rich to quiescent and gas-poor. SFR suppression appears to have the largest impact on the evolution of galaxies that are moderately gas-rich.

  5. A Comparison of Radio-loud and Radio-quiet E+A Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Yssavo; Wallack, Nicole; Learis, Anna; Liu, Charles

    2015-01-01

    E+A galaxies are systems undergoing an important evolutionary transition. Their optical spectra show significant numbers of A-type stars in an elliptical galaxy that has little to no star formation (SF). These galaxies have likely experienced a recent starburst (< 1 Gyr) followed by an even more recent quench in their SF. What caused their recent SF quench remains one of the most prominent questions surrounding E+A galaxies. Within the Goto (2007, MNRAS 381,187) catalogue of 564 E+A galaxies, there is a small fraction (~3%) that have detectable radio continuum emission from FIRST or NVSS. One possible cause for the observed radio continuum is active galactic nuclei (AGN). AGN feedback is believed to be important in galaxy evolution, including SF quenching (Dubois et al. 2013, MNRAS 433, 3297). In an effort to understand better the differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet E+As, we obtained and compared their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the publicly available data from SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE. We also compared them to the SEDs of other known galaxy types. We find that the radio-loud and radio-quiet samples exhibit statistically insignificant differences in the optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared bands. We also compare the two samples on a (J-H) vs. (H-K) color-color diagram. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation via grant AST-1004583 to the CUNY College of Staten Island, and grant AST-1004591 to the American Museum of Natural History.

  6. Sub-millimetre properties of massive star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2 in SHADES/SXDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, T.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Shimasaku, K.; Coppin, K.; Pope, A.; Ivison, R. J.; Hanami, H.; Serjeant, S.; Dunlop, J. S.

    2007-05-01

    We study the submillimetre (submm) properties of the following NIR-selected massive galaxies at high redshifts: BzK-selected star-forming galaxies (BzKs), distant red galaxies (DRGs) and extremely red objects (EROs). We used the SCUBA HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES), the largest uniform submm survey to date. We detected 6 NIR-selected galaxies in our SCUBA map. Four submm-detected galaxies out of six are found to be detected both at 24 micron and in radio (1.4 GHz), and therefore confirmed as genuine submm-bright galaxies. We identify two submm-bright NIR-selected galaxies are the BzK-DRG-ERO overlapping population. Although this overlapping population is rare, about 12% of this population could be submm galaxies. With a stacking analysis, we detected the 850-micron flux of submm-faint BzKs and EROs in our SCUBA maps. While the contribution from BzKs at z˜2 to submm background is about 10 - 15 % and similar to that from EROs typically at z˜1, BzKs have a higher fraction (˜30%) of flux in resolved sources than EROs do. Therefore, submm flux of BzKs seems to be biased high. From the SED fitting using an evolutionary model of starbursts with radiative transfer, submm-bright NIR-selected galaxies, mostly BzKs, are found to have the stellar mass of >5x1010M[sun] with the bolometric luminosity of >3x1012L[sun]. On the other hand, an average SED of submm-faint BzKs indicates the typical stellar mass of <6x1010M[sun] and therefore less massive.

  7. The dynamics and energetics of FR-II radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Jeremy; Morganti, Raffaella; Hardcastle, Martin; Croston, J.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the shape of the energy spectrum for an electron population can often give key insights into the underlying physics of a radio source. In principle, a region emitting via synchrotron radiation will preferentially cool higher energy electrons leading to a steeper, more strongly curved spectrum in older regions of plasma. Models of this so-called spectral aging have become a commonly used tool when describing the processes involved in emission from the lobes of FR-II radio galaxies; however, the lack of high resolution, broad-bandwidth observations has historically meant the details of these spectra have remained largely unexplored on small spatial scales. The broad-bandwidth capabilities of telescopes such as the JVLA, LOFAR, e-MERLIN and ultimately the SKA, will mean that the spectrum of any given source can be determined within the bandwidth of any given observation, producing a detailed spectral shape. This type of detailed spectral analysis is therefore set to become standard practice when dealing with any new broadband radio observations.In this talk, we provide details of the Broadband Radio Astronomy ToolS (BRATS) software package that uses innovative techniques to analyze this new generation of radio data. Through the application of BRATS to LOFAR and JVLA observations, we present results from our latest investigations into the dynamics and energetics of nearby FR-II radio galaxies and their spectral structure on small spatial scales. We go on to discuss how these new findings impact upon our current understanding of the underlying physics of FR-II radio galaxies and, ultimately, their impact of galaxy evolution as a whole.

  8. High Resolution Radio Imaging of the Merging Galaxies NGC3256 and NGC4194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Campion, S. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present new 6cm and 4cm radio continuum images of the central regions of the merging galaxy systems NGC3256 and NGC4194. NGC3256 is imaged with a resolution of approx. 1 in. or approx. 190pc; NGC4194 is imaged with a resolution of approx. 0.3 in. or approx. 50pc. In both systems, we detect numerous compact radio sources embedded in more diffuse radio emission. We detect 65 compact sources in NGC3256 at 6cm and we detect 46 compact sources in NGC4194, both to a limiting luminosity of approx. 5 x 10(exp 18) W/ Hz or approx. 5 times the luminosity of Cas A. Most of the compact radio sources are loosely associated with active star forming regions but not with specific optical emission sources. Several compact radio sources in NGC3256 are near positions of compact X-ray sources detected by Lira et al.. In both NGC3256 and NGC4194, we are able to measure reliable spectral indices for the stronger sources. We find in NGC3256 approx. 20% have nominally flat radio spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by thermal radio emission from HII regions) while approx. 80% have nominally steep spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by nonthermal emission from supernova remnants). In NGC4194, half the compact radio sources have flat spectral indices and half have steep indices. For the flat-spectrum sources, we estimate the number of young massive stars and the associated ionized gas masses. For the steep-spectrum sources, we estimate supernova rates. We compare these results with those from other well-studied merging galaxy systems. We gratefully acknowledge use of the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) and the VLA Archive. NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  9. WHAT ARE THE PROGENITORS OF COMPACT, MASSIVE, QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z = 2.3? THE POPULATION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z > 3 FROM NMBS AND CANDELS

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanon, Mauro; Rudnick, Gregory H.; Marchesini, Danilo; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2013-05-01

    Using public data from the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS) and the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), we investigate the population of massive galaxies at z > 3. The main aim of this work is to identify the potential progenitors of z {approx} 2 compact, massive, quiescent galaxies (CMQGs), furthering our understanding of the onset and evolution of massive galaxies. Our work is enabled by high-resolution images from CANDELS data and accurate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) from 37-band NMBS photometry. The total number of massive galaxies at z > 3 is consistent with the number of massive, quiescent galaxies (MQGs) at z {approx} 2, implying that the SFRs for all of these galaxies must be much lower by z {approx} 2. We discover four CMQGs at z > 3, pushing back the time for which such galaxies have been observed. However, the volume density for these galaxies is significantly less than that of galaxies at z < 2 with similar masses, SFRs, and sizes, implying that additional CMQGs must be created in the intervening {approx}1 Gyr between z = 3 and z = 2. We find five star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 3 that are compact (R{sub e} < 1.4 kpc) and have stellar mass M{sub *} > 10{sup 10.6} M{sub Sun }; these galaxies are likely to become members of the massive, quiescent, compact galaxy population at z {approx} 2. We evolve the stellar masses and SFRs of each individual z > 3 galaxy adopting five different star formation histories (SFHs) and studying the resulting population of massive galaxies at z = 2.3. We find that declining or truncated SFHs are necessary to match the observed number density of MQGs at z {approx} 2, whereas a constant delayed-exponential SFH would result in a number density significantly smaller than observed. All of our assumed SFHs imply number densities of CMQGs at z {approx} 2 that are consistent with the observed number density. Better agreement with the observed

  10. Hot, Massive Stars in the Extremely Metal-Poor Galaxy, I Zw 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Malumuth, Eliot M.

    2010-01-01

    The extremely metal-poor galaxy I Zw 18, is the Rosetta Stone for understanding z=7-8 galaxies now being discovered by Hubb|e's Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). Using HST/STIS images and recently obtained HST/COS ultraviolet spectra, we derive information about the hot, massive stars in this galaxy including stellar abundances, constraints on the stellar IMF and mass distribution of young clusters containing hot, massive stars.

  11. Far-UV to mid-IR properties of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, H. R.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; Fanti, C.

    2015-09-01

    component. XUV and the slope of the mid-IR are strongly correlated, as measured by the WISE bands in the interval 3.4 to 22 μm, in the sense that sources with a strong UV excess also have stronger IR emission. There is an inverse correlation between XUV and central black hole mass: the MBH of objects with strong UV excess is on average two to three times less massive than that of objects without UV excess. Low-luminosity radio galaxies tend to be more massive and contain more massive black holes. Full Fig. 1 and Tables 2-4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Early-type galaxies have been the predominant morphological class for massive galaxies since only z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, Fernando; Trujillo, Ignacio; Conselice, Christopher J.; Häußler, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Present-day massive galaxies are composed mostly of early-type objects. It is unknown whether this was also the case at higher redshifts. In a hierarchical assembling scenario the morphological content of the massive population is expected to change with time from disc-like objects in the early Universe to spheroid-like galaxies at present. In this paper we have probed this theoretical expectation by compiling a large sample of massive (Mstellar ≥ 1011 h- 270 M⊙) galaxies in the redshift interval 0 < z < 3. Our sample of 1082 objects comprises 207 local galaxies selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey plus 875 objects observed with the Hubble Space Telescope belonging to the Palomar Observatory Wide-field InfraRed/DEEP2 and GOODS NICMOS Survey surveys. 639 of our objects have spectroscopic redshifts. Our morphological classification is performed as close as possible to the optical rest frame according to the photometric bands available in our observations both quantitatively (using the Sérsic index as a morphological proxy) and qualitatively (by visual inspection). Using both techniques we find an enormous change on the dominant morphological class with cosmic time. The fraction of early-type galaxies among the massive galaxy population has changed from ˜20-30 per cent at z ˜ 3 to ˜70 per cent at z = 0. Early-type galaxies have been the predominant morphological class for massive galaxies since only z ˜ 1.

  13. Ultraviolet and optical spectra of broadline radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. Michael; Peterson, Bradley M.; Wagner, R. Mark

    1988-01-01

    Near-simultaneous ultraviolet and optical spectra of three broadline radio galaxies (3C 382, 3C 445, and PKS 2349-014) have been obtained, and the emission lines of Ly-alpha, H-beta, and H-alpha have been deconvolved into narrow and broad components; published fluxes for 3C 390.3 are also included in this study. Although the broad Ly-alpha/H-beta ratios in these objects cover a large range (1.2-22.3), there is no evidence that these ratios are intrinsically different from those of Seyfert 1 galaxies or quasars. Thus, in general, the higher H-alpha/H-beta ratios in these broadline radio galaxies cannot entirely be due to additional reddening of the broadline region. However, in the specific case of 3C 445, there is evidence that the nonstellar continuum and broadline region are highly reddened.

  14. OBSERVATIONS OF DARK AND LUMINOUS MATTER: THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF SATELLITE GALAXIES AROUND MASSIVE RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2012-05-20

    We study the projected radial distribution of satellite galaxies around more than 28,000 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) at 0.28 < z < 0.40 and trace the gravitational potential of LRG groups in the range 15 < r/kpc < 700. We show that at large radii the satellite number-density profile is well fitted by a projected Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile with r{sub s} {approx} 270 kpc and that at small radii this model underestimates the number of satellite galaxies. Utilizing the previously measured stellar light distribution of LRGs from deep imaging stacks, we demonstrate that this small-scale excess is consistent with a non-negligible baryonic mass contribution to the gravitational potential of massive groups and clusters. The combined NFW+scaled stellar profile provides an excellent fit to the satellite number-density profile all the way from 15 kpc to 700 kpc. Dark matter dominates the total mass profile of LRG halos at r > 25 kpc whereas baryons account for more than 50% of the mass at smaller radii. We calculate the total dark-to-baryonic mass ratio and show that it is consistent with measurements from weak lensing for environments dominated by massive early-type galaxies. Finally, we divide the satellite galaxies in our sample into three luminosity bins and show that the satellite light profiles of all brightness levels are consistent with each other outside of roughly 25 kpc. At smaller radii we find evidence for a mild mass segregation with an increasing fraction of bright satellites close to the central LRG.

  15. Clues to (Radio) Galaxy Formation from Deep HST Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, Rogier A.

    We review recent clues from deep HST images on the formation and evolution of galaxies, and of μJy and mJy radio sources in particular. Constraints from the radio source counts over 7 dex in flux and 1 dex in frequency are discussed. We review recent results from deep HST primary and parallel surveys relevant to (radio) galaxy formation. The WFPC2 galaxy counts as a function of morphological type for B < ~ 27 mag show that E/S0's and Sabc's are only marginally above the non-evolving predictions. The faint blue galaxy counts are dominated by Sd/Irr's, and are explained by a combination of a moderately steep local luminosity function undergoing strong luminosity evolution plus low-luminosity lower-redshift dwarf galaxies. Deep WFPC2 images in the medium-band filter F410M yielded 18 faint, compact Lyα emitting candidates at z ≃ 2.4 surrounding the radio galaxy 53W002 at z𢐲.390, as well as 18 more z ≃ 2.4 candidates in three random parallel fields. These objects appear to be star-forming spheroids smaller (rhl ≍ 0''.1 or 0.5-1 kpc) and fainter (MV (z=0)=-17--> -21) than the bulges of typical galaxies seen today. They may the building blocks from which many of the luminous nearby galaxies were formed through repeated hierarchical mergers. HST/PC images in BV I - as well as in redshifted Lyα - of 53W002 show several morphological components: (1) a blue AGN with < ~ 20-25% of the total continuum light; (2) an r1/4-like light distribution with colors indicating a stellar population age ~0.4 Gyr; and (3) two small blue clouds roughly aligned with the radio axis and the main stellar population. We show that both reflected AGN light and jet-induced starformation likely play a role in explaining its "alignment effect". We discuss a possible formation and evolution scenario of 53W002 in context of its surrounding sub-galactic objects, and argue that it will end up like a giant elliptical today.

  16. COMPARISONS OF COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER SIMULATIONS TO RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C.; Govoni, Federica; Murgia, Matteo; Norman, Michael L.; Cen Renyue; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele E-mail: hli@lanl.gov E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu E-mail: matteo@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: lferetti@ira.inaf.it

    2012-11-01

    Radio observations of galaxy clusters show that there are {mu}G magnetic fields permeating the intracluster medium (ICM), but it is hard to accurately constrain the strength and structure of the magnetic fields without the help of advanced computer simulations. We present qualitative comparisons of synthetic Very Large Array observations of simulated galaxy clusters to radio observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) and radio halos. The cluster formation is modeled using adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the assumption that the initial magnetic fields are injected into the ICM by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift. In addition to simulated clusters in Xu et al., we present a new simulation with magnetic field injections from multiple AGNs. We find that the cluster with multiple injection sources is magnetized to a similar level as in previous simulations with a single AGN. The RM profiles from simulated clusters, both |RM| and the dispersion of RM ({sigma}{sub RM}), are consistent at a first order with the radial distribution from observations. The correlations between the {sigma}{sub RM} and X-ray surface brightness from simulations are in a broad agreement with the observations, although there is an indication that the simulated clusters could be slightly overdense and less magnetized with respect to those in the observed sample. In addition, the simulated radio halos agree with the observed correlations between the radio power versus the cluster X-ray luminosity and between the radio power versus the radio halo size. These studies show that the cluster-wide magnetic fields that originate from AGNs and are then amplified by the ICM turbulence match observations of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters.

  17. The radio sources CTA 21 and OF+247: The hot spots of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukh, V. S.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chernikov, P. A.

    2013-06-01

    The physical conditions in the radio sources CTA 21 and OF+247 are studied assuming that the low-frequency spectral turnovers are due to synchrotron self-absorption. The physical parameters of the radio sources are estimated using a technique based on a nonuniform synchrotron source model. It is shown that the magnetic-field distributions in the dominant compact components of these radio sources are strongly inhomogeneous. The magnetic fields at the center of the sources are B ˜ 10-1 G, and the fields are two to three orders of magnitude weaker at the periphery. The magnetic field averaged over the compact component is B ˜ 10-3 G, and the density of relativistic electrons is n e ˜ 10-3 cm-3. Assuming that there is equipartition of the energies of the magnetic field and relativistic particles, averaged over the source, < E H > = < E e > ˜ 10-7-10-6 erg cm-3. The energy density of the magnetic field exceeds that of the relativistic electrons at the centers of the radio sources. The derived parameters of CTA 21 and OF+247 are close to those of the hot spots in the radio galaxy Cygnus A. On this basis, it is suggested that CTA 21 and OF+247 are radio galaxies at an early stage of their evolution, when the hot spots (dominant compact radio components) have appeared, and the radio lobes (weak extended components) are still being formed.

  18. Determination of the Cosmic Radio Background from the Radio-Infrared Relation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Barker, Michael K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We use the radioactive flux correlation for star forming galaxies in the local universe to derive their contribution to the cosmic radio background (CRB). The CRB from these galaxies is therefore determined by the evolution of the comoving infrared luminosity density with redshift, which is constrained by galaxy number counts at various infrared wavelengths and by the cosmic infrared background. The research of ED was supported by NASA NRA 99-OSS-01 Astrophysics Theory Program. MB acknowledges the support of the "Research Opportunities for Undergraduates in the Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics" for the summer student internship program at NASA/GSFC.

  19. Feeding a Leviathan: The Growth of Massive Red Galaxies Through Minor Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Tomer

    Observations of massive red galaxies have demonstrated gradual evolution since z = 2, with stellar mass doubling and size quintupling in the last ten billion years. One possible mode for mass and size growth in such galaxies is through minor mergers, which are expected to increase the size of galaxies by the square of the growth in mass. In this thesis we present an analysis of the importance of minor mergers to the evolution of massive red galaxies in the nearby universe. We acquire and process large samples of galaxy observations to study minor mergers before, during and after the interaction takes place. We show that stellar tidal features are found around nearly all nearby ellipticals, suggesting that minor mergers are common. We calculate the implied mass evolution and show that it is in agreement with observations. We then study the faint outskirts of Luminous Red Galaxies by stacking more than 40,000 images and find that their color gradients are consistent with minor mergers and low mass galaxy accretion. In addition, we utilize statistical background subtraction techniques to measure the projected radial distribution of satellite galaxies around massive red galaxies. Our analysis shows that the most probable channel for mass growth in such galaxies is through mergers with significantly lower mass galaxies. Finally, the distribution of satellites around massive red galaxies is consistent with the minor merger model and suggests that most of the stellar mass in these halos is already locked in the central galaxy itself. In conclusion, we find that minor mergers likely play a significant role in the evolution of massive galaxies, even in the nearby universe.

  20. Fully cosmological virtual massive galaxies at z = 0: kinematical, morphological and stellar population characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-González, Javier; Ricciardelli, Elena; Quilis, Vicent; Vazdekis, Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of a numerical adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamical and N-body simulation in a Λ cold dark matter cosmology. We focus on the analysis of the main properties of massive galaxies (M* > 1011 M⊙) at z = 0. For all the massive virtual galaxies, we carry out a careful study of their one-dimensional density, luminosity, velocity dispersion and stellar population profiles. In order to best compare with observational data, the method to estimate the velocity dispersion is calibrated by using an approach similar to that performed in the observations, based on the stellar populations of the simulated galaxies. With these ingredients, we discuss the different properties of massive galaxies in our sample according to their morphological types, accretion histories and dynamical properties. We find that the galaxy merging history is the leading actor in shaping the massive galaxies that we see nowadays. Indeed, galaxies having experienced a turbulent life are the most massive in the sample and show the steepest metallicity gradients. Beside the importance of merging, only a small fraction of the final stellar mass has been formed ex situ (10-50 per cent), while the majority of the stars formed within the galaxy. These accreted stars are significantly older and less metallic than the stars formed in situ and tend to occupy the most external regions of the galaxies.

  1. Radio Bubbles in Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Robert J.H.; Fabian, A.C.; Taylor, G.B.; /NRAO, Socorro /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We extend our earlier work on cluster cores with distinct radio bubbles, adding more active bubbles, i.e. those with GHz radio emission, to our sample, and also investigating ''ghost bubbles'', i.e. those without GHz radio emission. We have determined k, which is the ratio of the total particle energy to that of the electrons radiating between 10MHz and 10GHz. Constraints on the ages of the active bubbles confirm that the ratio of the energy factor, k, to the volume filling factor, f lies within the range 1 {approx}< k/f {approx}< 1000. In the assumption that there is pressure equilibrium between the radio-emitting plasma and the surrounding thermal X-ray gas, none of the radio lobes has equipartition between the relativistic particles and the magnetic field. A Monte-Carlo simulation of the data led to the conclusion that there are not enough bubbles present in the current sample to be able to determine the shape of the population. An analysis of the ghost bubbles in our sample showed that on the whole they have higher upper limits on k/f than the active bubbles, especially when compared to those in the same cluster. A study of the Brightest 55 cluster sample shows that 17, possibly 20, clusters required some form of heating as they have a short central cooling time, t{sub cool} {approx}< 3 Gyr, and a large central temperature drop, T{sub centre}/T{sub outer} < 1/2. Of these between 12 (70 per cent) and 15 (75 per cent), contain bubbles. This indicates that the duty cycle of bubbles is large in such clusters and that they can play a major role in the heating process.

  2. Radio Telescope Reveals Secrets of Massive Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    At the cores of many galaxies, supermassive black holes expel powerful jets of particles at nearly the speed of light. Just how they perform this feat has long been one of the mysteries of astrophysics. The leading theory says the particles are accelerated by tightly-twisted magnetic fields close to the black hole, but confirming that idea required an elusive close-up view of the jet's inner throat. Now, using the unrivaled resolution of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), astronomers have watched material winding a corkscrew outward path and behaving exactly as predicted by the theory. Galactic core and jet Artist's conception of region near supermassive black hole where twisted magnetic fields propel and shape jet of particles (Credit: Marscher et al., Wolfgang Steffen, Cosmovision, NRAO/AUI/NSF). Click on image for high-resolution file. Watch Video of Black-Hole-Powered Jet (Credit: Cosmovision, Wolfgang Steffen) Download: NTSC Format (90MB) | PAL Format (90MB) "We have gotten the clearest look yet at the innermost portion of the jet, where the particles actually are accelerated, and everything we see supports the idea that twisted, coiled magnetic fields are propelling the material outward," said Alan Marscher, of Boston University, leader of an international research team. "This is a major advance in our understanding of a remarkable process that occurs throughout the Universe," he added. Marscher's team studied a galaxy called BL Lacertae (BL Lac), some 950 million light-years from Earth. BL Lac is a blazar, the most energetic type of black-hole-powered galactic core. A black hole is a concentration of mass so dense that not even light can escape its gravitational pull. Supermassive black holes in galaxies' cores power jets of particles and intense radiation in similar objects including quasars and Seyfert galaxies. Material pulled inward toward the black hole forms a flattened, rotating disk, called an accretion disk

  3. Why do the HIghMass Galaxies Have so Much Gas?: Studying Massive, Gas-Rich Galaxies at z~0 with Resolved HI and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; HIghMass Team

    2016-01-01

    In the standard ΛCDM cosmology, galaxies form via mergers of many smaller dark matter halos. Because mergers drive star formation, the most massive galaxies should also be the ones which have been the most efficient at converting their gas reservoirs into stars. This trend is seen observationally: in general, as stellar mass increases, gas fraction (GF = MHI/M*) decreases. Galaxies which have large reservoirs of atomic hydrogen (HI) are thus expected to be extremely rare, which was seemingly supported by earlier blind HI surveys.In seeming contradiction, ALFALFA, the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey has observed a sample of 34 galaxies which are both massive (MHI>1010 M⊙) and have unusually high gas fractions (all ≥ 0.3; half are > 1). We call this sample HighMass. Unlike other extremely HI-massive samples, such galaxies are neither low surface brightness galaxies nor are they simply "scaled up" spirals. Could this gas be recently acquired, either from accreting small companions or directly from the cosmic web? Or is it primordial, and has been kept from forming stars, possibly because of an unusually high dark matter halo spin parameter?We present resolved HI, H2, and star formation properties of three of these HIghMass galaxies, and compare them with two HIghMass galaxies previously discussed in Hallenbeck et al. (2014). One of these galaxies, UGC 6168, appears in the process of transitioning from a quiescent to star-forming phase, as indicated by its bar and potential non-circular flows. A second, UGC 7899, has a clear warp, which could be evidence of recently accreted gas—but the presence of a warp is far from conclusive evidence. Both have moderately high dark matter halo spin parameters (λ' = 0.09), similar to the previously studied UGC 9037. The third, NGC 5230, looks undisturbed both optically and in its radio emission, but is in a group full of extragalactic gas. A neighboring galaxy has been significantly disrupted, and NGC 5230 may be in the

  4. Radio emission from dusty galaxies observed by AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepiak, A.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Jurusik, W.

    2014-10-01

    We probe radio-infrared correlation for two samples of extragalactic sources from the local Universe from the AKARI All-Sky Catalogue. The first, smaller sample (1053 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue, the AKARI IRC All-Sky Survey Point Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the mid- and far-infrared by AKARI, and at the 1.4 GHz radio frequency by NRAO. The second, larger sample (13,324 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of only the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the far-infrared and radio, without a condition to be detected in the mid-infrared. Additionally, all objects in both samples were identified as galaxies in the NED and/or SIMBAD databases, and a part of them is known to host active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For the present analysis, we have restricted our samples only to sources with known redshift z. In this paper, we analyse the far-infrared-radio correlation for both of these samples. We compare the ratio of infrared and radio emission from normal star-forming dusty galaxies and AGNs in both samples. For the smaller sample we obtained =2.14 for AGNs and =2.27 for normal galaxies, while for the larger sample =2.15 for AGNs and =2.22 for normal galaxies. An average value of the slope in both samples is ~2.2, which is consistent with the previous measurements from the literature.

  5. Giant radio galaxies via inverse Compton weakened jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiita, Paul J.; Rosen, Alexander; Gopal-Krishna; Saripalli, L.

    Both analytical and numerical models for the propagation of relativistic jets through a hot interstellar medium (ISM) and into an even hotter intergalactic medium (IGM) have been considered. The models by Gopal-Krishna and Wiita (1987), and Wiita and Gopal-Krishna (1987, 1988) were extended to allow for intrinsically extremely powerful jets, which may start off advancing relativistically through the interstellar medium. Eventually the energy density in the lobes becomes comparable to that of the microwave background, and inverse Compton losses of the synchrotron emitting electrons against the background photons become important. It is argued that only powerful radio engines are responsible for giant radio galaxies (GRGs, those whose linear size exceeds 1.5 Mpc), most of the observed peculiarities of the GRGs, such as their rarity, moderate radio flux and relatively strong radio cores can be explained.

  6. REVISITING SCALING RELATIONS FOR GIANT RADIO HALOS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Pratt, G. W.; Markevitch, M.

    2013-11-10

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R{sub 500} as P{sub 1.4}∼L{sup 2.1±0.2}{sub 500}. Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L{sub 500} > 5 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}) clusters branch into two populations—radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P{sub 1.4} scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R{sub 500}, measured by Planck, as P{sub 1.4}∼Y{sup 2.05±0.28}{sub 500}, in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that 'SZ-luminous' Y{sub 500} > 6 × 10{sup –5} Mpc{sup 2} clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle

  7. Revisiting Scaling Relations for Giant Radio Halos in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassano, R.; Ettori, S.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Dolag, K.; Markevitch, Maxim L.

    2013-01-01

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R(sub 500) as P(sub 1.4) approx. L(2.1+/-0.2) - 500). Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L(sub 500) > 5 × 10(exp 44) erg/s)) clusters branch into two populations-radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P(sub 1.4) scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R(sub 500), measured by Planck, as P(sub 1.4) approx. Y(2.05+/-0.28) - 500), in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that "SZ-luminous" Y(sub 500) > 6×10(exp -5) Mpc(exp 2) clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle acceleration.

  8. THE ROLE OF MERGER STAGE ON GALAXY RADIO SPECTRA IN LOCAL INFRARED-BRIGHT STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Eric J.

    2013-11-01

    An investigation of the steep, high-frequency (i.e., ν ∼ 12 GHz) radio spectra among a sample of 31 local infrared-bright starburst galaxies is carried out in light of their Hubble-Space-Telescope-based merger classifications. Radio data covering as many as 10 individual bands allow for spectral indices to be measured over three frequency bins between 0.15 and 32.5 GHz. Sources having the flattest spectral indices measured at ∼2 and 4 GHz, arising from large free-free optical depths among the densest starbursts, appear to be in ongoing through post-stage mergers. The spectral indices measured at higher frequencies (i.e., ∼12 GHz) are steepest for sources associated with ongoing mergers in which their nuclei are distinct, but share a common stellar envelope and/or exhibit tidal tails. These results hold after excluding potential active galactic nuclei based on their low 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon equivalent widths. Consequently, the low-, mid-, and high-frequency spectral indices each appear to be sensitive to the exact merger stage. It is additionally shown that ongoing mergers, whose progenitors are still separated and share a common envelope and/or exhibit tidal tails, also exhibit excess radio emission relative to what is expected given the far-infrared/radio correlation, suggesting that there may be a significant amount of radio emission that is not associated with ongoing star formation. The combination of these observations, along with high-resolution radio morphologies, leads to a picture in which the steep high-frequency radio spectral indices and excess radio emission arise from radio continuum bridges and tidal tails that are not associated with star formation, similar to what is observed for so-called 'taffy' galaxies. This scenario may also explain the seemingly low far-infrared/radio ratios measured for many high-z submillimeter galaxies, a number of which are merger-driven starbursts.

  9. New Detections of Radio Minihalos in Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacintucci, Simona; Markevitch, Maxim; Venturi, Tiziana; Clarke, Tracy E.; Cassano, Rossella; Mazzotta, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Cool cores of some galaxy clusters exhibit faint radio minihalos. Their origin is unclear, and their study has been limited by their small number. We undertook a systematic search for minihalos in a large sample of X-ray luminous clusters with high-quality radio data. In this article, we report four new minihalos (A 478, ZwCl 3146,RXJ 1532.9+3021, and A 2204) and five candidates found in the reanalyzed archival Very Large Array observations.The radio luminosities of our minihalos and candidates are in the range of 102325 W Hz1 at 1.4 GHz, which is consistent with these types of radio sources. Their sizes (40160 kpc in radius) are somewhat smaller than those of previously known minihalos. We combine our new detections with previously known minihalos, obtaining a total sample of 21 objects, and briefly compare the cluster radio properties to the average X-ray temperature and the total masses estimated from Planck.We find that nearly all clusters hosting minihalos are hot and massive. Beyond that, there is no clear correlation between the minihalo radio power and cluster temperature or mass (in contrast with the giant radio halos found in cluster mergers, whose radio luminosity correlates with the cluster mass). Chandra X-ray images indicate gas sloshing in the cool cores of most of our clusters, with minihalos contained within the sloshing regions in many of them. This supports the hypothesis that radio-emitting electrons are reaccelerated by sloshing. Advection of relativistic electrons by the sloshing gas may also play a role in the formation of the less extended minihalos.

  10. New detections of radio minihalos in cool cores of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Giacintucci, Simona; Markevitch, Maxim; Clarke, Tracy E.; Mazzotta, Pasquale

    2014-01-20

    Cool cores of some galaxy clusters exhibit faint radio 'minihalos'. Their origin is unclear, and their study has been limited by their small number. We undertook a systematic search for minihalos in a large sample of X-ray luminous clusters with high-quality radio data. In this article, we report four new minihalos (A 478, ZwCl 3146, RXJ 1532.9+3021, and A 2204) and five candidates found in the reanalyzed archival Very Large Array observations. The radio luminosities of our minihalos and candidates are in the range of 10{sup 23-25} W Hz{sup –1} at 1.4 GHz, which is consistent with these types of radio sources. Their sizes (40-160 kpc in radius) are somewhat smaller than those of previously known minihalos. We combine our new detections with previously known minihalos, obtaining a total sample of 21 objects, and briefly compare the cluster radio properties to the average X-ray temperature and the total masses estimated from Planck. We find that nearly all clusters hosting minihalos are hot and massive. Beyond that, there is no clear correlation between the minihalo radio power and cluster temperature or mass (in contrast with the giant radio halos found in cluster mergers, whose radio luminosity correlates with the cluster mass). Chandra X-ray images indicate gas sloshing in the cool cores of most of our clusters, with minihalos contained within the sloshing regions in many of them. This supports the hypothesis that radio-emitting electrons are reaccelerated by sloshing. Advection of relativistic electrons by the sloshing gas may also play a role in the formation of the less extended minihalos.

  11. The host galaxy of a fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, E. F.; Johnston, S.; Bhandari, S.; Barr, E.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Caleb, M.; Flynn, C.; Jameson, A.; Kramer, M.; Petroff, E.; Possenti, A.; van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Eatough, R. P.; Stappers, B. W.; Totani, T.; Honma, M.; Furusawa, H.; Hattori, T.; Morokuma, T.; Niino, Y.; Sugai, H.; Terai, T.; Tominaga, N.; Yamasaki, S.; Yasuda, N.; Allen, R.; Cooke, J.; Jencson, J.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Tingay, S. J.; Williams, A.; Wayth, R.; Chandra, P.; Perrodin, D.; Berezina, M.; Mickaliger, M.; Bassa, C.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, millisecond-duration radio signals originating in distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called fast radio bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity, which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. Every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, but none before now have had a redshift measurement, because of the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we report the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting ~6 days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy’s redshift to be z = 0.492 ± 0.008. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionized baryons in the intergalactic medium of ΩIGM = 4.9 ± 1.3 per cent, in agreement with the expectation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and including all of the so-called ‘missing baryons’. The ~6-day radio transient is largely consistent with the radio afterglow of a short γ-ray burst, and its existence and timescale do not support progenitor models such as giant pulses from pulsars, and supernovae. This contrasts with the interpretation of another recently discovered fast radio burst, suggesting that there are at least two classes of bursts.

  12. A New Radio Loudness Diagnostic for Active Galaxies: A Radio-to-Mid-Infrared Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendez, Marcio B.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between the nuclear (high-resolution) radio emission, at 8.4GHz (3.6cm) and 1.4GHz (20cm), the [O IV) (gamma)25.89 micron, [Ne III] (gamma)l5.56 micron and [Ne II] (gamma)l2.81 micron emission lines and the black hole mass accretion rate for a sample of Seyfert galaxies. In order to characterize the radio contribution for the Seyfert nuclei we used the 8.4 GHz/[O IV] ratio, assuming that [0 IV] scales with the luminosity of the active galactic nuclei (AGN). From this we find that Seyfert 1 s (i.e. Seyfert 1.0s, 1.2s and 1.5s) and Seyfert 2s (i.e. Seyfert 1.8s, 1.9s and 2.0s) have similar radio contributions, relative to the AGN. On the other hand, sources in which the [Ne u] emission is dominated either by the AGN or star formation have statistically different radio contributions, with star formation dominated sources more 'radio loud', by a factor of approx.2.8 on average, than AGN dominated sources. We show that star formation dominated sources with relatively larger radio contribution have smaller mass accretion rates. Overall, we suggest that 8.4 GHz/[O IV], or alternatively, 1.4 GHz/[O IV] ratios, can be used to characterize the radio contribution, relative to the AGN, without the limitation of previous methods that rely on optical observables. Key words: Galaxy: stellar content - galaxies: Seyfert - infrared: galaxies

  13. New View of X-Ray Jet Blasting Through Nearest Radio Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    By combining radio and X-ray observations, astronomers have obtained their most detailed view yet of the effects a powerful galactic jet has as it blasts its way through stars and gas on its way out from the centre of a galaxy. New observations of our nearest neighbouring radio galaxy, Centaurus A, (10 million light years away in the southern sky) show intense X-rays in places where the fast-moving jet is apparently running into the gas and stars that make up the galaxy. Because Centaurus A is the nearest radio galaxy, it is a key object for understanding how all other radio galaxies work. Results from the research will be presented at the UK/Ireland National Astronomy Meeting in Dublin by Dr Martin Hardcastle of the University of Bristol. Only a small minority of galaxies have powerful jets of electrically charged particles but, where they are present, they can have profound effects on the galaxies they inhabit. They are believed to come from close to a central massive black hole and in many cases they extend for hundreds of thousands of light years. Astronomers have been aware of radio emission and visible light from such jets for many years, but more recently, scientists using the orbiting observatory Chandra have discovered that X-ray emission from jets is also common. The X-rays come from electrons carrying large amounts of energy - comparable with the energies reached in the accelerators used in particle physics experiments on Earth. The team working on Centaurus A, led by Dr Hardcastle, a Royal Society Research Fellow at the University of Bristol, and Dr Ralph Kraft, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in the USA, observed its jet with both Chandra and the Very Large Array radio telescope in New Mexico. The radio observations, taken between 1991 and 2002, showed that parts of the jet are moving away from the centre of the galaxy at speeds of about half the speed of light. However, the regions of the jet that are emitting the most X-rays were

  14. Compact radio sources in the spiral galaxy M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Long, Knox S.; Winkler, P. Frank; Kuntz, Kip; Blair, William

    2011-04-01

    We are doing a multiband study of the stellar life cycle in the grand-design spiral galaxy M83, one of the most actively star-forming systems in the local Universe. We have already obtained exceptional optical coverage with HST and Magellan, and we have been awarded 750 ks of Chandra time this year. Now we propose an ATCA radio study, crucial for integrating the optical and X-ray studies. The radio study will allow us to achieve three main objectives: a) monitor the long-term evolution of three historical supernovae observed in M83 over the last 100 years, and hence constrain the late stages of evolution of their stellar progenitors; b) determine the distribution, radio spectral index and other physical properties of different types of young supernova remnants; c) resolve the morphology and search for variability of the nuclear sources: in particular, we will investigate the radio evidence for a double nucleus. In addition, we will study the aligned triple source just outside the nucleus: the traditional interpretation is that it is a background radio galaxy, but it has recently been suggested that it could be a recoiling nuclear black hole in M83.

  15. DISCOVERY OF GIANT RELIC RADIO LOBES STRADDLING THE CLASSICAL DOUBLE RADIO GALAXY 3C452

    SciTech Connect

    Sirothia, S. K.; Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul J. E-mail: krishna@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of a pair of megaparsec size radio lobes of extremely steep spectrum straddling the well-known classical double radio source 3C452. The existence of such fossil lobes was unexpected since for the past several decades this powerful radio galaxy has been regarded as a textbook example of an edge-brightened double radio source of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II), which we now show to be a bona fide ''double-double'' radio galaxy (DDRG). Thus, 3C452 presents a uniquely robust example of recurrent nuclear activity in which the restarted jets are expanding non-relativistically within the relic synchrotron plasma from an earlier active phase and hence the inner double fed by them has evolved into a perfectly normal FR II radio source. This situation contrasts markedly with the strikingly narrow inner doubles observed in a few other DDRGs that have been interpreted in terms of compression of the synchrotron plasma of the relic outer lobes at the relativistic bow-shocks driven by the near ballistic propagation of the two inner jets through the relic plasma. A key ramification of this finding is that it cautions against the currently widespread use of FR II classical double radio sources for testing cosmological models and unification schemes for active galactic nuclei.

  16. Discovery of Giant Relic Radio Lobes Straddling the Classical Double Radio Galaxy 3C452

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirothia, S. K.; Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul J.

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of a pair of megaparsec size radio lobes of extremely steep spectrum straddling the well-known classical double radio source 3C452. The existence of such fossil lobes was unexpected since for the past several decades this powerful radio galaxy has been regarded as a textbook example of an edge-brightened double radio source of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II), which we now show to be a bona fide "double-double" radio galaxy (DDRG). Thus, 3C452 presents a uniquely robust example of recurrent nuclear activity in which the restarted jets are expanding non-relativistically within the relic synchrotron plasma from an earlier active phase and hence the inner double fed by them has evolved into a perfectly normal FR II radio source. This situation contrasts markedly with the strikingly narrow inner doubles observed in a few other DDRGs that have been interpreted in terms of compression of the synchrotron plasma of the relic outer lobes at the relativistic bow-shocks driven by the near ballistic propagation of the two inner jets through the relic plasma. A key ramification of this finding is that it cautions against the currently widespread use of FR II classical double radio sources for testing cosmological models and unification schemes for active galactic nuclei.

  17. Deep HST imaging of distant weak radio and field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, R. A.; Gordon, J. M.; Pascarelle, S. M.; Schmidtke, P. C.; Keel, W. C.; Burkey, J. M.; Dunlop, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camera (WFC) V- and I-band images of three distant weak radio galaxies with z = 0.311-2.390 and seven field galaxies with z = 0.131-0.58. The images were deconvolved with both the Lucy and multiresolution CLEAN methods, which yield a restoring Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of less than or equal to 0.2 sec, (nearly) preserve photons and signal-to-noise ratio at low spatial frequencies, and produce consistent light profiles down to our 2 sigma surface brightness sensitivity limit of V approximately 27.2 and I approximately 25.9 mag/sq arcsec. Multi-component image modeling was used to provide deconvolution-independent estimates of structural parameters for symmetric galaxies. We present 12-band (m(sub 2750) UBVRIgriJHK) photometry for a subset of the galaxies and bootstrap the unknown FOC/48 zero point at 2750 A in three independent ways (yielding m(sub 2750) = 21.34 +/- 0.09 mag for 1.0 e(-)/s). Two radio galaxies with z = 0.311 and 0.528, as well as one field galaxy with z = 0.58, have the colors and spectra of early-type galaxies, and a(exp 1/4)-like light profiles in the HST images. The two at z greater than 0.5 have little or no color gradients in V - I and are likely giant ellipticals, while the z = 0.311 radio galaxy has a dim exponential disk and is likely an S0. Six of the seven field galaxies have light profiles that indicate (small) inner bulges following a(exp 1/4) laws and outer exponential disks, both with little or no color gradients. These are (early-type) spiral galaxies with z = 0.131-0.528. About half have faint companions or bars. One shows lumpy structure, possibly a merger. The compact narrow-line galaxy 53W002 at z = 2.390 has less than or = 30% +/- 10% of its HST V and I flux in the central kiloparsec (due to its weak Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN)). Most of its light (V approximately equal to 23.3) occurs in a symmetric envelope with a regular a(exp 1/4)-like profile of effective

  18. EXPLORING THE z = 3-4 MASSIVE GALAXY POPULATION WITH ZFOURGE: THE PREVALENCE OF DUSTY AND QUIESCENT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, Lee R.; Rees, Glen; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Labbé, Ivo; Glazebrook, Karl; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Papovich, Casey; Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Mehrtens, Nicola; Tilvi, Vithal; Tomczak, Adam R.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Persson, S. Eric; Kelson, Daniel D.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Monson, Andrew J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Allen, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    Our understanding of the redshift z > 3 galaxy population relies largely on samples selected using the popular ''dropout'' technique, typically consisting of UV-bright galaxies with blue colors and prominent Lyman breaks. As it is currently unknown if these galaxies are representative of the massive galaxy population, we here use the FOURSTAR Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) survey to create a stellar mass-limited sample at z = 3-4. Uniquely, ZFOURGE uses deep near-infrared medium-bandwidth filters to derive accurate photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. The mass-complete sample consists of 57 galaxies with log M >10.6, reaching below M {sup *} at z = 3-4. On average, the massive z = 3-4 galaxies are extremely faint in the observed optical with median R{sub tot}{sup AB}=27.48±0.41 (rest-frame M {sub 1700} = –18.05 ± 0.37). They lie far below the UV luminosity-stellar mass relation for Lyman break galaxies and are about ∼100 × fainter at the same mass. The massive galaxies are red (R – K {sub s} {sub AB} = 3.9 ± 0.2; rest-frame UV-slope β = –0.2 ± 0.3) likely from dust or old stellar ages. We classify the galaxy spectral energy distributions by their rest-frame U–V and V–J colors and find a diverse population: 46{sub −6−17}{sup +6+10}% of the massive galaxies are quiescent, 40{sub −6−5}{sup +6+7}% are dusty star-forming galaxies, and only 14{sub −3−4}{sup +3+10}% resemble luminous blue star-forming Lyman break galaxies. This study clearly demonstrates an inherent diversity among massive galaxies at higher redshift than previously known. Furthermore, we uncover a reservoir of dusty star-forming galaxies with 4 × lower specific star-formation rates compared to submillimeter-selected starbursts at z > 3. With 5 × higher numbers, the dusty galaxies may represent a more typical mode of star formation compared to submillimeter-bright starbursts.

  19. RELICS OF GALAXY MERGING: OBSERVATIONAL PREDICTIONS FOR A WANDERING MASSIVE BLACK HOLE AND ACCOMPANYING STAR CLUSTER IN THE HALO OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Saito, Yuriko; Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Galaxies and massive black holes (BHs) presumably grow via galactic merging events and subsequent BH coalescence. As a case study, we investigate the merging event between the Andromeda galaxy (M31) and a satellite galaxy. We compute the expected observational appearance of the massive BH that was at the center of the satellite galaxy prior to the merger and is currently wandering in the M31 halo. We demonstrate that a radiatively inefficient accretion flow with a bolometric luminosity of a few tens of solar luminosities develops when Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion onto the BH is assumed. We compute the associated broadband spectrum and show that the radio band (observable with EVLA, ALMA, and the Square Kilometre Array) is the best frequency range in which to detect the emission. We also evaluate the mass and the luminosity of the stars bound by the wandering BH and find that such a star cluster is sufficiently luminous that it could correspond to one of the star clusters found by the PAndAS survey. The discovery of a relic massive BH wandering in a galactic halo will provide a direct means of investigating in detail the coevolution of galaxies and BHs. It also means a new population of BHs (off-center massive BHs) and offers targets for clean BH imaging that avoid strong interstellar scattering in the centers of galaxies.

  20. Relics of Galaxy Merging: Observational Predictions for a Wandering Massive Black Hole and Accompanying Star Cluster in the Halo of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Saito, Yuriko; Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Galaxies and massive black holes (BHs) presumably grow via galactic merging events and subsequent BH coalescence. As a case study, we investigate the merging event between the Andromeda galaxy (M31) and a satellite galaxy. We compute the expected observational appearance of the massive BH that was at the center of the satellite galaxy prior to the merger and is currently wandering in the M31 halo. We demonstrate that a radiatively inefficient accretion flow with a bolometric luminosity of a few tens of solar luminosities develops when Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion onto the BH is assumed. We compute the associated broadband spectrum and show that the radio band (observable with EVLA, ALMA, and the Square Kilometre Array) is the best frequency range in which to detect the emission. We also evaluate the mass and the luminosity of the stars bound by the wandering BH and find that such a star cluster is sufficiently luminous that it could correspond to one of the star clusters found by the PAndAS survey. The discovery of a relic massive BH wandering in a galactic halo will provide a direct means of investigating in detail the coevolution of galaxies and BHs. It also means a new population of BHs (off-center massive BHs) and offers targets for clean BH imaging that avoid strong interstellar scattering in the centers of galaxies.

  1. SATELLITES AROUND MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 2: CONFRONTING THE MILLENNIUM SIMULATION WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2012-06-20

    Minor merging has been postulated as the most likely evolutionary path to produce the increase in size and mass observed in the massive galaxies since z {approx} 2. In this Letter, we directly test this hypothesis, comparing the population of satellites around massive galaxies in cosmological simulations versus the observations. We use state-of-the-art, publically available, Millennium I and II simulations, and the associated semi-analytical galaxy catalogs to explore the time evolution of the fraction of massive galaxies that have satellites, the number of satellites per galaxy, the projected distance at which the satellites locate from the host galaxy, and the mass ratio between the host galaxies and their satellites. The three virtual galaxy catalogs considered here overproduce the fraction of galaxies with satellites by a factor ranging between 1.5 and 6 depending on the epoch, whereas the mean projected distance and ratio of the satellite mass over host mass are in closer agreement with data. The larger pull of satellites in the semi-analytical samples could suggest that the size evolution found in previous hydrodynamical simulations is an artifact due to the larger number of infalling satellites compared to the real universe. These results advise us to revise the physical ingredients implemented in the semi-analytical models in order to reconcile the observed and computed fraction of galaxies with satellites, and eventually, it would leave some room for other mechanisms explaining the galaxy size growth not related to the minor merging.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Massive early-type galaxies (Buitrago+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, F.; Trujillo, I.; Conselice, C. J.; Haussler, B.

    2013-08-01

    Present-day massive galaxies are composed mostly of early-type objects. It is unknown whether this was also the case at higher redshifts. In a hierarchical assembling scenario the morphological content of the massive population is expected to change with time from disc-like objects in the early Universe to spheroid-like galaxies at present. In this paper we have probed this theoretical expectation by compiling a large sample of massive (Mstellar>=1011h-270M⊙) galaxies in the redshift interval 0galaxies selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey plus 875 objects observed with the Hubble Space Telescope belonging to the Palomar Observatory Wide-field InfraRed/DEEP2 and GOODS NICMOS Survey surveys. 639 of our objects have spectroscopic redshifts. Our morphological classification is performed as close as possible to the optical rest frame according to the photometric bands available in our observations both quantitatively (using the Sersic index as a morphological proxy) and qualitatively (by visual inspection). Using both techniques we find an enormous change on the dominant morphological class with cosmic time. The fraction of early-type galaxies among the massive galaxy population has changed from ~20-30 per cent at z~3 to~70 per cent at z=0. Early-type galaxies have been the predominant morphological class for massive galaxies since only z~1. (1 data file).

  3. Erratum: A Comparison of Radio Axis with Host Galaxy Plane Axis in Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Henrique R.; Kinney, Anne L.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Antonucci, Robert

    1997-08-01

    In the paper ``A Comparison of Radio Axis with Host Galaxy Plane Axis in Seyfert Galaxies'' by Henrique R. Schmitt, Anne L. Kinney, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, & Robert Antonucci (ApJ, 477, 623 [1997]), there are errors in Table 1 and Figure 6, and there is a reference to a previous work that should be stated. With respect to the latter, the authors compare the position angle of small-scale radio structures in Seyfert galaxies with the position angle of their host galaxy major axis. In their analysis they find a zone of avoidance, where the small-scale radio axis avoids close alignment with the host galaxy minor axis. The authors wish to note that J. S. Ulvestad and A. S. Wilson (ApJ, 285, 439 [1984]) already observed a paucity of radio structures aligned with the host galaxy minor axis in Seyfert 2 galaxies, although on a smaller sample. Ulvestad & Wilson was referenced in their paper as Ulvestad & Wilson (1984b). In Table 1 there were errors in the references listed in the note to the table. A new version of Table 1 with correct references is given here, and the following reference entries should be added to the reference list of the original paper: Mulchaey, J. S., Wilson, A. S., & Tsvetanov, Z. I. 1996, ApJS, 102, 309; Oke, J. B., & Lauer, T. R. 1979, ApJ, 230, 360; Simkin, S. M. 1975, ApJ, 200, 567. Figure 6a was printed twice, once correctly and once incorrectly in place of Figure 6c. The correct version of Figure 6c appears below.

  4. CONSTRAINING JET PRODUCTION SCENARIOS BY STUDIES OF NARROW-LINE RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Stasinska, Grazyna; Koziel-Wierzbowska, Dorota; Madejski, Greg M.; Asari, Natalia V.

    2013-03-01

    We study a large sample of narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs) with extended radio structures. Using 1.4 GHz radio luminosities L {sub 1.4}, narrow optical emission line luminosities L {sub [OIII]} and L{sub H{sub {alpha}}}, as well as black hole masses M {sub BH} derived from stellar velocity dispersions measured from the optical spectra obtained with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we find that (1) NLRGs cover about four decades of the Eddington ratio, {lambda} {identical_to} L {sub bol}/L {sub Edd}{proportional_to}L {sub line}/M {sub BH}; (2) L {sub 1.4}/M {sub BH} strongly correlates with {lambda}; and (3) radio loudness, R{identical_to}L{sub 1.4}/L{sub line}, strongly anti-correlates with {lambda}. A very broad range of the Eddington ratio indicates that the parent population of NLRGs includes both radio-loud quasars (RLQs) and broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs). The correlations they obey and their high jet production efficiencies favor a jet production model which involves the so-called magnetically choked accretion scenario. In this model, production of the jet is dominated by the Blandford-Znajek mechanism, and the magnetic fields in the vicinity of the central black hole are confined by the ram pressure of the accretion flow. Since large net magnetic flux accumulated in central regions of the accretion flow required by the model can take place only via geometrically thick accretion, we speculate that the massive, 'cold' accretion events associated with luminous emission-line active galactic nucleus can be accompanied by an efficient jet production only if preceded by a hot, very sub-Eddington accretion phase.

  5. Super-Sharp Radio "Vision" Measures Galaxy's Motion in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) have measured the motion across the sky of a galaxy nearly 2.4 million light-years from Earth. While scientists have been measuring the motion of galaxies directly toward or away from Earth for decades, this is the first time that the transverse motion (called proper motion by astronomers) has been measured for a galaxy that is not a satellite of our own Milky Way Galaxy. M33 Radio/Optical Image of M33 CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, NOAO/AURA/NSF (Click on image for more files) An international scientific team analyzed VLBA observations made over two and a half years to detect minuscule shifts in the sky position of the spiral galaxy M33. Combined with previous measurements of the galaxy's motion toward Earth, the new data allowed the astronomers to calculate M33's movement in three dimensions for the first time. "A snail crawling on Mars would appear to be moving across the surface more than 100 times faster than the motion we measured for this galaxy," said Mark Reid, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. M33 is a satellite of the larger galaxy M31, the well-known Andromeda Galaxy that is the most distant object visible to the naked eye. Both are part of the Local Group of galaxies that includes the Milky Way. In addition to measuring the motion of M33 as a whole, the astronomers also were able to make a direct measurement of the spiral galaxy's rotation. Both measurements were made by observing the changes in position of giant clouds of molecules inside the galaxy. The water vapor in these clouds acts as a natural maser, strengthening, or amplifying, radio emission the same way that lasers amplify light emission. The natural masers acted as bright radio beacons whose movement could be tracked by the ultra-sharp radio "vision" of the VLBA. Reid and his colleagues plan to continue measuring M33's motion and also to make similar measurements of M31's motion

  6. Giant ringlike radio structures around galaxy cluster Abell 3376.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Durret, Florence; Neto, Gastão B Lima; Paul, Surajit

    2006-11-01

    In the current paradigm of cold dark matter cosmology, large-scale structures are assembling through hierarchical clustering of matter. In this process, an important role is played by megaparsec (Mpc)-scale cosmic shock waves, arising in gravity-driven supersonic flows of intergalactic matter onto dark matter-dominated collapsing structures such as pancakes, filaments, and clusters of galaxies. Here, we report Very Large Array telescope observations of giant ( approximately 2 Mpc by 1.6 Mpc), ring-shaped nonthermal radio-emitting structures, found at the outskirts of the rich cluster of galaxies Abell 3376. These structures may trace the elusive shock waves of cosmological large-scale matter flows, which are energetic enough to power them. These radio sources may also be the acceleration sites where magnetic shocks are possibly boosting cosmic-ray particles with energies of up to 10(18) to 10(19) electron volts. PMID:17082451

  7. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D.; Grandi, P.; Giovannini, G.; Montez, R.

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the primary difference between the 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies is in their ability to launch

  8. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S.; Clampitt, J.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; Jouvel, S.; Krause, E.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Patton, K.; Plazas, A.; Rowe, B.; Vikram, V.; Wilcox, H.; Young, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; Cunha, C. E.; Depoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. F.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Jarvis, M.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B. D.; Reil, K.; Roe, N. A.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Sypniewski, A. J.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.

    2015-03-31

    We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modelling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modelling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. Additionally, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.

  9. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, P.; et al.

    2015-05-21

    We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modeling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modeling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. In addition, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1 degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.

  10. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; et al

    2015-03-31

    We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modelling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Sciencemore » Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modelling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. Additionally, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.« less

  11. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S.; Clampitt, J.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; Jouvel, S.; Krause, E.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Patton, K.; Plazas, A.; Rowe, B.; Vikram, V.; Wilcox, H.; Young, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; Cunha, C. E.; Depoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Jarvis, M.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B. D.; Reil, K.; Roe, N. A.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Sypniewski, A. J.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.

    2015-05-01

    We measure the weak lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This pathfinder study is meant to (1) validate the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) imager for the task of measuring weak lensing shapes, and (2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, point spread function (PSF) modelling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well behaved, but the modelling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting Navarro-Frenk-White profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak lensing mass, and richness. In addition, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1°(approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.

  12. Ram pressure statistics for bent tail radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mguda, Zolile; Faltenbacher, Andreas; Heyden, Kurt van der; Gottlöber, Stefan; Cress, Catherine; Vaisanen, Petri; Yepes, Gustavo

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we use the MareNostrum Universe Simulation, a large-scale, hydrodynamic, non-radiative simulation in combination with a simple abundance matching approach to determine the ram pressure statistics for bent radio sources (BRSs). The abundance matching approach allows us to determine the locations of all galaxies with stellar masses ≥ 1011 h- 1 M⊙ in the simulation volume. Assuming that ram pressure exceeding a critical value causes bent morphology, we compute the ratio of all galaxies exceeding the ram pressure limit (RPEX galaxies) relative to all galaxies in our sample. According to our model 50 per cent of the RPEX galaxies at z = 0 are found in clusters with masses larger than 1014.5 h- 1 M⊙ the other half resides in lower mass clusters. Therefore, the appearance of bent tail morphology alone does not put tight constraints on the host cluster mass. In low-mass clusters, M ≤ 1014 h- 1 M⊙, RPEX galaxies are confined to the central 500 h-1 kpc whereas in clusters of ≥ 1015 h- 1 M⊙ they can be found at distances up to 1.5 h-1 Mpc. Only clusters with masses ≥ 1015 h- 1 M⊙ are likely to host more than one BRS. Both criteria may prove useful in the search for distant, high-mass clusters.

  13. Inverse Compton X-Ray Halos Around High-z Radio Galaxies: A Feedback Mechanism Powered by Far-Infrared Starbursts or the Cosmic Microwave Background?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Ian; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lehmer, B. D.; Alexander, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    activity in these galaxies are thus combining to produce an even more effective and widespread "feedback" process, acting on the long-term gas reservoir for the galaxy, than either individually could achieve. If episodic radio activity and co-eval starbursts are common in massive, high-redshift galaxies, then this IC-feedback mechanism may play a role in affecting the star formation histories of the most massive galaxies at the present day.

  14. Dusty Feedback from Massive Black Holes in Two Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temi, P.; Brighenti, F.; Mathews, W. G.; Amblard, A.; Riguccini, L.

    2013-01-01

    Far-infrared dust emission from elliptical galaxies informs us about galaxy mergers, feedback energy outbursts from supermassive black holes and the age of galactic stars. We report on the role of AGN feedback observationally by looking for its signatures in elliptical galaxies at recent epochs in the nearby universe. We present Herschel observations of two elliptical galaxies with strong and spatially extended FIR emission from colder grains 5-10 kpc distant from the galaxy cores. Extended excess cold dust emission is interpreted as evidence of recent feedback-generated AGN energy outbursts in these galaxies, visible only in the FIR, from buoyant gaseous outflows from the galaxy cores.

  15. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  16. CORE CREATION IN GALAXIES AND HALOS VIA SINKING MASSIVE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Goerdt, Tobias; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim; Read, J. I.

    2010-12-20

    We perform a detailed investigation into the disruption of central cusps via the transfer of energy from sinking massive objects. Constant density inner regions form at the radius where the enclosed mass approximately matches the mass of the infalling body. We explore parameter space using numerical simulations and give an empirical relation for the size of the resulting core within structures that have different initial cusp slopes. We find that infalling bodies always stall at the edge of these newly formed cores, experiencing no dynamical friction over many dynamical times. As applications, we consider the resulting decrease in the dark matter annihilation flux due to centrally destroyed cusps, and we present a new theory for the formation of close binary nuclei-the 'stalled binary' model. We focus on one particularly interesting binary nucleus system, the dwarf spheroidal galaxy VCC 128 which is dark matter dominated at all radii. We show that its nuclei would rapidly coalesce within a few million years if it has a central dark matter cusp slope steeper than r {sup -1}. However, if its initial dark matter cusp is slightly shallower than a logslope of -0.75 at {approx}0.1% of the virial radius, then the sinking nuclei naturally create a core equal to their observed separation and stall. This is close to the logslope measured in a recent billion particle cold dark matter halo simulation.

  17. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  18. Chandra observations of dying radio sources in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims: We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods: We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results: The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions: We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  19. The X-ray halos of the most MASSIVE galaxies in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, Andy D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Blakeslee, John; Bogdan, Akos; Thomas, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the assembly history and evolution of the most massive elliptical galaxies in the Universe remains mysterious. The physical properties (gas temperatures, halo masses, stellar kinematics etc.) of local elliptical galaxies are now being probed in depth by studies such as Atlas3D. However, due to their limited volume, these studies still do not include the most massive galaxies. Here I will present our investigation of the X-ray and optical properties of a complete sample of M > 1011 M⊙ sources within the MASSIVE Galaxy Survey (Ma et al. 2014), extending the previous Atlas3D analyses by an order of magnitude in K-band luminosity. We harness the exquisite spatial resolution and sensitivity of the Chandra X-ray observatory, combined with integral field optical spectroscopy, to provide the most complete and unbiased picture, to date, for the effect of large and small scale environment on the evolution of elliptical galaxies.

  20. Infrared imaging of MG 0414 + 0534 - The red gravitational lens systems as lensed radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, James; Luppino, Gerard A.

    1993-01-01

    We present an IR image of the gravitational lens system MG 0414 + 0534, and IR photometry of PG 1115 + 080, H1413 + 117, and Q1429 - 008. The IR of MG 0414 + 0534 shows a morphology that is similar to the radio and optical morphologies. The object is bright (K-prime = 13.7) and extremely red (I-K-prime = 5.7). MG 0414 + 0534 thus becomes the second radio-selected lens system to have very red optical IR colors. When plotted on a color-magnitude diagram of objects from a radio survey, MG 0414 + 0534 and the other very red system, MG 1131 + 0456, lie near the locus of radio galaxies. We therefore suggest that these systems are lensed high-redshift radio galaxies. In general, lensed radio galaxies should be common among lens systems selected from radio surveys, since a high proportion of radio sources are radio galaxies.

  1. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN THE ESO DISTANT CLUSTER SURVEY (EDisCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'onofrio, M.; Vulcani, B.; Poggianti, B. M.; Fritz, J.; Moretti, A.; Saglia, R. P.; Aragon-Salamanca, A.; Simard, L.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.

    2010-09-20

    We find a significant number of massive and compact galaxies in clusters from the ESO Distant Clusters Survey (EDisCS) at 0.4 < z < 1. They have similar stellar masses, ages, sizes, and axial ratios to local z {approx} 0.04 compact galaxies in WIde field Nearby Galaxy clusters Survey (WINGS) clusters, and to z = 1.4-2 massive and passive galaxies found in the general field. If non-brightest cluster galaxies of all densities, morphologies, and spectral types are considered, the median size of EDisCS galaxies is only a factor 1.18 smaller than in WINGS. We show that for morphologically selected samples, the morphological evolution taking place in a significant fraction of galaxies during the last Gyr may introduce an apparent, spurious evolution of size with redshift, which is actually due to intrinsic differences in the selected samples. We conclude that the median mass-size relation of cluster galaxies does not evolve significantly from z {approx} 0.7 to z {approx} 0.04. In contrast, the masses and sizes of BCGs and galaxies with M {sub *}>4 x 10{sup 11} M {sub sun} have significantly increased by a factor of 2 and 4, respectively, confirming the results of a number of recent works on the subject. Our findings show that progenitor bias effects play an important role in the size-growth paradigm of massive and passive galaxies.

  2. Radio continuum properties of luminous infrared galaxies. Identifying the presence of an AGN in the radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardoulaki, E.; Charmandaris, V.; Murphy, E. J.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Evans, A. S.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Privon, G. C.; Stierwalt, S.; Barcos-Muñoz, L.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are systems enshrouded in dust, which absorbs most of their optical/UV emission and radiates it again in the mid- and far-infrared. Radio observations are largely unaffected by dust obscuration, enabling us to study the central regions of LIRGs in an unbiased manner. Aims: The main goal of this project is to examine how the radio properties of local LIRGs relate to their infrared spectral characteristics. Here we present an analysis of the radio continuum properties of a subset of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), which consists of 202 nearby systems (z< 0.088). Our radio sample consists of 35 systems, containing 46 individual galaxies, that were observed at both 1.49 and 8.44 GHz with the VLA with a resolution of about 1 arcsec (FWHM). The aim of the project is to use the radio imagery to probe the central kpc of these LIRGs in search of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Methods: We used the archival data at 1.49 and 8.44 GHz to create radio-spectral-index maps using the standard relation between flux density Sν and frequency ν, Sν ~ ν- α, where α is the radio spectral index. By studying the spatial variations in α, we classified the objects as radio-AGN, radio-SB, and AGN/SB (a mixture). We identified the presence of an active nucleus using the radio morphology, deviations from the radio/infrared correlation, and spatially resolved spectral index maps, and then correlated this to the usual mid-infrared ([NeV]/[NeII] and [OIV]/[NeII] line ratios and equivalent width of the 6.2 μm PAH feature) and optical (BPT diagram) AGN diagnostics. Results: We find that 21 out of the 46 objects in our sample (~45%) are radio-AGN, 9 out of the 46 (~20%) are classified as starbursts (SB) based on the radio analysis, and 16 (~35%) are AGN/SB. After comparing to other AGN diagnostics we find 3 objects out of the 46 (~7%) that are identified as AGN based on the radio analysis, but are not classified as such based on

  3. Size dependence of the radio-luminosity-mechanical-power correlation in radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Shabala, S. S.; Godfrey, L. E. H.

    2013-06-01

    We examine the relationship between source radio luminosity and kinetic power in active galactic nucleus jets. We show that neglecting various loss processes can introduce a systematic bias in the jet powers inferred from radio luminosities for a sample of radio galaxies. This bias can be corrected for by considering source size as well as radio luminosity; effectively the source size acts as a proxy for source age. Based on a sample of Fanaroff-Riley Type II radio sources with jet powers derived from the measured hotspot parameters, we empirically determine a new expression for jet power that accounts for the source size, (Q{sub jet}/10{sup 36} W)=1.5{sub −0.8}{sup +1.8}(L{sub 151}/10{sup 27} W Hz{sup −1}){sup 0.8}(1+z){sup 1.0}(D/kpc){sup 0.58±0.17}, where D is source size and L {sub 151} the 151 MHz radio luminosity. By comparing a flux-limited and volume-limited sample, we show that any derived radio-luminosity-jet-power relation depends sensitively on sample properties, in particular the source size distribution and the size-luminosity correlation inherent in the sample. Such bias will affect the accuracy of the kinetic luminosity function derived from lobe radio luminosities and should be treated with caution.

  4. On the Interaction of the PKS B1358-113 Radio Galaxy with the A1836 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stawarz, Ł.; Szostek, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Siemiginowska, A.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Werner, N.; Simionescu, A.; Madejski, G.; Begelman, M. C.; Harris, D. E.; Ostrowski, M.; Hagino, K.

    2014-10-01

    Here we present the analysis of multifrequency data gathered for the Fanaroff-Riley type-II (FR II) radio galaxy PKS B1358-113, hosted in the brightest cluster galaxy in the center of A1836. The galaxy harbors one of the most massive black holes known to date, and our analysis of the acquired optical data reveals that this black hole is only weakly active, with a mass accretion rate \\dot{M}_acc ˜ 2 × 10-4 \\dot{M}_Edd ˜ 0.02 M⊙ yr-1. Based on analysis of new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations and archival radio data, and assuming the well-established model for the evolution of FR II radio galaxies, we derive the preferred range for the jet kinetic luminosity L j ~ (1-6) × 10-3 L Edd ~ (0.5-3) × 1045 erg s-1. This is above the values implied by various scaling relations proposed for radio sources in galaxy clusters, being instead very close to the maximum jet power allowed for the given accretion rate. We also constrain the radio source lifetime as τj ~ 40-70 Myr, meaning the total amount of deposited jet energy E tot ~ (2-8) × 1060 erg. We argue that approximately half of this energy goes into shock heating of the surrounding thermal gas, and the remaining 50% is deposited into the internal energy of the jet cavity. The detailed analysis of the X-ray data provides indication for the presence of a bow shock driven by the expanding radio lobes into the A1836 cluster environment. We derive the corresponding shock Mach number in the range {M}_sh ˜ 2{--}4, which is one of the highest claimed for clusters or groups of galaxies. This, together with the recently growing evidence that powerful FR II radio galaxies may not be uncommon in the centers of clusters at higher redshifts, supports the idea that jet-induced shock heating may indeed play an important role in shaping the properties of clusters, galaxy groups, and galaxies in formation. In this context, we speculate on a possible bias against detecting stronger jet-driven shocks in poorer environments

  5. On the interaction of the PKS B1358–113 radio galaxy with the A1836 cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, Ł.; Simionescu, A.; Hagino, K.; Szostek, A.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Ostrowski, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D. E.; Werner, N.; Madejski, G.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-10-20

    Here we present the analysis of multifrequency data gathered for the Fanaroff-Riley type-II (FR II) radio galaxy PKS B1358-113, hosted in the brightest cluster galaxy in the center of A1836. The galaxy harbors one of the most massive black holes known to date, and our analysis of the acquired optical data reveals that this black hole is only weakly active, with a mass accretion rate M-dot {sub acc}∼2×10{sup −4} M-dot {sub Edd}∼0.02 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup –1}. Based on analysis of new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations and archival radio data, and assuming the well-established model for the evolution of FR II radio galaxies, we derive the preferred range for the jet kinetic luminosity L {sub j} ∼ (1-6) × 10{sup –3} L {sub Edd} ∼ (0.5-3) × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}. This is above the values implied by various scaling relations proposed for radio sources in galaxy clusters, being instead very close to the maximum jet power allowed for the given accretion rate. We also constrain the radio source lifetime as τ{sub j} ∼ 40-70 Myr, meaning the total amount of deposited jet energy E {sub tot} ∼ (2-8) × 10{sup 60} erg. We argue that approximately half of this energy goes into shock heating of the surrounding thermal gas, and the remaining 50% is deposited into the internal energy of the jet cavity. The detailed analysis of the X-ray data provides indication for the presence of a bow shock driven by the expanding radio lobes into the A1836 cluster environment. We derive the corresponding shock Mach number in the range M{sub sh}∼2--4, which is one of the highest claimed for clusters or groups of galaxies. This, together with the recently growing evidence that powerful FR II radio galaxies may not be uncommon in the centers of clusters at higher redshifts, supports the idea that jet-induced shock heating may indeed play an important role in shaping the properties of clusters, galaxy groups, and galaxies in formation. In this context, we speculate on

  6. Dark matter and MOND dynamical models of the massive spiral galaxy NGC 2841

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samurović, S.; Vudragović, A.; Jovanović, M.

    2015-08-01

    We study dynamical models of the massive spiral galaxy NGC 2841 using both the Newtonian models with Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) and isothermal dark haloes, as well as various MOND (MOdified Newtonian Dynamics) models. We use the observations coming from several publicly available data bases: we use radio data, near-infrared photometry as well as spectroscopic observations. In our models, we find that both tested Newtonian dark matter approaches can successfully fit the observed rotational curve of NGC 2841. The three tested MOND models (standard, simple and, for the first time applied to another spiral galaxy than the Milky Way, Bekenstein's toy model) provide fits of the observed rotational curve with various degrees of success: the best result was obtained with the standard MOND model. For both approaches, Newtonian and MOND, the values of the mass-to-light ratios of the bulge are consistent with the predictions from the stellar population synthesis (SPS) based on the Salpeter initial mass function (IMF). Also, for Newtonian and simple and standard MOND models, the estimated stellar mass-to-light ratios of the disc agree with the predictions from the SPS models based on the Kroupa IMF, whereas the toy MOND model provides too low a value of the stellar mass-to-light ratio, incompatible with the predictions of the tested SPS models. In all our MOND models, we vary the distance to NGC 2841, and our best-fitting standard and toy models use the values higher than the Cepheid-based distance to the galaxy NGC 2841, and the best-fitting simple MOND model is based on the lower value of the distance. The best-fitting NFW model is inconsistent with the predictions of the Λ cold dark matter cosmology, because the inferred concentration index is too high for the established virial mass.

  7. Super-Sharp Radio "Vision" Measures Galaxy's Motion in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) have measured the motion across the sky of a galaxy nearly 2.4 million light-years from Earth. While scientists have been measuring the motion of galaxies directly toward or away from Earth for decades, this is the first time that the transverse motion (called proper motion by astronomers) has been measured for a galaxy that is not a satellite of our own Milky Way Galaxy. M33 Radio/Optical Image of M33 CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, NOAO/AURA/NSF (Click on image for more files) An international scientific team analyzed VLBA observations made over two and a half years to detect minuscule shifts in the sky position of the spiral galaxy M33. Combined with previous measurements of the galaxy's motion toward Earth, the new data allowed the astronomers to calculate M33's movement in three dimensions for the first time. "A snail crawling on Mars would appear to be moving across the surface more than 100 times faster than the motion we measured for this galaxy," said Mark Reid, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. M33 is a satellite of the larger galaxy M31, the well-known Andromeda Galaxy that is the most distant object visible to the naked eye. Both are part of the Local Group of galaxies that includes the Milky Way. In addition to measuring the motion of M33 as a whole, the astronomers also were able to make a direct measurement of the spiral galaxy's rotation. Both measurements were made by observing the changes in position of giant clouds of molecules inside the galaxy. The water vapor in these clouds acts as a natural maser, strengthening, or amplifying, radio emission the same way that lasers amplify light emission. The natural masers acted as bright radio beacons whose movement could be tracked by the ultra-sharp radio "vision" of the VLBA. Reid and his colleagues plan to continue measuring M33's motion and also to make similar measurements of M31's motion

  8. The formation of the massive galaxies in the SSA22 z = 3.1 protocluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Yamada, T.; Ichikawa, T.; Akiyama, M.; Kajisawa, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Hayashino, T.; Konishi, M.; Nishimura, T.; Omata, K.; Suzuki, R.; Tanaka, I.; Yoshikawa, T.; Alexander, D. M.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Lehmer, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    We study the properties of K-band-selected galaxies (K {sub AB} < 24) in the z = 3.09 SSA22 protocluster field. 430 galaxies at 2.6 < z {sub phot} < 3.6 are selected as potential protocluster members in a 112 arcmin{sup 2} area based on their photometric redshifts. We find that ≈20% of the massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} at z {sub phot} ∼ 3.1 have colors consistent with those of quiescent galaxies with ages >0.5 Gyr. This fraction increases to ≈50% after correcting for unrelated foreground/background objects. We also find that 30% of the massive galaxies are heavily reddened, dusty, star-forming galaxies. Few such quiescent galaxies at similar redshifts are seen in typical survey fields. An excess surface density of 24 μm sources at z {sub phot} ∼ 3.1 is also observed, implying the presence of dusty star-formation activity in the protocluster. Cross-correlation with the X-ray data indicates that the fraction of K-band-selected protocluster galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is also high compared with the field. The sky distribution of the quiescent galaxies, the 24 μm sources, and the X-ray AGNs show clustering around a density peak of z = 3.1 Lyα emitters. A significant fraction of the massive galaxies have already become quiescent, while dusty star-formation is still active in the SSA22 protocluster. These findings indicate that we are witnessing the formation epoch of massive early-type galaxies in the centers of the predecessors to present-day rich galaxy clusters.

  9. The fate of high redshift massive compact galaxies in dense environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, Tobias; Mayer, Lucio; Carollo, Marcella; Feldmann, Robert; /Fermilab /Chicago U., KICP

    2012-01-01

    Massive compact galaxies seem to be more common at high redshift than in the local universe, especially in denser environments. To investigate the fate of such massive galaxies identified at z {approx} 2 we analyse the evolution of their properties in three cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that form virialized galaxy groups of mass {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} hosting a central massive elliptical/S0 galaxy by redshift zero. We find that at redshift {approx} 2 the population of galaxies with M{sub *} > 2 x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} is diverse in terms of mass, velocity dispersion, star formation and effective radius, containing both very compact and relatively extended objects. In each simulation all the compact satellite galaxies have merged into the central galaxy by redshift 0 (with the exception of one simulation where one of such satellite galaxy survives). Satellites of similar mass at z = 0 are all less compact than their high redshift counterparts. They form later than the galaxies in the z = 2 sample and enter the group potential at z < 1, when dynamical friction times are longer than the Hubble time. Also, by z = 0 the central galaxies have increased substantially their characteristic radius via a combination of in situ star formation and mergers. Hence in a group environment descendants of compact galaxies either evolve towards larger sizes or they disappear before the present time as a result of the environment in which they evolve. Since the group-sized halos that we consider are representative of dense environments in the {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we conclude that the majority of high redshift compact massive galaxies do not survive until today as a result of the environment.

  10. 3C 220.3: A radio galaxy lensing a submillimeter galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Martin; Westhues, Christian; Chini, Rolf; Leipski, Christian; Klaas, Ulrich; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Barthel, Peter; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Bussmann, R. Shane; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Vegetti, Simona; Clements, David L.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Horesh, Assaf; Lagattuta, David J.; Stern, Daniel; Wylezalek, Dominika

    2014-07-20

    Herschel Space Observatory photometry and extensive multiwavelength follow-up have revealed that the powerful radio galaxy (PRG) 3C 220.3 at z = 0.685 acts as a gravitational lens for a background submillimeter galaxy (SMG) at z = 2.221. At an observed wavelength of 1 mm, the SMG is lensed into three distinct images. In the observed near infrared, these images are connected by an arc of ∼1''.8 radius forming an Einstein half-ring centered near the radio galaxy. In visible light, only the arc is apparent. 3C 220.3 is the only known instance of strong galaxy-scale lensing by a PRG not located in a galaxy cluster and therefore it offers the potential to probe the dark matter content of the radio galaxy host. Lens modeling rejects a single lens, but two lenses centered on the radio galaxy host A and a companion B, separated by 1''.5, provide a fit consistent with all data and reveal faint candidates for the predicted fourth and fifth images. The model does not require an extended common dark matter halo, consistent with the absence of extended bright X-ray emission on our Chandra image. The projected dark matter fractions within the Einstein radii of A (1''.02) and B (0''.61) are about 0.4 ± 0.3 and 0.55 ± 0.3. The mass to i-band light ratios of A and B, M/L{sub i}∼8±4 M{sub ⊙} L{sub ⊙}{sup −1}, appear comparable to those of radio-quiet lensing galaxies at the same redshift in the CfA-Arizona Space Telescope LEns Survey, Lenses Structure and Dynamics, and Strong Lenses in the Legacy Survey samples. The lensed SMG is extremely bright with observed f(250 μm) = 440 mJy owing to a magnification factor μ ∼ 10. The SMG spectrum shows luminous, narrow C IV λ1549 Å emission, revealing that the SMG houses a hidden quasar in addition to a violent starburst. Multicolor image reconstruction of the SMG indicates a bipolar morphology of the emitted ultraviolet (UV) light suggestive of cones through which UV light escapes a dust-enshrouded nucleus.