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Sample records for radio propagation characteristics

  1. Plasma plume propagation characteristics of pulsed radio frequency plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. H.; Liu, X. Y.; Hu, K.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2011-04-11

    A 4 cm long helium cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet with pulsed radio frequency (rf) excitation was obtained by a copper electrode inside a quartz tube. The plasma bullet propagation characteristics common to the microseconds direct current pulse and kilohertz plasma jet is not observed in this case. The space-, time-, and wavelength-resolved optical emission profiles suggest the pulsed rf plasma channel out of the tube was strengthened by ions and metastables with longer life time than the rf period, and the plasma propagation was actually an illumination of the plasma channel caused by energetic electrons accelerated along the channel.

  2. The modeling of HF radio wave propagation characteristics during the periods of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarchuk, S. N.; Kurkin, V. I.; Lyakhov, A. N.; Romanova, E. B.; Tashchilin, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results for modeling of HF radio waves propagation characteristics are given for the periods of solar flares 25.02.2014, 25.10.2013, 13-14.05.2013. The distance-frequency and amplitude-frequency propagation characteristics are calculated on the base of the complex algorithm which includes modules of ionosphere and plasmasphere global models and radio waves propagation model. The results of calculations were compared with experimental data of oblique ionosphere sounding obtained by chirp ionosonde on paths Magadan - Irkutsk, Khabarovsk - Irkutsk and Norilsk - Irkutsk.

  3. The seasonal variation of the D region as inferred from propagation characteristics of LF radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishimine, T.; Ishii, T.; Echizenya, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation data of JG2AS 40 kHz (Japanese Standard Frequency), Loran C 100 kHz radio waves, and meteorological data were analyzed to study the association of propagation characteristics of LF radio waves with the atmospheric circulation in the mesosphere. The monthly averaged electric fields were depicted on the complex plane for typical summer and winter months, June and November. The locus traced out by the electric field vector during daytime is nearly circular. This is because during daytime the amplitude of the sky wave remains nearly constant while its phase changes in accord with the height change of the reflection layer, and thus the electric field vector traces out a circular locus with its center at the tip of the supposed ground wave vector. The locus has a loop during the sunrise or sunset period, which seems to arise from interference of two waves reflected by two different layers. In June the amplitude of the sky wave decreases rapidly before the dawn or increases after the dusk. In November such rapid change is not observed. During nighttime, the sky wave phase changes in such a way as to suggest that the reflection height moves upwards with time before midnight or lowers after midnight in November. In June it changes similarly before midnight, but after midnight it varies erratically. These characteristics are closely related to the structure of the D region, which is clearly shown by simulating the loci traced out by electric fields.

  4. Modeling of long-path propagation characteristics of VLF radio waves as observed from Indian Antarctic station Maitri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, Sudipta; Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2015-10-01

    Propagation of very low frequency (VLF) radio signal through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide depends strongly on the plasma properties of the ionospheric D layer. Solar extreme ultraviolet radiation plays the central role in controlling physical and chemical properties of the lower ionospheric layers and hence determining the propagation characteristics of a VLF signal. The nature of interference among different propagating modes varies widely with the length of the propagation path. For a very long path, exposure of solar radiation and thus the degree of ionization vary by a large amount along the path. This influences the VLF signal profile by modulating the sky wave propagation. To understand the propagation characteristics over such a long path, we need a thorough investigation of the chemical reactions of the lower ionosphere which is lacking in the literature. Study of radio signal characteristics in the Antarctic region during summer period in the Southern Hemisphere gives us a unique opportunity to explore such a possibility. In addition, there is an extra feature in this path—the presence of solar radiation and hence the D region for the whole day during summer in at least some sections of the path. In this paper, we present long-distance propagation characteristics of VLF signals transmitted from VTX (18.2 kHz) and NWC (19.8 kHz) transmitters recorded at the Indian permanent station Maitri (latitude 70°45'S, longitude 114°40'E) in 2007-2008. A very stable diurnal variation of the signal has been obtained with no signature of nighttime fluctuation due the presence of 24 h of sunlight. Using ion production and recombination profiles by solar irradiance and incorporating D region ion chemistry processes, we calculate the electron density profile at different heights. Using this profile in the Long Wavelength Propagation Capability code, we are able to reproduce the amplitude of VLF signal.

  5. Modeling UHF Radio Propagation in Buildings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honcharenko, Walter

    The potential implementation of wireless Radio Local Area Networks and Personal Communication Services inside buildings requires a thorough understanding of signal propagation within buildings. This work describes a study leading to a theoretical understanding of wave propagation phenomenon inside buildings. Covered first is propagation in the clear space between the floor and ceiling, which is modeled using Kirchoff -Huygens diffraction theory. This along with ray tracing techniques are used to develop a model to predict signal coverage inside buildings. Simulations were conducted on a hotel building, two office buildings, and a university building to which measurements of CW signals were compared, with good agreement. Propagation to other floors was studied to determine the signal strength as a function of the number of floors separating transmitter and receiver. Diffraction paths and through the floor paths which carry significant power to the receivers were examined. Comparisons were made to measurements in a hotel building and an office building, in which agreements were excellent. As originally developed for Cellular Mobile Radio (CMR) systems, the sector average is obtained from the spatial average of the received signal as the mobile traverses a path of 20 or so wavelengths. This approach has also been applied indoors with the assumption that a unique average could be obtained by moving either end of the radio link. However, unlike in the CMR environment, inside buildings both ends of the radio link are in a rich multipath environment. It is shown both theoretically and experimentally that moving both ends of the link is required to achieve a unique average. Accurate modeling of the short pulse response of a signal within a building will provide insight for determining the hardware necessary for high speed data transmission and recovery, and a model for determining the impulse response is developed in detail. Lastly, the propagation characteristics of concrete walls are examined. Theoretical and experimental studies were conducted to determine their transmission and reflections coefficients with respect to incidence angle. Furthermore, Floquet' s theory of periodic structures was used to compute the space harmonic modes introduced by the periodicity of concrete blocks.

  6. Implications for Near-Relativistic Solar Electron Transport from the Propagation Characteristics of Type-III Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Haggerty, D. K.

    2004-05-01

    A companion paper by Haggerty and Roelof [this Session] sets out the characteristics of fast-drift radio bursts from 0.05AU to 0.5AU. The radial exciter velocities that define the leading edge of the bursts commonly are in the range 0.1c to 0.4c. The near-relativistic electrons observed by ACE/EPAM have velocities 0.4c-0.8c. We consider the possibility that the near-relativistic electrons are also generating radio emission in the type-III radio bursts, albeit below the sensitivity threshold of the WIND/WAVES receivers. If so, the energy spectrum of the electron unidirectional differential intensity during the rise of the near-relativistic electron events should exhibit a plateau. A positive slope in the reduced phase space density (PSD) would be quenched to a plateau, because otherwise it would drive the growth of Langmuir waves (which can then couple to electromagnetic modes to produce type-III radio emission). For strongly anisotropic PSDs, the reduced PSD is proportional to the peak intensity in the beam. However, such a plateau in the beam intensity would be partially obscured by an instrumental effect, namely the scattering of electrons within the EPAM solid-state detector (SSD). This would deposit energy in the lower energy channels from the early-arriving higher energy electrons, thus producing counts in the lower energy channels before electrons of that energy had actually arrived (thus tending to flatten the measured spectrum). We have developed a tool for evaluating this instrumental effect in the SSD during the rise phase of the EPAM electron events [Haggerty and Roelof, Adv. Space Res., 32(3), 423-428, 2003] using the GEANT simulation package. We are now adapting it to beam intensity spectra with the expected plateau at lower energies. The measured (uncorrected) EPAM spectra do indeed exhibit a plateau during the rise phase of beam-like events. If the instrumental effect proves to be negligible, the plateau implies that the electrons have lost energy by transferring parallel momentum to the Langmuir waves throughout their transit from the Sun. Then the measured electron injection delays ~10 minutes that we have reported [Haggerty and Roelof, Adv. Space Res., 32(12), 2673-2678, 2003] would have to be increased, because we had assumed that the electrons traveled to 1 AU at the measured energy without energy loss.

  7. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  8. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  9. Effects of D region ionization on radio wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of anomalous D region ionization upon radio wave propagation are described for the main types of disturbances: sudden ionospheric disturbances, relativistic electron events, magnetic storms, auroral disturbances, polar cap events, and stratospheric warmings. Examples of radio wave characteristics for such conditions are given for the frequencies between the extremely low (3-3000 Hz) and high (3-30 MHz) frequency domains. Statistics on the disturbance effects and radio wave data are given in order to contribute towards the evaluation of possibilities for predicting the radio effects.

  10. Wave propagation and earth satellite radio emission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Liu, C. H.; Flaherty, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radio propagation studies of the ionosphere using satellite radio beacons are described. The ionosphere is known as a dispersive, inhomogeneous, irregular and sometimes even nonlinear medium. After traversing through the ionosphere the radio signal bears signatures of these characteristics. A study of these signatures will be helpful in two areas: (1) It will assist in learning the behavior of the medium, in this case the ionosphere. (2) It will provide information of the kind of signal characteristics and statistics to be expected for communication and navigational satellite systems that use the similar geometry.

  11. Propagation of cosmic rays in extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A model of extragalactic radio sources is considered which assumes that relativistic electrons carry energy from the central galaxy to the radio lobes and also emit the radio waves. It is suggested that the radio emission is confined to an axis because electrons propagate parallel to the magnetic field more readily than perpendicular to it and that symmetric radio lobes appear on this axis because electrons are deposited at supercoherent transitions far from the central galaxy, where they propagate diffusively. The slow drift velocities that characterize this propagation are shown to explain the secondary structure between the main lobes and to establish a relationship between double sources and galactic radio trails.

  12. Subionospheric VLF/LF radio waves propagation characteristics before, during and after the Sofia, Bulgaria Mw=5.6 earthquake occurred on 22 May 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, Iren Adelina; Emilian Toader, Victorin; Nenovski, Petko; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Septimiu Moldovan, Adrian; Ionescu, Constantin

    2013-04-01

    In 2009, INFREP, a network of VLF (20-60 kHz) and LF (150-300 kHz) radio receivers, was put into operation in Europe having as principal goal, the study of disturbances produced by the earthquakes on the propagation properties of these signals. On May 22nd, 2012 an earthquake with Mw=567 occurred in Bulgaria, near Sofia, inside the "sensitive" area of the INFREP VLF/LF electromagnetic network. The data collected on different frequencies, during April-May 2012 were studied using different methods of analysis: daily correlation methods, spectral approaches and terminator time techniques, in order to find out possible connections between the seismic activity and the subionospheric propagation properties of radio waves. The studies were performed with the help of a specially designed LabVIEW application, which accesses the VLF/LF receiver through internet. This program opens the receiver's web-page and automatically retrieves the list of data files to synchronize the user-side data with the receiver's data. Missing zipped files are also automatically downloaded. The application performs primary, statistical correlation and spectral analysis, appends daily files into monthly and annual files and performs 3D colour-coded maps with graphic representations of VLF and LF signals' intensities versus the minute-of-the-day and the day-of-the-month, facilitating a near real-time observation of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves' propagation. Another feature of the software is the correlation of the daily recorded files for the studied frequencies by overlaying the 24 hours radio activity and taking into account the sunrise and sunset. Data are individually processed (spectral power, correlations, differentiation, filtered using bandpass, lowpass, highpass). JTFA spectrograms (Cone-Shaped Distribution CSD, Gabor, Wavelet, short-time Fourier transform STFT, Wigner-Ville Distribution WVD, Choi-Williams Distribution CWD) are used, too.

  13. Determination of sporadic E radio wave propagation parameters based on vertical and oblique sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherstyukov, O. N.; Akchurin, A. D.; Sherstyukov, R. O.

    2015-09-01

    Sporadic E layer is often determined for HF radio communication. We have to deal with oblique radiowave propagation in the radio practice. The limiting frequencies at oblique propagation depend heavily on the transmitter power and the receiver sensitivity. The reason for this, as in the case of vertical propagation, is the dependence of Es reflection coefficient, ?Es (reflection loss R(dB)), on Es operation frequencies. This paper describes the characteristics of HF Es propagation in relation to foEs obtained from ionospheric vertical observations. It was found that characteristics of Es propagation depend on the type and height of the Es layer. Also the foEs diurnal variation at definite R(dB) was detected. This investigation allows improving the prediction of limiting frequencies for HF radio propagation.

  14. Characteristics of radio halos, cosmic ray electron propagation, and the warm ionized medium as determined through observations of radio synchrotron emission from the Milky Way and edge-on spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Jason Drew

    Observations of radio synchrotron emission from the Milky Way and other galaxies can be used as a powerful probe of the intrinsic properties and distribution of both the emitting material and absorbing material along the line of sight. In the case of our own Galaxy, low radio frequency measurements (100 kHz 100 MHz) exhibit the telltale signs of free-free absorption. By assuming a reasonable form of the cosmic ray electron (CRE) spectrum and its distribution with height above the galactic plane, propagation simulations imply that the warm ionized medium of the Galaxy is clumpy on scales of the order of a parsec with electron density of 0.225 cm-3, a filling factor of 0.1, and temperature of 7000 K. In order to explain the shape of the radio spectrum at the lowest end of the frequency range, the simulations further predict a local cloud with the same properties of the clumps in which the solar system is embedded. The radio synchrotron emission from edge-on galaxies proves to be useful in examining the vertical distribution of CREs above the galactic plane. Several methods have been proposed to extract as much information as possible from the outer halo of these galaxies, such as the multiscale clean algorithm employed in this project. For the seven sample galaxies chosen for this project, medium resolution observations reveal radio emission distributed exponentially above the galactic plane with a typical scale height of about 1 kpc. These halos are seen to extend up to 10 kpc from the plane, although these estimates appear to be affected by a distance related bias. Spectral index profiles derived from observations at 20 cm and 6 cm are compared with those predicted by cosmic ray propagation models to constrain the values of parameters governing the propagation of CREs throughout the galaxies, particularly: D, the diffusion coefficient (D ? 6.8 5.1 cm 2/s), ?, the CRE injection spectral index (? ? 2.0 0.2), and B, the magnetic field strength ( B ? 5.5 1.8 ?G). These models are also consistent with a Gaussian source distribution in the galactic plane with a FWHM of 5.4 1.4 kpc.

  15. Radio-wave propagation for space communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the effects of Earth's atmosphere on space communications systems is reviewed. The design and reliable operation of satellite systems that provide the many applications in space which rely on the transmission of radio waves for communications and scientific purposes are dependent on the propagation characteristics of the transmission path. The presence of atmospheric gases, clouds, fog, precipitation, and turbulence causes uncontrolled variations in the signal characteristics. These variations can result in a reduction of the quality and reliability of the transmitted information. Models and other techniques are used in the prediction of atmospheric effects as influenced by frequency, geography, elevation angle, and type of transmission. Recent data on performance characteristics obtained from direct measurements on satellite links operating to above 30 GHz have been reviewed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the effects of precipitation on the Earth/space path, including rain attenuation, and ice particle depolarization. Other factors are sky noise, antenna gain degradation, scintillations, and bandwidth coherence. Each of the various propagation factors has an effect on design criteria for communications systems. These criteria include link reliability, power margins, noise contribution, modulation and polarization factors, channel cross talk, error rate, and bandwidth limitations.

  16. Multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves inferred from high-resolution array analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Smith, Nathan; Mezentsev, Andrew; Watson, Robert; Astin, Ivan; Gaffet, Stéphane; Evans, Adrian; Rycroft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The low-frequency radio sky shows the locations of electromagnetic radio sources with a characteristic dilution of precision. Here we report a thorough high-resolution analysis of radio waves from low-frequency (˜20-150 kHz) radio communication transmitters which are recorded with a small aperture array of radio receivers during the day. It is found that the observed dilution of precision results from the array geometry of the radio receivers, a birefringent wave propagation, and the correlated multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves. The influence of the array geometry on the dilution of precision is reduced by taking into account the impulse response of the array. This procedure reveals for the very first time the splitting of one single radio source into two distinct source locations separated by ˜0.2°-1.9° which result from a birefringent wave propagation. The two locations are yet more clearly identified by using the polarity of the modulated wave number vectors of the radio waves. This polarity is also used to quantify the dilution of precision arising from correlated multipath propagation which is discriminated against wave number fluctuations arising from the timing accuracy of the radio receivers. It is found that ˜69% of the wave number variability is of natural origin and ˜31% originates from the timing accuracy of the receivers. The wave number variability from correlated multipath propagation results in a standard deviation ˜2-8% relative to the source location. This compact measurement of correlated multipath propagation is used to characterize the uncertainty of source locations in the radio sky. The identification of correlated multipath propagation strongly suggests the existence of very fast processes acting on time scales <1 ms in the D region ionosphere with physically meaningful effects on low-frequency radio wave propagation. This important result has implications for practical applications in that the observed multipath propagation enables the determination of natural limits for the accuracy of navigation and lightning location methods using low-frequency radio waves.

  17. Coherence bandwidth loss in transionospheric radio propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Gonzalez, V. H.; Hessing, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    In this report a theoretical model is developed that predicts the single-point, two-frequency coherence function for transionospheric radio waves. The theoretical model is compared to measured complex frequency correlation coefficients using data from the seven equispaced, phase-coherent UHF signals transmitted by the Wideband satellite. The theory and data are in excellent agreement. The theory is critically dependent upon the power-law index, and the frequency coherence data clearly favor the comparatively small spectral indices that have been consistently measured from the wideband satellite phase data. A model for estimating the pulse delay jitter induced by the coherence bandwidth loss is also developed and compared with the actual delay jitter observed on synthesized pulses obtained from the Wideband UFH comb. The results are in good agreement with the theory. The results presented in this report, which are based on an asymptotic theory, are compared with the more commonly used quadratic theory. The model developed and validated in this report can be used to predict the effects of coherence bandwidth loss in disturbed nuclear environments. Simple formulas for the resultant pulse delay jitter are derived that can be used in predictive codes.

  18. An Experiment Study of the Propagation of Radio Waves in a Scaled Model of Long-Wall Coal Mining Tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Han, G.R.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, Y.P.

    2009-07-01

    A long-wall coal mining tunnel is the most important working area in a coal mine. It has long been realized that radio communications can improve both productivity and safety in this dangerous area. Hence, many attempts to use radio communications in such an environment have been made. Unfortunately, no radio system has satisfactorily provided communication services there, which, we believe, is partially due to poor understanding of the propagation characteristics of radio waves in the long-wall mining tunnel. To have deeper physical insight into the propagation problem, a scaled model of the long-wall mining tunnel was built, and the propagation characteristics of UHF radio waves were measured. The experiment and the measured results are presented and discussed.

  19. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechanisms and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-2412. The objective of this project is to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as if flew by Neptune. This study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, ray tracing, and modeling to determine the possible source mechanism(s) and locations of the Neptune radio emissions. We have completed four papers, which are included in the appendix. The paper 'Modeling of Whistler Ray Paths in the Magnetosphere of Neptune' investigated the propagation and dispersion of lighting-generated whistler in the magnetosphere of Neptune by using three dimensional ray tracing. The two papers 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Radio Emissions from Planetary Magnetospheres' and 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Planetary Radio Emissions' employed numerical simulations to investigate an alternate source mechanism of bursty radio emissions in addition to the cyclotron maser instability. We have also studied the possible generation of Z and whistler mode waves by the temperature anisotropic beam instability and the result was published in 'Electron Cyclotron Wave Generation by Relativistic Electrons.' Besides the aforementioned studies, we have also collaborated with members of the PRA team to investigate various aspects of the radio wave data. Two papers have been submitted for publication and the abstracts of these papers are also listed in the appendix.

  20. Electromagnetic wave propagation characteristics in unimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingpeng; Huang, Kama

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical reactions have attracted interests because of their benefits for enhancement of reaction rates. However, the problems, such as hot spots and thermal runaway, limit the application of microwaves in the chemical industry. To study the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in a chemical reaction is critical to solve the problems. The research on the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction that is a simple model reaction, can be generalized to the research in a chemical reaction. The approximate expressions of the attenuation and dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction are derived by the nonlinear propagation theory. Specially, when the reaction rate is zero, the derived approximate expressions can be reduced to the formulas in low-loss dispersive media. Moreover, a 1D mold is used to validate the feasibility of the approximate expressions. The influences of the reaction rate and initial reactant concentration on the characteristics are obtained.

  1. Jet propagation and the asymmetries of CSS radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, S.; Wiita, P. J.; Saikia, D. J.; Hooda, J. S.

    2005-03-01

    As Compact Steep Spectrum radio sources have been shown to be more asymmetrical than larger sources of similar powers, there is a high probability that they interact with an asymmetric medium in the central regions of the host elliptical galaxy. We consider a simple analytical model of the propagation of radio jets through a reasonable asymmetric environment and show that they can yield the range of arm-length and luminosity asymmetries that have been observed. We then generalize this to allow for the effects of orientation, and quantify the substantial enhancements of the asymmetries that can be produced in this fashion. We present two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations of jets propagating through multi-phase media and note that the results from the simulations are also broadly consistent with the observations.

  2. Radio Wave Propagation Handbook for Communication on and Around Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser; Kliore, Arvydas

    2002-01-01

    This handbook examines the effects of the Martian environment on radio wave propagation on Mars and in the space near the planet. The environmental effects include these from the Martian atmosphere, ionosphere, global dust storms, aerosols, clouds, and geomorphologic features. Relevant Martian environmental parameters were extracted from the measurements of Mars missions during the past 30 years, especially from Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor. The results derived from measurements and analyses have been reviewed through an extensive literature search. The updated parameters have been theoretically analyzed to study their effects on radio propagation. This handbook also provides basic information about the entire telecommunications environment on and around Mars for propagation researchers, system engineers, and link analysts. Based on these original analyses, some important recommendations have been made, including the use of the Martian ionosphere as a reflector for Mars global or trans-horizon communication between future Martian colonies, reducing dust storm scattering effects, etc. These results have extended our wave propagation knowledge to a planet other than Earth; and the tables, models, and graphics included in this handbook will benefit telecommunication system engineers and scientific researchers.

  3. Radio propagation through solar and other extraterrestrial ionized media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. K.; Edelson, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The present S- and X-band communications needs in deep space are addressed to illustrate the aspects which are affected by propagation through extraterrestrial plasmas. The magnitude, critical threshold, and frequency dependence of some eight propagation effects for an S-band propagation path passing within 4 solar radii of the Sun are described. The theory and observation of propagation in extraterrestrial plasmas are discussed and the various plasma states along a near solar propagation path are illustrated. Classical magnetoionic theory (cold anisotropic plasma) is examined for its applicability to the path in question. The characteristics of the plasma states found along the path are summarized and the errors in some of the standard approximations are indicated. Models of extraterrestrial plasmas are included. Modeling the electron density in the solar corona and solar wind, is emphasized but some cursory information on the terrestrial planets plus Jupiters is included.

  4. Morphology and characteristics of radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiradakis, John H.; Wielebinski, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This review describes the observational properties of radio pulsars, fast rotating neutron stars, emitting radio waves. After the introduction we give a list of milestones in pulsar research. The following chapters concentrate on pulsar morphology: the characteristic pulsar parameters such as pulse shape, pulsar spectrum, polarization and time dependence. We give information on the evolution of pulsars with frequency since this has a direct connection with the emission heights, as postulated in the radius to frequency mapping (RFM) concept. We deal successively with the properties of normal (slow) pulsars and of millisecond (fast-recycled) pulsars. The final chapters give the distribution characteristics of the presently catalogued 1300 objects.

  5. Prediction system about path loss of radio propagation based on GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao-qun; Xiao, Hong-xiang; Zheng, Shu-yu

    2015-12-01

    Prediction of the field strength is important in radio wave propagation in radio and television industry. Affected by the complex terrain on propagation path, the radio wave generate path loss. In order to predict the field strength, we have to analyze the path loss of radio propagation. In this paper, a prediction system about path loss of radio propagation based on GIS is presented. The system embeds GIS technology into ITU-R P.526 model, and establishes relevant development platform. The system's major modules and experiment results are presented.

  6. Fade durations in satellite-path mobile radio propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmier, Robert G.; Bostian, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    Fades on satellite to land mobile radio links are caused by several factors, the most important of which are multipath propagation and vegetative shadowing. Designers of vehicular satellite communications systems require information about the statistics of fade durations in order to overcome or compensate for the fades. Except for a few limiting cases, only the mean fade duration can be determined analytically, and all other statistics must be obtained experimentally or via simulation. This report describes and presents results from a computer program developed at Virginia Tech to simulate satellite path propagation of a mobile station in a rural area. It generates rapidly-fading and slowly-fading signals by separate processes that yield correct cumulative signal distributions and then combines these to simulate the overall signal. This is then analyzed to yield the statistics of fade duration.

  7. Propagation characteristics of acoustic waves in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Achille; Kapil, Jagdish Chandra; Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jrg; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is a promising technique for monitoring snow slope stability with potential for application in early warning systems for avalanches. Current research efforts focus on identification and localization of acoustic emission features preceding snow failure and avalanches. However, our knowledge of sound propagation characteristics in snow is still limited. A review of previous studies showed that significant gaps exist and that the results of the various studies are partly contradictory. Furthermore, sound velocity and attenuation have been determined for the frequency range below 10 kHz, while recent snow failure experiments suggest that the peak frequency is in the ultrasound range between 30 kHz to 500 kHz. We therefore studied the propagation of pencil lead fracture (PLF) signals through snow in the ultrasound frequency range. This was achieved by performing laboratory experiments with columns of artificially produced snow of varying density and temperature. The attenuation constant was obtained by varying the size of the columns to eliminate possible influences of the snow-sensor coupling. The attenuation constant was measured for the entire PLF burst signal and for single frequency components. The propagation velocity was calculated from the arrival time of the acoustic signal. We then modelled the sound propagation for our experimental setup using Biot's model for wave propagation in porous media. The Model results were in good agreement with our experimental results. For the studied samples, the acoustic signals propagated as fast and slow longitudinal waves, but the main part of the energy was carried by the slow waves. The Young's modulus of our snow samples was determined from the sound velocity. This is highly relevant, as the elastic properties of snow are not well known.

  8. Lightning-induced effects on VLF/LF radio propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inan, U. S.; Rodriguez, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, at least two different ways in which energy from lightning discharges couples into the lower ionosphere and the radiation belts have come to the fore. In this paper, we briefly review these recent results especially from the point of view of their effects on VLF/LF radio propagation in the earth-ionosphere wave guide. We separately discuss two different mechanisms of coupling, namely lightning-induced electron precipitation, and lightning-induced heating and ionization of the lower ionosphere. We also discuss a planned active VLF wave-injection experiment designed to investigate ionospheric heating by VLF waves under controlled conditions and to generate ELF waves by modulated VLF heating.

  9. Propagation and Asymmetries of Compact Steep Spectrum Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, S.; Wiita, P. J.; Saikia, D. J.; Hooda, J. S.

    1999-12-01

    As Compact Steep Spectrum radio sources have been shown to be more asymmetrical than larger sources of similar powers, there is a high probability that they interact with an asymmetric medium in the central regions of the host elliptical galaxy. We compute simple analytical models of the propagation of radio jets through various reasonable asymmetric situations and see that they can yield the range of arm-length and luminosity asymmetries that have been observed. We then generalize these models to allow for various viewing angles, and quantify the substantial enhancements of the asymmetries that can be produced in this fashion. We then perform two-dimensional (axisymmetric) numerical simulations of conical jets, along the lines of the most realistic of our analytical models, and find a similar trend. Finally, we present results of three-dimensional simulations which include finite opening angles and compare them with the analytical and two-dimensional numerical approximations. This work was supported in part by NASA grant NAG 5-3098 and by RPE and Strategic Initiative Funds at GSU.

  10. Wave propagation simulation of radio occultations based on ECMWF refractivity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Heg, Per

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a complete radio occultation simulation environment, including realistic refractivity profiles, wave propagation modeling, instrument modeling, and bending angle retrieval. The wave propagator is used to simulate radio occultation measurements. The radio waves are propagated through a refractivity field which has been calculated with the use of numerical weather prediction models. The numerical weather prediction model used in this paper is a model from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The wave propagator has been used to simulate a number of radio occultations. The output from the wave propagator simulator is used as input to a Full Spectrum Inversion retrieval module which calculates geophysical parameters. These parameters can be compared to the ECMWF atmospheric profiles. The comparison can be used to reveal system errors and get a better understanding of the physics. The wave propagation simulations will in this paper also be compared to real measurements. These radio occultations have been exposed to the same atmospheric conditions as the radio occultations simulated by the wave propagator. This comparison reveals that precise radio occultations can be simulated when the simulations are based on wave propagation and refractivity field inputs from a numerical weather prediction model.

  11. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechamisms and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. Douglas

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as it flew by Neptune. The study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, and ray tracing to determine the possible source mechanisms and locations of the radiation, including the narrowband bursty and smooth components of the Neptune radio emission.

  12. Propagation Characteristics of International Space Station Wireless Local Area Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sham, Catherine C.; Hwn, Shian U.; Loh, Yin-Chung

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD) for Space Station Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) indoor propagation characteristics analysis. The verification results indicate good correlation between UTD computed and measured signal strength. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are quite different in the Space Station modules as compared with those in the typical indoor WLANs environment, such as an office building. The existing indoor propagation models are not readily applicable to the Space Station module environment. The Space Station modules can be regarded as oversized imperfect waveguides. Two distinct propagation regions separated by a breakpoint exist. The propagation exhibits the guided wave characteristics. The propagation loss in the Space Station, thus, is much smaller than that in the typical office building. The path loss model developed in this paper is applicable for Space Station WLAN RF coverage and link performance analysis.

  13. Radio jet propagation and wide-angle tailed radio sources in merging galaxy cluster environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loken, Chris; Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack O.; Norman, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM) within merging clusters of galaxies is likely to be in a violent or turbulent dynamical state which may have a significant effect on the evolution of cluster radio sources. We present results from a recent gas + N-body simulation of a cluster merger, suggesting that mergers can result in long-lived, supersonic bulk flows, as well as shocks, within a few hundred kiloparsecs of the core of the dominant cluster. These results have motivated our new two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations of jet propagation in such environments. The first set of simulations models the ISM/ICM transition as a contact discontinuity with a strong velocity shear. A supersonic (M(sub j) = 6) jet crossing this discontinuity into an ICM with a transverse, supersonic wind bends continuously, becomes 'naked' on the upwind side, and forms a distended cocoon on the downwind side. In the case of a mildly supersonic jet (M(sub j) = 3), however, a shock is driven into the ISM and ISM material is pulled along with the jet into the ICM. Instabilities excited at the ISM/ICM interface result in the jet repeatedly pinching off and reestablishing itself in a series of 'disconnection events.' The second set of simulations deals with a jet encountering a shock in the merging cluster environment. A series of relatively high-resolution two-dimensional calculations is used to confirm earlier analysis predicting that the jet will not disrupt when the jet Mach number is greater than the shock Mach number. A jet which survives the encounter with the shock will decrease in radius and disrupt shortly thereafter as a result of the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We also find, in disagreement with predictions, that the jet flaring angle decreases with increasing jet density. Finally, a three-dimensional simulation of a jet crossing an oblique shock gives rise to a morphology which resembles a wide-angle tailed radio source with the jet flaring at the shock and disrupting to form a long, turbulent tail which is dragged downstream by the preshock wind.

  14. Propagation characteristics of power line harmonic radiation in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Fu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Chong

    2014-03-01

    Theoretical model and solutions on power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) propagating in the ground, air, and anisotropic homogeneous ionosphere are presented. The theoretical model is verified by the PLHR events observed by the DEMETER satellite. Some propagation characteristics of PLHR based on the model are obtained. This paper is beneficial to quantitatively interpret the formation mechanism of PLHR phenomenon.

  15. Analysis of tropospheric propagation characteristics based on regional meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Junho; Melton, Mara; Donohue, John; Fryland, Albert

    1995-02-01

    Meteorological data has been processed to investigate RF (radio frequency) propagation efforts of the tropospheric region from ground to 28 km in space. A data base has been developed to provide enough information for analyzing many different phenomena of the troposphere in terms of lapse rate, refractivity, range error, angle error, slant range, and interrelationships among these parameters. Based on preliminary analysis, the results are very distinguishable from the values arrived at through the application of conventional data for analysis of RF propagation patterns. This implies that the seasonal average value provides better indications of the current atmospheric variation than the annual global average value which most users have adopted for convenience.

  16. Radio wave propagation at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 in the short wave band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkaliyev, Y. F.; Bocharov, V. I.

    1972-01-01

    The results of measurements of field strength and signal/noise ratio on experimental ionospheric-scattering short wave radio links are presented. It is shown that the seasonal and diurnal variations of field strength are determined by features of solar and meteoric activity. The role of the sporadic E-layer in propagation of short radio waves at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 is noted.

  17. The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain. [radio signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.; Wiley, P. H.; Marshall, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The measurement and analysis of the depolarization and attenuation that occur when millimeter wave radio signals propagate through rain are described. Progress was made in three major areas: the processing of recorded 1972 data, acquisition and processing of a large amount of 1973 data, and the development of a new theoretical model to predict rain cross polarization and attenuation. Each of these topics is described in detail along with radio frequency system design for cross polarization measurements.

  18. Morphology of solar wind fluctuations and structure in the vicinity of the Sun from radio propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.

    1995-01-01

    Radio propagation measurements represent a powerful means for remote probing of electron density and solar wind speed in the acceleration region of the solar wind not yet explored by in situ measurements. Recent investigations based on radio propagation measurements have led to considerable progress in our knowledge of the general morphology of solar wind fluctuations and structure, especially in terms of their relationship to solar wind properties that have been observed directly by fields and particles measurements, and to coronal features observed in white-light measurements. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the latest results on quasi-stationary structure covering the large scale variation of solar wind speed over the streamer belt and coronal hole regions, coronal streamers (source of slow solar wind) and their associated small-scale electron density structure, plumes, density and fractional or relative density fluctuations, and the spectral characteristics of the electron density fluctuations. The radio propagation measurements not only reveal new information on the structure near the Sun, but also show that the structure appears to undergo substantial evolution on its way to 0.3 AU, the closest radial distance for which direct in situ spacecraft measurements are available.

  19. Propagation of Saturn's radio lightning studied by three-dimensional ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, A. L.; Cecconi, B.; Zarka, P.; Fischer, G.

    2011-10-01

    Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SED) are the radio signature of lightning flashes originating from Saturn atmosphere. Their source is well correlated with cloud features rotating with Saturn's atmosphere. However comparisons of Cassini/RPWS (Radio and Plasma Waves Science) and Cassini/ ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) data have shown that when Cassini is at specific Local Time positions relative to Saturn (e.g. ~06:00 LT), radio detection starts before the cloud system is in the hemisphere visible from Cassini : this phenomenon has been called the "over the horizon" effect, and it appears to be frequency-dependent. Using our 3D ray tracing code which computes the wave propagation through a realistic model of Saturn's ionosphere, where electron density varies with the local time, altitude, and latitude, we show that this effect can be explained by temporary trapping of the SED radio waves below the ionosphere, before their escape from Saturn's vicinity. These results are obtained with propagation on the free-space mode, i.e. neglecting background magnetic field. But it has also been shown that below ~2 MHz, SED are circularly polarized in a sense consistent with magneto-ionic O-mode propagation. Thus we have implemented mode-dependent propagation in our raytracing code, in order to further explore SED propagation though Saturn's magnetized ionosphere. We present the results of this study.

  20. Radio wave propagation experiments to probe the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    Ionospheric bias corrections associated with radio tracking of spacecraft depend on the following measuring techniques for integrated electron content: (1) Faraday rotation measurements from an earth synchronous satellite; (2) ranging measurements at two frequencies; and (3) group and phase velocity measurements obtained from tracking data. The extraction of the integrated electron content directly from tracking data is achieved by comparison of range-rate measurements based on Doppler shift with differentiated range measurements based on tone delay. This method is most desirable because the measured corrections pertain directly to the spacecraft whose orbit is being determined and can be used in near earth as well as deep space tracking data.

  1. Long-Range Transhorizon Lunar Surface Radio Wave Propagation in the Presence of a Regolith and a Sparse Exospheric Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Long-range, over-the-horizon (transhorizon) radio wave propagation is considered for the case of the Moon. In the event that relay satellites are not available or otherwise unwarranted for use, transhorizon communication provides for a contingency or backup option for non line-of-sight lunar surface exploration scenarios. Two potential low-frequency propagation mechanisms characteristic of the lunar landscape are the lunar regolith and the photoelectron induced plasma exosphere enveloping the Moon. Although it was hoped that the regolith would provide for a spherical waveguide which could support a trapped surface wave phenomena, it is found that, in most cases, the regolith is deleterious to long range radio wave propagation. However, the presence of the plasma of the lunar exosphere supports wave propagation and, in fact, surpasses the attenuation of the regolith. Given the models of the regolith and exosphere adopted here, it is recommended that a frequency of 1 MHz be considered for low rate data transmission along the lunar surface. It is also recommended that further research be done to capture the descriptive physics of the regolith and the exospheric plasma so that a more complete model can be obtained. This comprehensive theoretical study is based entirely on first principles and the mathematical techniques needed are developed as required; it is self-contained and should not require the use of outside resources for its understanding.

  2. Source characteristics of Jovian hectometric radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Direct confirmation that low-frequency Jovian hectometric (HOM) radio emissions centered near 0 deg central meridian longitude consist of distinct, oppositely polarized northern and southern beams has been achieved using data from the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft during the Ulysses-Jupiter encounter in early February 1992. Distinct northern and southern beams were observed in the frequency range from approximately 300 kHz to 1 MHz for at least eight Jovian rotations during the Ulysses inbound pass at distances from 100 to 40 R(sub j). The radiation from the two magnetic hemispheres was measured from different Jovigraphic longitudes and magnetic (or centrifugal) latitudes. Observed temporal variations in the radio intensities, with time scales on the order of 30 min, may result either from longitudinal variations of the HOM sources or from longitudinal density variations in the Io plasma torus. Using the URAP direction-finding capabilities and assuming a tilted dipole planetary magnetic field model, the three-dimensional HOM source locations, the L shell through these source locations, and the beam opening angles were independently deduced. The HOM sources were found to originate at approximately 3 R(sub j) and on low L shells (L approximately 4 to 6), with beam opening angles ranging from 10 to 50 deg.

  3. The magnetoionic modes and propagation properties of auroral radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, Wynne; Hashimoto, Kozo

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the magnetoionic wave modes which accompany the aurora is clarified here by a detailed analysis, using multiple techniques, of DE 1 auroral radio observations. All four of the possible magnetoionic wave modes are found to occur, apparently emitted from two different source regions on the same auroral field line. AKR originates primarily in the X mode near the electron cyclotron frequency, and is frequently also accompanied by a weaker O-mode component from the same location. The next most prominent auroral emission is the W-mode auroral hiss originating from altitudes always well below the DE 1 satellite at frequencies below the local cyclotron frequency. The previously reported Z-mode auroral radiation was also detected, but from sources also below the satellite at the poleward edge of the cavity, and not from the expected AKR source at the cyclotron frequency.

  4. Propagation of radio frequency waves through density filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos

    2015-12-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. In this paper we develop an analytical formalism for the scattering of radio frequency waves by filaments which are cylindrical with their major axis aligned along the toroidal magnetic field lines. Since the magnitude of the ratio of the density inside the filaments to the background density is generally of order 1, the geometric optics approximation cannot be used to describe the scattering. A full-wave model is formulated which assumes that the plasma is cold and that the plasma in the cylindrical filament has uniform density. The background plasma, in which the filament is present, is also assumed to be cold and uniform. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any plasma wave.

  5. Predictions and observations of HF radio propagation in the northerly ionosphere: The effect of the solar flares and a weak CME in early January 2014.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallam, Jonathan; Stocker, Alan J.; Warrington, Mike; Siddle, Dave; Zaalov, Nikolay; Honary, Farideh; Rogers, Neil; Boteler, David; Danskin, Donald

    2014-05-01

    We have previously reported on a significant new multi-national project to provide improved predictions and forecasts of HF radio propagation for commercial aircraft operating on trans-polar routes. In these regions, there are limited or no VHF air-traffic control facilities and geostationary satellites are below the horizon. Therefore HF radio remains important in maintaining communications with the aircraft at all times. Space weather disturbances can have a range of effects on the ionosphere and hence HF radio propagation - particularly in the polar cap. While severe space weather effects can lead to a total loss of communications (i.e. radio blackout), less intense events can still cause significant disruption. In this paper we will present the effect of a series of M and X class solar flares and a relatively weak CME on HF radio performance from 6 to 13 January 2014. This is an interesting interval from the point of view of HF radio propagation because while the solar effects on the ionosphere are significant, except for an interval of approximately 12 hours duration, they are not so intense as to produce a complete radio blackout on all paths. Observations of the signal-to-noise ratio, direction of arrival, and time of flight of HF radio signals on six paths (one entirely within the polar cap, three trans-auroral, and two sub-auroral) will be presented together with riometer measurements of the ionospheric absorption. Global maps of D-region absorption (D-region absorption prediction, DRAP) inferred from satellite measurements of the solar wind parameters will be compared with the HF and riometer observations. In addition, a ray-tracing model using a realistic background ionosphere and including localised features found in the ionospheric polar cap (e.g. polar patches and arcs) will be used to model the expected and observed HF radio propagation characteristics.

  6. Confinement and propagation characteristics of subwavelength plasmonic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulton, R. F.; Bartal, G.; Pile, D. F. P.; Zhang, X.

    2008-10-01

    We have studied subwavelength confinement of the surface plasmon polariton modes of various plasmonic waveguides and examined their relative merits using a graphical parametric representation of their confinement and propagation characteristics. While the same plasmonic phenomenon governs mode confinement in all these waveguides, the various architectures can exhibit distinctive behavior in terms of effective mode area and propagation distance. We found that the waveguides based on metal and one dielectric material show a similar trade-off between energy confinement and propagation distance. However, a hybrid plasmon waveguide, incorporating metal, low index and high index dielectric materials, exhibits longer propagation distances for the same degree of confinement. We also point out that plasmonic waveguides with sharp features can provide an extremely strong local field enhancement, which is not necessarily accompanied by strong confinement of the total electromagnetic energy. In these waveguides, a mode may couple strongly to nearby atoms, but suffer relatively low propagation losses due to weak confinement.

  7. Characteristics of Electromagnetic Pulse Propagation in Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Nath, S.; Fulton, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the solution of the diffusion equation for an electromagnetic field with a time harmonic term, e(sup iwt), is in the form of a traveling wave whose amplitude attenuates over distance into a conducting medium. As the attenuation is an increasing function of frequency, the high frequency components attenuate more rapidly than those of low ones upon entering a well conducting object. At the same time, the phase velocity of an individual component is also an increasing function of frequency causing a broadening of the pulse traveling inside a conductor. In the results of our previous study of numerical simulations, the problem of using a gaussian input pulse was immediately clear. First, having the dominant frequency components distributed around zero, the movement of the peak was not well defined. Second, with the amplitude of fourier components varying slowly over a wide range, the dispersion-induced blurring of the peak position was seen to be severe. For the present study, we have used a gaussian modulated single frequency sinusoidal wave, i. e., the carrier, as an input pulse in an effort to improve the issues related to the unclear movement of peak and dispersion as described above. This was based on the following two anticipated advantages: First, the packet moves in a conductor at the group velocity calculated at the carrier frequency, which means it is well controllable. Second, the amplitude of frequency components other than that of the carrier can be almost negligible, such that the effect of dispersion can be significantly reduced. A series of experiments of transmitting electromagnetic pulses through aluminum plates of various thickness was performed to test the validity of the above points. The results of numerical simulation based on wave propagation are discussed with respect to the experimental results. Finally, a simple simulation was performed based on diffusion of a continuous sine wave input and the results are compared with those of a single frequency sinusoidal wave observed over time at difference locations inside a conductor.

  8. Spacecraft VHF Radio Propagation Analysis in Ocean Environments Including Atmospheric Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian; Moreno, Gerardo; Desilva, Kanishka; Jih, CIndy

    2010-01-01

    The Communication Systems Simulation Laboratory (CSSL) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Johnson Space Center (JSC) is tasked to perform spacecraft and ground network communication system simulations. The CSSL has developed simulation tools that model spacecraft communication systems and the space/ground environment in which they operate. This paper is to analyze a spacecraft's very high frequency (VHF) radio signal propagation and the impact to performance when landing in an ocean. Very little research work has been done for VHF radio systems in a maritime environment. Rigorous Radio Frequency (RF) modeling/simulation techniques were employed for various environmental effects. The simulation results illustrate the significance of the environmental effects on the VHF radio system performance.

  9. Computational strategy for modeling radio wave propagation in lossy circular waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Ronald; Cai, D Michael

    2008-01-01

    The propagation of radio waves in lossy waveguides and tunnels has been researched extensively for many years as can be seen in the detailed book by Wait. The mathematics used to model waveguides for communications is essentially the same as that needed to model radio frequency (RF) propagation in simple tunnels. The presence or lack of conductors inside a waveguide or tunnel is a key driver in the nature of the solutions one will find for a particular application, Delogne. When there are conductors passing through a waveguide or tunnel, the simplest modes of propagation are surface-guided waves following the conductor and typically enabling long-range transmission. A tunnel containing a core conductor can act rather like a coaxial cable, propagating waves at a nearly constant speed, regardless of frequency. Conversely, a tunnel or waveguide without internal conductors is subject to very different wave patterns, resulting in a much more complex propagation analysis. Holloway et al. presented an exhaustive study of RF propagation in circular structures embedded in lossy surroundings. The work of Holloway et al. is the basis for this paper, where we discuss application of their computational techniques and present refinements gleaned from our work on similar problems.

  10. Remote sensing of the turbulence characteristics of a planetary atmosphere by radio occultation of a space probe.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Ishimaru, A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of small-scale turbulence on radio waves propagating through a planetary atmosphere. The analysis provides a technique for inferring the turbulence characteristics of a planetary atmosphere from the radio signals received from a spacecraft as it is occulted by the planet. The planetary turbulence is assumed to be localized and smoothly varying, with the structure constant varying exponentially with altitude. Rytov's method is used to derive the variance of log-amplitude and phase fluctuations of a wave propagating through the atmosphere.

  11. Study of long path VLF signal propagation characteristics as observed from Indian Antarctic station, Maitri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, Sudipta; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Pal, Sujay

    To examine quality and propagation characteristics of radio waves in a very long propagation path, Indian Centre for Space Physics participated in the 27th Indian scientific expedition to Antarctica during 2007-2008. One Stanford University made AWESOME (Atmospheric Weather Educational System for Observation and Modeling of Effects) Very Low Frequency (VLF) receiving system was installed at the Indian Antarctic station Maitri and about five weeks of data was recorded successfully from the Indian transmitter VTX and several other transmitting stations worldwide. Signal quality of VTX was found to be very good and signal amplitude was highly stable. The signal showed evidences of round the clock solar radiation in Antarctic region during local summer. We compute elevation angle of the Sun theoretically during this period. We compute the spatial distribution of the signal by using the LWPC model during the all-day and all-night propagation conditions. We compute the attenuation coefficient of the different propagation modes and observe that different modes are dominating in different propagation conditions. We also observe effects of the Antarctic polar ice in the propagation modes.

  12. Study of long path VLF signal propagation characteristics as observed from Indian Antarctic station, Maitri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, Sudipta; Pal, Sujay; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2014-10-01

    To examine the quality and propagation characteristics of the Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves in a very long propagation path, Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata, participated in the 27th Indian scientific expedition to Antarctica during 2007-2008. One Stanford University made AWESOME VLF receiving system was installed at the Indian Antarctic station Maitri and about five weeks of data were recorded successfully from the Indian transmitter VTX and several other transmitting stations worldwide. The quality of the signal from the VTX transmitter was found to be very good, consistent and highly stable in day and night. The signal shows the evidences of the presence of the 24 h solar radiation in the Antarctic region during local summer. Here we report the both narrow band and broadband VLF observations from this site. The diurnal variations of VTX signal (18.2 kHz) are presented systematically for Antarctica path and also compared the same with the variations for a short propagation path (VTX-Kolkata). We compute the spatial distribution of the VTX signal along the VTX-Antarctica path using the most well-known LWPC model for an all-day and all-night propagation conditions. The calculated signal amplitudes corresponding to those conditions relatively corroborate the observations. We also present the attenuation rate of the dominant waveguide modes corresponding to those propagation conditions where the effects of the Antarctic polar ice on the attenuation of different propagating waveguide modes are visible.

  13. Global ionospheric effects of geomagnetic storm on May 2-3, 2010 and their influence on HF radio wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, Daria; Klimenko, Maxim; Klimenko, Vladimir; Zakharov, Veniamin

    2013-04-01

    In this work we have investigated the global ionospheric response to geomagnetic storm on May 2-3, 2010 using GSM TIP (Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere) simulation results. In the GSM TIP storm time model runs, several input parameters such as cross-polar cap potential difference and R2 FAC (Region 2 Field-Aligned Currents) varied as a function of the geomagnetic activity AE-index. Current simulation also uses the empirical model of high-energy particle precipitation by Zhang and Paxton. In this model, the energy and energy flux of precipitating electrons depend on a 3 hour Kp-index. We also have included the 30 min time delay of R2 FAC variations with respect to the variations of cross-polar cap potential difference. In addition, we use the ground-based ionosonde data for comparison our model results with observations. We present an analysis of the physical mechanisms responsible for the ionospheric effects of geomagnetic storms. The obtained simulation results are used by us as a medium for HF radio wave propagation at different latitudes in quiet conditions, and during main and recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm. To solve the problem of the radio wave propagation we used Zakharov's (I. Kant BFU) model based on geometric optics. In this model the solution of the eikonal equation for each of the two normal modes is reduced using the method of characteristics to the integration of the six ray equation system for the coordinates and momentum. All model equations of this system are solved in spherical geomagnetic coordinate system by the Runge-Kutta method. This model was tested for a plane wave in a parabolic layer. In this study, the complex refractive indices of the ordinary and extraordinary waves at ionospheric heights was calculated for the first time using the global first-principal model of the thermosphere-ionosphere system that describes the parameters of an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium during a geomagnetic storm. A comparison of the ordinary and extraordinary modes of HF radio ray paths in quiet and disturbed conditions has been done. We considered in more detail the features of the radio ray paths in the presence of F3 layer in the equatorial ionosphere, the main ionospheric trough and tongue of ionization at high latitudes. It is shown that the results obtained with use of radio propagation and GSM TIP models adequately describe HF radio ray paths in the Earth's ionosphere and can be used in applications. These investigations were carried out at financial support of Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR) - Grant # 12-05-31217 and RAS Program 22.

  14. Channelized coplanar waveguide: Discontinuities, junctions, and propagation characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Ponchak, George E.; Martzaklis, Konstantinos S.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    A new variant of CPW which has been termed channelized CPW, CCPW, is presented. Measured and computed propagation characteristics are presented. Lumped equivalent circuit element values for a CCPW open circuit and right angle bend have been obtained. CCPW power divider junctions and a coax-to-CCPW in-phase, radial power divider are also presented.

  15. Radio Wave Propagation for Communication on and around Mars. Part 1; Highlights: Propagation Through Mars Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser

    1999-01-01

    We recommend to use the dayside Martian ionosphere as a reflector for global communication, because the dayside ionosphere has stable density peak and usable critic frequency. This is very crucial for the future Mars ground to around communication. The dayside ionosphere has been well modeled as a Chapman layer. We suggest to perform the Martian nightside ionospheric modeling study. Because the nightside ionosphere has very little measurements available, we propose to drop a digital ionosond instrument into the Mars surface for data collection. Even though the Martian tropospheric radio refractivity has small value, it still can cause the ray bending and multipath effects. We recommend to perform an accurate calculation on excess phase and group delays (range and time delays). Other effects, such as range rate errors, appearance angle deviation, defocusing loss on Mars, etc. are also needed to be estimated. Ice depolarization effects due to Martian clouds on radio waves is unknown yet, which is expected to be small, because lower optical depth and thinner layer of cloud: Total Martian atmospheric gaseous attenuation is expected to be less than 1 dB on microwaves band, because the Martian atmosphere has very low concentration in uncondensed H2O and O2. An accurate calculation for zenith opacity requires the information about scale heights of H2O and O2 distribution. An accurate water vapor altitude profile at Mars is not available yet. Under the normal condition, CO2 and N2 gases do not have electric or magnetic dipoles and do not absorb electromagnetic energy from the waves. However, they may generate the dipoles through a collision and interact with waves under a high density condition and absorb electromagnetic waves in the infrared and visible band. Dust storm is most dominant factor to the radio wave attenuation. Large Martian dust storm can cause at least 3 dB or higher loss to Ka band wave. For a normal dust storm, the attenuation is about 1 dB. The attenuation much depends on dust mass loading, dust size distribution, etc. Most large dust storm occur in the southern hemisphere during later spring and early summer when the southern hemisphere become suddenly hot.

  16. Reversible Parallel Discrete Event Formulation of a TLM-based Radio Signal Propagation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Sudip K; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2011-01-01

    Radio signal strength estimation is essential in many applications, including the design of military radio communications and industrial wireless installations. For scenarios with large or richly- featured geographical volumes, parallel processing is required to meet the memory and computa- tion time demands. Here, we present a scalable and efficient parallel execution of the sequential model for radio signal propagation recently developed by Nutaro et al. Starting with that model, we (a) provide a vector-based reformulation that has significantly lower computational overhead for event handling, (b) develop a parallel decomposition approach that is amenable to reversibility with minimal computational overheads, (c) present a framework for transparently mapping the conservative time-stepped model into an optimistic parallel discrete event execution, (d) present a new reversible method, along with its analysis and implementation, for inverting the vector-based event model to be executed in an optimistic parallel style of execution, and (e) present performance results from implementation on Cray XT platforms. We demonstrate scalability, with the largest runs tested on up to 127,500 cores of a Cray XT5, enabling simulation of larger scenarios and with faster execution than reported before on the radio propagation model. This also represents the first successful demonstration of the ability to efficiently map a conservative time-stepped model to an optimistic discrete-event execution.

  17. Propagation characteristics of plasma sheet oscillations during a small storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, C.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Kepko, L.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Auster, H. U.; McFadden, J.; Carlson, C. W.; Larson, D.

    2008-06-01

    On 24 March 2007, the THEMIS spacecraft were in a string-of-pearls configuration through the dusk plasma sheet at the recovery phase of a small storm. Large undulations of the plasma sheet were observed that brought the five probes from one lobe to another. Each neutral sheet crossing was accompanied by bursty bulk flows and Pi2 oscillations. In this paper we focus on the low frequency (~10 min) large scale plasma sheet undulations and determine their propagation characteristics, origin, and properties in the presence of storm-time substorms. As the first case of ``flapping waves'' observed and analyzed during storm-time, it is interesting to find their characteristics coincide with those described by previous quiet-time observations. These characteristics include flankward propagation of the undulations with velocities generally between ~40-130 km/s.

  18. Can the fine structure of type II solar radio bursts at decametric and hectometric waves be the consequence of propagation effects in the solar corona?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, A. N.

    2009-04-01

    Dynamic spectra obtained with WIND/WAVES and STEREO/SWAVES instruments show that type II solar radio bursts at decametric and longer waves quite often reveal fine structure in the form of narrow-band fibers. The analysis of observational data has made it possible to draw a conclusion (Chernov et al., Solar Phys. 241, 145, 2007) that the fiber structure is formed when the shock wave generating the burst is catching up with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and passing through narrow jets in the wake of the CME. However, the fibers observed display variety in their characteristics, which may be related to different generation mechanisms. As one of possible generation mechanisms, we consider in this paper a mechanism based on propagation effects of radio emission in the corona. The narrow-band fibers, from this point of view, represent traces of focusings of radio emission propagating through the inhomogeneous structure of the CME. The jets with increased electron density play an important role in the mechanism under consideration. In the paper, we have carried out Monte Carlo simulations of radio emission propagation in such a structured corona. We take into account regular refraction of radio waves on the jets and inhomogeneous structure of the CME as well as scattering by the spectrum of chaotic inhomogeneities. The possibilities for identification of the fibers caused by this mechanism, based on SWAVES data are discussed.

  19. FDTD analysis of ELF radio waves propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Volodymyr; Kulak, Andrzej; Mlynarczyk, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    We developed an FDTD model of electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. We present the results of FDTD calculations assuming axisymmetric system with the source located at the north pole and with no dependence on azimuthal coordinate. Therefore we reduced the Maxwell equations to 2D spherical system of Maxwell equations. To model the conductivity profile of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide we used two models, namely one- and two-exponential profiles [Mushtak and Williams, 2002]. The day-night asymmetry was introduced by setting different model parameters for the north and south hemispheres. The ground was modeled as a perfect electric conductor. Also the upper boundary for the model was a perfect conductor but it was placed at a high enough altitude to make sure there is no reflection of the waves from this boundary. We obtained the results for the electric and magnetic field components of the propagating wave in the time and frequency domains and for various locations on Earth along the meridian. In the time domain we analyzed the evolution of the electric and magnetic field components of the radio wave generated by lighting for different probe position, the penetration of the ionosphere by the electromagnetic waves and the reflection of the waves on the terminator. In the frequency domain we analyzed the Schumann resonance spectra in different field components for different location in the computational space, the behavior of the Poynting vector and the wave impedance. We also calculated real and imaginary parts of the characteristic electric and magnetic altitudes for the daytime and nighttime ionosphere. The analysis in the frequency domain was performed up to 1 kHz. We compared the results of numerical calculations with our analytical model and found a reasonably good agreement between them. The results can be used in the analysis of global thunderstorm activity based on measurements of Schumann resonance spectra. Acknowledgements. This work has been supported by the National Science Centre grant 2012/04/M/ST10/00565. The numerical computations were done using the PL-Grid infrastructure.

  20. Attenuation characteristics of nonlinear pressure waves propagating in pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to investigate temporal and spatial velocity distributions of fluid flow in 3-in. open-end pipes of various lengths up to 210 ft, produced by the propagation of nonlinear pressure waves of various intensities. Velocity profiles across each of five sections along the pipes were measured as a function of time with the use of hot-film and hot-wire anemometers for two pressure waves produced by a piston. Peculiar configurations of the velocity profiles across the pipe section were noted, which are uncommon for steady pipe flow. Theoretical consideration was given to this phenomenon of higher velocity near the pipe wall for qualitative confirmation. Experimentally time-dependent velocity distributions along the pipe axis were compared with one-dimensional theoretical results obtained by the method of characteristics with or without diffusion term for the purpose of determining the attenuation characteristics of the nonlinear wave propagation in the pipes.

  1. Effects in the ionosphere and HF radio-wave propagation during an intense substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchensky, D. V.; Borisova, T. D.; Rogov, D. D.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of combined radiophysical studies during the period of an intense magnetospheric substorm which occurred from 00:00 to 02:00 UT in April 12, 1999. Measurements of the ionospheric parameters by a chain of European ionosondes for this period were compared with the variations in ionospheric parameters averaged over more than 70 substorms. The latter variations were obtained by data from the ionosondes of Europe, Central Siberia, and North America in 1993-1999. Data from the CUTLASS radar as well as the DMSP and POES satellites were used for the analysis of the April 11-12 substorm. Numerical calculations of HF radio-wave propagation on the St. PetersburgLongyearbyen (Svalbard) high-latitude path were carried out by the ray tracing technique. Two simultaneous effects have been revealed in the ionosphere. One occurs immediately during the substorm and another is associated with the end of the magnetic storm in April 10, 1999. According to the CUTLASS radar data, the number of backscattering irregularities in the ionospheric F layer notably decreased during the substorm expansion phase. Satellite data showed an increase in the soft (hundreds of eV) particle precipitation before and after the substorm. Numerical calculations of HF radio-wave propagation on the St. PetersburgLongyearbyen path have demonstrated an essential change of propagation mechanisms during the substorm and a tangible change in the wave arrival angles before and after the substorm.

  2. Antenna system characteristics and solar radio burst observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Yan, Yi-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Dong-Hao

    2015-11-01

    The Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) is an advanced aperture synthesis solar radio heliograph, independently developed by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It consists of 100 reflector antennas, which are grouped into two antenna arrays (CSRH-I and CSRH-II) for low and high frequency bands respectively. The frequency band of CSRH-I is 0.4-2 GHz and that for CSRH-II is 2-15 GHz. In the antenna and feed system, CSRH uses eleven feeds to receive signals coming from the Sun. The radiation pattern has a lower side lobe and the back lobe of the feed is well illuminated. The characteristics of gain G and antenna noise temperature T affect the quality of solar radio imaging. For CSRH, the measured G is larger than 60 dBi and T is less than 120 K. After CSRH-I was established, we successfully captured a solar radio burst between 1.2-1.6 GHz on 2010 November 12 using this instrument and this event was confirmed through observations with the Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at 2.84 GHz and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite. In addition, an image obtained from CSRH-I clearly revealed the profile of the solar radio burst. The other observational work involved the imaging the Fengyun-2E geosynchronous satellite which is assumed to be a point source. Results indicate that the data processing method applied in this study for deleting errors in a noisy image could be used for processing images from other sources.

  3. A 3-D Propagation Model for Emerging Land Mobile Radio Cellular Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Abrar; Nawaz, Syed Junaid; Gulfam, Sardar Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    A tunable stochastic geometry based Three-Dimensional (3-D) scattering model for emerging land mobile radio cellular systems is proposed. Uniformly distributed scattering objects are assumed around the Mobile Station (MS) bounded within an ellipsoidal shaped Scattering Region (SR) hollowed with an elliptically-cylindric scattering free region in immediate vicinity of MS. To ensure the degree of expected accuracy, the proposed model is designed to be tunable (as required) with nine degrees of freedom, unlike its counterparts in the existing literature. The outer and inner boundaries of SR are designed as independently scalable along all the axes and rotatable in horizontal plane around their origin centered at MS. The elevated Base Station (BS) is considered outside the SR at a certain adjustable distance and height w.r.t. position of MS. Closed-form analytical expressions for joint and marginal Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of Angle-of-Arrival (AoA) and Time-of-Arrival (ToA) are derived for both up- and down-links. The obtained analytical results for angular and temporal statistics of the channel are presented along with a thorough analysis. The impact of various physical model parameters on angular and temporal characteristics of the channel is presented, which reveals the comprehensive insight on the proposed results. To evaluate the robustness of the proposed analytical model, a comparison with experimental datasets and simulation results is also presented. The obtained analytical results for PDF of AoA observed at BS are seen to fit a vast range of empirical datasets in the literature taken for various outdoor propagation environments. In order to establish the validity of the obtained analytical results for spatial and temporal characteristics of the channel, a comparison of the proposed analytical results with the simulation results is shown, which illustrates a good fit for 107 scattering points. Moreover, the proposed model is shown to degenerate to various notable geometric models in the literature by an appropriate choice of a few parameters. PMID:26305328

  4. Observational Evidence for Solar Radio Microflares with Unusual Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, R. X.; Wang, M.

    A very rare type of solar radio microflares occurred during 0645 - 0720 UT on Jan. 5, 1994 is introduced in this paper. The radio and optical characteristics of the solar microflares of a short decimetric wave (1.42 GHz) are discussed. This event contains 53 radio fast fine structures (FFS), that is 53 intermittently periodic impulse trains with similar morphologies superimposed on the continuum radiation background. The intensities of the pulses lie within 150 - 200 s.f.u. and the durations (half power width) are of the order of 10 - 20 milliseconds. 18 out of 53 FFSs are doublepeak- separating structures. There are two newly emerged small sunspot groups on Jan. 5 presenting complex polarities and it seems that there existed small multiple-cross magnetic flux loops in Figure 2. The multiple reconnections also might have occurred. In this paper we try to discuss the generation mechanism qualitatively and find it is in consistence with the model of current loop explosive coalescence (Sakai and De Jager, 1989a, 1989b; De Jager and Sakai, 1991; Tajima, et al., 1987): the explosive coalescense of the multiple of cross magnetic flux loops causes the plasma disturbance and so rapidly transform the magnetic energy into the kinetic energy of electrons. The radio emission can be generated by the stimulated plasma waves or the instability of electron cyclotron masers.

  5. Source characteristics of Jovian narrow-band kilometric radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Manning, R.; Zarka, P.; Pedersen, B.-M.

    1993-07-01

    New observations of Jovian narrow-band kilometric (nKOM) radio emissions were made by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft during the Ulysses-Jupiter encounter in early February 1992. These observations have demonstrated the unique capability of the URAP instrument for determining both the direction and polarization of nKOM radio sources. An important result is the discovery that nKOM radio emission originates from a number of distinct sources located at different Jovian longitudes and at the inner and outermost regions of the Io plasma torus. These sources have been tracked for several Jovian rotations, yielding their corotational lags, their spatial and temporal evolution, and their radiation characteristics at both low latitudes far from Jupiter and at high latitudes near the planet. Both right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized nKOM sources were observed. The polarizations observed for sources in the outermost regions of the torus seem to favor extraordinary mode emission.

  6. Effect of a heated patch of auroral ionosphere on VLF-radio wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, R.; Rietveld, M. T.; Kopka, H.; Stubbe, P.

    1984-06-01

    In the early 1960s, during the period of atmospheric nuclear tests, much theoretical interest developed in the effects of localized ionospheric depressions on the propagation of very low frequency (VLF) radio waves1-4. Similar VLF-propagation effects are also produced by the localized dumping of electrons from the radiation belts after wave-particle interactions5,6. Both nuclear explosions and particle precipitation events are of a transient nature, however, and no experimental study has yet been made to confirm these early theoretical predictions. With the development of a unique high frequency (HF) heating facility near Troms, Norway, the generation of movable controlled anomalies in the D-region has become possible. We describe here some initial observations, made in Norway, of the effect of such a movable D-region anomaly on the VLF signals received from the 12.1-kHz Omega transmitter at Aldra. The observations confirm the validity of earlier theoretical predictions.

  7. The Relation between Type II Radio Bursts and Large-scale Coronal Propagating Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Nariaki

    2014-06-01

    Both type II radio bursts and chromospheric Moreton-Ramsey waves are believed to signify shock waves that propagate in the solar corona. Large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs), which are also called EIT waves, EUV waves or coronal bright fronts in the literature, were initially thought to be coronal counterparts of Moreton-Ramsey waves, and thus they were expected to be correlated with type II bursts. At present, the prevailing view seems to be that both type II bursts and LCPFs are more closely linked with CMEs than with flares. Here we revisit the relation between type II bursts and LCPFs, by examining radio dynamic spectra (180-25 MHz) as obtained by USAF/RSTN and analyzing EUV and white-light data from SDO and STEREO. In the sample of about 140 type II bursts and LCPFs between April 2010 and January 2013, we find the correlation of 50-60 %. Type II bursts could be associated with eruptions without significant lateral expansion, and fast LCPFs could show no presence in the metric radio spectral range. Using data from STEREO COR-1 that observed the CME as a limb event, in 42 cases we directly measure the height of the CME at the onset of the type II burst. As expected, the height tends to be lower when the type II burst starts at a higher frequency. It is found that those type II bursts that start at higher altitudes and lower frequencies tend to have weaker EUV fronts. This may indicate multiple ways of how LCPFs and type II bursts are related with CMEs.

  8. Stochastic relation between anomalous propagation in the line-of-sight VHF radio band and occurrences of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, K.; Haga, N.

    2013-11-01

    This paper was intended to find out any relation between anomalous line-of-sight propagation on the VHF band and occurrences of earthquakes near the VHF propagation paths. The television and FM radio broadcasting waves on the VHF band were monitored continuously over the long term. For that purpose, a multidirectional VHF band monitoring system was established and utilized. Anomalous line-of-sight propagation on the VHF band was distinguished from the monitored wave by using a statistical analysis. After the stochastic consideration, it was found out that earthquakes associated with anomalous propagation were characterized by magnitude of earthquakes M ? 4.5, and distances from epicenters L ? 75 km. The anomalous propagation was monitored on the VHF band a few days earlier the associated earthquakes occurred. Moreover, the anomaly appeared on multidirectional propagation paths simultaneously. The anomaly on the line-of-sight propagation indicates possibility of narrow focusing the area of epicenter of earthquake.

  9. Stochastic relation between anomalous propagation in the line-of-sight VHF radio band and occurrences of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, K.; Haga, N.

    2014-08-01

    This paper was intended to find out any relation between anomalous line-of-sight propagation on the very high frequency (VHF) band and occurrences of earthquakes near the VHF propagation paths. The television and FM radio broadcasting waves on the VHF band were monitored continuously over the long term. For that purpose, a multidirectional VHF band monitoring system was established and utilized. Anomalous line-of-sight propagation on the VHF band was distinguished from the monitored wave by using a statistical analysis. After the stochastic consideration, it was found out that earthquakes associated with anomalous propagation were characterized by magnitude of earthquakes M ? 4.5, and distances from epicenters L ? 75 km. The anomalous propagation was monitored on the VHF band a few days before the associated earthquakes occurred. Moreover, the anomaly appeared on multidirectional propagation paths simultaneously. The anomaly on the line-of-sight propagation indicates the possibility of narrowly focusing the area of the epicenter of earthquake.

  10. Propagation characteristics of multilayered subwavelength gratings composed of metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isdio de Lima, Joaquim Jnior; Caetano da Silva, Juarez; Rodriguez-Esquerre, Vitaly Felix

    2015-03-01

    The absorption and reflection characteristics of multilayered nanoplasmonic gratings with sub wavelength sizes are analyzed in details by using an efficient finite element method. The multilayered structures are composed by several layers of nanoparticles of metals such as Silver, Gold and Aluminum embedded in dielectric such as amorphous silicon over a metallic substrate. The propagations characteristics for several geometrical configurations are obtained and a broadband reflection or absorption covering the near infrared wavelengths has been observed. The proposed nanoplasmonic structures have a great potential for applications in photovoltaic cells or polarizers by improving their reflection or absorption efficiency. Peaks of reflection or absorption larger than 80% were obtained and their performance over the near infrared can be improved by adequately tuning their geometrical parameters, the refractive index and thickness of the layers as well as the nanoparticles shape and size.

  11. Characteristics of diving in radio-marked Xantus's Murrelets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, C.D.; Golightly, R.T.; Takekawa, J.Y.

    2005-01-01

    We monitored diving activity of radio-marked Xantus's Murrelets Synthliboramphus hypoleucus near Anacapa Island, California, during the breeding season. Thirteen radio-marked murrelets were remotely monitored from Anacapa Island with a handheld antenna and radio receiver for 29 hours in three sample periods in April and May 2003. Mean dive durations in the sample periods were 18 s ?? 2 s, 28 s ?? 2 s, and 24 s ?? 4 s, suggesting that dives were less than 21 m from the surface. Dive duration and subsequent time on the surface differed between the sample periods. Dive duration and subsequent time on the surface were not correlated in observations stratified by individual bird or by sample period. Further, dive duration and subsequent time on the surface were not correlated within foraging bouts. Dive characteristics measured near Anacapa Island suggested that Xantus's Murrelets have the ability to capture prey found at varying depths, but will feed on prey that is most available near the surface of the water.

  12. Scalable Parallel Execution of an Event-based Radio Signal Propagation Model for Cluttered 3D Terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Sudip K; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2009-01-01

    Radio signal strength estimation is essential in many applications, including the design of military radio communications and industrial wireless installations. While classical approaches such as finite difference methods are well-known, new event-based models of radio signal propagation have been recently shown to deliver such estimates faster (via serial execution) than other methods. For scenarios with large or richly-featured geographical volumes, however, parallel processing is required to meet the memory and computation time demands. Here, we present a scalable and efficient parallel execution of a recently-developed event-based radio signal propagation model. We demonstrate its scalability to thousands of processors, with parallel speedups over 1000x. The speed and scale achieved by our parallel execution enable larger scenarios and faster execution than has ever been reported before.

  13. HF Radio Wave Propagation in the Ionosphere Observed with the ePOP RRI (Radio Receiver Instrument) -- SuperDARN Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, G. C.; Gillies, R. G.; Ridley, C. G.; Yau, A. W.; McWilliams, K. A.; Sofko, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) on the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) scientific payload of the recently launched CSA (Canadian Space Agency) CASSIOPE (Cascade Demonstrator Small-Sat and Ionospheric Polar Explorer) satellite mission and the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) of HF radars have successfully executed a number of experiments since the launch of ePOP in late September, 2013. This presentation investigates the propagation delays and timing associated with HF radio waves transversing the plasma in the terrestrial ionosphere. Both the relative and absolute timing of the co-ordinated SuperDARN-RRI experiments will be presented. This knowledge is essential for interpreting HF radio wave propagation effects such as range accuracy, mode-splitting and timing, Doppler shift, and delayed 'echo' signatures, for example.

  14. Effect of electron-density gradients on propagation of radio waves in the mid-latitude trough. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Citrone, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    Partial contents of this thesis include: (1) Radio-wave propagation and the mid-latitude trough; (2) Ionospheric measurements; (3) Modification of time-dependent ionospheric model output with latitudinal electron-density profiles from digisonde trough depictions; (4) Ray-tracing simulations to examine ground range; and (5) Effects of three-dimensional gradients in electron density on radio-wave propagation in the trough region. Data is tabulated for geophysical conditions, solar activity level, geomagnetic activity level, conditions for vertical ray refraction to surface, and ray-tracing fixed-input conditions.

  15. Low-Frequency Type-II Radio Detections and Coronagraph Data Employed to Describe and Forecast the Propagation of 71 CMEs/Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, H.; Iglesias, F. A.; St. Cyr, O. C.; Xie, H.; Kaiser, M. L.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by improving predictions of arrival times at Earth of shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we have analyzed 71 Earth-directed events in different stages of their propagation. The study is primarily based on approximated locations of interplanetary (IP) shocks derived from Type-II radio emissions detected by the Wind/WAVES experiment during 1997 - 2007. Distance-time diagrams resulting from the combination of white-light corona, IP Type-II radio, and in-situ data lead to the formulation of descriptive profiles of each CME's journey toward Earth. Furthermore, two different methods for tracking and predicting the location of CME-driven IP shocks are presented. The linear method, solely based on Wind/WAVES data, arises after key modifications to a pre-existing technique that linearly projects the drifting low-frequency Type-II emissions to 1 AU. This upgraded method improves forecasts of shock-arrival times by almost 50 %. The second predictive method is proposed on the basis of information derived from the descriptive profiles and relies on a single CME height-time point and on low-frequency Type-II radio emissions to obtain an approximate value of the shock arrival time at Earth. In addition, we discuss results on CME-radio emission associations, characteristics of IP propagation, and the relative success of the forecasting methods.

  16. The coherer: with simple demonstrations of the generation, propagation and detection of radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Allan

    2010-03-01

    A coherer is a bistable device based on metal filings loosely confined between solid metal electrodes. This granular material normally exhibits a very high electrical resistance (tens of kilohms), but passage of the high-frequency current generated by reception of a radio signal causes it to 'cohere' into a comparatively low resistance condition (tens of ohms). This state persists until the device is mechanically disturbed, whereupon the high resistance state is restored. This characteristic was employed by scientists in the 1890s to detect radio waves, and applied commercially by Marconi in his 'wireless' telegraph. It is easy to make a working coherer and directions are given for operating it from a distance with a spark transmitter based on a piezoelectric gas igniter. Incorporation of an 'aerial' and 'earth' enable a range of 7 m to be achieved and simple signals may be transmitted.

  17. Measurements on wave propagation characteristics of spiraling electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, A.; Getty, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of cyclotron-harmonic waves propagating on a neutralized spiraling electron beam immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field are studied experimentally. The experimental setup consisted of a vacuum system, an electron-gun corkscrew assembly which produces a 110-eV beam with the desired delta-function velocity distribution, a measurement region where a microwave signal is injected onto the beam to measure wavelengths, and a velocity analyzer for measuring the axial electron velocity. Results of wavelength measurements made at beam currents of 0.15, 1.0, and 2.0 mA are compared with calculated values, and undesirable effects produced by increasing the beam current are discussed. It is concluded that a suitable electron beam for studies of cyclotron-harmonic waves can be generated by the corkscrew device.

  18. Spectral characteristics of lightning dart leader propagating in long path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Jianyong; Yuan, Ping; Xue, Simin; Wang, Xuejuan

    2015-10-01

    Cloud-to-ground lightning with six return strokes has been recorded with high-speed slitless spectrograph at a recording rate of 9110 frames per second. The dart leaders propagate along the same channel which consists of a long horizontal path and a vertical path, and its speed at the horizontal path is faster than that at the vertical path. The first-order spectrum of dart leader is recorded with an exposure time of 110 ?s. The wavelength observed in dart leader spectrum is firstly extended to near infrared range. The spectral characteristics indicate that all the emission lines in the 400-700 nm range are radiated from singly ionized nitrogen except the H? line at 656.3 nm, and in the range of 700-1000 nm the emission lines are radiated from neutral nitrogen and oxygen.

  19. Finite-difference time-domain modelling of through-the-Earth radio signal propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralchenko, M.; Svilans, M.; Samson, C.; Roper, M.

    2015-12-01

    This research seeks to extend the knowledge of how a very low frequency (VLF) through-the-Earth (TTE) radio signal behaves as it propagates underground, by calculating and visualizing the strength of the electric and magnetic fields for an arbitrary geology through numeric modelling. To achieve this objective, a new software tool has been developed using the finite-difference time-domain method. This technique is particularly well suited to visualizing the distribution of electromagnetic fields in an arbitrary geology. The frequency range of TTE radio (400-9000 Hz) and geometrical scales involved (1 m resolution for domains a few hundred metres in size) involves processing a grid composed of millions of cells for thousands of time steps, which is computationally expensive. Graphics processing unit acceleration was used to reduce execution time from days and weeks, to minutes and hours. Results from the new modelling tool were compared to three cases for which an analytic solution is known. Two more case studies were done featuring complex geologic environments relevant to TTE communications that cannot be solved analytically. There was good agreement between numeric and analytic results. Deviations were likely caused by numeric artifacts from the model boundaries; however, in a TTE application in field conditions, the uncertainty in the conductivity of the various geologic formations will greatly outweigh these small numeric errors.

  20. Utilizing a TDRS satellite for direct broadcast satellite-radio propagation experiments and demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA/VOA Direct Broadcast Satellite-Radio (DBS-R) Program will be using a NASA Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) satellite at 62 deg. West longitude to conduct live satellite S-band propagation experiments and demonstrations of satellite sound broadcasting over the next two years (1993-1994). The NASA/VOA DBS-R program has applied intensive effort to garner domestic and international support for the DBS-R concept. An S-band DBS-R allocation was achieved for Region 2 at WARC-92 held in Spain. With this allocation, the DBS-R program now needs to conduct S-band propagation experiments and systems demonstrations that will assist in the development of planning approaches for the use of Broadcast Satellite Service (Sound) frequency bands prior to the planning conference called for by WARC-92. These activities will also support receiver concept development applied to qualities ranging from AM to Monophonic FM, Stereophonic FM, Monophonic CD, and Stereophonic CD quality.

  1. Study of Temperature Wave Propagation in Superfluid Helium Focusing on Radio-Frequency Cavity Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koettig, T.; Peters, B. J.; Avellino, S.; Junginger, T.; Bremer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OSTs) can be used to localize quenches of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Local hot spots at the cavity surface initiate temperature waves in the surrounding superfluid helium that acts as cooling fluid at typical temperatures in the range of 1.6 K to 2 K. The temperature wave is characterised by the properties of superfluid helium such as the second sound velocity. For high heat load densities second sound velocities greater than the standard literature values are observed. This fast propagation has been verified in dedicated small scale experiments. Resistors were used to simulate the quench spots under controlled conditions. The three dimensional propagation of second sound is linked to OST signals. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the OST signal especially the incident angle dependency. The characterised OSTs are used as a tool for quench localisation on a real size cavity. Their sensitivity as well as the time resolution was proven to be superior to temperature sensors glued to the surface of the cavity.

  2. Long-term integrated radiophysical studies of the ionosphere, near space, and the propagation of radio waves from space objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misyura, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    The radiophysical studies reported consist of direct measurements of certain effects induced in the propagation of radio waves from space objects. From measured effects and from data on the motion and position of space objects, physical parameters of the medium and bodies are determined.

  3. Antenna Construction & Propagation of Radio Waves, 5-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps, Washington, DC.

    These military-developed curriculum materials consist of five individualized, self-paced chapters dealing with antenna construction and propagation of radio waves. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: basic electricity; antenna transmission-line fundamentals; quarter-wave antennas, half-wave antennas, and associated radio…

  4. Ionosphere-magnetosphere studies using ground based VLF radio propagation technique: an Indian example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Subhas

    Since IGY period (1957-58), natural and artificially produced Very Low Frequency (VLF) elec-tromagnetic radiations are being recorded at large number of ground stations all over the world and on-board satellites to study various radio wave-thermal/energetic plasma interactive pro-cesses related to earth's ionosphere-plasmasphere-magnetosphere environment. The terrestrial propagation of these VLF radio waves are primarily enabled through the earth ionosphere wave guide (EIWG) mode to long horizontal distances around the globe and ducted along the ge-omagnetic field lines into the conjugate hemisphere through the plasmasphere-magnetosphere regions. The time frequency spectra of the received signals indicate presence of dispersion (wave/group velocities changing with frequency) and various cut-off frequencies based on the width of the EIWG, electron gyro and plasma frequencies etc., providing several types of received signals like whistlers, chorus, tweeks, hiss and hisslers which can be heard on loud-speakers/earphones with distinguishing audio structures. While the VLF technique has been a very effective tool for studying middle and high latitude phenomena, the importance of the similar and anomalous observations over the Indian low latitude stations provide potentially new challenges for their scientific interpretation and modelling. The ducted and non-ducted magnetospheric propagation, pro-longitudinal (PL) mode, low latitude TRIMPI/TLE (Tran-sient Luminous Emissions) or other effects of wave-particle/wave-wave interactions, effects due to ionospheric irregularities and electric fields, full wave solutions to D-region ionisation per-turbations due to solar and stellar energetic X-and γ ray emissions during normal and flaring conditions are a few problems which have been addressed in these low latitude studies over India. Since the conjugate points of Indian stations lie over the Indian oceanic region, the VLF propagation effects would be relatively free from sferics at least in some seasons providing a noise free environment for observing rare and new phenomena requiring better SNR to detect such changes, The VLF signals from the active seismic zones or other electro-geological sources would require high sensitivities of the system and suitable network of transmitting and receiv-ing stations designed for targeted data and applications. Some new results over Indian and other regions show evidences of earthquake related seismo-geological VLF emissions with the potential of being used as a prognostic tool, change in ozone and ion production in the night time middle atmosphere due to transit of stellar x-ray/γ ray sources. Results obtained on whistlers and related studies from a number of Indian stations covering geomagnetic latitude range between 13-24 N will be mentioned and reviewed in the background of theoretical understanding of the lightning return stroke signal elements, VLF propagation through cold plasma, ionospheric wave guide mode, electron precipitation due to cyclotron resonance and production of atomic oxygen O (3 P) and ionisation in the mesosphere due to solar/stellar UV/X/γrays. Use of future VLF techniques in terms of improving ground based observations, critical analysis of available satellite data in the context and real time moni-toring/modelling of earth's geosphere and space weather conditions will be considered for a possible programme of a developing country.

  5. The Relation Between Large-Scale Coronal Propagating Fronts and Type 2 Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Liu, Wei; Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale, wave-like disturbances in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and type II radio bursts are often associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Both phenomena may signify shock waves driven by CMEs. Taking EUV full-disk images at an unprecedented cadence, the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has observed the so-called EIT waves or large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs) from their early evolution, which coincides with the period when most metric type II bursts occur. This article discusses the relation of LCPFs as captured by AIA with metric type II bursts. We show examples of type II bursts without a clear LCPF and fast LCPFs without a type II burst. Part of the disconnect between the two phenomena may be due to the difficulty in identifying them objectively. Furthermore, it is possible that the individual LCPFs and type II bursts may reflect different physical processes and external factors. In particular, the type II bursts that start at low frequencies and high altitudes tend to accompany an extended arc-shaped feature, which probably represents the 3D structure of the CME and the shock wave around it, and not just its near-surface track, which has usually been identified with EIT waves. This feature expands and propagates toward and beyond the limb. These events may be characterized by stretching of field lines in the radial direction and may be distinct from other LCPFs, which may be explained in terms of sudden lateral expansion of the coronal volume. Neither LCPFs nor type II bursts by themselves serve as necessary conditions for coronal shock waves, but these phenomena may provide useful information on the early evolution of the shock waves in 3D when both are clearly identified in eruptive events.

  6. Experimental simulation of beam propagation over long path lengths using radio-frequency and magnetic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, H.; Endo, M.; Fukushima, K.; Higaki, H.; Ito, K.; Moriya, K.; Yamaguchi, S.; Lund, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    An overview is given of the novel beam-dynamics experiments based on compact non-neutral plasma traps at Hiroshima University. We have designed and constructed two different classes of trap systems, one of which uses a radio-frequency electric field (Paul trap) and the other uses an axial magnetic field (Penning trap) for transverse plasma confinement. These systems are called "S-POD" (Simulator for Particle Orbit Dynamics). The S-POD systems can approximately reproduce the collective motion of a charged-particle beam propagating through long alternating-gradient (AG) quadrupole focusing channels using the Paul trap and long continuous focusing channels using the Penning trap. This allows us to study various beam-dynamics issues in compact and inexpensive experiments without relying on large-scale accelerators. So far, the linear Paul traps have been applied for the study of resonance-related issues including coherent-resonance-induced stop bands and their dependence on AG lattice structures, resonance crossing in fixed-field AG accelerators, ultralow-emittance beam stability, etc. The Penning trap with multi-ring electrodes has been employed primarily for the study of beam halo formation driven by initial distribution perturbations. In this paper, we briefly overview the S-POD systems, and then summarize recent experimental results on resonance effects and halo formation.

  7. Tracker: A three-dimensional raytracing program for ionospheric radio propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; DeLapp, D.; Sutherland, C.D.; Farrer, R.G.

    1994-12-01

    TRACKER is an extension of a three-dimensional Hamiltonian raytrace code developed some thirty years ago by R. Michael Jones. Subsequent modifications to this code, which is commonly called the {open_quotes}Jones Code,{close_quotes} were documented by Jones and Stephensen (1975). TRACKER incorporates an interactive user`s interface, modern differential equation integrators, graphical outputs, homing algorithms, and the Ionospheric Conductivity and Electron Density (ICED) ionosphere. TRACKER predicts the three-dimensional paths of radio waves through model ionospheres by numerically integrating Hamilton`s equations, which are a differential expression of Fermat`s principle of least time. By using continuous models, the Hamiltonian method avoids false caustics and discontinuous raypath properties often encountered in other raytracing methods. In addition to computing the raypath, TRACKER also calculates the group path (or pulse travel time), the phase path, the geometrical (or {open_quotes}real{close_quotes}) pathlength, and the Doppler shift (if the time variation of the ionosphere is explicitly included). Computational speed can be traded for accuracy by specifying the maximum allowable integration error per step in the integration. Only geometrical optics are included in the main raytrace code; no partial reflections or diffraction effects are taken into account. In addition, TRACKER does not lend itself to statistical descriptions of propagation -- it requires a deterministic model of the ionosphere.

  8. Medium frequency propagation characteristics of different transmission lines in an underground coal mine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingcheng; Waynert, Joseph A.; Whisner, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    A medium frequency (MF) communication system operating in an underground coal mine couples its signals to a long conductor, which acts as an MF transmission line (TL) in a tunnel to permit communications among transceivers along the line. The TL is generally the longest signal path for the system, and its propagation characteristics will have a major impact on the performance of the MF communication system. In this study, the propagation characteristics of three types of MF TLs in two layouts—on the roof and on the floor of a coal mine tunnel—were obtained in an effort to understand the propagation characteristics of different TLs in different locations. The study confirmed a low MF signal loss on all of these TLs. The study also found that the TLs in different layouts had substantially different propagation characteristics. The propagation characteristics of these different TLs in different layouts are presented in the paper. PMID:26203349

  9. A novel idea of purposefully affecting radio wave propagation by coherent acoustic source-induced atmospheric refractivity fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shuhong; Yan, Daopu; Wang, Xuan

    2015-10-01

    The mechanism generating the array-distributed atmospheric refractivity fluctuation by a coherent acoustic source is analyzed. The theoretical model is established, which is used to quantifiably analyze the array structure of the artificial dielectric irregularities. It is qualitatively validated that the array-distributed artificial dielectric irregularities really exist and that the array structure of the artificial dielectric irregularities and the scattering effect of the artificial dielectric irregularities on a radio wave can be controlled by adjusting and selecting the optimized parameters of the transmitted acoustic wave and the adopted acoustic antenna array. It can be concluded that the array-distributed artificial dielectric irregularities can be used to purposefully affect radio wave propagation. After radio acoustic sounding system, the idea of this paper is a novel development in the field of the tropospheric atmospheric refractivity artificial abnormality technique and its applications.

  10. Turbulent Flame Propagation Characteristics of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Seitzman, Jerry; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2014-09-30

    This final report describes the results of an effort to better understand turbulent flame propagation, especially at conditions relevant to gas turbines employing fuels with syngas or hydrogen mixtures. Turbulent flame speeds were measured for a variety of hydrogen/carbon monoxide (H2/CO) and hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) fuel mixtures with air as the oxidizer. The measurements include global consumption speeds (ST,GC) acquired in a turbulent jet flame at pressures of 1-10 atm and local displacement speeds (ST,LD) acquired in a low-swirl burner at atmospheric pressure. The results verify the importance of fuel composition in determining turbulent flame speeds. For example, different fuel-air mixtures having the same unstretched laminar flame speed (SL,0) but different fuel compositions resulted in significantly different ST,GC for the same turbulence levels (u'). This demonstrates the weakness of turbulent flame speed correlations based simply on u'/SL,0. The results were analyzed using a steady-steady leading points concept to explain the sensitivity of turbulent burning rates to fuel (and oxidizer) composition. Leading point theories suggest that the premixed turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at the flame brush leading edge, or, in other words, by the flamelets that advance farthest into the unburned mixture (the so-called leading points). For negative Markstein length mixtures, this is assumed to be close to the maximum stretched laminar flame speed (SL,max) for the given fuel-oxidizer mixture. For the ST,GC measurements, the data at a given pressure were well-correlated with an SL,max scaling. However the variation with pressure was not captured, which may be due to non-quasi-steady effects that are not included in the current model. For the ST,LD data, the leading points model again faithfully captured the variation of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of fuel-compositions and turbulence intensities. These results provide evidence that the leading points model can provide useful predictions of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of operating conditions and flow geometries.

  11. Radio Frequency Characteristics of Printed Meander Inductors and Interdigital Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllymaki, Sami; Teirikangas, Merja; Nelo, Mikko; Tulppo, Joel; Soboci?ski, Maciej; Juuti, Jari; Jantunen, Heli; Sloma, Marcin; Jakubowska, Malgorzata

    2013-05-01

    Radio frequency (RF) characterizations of printed silver ink inductors manufactured at low (150 C) and high (850 C) temperatures and interdigital capacitors manufactured at high (850 C) temperatures were carried out in the 500 MHz to 6 GHz range. The S-parameter responses of the components were measured with a probe station and an Agilent 8510C network analyzer. Electrical parameters such as inductance, capacitance, and a quality factor were estimated from experimental results and numerical calculation. Component parameters are dependent on physical dimensions and material properties. The components were created in a 4 4 mm2 area with line widths/gaps of 500/500, 250/250, and 200/200 m. Windings in the coils varied from 2 to 5 turns and finger counts in the capacitors, from 5 to 11 within the defined area and line widths. As a result, low-T-cured (150 C) silver ink meander line inductors achieved 8 to 18 nH inductances at 1 and 2 GHz with a quality value of 10-25. High-T-cured (850 C) silver ink meander line inductors had 6-15 nH inductances and quality values were around 100, indicating a conductivity challenge with low-T-cured inks. Interdigital capacitors with 1 to 4 pF capacitances and sufficient quality values were created. A low-loss BaTiO3 coating was printed over the interdigital capacitors; they exhibited suitable electrical characteristics to allow decreasing the physical size of the component.

  12. Guided radio-wave propagation in the equatorial ionosphere according to the topside sounding onboard Interkosmos-19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpachev, A. T.; Zhbankov, G. A.; Kuleshova, V. P.; Telegin, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to normal vertical-incident ionogram traces, strongly remote (up to 2000 km) traces of HF-radio-signal reflections observed on topside-sounder ionograms of the Interkosmos-19 satellite obtained in the equatorial ionosphere are presented. Such traces are connected with waveguides (ducts). These waveguides are field-aligned irregularities of the ionospheric plasma with electron density depletions of a few percent and cross-field dimension of a few to several kilometers. Ray tracing confirms this supposition and allows an estimate of typical waveguide parameters: diameter ≤10-15 km and amplitude |ΔN/N|≥10%, where N is the electron density. The waveguide traces usually start at the cutoff frequencies of the main traces. However, sometimes they begin at much lower frequencies which indicates the satellite was transitioning through an equatorial plasma bubble during the recording of the ionogram. The X-mode of ducted echoes is more distinct then the O-mode. Only one ducted trace is usually observed on the Interkosmos-19 ionograms; a second conjugate trace is rarely recorded. The same is true for combination modes which is a combination of an oblique-incidence and guided propagation. Waveguides are observed at all heights of Interkosmos-19 (500-1000 km) inside the equatorial anomaly region (from -40° to +40° Dip). Waveguides are usually associated with other irregularities of various sizes in the equatorial ionosphere, some of which cause additional traces and spread F on the topside-sounding ionograms. Ducted-echo characteristics observed with Interkosmos-19 are different from those observed earlier with the Alouette and ISIS satellites. This difference is discussed. It is shown that the ionospheric plasma irregularities responsible for the waveguides are observed much more often during nighttime than during daytime.

  13. Review of propagation characteristics and prediction for satellite links at frequencies of 10-40 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. G.; Lane, J. A.

    1986-07-01

    The paper is intended to provide a short review on earth-space propagation, concentrating on developments dating primarily from about 1982. The review is orientated towards the needs of radio services, specifically the fixed satellite, broadcasting satellite and mobile satellite services, and draws substantially on the work of the International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR). The prediction methods on slant path attenuation and interference, including ducting, tropospheric scatter and unwanted crosspolar coupling, are treated in a general way. However, particular emphasis is placed on application to systems within Europe.

  14. Type 2 solar radio events observed in the interplanetary medium. Part 1: General characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.; Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.

    1980-01-01

    Twelve type 2 solar radio events were observed in the 2 MHz to 30 kHz frequency range by the radio astronomy experiment on the ISEE-3 satellite over the period from September 1978 to December 1979. These data provide the most comprehensive sample of type 2 radio bursts observed at kilometer wavelengths. Dynamic spectra of a number of events are presented. Where possible, the 12 events were associated with an initiating flare, ground based radio data, the passage of a shock at the spacecraft, and the sudden commencement of a geomagnetic storm. The general characteristics of kilometric type 2 bursts are discussed.

  15. RADIO BURSTS WITH EXTRAGALACTIC SPECTRAL CHARACTERISTICS SHOW TERRESTRIAL ORIGINS

    SciTech Connect

    Burke-Spolaor, S.; Bailes, Matthew; Ekers, Ronald; Macquart, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-20

    Three years ago, the report of a solitary radio burst was thought to be the first discovery of a rare, impulsive event of unknown extragalactic origin. The extragalactic interpretation was based on the swept-frequency nature of the event, which followed the dispersive delay expected from an extragalactic pulse. We report here on the detection of 16 pulses, the bulk of which exhibit a frequency sweep with a shape and magnitude resembling the Lorimer Burst. These new events were detected in a sidelobe of the Parkes Telescope and are of clearly terrestrial origin, with properties unlike any known sources of terrestrial broadband radio emission. The new detections cast doubt on the extragalactic interpretation of the original burst, and call for further sophistication in radio-pulse survey techniques to identify the origin of the anomalous terrestrial signals and definitively distinguish future extragalactic pulse detections from local signals. The ambiguous origin of these seemingly dispersed, swept-frequency signals suggests that radio-pulse searches using multiple detectors will be the only experiments able to provide definitive information about the origin of new swept-frequency radio burst detections.

  16. Dynamic characteristic of intense short microwave propagation in an atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, J.H.; Alvarez, R.A.; Mayhall, D.J.; Madsen, N.K.; Cabayan, H.S.

    1983-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of an intense microwave pulse which propagates through the atmosphere will be presented. Our theoretical results are obtained by solving Maxwell's equations, together with the electron fluid equations. Our calculations show that although large portions of the initial energy are absorbed by the electrons that are created through the avalanche process, a significant amount of energy is still able to reach the earth's surface. The amount of energy that reaches the earth's surface as a function of initial energy and wave shape after having propagated through 100 km in the atmosphere are investigated. Results for the air breakdown threshold intensity as a function of the pressure for different pulse widths and different frequencies will also be presented. In addition, we will present a comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results for the pulse shape of a short microwave pulse after it has traveled through a rectangular wave guide which contains a section of air. 23 references, 9 figures.

  17. A propagation method with adaptive mesh grid based on wave characteristics for wave optics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qiuyan; Wang, Jing; Lv, Pin; Sun, Quan

    2015-10-01

    Propagation simulation method and choosing mesh grid are both very important to get the correct propagation results in wave optics simulation. A new angular spectrum propagation method with alterable mesh grid based on the traditional angular spectrum method and the direct FFT method is introduced. With this method, the sampling space after propagation is not limited to propagation methods no more, but freely alterable. However, choosing mesh grid on target board influences the validity of simulation results directly. So an adaptive mesh choosing method based on wave characteristics is proposed with the introduced propagation method. We can calculate appropriate mesh grids on target board to get satisfying results. And for complex initial wave field or propagation through inhomogeneous media, we can also calculate and set the mesh grid rationally according to above method. Finally, though comparing with theoretical results, it's shown that the simulation result with the proposed method coinciding with theory. And by comparing with the traditional angular spectrum method and the direct FFT method, it's known that the proposed method is able to adapt to a wider range of Fresnel number conditions. That is to say, the method can simulate propagation results efficiently and correctly with propagation distance of almost zero to infinity. So it can provide better support for more wave propagation applications such as atmospheric optics, laser propagation and so on.

  18. Authentication of Radio Frequency Identification Devices Using Electronic Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinnappa Gounder Periaswamy, Senthilkumar

    2010-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) tags are low-cost devices that are used to uniquely identify the objects to which they are attached. Due to the low cost and size that is driving the technology, a tag has limited computational capabilities and resources. This limitation makes the implementation of conventional security protocols to prevent…

  19. Authentication of Radio Frequency Identification Devices Using Electronic Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinnappa Gounder Periaswamy, Senthilkumar

    2010-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) tags are low-cost devices that are used to uniquely identify the objects to which they are attached. Due to the low cost and size that is driving the technology, a tag has limited computational capabilities and resources. This limitation makes the implementation of conventional security protocols to prevent

  20. Automated Classification of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Gastric Slow Wave Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Gao, Jerry; Du, Peng; O'Grady, Gregory; Cheng, Leo K.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric contractions are underpinned by an electrical event called slow wave activity. High-resolution electrical mapping has recently been adapted to study gastric slow waves at a high spatiotemporal detail. As more slow wave data becomes available, it is becoming evident that the spatial organization of slow wave plays a key role in the initiation and maintenance of gastric dsyrhythmias in major gastric motility disorders. All of the existing slow wave signal processing techniques deal with the identification and partitioning of recorded wave events, but not the analysis of the slow wave spatial organization, which is currently performed visually. This manual analysis is time consuming and is prone to observer bias and error. We present an automated approach to classify spatial slow wave propagation patterns via the use of Pearson cross correlations. Slow wave propagations were grouped into classes based on their similarity to each other. The method was applied to high-resolution gastric slow wave recordings from four pigs. There were significant changes in the velocity of the gastric slow wave wavefront and the amplitude of the slow wave event when there was a change in direction to the slow wave wavefront during dsyrhythmias, which could be detected with the automated approach. PMID:24111441

  1. Characteristics of Radio-Frequency Circuits Utilizing Ferroelectric Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Michael; Gui, Xiao; MacLeod, Todd; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    Ferroelectric capacitors, most commonly used in memory circuits and variable components, were studied in simple analog radio-frequency circuits such as the RLC resonator and Colpitts oscillator. The goal was to characterize the RF circuits in terms of frequency of oscillation, gain, etc, using ferroelectric capacitors. Frequencies of oscillation of both circuits were measured and studied a more accurate resonant frequency can be obtained using the ferroelectric capacitors. Many experiments were conducted and data collected. A model to simulate the experimental results will be developed. Discrepancies in gain and frequency in these RF circuits when conventional capacitors are replaced with ferroelectric ones were studied. These results will enable circuit designers to anticipate the effects of using ferroelectric components in their radio- frequency applications.

  2. Characteristics of lightning leader propagation and ground attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rubin; Qie, Xiushu; Wang, Zhichao; Zhang, Hongbo; Lu, Gaopeng; Sun, Zhuling; Liu, Mingyuan; Li, Xun

    2015-12-01

    The grounding process and the associated leader behavior were analyzed by using high-speed video record and time-correlated electric field change for 37 natural negative cloud-to-ground flashes. Weak luminous grounded channel was recognized below the downward leader tip in the frame preceding the return stroke, which is inferred as upward connecting leader considering the physical process of lightning attachment, though not directly confirmed by sequential frames. For stepped leader-first return strokes, the upward connecting leaders tend to be induced by those downward leader branches with brighter luminosity and lower channel tip above ground, and they may accomplish the attachment with great possibility. The upward connecting leaders for 2 out of 61 leader-subsequent stroke sequences were captured in the frame prior to the return stroke, exhibiting relatively long channel lengths of 340 m and 105 m, respectively. The inducing downward subsequent leaders were of the chaotic type characterized by irregular electric field pulse train with duration of 0.2-0.3 ms. The transient drop of the high potential difference between stepped leader system and ground when the attachment occurred would macroscopically terminate the propagation of those ungrounded branches while would not effectively prevent the development of the existing space stem systems in the low-conductivity streamer zone apart from the leader tip. When the ungrounded branches are of poor connection with the main stroke channel, their further propagation toward ground would be feasible. These two factors may contribute to the occurrence of multiple grounding within the same leader-return stroke sequence.

  3. End-to-End Network Simulation Using a Site-Specific Radio Wave Propagation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Nutaro, James J

    2013-01-01

    The performance of systems that rely on a wireless network depends on the propagation environment in which that network operates. To predict how these systems and their supporting networks will perform, simulations must take into consideration the propagation environment and how this effects the performance of the wireless network. Network simulators typically use empirical models of the propagation environment. However, these models are not intended for, and cannot be used, to predict a wireless system will perform in a specific location, e.g., in the center of a particular city or the interior of a specific manufacturing facility. In this paper, we demonstrate how a site-specific propagation model and the NS3 simulator can be used to predict the end-to-end performance of a wireless network.

  4. [Monitoring of Crack Propagation in Repaired Structures Based on Characteristics of FBG Sensors Reflecting Spectra].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shen-fang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Lei; Huang, Hong-mei

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the security of aircraft repaired structures, a method of crack propagation monitoring in repaired structures is put forward basing on characteristics of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) reflecting spectra in this article. With the cyclic loading effecting on repaired structure, cracks propagate, while non-uniform strain field appears nearby the tip of crack which leads to the FBG sensors' reflecting spectra deformations. The crack propagating can be monitored by extracting the characteristics of FBG sensors' reflecting spectral deformations. A finite element model (FEM) of the specimen is established. Meanwhile, the distributions of strains which are under the action of cracks of different angles and lengths are obtained. The characteristics, such as main peak wavelength shift, area of reflecting spectra, second and third peak value and so on, are extracted from the FBGs' reflecting spectral which are calculated by transfer matrix algorithm. An artificial neural network is built to act as the model between the characteristics of the reflecting spectral and the propagation of crack. As a result, the crack propagation of repaired structures is monitored accurately and the error of crack length is less than 0.5 mm, the error of crack angle is less than 5 degree. The accurately monitoring problem of crack propagation of repaired structures is solved by taking use of this method. It has important significance in aircrafts safety improvement and maintenance cost reducing. PMID:26117887

  5. Analysis of Radio Wave Propagation for ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks in Inhomogeneous Vegetation Environments

    PubMed Central

    Azpilicueta, Leire; López-Iturri, Peio; Aguirre, Erik; Mateo, Ignacio; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The use of wireless networks has experienced exponential growth due to the improvements in terms of battery life and low consumption of the devices. However, it is compulsory to conduct previous radio propagation analysis when deploying a wireless sensor network. These studies are necessary to perform an estimation of the range coverage, in order to optimize the distance between devices in an actual network deployment. In this work, the radio channel characterization for ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in an inhomogeneous vegetation environment has been analyzed. This analysis allows designing environment monitoring tools based on ZigBee and WiFi where WSN and smartphones cooperate, providing rich and customized monitoring information to users in a friendly manner. The impact of topology as well as morphology of the environment is assessed by means of an in-house developed 3D Ray Launching code, to emulate the realistic operation in the framework of the scenario. Experimental results gathered from a measurement campaign conducted by deploying a ZigBee Wireless Sensor Network, are analyzed and compared with simulations in this paper. The scenario where this network is intended to operate is a combination of buildings and diverse vegetation species. To gain insight in the effects of radio propagation, a simplified vegetation model has been developed, considering the material parameters and simplified geometry embedded in the simulation scenario. An initial location-based application has been implemented in a real scenario, to test the functionality within a context aware scenario. The use of deterministic tools can aid to know the impact of the topological influence in the deployment of the optimal Wireless Sensor Network in terms of capacity, coverage and energy consumption, making the use of these systems attractive for multiple applications in inhomogeneous vegetation environments. PMID:25513820

  6. Analysis of radio wave propagation for ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks in inhomogeneous vegetation environments.

    PubMed

    Azpilicueta, Leire; López-Iturri, Peio; Aguirre, Erik; Mateo, Ignacio; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The use of wireless networks has experienced exponential growth due to the improvements in terms of battery life and low consumption of the devices. However, it is compulsory to conduct previous radio propagation analysis when deploying a wireless sensor network. These studies are necessary to perform an estimation of the range coverage, in order to optimize the distance between devices in an actual network deployment. In this work, the radio channel characterization for ISM 2.4 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in an inhomogeneous vegetation environment has been analyzed. This analysis allows designing environment monitoring tools based on ZigBee and WiFi where WSN and smartphones cooperate, providing rich and customized monitoring information to users in a friendly manner. The impact of topology as well as morphology of the environment is assessed by means of an in-house developed 3D Ray Launching code, to emulate the realistic operation in the framework of the scenario. Experimental results gathered from a measurement campaign conducted by deploying a ZigBee Wireless Sensor Network, are analyzed and compared with simulations in this paper. The scenario where this network is intended to operate is a combination of buildings and diverse vegetation species. To gain insight in the effects of radio propagation, a simplified vegetation model has been developed, considering the material parameters and simplified geometry embedded in the simulation scenario. An initial location-based application has been implemented in a real scenario, to test the functionality within a context aware scenario. The use of deterministic tools can aid to know the impact of the topological influence in the deployment of the optimal Wireless Sensor Network in terms of capacity, coverage and energy consumption, making the use of these systems attractive for multiple applications in inhomogeneous vegetation environments. PMID:25513820

  7. The Coherer: With Simple Demonstrations of the Generation, Propagation and Detection of Radio Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    A coherer is a bistable device based on metal filings loosely confined between solid metal electrodes. This granular material normally exhibits a very high electrical resistance (tens of kilohms), but passage of the high-frequency current generated by reception of a radio signal causes it to "cohere" into a comparatively low resistance condition…

  8. The Coherer: With Simple Demonstrations of the Generation, Propagation and Detection of Radio Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    A coherer is a bistable device based on metal filings loosely confined between solid metal electrodes. This granular material normally exhibits a very high electrical resistance (tens of kilohms), but passage of the high-frequency current generated by reception of a radio signal causes it to "cohere" into a comparatively low resistance condition

  9. Enhanced MUF propagation of HF radio waves in the auroral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Jones, T. B.; Warrington, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Four high frequency propagation paths were monitored from a transmitter located within the polar cap by four receivers located variously within the polar cap and at sub-auroral latitudes. Of these paths, one was contained entirely within the polar cap at all times, two were trans-auroral at all times, and one varied from trans-auroral during the day to polar cap during the night. Fourteen frequencies within the HF band were transmitted each hour for the duration of two 24 day experimental campaigns during the summer of 1988 and the winter of 1989. From an analysis of the received signals the confidence of signal recognition and signal strength were determined. During geomagnetically undisturbed periods the propagation behaviour resembled that of mid-latitude paths. During geomagnetically disturbed times, however, night-time propagation occurred on frequencies up to and sometimes over 10 MHz above the undisturbed night-time MUF, for periods of 2 to 6 h. These features appeared on the trans-auroral paths only and were attributed to E region (and occasionally F region) enhancement by auroral precipitation. APEs (auroral E propagation events) occurred on over 50% of nights. The occurrence of APEs also coincided with ionospheric storm periods when the HF band available for propagation was otherwise significantly narrowed due to a depletion of the F region electron density.

  10. Sparsity-inspired nonparametric probability characterization for radio propagation in body area networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Yang, Shuyuan; Abbasi, Qammer Hussain; Zhang, Zhiya; Ren, Aifeng; Zhao, Wei; Alomainy, Akram

    2015-05-01

    Parametric probability models are common references for channel characterization. However, the limited number of samples and uncertainty of the propagation scenario affect the characterization accuracy of parametric models for body area networks. In this paper, we propose a sparse nonparametric probability model for body area wireless channel characterization. The path loss and root-mean-square delay, which are significant wireless channel parameters, can be learned from this nonparametric model. A comparison with available parametric models shows that the proposed model is very feasible for the body area propagation environment and can be seen as a significant supplement to parametric approaches. PMID:25014979

  11. Programming an Artificial Neural Network Tool for Spatial Interpolation in GIS - A Case Study for Indoor Radio Wave Propagation of WLAN

    PubMed Central

    Şen, Alper; Gümüşay, M. Ümit; Kavas, Aktül; Bulucu, Umut

    2008-01-01

    Wireless communication networks offer subscribers the possibilities of free mobility and access to information anywhere at any time. Therefore, electromagnetic coverage calculations are important for wireless mobile communication systems, especially in Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs). Before any propagation computation is performed, modeling of indoor radio wave propagation needs accurate geographical information in order to avoid the interruption of data transmissions. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial interpolation techniques are very efficient for performing indoor radio wave propagation modeling. This paper describes the spatial interpolation of electromagnetic field measurements using a feed-forward back-propagation neural network programmed as a tool in GIS. The accuracy of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and geostatistical Kriging were compared by adjusting procedures. The feedforward back-propagation ANN provides adequate accuracy for spatial interpolation, but the predictions of Kriging interpolation are more accurate than the selected ANN. The proposed GIS ensures indoor radio wave propagation model and electromagnetic coverage, the number, position and transmitter power of access points and electromagnetic radiation level. Pollution analysis in a given propagation environment was done and it was demonstrated that WLAN (2.4 GHz) electromagnetic coverage does not lead to any electromagnetic pollution due to the low power levels used. Example interpolated electromagnetic field values for WLAN system in a building of Yildiz Technical University, Turkey, were generated using the selected network architectures to illustrate the results with an ANN.

  12. Breakdown Characteristics of a Radio-Frequency Atmospheric Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianjun; Kong, Michael

    2004-09-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) are a capacitive nonthermal plasma with distinct advantage of low gas temperature and long-term stability. In practice their ignition is challenging particularly when they are generated at large electrode gaps. To this end, this contribution reports a one-dimensional fluid simulation of gas breakdown over a large pressure range of 100 - 760 Torr so that key physical processes can be understood in the ignition phase of rf APGD. Our model is an electron-hybrid model in which electrons are treated kinetically and all other plasma species are treated hydrodynamically. Computational results suggest that as the pressure-distance product increases from 25 Torr cm upwards the breakdown voltage increases in a way that resembles the right-hand-side branch of a Pachen curve. Importance of secondary electron emission is shown as well as its dependence on gas pressure even though identical electrode material is assumed. With these factors considered, excellent agreement with experimental data is achieved. Finally frequency dependence of the breakdown voltage is calculated and again found to agree with experimental data.

  13. Trends in Performance and Characteristics of Ultra-Stable Oscillators for Deep Space Radio Science Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami

    1997-01-01

    Telecommunication systems of spacecraft on deep space missions also function as instruments for Radio Science experiments. Radio scientists utilize the telecommunication links between spacecraft and Earth to examine very small changes in the phase/frequency, amplitude, and/or polarization of radio signals to investigate a host of physical phenomena in the solar system. Several missions augmented the radio communication system with an Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) in order to provide a highly stable reference signal for oneway downlink. This configuration is used in order to enable better investigations of the atmospheres of the planets occulting the line-of-sight to the spacecraft; one-way communication was required and the transponders' built-in auxiliary oscillators were neither sufficiently stable nor spectrally pure for the occultation experiments. Since Radio Science instrumentation is distributed between the spacecraft and the ground stations, the Deep Space Network (DSN) is also equipped to function as a world-class instrument for Radio Science research. For a detailed account of Radio Science experiments, methodology, key discoveries, and the DSN's historical contribution to the field, see Asmar and Renzetti (1993). The tools of Radio Science can be and have also been utilized in addressing several mission engineering challenges; e.g., characterization of spacecraft nutation and anomalous motion, antenna calibrations, and communications during surface landing phases. Since the first quartz USO was flown on Voyager, the technology has advanced significantly, affording future missions higher sensitivity in reconstructing the temperature pressure profiles of the atmospheres under study as well as other physical phenomena of interest to Radio Science. This paper surveys the trends in stability and spectral purity performance, design characteristics including size and mass, as well as cost and history of these clocks in space.

  14. Propagation characteristics of a Gaussian laser beam in plasma with modulated collision frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ying; Yuan Chengxun; Zhou Zhongxiang; Gao Ruilin; Li Lei; Du Yanwei

    2012-08-15

    The propagation characteristics of a Gaussian laser beam in cold plasma with the electron collision frequency modulated by laser intensity are presented. The nonlinear dynamics of the ponderomotive force, which induce nonlinear self-focusing as opposed to spatial diffraction, are considered. The effective dielectric function of the Drude model and complex eikonal function are adopted in deriving coupled differential equations of the varying laser beam parameters. In the framework of ponderomotive nonlinearity, the frequency of electron collision in plasmas, which is proportional to the spatial electron density, is strongly interrelated with the laser beam propagation characteristics. Hence, the propagation properties of the laser beam and the modulated electron collision frequency distribution in plasma were studied and explained in depth. Employing this self-consistent method, the obtained simulation results approach practical conditions, which is of significance to the study of laser-plasma interactions.

  15. Modelling the transfer function in medium bandwidth radio channels during multipath propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvain, M.; Lavergnat, J.

    1985-12-01

    The computation of the effects of a multipath propagation channel on a line-of-sight link requires a statistical model of the channel transfer function. The various steps in the construction and validation of such a model are discussed, and several proposed models are compared from the point of view of their applications. The selection of data for the model is examined, and the results of modelling are considered in terms of a Rummler model, a complex polynomial expansion, and a normalized two-ray model. The use of the complete two-ray model is addressed. Results from the PACEM I experiment are used by way of illustration.

  16. Using IRI and GSM TIP model results as environment for HF radio wave propagation model during the geomagnetic storm occurred on September 26-29, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, D. S.; Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Zakharov, V. E.; Ratovsky, K. G.; Nosikov, I. A.; Zhao, B.

    2015-11-01

    This paper analyses the geomagnetic storm on September 26-29, 2011. We compare the calculation results obtained using the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) and IRI-2012 (Bilitza et al., 2014) model with ground-based ionosonde data of stations at different latitudes and longitudes. We examined physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of ionospheric effects during the main phase of geomagnetic storm that occurred at the rising phase of the 24th solar cycle. We used numerical results obtained from IRI-2012 and GSM TIP models as propagation environment for HF signals from an equatorial transmitter during quiet and disturbed conditions. We used the model of HF radio wave propagation developed in I. Kant Baltic Federal University (BFU) that is based on the geometrical optics approximation. We compared the obtained radio paths in quiet conditions and during the main and recovery storm phases and evaluated radio wave attenuation in different media models.

  17. Characteristics of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with air using bare metal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua-Bo; Sun, Wen-Ting; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Zhang

    2006-10-01

    In this letter, an induced gas discharge approach is proposed and described in detail for obtaining a uniform atmospheric-pressure glow discharge with air in a γ mode using water-cooled, bare metal electrodes driven by radio-frequency (13.56MHz) power supply. A preliminary study on the discharge characteristics of the air glow discharge is also presented in this study. With this induced gas discharge approach, radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges using bare metal electrodes with other gases which cannot be ignited directly as the plasma working gas, such as nitrogen, oxygen, etc., can also be obtained.

  18. Propagation characteristics of a non-uniformly HermiteGaussian correlated beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhenzhen; Liu, Zhengjun; Zhou, Keya; Sun, Qiongge; Liu, Shutian

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new kind of partially coherent beam, non-uniformly HermiteGaussian correlated beam, by employing a non-uniformly Hermite function to modulate the spectral degree of coherence. The evolution of such scalar beam on propagation in free space and turbulent atmosphere are investigated. It is demonstrated that the spectral intensity distributions exhibit extraordinary propagation characteristics, such as self-focusing and laterally shifted intensity maxima. The position of the maximum intensity and the intensity profile can be controlled by the order of the Hermite function. The results can be useful in free-space optical communications and beam shaping.

  19. Characteristics of Small-scale Gravity Wave Propagation in the Mesopause Region over Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Murayama, Y.; Kita, K.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated characteristics of the atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) propagation using sodium airglow images obtained by an all-sky imager installed at Poker Flat Research Range (65.1N, 147.4W, MLAT 65.6) in Alaska. In this study, we developed data analysis programs which automatically derive the unambiguous 2-D power spectrum from the sodium airglow images, using a method by Coble et al. (1998). The power spectrums of the AGWs which have horizontal wavelengths between 2 - 400 km and periods up to 8 hours were obtained by these programs. Statistical study of the AGW data and mesospheric wind data by an MF radar during two winter seasons from October 2000 to April 2002 indicates the following characteristics. - During these periods, the AGW dominantly propagated westward in the zonal direction. - The meridional propagation direction frequently changed. This change seems to be explained by filtering effect by the mesospheric wind. - Total power of the AGW increased in December and January. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between these characteristics of the AGW propagation and unique phenomena in high-latitude region such as auroral precipitation. Acknowledgements This work is conducted as a part of "Alaska Project", the cooperative research project between NICT and Geophysical Institute of University of Alaska. Reference Coble, M. R., G. C. Papen, and C. S. Gardner, Computing two-dimensional unambiguous horizontal wavenumber spectra from OH airglow images, IEEE Trans. Geosci. and Remote Sens., 36, 368--382, 1998.

  20. Cascaded neural networks for sequenced propagation estimation, multiuser detection, and adaptive radio resource control of third-generation wireless networks for multimedia services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    1999-03-01

    A hybrid neural network approach is presented to estimate radio propagation characteristics and multiuser interference and to evaluate their combined impact on throughput, latency and information loss in third-generation (3G) wireless networks. The latter three performance parameters influence the quality of service (QoS) for multimedia services under consideration for 3G networks. These networks, based on a hierarchical architecture of overlaying macrocells on top of micro- and picocells, are planned to operate in mobile urban and indoor environments with service demands emanating from circuit-switched, packet-switched and satellite-based traffic sources. Candidate radio interfaces for these networks employ a form of wideband CDMA in 5-MHz and wider-bandwidth channels, with possible asynchronous operation of the mobile subscribers. The proposed neural network (NN) architecture allocates network resources to optimize QoS metrics. Parameters of the radio propagation channel are estimated, followed by control of an adaptive antenna array at the base station to minimize interference, and then joint multiuser detection is performed at the base station receiver. These adaptive processing stages are implemented as a sequence of NN techniques that provide their estimates as inputs to a final- stage Kohonen self-organizing feature map (SOFM). The SOFM optimizes the allocation of available network resources to satisfy QoS requirements for variable-rate voice, data and video services. As the first stage of the sequence, a modified feed-forward multilayer perceptron NN is trained on the pilot signals of the mobile subscribers to estimate the parameters of shadowing, multipath fading and delays on the uplinks. A recurrent NN (RNN) forms the second stage to control base stations' adaptive antenna arrays to minimize intra-cell interference. The third stage is based on a Hopfield NN (HNN), modified to detect multiple users on the uplink radio channels to mitigate multiaccess interference, control carrier-sense multiple-access (CSMA) protocols, and refine call handoff procedures. In the final stage, the Kohonen SOFM, operating in a hybrid continuous and discrete space, adaptively allocates the resources of antenna-based cell sectorization, activity monitoring, variable-rate coding, power control, handoff and caller admission to meet user demands for various multimedia services at minimum QoS levels. The performance of the NN cascade is evaluated through simulation of a candidate 3G wireless network using W-CDMA parameters in a small-cell environment. The simulated network consists of a representative number of cells. Mobile users with typical movement patterns are assumed. QoS requirements for different classes of multimedia services are considered. The proposed method is shown to provide relatively low probability of new call blocking and handoff dropping, while maintaining efficient use of the network's radio resources.

  1. Delay time measurements of the propagation of radio waves in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohde, F.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and operation of the Geodetic Secor System are described. The precision of the ionospheric radiation measurements was determined by a collocation experiment. The EGRS-13 satellite, which was used in the experiment, is discussed. The geodetic network is shown in a diagram form. Conclusions resulting from the experiments are reported.

  2. The characteristics of atmospheric radio frequency discharges with frequency increasing at a constant power density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan Tao; Li, Qing Quan; Lou, Jie; Li, Qing Min

    2010-10-01

    A computational model is used to investigate the characteristics of atmospheric radio frequency discharges by increasing frequency from 20 to 100 MHz at a constant power density. The simulation results show that increasing frequency can effectively enhance electron density before the transition frequency but after it the ignition is quenched then the electron density decreases. However this simulation also indicates the maximum time-averaged electron energy reduces monotonically with the excitation frequency increasing at a constant power density.

  3. Numerical investigation of fast-wave propagation and radio-frequency sheath interaction with a shaped tokamak wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    Interactions between propagating fast waves and radio-frequency (RF) sheaths in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies are numerically investigated based on a cold fluid plasma model coupled with a sheath boundary condition. In this two-dimensional study, the capability of the finite element code rfSOL, which was developed in previous numerical work, is extended to analyze self-consistent RF sheath-plasma interaction problems in a tokamak with a non-circular cross-section. It is found that a large sheath voltage is generated near the edges of the limiter-shaped deformation as a result of the conversion from fast to slow waves on the sheaths. The sheath voltage associated with this conversion is particularly significant in the localized region where the contact angle between the magnetic field line and the conducting wall varies rapidly along the curved sheath surface, which is consistent with the results in previous one-dimensional theoretical work. The dependences of the RF sheaths on various parameters in plasma such as the toroidal wavenumber, edge plasma density, and the degree of the RF wave absorption in the core region are also examined in detail.

  4. Uncertainty propagation through wave optics retrieval of bending angles from GPS radio occultation: Theory and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, Michael E.; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2015-10-01

    The wave optical technique for bending angle retrieval in processing radio occultation observations is nowadays widely used by different data processing and assimilation groups and centers. This technique uses Fourier Integral Operators that map the observed records of the amplitude and phase into the impact parameter representation, which allows for the retrieval of bending angle as a function of impact parameter. We investigate the propagation of uncertainty in the observed amplitude and excess phase to the retrieved bending angle. We construct a simple linear approximation, where the excess phase uncertainty is mapped into the bending angle uncertainty. This results in a simple analytical expression for the final uncertainty. To verify our approximation, we perform numerical Monte Carlo simulations for three example occultation events (tropical, middle, and polar latitude profiles from an atmospheric analysis). We demonstrate that our approximation basically gives good results in all cases over the entire troposphere. Exception is the narrow area near the top of the sharp boundary layer, especially in tropics, where, due to nonlinear effects, a significant systematic error arises accompanied by increased uncertainty.

  5. Turbid media optical properties derived from the characteristics of propagating laser radiation beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurdev, Ljuan; Dreischuh, Tanja; Vankov, Orlin; Bliznakova, Irina; Avramov, Lachezar; Stoyanov, Dimitar

    2014-06-01

    The possibility is studied to develop a straightforward analytical approach to the determination of the optical properties of liquid turbid media having forward-peaked scattering indicatrices. The approach is based on investigating the in-depth behavior of the radius and the axial intensity of a laser radiation beam propagating through the turbid medium. Based on the small-angle approximation, the detected forward-propagating light power spatial distribution, at relatively small or large optical depths along the beam axis, is obtained asymptotically in analytical form allowing one to derive relatively simple expressions of the extinction, reduced-scattering and absorption coefficients and the anisotropy factor of the medium through the characteristics of the propagating light beam. Preliminary experiments have also been performed, using Intralipid dilutions of different relatively low concentrations and measuring the cross-sectional radial distribution of the detected light power at different depths along the beam axis. The corresponding on-axis detected light power profiles have been measured independently as well. The experimental results are consistent with the analytical expressions obtained that allow one to estimate the optical coefficients and the anisotropy factor of the investigated media on the basis of the measured beam characteristics. The values obtained are near those predicted by other researchers.

  6. Microscopic characteristics of fatigue crack propagation in aluminum alloy based particulate reinforced metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhirui; Zhang, R.J. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science)

    1994-04-01

    Microscopic characteristics of fatigue crack propagation in two aluminum alloy (A356 and 6061) based particulate reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) were investigated by carrying out three point bending fatigue tests. The impedance offered by the reinforcing particles against fatigue crack propagation has been studied by plotting the nominal and actual crack lengths vs number of cycles. Surface observation shows that fatigue cracks tend to develop along the particle-matrix interface. In the case of Al (A356) MMCs, stronger interaction of fatigue crack with Si particles, as compared to SiC particles, was evident. In both MMC materials, particle debonding was more prominent as compared to particle cracking. The attempted application of Davidson's model to calculate [Delta]K[sub th] indicated that for cast MMCs the matrix grain including the surrounding reinforcing particles has to considered as a large hard particle'', and the grain boundary particles themselves behave like a hard egg-shell'' to strengthen the material.

  7. Characteristics of domain wall chirality and propagation in a Y-junction nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, W.-Y.; Yoon, Seungha; Kwon, J.-H.; Grnberg, P.; Cho, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality-dependent propagation of transverse wall along a nanowire was investigated using a Y-junction with spin-valve structure. It was found that the Y-junction can be used for convenient and effective electric detection of transverse domain wall chirality, especially in a nanowire with sub-200 nm width, where it is difficult to electrically detect chirality using conventional artificial defect, such as a notch, due to small resistance change. Domain wall propagation path in the Y-junction was found to be determined by the wall chirality, whether clockwise or counterclockwise. Using the Y-junction nanowire, characteristics of domain wall chirality that was nucleated in a nucleation pad, attached at the end of a nanowire, were studied and found to be in good agreement with the results of theoretical simulation.

  8. Discharge ignition characteristics of pulsed radio-frequency glow discharges in atmospheric helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianjun; Cai, Yeqing; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Ke; Zhang, Jing

    2009-07-01

    An experimental study of radio-frequency (15 MHz) glow discharges in atmospheric helium modulated by pulses with repetition frequency of 500 kHz and duty cycle of 6% and 8% is presented in this paper. In each discharge burst, the discharge is restricted to operate in ignition phase with duration of one or two radio-frequency cycles. The ignition characteristics in terms of spatial-temporal evolution of discharge interelectrode structure and optical emission intensity are investigated by time resolved imaging. Optical emission intensities at lines of 706 and 777 nm are used to capture clearly the temporal evolution of energetic electrons and active specie of atom oxygen generated in discharge.

  9. How cosmic ray electron propagation affects radio-far-infrared correlations in M 31 and M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhuijsen, E. M.; Beck, R.; Tabatabaei, F. S.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the effect of propagation of cosmic ray electrons (CRE) on the non-thermal (NTH; synchrotron)-far-infrared correlations in M 31 and M 33. The thermal (TH) and NTH emission components of the radio continuum emission at 1.4 GHz and one higher frequency are compared with dust emission from M 31 and M 33 using Spitzer data. In both galaxies the TH emission is linearly correlated with the emission from warm dust (24 μ m, 70 μ m), but the power laws of the NTH-FIR correlations have exponents b < 1 that increase with increasing frequency. Furthermore, the values of b for M 33 are significantly smaller (b ≃ 0.4) than those for M 31 (b ≃ 0.6). We interpret the differences in b as differences in the diffusion length of the CRE. We estimate the diffusion length in two ways: (1) by smoothing the NTH emission at the higher frequency until the correlation with NTH emission at 1.4 GHz has b = 1, and (2) by smoothing the TH emission until the correlation with the NTH emission at the same frequency has b = 1, assuming that the TH emission represents the source distribution of the CRE. Our smoothing experiments show that M 31 only has a thin NTH disc with a scale height of h = 0.3-0.4 kpc at 1.4 GHz, whereas M 33 has a similar thin disc as well as a thick disc with scale height hthick ≃ 2 kpc. In the thin discs, the (deprojected) diffusion length at 1.4 GHz is ≃1.5 kpc, yielding a diffusion coefficient of ≃2 × 1028 cm2 s-1. The structure, strength and regularity of the magnetic field in a galaxy as well as the existence of a thick disc determine the diffusion of the CRE, and hence, the power-law exponent of the NTH-FIR correlations.

  10. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Adam J.; Lee, John C.

    2016-02-01

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  11. Measured Propagation Characteristics of Finite Ground Coplanar Waveguide on Silicon with a Thick Polyimide Interface Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Papapolymerou, John; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Williams, W. O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Measured propagation characteristics of Finite Ground Coplanar (FGC) waveguide on silicon substrates with resistivities spanning 3 orders of magnitude (0.1 to 15.5 Ohm cm) and a 20 micron thick polyimide interface layer is presented as a function of the FGC geometry. Results show that there is an optimum FGC geometry for minimum loss, and silicon with a resistivity of 0.1 Ohm cm has greater loss than substrates with higher and lower resistivity. Lastly, substrates with a resistivity of 10 Ohm cm or greater have acceptable loss.

  12. Energetic Particle Propagation in the Inner Heliosphere as Deduced from Low Frequency (less than 100 kHz) Observations of Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are well-associated with solar flares. It is observed that the delay between the time of the flare and the first-arriving particles at a spacecraft increases with increasing difference between the flare longitude and the footpoint of the field line on which the spacecraft is located. This difference we call the "connection angle" and can be as large as approximately 120 deg. Recently it has been found that all SEP events are preceded by type III radio bursts. These bursts are plasma emission caused by the propagation of 2-50 keV flare electrons through the solar corona and into the solar wind. The drift of these type III radio bursts to lower and lower frequencies enables the propagation of the flare electrons to be traced from the Sun to about 1 AU. We have made an extensive analysis of the type III bursts associated with greater than 20 MeV proton events and find that, in most cases, the radio emission extends to the local plasma frequency when the energetic particles arrive within a few hours of the flare. We conclude that this emission at the lowest possible frequency is generated close to the spacecraft. We then use the time from when the burst started at the Sun to when it reached the local plasma frequency to infer the time it took the radio producing electrons to travel to the spacecraft. We find that these delay times are organized by the connection angle and correlate with the proton delay times. We also find that the differences between the radio delays at Wind and Ulysses are matched by differences in the relative arrival times of the energetic particles at the two spacecraft. The consistent timing between the relative arrival times of energetic electrons and protons and the start of the lowest frequency radio emissions suggests that the first arriving particles of both species are accelerated as part of the flare process and that they propagate to the spacecraft along trajectories similar to those of the lower energy flare electrons. To be detected by observers at locations distant from the nominal field lines originating in the flaring regions the particles must undergo lateral transport. The continuity of the radio bursts suggests that the cross-field transport may occur in the interplanetary medium.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Propagating Deformation Bands in AA5182 Alloy at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Codes, R. Nogueira; Hopperstad, O. S.; Engler, O.; Lademo, O.-G.; Embury, J. D.; Benallal, A.

    2011-11-01

    The spatial and temporal characteristics of propagating deformation bands in the Al-Mg alloy AA5182 in O temper were studied experimentally at room temperature. Tensile tests were carried out on flat specimens at strain rates in the range from 10-5 to 10-1 s-1. Digital image correlation (DIC) and digital infrared thermography (DIT) were applied to monitor the propagating bands. It was found that the material exhibits a sharp yield point, and Lders bands were seen at all the strain rates. Jerky flow took place all along the Lders plateau. It thus seems that the Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect starts at incipient yielding and that there is no critical strain. At the end of the Lders plateau, PLC bands immediately started to propagate back and forth along the gage section of the specimen. The work hardening of the material decreased consistently with increasing strain rate, while the flow stress on the Lders plateau was rather unaffected by the strain rate. This indicates that the dynamic strain aging (DSA) mainly affects the strength of the interaction between mobile and forest dislocations. The strain to necking was found to decrease gradually with strain rate for this alloy, which is consistent with the lower work-hardening rate at the higher strain rates.

  14. Characteristics of radio-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric-barrier discharge with dielectric electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S. E-mail: shussainuos@yahoo.com; Qazi, H. I. A.; Badar, M. A.

    2014-03-15

    An experimental investigation to characterize the properties and highlight the benefits of atmospheric pressure radio-frequency dielectric-barrier discharge (rf DBD) with dielectric electrodes fabricated by anodizing aluminium substrate is presented. The current-voltage characteristics and millisecond images are used to distinguish the α and γ modes. This atmospheric rf DBD is observed to retain the discharge volume without constriction in γ mode. Optical emission spectroscopy demonstrates that the large discharge current leads to more abundant reactive species in this plasma source.

  15. Characteristics of radio-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric-barrier discharge with dielectric electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Qazi, H. I. A.; Badar, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    An experimental investigation to characterize the properties and highlight the benefits of atmospheric pressure radio-frequency dielectric-barrier discharge (rf DBD) with dielectric electrodes fabricated by anodizing aluminium substrate is presented. The current-voltage characteristics and millisecond images are used to distinguish the α and γ modes. This atmospheric rf DBD is observed to retain the discharge volume without constriction in γ mode. Optical emission spectroscopy demonstrates that the large discharge current leads to more abundant reactive species in this plasma source.

  16. Radiation characteristics of quasi-periodic radio bursts in the Jovian high-latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Misawa, Hiroaki; Morioka, Akira; Nozawa, Hiromasa

    2008-12-01

    Ulysses had a "distant encounter" with Jupiter in February 2004. The spacecraft passed from north to south, and it observed Jovian radio waves from high to low latitudes (from +80 to +10) for few months during its encounter. In this study, we present a statistical investigation of the occurrence characteristics of Jovian quasi-periodic bursts, using spectral data from the unified radio and plasma wave experiment (URAP) onboard Ulysses. The latitudinal distribution of quasi-periodic bursts is derived for the first time. The analysis suggested that the bursts can be roughly categorized into two types: one having periods shorter than 30 min and one with periods longer than 30 min, which is consistent with the results of the previous analysis of data from Ulysses' first Jovian flyby [MacDowall, R.J., Kaiser, M.L., Desch, M.D., Farrell, W.M., Hess, R.A., Stone, R.G., 1993. Quasi-periodic Jovian radio bursts: observations from the Ulysses radio and plasma wave. Experiment. Planet. Space Sci. 41, 1059-1072]. It is also suggested that the groups of quasi-periodic bursts showed a dependence on the Jovian longitude of the sub-solar point, which means that these burst groups are triggered during a particular rotational phase of the planet. Maps of the occurrence probability of these quasi-periodic bursts also showed a unique CML/MLAT dependence. We performed a 3D ray tracing analysis of the quasi-periodic burst emission to learn more about the source distribution. The results suggest that the longitudinal distribution of the occurrence probability depends on the rotational phase. The source region of quasi-periodic bursts seems to be located at an altitude between 0.4 and 1.4 Rj above the polar cap region ( L>30).

  17. Modal propagation and imaging characteristics of a custom designed coherent fiberbundle for endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyvaert, S.; Ottevaere, H.; Kujawa, I.; Buczynski, R.; Raes, M.; Terryn, H.; Thienpont, H.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, several groups have investigated the use of Proximal Spatial Light modulation (PSML) as an alternative fiber optic imaging technique. In PSLM, the light exiting the distal end of the fiber optic endoscope can be focused, without any distal micro-optics or micro-mechanics, on any point within the Field Of View (FOV) via spatial modulation of the light before it is coupled in at the endoscope's proximal end. In previous work, we reported on the custom design of a Coherent Fiber Bundle made with soft glasses (as opposed to the commercially available optical fibers used by other groups) to be used with PSLM. In this paper we present the results of the numerical characterization of the Coherent Fiber Bundle fabricated according to our design. We investigate the CFB's modal propagation characteristics as well as its imaging properties (FOV and point spread function). Our numerical characterization also takes into account fabrication induced defects such as variations in core size, core shape (ellipticity) and lattice constant. Realistic values for the defects were obtained via SEM images of the fabricated CFB's cross section. We find that noise on the wave front of the field exiting the distal end of the CFB causes a much larger deterioration of the point spread function than amplitude noise. And while we find that variations in core shape have the largest impact on the CFB's propagation characteristics, our results indicate that this negative impact could be negated if the elliptical cores were aligned along a common axis.

  18. N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) yesterday, today, tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the basic and applied research rationale for the organization of IZMIRAN and provides insight into the 75 years of the Institute's activities and development. Historically, early magnetic measurements in Russia were developed largely to meet the Navy's navigation needs and were, more generally, stimulated by the Peter the Great decrees and by the foundation of the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences in 1724. The paper examines the roles of the early Academicians in developing geomagnetism and making magnetic measurements a common practice in Russia. The need for stable radio communications prompted ionospheric and radio wave propagation research. The advent of the space era and the 1957-1958 International Geophysical Year Project greatly impacted the development of IZMIRAN and spurred the creation of a number of geophysical research institutes throughout the country. Currently, the research topics at IZMIRAN range widely from geomagnetism to solar-terrestrial physics to the ionosphere and radio wave propagation, and its primary application areas are the study and forecast of space weather, an increasingly important determining factor in ever-expanding ground- and space-based technologies (space navigation and communications, space activities, etc.).

  19. Remote sensing and modeling of lightning caused long recovery events within the lower ionosphere using VLF/LF radio wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitter, E. D.

    2014-11-01

    On the 4 November 2012 at 3:04:27 UT a strong lightning in the midst of the North Sea affected the propagation conditions of VLF/LF transmitter radio signals from NRK (Iceland, 37.5 kHz) and GBZ (UK, 19.58 kHz) received at 5246 N 8 E (NW Germany). The amplitude and phase dips show a recovery time of 6-12 min pointing to a LOng Recovery Early VLF (LORE) event. Clear assignment of the causative return stroke in space and time was possible with data from the WWLLN (Worldwide Lightning Location Network). Based on a return stroke current model the electric field is calculated and an excess electron density distribution which decays over time in the lower ionosphere is derived. Ionization, attachment and recombination processes are modeled in detail. Entering the electron density distribution in VLF/LF radio wave propagation calculations using the LWPC (Long Wavelength Propagation Capability) code allows to model the VLF/LF amplitude and phase behavior by adjusting the return stroke current moment. The results endorse and quantify the conception of lower ionosphere EMP heating by strong - but not necessarily extremely strong - return strokes of both polarities.

  20. Back-Propagation Operation for Analog Neural Network Hardware with Synapse Components Having Hysteresis Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Michihito; Nishitani, Yu; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Omote, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    To realize an analog artificial neural network hardware, the circuit element for synapse function is important because the number of synapse elements is much larger than that of neuron elements. One of the candidates for this synapse element is a ferroelectric memristor. This device functions as a voltage controllable variable resistor, which can be applied to a synapse weight. However, its conductance shows hysteresis characteristics and dispersion to the input voltage. Therefore, the conductance values vary according to the history of the height and the width of the applied pulse voltage. Due to the difficulty of controlling the accurate conductance, it is not easy to apply the back-propagation learning algorithm to the neural network hardware having memristor synapses. To solve this problem, we proposed and simulated a learning operation procedure as follows. Employing a weight perturbation technique, we derived the error change. When the error reduced, the next pulse voltage was updated according to the back-propagation learning algorithm. If the error increased the amplitude of the next voltage pulse was set in such way as to cause similar memristor conductance but in the opposite voltage scanning direction. By this operation, we could eliminate the hysteresis and confirmed that the simulation of the learning operation converged. We also adopted conductance dispersion numerically in the simulation. We examined the probability that the error decreased to a designated value within a predetermined loop number. The ferroelectric has the characteristics that the magnitude of polarization does not become smaller when voltages having the same polarity are applied. These characteristics greatly improved the probability even if the learning rate was small, if the magnitude of the dispersion is adequate. Because the dispersion of analog circuit elements is inevitable, this learning operation procedure is useful for analog neural network hardware. PMID:25393715

  1. Self-configurable radio receiver system and method for use with signals without prior knowledge of signal defining characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon (Inventor); Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Tkacenko, Andre (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, radio receiver, and system to autonomously receive and decode a plurality of signals having a variety of signal types without a priori knowledge of the defining characteristics of the signals is disclosed. The radio receiver is capable of receiving a signal of an unknown signal type and, by estimating one or more defining characteristics of the signal, determine the type of signal. The estimated defining characteristic(s) is/are utilized to enable the receiver to determine other defining characteristics. This in turn, enables the receiver, through multiple iterations, to make a maximum-likelihood (ML) estimate for each of the defining characteristics. After the type of signal is determined by its defining characteristics, the receiver selects an appropriate decoder from a plurality of decoders to decode the signal.

  2. Multi-Band (K- Q- and E-Band) Multi-Tone Millimeter-Wave Frequency Synthesizer for Radio Wave Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a multi-band multi-tone millimeter-wave frequency synthesizer, based on a solid-state frequency comb generator. The intended application of the synthesizer is in a space-borne transmitter for radio wave atmospheric studies at K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz), Q-band (37 to 42 GHz), and E-band (71 to 76 GHz). These studies would enable the design of robust multi-Gbps data rate space-to-ground satellite communication links. Lastly, the architecture for a compact multi-tone beacon transmitter, which includes a high frequency synthesizer, a polarizer, and a conical horn antenna, has been investigated for a notional CubeSat based space-to-ground radio wave propagation experiment.

  3. Characteristics of the propagation of radioactive pollutants near a radiation-hazardous object

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V.I.

    1995-09-01

    It is well known that the radiation effect of nuclear enterprises on the environment is due mainly to gas-aerosol emissions which emanate from the object in the form of a jet flow. A characteristic feature of the propagation of radioactive impurities near such structures is that they depend on the local thermal and wind conditions at the location of the source of contamination. Transferring directly the results of laboratory investigations of the propagation and diffusion of fluxes to objects in the environment and neglecting the peculiarities of the wind and thermal interference with the underlying surface and other buildings can lead to incorrect conclusions. In this paper, we examine two examples: (1) emissions through the plant stack or other ventilation system openings, and (2) leakage of radioactive pollutants into the reactor building and from there to the atmosphere. A mathematical description on each example is provided, and data on the Archimedes number for a convective jet is given as a function of the deflecting wind velocity.

  4. Experimental Study on Surge Propagation Characteristics of Rail and Lightning Overvoltages on Level Crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Hideki; Matsubara, Hiroji; Miyajima, Kiyotomi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Sato, Kazutoshi

    Lightning protection measures are required for the railway signalling system because suspension and delays of trains due to lightnings may cause social confusion. Therefore, we carried out experiments on propagation characteristics of lightning surges along a rail, and injected a lightning surge current into the rail or wayside ground to raise their potentials, in order to measure the lightning overvoltages on a level crossing for the insulation design. There are no precedents that have carried out these experiments in the field until now. We could obtain the following results. (1) The surge impedance of the rail is 56? and the surge propagation velocity in the rail is 55m/?s. (2) The surge attenuation depends only on the duration of wave tail of the traveling lightning surge along the rail and decreases as the duration of wave tail becomes longer. (3) Flashovers may occur at the terminals in the equipment of the level crossing in case 1) a 2kA lightning surge current is directly injected into the rail, or 2) a 10kA lightning surge current is injected into the wayside ground at a vertical distance of 2m from the rail. (4) We can estimate the lightning overvoltages on the terminals in the equipment of the level crossing according to the vertical distance from the rail of the lighting stroke and the level of the stroke current.

  5. Propagation characteristics of atmospheric-pressure He+O2 plasmas inside a simulated endoscope channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wang, X. H.; Li, D.; Yang, A. J.; Liu, D. X.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2015-11-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas have potential to be used for endoscope sterilization. In this study, a long quartz tube was used as the simulated endoscope channel, and an array of electrodes was warped one by one along the tube. Plasmas were generated in the inner channel of the tube, and their propagation characteristics in He+O2 feedstock gases were studied as a function of the oxygen concentration. It is found that each of the plasmas originates at the edge of an instantaneous cathode, and then it propagates bidirectionally. Interestingly, a plasma head with bright spots is formed in the hollow instantaneous cathode and moves towards its center part, and a plasma tail expands through the electrode gap and then forms a swallow tail in the instantaneous anode. The plasmas are in good axisymmetry when [O2] ? 0.3%, but not for [O2] ? 1%, and even behave in a stochastic manner when [O2] = 3%. The antibacterial agents are charged species and reactive oxygen species, so their wall fluxes represent the "plasma dosage" for the sterilization. Such fluxes mainly act on the inner wall in the hollow electrode rather than that in the electrode gap, and they get to the maximum efficiency when the oxygen concentration is around 0.3%. It is estimated that one can reduce the electrode gap and enlarge the electrode width to achieve more homogenous and efficient antibacterial effect, which have benefits for sterilization applications.

  6. a Theoretical Investigation on Propagation Characteristics and Coupling Efficiencies of a Coupling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuping; Zhu, Jingping; Sun, Yuzhou; Qin, Wanguang; Tang, Tiantong

    In a butt-joint coupling system, a fiber is coupled to a slab waveguide by a fiber ended micro-lens (FEML), so that the electromagnetic field emerging from the FEML is completely different from the fiber mode. The conventional method for calculations of the coupling efficiency, such as the overlap integral method, is not valid. In this paper, a Monte Carlo model for the coupling system is proposed, based not only on the principles of reflection and refraction at media interface plane, but also on the diffractions of micro lens. This model incorporates the geometrical surface of both the fiber end-face micro-lens and slab waveguide, the relative position of the fiber and slab waveguide, and also takes into consideration both the aberration and diffraction effects. The propagation characteristics and coupling efficiencies of the system are simulated. The losses caused by misalignment of the system are also discussed.

  7. Characteristics of Type-II Radio Bursts Associated with Flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanth, V.; Umapathy, S.; Vršnak, Bojan; Anna Lakshmi, M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a statistical study of the characteristics of type-II radio bursts observed in the metric (m) and deca-hectometer (DH) wavelength range during 1997-2008. The collected events are divided into two groups: Group I contains the events of m-type-II bursts with starting frequency ≥ 100 MHz, and group II contains the events with starting frequency of m-type-II radio bursts < 100 MHz. We have analyzed both samples considering three different aspects: i) statistical properties of type-II bursts, ii) statistical properties of flares and CMEs associated with type-II bursts, and iii) time delays between type-II bursts, flares, and CMEs. We find significant differences in the properties of m-type-II bursts in duration, bandwidth, drift rate, shock speed and delay between m- and DH-type-II bursts. From the timing analysis we found that the majority of m-type-II bursts in both groups occur during the flare impulsive phase. On the other hand, the DH-type-II bursts in both groups occur during the decaying phase of the associated flares. Almost all m-DH-type-II bursts are found to be associated with CMEs. Our results indicate that there are two kinds of shock in which group I (high frequency) m-type-II bursts seem to be ignited by flares whereas group II (low frequency) m-type-II bursts are CME-driven.

  8. Transmit-reference methods in software defined radio platforms for communication in harsh propagation environments and systems thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, Farid U; Nekoogar, Faranak

    2015-03-03

    A method for adaptive Radio Frequency (RF) jamming according to one embodiment includes dynamically monitoring a RF spectrum; detecting any undesired signals in real time from the RF spectrum; and sending a directional countermeasure signal to jam the undesired signals. A method for adaptive Radio Frequency (RF) communications according to another embodiment includes transmitting a data pulse in a RF spectrum; and transmitting a reference pulse separated by a predetermined period of time from the data pulse; wherein the data pulse is modulated with data, wherein the reference pulse is unmodulated. A method for adaptive Radio Frequency (RF) communications according to yet another embodiment includes receiving a data pulse in a RF spectrum; and receiving a reference pulse separated in time from the data pulse, wherein the data pulse is modulated with data, wherein the reference pulse is unmodulated; and demodulating the pulses.

  9. Preliminary breakdown of intracloud lightning: Initiation altitude, propagation speed, pulse train characteristics, and step length estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting; Yoshida, Satoru; Akiyama, Yasuhiro; Stock, Michael; Ushio, Tomoo; Kawasaki, Zen

    2015-09-01

    Using a low-frequency lightning location system comprising 11 sites, we located preliminary breakdown (PB) processes in 662 intracloud (IC) lightning flashes during the summer of 2013 in Osaka area of Japan. On the basis of three-dimensional location results, we studied initiation altitude and upward propagation speed of PB processes. PB in most IC flashes has an initiation altitude that ranges from 5 to 10 km with an average of 7.8 km. Vertical speed ranges from 0.5 to 17.8 105 m/s with an average of 4.0 105 m/s. Vertical speed is closely related with initiation altitude, with IC flashes initiated at higher altitude having lower vertical speed during PB stage. Characteristics of PB pulse trains including pulse rate, pulse amplitude, and pulse width are also analyzed. The relationship between pulse rate and vertical speed has the strongest correlation, suggesting that each PB pulse corresponds to one step of the initial leader during the PB stage. Pulse rate, pulse amplitude, and pulse width all show decreasing trends with increasing initiation altitude and increasing trends with increasing vertical speed. Using a simple model, the step length of the initial leader during the PB stage is estimated. Most of initial leaders have step lengths that range from 40 to 140 m with an average of 113 m. Estimated step length has a strong correlation with initiation altitude, indicating that leaders initiated at higher altitude have longer steps. Based on the results of this study, we speculate that above certain altitude (~12 km), initial leaders in PB stages of IC flashes may only have horizontal propagations. PB processes at very high altitude may also have very weak radiation, so detecting and locating them would be relatively difficult.

  10. Generation and Propagation Characteristics of Dual-Band Chorus Emissions Observed by Geotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagitani, S.; Habagishi, T.; Mori, S.; Omura, Y.; Kojima, H.

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the generation and propagation characteristics of chorus emissions observed by the wave form capture (WFC) and the sweep frequency analyzer (SFA) onboard the Geotail spacecraft in the dayside outer magnetosphere (L from 9 to 10). We examine any observational evidence, which may validate the nonlinear growth theory of the chorus emissions [1]. In the nonlinear growth theory a rising-tone element is initially generated continuously in the frequency range from 0.1 to 0.7 fce, where fce is the gyrofrequency in the generation region. Because of the nonlinear damping mechanism the rising-tone element is separated into upper and lower bands at half the local gyrofrequency (1/2 fce) through propagation [2]. As the rising-tone emissions are generated in the minimum-B region and propagate toward the larger-B regions along the geomagnetic field line, the upper cutoff of the lower-band chorus corresponds to 1/2 fce in the generation region, and the lower cutoff of the upper-band chorus corresponds to 1/2 fce at the observation point. In this study, we analyze the SFA spectrum data (consecutively over several hours) and WFC waveform data (several seconds) of the dual-band chorus emissions observed by Geotail. As a result, it is found that the upper cutoff of the lower-band chorus coincides with 1/2 fce at the minimum-B region estimated from the geomagnetic field line connecting to the Geotail position by using the Tsyganenko geomagnetic field model (TS04 model), whereas the lower cutoff of the upper-band chorus coincides with 1/2 fce locally at the observation point. We also examine the amplitude of a rising-tone emission using the WFC waveform data on the basis of the nonlinear growth theory. The amplitude at the generation region is estimated from the observed frequency sweep rate of the emission, and the nonlinear growth of the amplitude through propagation toward the observation point is calculated from the nonlinear growth rate, which is found consistent with the observed amplitude. We will also discuss the observational evidence for the threshold amplitudes and the optimum amplitudes required for triggering rising-tone chorus emissions in the generation region. [1] Omura Y., Y. Katoh and D. Summers (2008), Theory and simulation of the generation of whistler-mode chorus, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A04223, doi:10.1029/2007JA012622. [2] Omura Y., M. Hikishima, Y. Katoh, D. Summers, and S. Yagitani (2009), Nonlinear mechanisms of lower-band and upper-band VLF chorus emissions in the magnetosphere, J.Geophys. Res., 114, A07217, doi:10.1029/2009JA014206. [3] Omura Y., and D. Nunn (2011), Triggering process of whistler mode chorus emissions in the magnetosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A05205, doi:10.1029/2010JA016280.

  11. Static current-voltage characteristics for radio-frequency induction discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Budyansky, A.; Zykov, A.

    1995-12-31

    The aim of this work was to obtain experimentally such characteristic of Radio-Frequency Induction Discharge (RFID) that can play the role of its current-voltage characteristic (CVC) and to explain the nature of current and voltage jumps arising in RF coils at exciting of discharge. Experiments were made in quartz 5.5, 11, 20 cm diam tubes with outer RF coil at pressures 10--100 mTorr, at frequency 13.56 MHz and discharge power to 500 W. In case of outer coil as analogue of discharge voltage it`s convenient to use the value of the RF voltage U{sub R}, induced around outer perimeter of discharge tube. It is evident that current and voltage jumps arising at exciting of discharge are due to low output resistance of standard generators and negative slope of initial part of CVC. Three sets of such dependencies for different pressures were obtained for each diameter of tubes. The influence of different metal electrodes placed into discharge volume on CVC`s shape has been studied also. Experimental results can explain the behavior of HFI discharge as a load of RF generator and give data for calculation of RF circuit.

  12. Statistical Characteristics of MF/HF Auroral Radio Emissions Emanating from the Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Kumamoto, A.; Katoh, Y.; Shinbori, A.

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial auroral ionosphere is a natural emitter of electromagnetic waves in the MF/HF ranges (up to 6 MHz) as well as well-known intense auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) and auroral hiss in the VLF/LF ranges. We report on the statistical properties of Terrestrial Hectometric Radiation (THR), MF/HF auroral radio emissions emanating from the topside ionosphere, using a long-term data set obtained from the Plasma Waves and Sounder (PWS) experiment mounted on the Akebono satellite during 2 solar cycles. THR typically occurs in either or both of two frequency bands near 1.5-2.0 MHz and 3.0-4.0 MHz, whose polarization features correspond to the L-O and R-X mode. Statistical studies using the Akebono/PWS data reveal clear bimodality in the frequency distribution of THR with two broad peaks near 1.6 MHz and 3.6 MHz and the spatial distribution of occurrence rate of THR-L (lower than 2.5 MHz) and THR-H (higher than 2.5 MHz). In the morning to postnoon sectors (3h-15h MLT), the spatial distribution of both types of THR is confined to magnetic latitudes higher than 70 deg, while during nighttime (15h-3h MLT) it spreads to lower magnetic latitudes (~ 30 deg) at higher altitudes. The explanation of this distribution is that THR is generated in the night-side auroral latitudes near 1000-km altitude and propagation effect makes an emission cone. Occurrence rate of THR-L is higher than that of THR-H. The long-term Akebono/PWS data also show clear solar activity dependence and seasonal variations of THR appearance; THR occurrence rate drops from a few percent during solar maxima to 0.1 percent or less during solar minima and is the highest in summer and the lowest in winter.

  13. Propagation characteristics of SH wave in an mm2 piezoelectric layer on an elastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yanping; Liu, Jinxi; Nie, Guoquan

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the propagation characteristics of shear horizontal (SH) waves in a structure consisting of an elastic substrate and an mm2 piezoelectric layer with different cut orientations. The dispersion equations are derived for electrically open and shorted conditions on the free surface of the piezoelectric layer. The phase velocity and electromechanical coupling coefficient are calculated for a layered structure with a KNbO3 layer perfectly bonded to a diamond substrate. The dispersion curves for the electrically shorted boundary condition indicate that for a given cut orientation, the phase velocity of the first mode approaches the B-G wave velocity of the KNbO3 layer, while the phase velocities of the higher modes tend towards the limit velocity of the KNbO3 layer. For the electrically open boundary condition, the asymptotic phase velocities of all modes are the limit velocity of the KNbO3 layer. In addition, it is found that the electromechanical coupling coefficient strongly depends on the cut orientation of the KNbO3 crystal. The obtained results are useful in device applications.

  14. A BROKEN SOLAR TYPE II RADIO BURST INDUCED BY A CORONAL SHOCK PROPAGATING ACROSS THE STREAMER BOUNDARY

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X. L.; Chen, Y.; Li, G.; Feng, S. W.; Song, H. Q.; Jiao, F. R.; Guo, F.

    2012-05-10

    We discuss an intriguing type II radio burst that occurred on 2011 March 27. The dynamic spectrum was featured by a sudden break at about 43 MHz on the well-observed harmonic branch. Before the break, the spectrum drifted gradually with a mean rate of about -0.05 MHz s{sup -1}. Following the break, the spectrum jumped to lower frequencies. The post-break emission lasted for about 3 minutes. It consisted of an overall slow drift which appeared to have a few fast-drift sub-bands. Simultaneous observations from the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory and the Solar Dynamics Observatory were also available and are examined for this event. We suggest that the slow-drift period before the break was generated inside a streamer by a coronal eruption driven shock, and the spectral break as well as the relatively wide spectrum after the break is a consequence of the shock crossing the streamer boundary where density drops abruptly. It is suggested that this type of radio bursts can be taken as a unique diagnostic tool for inferring the coronal density structure, as well as the radio-emitting source region.

  15. Influences of band-correlated noise on FVC by VI-isoline based LMM: characteristic behavior of propagated error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Kenta; Obata, Kenta; Matsuoka, Masayuki; Yoshioka, Hiroki

    2012-10-01

    Fraction of vegetation cover (FVC) has been used for environmental studies of both regional and global scale, and data products of similar kinds have been generated from several agencies. Although there are differences in sensors/datasets used and algorithms employed among those products, many of those use spectral mixture analysis either directly or indirectly, and/or assume an essence of spectral mixture in their models. In the FVC estimations, noises in reflectance spectra of both target and endmember are propagated into the estimated FVC. Those propagation mechanisms such as patterns and degree of influences need to be clarified analytically, where this study tries to contribute. The objective of this study is to investigate characteristics of the noise propagation into the estimated FVC based on one of the linear mixture models known as VI-isoline based LMM. In order to facilitate analytical discussions, the number of endmember spectra is limited into two. In addition, a band-correlated noise is assumed in both reflectance spectrum of a target pixel and endmember spectra of vegetation and non-vegetation surfaces. The propagated error in FVC from those spectra is analytically derived. The derived expressions indicated that the characteristic behavior of the propagated errors exists such that there are certain conditions among the band correlated noises which result in the cancellations of propagated errors on FVC value (it looks as if the spectra are noise-free). Findings of this study would reveal unknown behavior of the propagated noise, and would contribute better understanding of FVC retrieval algorithms of this kind.

  16. Error propagation in time-dependent probability of occurrence for characteristic earthquakes in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzza, Laura; Pace, Bruno; Cavallini, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Time-dependent models for seismic hazard and earthquake probabilities are at the leading edge of research nowadays. In the framework of a 2-year national Italian project (2005-2007), we have applied the Brownian passage time (BPT) renewal model to the recently released Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS) to compute earthquake probability in the period 2007-2036. Observed interevent times on faults in Italy are absolutely insufficient to characterize the recurrence time. We, therefore, derived mean recurrence intervals indirectly. To estimate the uncertainty of the results, we resorted to the theory of error propagation with respect to the main parameters: magnitude and slip rate. The main issue concerned the high variability of slip rate, which could hardly be reduced by exploiting geodetic constraints. We did some validation tests, and interesting considerations were derived from seismic moment budgeting on the historical earthquake catalog. In a time-dependent perspective, i.e., when the date of the last event is known, only 10-15% of the 115 sources exhibit a probability of a characteristic earthquake in the next 30 years higher than the equivalent Poissonian probabilities. If we accept the Japanese conventional choice of probability threshold greater than 3% in 30 years to define highly probable sources, mainly intermediate earthquake faults with characteristic M < 6, having an elapsed time of 0.7-1.2 times the recurrence interval are the most prone sources. The number of highly probable sources rises by increasing the aperiodicity coefficient (from 14 sources in the case of variable ? ranging between 0.22 and 0.36 to 31 sources out of 115 in the case of an ? value fixed at 0.7). On the other hand, in stationary time-independent approaches, more than two thirds of all sources are considered probabilistically prone to an impending earthquake. The performed tests show the influence of the variability of the aperiodicity factor in the BPT renewal model on the absolute probability values. However, the influence on the relative ranking of sources is small. Future developments should give priority to a more accurate determination of the date of the last seismic event for a few seismogenic sources of the DISS catalog and to a careful check on the applicability of a purely characteristic model.

  17. Analysis of uncompensated Langmuir probe characteristics in radio-frequency discharges revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Oksuz, L.; Soberon, F.; Ellingboe, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of the electron temperature, plasma density, and floating and plasma potentials with Langmuir probes in radio-frequency discharges often represent a challenge due to rf oscillations of the plasma potential. These oscillations distort the probe characteristic, resulting in wrong estimates of the plasma parameters. Both active and passive rf compensation methods have previously been used to eliminate rf fluctuation effects on the electron current drawn by an electrostatic probe. These effects on an uncompensated probe have been theoretically and experimentally studied by Garscadden and Emeleus [Proc. Phys. Soc. London 79, 535 (1962)], Boschi and Magistrelli [Nuovo Cimento 29, 487 (1963)], and Crawford [J. Appl. Phys. 34, 1897 (1963)]. They have shown theoretically that, assuming a Maxwellian distribution and sinusoidal plasma-potential oscillation, the electron temperature can be deduced directly from an uncompensated Langmuir probe trace, by taking the natural logarithm of the electron current. It is the purpose of this paper to bring back the attention onto this result, which shows that under certain discharge conditions it is not necessary to build any rf compensation in a Langmuir probe system. Here we present and reference experimental data found on the literature which support this result. Also computational data are presented.

  18. Experimental investigation of ULF/VLF radio wave generation and propagation in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere during EISCAT heating experiment in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryakhovskiy, Iliya; Gavrilov, Boris; Zetzer, Julius; Rietveld, Michael; Poklad, Yuriy; Blagoveshchenskaya, Nataly

    Powerful high frequency radio waves transmitted from high-power HF heating facilities modify the ionospheric plasma. The X-mode HF pump wave generates strong small-scale artificial field aligned irregularities in the F region of the ionosphere when the heater frequency is near or above the critical frequency of F2 layer [Blagoveshchenskaya et al]. One of the tasks of the Russian EISCAT heating campaign in February 2012 was an investigation of the generation and propagation of ULF/VLF signals generated as the result of HF radiation modulation. Despite the numerous attempts of long-range detection of such signals, there are a few successful results. The most reliable and important results were obtained by [Barr et al.] more than 20 years ago. They measured the VLF radio waves in Lindau, Germany at the distance of about 2000 km from EISCAT Heater. We present the results of the ULF/VLF registrations at the same distance during heating campaign of February 2012. The measurements were conducted at Mikhnevo Geohysical Observatory located in 80 km to the south of Moscow and at the distance of about 1900 km from Troms. For measurements were used a sensitive receivers with crossed air-coil loop antennas in the frequency range from 800 Hz to 30 kHz in the femtotesla amplitude range. We recorded the radial and azimuthal magnetic component of the signals and from their ratio obtained the mode polarization. The radiated heater frequency was modulated by 517, 1017, 2017, 3017, 4017 and 6017 Hz. It was shown the signals with frequency less than 2 kHz propagate in the QTEM mode, and signals at the frequency from 2 to 4 kHz are in the QTE mode. Observed magnetic field strengths and waveguide polarizations are found to be in line with the predictions of simple waveguide models. Qualitative coincidence of the signals polarization character and its dependence on the frequency specifies adequacy of numerical models and reliability of the data received in campaign 2012. Blagoveshchenskaya N. F., M. T. Rietveld et al. Artificial field-aligned irregularities in the high-latitude F region of the ionosphere induced by an X-mode HF heater wave. // Geophys. Res. Lett. - 2011. V. 38, doi: 10.1029/2011GL046724. Barr, R., P. Stubbe, and H. Kopka, 1991, Long-range detection of VLF radiation produced by heating the auroral electrojet. Radio Science, Volume 26, Number 4, Pages 871-879, July-August 1991

  19. Characteristics of coronal shock waves and solar type 2 radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.

    1995-01-01

    In the solar corona shock waves generated by flares and/or coronal mass ejections can be observed by radio astronomical methods in terms of solar type 2 radio bursts. In dynamic radio spectra they appear as emission stripes slowly drifting from high to low frequencies. A sample of 25 solar type 2 radio bursts observed in the range of 40 - 170 MHz with a time resolution of 0.1 s by the new radiospectrograph of the Astrophvsikalisches Institut Potsdam in Tremsdorf is statistically investigated concerning their spectral features, i.e, drift rate, instantaneous bandwidth, and fundamental harmonic ratio. In-situ plasma wave measurements at interplanetary shocks provide the assumption that type 2 radio radiation is emitted in the vicinity of the transition region of shock waves. Thus, the instantaneous bandwidth of a solar type 2 radio burst would reflect the density jump across the associated shock wave. Comparing the inspection of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations of shock waves under coronal circumstances with those obtained from the observational study, solar type 2 radio bursts should be regarded to be generated by weak supercritical, quasi-parallel, fast magnetosonic shock waves in the corona.

  20. Characterizing lower ionosphere forcing by a strong lightning stroke using VLF/LF radio wave remote sensing and propagation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitter, E. D.

    2013-09-01

    The direct and indirect effects of lightning strokes on the lower ionosphere seen with VLF signal propagation with regard to the generation of Trimpis are well known, e.g. [5]. Additionally to these events with recovery times of the order of seconds disturbance events with long recovery times of the order of minutes to half an hour are observed and related to direct lightning EMP heating of the lower ionosphere [2]. This work discusses remote sensing and modeling of such an event (4th of Nov. 2012, 3:04:27 UT, North Sea) allowing to characterize the disturbance conditions with regard to time development and space extension.

  1. Characteristics of layers, waves and turbulence in the atmosphere and ionosphere as estimated by GPS space radio-holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, Alexander; Gubenko, Vladimir; Matyugov, Stanislav; Pavelyev, Alexey

    The spatial, seasonal and geographical distrubutions of the intensity of layers, turbulence and internal waves at different altitudes in the atmosphere and ionosphere of the Earth are presented. The results have been obtained on the base of locality principle using a new phase acceleration-intensity method for analysis of the GPS radio occultation signals. This methodology has been applied to mesearements of the inclination and altitude of ionospheric layers. Obtained information has been used for estimation of the front orientation, internal frequency and phase speed of the internal waves in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. A new index of the ionospheric activity as measured from the phase of radio waves passed through the ionosphere is introduced and its high correlation with S4 scintillation index is established. This correlation indicates the significant influence of ionospheric layers on variations of characteristics of radio waves in transionospheric communication links. Specially for the troposphere the geographical distribution of the weak total absorption (about of 1-2 db) of the radio waves at GPS frequencies in the Earth atmosphere corresponding to influence of the oxygen and water vapor in the troposphere is measured with accuracy better than 0.1 db. Obtained results expanded the applicable domain of the GPS space radio-holography for global investigation of the natural processes in the atmosphere and ionosphere as function of solar activity and space weather effects. The new phase acceleration-intensity method is also a basic tool which can be applied for data analysis of future planetary radio occultation missions

  2. Jupiter: As a planet. [its physical characteristics and radio waves emitted from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The planet Jupiter, its planetary mass and atmosphere, radio waves emitted from Jupiter, thermal radiation, internal structure of Jupiter, and the possibility of life on Jupiter are discussed. Educational study projects are included.

  3. Comparison of pulse propagation and gain saturation characteristics among different input pulse shapes in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, Suchi; Das, Narottam; Nordholm, Sven; Razaghi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the pulse propagation and gain saturation characteristics for different input optical pulse shapes with different energy levels in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). A finite-difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM) is used to solve the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation (MNLSE) for the simulation of nonlinear optical pulse propagation and gain saturation characteristics in the SOAs. In this MNLSE, the gain spectrum dynamics, gain saturation are taken into account those are depend on the carrier depletion, carrier heating, spectral hole-burning, group velocity dispersion, self-phase modulation and two photon absorption. From this simulation, we obtained the output waveforms and spectra for different input pulse shapes considering different input energy levels. It has shown that the output pulse shape has changed due to the variation of input parameters, such as input pulse shape, input pulse width, and input pulse energy levels. It also shown clearly that the peak position of the output waveforms are shifted toward the leading edge which is due to the gain saturation of the SOA. We also compared the gain saturation characteristics in the SOA for different input pulse shapes.

  4. On some statistical characteristics of radio-rich CMEs in the solar cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Joginder; Mittal, Nishant; Narain, Udit

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we have presented the properties of radio-rich coronal mass ejections (CMEs), during the period 1997-2013. The CME event accompanied by the type II radio burst is referred to as radio-loud (RL), while the one lacking a type II burst is termed radio-quiet (RQ). These radio rich CMEs produce type II (1-14 MHz), i.e. decametric-hectometric or DH radio burst. It is found that the average width of all DH CMEs during the study period is 235 and 75% of the DH CMEs are halo CMEs in solar cycle 24. The DH CMEs linear speeds distribution is in the range 112-3387 km/s, with an average speed of 1043 km/s; the acceleration varies between 434 m/s2 and -179 m/s2. About 62% of the DH CMEs are decelerated. A CME associated with a type II burst and originating close to the center of the solar disk typically results in a shock at Earth in 2-3 days and hence can be used to predict shock arrival at Earth.

  5. Propagation characteristics of nighttime mesospheric waves observed with an all-sky camera at Tromsoe, Norway in 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Shin-Ichiro; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Nozawa, Satonori; Otsuka, Yuichi; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Suzuki, Shin; Hall, Chris; Meek, Chris; Manson, Alan

    An important aspect of the wind dynamics in the mesosphere is to know characteristics of the atmospheric gravity waves, such as propagation direction, zonal and meridional wavenumbers, horizontal wavelength, apparent phase speed, and intensity perturbation amplitude, because it is widely known that the atmospheric gravity waves transport energy and momentum from the lower atmosphere to the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere. Statistical analysis of the OH airglow images measured with all-sky cameras (ASC) at low and middle latitudes suggest seasonal, latitudinal dependencies of the wave characteristics. In particular, the wave prop-agation direction shows clear seasonal variations dependent on latitudes and may also be on longitudes. For example, northward or northeastward propagations are predominant in sum-mer at Rikubetsu (43.5 N, 143.8 E) and Shigaraki (34.9 N, 136.1 E), Japan; but westward and southwestward propagation are predominant in winter at Rikubetsu and Shigaraki, respectively. Another statistical result at equatorial region suggests that eastward and westward directions are predominant in winter and summer, respectively, at Kototabang (0.2 S, 100.3 E), although the propagation direction can be found in all directions. These seasonal, geographical depen-dencies of the wave propagation direction are controlled by wind filtering, ducting processes, and relevant location of the wave sources in the lower atmosphere. A new all-sky camera (cam-era 12 of the Optical Mesosphere Thermosphere Imagers (OMTIs)) was installed at Troms EISCAT radar site in Norway (69.6 N, 19.2 E; EISCAT radar: European Incoherent Scatter radar) in January 2009. The camera has a filter turret to programmatically select one of the six optical filters (557.7 nm, 630.0 nm, OH band (720-910 nm), 589.3 nm, 572.5 nm, and 732.0 nm) for one exposure interval. This study focuses on data taken with the OH-band filter to study the mesospheric gravity waves. Wave characteristics of the mesospheric gravity wave at high latitudes still remain as fundamental questions because they have not yet been investigated significantly compared with the middle and low latitudes. The wave characteristics from this study should be compared with the results at middle and low latitudes. Comparison study is also done with the meteor radar and the MF radar at the same site in order to know the background wind dynamics in the mesosphere.

  6. Propagation Characteristics of Laser-Generated Rayleigh Waves in Coating-Substrate Structures with Anisotropic and Viscoelastic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Zhang, Shu-yi; Xia, Jian-ping

    2015-06-01

    The propagation characteristics of laser-generated Rayleigh waves in coating-substrate structures with anisotropic and viscoelastic properties have been investigated quantitatively. Based on the plane strain theory, finite element models for simulating laser-generated Rayleigh waves in coating-substrate structures are established, in which the carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy matrix composite and aluminum are used as the coating and/or the substrate alternately. The numerical results exhibit that the characteristics of the laser-generated Rayleigh waves, including attenuation, velocity, and dispersion, are mainly and closely related to the anisotropic and viscoelastic properties of the composite in the coating-substrate structures.

  7. Characteristics pertinent to propagation of pulsating pressure in the channels of turbine machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Chen, Zuoyi

    2007-01-01

    A new model describing the propagation of the pressure pulsations in the intricately shaped channels of turbine machines is presented. The proposed model was successfully used to analyze two emergency events: a failure of a steam turbine’s cast diaphragm and a failure of a rocket engine’s oxygen pump booster stage.

  8. Three-dimensional propagation characteristics of the leaders in the attachment process of a downward negative lightning flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Weitao; Gao, Yan; Chen, Luwen; Qi, Qi; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Shaodong; Yan, Xu; Chen, Chang; Zhang, Yijun

    2015-12-01

    A downward negative lightning flash that contained three return strokes and terminated on a 440-m-high building in Guangzhou in 2012 was analyzed. The three-dimensional (3-D) channels of the return stroke and an unconnected upward leader (UUL) were reconstructed using the dual-station optical observation data. The 3-D propagation characteristics of the downward leader, the upward connecting leader (UCL), and the UUL during the attachment process prior to the first return stroke were obtained. For the 3-D propagation speed, both the UCL and the UUL exhibit an increasing trend after their inception, whereas the downward leader shows no clear trend, except for the final 200 μs preceding the first return stroke onset. The speed of the UCL can reach five times that of the downward leader. The two-dimensional propagation characteristics of these leaders during the attachment process were also analyzed using single-station high-speed video recordings and compared with the 3-D results.

  9. Deep radio occultations and 'evolute flashes' - Their characteristics and utility for planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, V. R.; Tyler, G. L.; Freeman, W. T.

    1979-01-01

    Deep radio occultation signals from spacecraft passing behind planets may provide data on atmospheric absorption, turbulence, and structure, as well as information on the effects of planetary gravitational moments, rotation and zonal winds on the atmospheric shape. The strength of radio signals from a spacecraft passing behind a planet will at first decrease because of defocusing in the atmosphere, but then increase as the evolute of the planetary limb is neared, due to focusing caused by limb curvature within the evolute. Within the evolute, the availability of four simultaneous signal paths over four limb positions may render focused signals instantaneously great. The passage of Voyager 1 behind Jupiter and Voyager 2 behind Saturn will provide a test of deep radio occultation studies.

  10. Propagation characteristics of two-color laser pulses in homogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemlata, Saroch, Akanksha; Jha, Pallavi

    2015-11-01

    An analytical and numerical study of the evolution of two-color, sinusoidal laser pulses in cold, underdense, and homogeneous plasma has been presented. The wave equations for the radiation fields driven by linear as well as nonlinear contributions due to the two-color laser pulses have been set up. A variational technique is used to obtain the simultaneous equations describing the evolution of the laser spot size, pulse length, and chirp parameter. Numerical methods are used to graphically analyze the simultaneous evolution of these parameters due to the combined effect of the two-color laser pulses. Further, the pulse parameters are compared with those obtained for a single laser pulse. Significant focusing, compression, and enhanced positive chirp is obtained due to the combined effect of simultaneously propagating two-color pulses as compared to a single pulse propagating in plasma.

  11. Propagation characteristics of Bessel beams generated by continuous, incoherent light sources.

    PubMed

    Altıngöz, Ceren; Yalızay, Berna; Akturk, Selcuk

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the propagation behavior of Bessel beams generated by incoherent, continuous light sources. We perform experiments with narrowband and broadband light emitting diodes, and, for comparison, with a laser diode. We observe that the formation of Bessel beams is affected minimally by temporal coherence, while spatial coherence determines the longitudinal evolution of the beam profile. With spatially incoherent beams, the fringe contrast is comparable to the coherent case at the beginning of the Bessel zone, while it completely fades away by propagation, turning into a cylindrical light pipe. Our results show that beam shaping methods can be extended to cases of limited spatial coherence, paving the way for potential new uses and applications of such sources. PMID:26367302

  12. Propagation characteristics of 20/30 GHz links with a 40 deg masking angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Kantak, Anil V.; Le, Choung

    1994-01-01

    An effective means of reducing Ka-band propagation loss is the use of high elevation angle paths, i.e., a large masking angle, between earth stations and the space platform. Experimental data have shown that the signal loss associated with most atmospheric effects is inversely proportional to sin(theta), where theta denotes the path elevation angle. A large masking angle and a generous link margin are the primary tools used in the Teledesic Corporation network to minimize atmospheric-related signal outages. This report documents the results of a study sponsored by Teledesic Corporation to characterize the effect of radiowave propagation on Teledesic's links. The recent Olympus campaign in Europe and the U.S. has provided new information that is not included. Therefore, CCIR recommendations and NASA Propagation Handbook models constitute the base of this study, and, when applicable, data from other sources have been used to improve the predictions. Furthermore, attention has been given to data from the Olympus campaign. The effects investigated during this study include gas, rain, fog, sand, and cloud attenuation; diversity gain; scintillation; and depolarization.

  13. Acoustic propagation and atmosphere characteristics derived from infrasonic waves generated by the Concorde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pichon, Alexis; Garcs, Milton; Blanc, Elisabeth; Barthlmy, Maud; Drob, Doug P.

    2002-01-01

    Infrasonic signals generated by daily supersonic Concorde flights between North America and Europe have been consistently recorded by an array of microbarographs in France. These signals are used to investigate the effects of atmospheric variability on long-range sound propagation. Statistical analysis of wave parameters shows seasonal and daily variations associated with changes in the wind structure of the atmosphere. The measurements are compared to the predictions obtained by tracing rays through realistic atmospheric models. Theoretical ray paths allow a consistent interpretation of the observed wave parameters. Variations in the reflection level, travel time, azimuth deviation and propagation range are explained by the source and propagation models. The angular deviation of a ray's azimuth direction, due to the seasonal and diurnal fluctuations of the transverse wind component, is found to be ~5 from the initial launch direction. One application of the seasonal and diurnal variations of the observed phase parameters is the use of ground measurements to estimate fluctuations in the wind velocity at the reflection heights. The simulations point out that care must be taken when ascribing a phase velocity to a turning height. Ray path simulations which allow the correct computation of reflection heights are essential for accurate phase identifications.

  14. Acoustic propagation and atmosphere characteristics derived from infrasonic waves generated by the Concorde.

    PubMed

    Le, Pichon Alexis; Garcs, Milton; Blanc, Elisabeth; Barthlmy, Maud; Drob, Doug P

    2002-01-01

    Infrasonic signals generated by daily supersonic Concorde flights between North America and Europe have been consistently recorded by an array of microbarographs in France. These signals are used to investigate the effects of atmospheric variability on long-range sound propagation. Statistical analysis of wave parameters shows seasonal and daily variations associated with changes in the wind structure of the atmosphere. The measurements are compared to the predictions obtained by tracing rays through realistic atmospheric models. Theoretical ray paths allow a consistent interpretation of the observed wave parameters. Variations in the reflection level, travel time, azimuth deviation and propagation range are explained by the source and propagation models. The angular deviation of a ray's azimuth direction, due to the seasonal and diurnal fluctuations of the transverse wind component, is found to be approximately 5 degrees from the initial launch direction. One application of the seasonal and diurnal variations of the observed phase parameters is the use of ground measurements to estimate fluctuations in the wind velocity at the reflection heights. The simulations point out that care must be taken when ascribing a phase velocity to a turning height. Ray path simulations which allow the correct computation of reflection heights are essential for accurate phase identifications. PMID:11837968

  15. Field observation of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation characteristics of an estuarine salt wedge.

    PubMed

    Reeder, D Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The estuarine environment often hosts a salt wedge, the stratification of which is a function of the tide's range and speed of advance, river discharge volumetric flow rate, and river mouth morphology. Competing effects of temperature and salinity on sound speed in this stratified environment control the degree of acoustic refraction occurring along an acoustic path. A field experiment was carried out in the Columbia River Estuary to test the hypothesis: the estuarine salt wedge is acoustically observable in terms of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation. Linear frequency-modulated acoustic signals in the 500-2000 Hz band were transmitted during the advance and retreat of the salt wedge during May 27-29, 2013. Results demonstrate that the salt wedge front is the dominant physical mechanism controlling acoustic propagation in this environment: received signal energy is relatively stable before and after the passage of the salt wedge front when the acoustic path consists of a single medium (either entirely fresh water or entirely salt water), and suffers a 10-15 dB loss and increased variability during salt wedge front passage. Physical parameters and acoustic propagation modeling corroborate and inform the acoustic observations. PMID:26827001

  16. ESTABLISHMENT OF BESNOITIA DARLINGI FROM OPOSSUMS (DIDELPHIS VIRGINIANA) IN EXPERIMENTAL INTERMEDIATE AND DEFINITIVE HOSTS, PROPAGATION IN CELL CULTURE, AND DESCRIPTION OF ULTRASTRUCTURAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERISTICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Besnoitia darlingi from naturally infected opossums (Didelphis virginiana) from Mississippi, USA, was propagated experimentally in mice, cats, and cell culture and was characterised according to ultrastructural, genetic, and life-history characteristics. Cats fed tissue cysts from opossums ...

  17. Propagation Characteristics of Finite Ground Coplanar Waveguide on Si Substrates With Porous Si and Polyimide Interface Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Itotia, Isaac K.; Drayton, Rhonda Franklin

    2003-01-01

    Measured and modeled propagation characteristics of Finite Ground Coplanar (FGC) waveguide fabricated on a 15 ohm-cm Si substrate with a 23 micron thick, 68% porous Si layer and a 20 micron thick polyimide interface layer are presented for the first time. Attenuation and effective permittivity as function of the FGC geometry and the bias between the center conductor and the ground planes are presented. It is shown that the porous Si reduces the attenuation by 1 dB/cm compared to FGC lines with only polyimide interface layers, and the polyimide on porous silicon demonstrates negligible bias dependence.

  18. Fields and propagation characteristics in vacuum of an ultrashort tightly focused radially polarized laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamin, Yousef I.

    2015-11-01

    Analytic expressions for the electric and magnetic fields of a radially polarized ultrashort and tightly focused laser pulse, propagating in vacuum, are derived from scalar and vector potentials satisfying simple initial conditions. It is shown that for a pulse of axial length comparable to a wavelength, only the zeroth (lowest-order) term in a power-series expansion of the vector potential is needed. A procedure is outlined which may be used to obtain the fields analytically, to any desired order. Most of the needed analytic work is done that would lead to the vector potential from which the fields may be derived and the main expressions are given.

  19. Rupture propagation and seismic energy radiation along fault surfaces of fractal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, S.; Aochi, H.

    2005-12-01

    We study rupture propagation in a 2D/3D infinite elastic medium with a slip-weakening friction law and heterogeneous distribution of slip-weakening distance, Dc. Ide and Aochi (2005 JGR) numerically demonstrated statistically self-similar rupture growths in a 3D space using a set of circular patches that obey a power-law size statistics. They showed that the rupture propagation velocity was sub-shear in average, but it could exceed S-wave velocity locally. Moment rate functions of most events had initial phases, but these were useless to predict the final event size. Seismic energy radiation from each model scaled linearly with seismic moment as expected from the self-similarity. We present a simple 2D model of shear crack growth to further investigate the effects of fractal property and Dc scaling. We define the local values of Dc to be proportional to the size of asperities, which is measured on a randomly generated fractal surface in the macroscopic slip direction, and calculate the Dc distribution multiplying a proportionality constant A. The initial, yield, and residual stresses are homogeneous over entire model area except within an initial nucleation area where Dc value is a local minimum. Changing the values of Dc and A, we simulate spontaneous rupture propagation from numerous local minimums. Each rupture is calculated till it stops spontaneously (stopped event) or breaks the entire model space (non-stopping event). We use a boundary integration equation method with a renormalization technique developed by Aochi and Ide (2004). When D = 1, most ruptures naturally stop and the probability of rupture arrest is almost constant at any size. The ratio of non-stopping events increases as A decreases and D increases. At the limit to D = 2, where the topography becomes white noise, it is natural that such high irregularity acts as a spatially uniform Dc and no rupture stops once starts. For these non-stopping events, the final rupture area should be determined by other factor such as stress heterogeneity that is not considered in the present model. For many stopped events, we observe dynamic behavior similar to those visible in our 3D circular patch simulation, such as average sub-shear rupture propagation, local acceleration and deceleration of rupture front, and initial phase in radiated seismograms. The ratio between seismic energy and seismic moment is almost constant for the stopped events except for very small ones.

  20. A Study on Propagation Characteristic of One-dimensional Stress Wave in Functionally Graded Armor Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. Y.; Liu, X.; Cao, D. F.; Mei, H.; Lei, Z. T.; Liu, L. S.

    2013-03-01

    The development of Functionally Graded Materials (FGM) for energy-absorbing applications requires understanding of stress wave propagation in these structures in order to optimize their resistance to failure. One-dimensional stress wave in FGM composites under elastic and plastic wave loading have been investigated. The stress distributions through the thickness and stress status have been analyzed and some comparisons have been done with the materials of sharp interfaces (two-layered material). The results demonstrate that the gradient structure design greatly decreases the severity of the stress concentrations at the interfaces and there are no clear differences in stress distribution in FGM composites under elastic and plastic wave loading.

  1. Effect of Radio Frequency Plasma Treatment on Evaporation Behavior and Characteristics of RuCr Alloy Powder.

    PubMed

    Jung, Taek-Kyun; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kwon, Hyouk-Chon; Park, Soo-Keun; Hon, Jong-Whan; Jung, Seung-Boo; Baek, Jong-Jin; Jang, Kyu-Bong

    2015-11-01

    The evaporation behavior and characteristics of jet milled RuCr alloy powders processed by radio-frequency (RF) plasma treatment were evaluated during this study. RF plasma treatment was found to be effective in eliminating internal pores and in manufacturing spherical powder. However, the RF plasma treatment resulted in the evaporation of Cr. The degree of evaporation of Cr was significantly affected by the powder feeding rate. As a result, it was found that controlling the torch power was more effective than controlling the powder feeding rate for obtaining desirable RuCr alloy powders. PMID:26726528

  2. Compared propagation characteristics of superluminal and slow light in SOA and EDFA based on rectangle signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Chongqing; Sun, Zhenchao; Mao, Yaya; Liu, Lanlan; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Based on the general mechanism of the coherent population oscillations (CPO) in the Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) and Erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA), the group time delay of rectangle signal propagating in the active media is deduced. Compared with the sinusoidal signal, the time delay difference between the fundamental harmonics (FHFD: fundamental harmonic fractional delay) is first investigated in detail for the rectangle signal which is more popularly used in the digital signal systems. The plenty of simulations based on the propagation equations and some experiments for the sinusoidal and rectangle signals are used to analyze the differences and evaluate the slow and superluminal light effects. Furthermore, the time delay/advance always takes place accompanying with the signal distortion, which is evaluated by the total harmonic distortion (THD). The distortion caused by the SOA is smaller than that by the EDFA. A factor Q which is defined to evaluate the trade-off between the FHFD and the THD, shows that higher input power or higher optical gain is better for optical signal processing and optical telecommunications, and the SOA is more suitable for the higher modulation frequency (>10 GHz).

  3. [Spring propagation and size dynamics characteristics of two kinds of bee populations in Anhui Province].

    PubMed

    Yu, Linsheng; Meng, Xiangjin

    2002-09-01

    Systematical observations and researches were conducted on the population size dynamics of Apis mellifera Ligustica Spi. and Apis cerana cerana Feb. in Wanzhong, Wanxi and Wannan mountainous area in Anhui Province in 1997-1999. The results showed that the bee population size was influenced by climate and flower fertility, which was higher in Spring and Autumn, and lower in Summer and Winter. The propagation and renewal of A. mellifera in Autumn were quicker than those of A. cerana cerana, while the effect of overcoming Summer was inferior to that of Apis cerana cerana. The sex ratio of A. mellifera was (314.4 +/- 289.9):1-(329.4 +/- 305.8):1, and that of A. cerana cerana was (334.2 +/- 235.5):1-(413.1 +/- 377.2):1. The birth of drones was seasonal, and the age structure of each bee population was variable. PMID:12561176

  4. Propagation Characteristics of Pc 1-2 Waves at High Latitude Ionospheric Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Young, M. A.; Lessard, M.; Engebretson, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    ULF Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations have been observed from a ground array of search-coil magnetometers predominantly in the pre-noon to post-noon sector of Antarctica. With extensive coverage from geomagnetic latitudes of 62 to 87 and good alignment along the magnetic meridian, the five search-coil magnetometers operating aboard American Automated Geophysical Observatories (AGOs) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) showed very clear ducting with spectral power attenuation of the waves in the waveguide. Halley Station, located at the lowest latitude, typically observed the highest spectral wave power and well-defined band-limited signatures with the same wave event, showing less wave power, found at the other four remote stations at higher latitudes. This is a clear implication of the ducting of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the ionospheric waveguide, which are generated from the equatorial magnetosphere along the geomagnetic field lines and transmitted to the ionosphere. Since the wave event was observed over a very wide range in latitude, the observation of the wave propagation will provide significant information on the ULF wave ducting in the waveguide and the source region. This study presents the observations of over 100 Pc1 events showing spectral power attenuation in the waveguide. The changes of the polarization properties such as ellipticity and polarization ellipse major axis direction during the propagation are also shown. It is shown both qualitatively and quantitatively how these behaviors are affected by specific ionospheric conditions (i.e. conductivity) and geomagnetic activity. In addition, CHAMP satellite data obtained in the ionosphere is also presented to validate the wave ducting.

  5. Source and Propagation Characteristics of Kilometric Continuum Observed with Multiple Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Anderson, R. R.; Green, J. L.; Matsumoto, H.

    2004-01-01

    Kilometric continuum radiation was first identified with the GEOTAIL Plasma Wave Instrument (PWI) as the high frequency extension of escaping continuum emissions in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 800 kHz. It consists of from a few to many narrow-band emissions. It was observed mainly near the magnetic equator, and its source was expected to be inside of the plasmapause and the topside equatorial region. Recently, data from the IMAGE Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) and Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) experiments have been used to show that kilometric continuum is generated at the plasmapause, in or near the magnetic equator, within a notch region, and have confirmed the expectation. Data from the CRRES PWI have also identified other sources from the equatorial density irregularities. An example of CRRES observations reveals a possibility that kilometric continuum has been radiated as a wide beam emission. The IMAGE and GEOTAIL simultaneous observations are not like the previous observations since they show it has been observed to have a very broad emission cone. It could also be the highest frequency continuum enhancement so far observed since it is associated with a high energy electron injection event.

  6. Characteristics of rainfall queues for rain attenuation studies over radio links at subtropical and equatorial Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonge, Akintunde A.; Afullo, Thomas J.

    2014-08-01

    Attenuation due to precipitation remains an important design factor in the future deployment of terrestrial and earth-space communication radio links. Largely, there are concerted efforts to understand the dynamics of precipitation in attenuation occurrence at subtropical, tropical, and equatorial region of Africa. In this deliberate approach, rainfall spikes pertaining to rain cells are conceptualized as distinct rain spike traffic over radio links, by applying queueing theory concepts. The queue distributions at Durban (29°52'S, 30°58'E) and Butare (2°36'S, 29°44'E)—respectively, of subtropical and equatorial climates—are investigated from distrometer measurements. The data sets at both sites are observed over four rain regimes: drizzle, widespread, shower, and thunderstorm. The queue parameters of service time and inter-arrival of rain spikes traffic at both regions are found to be Erlang-k distributed (Ek) and exponentially distributed (M), respectively. It is established that the appearance of rain rates over radio links invariably follows a First Come, First Served (FCFS), multi-server (s), infinite queue, and semi-Markovian process, designated as M/Ek/s/∞/FCFS discipline. Modeled queue parameters at both regions are found to vary significantly over different regimes. However, these queue parameters over the entire data set suggest similar queue patterns at both sites. More importantly, power law relationships describing other queue-related parameters are formulated. The paper concludes by demonstrating an application of queueing theory for rainfall synthesis. The proposed technique will provide an alternative method of estimating rain cell sizes and rain attenuation over satellite and terrestrial links.

  7. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  8. Atmospheric propagation characteristics of highest importance to commercial free space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korevaar, Eric J.; Kim, Isaac I.; McArthur, Bruce

    2003-04-01

    There is a certain amount of disconnect between the perception and reality of Free Space Optics (FSO), both in the marketplace and in the technical community. In the marketplace, the requirement for FSO technology has not grown to even a fraction of the levels predicted a few years ago. In the technical community, proposed solutions for the limitations of FSO continue to miss the mark. The main commercial limitation for FSO is that light does not propagate very far in dense fog, which occurs a non-negligible amount of the time. There is no known solution for this problem (other than using microwave or other modality backup systems), and therefore FSO equipment has to be priced very competitively to sell in a marketplace dominated by copper wire, fiber optic cabling and increasingly lower cost and higher bandwidth wireless microwave equipment. Expensive technologies such as adaptive optics, which could potentially increase equipment range in clear weather, do not justify the added cost when expected bad weather conditions are taken into account. In this paper we present a simple equation to fit average data for probability of exceeding different atmospheric attenuation values. This average attenuation equation is then used to compare the expected availability performance as a function of link distance for representative FSO systems of different cost.

  9. Theoretical Analysis of the Optical Propagation Characteristics in a Fiber-Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linlin; Yang, Jun; Yang, Zhong; Wan, Xiaoping; Hu, Ning; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is widely used for its high precision and real-time analysis. Fiber-optic SPR sensor is easy for miniaturization, so it is commonly used in the development of portable detection equipment. It can also be used for remote, real-time, and online detection. In this study, a wavelength modulation fiber-optic SPR sensor is designed, and theoretical analysis of optical propagation in the optical fiber is also done. Compared with existing methods, both the transmission of a skew ray and the influence of the chromatic dispersion are discussed. The resonance wavelength is calculated at two different cases, in which the chromatic dispersion in the fiber core is considered. According to the simulation results, a novel multi-channel fiber-optic SPR sensor is likewise designed to avoid defaults aroused by the complicated computation of the skew ray as well as the chromatic dispersion. Avoiding the impact of skew ray can do much to improve the precision of this kind of sensor. PMID:23748170

  10. Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Hermannsen, Line; Tougaard, Jakob; Beedholm, Kristian; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-01-01

    Airguns used in seismic surveys are among the most prevalent and powerful anthropogenic noise sources in marine habitats. They are designed to produce most energy below 100 Hz, but the pulses have also been reported to contain medium-to-high frequency components with the potential to affect small marine mammals, which have their best hearing sensitivity at higher frequencies. In shallow water environments, inhabited by many of such species, the impact of airgun noise may be particularly challenging to assess due to complex propagation conditions. To alleviate the current lack of knowledge on the characteristics and propagation of airgun pulses in shallow water with implications for effects on small marine mammals, we recorded pulses from a single airgun with three operating volumes (10 in3, 25 in3 and 40 in3) at six ranges (6, 120, 200, 400, 800 and 1300 m) in a uniform shallow water habitat using two calibrated Reson 4014 hydrophones and four DSG-Ocean acoustic data recorders. We show that airgun pulses in this shallow habitat propagated out to 1300 meters in a way that can be approximated by a 18log(r) geometric transmission loss model, but with a high pass filter effect from the shallow water depth. Source levels were back-calculated to 192 dB re Pa2s (sound exposure level) and 200 dB re 1 Pa dB Leq-fast (rms over 125 ms duration), and the pulses contained substantial energy up to 10 kHz, even at the furthest recording station at 1300 meters. We conclude that the risk of causing hearing damage when using single airguns in shallow waters is small for both pinnipeds and porpoises. However, there is substantial potential for significant behavioral responses out to several km from the airgun, well beyond the commonly used shut-down zone of 500 meters. PMID:26214849

  11. Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hermannsen, Line; Tougaard, Jakob; Beedholm, Kristian; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-01-01

    Airguns used in seismic surveys are among the most prevalent and powerful anthropogenic noise sources in marine habitats. They are designed to produce most energy below 100 Hz, but the pulses have also been reported to contain medium-to-high frequency components with the potential to affect small marine mammals, which have their best hearing sensitivity at higher frequencies. In shallow water environments, inhabited by many of such species, the impact of airgun noise may be particularly challenging to assess due to complex propagation conditions. To alleviate the current lack of knowledge on the characteristics and propagation of airgun pulses in shallow water with implications for effects on small marine mammals, we recorded pulses from a single airgun with three operating volumes (10 in3, 25 in3 and 40 in3) at six ranges (6, 120, 200, 400, 800 and 1300 m) in a uniform shallow water habitat using two calibrated Reson 4014 hydrophones and four DSG-Ocean acoustic data recorders. We show that airgun pulses in this shallow habitat propagated out to 1300 meters in a way that can be approximated by a 18log(r) geometric transmission loss model, but with a high pass filter effect from the shallow water depth. Source levels were back-calculated to 192 dB re µPa2s (sound exposure level) and 200 dB re 1 µPa dB Leq-fast (rms over 125 ms duration), and the pulses contained substantial energy up to 10 kHz, even at the furthest recording station at 1300 meters. We conclude that the risk of causing hearing damage when using single airguns in shallow waters is small for both pinnipeds and porpoises. However, there is substantial potential for significant behavioral responses out to several km from the airgun, well beyond the commonly used shut-down zone of 500 meters. PMID:26214849

  12. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  13. Signatures and Characteristics of Internal Gravity Waves in the Venus' and Mars' Atmospheres as Revealed by the Radio Occultation Temperature Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubenko, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Alexander; Andreev, Vitali; Salimzyanov, Rishat; Pavelyev, Alexey

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that internal gravity waves (IGWs) affect the structure and mean circulation of the Earth' middle and upper atmosphere by transporting energy and horizontal momentum upward from the lower atmosphere. The IGWs modulate the background atmospheric structure, producing a periodic pattern of spatial and temporal variations in the wind velocity, temperature and density. Similar effects are anticipated for the Venus and Mars since IGWs are a characteristic of stably stratified atmosphere. For instance, Yakovlev et al. (1991) and Gubenko et al. (2008a) used the radio occultation (RO) data from Venera 15 and 16 missions to investigate the thermal structure and layering of the Venus' middle atmosphere. They noted that a wavelike periodic structure commonly appears in retrieved vertical profiles at altitudes above 60 km in the atmosphere where the static stability is large. Through comparisons between Magellan RO observations in the Venus' atmosphere, Hinson and Jenkins (1995) have demonstrated that small scale variations in retrieved temperature profiles at altitudes from 60 to 90 km are caused by a spectrum of vertical propagating IGWs. Temperature profiles from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) measurements reveal vertical wavelike structures assumed to be atmospheric IGWs in the Mars' lower atmosphere (Creasey et al., 2006). The very large IGW amplitudes inferred from MGS RO data imply a very significant role for IGWs in the atmospheric dynamics of Mars as well. There is one general problem inherent to all measurements of IGWs. Observed wavelike variations may alternatively be caused by the IGWs, turbulence or persistent layers in the atmosphere, and it is necessary to have an IGW identification criterion for the correct interpretation of obtained results. In this context, we have developed an original method for the determination of internal gravity wave parameters from a single vertical temperature profile measurement in a planetary atmosphere (Gubenko et al., 2008b, 2011). This method does not require any additional information not contained in the profile and may be used for the analysis of profiles measured by various techniques. The criterion for the IGW identification has been formulated and argued. In the case when this criterion is satisfied, the analyzed temperature fluctuations can be considered as wave-induced. The method is based on the analysis of relative amplitude thresholds of the wave temperature field and on the linear IGW saturation theory in which amplitude thresholds are restricted by dynamical (shear) instability processes in the atmosphere. When the amplitude of an internal wave reaches the shear instability limit, energy is assumed to be dissipated in such a way that the amplitude is maintained at the instability limit as the wave propagates upwards. An application of the developed method to the RO temperature data has given the possibility to identify the IGWs in the Venus' and Mars' atmospheres and to determine the magnitudes of key wave parameters such as the intrinsic frequency, amplitudes of vertical and horizontal perturbations of the wind velocity, vertical and horizontal wavelengths, intrinsic vertical and horizontal phase (and group) speeds, kinetic and potential energy, vertical fluxes of the wave energy and horizontal momentum. The obtained results of internal wave studies in the Venus' and Mars' atmospheres deduced from the Magellan and MGS RO temperature profiles are presented and discussed. This work was partially supported by the RFBR Grant (No. 10-02-01015-a) and program OFN-15 of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References Creasey, J. E., Forbes, J. M., and Hinson, D. P.: Global and seasonal distribution of gravity wave activity in Mars' lower atmosphere derived from MGS radio occultation data, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L01803, doi: 10.1029/2005GL024037, 2006. Gubenko, V.N., Andreev, V.E., and Pavelyev, A.G.: Detection of layering in the upper cloud layer of Venus northern polar atmosphere observed from radio occultation data, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E03001, doi:10.1029/2007

  14. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  15. Characteristics of kilohertz-ignited, radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharges in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Pei-Si; Li, Guo; Wang, Sen; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2009-11-01

    In this letter, ignited by a kilohertz atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier discharge (APDBD), the stable and uniform argon radio-frequency (rf) APDBDs are generated with lower rf ignition voltages compared to the conventional rf APDBDs without the aid of the kilohertz filamentary discharges. The experimental studies on the mechanisms of this dual-frequency APDBD method indicate that it is the filaments extending from the kilohertz electrode region to the rf electrode region that provide the seed electrons for the ignition of the rf APDBDs at the lower applied rf voltages. A 12-mm-long stable and uniform argon plasma jet is obtained using the coaxial-type plasma generator.

  16. Crack propagation through phase-separated glasses: effect of the characteristic size of disorder.

    PubMed

    Dalmas, Davy; Lelarge, Anne; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2008-12-19

    We perform fracture experiments on nanoscale phase-separated glasses and measure crack surface roughness by atomic force microscopy. The ability of tuning the phase domain size by thermal treatment allows us to test thoroughly the predictions of crack front depinning models about the scaling properties of crack surface roughness. It appears that, in the range of validity of these depinning models developed for the fracture of brittle materials, our experimental results show a quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions: Beyond the characteristic size of disorder, the roughness of crack surfaces obeys the logarithmic scaling early predicted by Ramanathan, Erta?, and Fisher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 873 (1997)]. PMID:19113722

  17. Analytical and experimental procedures for determining propagation characteristics of millimeter-wave gallium arsenide microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    In this report, a thorough analytical procedure is developed for evaluating the frequency-dependent loss characteristics and effective permittivity of microstrip lines. The technique is based on the measured reflection coefficient of microstrip resonator pairs. Experimental data, including quality factor Q, effective relative permittivity, and fringing for 50-omega lines on gallium arsenide (GaAs) from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz are presented. The effects of an imperfect open circuit, coupling losses, and loading of the resonant frequency are considered. A cosine-tapered ridge-guide text fixture is described. It was found to be well suited to the device characterization.

  18. Propagation characteristics of a focused laser beam in a strontium barium niobate photorefractive crystal under reverse external electric field.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q L; Liang, B L; Wang, Y; Deng, G Y; Jiang, Y H; Zhang, S H; Fu, G S; Simmonds, P J

    2014-10-01

    The propagation characteristics of a focused laser beam in a SBN:75 photorefractive crystal strongly depend on the signal-to-background intensity ratio (R=Is/Ib) under reverse external electric field. In the range 20>R>0.05, the laser beam shows enhanced self-defocusing behavior with increasing external electric field, while it shows self-focusing in the range 0.03>R>0.01. Spatial solitons are observed under a suitable reverse external electric field for R=0.025. A theoretical model is proposed to explain the experimental observations, which suggest a new type of soliton formation due to "enhancement" not "screening" of the external electrical field. PMID:25322227

  19. Investigation on broadband propagation characteristic of terahertz electromagnetic wave in anisotropic magnetized plasma in frequency and time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yuan; Han, Yiping; Ai, Xia; Liu, Xiuxiang

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave in an anisotropic magnetized plasma by JE convolution-finite difference time domain method. The anisotropic characteristic of the plasma, which leads to right-hand circularly polarized (RCP) and right-hand circularly polarized (LCP) waves, has been taken into account. The interaction between electromagnetic waves and magnetized plasma is illustrated by reflection and transmission coefficients for both RCP and LCP THz waves. The effects of both the magnetized plasma thickness and the external magnetized field are analyzed and numerical results demonstrate that the two factors could influence the THz wave greatly. It is worthy to note that besides the reflection and transmission coefficients in the frequency domain, the waveform of the electric field in the time domain varying with thicknesses and external magnetic fields for different polarized direction has been studied.

  20. NASA Propagation Studies Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angkasa, Krisjani S.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA propagation studies objective is to enable the development of new commercial satellite communication systems and services by providing timely data and models about propagation of satellite radio signals through the intervening environment and to support NASA missions. In partnership with industry and academia, the program leverages unique NASA assets (currently Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) to obtain propagation data. The findings of the study are disseminated through referred journals, NASA reference publications, workshops, electronic media, and direct interface with industry.

  1. Characteristics of vibrational wave propagation and attenuation in submarine fluid-filled pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jin; Zhang, Juan

    2015-04-01

    As an important part of lifeline engineering in the development and utilization of marine resources, the submarine fluid-filled pipeline is a complex coupling system which is subjected to both internal and external flow fields. By utilizing Kennard's shell equations and combining with Helmholtz equations of flow field, the coupling equations of submarine fluid-filled pipeline for n=0 axisymmetrical wave motion are set up. Analytical expressions of wave speed are obtained for both s=1 and s=2 waves, which correspond to a fluid-dominated wave and an axial shell wave, respectively. The numerical results for wave speed and wave attenuation are obtained and discussed subsequently. It shows that the frequency depends on phase velocity, and the attenuation of this mode depends strongly on material parameters of the pipe and the internal and the external fluid fields. The characteristics of PVC pipe are studied for a comparison. The effects of shell thickness/radius ratio and density of the contained fluid on the model are also discussed. The study provides a theoretical basis and helps to accurately predict the situation of submarine pipelines, which also has practical application prospect in the field of pipeline leakage detection.

  2. Propagation characteristics of some novel coplanar waveguide transmission lines on GaAs at MM-wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    1986-01-01

    Three new Coplanar Waveguide (CPW) transmission lines, namely, Suspended CPW (SCPW), Stripline-like Suspended CPW (SSCPW) and Inverted CPW (ICPW), are proposed and also analyzed for their propagation characteristics. The substrate thickness, permittivity and dimensions of housing are assumed to be arbitrary. These structures have the following advantages over conventional CPW. Firstly, the ratio of guide wavelength to free space wavelength is closer to unity which results in larger dimensions and hence lower tolerances. Secondly, the effective dielectric constant is lower and hence the electromagnetic field energies are concentrated more in the air regions which should reduce attenuation. Thirdly, for a prescribed impedance level, the above structures have a wider slot width for identical strip width. Thus, low impedance lines can be achieved with reasonable slot dimensions. Fourthly, in an inverted CPW shunt mounting of active devices, such as Gunn and IMPATT diodes, between the strip and the metal trough is possible. This feature further enhances the attractiveness of the above structures. Lastly, an E-plane probe type transition from a rectangular waveguide to suspended CPW can also be easily realized. The computed results for GaAs at Ka-band illustrate the variation of normalized guide wavelength, effective dielectric constant and the characteristic impedance as a function of the: (1) frequency; (2) distance of separation between the trough side walls; (3) normalized strip and slot widths; and (4) normalized air gap.

  3. Theoretical investigation of surface acoustic wave propagation characteristics in periodic (AlN/ZnO)N /diamond multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lirong; Li, Cuiping; Li, Mingji; Wang, Fang; Yang, Baohe

    2014-11-01

    Propagation characteristics of surface acoustic wave (SAW) in periodic (AlN/ZnO)N/diamond multilayer structures were theoretically investigated using effective permittivity method. The phase velocity Vp, electromechanical coupling coefficient K2, and temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the Sezawa mode are analyzed for different thicknesses-to-wavelength H/?, thickness ratios of AlN to ZnO Rh, and periods of alternating ZnO and AlN layers N. Results show that, comparing with AlN/ZnO/diamond multilayer structure, the periodic (AlN/ZnO)N/diamond multilayer structure (N ? 2) shows excellent electromechanical coupling and temperature stable characteristics with significantly improved K2 and TCF. The largest coupling coefficient of 3.0% associated with a phase velocity of 5726 m/s and a TCF of -29.2 ppm/C can be reached for Rh = 0.2 and N = 2. For a low TCF of -24.4 ppm/C, a large coupling coefficient of 2.0% associated with a phase velocity of 7058 m/s can be obtained for Rh = 1.0 and N = 5. The simulated results can be used to design the low loss and good temperature stability SAW devices of gigahertz-band application.

  4. Evaluation of Wave Propagation Properties during a True-Triaxial Rock Fracture Experiment using Acoustic Emission Frequency Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, S. D.; Ghofrani Tabari, M.; Nasseri, M. B.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A true-triaxial deformation experiment was conducted to study the evolution of wave propagation properties by using frequency characteristics of AE waveforms to diagnose the state of fracturing in a sample of sandstone. Changes in waveform frequency content has been interpreted as either the generation of progressively larger fractures or the relative attenuation of high-frequency wave components as a result of micro-crack formation. A cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone was initially loaded to a stress state of σ1 = σ2 = 35 MPa, σ3 = 5 MPa at which point σ1¬ was increased until failure. Acoustic emission (AE) activity was monitored by 18 PZT transducers, three embedded in each platen. The sensor amplitude response spectrum was determined by following an absolute source calibration procedure and showed a relatively constant sensitivity in the frequency range between 20 kHz and 1200 kHz. Amplified waveforms were continuously recorded at a sampling rate of 10 MHz and 12-bit resolution. Continuous acoustic emission waveforms were harvested to extract discrete events. Using a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model, 48,502 events were locatable inside the sample volume. Prior to peak-stress, AE activity was associated with stable quasi-static growth of fractures coplanar with σ1 and σ2 located near the platen boundaries. In the post peak-stress regime, fracture growth displays unstable ¬dynamic propagation. Analysis of waveform frequency characteristics was limited to the pre peak-stress regime. Analysis of AE frequency characteristics was conducted on all 48,502 located AE events; each event file containing 18 waveforms of varied quality. If the signal to noise ratio was greater than 5, the waveforms power spectrum was estimated and the source-receiver raypath vector was calculated. The power spectrum of each waveform was divided into three frequency bands (Low: 100 - 300 kHz, Medium: 300 - 600 kHz and High: 600 - 1000 kHz) and the power in each band was calculated as a percentage of the total power within the 100-1000 kHz frequency band. The frequency band limits were carefully chosen to ensure that the component of power in each band was approximately equal in the early stages of the experiment. Next, issues related to the aperture effect were addressed. The frequency limit, above which there is azimuthal dependency, is a function of the sensing element diameter, the raypath azimuth (phi) and the P-wave velocity. Calculations indicated no significant aperture effect for 0 ≤ phi ≤ 60. All raypaths fitting these criteria were projected on a stereonet with the ratio of power held in the high frequency band (HF) to that held in the low frequency band (LF). Results show some underlying structure meaning that the HF/LF ratio is strongly dependent on raypath orientation. Transducer distortions and directionality effects were removed and source spectra corner frequencies were estimated to be above the frequency band of interest, suggesting the observed temporal and spatial changes in waveform frequency characteristics are a result of changing wave propagation properties (attenuation field) caused by progressive micro-crack formation.

  5. Determination of the time delay in the case of two-path propagation on the basis of the attenuation characteristics for two adjacent frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilroi, H. G.

    1979-01-01

    Pronounced fading occurring in the line of sight radio links at frequencies below 10 GHz can be traced to the effects of multipath propagation. Modulation disturbances depend on travel time differences between the direct wave and the wave which is reflected at atmospheric layers. A method described for the determination of the time delay is based on an indirect approach which utilizes the difference in fading at various frequencies. The method was employed in measurements involving a distance of 181 km. The results obtained in the measurement are discussed.

  6. Shallow structure and surface wave propagation characteristics of the Juan de Fuca plate from seismic ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shen, W.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Ambient noise cross-correlation analysis has been widely used to investigate the continental lithosphere, but the method has been applied much less to study the oceanic lithosphere due to the relative shortage of continuous ocean bottom seismic measurements. The Cascadia Initiative experiment possesses a total of 62 ocean bottom seismometers that spans much of the Juan de Fuca plate and provides data to investigate both the structure and evolution of the oceanic lithosphere near the Juan De Fuca ridge and the characteristics of surface waves and overtones propagating within the oceanic lithosphere. We produce ambient noise cross correlations for the first year of Cascadia OBS data for both the vertical and the horizontal components. The observed empirical Green's functions are first used to test the hypothesis that the near-ridge phase speeds can be described by a simple age-dependent formula, which we invert for an age-dependent shear wave speed model (Figure 1a). A shallow low shear velocity zone with a velocity minimum at about 20km depth is observed in Vsv and the lithosphere thickens with age faster than predicted by a half-space conductive cooling model (Figure 1b). To further understand the oceanic surface waves, we analyze the first higher mode Rayleigh waves that propagate within the Juan De Fuca plate and emerge on the North American continent and investigate the existence of radial anisotropy beneath the ridge by exploring the Rayleigh and Love wave Green's functions. The results of the study are summarized with the age-dependent shear velocity model along with some preliminary observations of both Love wave and higher mode Rayleigh waves.

  7. Analysis of propagation characteristics of flexural wave in honeycomb sandwich panel and design of loudspeaker for radiating inclined sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    A loudspeaker for an auditory guiding system is proposed. This loudspeaker utilizes inclined sound transformed from a flexural wave in a honeycomb sandwich panel. We focused on the fact that the inclined sound propagates extensively with uniform level and direction. Furthermore, sound can be generated without group delay dispersion because the phase velocity of the flexural wave in the sandwich panel becomes constant with increasing frequency. These characteristics can be useful for an auditory guiding system in public spaces since voice-guiding navigation indicates the right direction regardless of position on a pathway. To design the proposed loudspeaker, the behavior of the sandwich panel is predicted using a theoretical equation in which the honeycomb core is assumed as an orthotropic continuum. We calculated the phase velocity dispersion of the flexural wave in the sandwich panel and compared the results obtained using the equation with those of a simulation based on the finite element method and an experiment in order to confirm the applicability of the theoretical equation. It was confirmed that the phase velocities obtained using the theoretical equation and by the simulation were in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. The obtained results suggest that the behavior of the sandwich panel can be predicted using the parameters of the panel. In addition, we designed an optimized honeycomb sandwich panel for radiating inclined sound by calculating the phase velocity characteristics of various panels that have different parameters of core height and cell size using the theoretical equation. Sound radiation from the optimized panel was simulated and compared with that of a homogeneous plate. It was clear that the variance of the radiation angle with varying frequency of the optimized panel was smaller than that of the homogeneous plate. This characteristic of sound radiation with a uniform angle is useful for indicating the destination direction. On the basis of this fact, we established a design method of the flat-panel loudspeaker for generating inclined sound using a honeycomb sandwich panel.

  8. Characteristics of tropical cyclones and overshooting from GPS radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Rieckh, Therese; Steiner, Andrea; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2014-05-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are extreme weather events causing every year huge damages and several deaths. In some countries they are the natural catastrophes accounting for the major economic damages. The thermal structure of TCs gives important information on the cloud top height allowing for a better understanding of the troposphere-stratosphere transport, which is still poorly understood. The measurement of atmospheric parameters (such as temperature, pressure and humidity) with high vertical resolution and accuracy in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) is difficult especially during severe weather events (e.g TCs). Satellite remote sensing has improved the TC forecast and monitoring accuracy. In the last decade the Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) technique contributed to improve our knowledge especially at high troposphere altitudes and in remote regions of the globe thanks to the high vertical resolution, avoiding temperature smoothing issues (given by microwave and infrared instruments) in the UTLS and improving the poor temporal resolution and global coverage given by lidars and radars. We selected more than twenty-thousand GPS RO profiles co-located with TC best tracks for the period 2001 to 2012 and computed temperature anomaly profiles relative to a RO background climatology in order to detect TC cloud tops. We characterized the thermal structure for different ocean basins and for different TC intensities, distinguishing between tropical and extra-tropical cases. The analysis shows that all investigated storms have a common feature: they warm the troposphere and cool the UTLS near the cloud top. This behavior is amplified in the extra-tropical areas. Results reveal that the storms' cloud tops in the southern hemisphere basins reach higher altitudes and lower temperatures than in the northern hemisphere basins. We furthermore compared the cloud top height of each profile with the mean tropopause altitude (from the RO archive) in order to detect overshooting. We present a map of TC overshooting events indicating tropical areas which contribute most to UTLS transport and the large-scale atmospheric circulation.

  9. 75th anniversary of the N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 25 February 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-06-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) celebrating the 75th anniversary of the N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation of the RAS (IZMIRAN) was held in the IZMIRAN conference hall on 25 February 2015. The agenda of the session announced on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division contained the following reports: (1) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Moscow) "N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) yesterday, today, and tomorrow"; (2) Gvishiani A D (Geophysical Center, Moscow) "Studies of the terrestrial magnetic field and the network of Russian magnetic laboratories"; (3) Sokoloff D D (Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Magnetic dynamo questions"; (4) Petrukovich A A (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Some aspects of magnetosphere-ionosphere relations"; (5) Lukin D S (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region) "Current problems of ionospheric radio wave propagation"; (6) Safargaleev V V (Polar Geophysical Institute, Kola Scientific Center, RAS, Murmansk), Sergienko T I (Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Sweden), Kozlovskii A E (Sodankyl \\ddot a Geophysical Observatory, Finland), Safargaleev A V (St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg), Kotikov A L (St. Petersburg Branch of IZMIRAN, St. Petersburg) "Magnetic and optical measurements and signatures of reconnection in the cusp and vicinity"; (7) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Moscow) "Space solar research: achievements and prospects". Papers written on the basis of oral reports 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 are given below. • N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) yesterday, today, tomorrow, V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2015, Volume 58, Number 6, Pages 590-600 • Problems of magnetic dynamo, D D Sokoloff Physics-Uspekhi, 2015, Volume 58, Number 6, Pages 601-605 • Some aspects of magnetosphere-ionosphere relations, A A Petrukovich, M M Mogilevsky, A A Chernyshov, D R Shklyar Physics-Uspekhi, 2015, Volume 58, Number 6, Pages 606-611 • Magnetic and optical measurements and signatures of reconnection in the cusp and vicinity, V V Safargaleev, T I Sergienko, A V Safargaleev, A L Kotikov Physics-Uspekhi, 2015, Volume 58, Number 6, Pages 612-620 • Space solar research: achievements and prospects, V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2015, Volume 58, Number 6, Pages 621-629

  10. Case studies for solving the Saint-Venant equations using the method of characteristics: pipeline hydraulic transients and discharge propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, R. M.; Tiago Filho, G. L.; dos Santos, I. F. S.; da Silva, F. G. B.

    2014-03-01

    Hydraulic transients occur during a change from one equilibrium state to another, for example, in flows. The pipeline project should provide the head and discharge in any operating states, e.g., sudden valve opening or closure. Among the various numerical approaches for the calculation of pipeline transients, the method of characteristics (MOC) is advantageous This study aims to present a hydraulic transitory study as MOC applications for solving the Saint- Venant equations in two case studies: 1) in a penstock of a small hydropower system as a simple pipeline in the case of valve-closure in the downstream boundary with a reservoir in the upstream boundary; and 2) for discharge propagation into a channel by velocity and depth of the flow channel along space evaluation. The main data for the first case study consisted of a design head that is 182 meters, a turbine discharge of 13.82 m3/s, a diameter of 4 meters and length pipe (penstock) of 2,152.50 meters. Regarding the second case study, the entry hydrogram was given to a rectangular channel with a width of 6.1 meters, length of 3,048 meters, slope of 0.0016 meters, and exhibited uniform flow with nominal depth of 2.44 meters. The characteristic curve of the discharge in the downstream extremity is Q = 158.(y - 3.25)32. The proposed methodology by Chaudry [5] concerning the development of hydrodynamic models was used. The obtained results for first case study showed that the simulated values for valve pressure while varying turning the valve between 4 and 12 seconds results in maximum values of pressures that oscillated between 219.97mca and 212.39 mca (4s) and 196.42mca and 190.86mca (12s). For the second case study, the values of discharge, velocity, and depth for x=0 and elapsed time of 850s were, respectively, 127.70m3/s, 3.87m/s, and 5.36m. For x=0 and an elapsed time of 1,230s, the values were 87.92m3/s, 4.49m/s, and 3.21m. Therefore, the MOC numerical approach has been confirmed to be useful for several engineering purposes, including cases of hydraulic transients and discharge propagation in hydraulic systems

  11. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Wenting; Li Guo; Li Heping; Bao Chengyu; Wang Huabo; Zeng Shi; Gao Xing; Luo Huiying

    2007-06-15

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure {alpha}-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images.

  12. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Ting; Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Hua-Bo; Zeng, Shi; Gao, Xing; Luo, Hui-Ying

    2007-06-01

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure α-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images.

  13. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Seventy years of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Waves Propagation (IZMIRAN) (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 25 November 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences dedicated to the 70th anniversary of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) (Troitsk, Moscow region) was held in the conference hall of IZMIRAN on 25 November 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Gurevich A V (Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Moscow) "The role of cosmic rays and runaway electron breakdown in atmospheric lightning discharges"; (2) Aleksandrov E B (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Advances in quantum magnetometry for geomagnetic research"; (3) Dorman L I (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region, CR & SWC, Israel) "Cosmic ray variations and space weather"; (4) Mareev E A (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhnii Novgorod) "Global electric circuit research: achievements and prospects"; (5) Tereshchenko E D, Safargaleev V V (Polar Geophysical Institute, Kola Research Center, RAS, Murmansk) "Geophysical research in Spitsbergen Archipelago: status and prospects"; (6) Gulyaev Yu V, Armand N A, Efimov A I, Matyugov S S, Pavelyev A G, Savich N A, Samoznaev L N, Smirnov V V, Yakovlev O I (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics RAS, Fryazino Branch, Fryazino, Moscow region) "Results of solar wind and planetary ionosphere research using radiophysical methods"; (7) Kunitsyn V E (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Satellite radio probing and the radio tomography of the ionosphere"; (8) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space Research at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences." Papers based on reports 2-8 are published below. The main contents of report 1 are reproduced in A V Gurevich's review, "Nonlinear effects in the ionosphere" [Phys. Usp. 50 1091 (2007)] and in the paper by A V Gurevich et al., "Nonlinear phenomena in the ionospheric plasma. Effects of cosmic rays and runaway breakdown on thunderstorm discharges" [Phys. Usp. 52 735 (2009)]. • Advances in quantum magnetometry for geomagnetic research , E B Aleksandrov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 487-496 • Cosmic ray variations and space weather, L I Dorman Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 496-503 • Global electric circuit research: achievements and prospects, E A Mareev Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 504-511 • Geophysical research in Spitsbergen Archipelago: status and prospects, V V Safargaleev, E D Tereshchenko Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 511-517 • Results of solar wind and planetary ionosphere research using radiophysical methods, N A Armand, Yu V Gulyaev, A L Gavrik, A I Efimov, S S Matyugov, A G Pavelyev, N A Savich, L N Samoznaev, V M Smirnov, O I Yakovlev Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 517-523 • Satellite radio probing and radio tomography of the ionosphere, V E Kunitsyn, E D Tereshchenko, E S Andreeva, I A Nesterov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 523-528 • Space research at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences , V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 528-534

  14. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  15. Spatial anisotropy, rigidity spectrum, and propagation characteristics of the relativistic solar particles during the event of May 7, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Debrunner, H.; Lockwood, J.A.

    1980-12-01

    The data from the worldwide network of neutron monitors have been used to deduce the spatial distribution, rigidity spectrum, and propatation characteristics of the GLE on May 7, 1978. The large magnitude of the GLE and hard rigidity spectrum enabled an analysis to be made utilizing both high-latitude and mid-latitude stations. A straightforward method of analysis could not be used to determine the source function, probably owing to the influence of external magnetospheric currents upon the asymptotic directions of high-latitude neutron monitors and on the asymptotic directions of all stations at rigidities near cutoff. Consequently, we used measurements from the mid-latitude neutron monitors sensitive to high rigidity particles from the solar flare. The apparent source of the solar particle flux near earth was located in a region around 20 /sup 0/N, 87.5 /sup 0/E, which is approximately 40 /sup 0/ west of the sun. The functional form of the pitch angle distribution was given by exp (-delta/sup 2//2theta/sup 2/), thetaapprox. =25 /sup 0/ during the first 30 minutes and then became flatter. The observed anisotropy was approx.1 until 0410 UT, then decreased to <0.7 at 0430 UT when the enhancement of the counting rate was < or approx. =10% of the maximum increase at neutron monitors that were ideally situated to observe the GLE. The rigidity spectrum for P>3 GV was an exponential exp (-P/P/sub 0/) with P/sub 0/=1.45 near the onset, changing to P/sub 0/=0.7 GV later. An analysis using the telegraph equation (Fisk and Axford, 1969) yields a scattering mean free path lambda11> or approx. =3 AU. The analysis indicates that the propagation was scatter-free for about one hour and that the intensity-time profile of the solar injection was observed for particles with P>1 GV.

  16. NASA Propagation Studies Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angkasa, Krisjani S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an Internet website which provides information to enable the development of new commerical satellite systems and services by providing timely data and models about the propagation of satellite radio signals. In partnership with industry and academia, the program leverages NASA assets, currently the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), to obtain propagation data. The findings of the study are disseminated through refereed journals, NASA reference publications, workshops, electronic media, and direct interface with industry.

  17. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. F.; Sun, B.; Huo, W. G.

    2015-06-15

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W–683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  18. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Z. F.; Sun, B.; Huo, W. G.

    2015-06-01

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W-683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  19. Empirical relations to determine the normalized spot size of a single-mode trapezoidal index fiber and computation of its propagation characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Aswini Kumar; Sarkar, Somenath

    2014-07-01

    Simple and complete empirical relations are presented here to determine a normalized spot size in terms of normalized frequencies over a long range and aspect ratio of a trapezoidal index single-mode fiber considering Gaussian approximation of the fundamental mode following the Marcuse method for the first time. After verification of their validity for arbitrary values of aspect ratio and normalized frequency, we calculate various propagation characteristics viz. dispersion and splice loss by using our formulations. Upon comparison, we observe an excellent match and the validity of our results with exact values and other results available in the literature. These formulas should attract the attention of experimentalists as a simple alternative to the rigorous methods of estimating the propagation characteristics of such fibers.

  20. Propagation and stability characteristics of a 500-m-long laser-based fiducial line for high-precision alignment of long-distance linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Masanori; Telada, Souichi; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2013-09-15

    A laser-based alignment system with a He-Ne laser has been newly developed in order to precisely align accelerator units at the KEKB injector linac. The laser beam was first implemented as a 500-m-long fiducial straight line for alignment measurements. We experimentally investigated the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam passing through laser pipes in vacuum. The pointing stability at the last fiducial point was successfully obtained with the transverse displacements of ±40 μm level in one standard deviation by applying a feedback control. This pointing stability corresponds to an angle of ±0.08 μrad. This report contains a detailed description of the experimental investigation for the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam in the laser-based alignment system for long-distance linear accelerators.

  1. Propagation Characteristics of Higher-order Mode Electromagnetic Signals in Coaxial GIS Model with Various Conditions of Arch-shaped UHF Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Shuhei; Okabe, Shigemitsu

    Partial discharge detection using a UHF band signal is a well known advanced insulation diagnosis method in gas insulated switchgear (GIS), and has been well studied. In contrast to conventional diagnosis with lower frequencies in the kHz range, UHF band signal above the cutoff frequency has been detected with higher-order modes that only appear in electromagnetic signal propagating inside the GIS tank. This is because the wavelength of UHF band signals is comparable to the GIS tank size. The authors had observed the characteristics of such higher-order electromagnetic waves with a focus on the resonance characteristics of the TE11 mode, using a disk-shaped UHF sensor with the sensor extending into the inside of the tank. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the propagation characteristics of higher-order mode waves in a coaxial GIS model. Considering application to actual equipment, it was investigated that the output of a sensor with an arch-shape not extending into the inside of the tank, which has less influence on the propagation mode of the inner electromagnetic wave. In the frequency domain below the cutoff frequency of the TE11 mode, the output characteristics were almost independent of the installation position of the UHF sensor, but in the higher frequency domain the output power displayed discontinuous increases at some frequencies. It was also studied that the circumferential dependence of sensor output. For higher-order modes resonant characteristics appeared that depended on the tank length, and it was recognized that the electric field distribution inside the tank influenced the output of the UHF sensor at resonant frequencies. Further, it was found that installing a spacer inside the tank shifted resonant frequencies and the influence of the spacer consistent with the relationship between the spacer position and the electric field distribution inside the tank.

  2. Impulsiveness and energetics in solar flares with and without type II radio bursts - A comparison of hard X-ray characteristics for over 2500 solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Douglas H.; Nelson, Robert; Kojoian, Gabriel; Seal, James

    1989-01-01

    The hard X-ray characteristics of more than 2500 solar flares are used to study the relative size, impulsiveness, and energetics of flares with and without type II radio bursts. A quantitative definition of the hard X-ray impulsiveness is introduced, which may be applied to a large number of events unambiguously. It is found that the flares with type II bursts are generally not significantly larger, more impulsive, or more energetic than those without type II bursts. Also, no evidence is found to suggest a simple classification of the flares as either 'impulsive' or 'gradual'. Because type II bursts are present even in small flares with relatively unimpulsive energy releases, it is concluded that changes in the ambient conditions of the solar atmosphere causing an unusually low Alfven speed may be important in the generation of the shock wave that produces type II radio bursts.

  3. Radio Science in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefeuvre, Francois; Mc Kinnel, Lee-Anne; Chukwuma, Victor; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine

    2010-05-01

    Radio science activities covered by URSI (International Radio Science Union) are briefly reviewed. They encompass the knowledge and study of all aspects of electromagnetic fields and waves in a wide frequency range running from micro pulsation frequencies (i.e. from ~1 mHz) to Terahertz. The topics include: electromagnetic measurements and standards, electromagnetic theory and applications, radio-communication systems and signal processing, electronics and Photonics, electromagnetic environment and interference, wave propagation and remote sensing, ionospheric radio and propagation, waves in plasmas, radio astronomy, and electromagnetics in biology and medicine. The main radio science activities conducted by the URSI national Committees of South Africa, Egypt and Nigeria, and by African radio scientists groups gathered in GIRGEA (Groupe International de Recherche en Gophysique Europe Afrique) are reviewed. The emphasis is put on the activities developed in the context of the IHY programme and of the SCINDA network for forecasting ionospheric irregularities that adversely impact communication and navigation systems in the low latitude regions.

  4. Characteristics of VLF wave propagation in the Earth's magnetosphere in the presence of an artificial density duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmanik, Dmitry; Demekhov, Andrei

    We study the propagation of VLF waves in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere in the presence of large-scale artificial plasma inhomogeneities which can be created by HF heating facilities like HAARP and ``Sura''. A region with enhanced cold plasma density can be formed due to the action of HF heating. This region is extended along geomagnetic field (up to altitudes of several thousand km) and has rather small size across magnetic field (about 1 degree). The geometric-optical approximation is used to study wave propagation. The plasma density and ion composition are calculated with the use of SAMI2 model, which was modified to take the effect of HF heating into account. We calculate ray trajectories of waves with different initial frequency and wave-normal angles and originating at altitudes of about 100 km in the region near the heating area. The source of such waves could be the lightning discharges, modulated HF heating of the ionosphere, or VLF transmitters. Variation of the wave amplitude along the ray trajectories due to refraction is considered and spatial distribution of wave intensity in the magnetosphere is analyzed. We show that the presence of such a density disturbances can lead to significant changes of wave propagation trajectories, in particular, to efficient guiding of VLF waves in this region. This can result in a drastic increase of the VLF-wave intensity in the density duct. The dependence of wave propagation properties on parameters of heating facility operation regime is considered. We study the variation of the spatial distribution of VLF wave intensity related to the slow evolution of the artificial inhomogeneity during the heating.

  5. One-to-one relationship between low latitude whistlers and conjugate source lightning discharges and their propagation characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Prateek R.; Gokani, Sneha A.; Maurya, Ajeet K.; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Sushil; Veenadhari, B.; Selvakumaran, R.; Singh, Abhay K.; Siingh, Devendraa; Lichtenberger, Janos

    2013-12-01

    One-to-one relation with its causative lightning discharges and propagation features of night-time whistlers recorded at low-latitude station, Allahabad (geomag. lat. 16.05N, L = 1.08), India, from continuous observations made during 1-7 April, 2011 have been studied. The whistler observations were made using the Automatic Whistler Detector (AWD) system and AWESOME VLF receiver. The causative lightning strikes of whistlers were checked in data provided by World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). A total of 32 whistlers were observed out of which 23 were correlated with their causative lightnings in and around the conjugate location (geom. lat. 9.87S) of Allahabad. A multi-flash whistler is also observed on 1 April with dispersions 15.3, 17.5 and 13.6 s1/2. About 70% (23 out of 32) whistlers were correlated with the WWLLN detected causative lightnings in the conjugate region which supports the ducted mode of propagation at low latitude. The multi-flash and short whistlers also propagated most likely in the ducted mode to this station.

  6. ACTS propagation experiment discussion: Ka-band propagation measurements using the ACTS propagation terminal and the CSU-CHILL and Space Communications Technology Center Florida propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.; Mueller, Eugene A.; Turk, Joseph; Beaver, John; Helmken, Henry F.; Henning, Rudy

    1993-01-01

    Papers on Ka-band propagation measurements using the ACTS propagation terminal and the Colorado State University CHILL multiparameter radar and on Space Communications Technology Center Florida Propagation Program are discussed. Topics covered include: microwave radiative transfer and propagation models; NASA propagation terminal status; ACTS channel characteristics; FAU receive only terminal; FAU terminal status; and propagation testbed.

  7. Studies on characteristics of resistive power calculated with discrete Fourier transform in a pulse-modulated radio frequency discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, W. G.; Zhang, H.; Ding, Z. F.

    2015-02-01

    In a pulse-modulated (PM) radio-frequency (RF) capacitively coupled plasma, the DFT (Discrete Fourier Transform)-calculated RF power and the corresponding phase shift between voltage and current measured with calibrated voltage and current probes present oscillations in the pulse rising and falling edges. The oscillating phase shift between voltage and current obtained in the falling edge is outside the expected value for a resistive-capacitive RF discharge. Numerical simulation and analytical analysis are made to interpret these abnormal characteristics and seek an approach to obtaining the reliable resistive (active) RF power. The oscillation is proved to be originated from the oscillating non-zero reactive RF power of the capacitor(s) in the load. At the time instant when the reactive RF power within an integer RF period is not zero, the reactive RF power is mistakenly regarded as the active RF power in the DFT analysis, as a result, the corresponding phase is thus incorrect and even outside the expected value for a resistive-capacitive load. The resistive RF power and the phase can be only correctly calculated at the time instant when the reactive RF power is zero. For a series (or parallel) RC (resistor-capacitor) load and a combined RC load with the dominated series (or parallel) RC impedance, the time instant of the zero reactive RF power is calculated with one of the two proposed empirical formulae. In practice, the DFT-calculated resistive RF power is obtained according to the following procedures: (1) applying DFT to the measured RF voltage and current signals to obtain the power and time instants for minimal phase shifts between voltage and current; (2) selecting the empirical formula to calculate time instants of the zero reactive RF power; (3) getting resistive powers at time instants of the zero reactive RF power. In real PM RF capacitively coupled plasmas, the empirical formula for the series RC load is selected to calculate the resistive RF power. The accuracy of DFT-calculated resistive RF power is proved to be related to two kinds of errors. The first is the error of the time instant of the zero reactive RF power calculated using the empirical formula. This error is relatively lower when the requirement that the dominated parallel or series RC impedance is met and is almost independent of the impedance phase angle of a combined RC load. The second is the error of the DFT-calculated resistive RF power compared with the corresponding time integral RF power at the real zero reactive RF power. This error is independent of the load type or the load impedance but varies with the slope of PM RF voltage amplitude vs. time. The two kinds of errors both increase in the pulse rising and falling edges.

  8. Studies on characteristics of resistive power calculated with discrete Fourier transform in a pulse-modulated radio frequency discharge.

    PubMed

    Huo, W G; Zhang, H; Ding, Z F

    2015-02-01

    In a pulse-modulated (PM) radio-frequency (RF) capacitively coupled plasma, the DFT (Discrete Fourier Transform)-calculated RF power and the corresponding phase shift between voltage and current measured with calibrated voltage and current probes present oscillations in the pulse rising and falling edges. The oscillating phase shift between voltage and current obtained in the falling edge is outside the expected value for a resistive-capacitive RF discharge. Numerical simulation and analytical analysis are made to interpret these abnormal characteristics and seek an approach to obtaining the reliable resistive (active) RF power. The oscillation is proved to be originated from the oscillating non-zero reactive RF power of the capacitor(s) in the load. At the time instant when the reactive RF power within an integer RF period is not zero, the reactive RF power is mistakenly regarded as the active RF power in the DFT analysis, as a result, the corresponding phase is thus incorrect and even outside the expected value for a resistive-capacitive load. The resistive RF power and the phase can be only correctly calculated at the time instant when the reactive RF power is zero. For a series (or parallel) RC (resistor-capacitor) load and a combined RC load with the dominated series (or parallel) RC impedance, the time instant of the zero reactive RF power is calculated with one of the two proposed empirical formulae. In practice, the DFT-calculated resistive RF power is obtained according to the following procedures: (1) applying DFT to the measured RF voltage and current signals to obtain the power and time instants for minimal phase shifts between voltage and current; (2) selecting the empirical formula to calculate time instants of the zero reactive RF power; (3) getting resistive powers at time instants of the zero reactive RF power. In real PM RF capacitively coupled plasmas, the empirical formula for the series RC load is selected to calculate the resistive RF power. The accuracy of DFT-calculated resistive RF power is proved to be related to two kinds of errors. The first is the error of the time instant of the zero reactive RF power calculated using the empirical formula. This error is relatively lower when the requirement that the dominated parallel or series RC impedance is met and is almost independent of the impedance phase angle of a combined RC load. The second is the error of the DFT-calculated resistive RF power compared with the corresponding time integral RF power at the real zero reactive RF power. This error is independent of the load type or the load impedance but varies with the slope of PM RF voltage amplitude vs. time. The two kinds of errors both increase in the pulse rising and falling edges. PMID:25725843

  9. Solar Power Satellite (SPS) pilot beam and communication link subsystem investigation study, phase 1. [ionospheric propagation, radio frequency interference, and microwave transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary engineering model of ionospheric interactions with the pilot beam was established and used to demonstrate that the dual frequency baseline pilot beam system might not be viable in the presence of an unstable transmission path. Alternate approaches to remove this difficulty are described. Although ionospheric fluctuations will not significantly degrade beam pointing or raise the sidelobe levels, they will reduce transmission efficiency by upwards of 25%. Mitigating strategies to substantially reduce this effect are proposed. Based on the Klystron noise spectrum, the pilot beam transmitter power was determined as a function of frequency offset from the power beam carrier frequency. The RFI from the pilot beam, on the ground and at geosynchronous orbit is shown. Noise levels on the earth's surface due to the SPS are presented as a function of frequency and the number of SPS systems. Analysis of the communication subsystem indicates that a standard telemetry line of 1.544 MB/s would satisfy both voice and data link requirements. Additional links would be required for TV and radio transmissions.

  10. Radio Channel Simulator (RCSM)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-31

    This is a simulation package for making site specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power at discrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. It is intended for use with wireless network simulation packages and to support wireless network deployments.

  11. Extragalactic Synchrotron Transients in the Era of Wide-field Radio Surveys. I. Detection Rates and Light Curve Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Williams, P. K. G.; Berger, Edo

    2015-06-01

    The impending era of wide-field radio surveys has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of astrophysical transients. Here we evaluate the prospects of a wide range of planned and hypothetical radio surveys using the properties and volumetric rates of known and hypothetical classes of extragalactic synchrotron radio transients (e.g., on-axis and off-axis gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernovae, tidal disruption events, compact object mergers). Utilizing these sources and physically motivated considerations we assess the allowed phase space of radio luminosity and peak timescale for extragalactic transients. We also include for the first time effects such as redshift evolution of the rates, K-corrections, and non-Euclidean luminosity distance, which affect the detection rates of the most sensitive surveys. The number of detected events is calculated by means of a Monte Carlo method, using the various survey properties (depth, cadence, area) and realistic detection criteria that include a cut on the minimum variability of the transients during the survey and an assessment of host galaxy contamination. We find that near-term GHz frequency surveys (ASKAP/VAST, Very Large Array Sky Survey) will detect few events: ? 30-50 on- and off-axis long GRBs (LGRBs) and off-axis tidal disruption events, and ? 50-100 neutron star binary mergers if ? 0.5% of the mergers result in a stable millisecond magnetar. Low-frequency surveys (e.g., LOFAR) are unlikely to detect any transients, while a hypothetical large-scale mm survey may detect ?40 on-axis LGRBs. On the other hand, we find that SKA1 surveys at ? 0.1-1 GHz have the potential to uncover thousands of transients, mainly on-axis and off-axis LGRBs, on-axis short GRBs, off-axis TDEs, and neutron star binary mergers with magnetar remnants.

  12. Possible Estimation of the Solar Cycle Characteristic Parameters by the 10.7 cm Solar Radio Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampropoulos, George; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Tritakis, Vasilis

    2016-02-01

    Two independent methods for estimating basic parameters of the solar cycle are presented. The first of them, the ascending-descending triangle method, is based on a previous work by Tritakis (Astrophys. Space Sci. 82, 463, 1982), which described how the fundamental parameters of a certain solar cycle could be predicted from the shape of the previous one. The relation between the two cycles before and after a specific 11-year solar cycle is tighter than between the two cycles belonging to the same 22-year solar cycle (even-odd cycle). The second is the MinimaxX method, which uses a significant relation in the international sunspot number between the maximum value of a solar cycle and its value 2.5 or 3 years (depending on the enumeration of the even or odd cycle) before the preceding minimum. The tests applied to Cycles 12 to 24 indicate that both methods can estimate the peak of the 11-year solar radio flux at a high confidence level. The data used in this study are the 10.7 cm solar radio flux since 1947, which have been extrapolated back to 1848 from the strong correlation between the monthly international sunspot numbers and the adjusted values of the 10.7 cm radio flux.

  13. Galileo radio science investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, H. T.; Eshleman, V. R.; Hinson, D. P.; Kliore, A. J.; Lindal, G. F.; Woo, R.; Bird, M. K.; Volland, H.; Edenhoffer, P.; Paetzold, M.

    1992-01-01

    Galileo radio-propagation experiments are based on measurements of absolute and differential propagation time delay, differential phase delay, Doppler shift, signal strength, and polarization. These measurements can be used to study: the atmospheric and ionospheric structure, constituents, and dynamics of Jupiter; the magnetic field of Jupiter; the diameter of Io, its ionospheric structure, and the distribution of plasma in the Io torus; the diameters of the other Galilean satellites, certain properties of their surfaces, and possibly their atmospheres and ionospheres; and the plasma dynamics and magnetic field of the solar corona. The spacecraft system provides linear rather than circular polarization on the S-band downlink signal, the capability to receive X-band uplink signals, and a differential downlink ranging mode. A highly-stable, dual-frequency, spacecraft radio system is developed that is suitable for simultaneous measurements of all the parameters normally attributed to radio waves.

  14. Review of radio science 1984-1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, G.

    Theoretical, experimental, and applications aspects of radio science are examined in a collection of subject-area reviews. Topics addressed include EM metrology, fields and waves, signals and systems, electronic and optical devices and their applications, and EM noise and interference. Consideration is given to wave propagation and remote sensing, ionospheric radio and wave propagation in plasmas, radio astronomy, and the biological effects of EM waves. An extensive glossary of acronyms is provided.

  15. PROPAGATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS: IN VIEW OF CHARACTERISTICS OF SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    He, H.-Q.; Qin, G.; Zhang, M. E-mail: gqin@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2011-06-20

    In this paper, a model of solar energetic particle (SEP) propagation in the three-dimensional Parker interplanetary magnetic field is calculated numerically. We study the effects of the different aspects of particle sources on the solar surface, which include the source location, coverage of latitude and longitude, and spatial distribution of source particle intensity, on propagation of SEPs with both parallel and perpendicular diffusion. We compute the particle flux and anisotropy profiles at different observation locations in the heliosphere. From our calculations, we find that the observation location relative to the latitudinal and longitudinal coverage of particle source has the strongest effects on particle flux and anisotropy profiles observed by a spacecraft. When a spacecraft is directly connected to the solar sources by the interplanetary magnetic field lines, the observed particle fluxes are larger than when the spacecraft is not directly connected. This paper focuses on the situations when a spacecraft is not connected to the particle sources on the solar surface. We find that when the magnetic footpoint of the spacecraft is farther away from the source, the observed particle flux is smaller and its onset and maximum intensity occur later. When the particle source covers a larger range of latitude and longitude, the observed particle flux is larger and appears earlier. There is east-west azimuthal asymmetry in SEP profiles even when the source distribution is east-west symmetric. However, the detail of particle spatial distribution inside the source does not affect the profile of the SEP flux very much. When the magnetic footpoint of the spacecraft is significantly far away from the particle source, the anisotropy of particles in the early stage of an SEP event points toward the Sun, which indicates that the first arriving particles come from outside of the observer through perpendicular diffusion at large radial distances.

  16. Adaptive ground implemented phased array. [evaluation to overcome radio frequency interference characteristics of TDRS VHF return link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the feasibility of using an adaptive ground implemented phased array (AGIPA) to overcome the limitations of the radio frequency interference limited low data Tracking and Data Relay Satellite VHF return link. A feasibility demonstration model of a single user channel AFIPA system was designed, developed, fabricated, and evaluated. By scaling the frequency and aperture geometry from VHF to S-band, the system performance was more easily demonstrated in the controlled environment of an anechoic chamber. The testing procedure employs an AGIPA in which received signals from each element of the array are processed on the ground to form an adaptive, independent, computer controlled beam for each user.

  17. Solar radio bursts at kilometer wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1973-01-01

    The potential value of traveling solar radio bursts for investigating energetic particle propagation, and for probing the interplanetary medium is discussed. A general survey of the characteristics of type 3 radio phenomena observed at hectometer and kilometer wavelengths is presented along with a brief discussion of the relationships among type 1 meter noise storms, decametric continuum, and type 3 hectometric storms. Type 3 bursts are analyzed to show how these data provide information about the average energy, dispersion, and trajectory of energetic particles, the interplanetary scale, and magnetic field configuration. The recent observations of type 2 shock wave phenomena at kilometer wavelengths are described, and current research and the direction of future observation are outlined.

  18. Locating Radio Noise from Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Watson, R.; Gaffet, S.; Astin, I.; Evans, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sprites are composed of individual streamer discharges (e.g., Pasko, 2010) which split into exponentially growing streamer tips (McHarg et al., 2010). The acceleration of the electrons to a few eV results in the radiation of a small amount of electromagnetic energy. The incoherent superposition of many streamers causes the low frequency radio noise from sprites near ~40 km height (Qin et al., 2012). The presence of this theoretically predicted radiation was recently confirmed by low frequency radio noise measurements during dancing sprites with a very sensitive radio receiver (Fullekrug et al., 2013). To locate the radio noise from sprites in the sky, an interferometric network of low frequency radio receivers was developed (Mezentsev and Fullekrug, JGR, 2013). The key parameter for the interferometric signal processing is the frequency dependent wave propagation velocity of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere. This wave propagation velocity is determined by the wave number vector which needs to be inferred from the measurements. Here we adapt and subsequently apply array analyses which have been developed for seismic and infrasound arrays to determine the horizontal wave number vectors of ~20-24 kHz radio waves measured with an array of ten radio receivers distributed over an area of ~1 km 1 km. It is found that the horizontal slowness of ~20-24 kHz radio waves ranges from ~2.7 ns/m to ~4.1 ns/m depending on the arrival azimuth of the radio wave. For comparison, an electromagnetic wave in vacuum has a slowness of ~3.34 ns/m. A larger slowness indicates an apparent velocity which is smaller than the speed of light and a smaller slowness indicates that the radio wave arrives at the array from an elevation angle. The observed variability of the observed slowness almost certainly results from the distance dependent superposition of the transverse electric and magnetic TEn and TMn radio wave propagation modes.

  19. Energetic electrons from solar flares and associated type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    Distinct Kev electron events as observed by satellites near the earth are, in general, associated with solar flares which are accompained by the emission of both metric and hectometric type 3 radio bursts. The positions of these flares are mainly on the western hemisphere of the sun. These results show that Kev electrons propagate under the control of the magnetic field in the interplanetary space and that, while propagating through this space, these electrons excite type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies. Emission characteristics of hectometric type 3 bursts are briefly considered in relation to the positions of associated flares.

  20. Characteristics of sound propagation in shallow water over an elastic seabed with a thin cap-rock layer.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Alec J; Gavrilov, Alexander N; McCauley, Robert D; Parnum, Iain M; Collis, Jon M

    2013-07-01

    Measurements of low-frequency sound propagation over the areas of the Australian continental shelf, where the bottom sediments consist primarily of calcarenite, have revealed that acoustic transmission losses are generally much higher than those observed over other continental shelves and remain relatively low only in a few narrow frequency bands. This paper considers this phenomenon and provides a physical interpretation in terms of normal modes in shallow water over a layered elastic seabed with a shear wave speed comparable to but lower than the water-column sound speed. A theoretical analysis and numerical modeling show that, in such environments, low attenuation of underwater sound is expected only in narrow frequency bands just above the modal critical frequencies which in turn are governed primarily by the water depth and compressional wave speed in the seabed. In addition, the effect of a thin layer of harder cap-rock overlaying less consolidated sediments is considered. Low-frequency transmission loss data collected from an offshore seismic survey in Bass Strait on the southern Australian continental shelf are analyzed and shown to be in broad agreement with the numerical predictions based on the theoretical analysis and modeling using an elastic parabolic equation solution for range-dependent bathymetry. PMID:23862798

  1. Radio Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, John R.; Bittner, Denise A.

    This book, a how-to-do-it guide for the novice and the professional alike, deals with several aspects of radio journalism: producing documentaries, preparing and announcing radio news, ethics and responsibility, regulation of radio journalism, and careers. It traces the history and growth of radio news, shows its impact on the public, and

  2. Engineering geological characteristics and the hydraulic fracture propagation mechanism of the sand-shale interbedded formation in the Xu5 reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cong; Li, Mei; Guo, Jian-Chun; Tang, Xu-Hai; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Yong-Hui, Wang; Liang, Hao

    2015-06-01

    In the Xu5 formation the sandstone reservoir and the shale reservoir are interbedded with each other. The average thickness of each formation is about 8 m, which increases the difficulty of the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shale thickness ratio (the ratio of shale thickness to formation thickness) is 55-62.5%. The reservoir is characterized by ultra-low porosity and permeability. The brittleness index of sandstone is 0.5-0.8, and the brittleness index of shale is 0.3-0.8. Natural fractures are poorly developed and are mainly horizontal and at a low angle. The formation strength is medium and the reservoir is of the hybrid strike-slip fault and reverse fault stress regime. The difference between the minimum principal stress and the vertical stress is small, and the maximum horizontal principal stress is 20 MPa higher than the minimum horizontal principal stress and vertical stress. A mechanical model of a hydraulic fracture encountering natural fractures is built according to geological characteristics. Fracture mechanics theory is then used to establish a hydraulic fracturing model coupling the seepage-stress-damage model to simulate the initiation and propagation of a fracture. The hydraulic fracture geometry is mainly I-shaped and T-shaped, horizontal propagation dominates the extension, and vertical propagation is limited. There is a two to three meter stress diversion area around a single hydraulic fracture. The stress diversion between a hydraulic fracture and a natural fracture is advantageous in forming a complex fracture. The research results can provide theoretical guidance for tight reservoir fracturing design.

  3. Characteristics of silicon nitride deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using a dual frequency radio-frequency source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, C. W.; Fetcho, R. F.; Gross, M. D.; Koefer, R. F.; Pudliner, R. A.

    1992-02-01

    We have studied the effect of plasma excitation frequency on the properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition silicon nitride films. The use of two radio-frequency sources, one at 270 kHz and the other at 13.56 MHz, enabled us to vary film properties such as stress by altering the amount of power supplied by each source. The low-frequency excitation was seen to favor the formation of NH bonds in the deposited film. The relative amounts of NH and SiH bonds in the film were found to determine many of the film properties such as stress, conduction and wet etch rate.

  4. Characteristics of a rocket-triggered lightning flash with large stroke number and the associated leader propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhuling; Qie, Xiushu; Jiang, Rubin; Liu, Mingyuan; Wu, Xueke; Wang, Zhichao; Lu, Gaopeng; Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-12-01

    A negative lightning flash with 16 leader-return stroke sequences, triggered in the summer of 2013 using the classical rocket-and-wire triggering technique, was examined with simultaneous two-dimensional (2D) imaging of very high-frequency (VHF) radiation sources, channel-base current measurement, broadband electric field waveforms and high-speed video images. A total of 28.0 C negative charge was transferred to ground during the whole flash, and the charge transferred during the initial stage was 4.9 C, which is the weakest among the triggered lightning flashes at the SHandong Artificially Triggering Lightning Experiment (SHATLE). The peak current of 16 return strokes ranged from 5.8 to 32.5 kA with a geometric mean of 14.1 kA. The progression of upward positive leader and downward negative (dart or dart-stepped) leaders was reproduced visually by using an improved short-baseline VHF lightning location system with continuous data recording capability. The upward positive leader was mapped immediately from the tip of the metal wire during the initial stage, developing at a speed of about 104 m/s without branches. The upward positive leader and all the 14 negative leaders captured by the 2D imaging system propagated along the same channel with few branches inside the cloud, which might be the reason for the relatively small charge transfer. The 2D imaging results also show that dart leaders may transform into dart-stepped leaders after a long time interval between successive strokes.

  5. Source mechanisms and radio effects of ionospheric plasma. Annual report, 1 October 1991-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.C.

    1992-11-01

    Since October 1, 1991 experimental and theoretical research has been conducted by Prof. Min-Chang Lee and his students at BU and MIT. This research work is aimed at investigating the ionospheric plasma disturbances which can affect significantly the radio wave propagation in communications and space surveillance. The research topics which have been investigated include: (1) A source mechanism leading to the symmetric lower hybrid sidebands and a low-frequency mode in the upper atmosphere, (2) Characteristics of lightning-induced plasmas, (3) Radio wave-produced plasmas and effects on radio communications, (4) Plasma turbulence and formation of field aligned density fluctuations as ionospheric ducts.

  6. A Detailed Investigation of Radio Power Selection Effects Relevant to the Study of Classical Double Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lin; Daly, Ruth A.

    A sample of powerful classical double radio sources, also known as FR II sources, has been assembled to study the properties of the radio sources and their gaseous environments, as well as the redshift evolution of these properties. The possibility that the observed redshift dependences of various parameters of interest are caused by radio power selection effects is investigated here using statistical tools such as two-parameter fitting and partial rank correlation analysis. It is found that the Mach number of lobe advance, the lobe propagation velocity, and the ambient gas density of the FR II sources are unlikely to be significantly affected by radio power selection effects. Hence, the observed redshift dependences of these parameters are likely to reflect real redshift evolution. A previous study by Wellman, Daly, & Wan indicates that the powerful FR II sources in this sample lie in cluster-like gaseous environments. The fact that the ambient gas density of the FR II sources is not affected by radio power selection means that these sources can be used to probe the evolution of their environments. Specifically, the observed decrease of the ambient gas density with redshift is likely to reflect real redshift evolution rather than being caused by radio power selection effects. It is interesting to note that the current data suggest that the Mach number of lobe advance is independent of redshift, while the lobe propagation velocity increases with redshift, as summarized in the final table in this paper. Radio power selection effects are likely to be quite weak, if present at all, in the study of the nonthermal pressure inside a classical double source, and the study of the characteristic size of a source. The two-parameter fitting and partial rank correlation analysis applied to the ambient gas temperature and luminosity in directed kinetic energy of the jet yield inconclusive results, so these direct analyses do not clearly indicate whether the redshift evolution of each of these two parameters is due to radio power selection effects. However, each parameter is estimated using other parameters such as the Mach number of lobe advance, the lobe propagation velocity, and the nonthermal pressure inside the radio lobe, which do not suffer significant radio power selection effects.

  7. The NASA radiowave propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the NASA radiowave Propagation Program are to enable new satellite communication applications and to enhance existing satellite communication networks. These objectives are achieved by supporting radio wave propagation studies and disseminating the study results in a timely fashion. Studies initiated by this program in the 1980s enabled the infant concept of conducting mobile communications via satellite to reach a state of relative maturity in 1990. The program also supported the satellite communications community by publishing and revising two handbooks dealing with radio wave propagation effects for frequencies below and above 10 GHz, respectively. The program has served the international community through its support of the International Telecommunications Union. It supports state of the art work at universities. Currently, the program is focusing on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) and its propagation needs. An overview of the program's involvement in the ACTS project is given.

  8. The effect of adiabatic focusing upon charged particle propagation in random magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Charged particles propagating along the diverging lines of force of a spatially inhomogeneous guiding field were considered as they are scattered by random fields. Their longitudinal transport is described in terms of the eigenfunctions of a Sturm-Liouville operator incorporating the effect of adiabatic focussing along with that of scattering. The relaxation times and characteristic velocities are graphed and tabulated. The particle density is evaluated as a function of space and time for two different regimes. In the first regime (relatively weak focussing), a diffusive mode of propagation is dominant but coherent modes are also dominant. In the second regime (strong focussing), diffusion does not occur and the propagation is purely coherent. This supercoherent mode corresponds exactly to the so-called scatter-free propagation of kilovolt solar flare electrons. On a larger scale, focussed transport provides an interpretation of many observed characteristics of extragalactic radio sources.

  9. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation

    PubMed Central

    TSUDA, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10–100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50–90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10–50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet. PMID:24492645

  10. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10-100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50-90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10-50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet. PMID:24492645

  11. A crack initiation and propagation simulation and the fatigue characteristics of solder joints considering the material property changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, M.; Shishihara, Y.; Matsunami, H.; Fukumoto, S.; Fujimoto, K.

    2012-08-01

    The re-working of the manufacturing process from the reliability evaluation after the production process is a significant cost and loss of energy. In-vehicle electronic devices are exposed to multiple environmental loads such as thermal and vibrational loads. The effects of the material property changes in the thermal cycle load on the fatigue life of solder joints were estimated with our fatigue simulation for the purpose of constructing a design method considering the fatigue characteristic changes in the thermal cycle. The fatigue lives were estimated with and without considering the creep property changes measured by indentation tests. The fatigue ductility index and the coefficients increased toward the reported values by considering the creep property changes.

  12. Propagators in strong plasma turbulence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, T. J.; Bornatici, M.

    1971-01-01

    Straightforward relationships between Weinstock's (1969) propagator, U sub A, the Vlasov propagator, U, and the ensemble average Vlasov propagator, U (in carets) are derived. It is shown that U and U (in carets) are related to the characteristic trajectories of the Vlasov equation, and that U (in carets) can be related to various statistical correlations of the turbulent fields.

  13. NASA Lunar Base Wireless System Propagation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Sham, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    There have been many radio wave propagation studies using both experimental and theoretical techniques over the recent years. However, most of studies have been in support of commercial cellular phone wireless applications. The signal frequencies are mostly at the commercial cellular and Personal Communications Service bands. The antenna configurations are mostly one on a high tower and one near the ground to simulate communications between a cellular base station and a mobile unit. There are great interests in wireless communication and sensor systems for NASA lunar missions because of the emerging importance of establishing permanent lunar human exploration bases. Because of the specific lunar terrain geometries and RF frequencies of interest to the NASA missions, much of the published literature for the commercial cellular and PCS bands of 900 and 1800 MHz may not be directly applicable to the lunar base wireless system and environment. There are various communication and sensor configurations required to support all elements of a lunar base. For example, the communications between astronauts, between astronauts and the lunar vehicles, between lunar vehicles and satellites on the lunar orbits. There are also various wireless sensor systems among scientific, experimental sensors and data collection ground stations. This presentation illustrates the propagation analysis of the lunar wireless communication and sensor systems taking into account the three dimensional terrain multipath effects. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of the lunar terrain. The obtained results indicate the lunar surface material, terrain geometry and antenna location are the important factors affecting the propagation characteristics of the lunar wireless systems. The path loss can be much more severe than the free space propagation and is greatly affected by the antenna height, surface material and operating frequency. The results from this paper are important for the lunar wireless system link margin analysis in order to determine the limits on the reliable communication range, achievable data rate and RF coverage performance at planned lunar base work sites.

  14. Radio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Neil R.; Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    1990-10-01

    Market areas offering potential for future narrowband broadcast satellites are examined, including international public diplomacy, government- and advertising-supported, and business-application usages. Technical issues such as frequency allocation, spacecraft types, transmission parameters, and radio receiver characteristics are outlined. Service and system requirements, advertising revenue, and business communications services are among the economic issues discussed. The institutional framework required to provide an operational radio broadcast service is studied, and new initiatives in direct broadcast audio radio systems, encompassing studies, tests, in-orbit demonstrations of, and proposals for national and international commercial broadcast services are considered.

  15. Low Pressure Radio-Frequency Oxygen Plasma Induced Oxidation of Titanium – Surface Characteristics and Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Wan-Yu; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Huang, Chieh-Hsiun; Tu, Yu-Chieh; Tseng, Shao-Chin; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Chen, Min-Huey; Su, Wei-Fang; Lin, Li-Deh

    2013-01-01

    Objective This research was designed to investigate the effects of low pressure radio-frequency (RF) oxygen plasma treatment (OPT) on the surface of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) and Ti6Al4V. Surface topography, elemental composition, water contact angle, cell viability, and cell morphology were surveyed to evaluate the biocompatibility of titanium samples with different lengths of OP treating time. Materials and Methods CP-Ti and Ti6Al4V discs were both classified into 4 groups: untreated, treated with OP generated by using oxygen (99.98%) for 5, 10, and 30 min, respectively. After OPT on CP-Ti and Ti6Al4V samples, scanning probe microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and contact angle tests were conducted to determine the surface topography, elemental composition and hydrophilicity, respectively. The change of surface morphology was further studied using sputtered titanium on silicon wafers. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and F-actin immunofluorescence stain were performed to investigate the viability and spreading behavior of cultivated MG-63 cells on the samples. Results The surface roughness was most prominent after 5 min OPT in both CP-Ti and Ti6Al4V, and the surface morphology of sputtered Ti sharpened after the 5 min treatment. From the XPS results, the intensity of Ti°, Ti2+, and Ti3+ of the samples’ surface decreased indicating the oxidation of titanium after OPT. The water contact angles of both CP-Ti and Ti6Al4V were increased after 5 min OPT. The results of MTT assay demonstrated MG-63 cells proliferated best on the 5 min OP treated titanium sample. The F-actin immunofluorescence stain revealed the cultivated cell number of 5 min treated CP-Ti/Ti6Al4V was greater than other groups and most of the cultivated cells were spindle-shaped. Conclusions Low pressure RF oxygen plasma modified both the composition and the morphology of titanium samples’ surface. The CP-Ti/Ti6Al4V treated with 5 min OPT displayed the roughest surface, sharpest surface profile and best biocompatibility. PMID:24386433

  16. Population and movement characteristics of radio-collared striped skunks in North Dakota during an epizootic of rabies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, R.J.; Newton, W.E.; Pearson, G.L.; Schamber, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    We observed a total of 102 striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) from March to July of both 1991 and 1992 in Stutsman County, North Dakota (USA) during an experiment with food supplementation. Twenty-three apparently healthy skunks in 1991 and 56 in 1992 were equipped with radio-collars. In 1991, one of 23 was tested and found to be rabid. In 1992, 50 of 56 were tested; 35 (69%) were rabid. Of skunks with ages estimated, 19 (66%) of 29 were first year animals in 1991 compared with nine (22%) of 41 first year animals in 1992. All 18 females captured in 1991 were pregnant or parous compared with 21 (60%) of 35 in 1992. The estimated survival rate of skunks was 0.85 during April to June 1991, but only 0.17 during April to July 1992. In 1992, the survival rate of first year skunks was 0.08, compared with 0.35 for older animals. Eleven (31%) of 36 skunks found dead of rabies or in late clinical stage were located below ground. We detected no differences in 1992 between healthy and rabid skunks in estimated mean (i?? SE) rate of travel (232 i?? 14 m/hr), distance traveled (2047 i?? 141 m/night), or home range size (1.6 i?? 0.4 km2) during half-month periods from April through June. Among rabid skunks, mean (i?? SE) rate of travel tended to decrease from 298 i?? 48 m/hr during the 14 days preceding the clinical period of rabies (pre-clinical) to 174 i?? 48 m/hr during the clinical period of rabies (14 days immediately before death). Similar decrease occurred in mean (i?? SE) distance traveled in a night (2318 i?? 281 m, pre-clinical; 1497 i?? 281 m, clinical). Mean (i?? SE) home range size of males (2.8 i?? 0.4) was greater than of females (1.2 i?? 0.4) during the pre-clinical period, but during the clinical period home range sizes of males (1.8 i?? 0.4) and females (1.8 i?? 0.4) were similar. Mean (i?? SE) home range size of females did not differ between pre-clinical (1.2 i?? 0.4) and clinical (1.8 i?? 0.4) periods (P = 0.22). Deaths of skunks from rabies in 1992 tended to be more spatially clumped than expected had they been random, mostly due to deaths detected before 8 May. We detected no correlation between locations of animals found dead of rabies and dates of death.

  17. The back-diffusion effect of air on the discharge characteristics of atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency glow discharges using bare metal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Ting; Liang, Tian-Ran; Wang, Hua-Bo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2007-05-01

    Radio-frequency (RF), atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas using bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, deposition, surface treatment, disinfection, sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics, including the breakdown voltage and the discharge voltage for sustaining a stable and uniform α mode discharge of the RF APGD plasmas are presented. The experiments are conducted by placing the home-made planar-type plasma generator in ambient and in a vacuum chamber, respectively, with helium as the primary plasma-forming gas. When the discharge processes occur in ambient, particularly for the lower plasma-working gas flow rates, the experimental measurements show that it is the back-diffusion effect of air in atmosphere, instead of the flow rate of the gas, that results in the obvious decrease in the breakdown voltage with increasing plasma-working gas flow rate. Further studies on the discharge characteristics, e.g. the luminous structures, the concentrations and distributions of chemically active species in plasmas, with different plasma-working gases or gas mixtures need to be conducted in future work.

  18. Firefighters' Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Public Technology Inc. asked for NASA assistance to devise the original firefighter's radio. Good short-range radio communications are essential during a fire to coordinate hose lines, rescue victims, and otherwise increase efficiency. Useful firefighting tool is lower cost, more rugged short range two-way radio. Inductorless electronic circuit replaced inductances and coils in radio circuits with combination of transistors and other low-cost components. Substitution promises reduced circuit size and cost. Enhanced electrical performance made radio more durable and improved maintainability by incorporating modular construction.

  19. Satellite observations of type 3 solar radio bursts at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Type III solar radio bursts were observed from 10 MHz to 10 KHz by satellite experiments above the terrestrial plasmasphere. Solar radio emission in this frequency range results from excitation of the interplanetary plasma by energetic particles propagating outward along open field lines over distances from 5 solar radii to at least 1 AU from the sun. This review summarizes the morphology, characteristics and analysis of individual as well as storms of bursts. Burst rise times are interpreted in terms of exciter length and dispersion while decay times refer to the radiation damping process. The combination of radio observations at the lower frequencies and in-situ measurements on nonrelativistic electrons at 1 AU provide data on the energy range and efficiency of the wave-particle interactions responsible for the radio emission.

  20. Quasar feedback and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2014-07-01

    We analyse Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra of 568 obscured luminous quasars. The [O III] λ5007 Å emission line shows blueshifts and blue excess, indicating that some of the narrow-line gas is undergoing an organized outflow. The velocity width containing 90 per cent of line power ranges from 370 to 4780 km s-1, suggesting outflow velocities up to ˜2000 km s-1, and is strongly correlated with the radio luminosity among the radio-quiet quasars. We propose that radio emission in radio-quiet quasars is due to relativistic particles accelerated in the shocks within the quasar-driven outflows; star formation in quasar hosts is insufficient to explain the observed radio emission. The median radio luminosity of the sample of νLν[1.4 GHz] = 1040 erg s-1 suggests a median kinetic luminosity of the quasar-driven wind of Lwind = 3 × 1044 erg s-1, or about 4 per cent of the estimated median bolometric luminosity Lbol = 8 × 1045 erg s-1. Furthermore, the velocity width of [O III] is positively correlated with mid-infrared luminosity, which suggests that outflows are ultimately driven by the radiative output of the quasar. Emission lines characteristic of shocks in quasi-neutral medium increase with the velocity of the outflow, which we take as evidence of quasar-driven winds propagating into the interstellar medium of the host galaxy. Quasar feedback appears to operate above the threshold luminosity of Lbol ˜ 3 × 1045 erg s-1.

  1. Dissemination stability and phase noise characteristics in a cascaded, fiber-based long-haul radio frequency dissemination network.

    PubMed

    Gao, C; Wang, B; Zhu, X; Yuan, Y B; Wang, L J

    2015-09-01

    To study the dissemination stability and phase noise characteristics of the cascaded fiber-based RF dissemination, we perform an experiment using three sets of RF modulated frequency dissemination systems. The experimental results show that the total transfer stability of the cascaded system can be given by ?(T)(2)=?(i=1)(N)?(i)(2) (?(i) is the frequency dissemination stability of the ith segment and N is the quantity of segments). Furthermore, for each segment, the phase noise of recovered frequency signal is also measured. The results show that for an N-segment, cascaded dissemination system, its stability degrades only by a factor of N. This sub-linear relation makes the cascaded, RF-dissemination method a very attractive one for long-haul, time and frequency dissemination network. PMID:26429433

  2. Radio wave.

    PubMed

    Elkin, V

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries with high rates of poverty and illiteracy, radio is emerging as an excellent medium for delivering information on health issues, family planning, nutrition, and agricultural development. Since radio does not require wired electricity, it can reach remote rural populations. Surveys have found that between 50-75% of poor rural households in developing countries own radios, and the majority listen to educational radio at least once a week. A program that reaches the urban poor outside of Lima, Peru, has been instrumental in controlling the spread of cholera. A Bolivian station broadcasts 8 hours of literacy, health, agricultural, and cultural programming a day to an audience of more than 2 million Aymara Indians. Small village radio stations with a broadcast range of 15 miles can be established for under US$400 and can generally achieve sustainability through local fundraising events such as raffles. In many cases, listeners have become broadcasters at their local radio stations. PMID:12286181

  3. Proceedings of the Thirteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 13)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. The meeting was organized into three technical sessions: the first focused on mobile satellite propagation; the second examined the propagation effects for frequencies above 10 GHz; and the third addressed studies devoted exclusively to the Olympus/Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Program.

  4. Characteristics of high-purity Cu thin films deposited on polyimide by radio-frequency Ar/H{sub 2} atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, P.; Zheng, W.; Meng, Y. D.; Nagatsu, M.

    2013-03-28

    With a view to fabricating future flexible electronic devices, an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet driven by 13.56 MHz radio-frequency power is developed for depositing Cu thin films on polyimide, where a Cu wire inserted inside the quartz tube was used as the evaporation source. A polyimide substrate is placed on a water-cooled copper heat sink to prevent it from being thermally damaged. With the aim of preventing oxidation of the deposited Cu film, we investigated the effect of adding H{sub 2} to Ar plasma on film characteristics. Theoretical fitting of the OH emission line in OES spectrum revealed that adding H{sub 2} gas significantly increased the rotational temperature roughly from 800 to 1500 K. The LMM Auger spectroscopy analysis revealed that higher-purity Cu films were synthesized on polyimide by adding hydrogen gas. A possible explanation for the enhancement in the Cu film deposition rate and improvement of purity of Cu films by H{sub 2} gas addition is that atomic hydrogen produced by the plasma plays important roles in heating the gas to promote the evaporation of Cu atoms from the Cu wire and removing oxygen from copper oxide components via reduction reaction.

  5. Effects of the shielding cylinder and substrate on the characteristics of an argon radio-frequency atmospheric glow discharge plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guo; Le Peisi; Li Heping; Bao Chengyu

    2010-05-15

    With unique features of low breakdown voltages, large and uniform discharge areas and high concentrations of chemically reactive species, radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (rf APGD) plasma sources produced with bare-metallic electrodes have shown promising prospects in the field of materials processing. In this paper, the spatial distributions (i.e., the directly measured integrated axial distribution and the radial distribution by using the inverse Abel transform) of the emission intensities of the Ar I 696.5 nm line are studied for the argon rf APGD plasma jet under different operation conditions, including variations of the rf power input or the argon flow rate, the existence of the solid shielding cylinder or the substrate. The experimental results show that, with other parameters being unchanged, the emission intensities of the Ar I 696.5 nm line increase with increasing the rf power input or the argon flow rate; and the solid shielding cylinder has more significant influences on the characteristics of the plasma impinging jet by reducing the mass flow rate of the ambient air entrained into the plasma jet region than those for the cases without the existence of the substrate at the downstream of the plasma torch nozzle exit.

  6. Radio science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-10-01

    Radio science experiments use electromagnetic waves to probe or study the solar system. Three major research areas were identified within this discipline: radio astronomy, radar astronomy, and celestial mechanics. Radio astronomy (or radiometry) is the detection and measurement of naturally produced radio frequency emissions. Sources include surfaces, atmospheres, rings, and plasmas. Radar astronomy is the observation of man-made signals after their interaction with a target. Both imaging and non-imaging results. Celestial mechanics includes all studies related to the motions of (and gravity fields of) bodies within the solar system. These should not be considered rigid separations, but aid in the discussion of the data sets.

  7. Radio sociology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, George W., Jr.

    1996-04-01

    A work was conducted, using radio telemetry, to locate a migrating, radio-tagged, sharp-shinned hawk. The hawk was monitored through the noise radiation it created. The hawk was found. During this study, it was found that the concentration of population corresponds with areas of increased noise temperature. Through this study, a bigger study was planned. The study would involved the relationship between a place's radiation signature and its other attributes, such as economic type, population, geographic concentration. The method of radio sociology would be used to track the sources of radio noise.

  8. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  9. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Niell, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the DSN in support of Radio and Radar Astronomy Operations during September through December 1980 are described. Emphasis is on a report of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel: that of VLBI observations of the energetic galactic object SS-433.

  10. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Schaffer, R. D.; Gorenstein, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of Radio Astronomy Operations during April and May 1981 are reported. Work in progres in support of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel, Twin Quasi-Stellar Object VLBI, is reported.

  11. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Wolken, P. R.; Gulkis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of radio astronomy operations during the first quarter of 1981 are reported. Results of the use of a low noise maser are presented, as well as updates in DSN support of experiments sanctioned by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel.

  12. Nervous propagation along 'central' motor pathways in intact man: characteristics of motor responses to 'bifocal' and 'unifocal' spine and scalp non-invasive stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rossini, P M; Marciani, M G; Caramia, M; Roma, V; Zarola, F

    1985-10-01

    In 23 healthy adult volunteers motor action potentials (MAPs) were elicited in upper and lower limb muscles during stimulation of appropriate sites at spinal and scalp level, through skin electrodes. 'Bifocal' stimulation of scalp and spine motor tracts was performed with 2 plaques (3.5 cm2 each), delivering single pulses of 440-940 mA, less than 50 microseconds in duration, which elicited high voltage (up to 10 mV) MAPs in arm and leg muscles. 'Unifocal' stimulation of scalp was carried out through a cathode consisting in a belt or in a series of rectangular interconnected plaques secured around the head, 1-2 cm rostral to the nasion-inion plane, and in a circular anode placed on the appropriate scalp site. MAPs with similar amplitude-latency characteristics were recorded with both 'bifocal' and 'unifocal' stimulating methods. However, the 'unifocal' stimulation necessitated 5-10 times less current than the 'bifocal' one. The 'unifocal' device using the interconnected plaques (6-12 in number) provided the most tolerable stimuli with the lowest amount of current (60-106 mA, rectangular pulses of 100-150 microseconds). Conduction times and velocities of motor pathways in various 'central' and 'peripheral' districts were calculated. Voluntary contraction of target muscles remarkably enhanced MAP amplitudes during scalp, but not during spine stimulation. A nerve action potential was recorded from ulnar nerve during scalp stimulation. MAPs in hand muscles to scalp stimulation were obliterated by the simultaneous activation of the peripheral fibres innervating the target muscle, because of collision between ortho- and antidromically propagated motor impulses. Anodal stimuli showed liminal values significantly lower than the cathodal ones. Mapping studies have been carried out with 'unifocal' scalp stimulation by using different types of anode and of stimulus parameters. PMID:2411506

  13. On-Body Antennas and Propagation: Recent Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yang; Hall, Peter S.

    The paper reviews recent advances in on-body antennas and propagation under a joint UK EPSRC research project between Queen Mary College, University of London and University of Birmingham. The study of on-body radio propagation has been extended by using various small antennas. The effect of antenna size, gain and radiation patterns on on-body channel characteristics has been studied. A practical wearable sensor antenna design is presented and it is demonstrated that a global simulation including sensor environment and human body is needed for accurate antenna characterisation. A 3D animation design software, POSER 6 has been used together with XFDTD to predict the on-body path loss variation due to changes in human postures and human motion. Finally, a preliminary study on the feasibility of a diversity scheme in an on-body environment has been carried out.

  14. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  15. Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Dyakov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to the required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  16. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Disseau, M.; Chakravarthy, V. K.; Jagoda, J.

    1997-01-01

    Papers included address the following topics: (1) Turbulent premixed flame propagation in microgravity; (2) The effect of gravity on turbulent premixed flame propagation - a preliminary cold flow study; and (3) Characteristics of a subgrid model for turbulent premixed combustion.

  17. ELF/VLF propagation measurements in the Atlantic during 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickolaenko, A. P.

    1995-06-01

    The vertical electric field component was measured by a group of the Ukrainian Insitute of Radio Astronomy on board the Professor Zubov scientific vessel during April 1989 at latitudes from 30 deg S to 50 deg N. Results of the amplitude measurements in the Atlantic of natural ELF radio signals and those from the VLF navigation system 'Omega' at its lowest frequency of 10.2 kHz are given. Characteristics were obtained of the moving ship as the field-site for the ELF observations. Variations in the ELF radio noise amplitude recorded at tropical latitudes agree with the computed data for the model of three continental centers of lightning activity. The VLF results were obtained by the 'beat' technique providing the simplest narrow-band amplitude registration. Range dependencies of the field amplitudes from A (Norway), B (Liberia) and F (Argentina) stations have been analyzed. The VLF attentuation factor was estimated for the ambient day conditions along the four cardinal directions. This allowed the detection of a statistically significant attenuation difference between the east-west and west-east propagation paths. The VLF radio signal was also used as a probe to evaluate the effective height of the vertical electric antenna and to calibrate the ELF noise amplitudes.

  18. Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekers, Ron; Wilson, Thomas L.

    ``Radio Telescopes" starts with a brief historical introduction from Jansky's1931 discovery of radio emission from the Milky Way through the development ofradio telescope dishes and arrays to aperture synthesis imaging. It includessufficient basics of electromagnetic radiation to provide some understanding of thedesign and operation of radio telescopes. The criteria such as frequencyrange, sensitivity, survey speed, angular resolution, and field of view thatdetermine the design of radio telescopes are introduced. Because it is soeasy to manipulate the electromagnetic waves at radio frequencies, radiotelescopes have evolved into many different forms, sometimes with "wire"structures tuned to specific wavelengths, which look very different from anykind of classical telescope. To assist astronomers more familiar with otherwavelength domains, the appendix A.1. includes a comparison of radioand optical terminology. Some of the different types of radio telescopesincluding the filled aperture dishes, electronically steered phased arrays, andaperture synthesis radio telescopes are discussed, and there is a sectioncomparing the differences between dishes and arrays. Some of the morerecent developments including hierarchical beam forming, phased arrayfeeds, mosaicing, rotation measure synthesis, digital receivers, and longbaseline interferometers are included. The problem of increasing radiofrequency interference is discussed, and some possible mitigation strategies areoutlined.

  19. A virus spreading model for cognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, L.; Yeung, K. H.; Wong, K. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Since cognitive radio (CR) networks could solve the spectrum scarcity problem, they have drawn much research in recent years. Artificial intelligence(AI) is introduced into CRs to learn from and adapt to their environment. Nonetheless, AI brings in a new kind of attacks specific to CR networks. The most powerful one is a self-propagating AI virus. And no spreading properties specific to this virus have been reported in the literature. To fill this research gap, we propose a virus spreading model of an AI virus by considering the characteristics of CR networks and the behavior of CR users. Several important observations are made from the simulation results based on the model. Firstly, the time taken to infect the whole network increases exponentially with the network size. Based on this result, CR network designers could calculate the optimal network size to slow down AI virus propagation rate. Secondly, the anti-virus performance of static networks to an AI virus is better than dynamic networks. Thirdly, if the CR devices with the highest degree are initially infected, the AI virus propagation rate will be increased substantially. Finally, it is also found that in the area with abundant spectrum resource, the AI virus propagation speed increases notably but the variability of the spectrum does not affect the propagation speed much.

  20. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  1. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  2. A database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani; Le, Choung

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Program supports academic research that models various propagation phenomena in the space research frequency bands. NASA supports such research via school and institutions prominent in the field. The products of such efforts are particularly useful for researchers in the field of propagation phenomena and telecommunications systems engineers. The systems engineer usually needs a few propagation parameter values for a system design. Published literature on the subject, such as the Cunsultative Committee for International Radio (CCIR) publications, may help somewhat, but often times, the parameter values given in such publications use a particular set of conditions which may not quite include the requirements of the system design. The systems engineer must resort to programming the propagation phenomena model of interest and to obtain the parameter values to be used in the project. Furthermore, the researcher in the propagation field must then program the propagation models either to substantiate the model or to generate a new model. The researcher or the systems engineer must either be a skillful computer programmer or hire a programmer, which of course increases the cost of the effort. An increase in cost due to the inevitable programming effort may seem particularly inappropriate if the data generated by the experiment is to be used to substantiate the already well-established models, or a slight variation thereof. To help researchers and the systems engineers, it was recommended by the participants of NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) 15 held in London, Ontario, Canada on 28-29 June 1991, that propagation software should be constructed which will contain models and prediction methods of most propagation phenomenon. Moreover, the software should be flexible enough for the user to make slight changes to the models without expending a substantial effort in programming.

  3. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  4. SPEAKING IN LIGHT - Jupiter radio signals as deflections of light-emitting electron beams in a vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, K.

    2015-10-01

    Light emitting electron beam generated in a vacuum chamber is used as a medium for visualizing Jupiter's electromagnetic radiation. Dual dipole array antenna is receiving HF radio signals that are next amplified to radiate a strong electromagnetic field capable of influencing the propagation of electron beam in plasma. Installation aims to provide a platform for observing the characteristics of light emitting beam in 3D, as opposed to the experiments with cathode ray tubes in 2-dimensional television screens. Gas giant 'speaking' to us by radio waves bends the light in the tube, allowing us to see and hear the messages of Jupiter - God of light and sky.

  5. High amplitude propagated contractions.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, A E

    2012-11-01

    While most colonic motor activity is segmental and non-propulsive, colonic high amplitude propagated contractions (HAPC) can transfer colonic contents over long distances and often precede defecation. High amplitude propagated contractions occur spontaneously, in response to pharmacological agents or colonic distention. A subset of patients with slow transit constipation have fewer HAPC. In this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Rodriguez etal. report that anal relaxation during spontaneous and bisacodyl-induced HAPC exceeds anal relaxation during rectal distention in constipated children undergoing colonic manometry. Moreover, and consistent with a neural mechanism, anal relaxation often precedes arrival of HAPC in the left colon. High amplitude propagated contractions are also used to evaluate the motor response to a meal and pharmacological stimuli (e.g., bisacodyl, neostigmine) and to identify colonic inertia during colonic motility testing in chronic constipation. This editorial comprehensively reviews the characteristics, physiology and pharmacology of HAPC, their assessment by manometry, and relevance to constipation and diarrhea. PMID:23057554

  6. Influence of the axicon characteristics and beam propagation parameter M{sup 2} on the formation of Bessel beams from semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolovskii, G S; Dyudelev, V V; Losev, S N; Butkus, M; Soboleva, K K; Sobolev, A I; Deryagin, A G; Kuchinskii, V I; Sibbet, V; Rafailov, E U

    2013-05-31

    We study the peculiarities of the formation of Bessel beams in semiconductor lasers with a high propagation parameter M{sup 2}. It is shown that the propagation distance of the Bessel beam is determined by the divergence of the quasi-Gaussian beam with high M{sup 2} rather than the geometric parameters of the optical scheme. It is demonstrated that technologically inevitable rounding of the axicon tip leads to a significant increase in the transverse dimension of the central part of the Bessel beam near the axicon. (semiconductor lasers. physics and technology)

  7. Shaping propagation invariant laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soskind, Michael; Soskind, Rose; Soskind, Yakov

    2015-11-01

    Propagation-invariant structured laser beams possess several unique properties and play an important role in various photonics applications. The majority of propagation invariant beams are produced in the form of laser modes emanating from stable laser cavities. Therefore, their spatial structure is limited by the intracavity mode formation. We show that several types of anamorphic optical systems (AOSs) can be effectively employed to shape laser beams into a variety of propagation invariant structured fields with different shapes and phase distributions. We present a propagation matrix approach for designing AOSs and defining mode-matching conditions required for preserving propagation invariance of the output shaped fields. The propagation matrix approach was selected, as it provides a more straightforward approach in designing AOSs for shaping propagation-invariant laser beams than the alternative technique based on the Gouy phase evolution, especially in the case of multielement AOSs. Several practical configurations of optical systems that are suitable for shaping input laser beams into a diverse variety of structured propagation invariant laser beams are also presented. The laser beam shaping approach was applied by modeling propagation characteristics of several input laser beam types, including Hermite-Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian, and Ince-Gaussian structured field distributions. The influence of the Ince-Gaussian beam semifocal separation parameter and the azimuthal orientation between the input laser beams and the AOSs onto the resulting shape of the propagation invariant laser beams is presented as well.

  8. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  9. Managing Mobile/Satellite Propagation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1990-01-01

    "Data Management System for Mobile Satellite Propagation" software package collection of FORTRAN programs and UNIX shell scripts designed to handle huge amounts of data resulting from mobile/satellite radio-propagation experiments. Data from experiments converted into standard and more useful forms. Software package contains program to convert binary format of data into standard ASCII format suitable for use with wide variety of computing-machine architectures. Written in either FORTRAN 77 or UNIX shell scripts.

  10. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying D.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Moestl, Christian; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P.; Lugaz, Noe; Davies, Jackie A.

    2013-05-20

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts, and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast CMEs can be approximately formulated into three phases: an impulsive acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed propagation (or gradual deceleration); (2) the CMEs studied here are still accelerating even after the flare maximum, so energy must be continuously fed into the CME even after the time of the maximum heating and radiation has elapsed in the corona; (3) the rapid deceleration, presumably due to interactions with the ambient medium, mainly occurs over a relatively short timescale following the acceleration phase; and (4) CME-CME interactions seem a common phenomenon close to solar maximum. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations: (1) for the current cases, triangulation assuming a compact CME geometry is more reliable than triangulation assuming a spherical front attached to the Sun for distances below 50-70 solar radii from the Sun, but beyond about 100 solar radii we would trust the latter more; (2) a proper treatment of CME geometry must be performed in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, especially when the CME propagation direction is far away from the observer; and (3) our approach to comparing wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations with interplanetary radio type II bursts provides a novel tool in investigating CME propagation characteristics. Future CME observations and space weather forecasting are discussed based on these results.

  11. A time dependent difference theory for sound propagation in ducts with flow. [characteristic of inlet and exhaust ducts of turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    A time dependent numerical solution of the linearized continuity and momentum equation was developed for sound propagation in a two dimensional straight hard or soft wall duct with a sheared mean flow. The time dependent governing acoustic difference equations and boundary conditions were developed along with a numerical determination of the maximum stable time increments. A harmonic noise source radiating into a quiescent duct was analyzed. This explicit iteration method then calculated stepwise in real time to obtain the transient as well as the steady state solution of the acoustic field. Example calculations were presented for sound propagation in hard and soft wall ducts, with no flow and plug flow. Although the problem with sheared flow was formulated and programmed, sample calculations were not examined. The time dependent finite difference analysis was found to be superior to the steady state finite difference and finite element techniques because of shorter solution times and the elimination of large matrix storage requirements.

  12. Proceedings of the Seventeenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 17) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX) is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investors from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX 17 was held on 15 June 1993. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to slant path propagation studies and experiments. The second session focused on propagation studies for mobile and personal communications. Preceding NAPEX 17, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop was held on 14 June 1993 to review ACTS propagation activities with emphasis on ACTS experiments status and data collection, processing, and exchange.

  13. Features of Superlong-Distance and Round-the-World Propagation of HF Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponyatov, A. A.; Vertogradov, G. G.; Uryadov, V. P.; Vertogradova, E. G.; Shumaev, V. V.; Chernov, A. G.; Chaika, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the experimental studies of the features of superlong-distance and round-the-world propagation of the HF waves in the radio lines with different orientation and length, which were obtained in 2012-2014 using a new method of oblique ionospheric sounding. The frequency-time travel intervals of the direct round-the-world signals, their amplitude-frequency and angular-frequency characteristics are determined. The mechanism of propagation and transformation of the round-the-world signals due to the radio-wave refraction by the transverse electron-density gradients in the region of approach of two optimal paths passing via the transmitter and receiver so that each path forms the smallest angle with the terminator. It is shown that the proposed mechanism is in good agreement with the experimentally observed variation of the azimuth of the direct round-the-world signal on the Cyprus-Rostov-on-Don path and on the Alice Springs (Australia)-Rostov-on-Don path in the absence of variation of the direct round-the-world signal azimuth. For the superlong-distance propagation of the HF waves on the Virginia (USA)-Yoshkar-Ola and Puerto Rico-Yoshkar-Ola (the distances about 8000-10000 km) paths, the best propagation conditions are observed when the entire path is in the illuminated ionosphere near the terminator boundary making a small angle of 10-25 with the terminator.

  14. Phenomenology of magnetospheric radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, T. D.; Desch, M. D.; Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Jupiter has now been observed over 24 octaves of the radio spectrum, from about 0.01 MHz to 300,000 MHz. Its radio emissions fill the entire spectral region where interplanetary electromagnetic propagation is possible at wavelengths longer than infrared. Three distinct types of radiation are responsible for this radio spectrum. Thermal emission from the atmosphere accounts for virtually all the radiation at the high frequency end. Synchrotron emission from the trapped high-energy particle belt deep within the inner magnetosphere is the dominant spectral component from about 4000 to 40 MHz. The third class of radiation consists of several distinct components of sporadic low frequency emission below 40 MHz. The decimeter wavelength emission is considered, taking into account the discovery of synchrotron emission, radiation by high-energy electrons in a magnetic field, and the present status of Jovian synchrotron phenomenology. Attention is also given to the decameter and hectometer wavelength emission, and emissions at kilometric wavelengths.

  15. Linear mode conversion in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas during ionospheric modification by HF radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondarenko, N. A.; Guzdar, P. N.; Ossakow, S. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2003-12-01

    The propagation of high-frequency (HF) radio waves in an inhomogeneous magnetoactive plasma and generation of plasma waves at the resonance layer near the reflection layer of the ordinary mode are studied using one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional full-wave codes. The characteristics of the mode-conversion process are investigated in linear and parabolic density profiles as the angle of incidence is varied. We present the 1-D results for the wave propagation relevant to the high-latitude heater facility at Troms and the midlatitude facility at Arecibo. For the facility at Arecibo, the 2-D wave propagation in a plasma density approximating an overdense sporadic-E patch is investigated to determine the localized regions of amplified intensity, where plasma waves can facilitate acceleration of fast energetic electrons, resulting in observed enhanced airglow.

  16. Regional seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. C.; Pomeroy, P. W.

    1980-07-01

    In a review of studies on the seismic phase Lg, we describe its particle motion, dispersion, spectral content, mode of propagation, and magnitude-scale; we also tabulate the regional velocity, attenuation, and propagation efficiency for this seismic phase. The characteristics of Lg-wave propagation in the eastern United states are compared with those in different regions of the Soviet Union. Possible discriminants such as Lg VS. Pamplitudes, Lg/ P amplitude ratios as a function of distance, and Lg energy ratios are found, similar to attenuation and group velocity, to be highly dependent on the propagation path. The valid application of these quantities to the problem of earthquake-explosion discrimination will therefor require regional studies more detailed than previously assumed. A re-evaluation of the magnitude yield relation and an examination of physical parameters which may be relevant to the estimated yield of underground nuclear explosions were performed. The preliminary results indicate that the sub M sub b vs. yield relation shows regional differences and dependence on the source medium, and the collapse volume and the diameter of the collapsed crater are usually proportional to the estimated yield.

  17. Characteristic investigation of 2D photonic crystals with full material anisotropy under out-of-plane propagation and liquid-crystal-filled photonic-band-gap-fiber applications using finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sen-ming; Chang, Hung-chun

    2008-12-22

    To effectively investigate the fundamental characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals (PCs) with arbitrary 3D material anisotropy under the out-of-plane wave propagation, we establish a full-vectorial finite element method based eigenvalue algorithm to perform related analysis correctly. The band edge diagrams can be conveniently constructed from the band structures of varied propagation constants obtained from the algorithm, which is helpful for the analysis and design of photonic ban gap (PBG) fibers. Several PCs are analyzed to demonstrate the correctness of this numerical model. Our analysis results for simple PCs are checked with others' ones using different methods, including the transfer matrix method, the finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method, and the plane-wave expansion method. And the validity of those for the most complex PC with arbitrary 3D anisotropy is supported by related liquid-crystal-filled PBG fiber mode analysis, which demonstrates the dependence of transmission properties on the PBGs, employing a full-vectorial finite element beam propagation method (FE-BPM). PMID:19104565

  18. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of the scintillation measurements, and to highlight some of the scientific results obtained to date. Special emphasis is placed on comparing the remote sensing features of planetary and terrestrial scintillation measurements, and on contrasting spacecraft and natural radio source scintillation measurements. I will first discuss planetary atmospheres and ionospheres, and then the solar wind.

  19. User needs for propagation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas M.

    1993-01-01

    New and refined models of radio signal propagation phenomena are needed to support studies of evolving satellite services and systems. Taking an engineering perspective, applications for propagation measurements and models in the context of various types of analyses that are of ongoing interest are reviewed. Problems that were encountered in the signal propagation aspects of these analyses are reviewed, and potential solutions to these problems are discussed. The focus is on propagation measurements and models needed to support design and performance analyses of systems in the Mobile-Satellite Service (MSS) operating in the 1-3 GHz range. These systems may use geostationary or non-geostationary satellites and Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Time Division Multiple Access Digital (TDMA), or Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) techniques. Many of the propagation issues raised in relation to MSS are also pertinent to other services such as broadcasting-satellite (sound) at 2310-2360 MHz. In particular, services involving mobile terminals or terminals with low gain antennas are of concern.

  20. Stress propagation in sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, M. E.; Wittmer, J. P.

    We describe a new continuum approach to the modelling of stress propagation in static granular media, focussing on the conical sandpile created from a point source. We argue that the stress continuity equations should be closed by means of scale-free, local constitutive relations between different components of the stress tensor, encoding the construction history of the pile: this history determines the organization of the grains, and thereby the local relationship between stresses. Our preferred model fixed principle axes (FPA) assumes that the eigendirections (but not the eigenvalues) of the stress tensor are determined forever when a material element is first buried. Stresses propagate along a nested set of arch-like structures within the medium; the results are in good quantitative agreement with published experimental data. The FPA model is one of a larger class, called oriented stress linearity (OSL) models, in which the direction of the characteristics for stress propagation are fixed at burial. We speculate on the connection between these characteristics and the stress paths observed microscopically.

  1. On Sun-to-Earth Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Lugaz, N.; Moestl, C.; Bale, S. D.; Lin, R. P.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs, each of which has wide-angle imaging coverage from both STEREO A and B, a long-duration interplanetary type II burst and in situ signatures near the Earth. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast CMEs can be formulated into three phases: an impulsive acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed propagation (or gradual deceleration); (2) the CMEs studied here are still accelerating even after the flare maximum, so energy must be continuously fed into the CME even after the maximum heating and radiation have elapsed in the corona; (3) the rapid deceleration, presumably due to interactions with the ambient medium, mainly occurs within a relatively short time scale following the acceleration phase; (4) CME-CME interactions seem a common phenomenon close to solar maximum. Comparison between different techniques (and data sets) gives important implications for CME observations and interpretations: (1) for the current cases triangulation with the fixed ? approximation is more reliable than triangulation with the harmonic mean approximation below 50-70 solar radii from the Sun, but beyond about 100 solar radii we would trust the harmonic mean triangulation more; (2) a proper treatment of CME geometry must be performed in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, especially when the CME propagation direction is far away from the observer; (3) our approach in comparing wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations with interplanetary radio type II bursts provides a novel tool in investigating CME propagation characteristics. Future CME observations and space weather forecasting are discussed based on the results.

  2. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  3. FIBER AND INTEGRATED OPTICS: Analysis of the characteristics of a radio signal at the output of a multimode interference-type fiber channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratchikov, A. N.; Glukhov, I. P.

    1992-02-01

    An analysis is made of a theoretical model of an interference fiber channel for transmission of microwave signals. It is assumed that the channel consists of a multimode fiber waveguide with a step or graded refractive-index profile. A typical statistic of a longitudinal distribution of inhomogeneities is also assumed. Calculations are reported of the interference losses, the spectral profile of the output radio signal, the signal/noise ratio in the channel, and of the dependences of these parameters on: the type, diameter, and the length of the multimode fiber waveguide; the spectral width of the radiation source; the frequency offset between the interfering optical signals.

  4. Consideration on the scatter of cod and fatigue crack propagation characteristics of heavy section C-Mn-V forged steel for offshore structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, T.; Iwadate, T.; Shimazaki, M.

    1982-01-01

    A 197-mm thick C-Mn-V forged steel plate including welds was subjected to mechanical and corrosion-fatigue tests and several engineering data useful for the design of offshore structures were obtained. The chemical and mechanical properties of base metal and welds satisfy typical current requirements in the North Sea projects and the heavy wall forged tubular is proved to be applicable to the offshore structures. The scatter of critical cod in the transition temperature range was studied and a new statistical method was presented for estimating the lowest critical cod value. Corrosion-fatigure tests in seawater were conducted on the base metal and heat affected zone (HAZ) of submerged arc welding at a cyclic frequency corresponding to sea wave frequency. No difference in fatigue crack propagation rate was observed between the base metal and HAZ.

  5. The role of reaction temperature and cracking catalyst characteristics in determining the relative rates of protolytic cracking, chain propagation, and hydrogen transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Corma, A. ); Miguel, P.J.; Orchilles, A.V. )

    1994-01-01

    The cracking of isobutane on USY zeolites with different unit cell size has been studied in the temperature range 400-500[degrees]C, using an experimental apparatus which makes it possible to follow the reaction at very short times on stream. By measuring product initial selectivities it has been found that protolytic cracking and bimolecular reactions take place on Broensted acid sites. In this way the contributions of bimolecular reactions involving hydride transfer have been separated from those responsible for chain transfer and those producing hydrogen transfer. Chain transfer accounts for the chain propagation in paraffin cracking, while hydrogen transfer produces the extra paraffin amounts obtained in these reactions. Hydrogen transfer reactions increase, but chain transfer reactions decrease when the unit cell size increases. From energetic considerations, the influence of the zeolite catalyst and reaction conditions on the controlling step in isobutane cracking can be suggested. 24 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. EVA Radio DRATS 2011 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Aaron J.; Bakula, Casey J.

    2012-01-01

    In the Fall of 2011, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) participated in the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) field experiments held near Flagstaff, Arizona. The objective of the DRATS outing is to provide analog mission testing of candidate technologies for space exploration, especially those technologies applicable to human exploration of extra- terrestrial rocky bodies. These activities are performed at locations with similarities to extra-terrestrial conditions. This report describes the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Dual-Band Radio Communication System which was demonstrated during the 2011 outing. The EVA radio system is designed to transport both voice and telemetry data through a mobile ad hoc wireless network and employs a dual-band radio configuration. Some key characteristics of this system include: 1. Dual-band radio configuration. 2. Intelligent switching between two different capability wireless networks. 3. Self-healing network. 4. Simultaneous data and voice communication.

  7. INSPIRE - Premission. [Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  8. RADIO ALTIMETERS

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A radio ranging device is described which utilizes a superregenerative oscillator having alternate sending and receiving phases with an intervening ranging interval between said phases, means for varying said ranging interval, means responsive to an on-range noise reduction condition for stopping said means for varying the ranging interval and indicating means coupled to the ranging interval varying means and calibrated in accordance with one-half the product of the ranging interval times the velocity of light whereby the range is indicated.

  9. Study on method to simulate light propagation on tissue with characteristics of radial-beam LED based on Monte-Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Song, Sangha; Elgezua, Inko; Kobayashi, Yo; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2013-01-01

    In biomedical, Monte-carlo simulation is commonly used for simulation of light diffusion in tissue. But, most of previous studies did not consider a radial beam LED as light source. Therefore, we considered characteristics of a radial beam LED and applied them on MC simulation as light source. In this paper, we consider 3 characteristics of radial beam LED. The first is an initial launch area of photons. The second is an incident angle of a photon at an initial photon launching area. The third is the refraction effect according to contact area between LED and a turbid medium. For the verification of the MC simulation, we compared simulation and experimental results. The average of the correlation coefficient between simulation and experimental results is 0.9954. Through this study, we show an effective method to simulate light diffusion on tissue with characteristics for radial beam LED based on MC simulation. PMID:24109615

  10. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX XX) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nassar (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting and associated Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop convene yearly to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom)industry, academia, and government with an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation have peer discussion of work in progress, disseminate propagation results, and interact with the satcom industry. NAPEX XX, in Fairbanks, Alaska, June 4-5, 1996, had three sessions: (1) "ACTS Propagation Study: Background, Objectives, and Outcomes," covered results from thirteen station-years of Ka-band experiments; (2) "Propagation Studies for Mobile and Personal Satellite Applications," provided the latest developments in measurement, modeling, and dissemination of propagation phenomena of interest to the mobile, personal, and aeronautical satcom industry; and (3)"Propagation Research Topics," covered a range of topics including space/ground optical propagation experiments, propagation databases, the NASA Propagation Web Site, and revision plans for the NASA propagation effects handbooks. The ACTS Miniworkshop, June 6, 1996, covered ACTS status, engineering support for ACTS propagation terminals, and the ACTS Propagation Data Center. A plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  11. Solar radio continuum storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of research on solar radio continuum emissions from metric to hectometric wave frequencies, emphasizing the role of energetic electrons in the 10-100 keV range in these emissions. It is seen that keV-energy electrons generated in active sunspot groups must be the sources of radio continuum storm emissions for wide frequency bands. These electrons excite plasma oscillations in the medium, which in turn are converted to electromagnetic radiation. The radio noise continuum sources are usually associated with type III burst activity observed above these sources. Although the mechanism for the release of the energetic electrons is not known, it seems they are ejected from storm source regions in association with rapid variation of associated sunspot magnetic fields due to their growth into complex types. To explain some of the observed characteristics, the importance of two-stream instability and the scattering of ambient plasma ions on energetic electron streams is pointed out.

  12. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiters radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  13. The Influence of Soil Properties and Local Characteristics on the Distribution, Migration and Potential Bioavailability of Radio-Cesium in Bavarian Forest Ecosystems More Than 20 Years After the Chernobyl Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelbauer, J.; Voelkel, J.; Leopold, M.; Huerkamp, K.; Dehos, R.

    2008-12-01

    Soil properties and local characteristics of landscapes and ecosystems influence the behaviour of Radio- Cesium. Humic horizons are a main factor in understanding the migration and potential bioavailability of radio-nuclides in soils. Until 1962 and in the year 1986, nuclear arms tests in the Pacific and the Chernobyl reactor accident emitted persistent radionuclides in the atmosphere that are stored in several European ecosystems. Short-term high as well as long-term low immissions lead to enrichments and increasing contamination of the environment up to superposition effects in certain ecosystems. South German forest ecosystems like the Bavarian Forest or the Northern pre-Alps are subareas of the cesium fallout affected sites after the Chernobyl accident. Cesium-137 is constantly contained in the vegetation and food chain in spite of decreasing local doses. Investigations have shown that the enrichment of cesium is mainly restricted to the organic top layers of the forest soils. Examples of several Bavarian forest ecosystems are given. Horizontal and vertical forest soil distributions of the cesium contamination and its bioavailability were determined to provide a default-document how to act in case of a repetition of a nuclear accident. Such a guideline has been created by order of the Bavarian State Government and its scope is presented here.

  14. Characteristics and viral propagation properties of a new human diploid cell line, walvax-2, and its suitability as a candidate cell substrate for vaccine production

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bo; He, Li-Fang; Zhang, Yi-Li; Chen, Min; Wang, Li-Li; Yang, Hong-Wei; Yan, Ting; Sun, Meng-Xiang; Zheng, Cong-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Human diploid cell strains (HDCSs), possessing identical chromosome sets known to be free of all known adventitious agents, are of great use in developing human vaccines. However it is extremely difficult to obtain qualified HDCSs that can satisfy the requirements for the mass production of vaccines. We have developed a new HDCS, Walvax-2, which we derived from the lung tissue of a 3-month-old fetus. We established primary, master and working cell banks successfully from reconstituted frozen cells. Observations during the concurrent propagation of Walvax-2 and MRC-5 cells revealed differences in terms of growth rate, cell viability and viral sensitivities. Specifically, Walvax-2 cells replicated more rapidly than MRC-5 cells, with Walvax-2 cells attaining the same degree of confluence in 48 hours as was reached by MRC-5 cells in 72 hours. Moreover, Walvax-2 cells attained 58 passages of cell doublings whereas MRC-5 reached 48 passages during this period. We also assessed the susceptibility of these cells to rabies, hepatitis A, and Varicella viruses. Analysis of virus titers showed the Walvax-2 cells to be equal or superior to MRC-5 cells for cultivating these viruses. Furthermore, in order to characterize the Walvax-2 cell banks, a series of tests including cell identification, chromosomal characterization, tumorigenicity, as well as tests for the presence of microbial agents, exogenous viruses, and retroviruses, were conducted according to standard international protocols. In conclusion, results from this study show that Walvax-2 cell banks are a promising cell substrate and could potentially be used for the manufacturing of HDCVs. PMID:25803132

  15. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  16. Indoor radio measurement and planning for UMTS/HSDPA with antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eheduru, Marcellinus

    Over the last decade, mobile communication networks have evolved tremendously with a key focus on providing high speed data services in addition to voice. The third generation of mobile networks in the form of Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) is already offering revolutionary mobile broadband experience to its users by deploying High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) as its packet-data technology. With data speeds up to 14.4 Mbps and ubiquitous mobility, HSDPA is anticipated to become a preferred broadband access medium for end-users via mobile phones, laptops etc. While majority of these end-users are located indoors most of the time, approximately 70-80% of the HSDPA traffic is estimated to originate from inside buildings. Thus for network operators, indoor coverage has become a necessity for technical and business reasons. Macro-cellular (outdoor) to indoor coverage is a natural inexpensive way of providing network coverage inside the buildings. However, it does not guarantee sufficient link quality required for optimal HSDPA operation. On the contrary, deploying a dedicated indoor system may be far too expensive from an operator's point of view. In this thesis, the concept is laid for the understanding of indoor radio wave propagation in a campus building environment which could be used to plan and improve outdoor-to-indoor UMTS/HSDPA radio propagation performance. It will be shown that indoor range performance depends not only on the transmit power of an indoor antenna, but also on the product's response to multipath and obstructions in the environment along the radio propagation path. An extensive measurement campaign will be executed in different indoor environments analogous to easy, medium and hard radio conditions. The effects of walls, ceilings, doors and other obstacles on measurement results would be observed. Chapter one gives a brief introduction to the evolution of UMTS and HSDPA. It goes on to talk about radio wave propagation and some important properties of antennas which must be considered when choosing an antenna for indoor radio propagation. The challenges of in-building network coverage and also the objectives of this thesis are also mentioned in this chapter. The evolution and standardization, network architecture, radio features and most importantly, the radio resource management features of UMTS/HSDPA are given in chapter two. In this chapter, the reason why Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) was specified and selected for 3G (UMTS) systems would be seen. The architecture of the radio access network, interfaces with the radio access network between base stations and radio network controllers (RNC), and the interface between the radio access network and the core network are also described in this chapter. The main features of HSDPA are mentioned at the end of the chapter. In chapter three the principles of the WCDMA air interface, including spreading, Rake reception, signal fading, power control and handovers are introduced. The different types and characteristics of the propagation environments and how they influence radio wave propagation are mentioned. UMTS transport, logical and physical channels are also mentioned, highlighting their significance and relationship in and with the network. Radio network planning for UMTS is discussed in chapter four. The outdoor planning process which includes dimensioning, detailed planning, optimization and monitoring is outlined. Indoor radio planning with distributed antenna systems (DAS), which is the idea and motivation behind this thesis work, is also discussed. The various antennas considered and the antenna that was selected for this thesis experiment was discussed in chapter five. The antenna radiation pattern, directivity, gain and input impedance were the properties of the antenna that were taken into consideration. The importance of the choice of the antenna for any particular type of indoor environment is also mentioned. In chapter six, the design and fabrication of the monopole antennas used for the experimental measurement is mentioned. The procedure for measurement and the equipment used are also discussed. The results gotten from the experiment are finally analyzed and discussed. In this chapter the effect of walls, floors, doors, ceilings and other obstacles on radio wave propagation will be seen. Finally, chapter seven concludes this thesis work and gives some directions for future work.

  17. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  18. Effect of Low pH and Aluminum Toxicity on the Photosynthetic Characteristics of Different Fast-Growing Eucalyptus Vegetatively Propagated Clones

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Tan, Ling; Xu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yihui; Cheng, Fei; Ye, Shaoming; Jiang, Weixin

    2015-01-01

    Knowing how acid soils and aluminum in soils may limit the growth of Eucalyptus trees in plantations is important because these plantations grow in many tropical and subtropical regions. Seedlings of four vegetatively propagated Eucalyptus clones, E. grandis × E. urophylla ‘GLGU9’(G9), E. grandis × E. urophylla ‘GLGU12’ (G12), E. urophylla × E. camaldulensis ‘GLUC3’ (G3) and E. urophylla ‘GLU4’(G4), were subjected to liquid culture with Hoagland nutrient solution for 40 days, then treated with four different treatments of acid and aluminum for 1 day. The four treatments used either pH 3.0 or 4.0 with or without added aluminum (4.4 mM) in all possible combinations; a control used no added aluminum at pH 4.8. Subsequently, the photosynthetic parameters and morphology of leaves from eucalypt seedlings were determined and observed. The results showed that the tested chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate and water use efficiency were apparently inhibited by aluminum. Under uniform Al concentration (4.4 mM), the Al-induced limitation to photosynthetic parameters increased with pH, indicating acid stimulation to Al toxicity. Among all treatments, the most significant reduction was found in the combination of pH 3.0 and 4.4 mM Al. The photosynthetic and transpiration rates showed similar trends with G9 > G12 > G3 > G4, suggesting that G9 and G12 had higher Al-tolerance than other two clones. Microscopic observation revealed changes in leaf morphology when exposed to Al stress; for example, a reduced thickness of leaf epidermis and palisade tissue, the descendant palisade tissue/spongy tissue ratio and leaf tissue looseness. Overall, the acid and aluminum stress exerted negative effects on the photosynthetic activity of eucalypt seedlings, but the differences in tolerance to Al toxicity between the clones were favorable, offering potential to improve Eucalyptus plantation productivity by selecting Al tolerant clones. PMID:26090998

  19. Electron Exciter Speeds Associated with Interplanetary Type III Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    This article provides a comprehensive quantitative investigation of the kinematics of the electron exciters associated with interplanetary type III solar radio bursts. Detailed multispacecraft analyses of the radio and plasma wave data from the widely separated Wind and STEREO spacecraft are provided for five interplanetary type III bursts that illustrate different aspects of the problems involved in establishing the electron exciter speeds. The exciter kinematics are determined from the observed frequency drift and in-situ radiation characteristics for each type III burst. The analysis assumes propagation of the electron exciters along a Parker spiral, with origin at the associated solar active region, and curvature determined by the measured solar wind speed. The analyses take fully into account the appropriate light-propagation-time corrections from the radio source to the observing spacecraft as the exciters propagate along the Parker spiral path. For the five in-situ type III bursts analyzed in detail here, we found that their initial exciter speeds, near the Sun, ranged from 0.2c to 0.38c, where c is the speed of light. This is significantly higher than the exciter speeds derived from other recent analyses. The results presented here further suggest that the type III electron exciters normally decelerate as they propagate through the interplanetary medium. We argue based on the observations by the widely separated spacecraft that the initial part of the type III radiation usually occurs at the fundamental of the plasma frequency. Finally, we compare the results for the exciter speeds to all previous determinations and provide quantitative arguments to explain the differences.

  20. AURORAL RADIO EMISSION FROM STARS: THE CASE OF CU VIRGINIS

    SciTech Connect

    Trigilio, Corrado; Leto, Paolo; Umana, Grazia; Buemi, Carla S.; Leone, Francesco

    2011-09-20

    CU Virginis is a rapidly rotating Magnetic Chemically Peculiar star with at present unique characteristics as a radio emitter. The most intriguing one is the presence of intense, 100% circularly polarized radiation ascribed to a cyclotron maser. Each time the star rotates, this highly beamed emission points two times toward the Earth, like a pulsar. We observed CU Vir in 2010 April with the Expanded Very Large Array in two bands centered at 1450 and 1850 MHz. We covered nearly the whole rotational period, confirming the presence of the two pulses at a flux density up to 20 mJy. Dynamical spectra, obtained with unprecedented spectral and temporal sensitivity, allow us to clearly see the different time delays as a function of frequency. We interpret this behavior as a propagation effect of the radiation inside the stellar magnetosphere. The emerging scenario suggests interesting similarities with the auroral radio emission from planets, in particular with the Auroral Kilometric Radiation from Earth, which originates at few terrestrial radii above the magnetic poles and was only recently discovered to be highly beamed. We conclude that the magnetospheres of CU Vir, Earth, and other planets, maybe also exoplanets, could have similar geometrical and physical characteristics in the regions where the cyclotron maser is generated. In addition, the pulses are perfect 'markers' of the rotation period. This has given us for the first time the possibility to measure with extraordinary accuracy the spin-down of a star on or near the main sequence.

  1. Uranus as a radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Leblanc, Y.; Aubier, M.; Ortega-Molina, A.

    1991-01-01

    The complex nature of the Uranus radio emissions, both magnetospheric and atmospheric, is reviewed, with emphasis on the identification of distinct components and the determination of their source locations. Seven radii components were discovered in addition to the RF signature of lightning in the planet's atmosphere. Six of the seven magnetospheric components are freely propagating emissions; one component, the nonthermal continuum, is trapped in the density cavity between the magnetopause and the dense inner magnetosphere. The radio components are divided into two types according to their emission signature: bursty emission and smooth emission. The inferred source location for the dominant nightside emission is above the nightside magnetic pole, largely overlapping the UV auroral region and the magnetic polar cap. The N-burst component appears to be associated with solar-wind enhancements at Uranus, consistent with the idea that the solar wind was triggering magnetospheric substormlike activity during the encounter.

  2. The Cubesat Radio Experiment (CURE) and Beyond: Cubesat-based Low Frequency Radio Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Hilaire, P.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Sample, J. G.; Pulupa, M.; Maruca, B.; Bale, S. D.; Bonnell, J. W.; Mozer, F.; Hurford, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    We have proposed a 3U cubesat, to carry a low-frequency radio receiver into low-Earth orbit to study solar radio bursts induced by solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. Because of the reflective properties of the Earth's ionosphere, observations of radio waves around and below 10 MHz must be made from space. The measurements will allow continuous tracking of radio bursts and associated CMEs through the inner heliosphere. These observations are important since such events are the main cause for space weather disturbances. Data products from the mission will primarily be spectra and waveforms of solar radio type II and III bursts, and the direction to the radio source as it propagates through the inner heliosphere. These data products will be available to the community through an automated pipeline nominally within a few hours of downlink. Additional science data products will be sizes of radio sources obtained via lunar occultations, and local ionospheric plasma density and electron temperature. As a first cubesat with a scientific radio instrument at these frequencies, this project is also intended as a path-finder: the instrument and sub-systems can immediately be duplicated in other cubesats, with the goal of providing the first radio interferometric measurements below the ionospheric cutoff.

  3. Structure-guided engineering of Anticalins with improved binding behavior and biochemical characteristics for application in radio-immuno imaging and/or therapy.

    PubMed

    Eggenstein, E; Eichinger, A; Kim, H-J; Skerra, A

    2014-02-01

    Modern strategies in radio-immuno therapy and in vivo imaging require robust, small, and specific ligand-binding proteins. In this context we have previously developed artificial lipocalins, so-called Anticalins, with high binding activity toward rare-earth metal-chelate complexes using combinatorial protein design. Here we describe further improvement of the Anticalin C26 via in vitro affinity maturation to yield CL31, which has a fourfold slower dissociation half-life above 2h. Also, we present the crystallographic analyses of both the initial and the improved Anticalin, providing insight into the molecular mechanism of chelated metal binding and the role of amino acid substitutions during the step-wise affinity maturation. Notably, one of the four structurally variable loops that form the ligand pocket in the lipocalin scaffold undergoes a significant conformational change from C26 to CL31, acting as a lid that closes over the accommodated metal-chelate ligand. A systematic mutational study indicated that further improvement of ligand affinity is difficult to achieve while providing clues on the contribution of relevant side chains in the engineered binding pocket. Unexpectedly, some of the amino acid replacements led to strong increases - more then 10-fold - in the yield of soluble protein from periplasmic secretion in Escherichia coli. PMID:23542582

  4. S-Band propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A geosynchronous satellite system capable of providing many channels of digital audio radio service (DARS) to mobile platforms within the contiguous United States using S-band radio frequencies is being implemented. The system is designed uniquely to mitigate both multipath fading and outages from physical blockage in the transmission path by use of satellite spatial diversity in combination with radio frequency and time diversity. The system also employs a satellite orbital geometry wherein all mobile platforms in the contiguous United States have elevation angles greater than 20 deg to both of the diversity satellites. Since implementation of the satellite system will require three years, an emulation has been performed using terrestrial facilities in order to allow evaluation of DARS capabilities in advance of satellite system operations. The major objective of the emulation was to prove the feasibility of broadcasting from satellites 30 channels of CD quality programming using S-band frequencies to an automobile equipped with a small disk antenna and to obtain quantitative performance data on S-band propagation in a satellite spatial diversity system.

  5. Decimetric radio dot emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mszrosov, H.; Karlick, M.; Sawant, H. S.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.; de Andrade, M. C.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We study a rare type of solar radio bursts called decimetric dot emissions. Aims: In the period 1999-2001, 20 events of decimetric dot emissions observed by the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS) in the frequency range 950-2640 MHz are investigated statistically and compared with radio fine structures of zebras and fibers. Methods: For the study of the spectral characteristics of the dot emissions we use specially developed Interactive Data Language (IDL) software called BSSView and basic statistical methods. Results: We have found that the dm dot emissions, contrary to the fine structures of the type IV bursts (i.e. zebras, fibers, lace bursts, spikes), are not superimposed on any background burst emission. In the radio spectrum, in most cases the dot emissions form chains that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. Because some zebras and fibers, especially those observed with high time and high spectral resolutions, also show emission dots (but superimposed on the background burst emission), we compared the spectral parameters of the dot emissions with the dots being the fine structure of zebras and fibers. For both these dots, similar spectral characteristics were found. Some similarities of the dot emissions can be found also with the lace bursts and spikes. For some events the dot emissions show structural evolution from patterns resembling fibers to patterns resembling zebras and vice versa, or they evolve into fully chaotic patterns. Conclusions: For the first time, we present decimetric dot emissions that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. We propose that these emissions are generated by the plasma emission mechanism at the locations in the solar atmosphere where the double resonance condition is fulfilled.

  6. Graphene electrostatic microphone and ultrasonic radio

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Zheng, Jinglin; Onishi, Seita; Crommie, M. F.; Zettl, Alex K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a graphene-based wideband microphone and a related ultrasonic radio that can be used for wireless communication. It is shown that graphene-based acoustic transmitters and receivers have a wide bandwidth, from the audible region (20∼20 kHz) to the ultrasonic region (20 kHz to at least 0.5 MHz). Using the graphene-based components, we demonstrate efficient high-fidelity information transmission using an ultrasonic band centered at 0.3 MHz. The graphene-based microphone is also shown to be capable of directly receiving ultrasound signals generated by bats in the field, and the ultrasonic radio, coupled to electromagnetic (EM) radio, is shown to function as a high-accuracy rangefinder. The ultrasonic radio could serve as a useful addition to wireless communication technology where the propagation of EM waves is difficult. PMID:26150483

  7. Graphene electrostatic microphone and ultrasonic radio.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zheng, Jinglin; Onishi, Seita; Crommie, M F; Zettl, Alex K

    2015-07-21

    We present a graphene-based wideband microphone and a related ultrasonic radio that can be used for wireless communication. It is shown that graphene-based acoustic transmitters and receivers have a wide bandwidth, from the audible region (20?20 kHz) to the ultrasonic region (20 kHz to at least 0.5 MHz). Using the graphene-based components, we demonstrate efficient high-fidelity information transmission using an ultrasonic band centered at 0.3 MHz. The graphene-based microphone is also shown to be capable of directly receiving ultrasound signals generated by bats in the field, and the ultrasonic radio, coupled to electromagnetic (EM) radio, is shown to function as a high-accuracy rangefinder. The ultrasonic radio could serve as a useful addition to wireless communication technology where the propagation of EM waves is difficult. PMID:26150483

  8. Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, M.

    The Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI) experiment addresses fundamental aspects of cometary physics such as the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, its gravity field, nucleus size and shape, internal structure, composition and roughness of the nucleus surface, the abundance of large dust grains, the plasma content in the coma and the combined dust and gas mass flux. RSI does not have a dedicated instrument on the Rosetta spacecraft but makes use of the onboard radio subsystem which is responsible for communication between the spacecraft and the ground stations on Earth. The Rosetta radio subsystem is specially equipped with an Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) which significantly improves the sensitivity and accuracy of the measurements. The spacecraft is capable of receiving two uplink signals non-simultaneously at either X-band (7100 MHz) or S-band via the High Gain Antenna (HGA). The downlink transmission via the HGA can occur simultaneously at S-band and X-band. RSI is interested in the nondispersive frequency shifts (classical Doppler) and dispersive frequency shifts (due to the ionized propagation medium), the signal power and the polarization of the radio carrier waves. Variations in these parameters will yield information on the motion of the spacecraft, the perturbing forces acting on the spacecraft and the propagation medium. The RSI science objectives are divided into the primary science objectives (a) cometary gravity field investigations, (b) comet nucleus investigations, (c) cometary coma investigations, (d) asteroid mass and bulk density and the secondary science objectives (e) solar corona sounding, (f) a search for gravitational waves at the comet, the asteroids flybys and during cruise.

  9. Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptzold, M.; Hagermann, A.; Rsi Team

    2003-04-01

    The Rosetta spacecraft, to be launched sometime in the near future, will be equipped with the Rosetta Radio Science Investigations (RSI) experiment. This experiment addresses fundamental aspects of cometary physics such as the mass and bulk density of the nucleus, its gravity field as well as nongravitational forces, nucleus size and shape, internal structure, composition and roughness of the nucleus surface, the abundance of large dust grains, the plasma content in the coma and the combined dust and gas mass flux. RSI does not have a dedicated instrument on the Rosetta spacecraft. Instead, it uses the onboard radio subsystem responsible for communication between the spacecraftand the ground stations on Earth. The Rosetta radio subsystem is specially equipped with an Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) which significantly improves the sensitivity and accuracy of the measurements. The spacecraft is capable of receiving two uplink signals at S-band via the Low Gain Antennas (LGAs), or non-simultaneously receiving at either X-band (7100 MHz) or S-band via the HGA. The downlink transmission via the High Gain Antenna (HGA) can occur simultaneously at S-band and X-band or at S-band only via the LGAs. RSI is interested in the nondispersive frequency shifts (classical Doppler) anddispersive frequency shifts (due to the ionized propagation medium), the signal power and the polarization of the radio carrier waves.Variations in these parameters will yield information on the motion of the spacecraft, theperturbing forces acting on the spacecraft and the propagation medium. The primary and secondary science objectives of RSI at the comet, the asteroid flybys (planned in the original mission scenario) and during cruise are divided into categories begin{itemize} cometary gravity field investigations, comet nucleus investigations, cometary coma investigations asteroid mass and bulk density as the prime science objectives, and begin{itemize} solar corona sounding as secondary science objective

  10. Inverting ionospheric radio occultation measurements using maximum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.

    2007-08-01

    Practical aspects of the inversion of ionospheric radio occultation data using the Abel transform and its inverse are discussed. The linear inverse transform exhibits poor error propagation characteristics, producing significant artifacts preferentially at low altitudes where they might easily be mistaken for intermediate or sporadic layers in the ionosphere. Tikhonov regularization, which can be viewed as fixed linear filtering, reduces the artifacts at the expense of discarding fine structure in the profiles. Improved results are obtained using maximum entropy and Bayesian statistics. The maximum entropy algorithm can be viewed as a nonlinear adaptive filter which suppresses artifacts while preserving fine structure to the degree the data can support. Other advantages of and avenues for improving the basic maximum entropy algorithm are discussed.

  11. Advances in magnetospheric radio wave analysis and tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, S. A.; Green, J. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; Fung, S. F.; Kaiser, M. L.; Pickett, J. S.; Christopher, I.; Mutel, R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Escoubet, C. P.

    Initial theoretical studies of multi-spacecraft radio tomographic imaging of the magnetosphere have shown the potential scientific value of the technique. We report a series of multistatic radio propagation experiments with the goal of testing and verifying the capabilities of radio tomography. These experiments focused specifically on measuring the plasma-induced rotation of the wave polarization (Faraday rotation), from which the path integrated product of magnetospheric electron density and magnetic field can be directly inferred. These experiments used the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite as the transmitter. The receiving instruments were the WAVES instrument on WIND and the WBD instrument on CLUSTER. These experiments showed that Faraday rotation can be measured on relatively long (>10 RE) magnetospheric propagation paths with existing transmitter and receiver technology. We conclude that radio tomographic imaging of magnetospheric electron density and magnetic field is a powerful technique with unique, large-scale measurement capabilities that can effectively address important questions in magnetospheric physics.

  12. Propagation of a fluidization - combustion wave

    SciTech Connect

    Pron, G.P.; Gusachenko, L.K.; Zarko, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    A fluidization-combustion wave propagating through a fixed and initially cool bed was created by igniting coal at the top surface of the bed. The proposed physical interpretation of the phenomenon is in qualitative agreement with the experimental dependences of the characteristics of the process on determining parameters. A kindling regime with forced wave propagation is suggested.

  13. Fundamental limitations caused by RF propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    Propagation phenomena affect the design of radio frequency (RF) transmission systems. Propagation phenomena limit the suitability of portions of the frequency band for some applications, limit the reliability of RF transmission systems, and provide a means of coupling unwanted signals from one system to another with the potential of producing interference. The possibility of interference is the fundamental limitation to the unrestricted use of the frequency band. Phenomena affecting suitability, reliability, and the potential for interference are considered for frequencies in the 1- to 300-GHz range.

  14. Measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers with LOPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrandel, J. R.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Asch, T.; Badea, F.; Bhren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blmer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buitink, S.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Ender, M.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Krmer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Lafebre, S.; Link, K.; ?uczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Nigl, A.; Oehlschlger, J.; Over, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schrder, F.; Sima, O.; Singh, K.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J. A.

    2011-02-01

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequency range between 40 and 80 MHz. The intensity of the measured radio emission is investigated as a function of different shower parameters, such as shower energy, angle of incidence, and distance to shower axis. In addition, new antenna types are developed in the framework of LOPESstar and new methods are explored to realize a radio self-trigger algorithm in real time.

  15. Characteristics of Pc4-5 pulsations obtained using the method of bistatic backscatter of HF radio waves, the EISCAT HF heating facility, and ground-based magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T. D.; Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Kornienko, V. A.; Rietveld, M. T.

    2011-10-01

    The results of studying the Pc4-5 pulsation parameters based on the method of bistatic backscatter of radio waves, using the EISCAT/ Heating HF facility (Troms, Norway) and IMAGE ground-based magnetometers (Scandinavia), are presented. The observations were performed during the morning hours on October 3, 2006, when a substorm developed on the nightside. An analysis of the observational data obtained from 1000 to 1020 UT indicated that wave-like disturbances with periods corresponding to Pc4-5 pulsations (80-240 s) existed at that time. The variations in the full vector of the ionospheric irregularity motion and the electric field strength in an artificially disturbed high-latitude ionospheric F region has been reconstructed based on simultaneous Doppler observations on two paths. A general conformity is observed among the time variations in Pc4-5 pulsations in the magnetic and ionospheric data: between the velocity amplitude (|V|) and the X component of the Earth's magnetic field and between the irregularity motion azimuth and the Y component. Large-scale waves, corresponding to the natural resonances of magnetic field lines (small values of the azimuthal number | m| 2-4), and small-scale waves (large values | m| 17-20) were simultaneously registered during the experiment based on magnetic data. It has been indicated that the periods of wave-like processes registered using the method of bistatic backscatter and ground-based magnetometers were in agreement with one another. The formation of wave-like processes is explained by the nonstationary impact of the solar wind and IMF on the Earth's magnetosphere. The variations in the IMF, according to the ACE satellite measurements, were characterized by a sharp increase in the solar wind plasma dynamic pressure that occurred at about 09 UT on October 3, 2006, and was accompanied by rapid polarity reversals of the north-ward-southward ( B z) and transverse ( B y) IMF components.

  16. Characteristics of second-order residual ionospheric error in GNSS radio occultation and its impact on inversion of neutral atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaochuan; Li, Zhenghang; An, Jiachun; Ding, Wenwu

    2015-08-01

    In Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) radio occultation (RO), one of the most significant error sources is the ionospheric error, which is largely eliminated by dual-frequency linear combination. However, second-order residual ionospheric error (RIE) in excess phase still remains and affects the retrievals of neutral atmospheric parameters in RO. Second-order RIE varies with RO azimuth in a sinusoidal pattern for a set of simulated RO events occurring in the same location at different azimuths. The amplitude of the sinusoidal curve below 60 km is at the order of sub-centimeter under moderate solar activity level. The retrieval biases of the neutral atmospheric parameters induced by second-order RIE also have sinusoidal features with RO azimuth, but have opposite variation trends to that of the second-order RIE. The RO azimuths of the maximum positive and negative retrieval biases correspond approximately to the azimuths of maximum negative and positive second-order RIEs, respectively. The order of the maximum bending angle bias induced by the second-order RIE is about 10-8 rad under moderate solar activity level. However, the retrieval errors at low latitude are larger than those at high and middle latitudes, and the maximum temperature bias at low latitude could be 0.35 K at 40 km. Based on the sinusoidal variation of second-order RIE, it is shown that even at the same RO point and under the same solar activity level, the second-order RIEs at different RO azimuths still have different effects on the retrieval precision of atmospheric parameters. This should be considered carefully when many RO profiles are averaged for climate trend detection, especially at low latitude.

  17. Radio frequency plasma power dependence of the moisture permeation barrier characteristics of Al2O3 films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyunsoo; Choi, Hagyoung; Jeon, Heeyoung; Lee, Sanghun; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated the gas and moisture permeation barrier properties of Al2O3 films deposited on polyethersulfone films (PES) by capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) type Remote Plasma Atomic Layer Deposition (RPALD) at Radio Frequency (RF) plasma powers ranging from 100 W to 400 W in 100 W increments using Trimethylaluminum [TMA, Al(CH3)3] as the Al source and O2 plasma as the reactant. To study the gas and moisture permeation barrier properties of 100-nm-thick Al2O3 at various plasma powers, the Water Vapor Transmission Rate (WVTR) was measured using an electrical Ca degradation test. WVTR decreased as plasma power increased with WVTR values for 400 W and 100 W of 2.6 10-4 gm-2day-1 and 1.2 10-3 gm-2day-1, respectively. The trends for life time, Al-O and O-H bond, density, and stoichiometry were similar to that of WVTR with improvement associated with increasing plasma power. Further, among plasma power ranging from 100 W to 400 W, the highest power of 400 W resulted in the best moisture permeation barrier properties. This result was attributed to differences in volume and amount of ion and radical fluxes, to join the ALD process, generated by O2 plasma as the plasma power changed during ALD process, which was determined using a plasma diagnosis technique called the Floating Harmonic Method (FHM). Plasma diagnosis by FHM revealed an increase in ion flux with increasing plasma power. With respect to the ALD process, our results indicated that higher plasma power generated increased ion and radical flux compared with lower plasma power. Thus, a higher plasma power provides the best gas and moisture permeation barrier properties.

  18. Radio frequency plasma power dependence of the moisture permeation barrier characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hyunsoo; Samsung Display Co. Ltd., Tangjeong, Chungcheongnam-Do 336-741 ; Choi, Hagyoung; Lee, Sanghun; Jeon, Heeyoung; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791

    2013-11-07

    In the present study, we investigated the gas and moisture permeation barrier properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited on polyethersulfone films (PES) by capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) type Remote Plasma Atomic Layer Deposition (RPALD) at Radio Frequency (RF) plasma powers ranging from 100 W to 400 W in 100 W increments using Trimethylaluminum [TMA, Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] as the Al source and O{sub 2} plasma as the reactant. To study the gas and moisture permeation barrier properties of 100-nm-thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at various plasma powers, the Water Vapor Transmission Rate (WVTR) was measured using an electrical Ca degradation test. WVTR decreased as plasma power increased with WVTR values for 400 W and 100 W of 2.6 × 10{sup −4} gm{sup −2}day{sup −1} and 1.2 × 10{sup −3} gm{sup −2}day{sup −1}, respectively. The trends for life time, Al-O and O-H bond, density, and stoichiometry were similar to that of WVTR with improvement associated with increasing plasma power. Further, among plasma power ranging from 100 W to 400 W, the highest power of 400 W resulted in the best moisture permeation barrier properties. This result was attributed to differences in volume and amount of ion and radical fluxes, to join the ALD process, generated by O{sub 2} plasma as the plasma power changed during ALD process, which was determined using a plasma diagnosis technique called the Floating Harmonic Method (FHM). Plasma diagnosis by FHM revealed an increase in ion flux with increasing plasma power. With respect to the ALD process, our results indicated that higher plasma power generated increased ion and radical flux compared with lower plasma power. Thus, a higher plasma power provides the best gas and moisture permeation barrier properties.

  19. The Radio Amateur's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeslee, Douglas, Ed.

    The objectives of this basic reference work for the radio amateur are to present radio theory and practice in terms of application and to reflect both the fundamentals and the rapidly-advancing technology of radio communications so that the radio amateur will have a guide to what is practical, meaningful, proven, and useful. Twenty-three chapters

  20. Transequatorial Propagation and Depletion Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bust, G. S.; Kaeppler, S. R.; Frissell, N. A.; Paxton, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    The bottomside equatorial ionosphere in the afternoon and evening sector frequently evolves rapidly from smoothly stratified to violently unstable with large wedges of depleted plasma growing through to the topside on timescales of a few tens of minutes. These depletions have numerous practical impacts on radio propagation, including amplitude scintillation, field-aligned irregularity scatter, HF blackouts, and long-distance transequatorial propagation at frequencies above the MUF. Practical impacts notwithstanding, the pathways and conditions under which depletions form remain a topic of vigorous inquiry some 80 years after their first report. Structuring of the pre-sunset ionosphere---morphology of the equatorial anomalies and long-wavelength undulations of the isodensity contours on the bottomside---are likely to hold some clues to conditions that are conducive to depletion formation. The Conjugate Depletion Experiment is an upcoming transequatorial forward-scatter HF/VHF experiment to investigate pre-sunset undulations and their connection with depletion formation. We will present initial results from the Conjugate Depletion Experiment, as well as a companion analysis of a massive HF propagation data set.

  1. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  2. Proceedings of the 16th NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 16) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX 16 was held on May 29, 1992 in Houston, Texas. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to slant path propagation studies and measurements. The second session focused on Olympus propagation measurements and results. Following NAPEX 16, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Miniworkshop was held to review ACTS propagation activities with emphasis on ACTS hardware development and experiment planning. Eight technical papers were presented by contributors from government agencies, private industry, and university research establishments.

  3. Photoelectric spectrophotometry of radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. K. C.; Oke, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    The absolute energy distributions from 3200 to 10,000 A of 26 3CR radio galaxies are determined on the basis of spectrophotometric observations with the multichannel spectrometer of the Hale 5-m telescope. It is found that there is a continuous range of emission-line characteristics and UV excess in the sample and that a strong correlation exists between the nonthermal component luminosity and hydrogen emission, which favors the hypothesis that direct photoionization by the nuclear radiation is responsible for the emission lines observed. Calculations are performed which show that in almost all cases the power-law component model provides sufficient UV photons to produce the observed H-beta line. Indications are obtained that the optical nuclear component is related to the radio emission in some complex manner and that strong radio galaxies tend to be accompanied by UV excess and emission lines.

  4. Proceedings of the Eighteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 18) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. Participants included representatives from Canada, the Netherlands, England, and the United States, including researchers from universities, government agencies, and private industry. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to slant path propagation studies and experiments. The second session focused on propagation studies for mobile, personal, and sound broadcast systems. In total, 14 technical papers and some informal contributions were presented. Preceding NAPEX_17, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop was held to review ACTS propagation activities.

  5. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 20) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom) industry, academia, and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at these meetings by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satcom industry.

  6. Monitoring the lower ionosphere with a small scale interferometric network of radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezentsev, Andrey; Fullekrug, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Sprites, gigantic jets and relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds attracted significant attention in the last decades. These natural transient events are caused by lightning discharges and they are associated with characteristic low frequency radio emissions from a certain height above thunderclouds. The altitudes of these sources can be inferred from their radio waves which are reflected by the lower ionosphere along their propagation path. The ionospheric conditions vary with time and location which makes it important to monitor the lower ionosphere during the observation period. This work uses 100 kHz radio emissions from the LOng Range Navigation (LORAN) transmitters in Western Europe to monitor the height of the reflecting lower ionosphere. The pulsed LORAN transmissions are synced with high precision to atomic time and they are therefore particularly suitable for monitoring the lower ionosphere. The vertical electric field strengths of the LORAN transmissions are recorded with a small scale interferometric network of eight wide band digital radio receivers which are separated by distances ranging from ~3 km up to ~30 km. The network was deployed in southern France during the summer months from July to September in 2011 and 2012 when numerous thunderstorms occur. The ionospheric monitoring with the network reveals the dynamics of the lower ionosphere at different locations throughout the observation period. Results of the ionospheric monitoring for different meteorological conditions will be presented.

  7. Detection of traveling ionospheric disturbances by medium-frequency Doppler sounding using AM radio transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcote, M.; LaBelle, J.; Lind, F. D.; Coster, A. J.; Miller, E. S.; Galkin, I. A.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2015-03-01

    Nighttime traveling ionosphere disturbances (TIDs) propagating in the lower F region of the ionosphere have been detected by measuring time variations in the Doppler shifts of commercial AM radio broadcast signals. Three receivers, components of the Intercepted Signals for Ionospheric Science (ISIS) Array software radio instrumentation network in the northeastern United States, recorded signals from two radio stations during 11 nights in March-April, 2012. By combining these measurements, TIDs were detected as approximately 40min periodic variations in the frequencies of the received signals resulting from Doppler shifts produced by the ionosphere. The variations had amplitudes of up to a few tenths of a hertz and were correlated across the array. For one study interval, 0000-0400 UT on 13 April 2012, simultaneous GPS total electron content, Digisonde®, and Super Dual-Auroral Radar Network coherent backscatter radar measurements confirmed the detection of TIDs with the same characteristics. Besides TIDs, the receiver network often detected large (nearly 1 Hz) upward (downward) Doppler shifts of the AM broadcast signals at the dawn (dusk) terminator. These results demonstrate that AM radio signals can be used for detection and monitoring of nighttime TIDs and related effects.

  8. Wave propagation in the magnetosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed for identifying the spatial regimes of various modes of wave propagation in the Jupiter magnetosphere that may be encountered by flyby missions. The Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis (CMA) diagram of plasma physics is utilized to identify the frequency regimes in which different modes of propagation occur in the magnetoplasma. The Gledhill model and the Ioannidis and Brice model of the magnetoplasma are summarized, and configuration-space CMA diagrams are constructed for each model for frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 MHz. The distinctive propagation features, the radio noise regimes, and the wave-particle interactions are discussed. It is concluded that the concentration of plasma in the equatorial plane makes this region of vital importance for radio observations with flyby missions. Local radio noise around the electron cyclotron frequency will probably differ appreciably from its terrestrial counterpart due to the lack of field-line guidance. Hydromagnetic wave properties at frequencies near the ion cyclotron frequency and below will probably be similar to the terrestrial case.

  9. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  10. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  11. Proceedings of the Twenty-First NASA Propagation Experiments Meeting (NAPEX XXI) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications industry, academia and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at this meeting by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satellite communications industry. NAPEX XXI took place in El Segundo, California on June 11-12, 1997 and consisted of three sessions. Session 1, entitled "ACTS Propagation Study Results & Outcome " covered the results of 20 station-years of Ka-band radio-wave propagation experiments. Session 11, 'Ka-band Propagation Studies and Models,' provided the latest developments in modeling, and analysis of experimental results about radio wave propagation phenomena for design of Ka-band satellite communications systems. Session 111, 'Propagation Research Topics,' covered a diverse range of propagation topics of interest to the space community, including overviews of handbooks and databases on radio wave propagation. The ACTS Propagation Studies miniworkshop was held on June 13, 1997 and consisted of a technical session in the morning and a plenary session in the afternoon. The morning session covered updates on the status of the ACTS Project & Propagation Program, engineering support for ACTS Propagation Terminals, and the Data Center. The plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  12. Tracking the CME-driven Shock Wave on 2012 March 5 and Radio Triangulation of Associated Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdaleni?, J.; Marqu, C.; Krupar, V.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Maksimovi?, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  13. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenić, J.; Marqué, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimović, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  14. Radio frequency picosecond phototube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaryan, A.; Carlini, R.; Ent, R.; Grigoryan, N.; Gyunashyan, K.; Hashimoto, O.; Hovater, K.; Ispiryan, M.; Knyazyan, S.; Kross, B.; Majewski, S.; Marikyan, G.; Mkrtchyan, M.; Parlakyan, L.; Popov, V.; Tang, L.; Vardanyan, H.; Yan, C.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zorn, C.

    2006-10-01

    We propose a photon detector for recording low-level and ultra-fast optical signals, based on radio frequency (RF) analysis of low-energy photoelectrons (PEs). By using currently developed 500 MHz RF deflector, it is possible to scan circularly and detect single PEs, amplified in multi-channel plates (MCPs). The operation of the tube is investigated by means of thermionic electron source. It is demonstrated that the signals generated in the MCP can be processed event by event; by using available nanosecond electronics and that time resolution better than 20 ps can be achieved. Timing characteristics of the Cherenkov detector with RF phototube in a 'head-on' geometry is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. ATS-6 engineering performance report. Volume 5: Propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wales, R. O. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Propagation experiments at 1550 MHz to 1650 MHz are reviewed, including the Integrated L-Band Experiments system and results, and the Mobile L-Band Terminals for Satellite Communication system. Experiments at 4 GHz to 6 GHz are reported, including the Radio Frequency Interferometer Measurements system and results, and Earth station antenna evaluations. Experiments above 10 GHz are discussed, including Comsat and ATS-6 millimeter wave propagation/experiments, and communication ATS-6 version at 20 and 30 GHz.

  16. The universal propagator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klauder, John R.

    1993-01-01

    For a general Hamiltonian appropriate to a single canonical degree of freedom, a universal propagator with the property that it correctly evolves the coherent-state Hilbert space representatives for an arbitrary fiducial vector is characterized and defined. The universal propagator is explicitly constructed for the harmonic oscillator, with a result that differs from the conventional propagators for this system.

  17. Resonance and Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Malin J.

    2008-01-01

    The science and technology of radio receives little attention in contemporary education. This article discusses ways to explore the basic operating principles of radio. (Contains 4 figures, 3 footnotes, and 2 notes.)

  18. A review of ionospheric effects on Earth-space propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klobuchar, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A short description is given of each ionospheric total electron content (TEC) effect upon radio waves, along with a representative value of the magnitude of each of these effects under normal ionospheric conditions. A discussion is given of the important characteristics of average ionospheric TEC behavior and the temporal and spatial variability of TEC. Radio waves undergo several effects when they pass through the Earth's ionosphere. One of the most important of these effects is a retardation, or group delay, on the modulation or information carried on the radio wave that is due to its encounter with the free, thermal electrons in the Earth's ionosphere. Other effects the ionosphere has on radio waves include: radio frequency (RF) carrier phase advance; Doppler shift of the RF carrier of the radio wave; Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of linearly polarized waves; angular refraction or bending of the radio wave path as it travels through the ionosphere; and amplitude and phase scintillations.

  19. Proceedings of the Fourteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 14) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX XIV was held on May 11, 1990, at the Balcones Research Centers, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions: Satellite (ACTS) and the Olympus Spacecraft, while the second focused on the fixed and mobile satellite propagation studies and experiments. Following NAPEX XIV, the ACTS Miniworkshop was held at the Hotel Driskill, Austin, Texas, on May 12, 1990, to review ACTS propagation activities since the First ACTS Propagation Studies Workshop was held in Santa Monica, California, on November 28 and 29, 1989.

  20. Proceedings of the Fifteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 15) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. The meeting was organized into three technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to Olympus and ACTS studies and experiments, the second session was focused on the propagation studies and measurements, and the third session covered computer-based propagation model development. In total, sixteen technical papers and some informal contributions were presented. Following NAPEX 15, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) miniworkshop was held on 29 Jun. 1991, to review ACTS propagation activities, with emphasis on ACTS hardware development and experiment planning. Five papers were presented.

  1. Radio observations of compact planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, S.; Purton, C. R.; Keenan, D. W.

    1981-11-01

    An attempt has been made to identify very young planetary nebulae from radio observations. Details of the observations at the Algonquin Radio Observatory and the Very Large Array are presented. Four nebulae which were previously designated as stellar are resolved using aperture synthesis techniques with angular resolution as high as 0.2 arcsec. Two of the observed nebulae, SwSt-1 and M3-38, exhibit characteristics expected of very young planetary nebulae. These two nebulae are compared to other planetary nebulae which are believed to be young, and the possibility that young planetary nebulae may have different spectral behavior in the radio is discussed.

  2. Speckles in interstellar radio-wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, K. M.; Gwinn, C. R.; Reynolds, J.; King, E. A.; Jauncey, D.; Nicholson, G.; Flanagan, C.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of speckles in the scattering disk of the Vela pulsar are presented and speckle techniques for studying and circumventing scattering of radio waves by the turbulent interstellar plasma are discussed. The speckle pattern contains, in a hologrammatic fashion, complete information on the structure of the radio source as well as the distribution of the scattering material. Speckle observations of interstellar scattering of radio waves are difficult because of their characteristically short timescales and narrow bandwidths. Here, first observations are presented, taken at 13 cm wavelength with elements of the SHEVE VLBI network, of speckles in interstellar scattering.

  3. Low Frequency Radio Emissions: Remote Sensing of the Energetic Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Baptiste

    2014-05-01

    Low frequency radio emissions (below about 50 MHz) are tracers of energetic plasma instabilities. Their observation provides us with a unique proxy for instable energetic electron populations. In the solar wind, two types of emissions can be monitored: Type II and Type III radio bursts. The former are related to interplanetary shocks, while the latter are linked to energetic electron beams going out from the solar corona. The magnetized planets are also producing low frequency radio emissions linked to the auroral activity, and thus to the interaction between the planet and the solar wind. These radio emission are non-thermal emissions. They are very powerful (Jupiter is as intense as the Sun in this frequency range). Furthermore, the low frequency radio instrumentation in space has the advantage to be quasi-isotropic. The antenna systems have no intrinsic directivity. However, goniopolarimetric inversions have been developed to derive the observed radio waves parameters (assuming we see a single source at a given time). Hence, the low frequency radio systems can monitor the whole sky at once and provide direction of arrival for each event. We will present the various emission mechanisms involved for the low frequency radio emissions in the solar system, the various propagation effects along the wave path and the radio instrumentation necessary to derived all relevant wave parameters. We will discuss how these radio emissions can be used in a space weather perspective. We will finally overview the possible future steps in terms of instrumentation for this frequency range.

  4. Advanced MIL-STD-1553 UHF/VHF radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiano, Paul F.

    Hardware and software for the control of multiple UHF/VHF radios aboard an aircraft via the MIL-STD-1553 data bus are described, and the system architecture is illustrated with extensive diagrams and flow charts. The system comprises independent mulitpurpose display/entry units, a bus-control processor, an audio control distribution unit, and the radios and antennas. The characteristics of the radios are reviewed, and the control operation is outlined. The use of the MIL-STD-1553 bus is shown to simplify radio operation, reduce crew intervention requirements, and provide crew and maintenance personnel with accurate information on the operating capabilities of damaged or malfunctioning radios.

  5. DISCOVERY OF GIANT RELIC RADIO LOBES STRADDLING THE CLASSICAL DOUBLE RADIO GALAXY 3C452

    SciTech Connect

    Sirothia, S. K.; Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul J. E-mail: krishna@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of a pair of megaparsec size radio lobes of extremely steep spectrum straddling the well-known classical double radio source 3C452. The existence of such fossil lobes was unexpected since for the past several decades this powerful radio galaxy has been regarded as a textbook example of an edge-brightened double radio source of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II), which we now show to be a bona fide ''double-double'' radio galaxy (DDRG). Thus, 3C452 presents a uniquely robust example of recurrent nuclear activity in which the restarted jets are expanding non-relativistically within the relic synchrotron plasma from an earlier active phase and hence the inner double fed by them has evolved into a perfectly normal FR II radio source. This situation contrasts markedly with the strikingly narrow inner doubles observed in a few other DDRGs that have been interpreted in terms of compression of the synchrotron plasma of the relic outer lobes at the relativistic bow-shocks driven by the near ballistic propagation of the two inner jets through the relic plasma. A key ramification of this finding is that it cautions against the currently widespread use of FR II classical double radio sources for testing cosmological models and unification schemes for active galactic nuclei.

  6. Extragalactic Radio Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Kenneth I.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses new problems arising from the growing observational data through radio telescope arrays, involving the origin of radio sources, apparent superluminal velocities, conversion of radio sources to relativistic particles, and the nature of compact opaque and extended transparent sources. New physics may be needed to answer these cosmological

  7. Theory of Type 3 and Type 2 Solar Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.

    2000-01-01

    The main features of some current theories of type III and type II bursts are outlined. Among the most common solar radio bursts, type III bursts are produced at frequencies of 10 kHz to a few GHz when electron beams are ejected from solar active regions, entering the corona and solar wind at typical speeds of 0.1c. These beams provide energy to generate Langmuir waves via a streaming instability. In the current stochastic-growth theory, Langmuir waves grow in clumps associated with random low-frequency density fluctuations, leading to the observed spiky waves. Nonlinear wave-wave interactions then lead to secondary emission of observable radio waves near the fundamental and harmonic of the plasma frequency. Subsequent scattering processes modify the dynamic radio spectra, while back-reaction of Langmuir waves on the beam causes it to fluctuate about a state of marginal stability. Theories based on these ideas can account for the observed properties of type III bursts, including the in situ waves and the dynamic spectra of the radiation. Type 11 bursts are associated with shock waves propagating through the corona and interplanetary space and radiating from roughly 30 kHz to 1 GHz. Their basic emission mechanisms are believed to be similar to those of type III events and radiation from Earth's foreshock. However, several sub-classes of type II bursts may exist with different source regions and detailed characteristics. Theoretical models for type II bursts are briefly reviewed, focusing on a model with emission from a foreshock region upstream of the shock for which observational evidence has just been reported.

  8. Propagation measurements for satellite radio reception inside buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Torrence, Geoffrey W.

    1993-01-01

    Swept CW signals (from 700 to 1800 MHz) were received inside six buildings of brick, corrugated sheet-metal, wood-frame, mobile-home, and reinforced concrete-wall construction. A transmitter antenna was mounted outdoors on top of an 18 m tower to simulate a satellite, and a linearly scanned directional receiver antenna was used to probe the spatial, spectral, and temporal variability of the signal indoors. Levels were found to have much structure in the spatial and frequency domain, but were relatively stable in time. Typically, people moving nearby produced variations of less than 0.5 dB, whereas a person blocking the transmission path produced fades of 6 to 10 dB. Severe losses (17.5 dB) were observed in the concrete-wall building, which also exhibited the longest multipath delays (over 100 ns). Losses inside a mobile home were even larger (over 20 dB) and were independent of antenna orientation. The power-frequency distortion increased with the logarithm of the bandwidth, but could be reduced by moving to a position of higher power. Only the losses showed a clear frequency dependence, but they could be mitigated by moving the antenna.

  9. Scintillation effects on radio wave propagation through solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Sue, M. K.; Bedrossian, A.; Sniffin, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    When RF waves pass through the solar corona and solar wind regions close to the Sun, strong scintillation effects appear at their amplitude, frequency and phase, especially in the regions very close to the Sun (less than 4 solar radius).

  10. Propagation of radio waves through the lower atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, K. R.

    1972-01-01

    A simplified model of the Venus atmosphere is developed providing the loss factor profile of the atmosphere. With this profile the atmospheric attenuation as it depends upon the incidence angle is calculated for wavelengths between 2 cm and 20 cm. It is shown that the signal-to-noise ratios for a real aperture radar, a synthetic aperture radar, and communication links between a satellite and a landing probe achieve maximum values by the proper choice of the wavelengths. Furthermore, it turns out that the wavelength dependence is less crucial for the synthetic aperture radar compared to the other cases.

  11. Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) 1 observations of terrestrial radio noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Caruso, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Radio Astonomy Explorer (RAE) 1 data are analyzed to establish characteristics of HF terrestrial radio noise at an altitude of about 6000 km. Time and frequency variations in amplitude of the observed noise well above cosmic noise background are explained on the basis of temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric critical frequency coupled with those in noise source distributions. It is shown that terrestrial noise regularly breaks through the ionosphere and reaches RAE with magnitudes 15 or more db higher than cosmic noise background. Maximum terrestrial noise is observed when RAE is over the dark side of the Earth in the neighborhood of equatorial continental land masses where thunderstorms occur most frequently. The observed noise level is 30-40 db lower with RAE over oceans.

  12. Planetary radio astronomy observations during the Voyager 1 Titan flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigne, G.; Pedersen, B. M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    During the Voyager 1 Titan flyby, unusual radio emissions were observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment in the 20- to 97-kHz frequency range. It is shown that Titan itself is not the source of the observed radio emission. The emission features are attributed to modification of the normal Saturn kilometric radiation by propagation effects in enhanced density structures within the Titan wake. Furthermore, spiky emissions observed in the magnetic wake of Titan are interpreted in terms of local electrostatic instabilities at the electron plasma frequency. From these measurements a range of electron densities in the wake region is derived, and the consistency of the results is discussed.

  13. A theory of solar type 3 radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Papadopoulos, K.; Smith, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Energetic electrons propagating through the interplanetary medium are shown to excite the one dimensional oscillating two stream instability (OTSI). The OTSI is in turn stabilized by anomalous resistivity which completes the transfer of long wavelength Langmuir waves to short wavelengths, out of resonance with the electrons. The theory explains the small energy losses suffered by the electrons in propagating to 1 AU, the predominance of second harmonic radiation, and the observed correlation between radio and electron fluxes.

  14. On the Reflection in the Solar Radio Emission of Processes in the Chromosphere and the lower Corona preceded CMEs Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durasova, M. S.; Tikhomirov, Yu. V.; Fridman, V. M.; Sheiner, O. A.

    The phenomena preceding the Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and observed in the radio-frequency band represent a lot of sporadic components of the emission, that cover the wide frequency range. The study of these phenomena composes the new, prevailing for the last ten years direction. This is caused by the fact that solar radioastronomy possesses the developed network of observant tools, by the sensitive methods of observations. It makes possible in a number of cases to obtain information from the layers of solar atmosphere, inaccessible for the studies by other methods of observations. The purpose of this work is analysis of information about the CMEs preceding radio-events and their dynamics in the centimeter and decimeter radio emission in 1998. We use the data of the worldwide network of solar observatories in the radio-frequency band, the data about the CMEs phenomena and the characteristics are taken from Internet: http://sdaw.gsfc.nasa.gov./CME_list}. From great number of the CMEs we select only such, before which there were no more recorded events in the time interval of 8 hours, and before which sporadic radio emission was observed on 2-hours interval. The selection of this interval was caused by available study about the mean lifetime of precursors before CMEs and powerful flares, as a rule, accompanying CMEs, in the optical, X-ray and radio emissions. It constitutes, on the average, about 30 min. The total volume of data composed 68 analyzed events of CMEs in 1998. The analysis of the spectral- temporary characteristics of sporadic radio emission in the dependence on the CMEs parameters is carried out. The nature of processes at the stage of formation and initial propagation of CMEs, such as floating up of new magnetic fluxes, the development of instabilities, the characteristic scales of phenomena, that have an effect upon the observed radio emission is analyzed. The work is carried out with the support of Russian Fund of Basic Research (grant 03-02-16691), Ministry of Education (grant E02-11.0-27) and FPSTP (Astronomy).

  15. The OPEX project and standard processing of propagation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brussaard, G.

    1989-05-01

    The Olympus Propagation Package, (OPEX), its mission, and main characteristics, are described. The voluntary participation of experimenters on the OPEX project, and their preparation of detailed handbooks for the design of hardware, data preprocessing and analysis are described. The main characteristics of the standard software developed for propagation data treatment are described.

  16. Voyager planetary radio astronomy studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, David H.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of nonthermal radio emission data obtained by the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) spectrometers on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft was performed. This PRA data provided unique insights into the radio emission characteristics of the outer planets because of PRA's unique spectral response below the terrestrial ionospheric plasma frequency and its unprecedented proximity to the source. Of those results which were documented or published, this final report surveys only the highlights and cites references for more complete discussions. Unpublished results for Uranus, Neptune, and theoretical Ionian current distributions are presented at greater length. The most important conclusion to be drawn from these observations is that banded spectral emission is common to the radio emission below 1-2 MHz observed from all four Jovian planets. In every case multiple spectral features evolve on time scales of seconds to minutes. To the extent these features drift in frequency, they appear never to cross one another. The Neptunian spectral features appear to drift little or not at all, their evolution consisting principally of waxing and waning. Since other evidence strongly suggests that most or all of this radio emission is occurring near the local magnetospheric electron cyclotron frequency, this implies that this emission preferentially occurs at certain continually changing planetary radii. It remains unknown why certain radii might be favored, unless radial electric field components or other means serve to differentiate radially the magnetospheric plasma density, particle energy vectors, or particle coherence. Calculation of the spatial distribution and intensity of the Io-generated magnetospheric currents are also presented; these currents may be limited principally by wave impedance and local field strengths.

  17. THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE FOR RADIO MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, Nanda; Torres, Diego F.; Pons, Jose A.; Turolla, Roberto

    2012-03-20

    High magnetic fields are a distinguishing feature of neutron stars and the existence of sources (the soft gamma repeaters, SGRs, and the anomalous X-ray pulsars) hosting an ultramagnetized neutron star (or magnetar) has been recognized in the past few decades. Magnetars are believed to be powered by magnetic energy and not by rotation, as with normal radio pulsars. Until recently, the radio quietness and magnetic fields typically above the quantum critical value (B{sub Q} {approx_equal} 4.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G) were among the characterizing properties of magnetars. The recent discovery of radio-pulsed emission from a few of them, and of a low dipolar magnetic field SGR, weakened further the idea of a clean separation between normal pulsars and magnetars. In this Letter, we show that radio emission from magnetars might be powered by rotational energy, similarly to what occurs in normal radio pulsars. The peculiar characteristics of magnetars radio emission should be traced in the complex magnetic geometry of these sources. Furthermore, we propose that magnetar radio activity or inactivity can be predicted from the knowledge of the star's rotational period, its time derivative, and the quiescent X-ray luminosity.

  18. Impulsive radio discharges near Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. R.; Warwick, J. W.; Pearce, J. B.; Carr, T. D.; Schauble, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Nonthermal radio emissions from the Saturn system were first detected by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy (PRA) experiment on board Voyager 1 in January 1980. Since then emission between 100 kHz and 1 MHz from the planet, termed Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR), has been received almost continuously. A description is presented of eight characteristics which have been fairly well defined by the Voyager 1 encounter. These include a very flat broadband frequency spectrum, a period of approximately 10 h 10 min, a change in the envelope shape of episodes between pre and postencounter, an intensity population structure typical of plural populations, and an episodic structure of a width of approximately 180 deg. It was found that postencounter episodes continue for about three times as long as preencounter ones, and that postencounter bursts are left-circularly polarized at high frequencies. At least one episode shows the onset of high frequency events some time before that of lower frequency ones.

  19. A radio view of high-redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreer, Ian D.

    The sparsely-populated radio sky is dominated by extragalactic objects, and radio surveys have long proven effective at identifying distant quasars. In this work, I describe the discovery of the only known z > 6 radio-loud quasar. This unique object, J1427+3312, was found through examination of the optical and infrared counterparts to radio sources in a four square degree region of the sky. I summarize the results of high-resolution radio imaging which constrains models of gravitational lensing for this object, and which indicate that the radio emission may have only recently turned on. The discovery of J1427+3312 motivated further attempts to locate high-redshift quasars in radio surveys. I present a method for identifying quasar candidates from faint, red optical counterparts to radio sources using wide-field survey data from FIRST and SDSS. This method can be used to target the rare population of highly-luminous, radio-loud quasars at z > 6. Radio data can also be used to examine the effectiveness of optical selection, by efficiently identifying quasar candidates with weaker constraints on their optical colors. I describe a spectroscopic survey of red, star-like counterparts to radio sources designed to probe the z > 3.5 quasar population. By deriving a radio-loud quasar luminosity function and comparing to optical results at the same redshift, I find that optical surveys are effective at identifying quasars in this redshift range. On the other hand, the radio-selected sample contains a large number of lowredshift, reddened quasars which are missed by optical surveys. I show that the red colors of these objects are consistent with having been caused by dust extinction. Lastly, I examine the environments of z > 1 radio-loud quasars. While an accumulating body of evidence suggests that powerful AGN strongly affect their environments, it is also possible that the local environment affects the nature of the radio source. In particular, the morphology of radio sources may be influenced by the local density, which determines whether the radio jets can propagate unimpeded to large distances. I present deep infrared imaging of the fields surrounding ten radio-loud quasars, and compare the counts of faint nearby galaxies likely to be within the local environments of the quasars.

  20. Radio science and the International Halley Watch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.; Gerard, E.

    1983-01-01

    The radio observations planned for the perihelion passage of Halley's comet in 1986 within the framework of the International Halley Watch (IHW) are reviewed. The roles of radar astronomy, continuum radio astronomy, and spectral-line radio astronomy in investigating the size and surface characteristics of the cometary nucleus, the nature and kinematics of the parent molecules sublimating into the coma, the properties of the coma particulate matter, and the cometary plasma are examined. Problems related to the inaccuracy of comet position data and lacks of background-source information, simultaneous submillimeter observations, and Southern-Hemisphere radio observing time are discussed; and the observatories participating in the IHW network are listed in tables with their instrument parameters.

  1. Re-examining the correlation of complex solar type III radio bursts and solar energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Richardson, I. G.; Hess, R. A.; Thejappa, G.

    2009-03-01

    Interplanetary radio observations provide important information on particle acceleration processes at the Sun and propagation of the accelerated particles in the solar wind. Cane et al. (2002) have drawn attention to a class of prominent radio bursts that accompany >20 MeV solar proton events. They call these bursts ‘type III-L’ because: they are fast drifting (like normal type III bursts associated with electrons accelerated at impulsive solar flares); they are Long-lasting compared to normal type III bursts; they occur Late compared to the onset of the related solar event; and, they commence at Lower frequencies (~100 MHz) than normal type III bursts, suggesting that they originate higher in the corona at ~0.5 Rs above the Sun. We report on an analysis of the correlated radio and SEP events during 1996-2006 using the Wind Waves and near-Earth SEP data sets, and discuss whether the characteristics of the complex type III bursts (at less than 14 MHz) will permit them to serve as proxies for SEP event occurrence and intensity.

  2. Spectral structures and their generation mechanisms for solar radio type-I bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Masuda, S.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2014-07-01

    The fine spectral structures of solar radio type-I bursts were observed by the solar radio telescope AMATERAS. The spectral characteristics, such as the peak flux, duration, and bandwidth, of the individual burst elements were satisfactorily detected by the highly resolved spectral data of AMATERAS with the burst detection algorithm that is improved in this study. The peak flux of the type-I bursts followed a power-law distribution with a spectral index of 2.9-3.3, whereas their duration and bandwidth were distributed more exponentially. There were almost no correlations between the peak flux, duration, and bandwidth. That means there was no similarity in the shapes of the burst spectral structures. We defined the growth rate of a burst as the ratio between its peak flux and duration. There was a strong correlation between the growth rate and peak flux. These results suggest that the free energy of type-I bursts that is originally generated by nonthermal electrons is modulated in the subsequent stages of the generation of nonthermal electrons, such as plasma wave generation, radio wave emissions, and propagation. The variation of the timescale of the growth rate is significantly larger than that of the coronal environments. These results can be explained by the situation wherein the source region may have the inhomogeneity of an ambient plasma environment, such as the boundary of open and closed field lines, and the superposition of entire emitted bursts was observed by the spectrometer.

  3. Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory began operating in 1959, and joined the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL in 1970. It became part of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics in 1975. The site near Penticton, BC has a 26 m radio telescope, a seven-antenna synthesis telescope on a 600 m baseline and two telescopes dedicated to monitoring the solar radio flux at 10.7 cm. This part of the Institu...

  4. STEM on the radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-10-01

    Looking for an Internet radio station focusing on programing about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)? The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced on 26 September the launch of Science360 Radio, which it says is the first Internet radio stream dedicated to STEM programing. Science360 includes more than 100 radio shows and podcasts that are available on the Web as well as on iPhone and Android devices. The shows originate from a variety of sources, including NSF, other U.S. government agencies, science organizations, universities, and media outlets. For more information, see http://science360.gov/files/.

  5. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  6. Theory of flame propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldovich, Y B

    1951-01-01

    The mechanism of flame propagation has been qualitatively formulated. In accordance with this formulation, the chemical reaction initiated in some layer brings about an increase in the temperature; because of the heat conduction, the temperature is raised in the neighboring layer where in turn the chemical reaction is initiated. In this manner the flame is propagated.

  7. Radiowave propagation measurements in Nigeria (preliminary reports)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falodun, S. E.; Okeke, P. N.

    2013-07-01

    International conferences on frequency coordination have, in recent years, required new information on radiowave propagation in tropical regions and, in particular, on propagation in Africa. The International Telecommunications Union (ITU-R) initiated `radio-wave propagation measurement campaign' in some African countries some years back. However, none of the ITU-initiated experiments were mounted in Nigeria, and hence, there is lack of adequate understanding of the propagation mechanisms associated with this region of the tropics. The Centre for Basic Space Science (CBSS) of NASRDA has therefore embarked on propagation data collection from the different climatic zones of Nigeria (namely Coastal, Guinea Savannah, Midland, and Sahelian) with the aim of making propagation data available to the ITU, for design and prediction purposes in order to ensure a qualitative and effective communication system in Nigeria. This paper focuses on the current status of propagation data from Nigeria (collected by CBSS), identifying other parameters that still need to be obtained. The centre has deployed weather stations to different locations in the country for refractivity measurements in clear atmosphere, at the ground surface and at an altitude of 100 m, being the average height of communication mast in Nigeria. Other equipments deployed are Micro Rain Radar and Nigerian Environmental and Climatic Observing Program equipments. Some of the locations of the measurement stations are Nsukka (7.4 E, 6.9 N), Akure (5.12 E, 7.15 N), Minna (6.5 E, 9.6 N), Sokoto (5.25 E, 13.08 N), Jos (8.9 E, 9.86 N), and Lagos (3.35 E, 6.6 N). The results obtained from the data analysis have shown that the refractivity values vary with climatic zones and seasons of the year. Also, the occurrence probability of abnormal propagation events, such as super refraction, sub-refraction, and ducting, depends on the location as well as the local time. We have also attempted to identify and calculate the most important propagation factors and associated data, such as k factor, that are relevant in considerations of propagation in tropical regions like Nigeria.

  8. Earth-Space Propagation Data Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper, designed for the newcomer rather than the expert, will take a rather broad view of what is meant by 'propagation data bases' in that it will take the term to mean both the actual measurements and models of Earth-space paths. The text will largely be drawn from International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) reports, now annexed to the Recommendations of the International Telecommunications Union-R Study Group 3, plus some experience with a course taught at the University of Colorado.

  9. Millimeter wavelength propagation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The investigations conducted for the Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Studies during the period December, 1966, to June 1974 are reported. These efforts included the preparation for the ATS-5 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment and the subsequent data acquisition and data analysis. The emphasis of the OSU participation in this experiment was placed on the determination of reliability improvement resulting from the use of space diversity on a millimeter wavelength earth-space communication link. Related measurements included the determination of the correlation between radiometric temperature and attenuation along the earth-space propagation path. Along with this experimental effort a theoretical model was developed for the prediction of attenuation statistics on single and spatially separated earth space propagation paths. A High Resolution Radar/Radiometer System and Low Resolution Radar System were developed and implemented for the study of intense rain cells in preparation for the ATS-6 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment.

  10. Radio data transmission for SCADA

    SciTech Connect

    Frasier, W.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Enron has used such wireless systems as meteor burst radio, 952 MHz multiple address radio, VSAT and L-band satellite, cellular radio and ACSB radio. The company's experience with meteor burst radio communications is discussed in this paper. It indicates good system reliability and consequently all back-up telephone lines have been removed from sites using this system.

  11. Wave propagation, scattering and emission in complex media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ya-Qiu

    I. Polarimetric scattering and SAR imagery. EM wave propagation and scattering in polarimetric SAR interferometry / S. R. Cloude. Terrain topographic inversion from single-pass polarimetric SAR image data by using polarimetric stokes parameters and morphological algorithm / Y. Q. Jin, L. Luo. Road detection in forested area using polarimetric SAR / G. W. Dong ... [et al.]. Research on some problems about SAR radiometric resolution / G. Dong ... [et al.]. A fast image matching algorithm for remote sensing applications / Z. Q. Hou ... [et al.]. A new algorithm of noised remote sensing image fusion based on steerable filters / X. Kang ... [et al.]. Adaptive noise reduction of InSAR data based on anisotropic diffusion models and their applications to phase unwrapping / C. Wang, X. Gao, H. Zhang -- II. Scattering from randomly rough surfaces. Modeling tools for backscattering from rough surfaces / A. K. Fung, K. S. Chen. Pseudo-nondiffracting beams from rough surface scattering / E. R. Mndez, T. A. Leskova, A. A. Maradudin. Surface roughness clutter effects in GPR modeling and detection / C. Rappaport. Scattering from rough surfaces with small slopes / M. Saillard, G. Soriano. Polarization and spectral characteristics of radar signals reflected by sea-surface / V. A. Butko, V. A. Khlusov, L. I. Sharygina. Simulation of microwave scattering from wind-driven ocean surfaces / M. Y. Xia ... [et al.]. HF surface wave radar tests at the Eastern China Sea / X. B. Wu ... [et al.] -- III. Electromagnetics of complex materials. Wave propagation in plane-parallel metamaterial and constitutive relations / A. Ishimaru ... [et al.]. Two dimensional periodic approach for the study of left-handed metamaterials / T. M. Grzegorczyk ... [et al.]. Numerical analysis of the effective constitutive parameters of a random medium containing small chiral spheres / Y. Nanbu, T. Matsuoka, M. Tateiba. Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media: from the Helmholtz to the Ginzburg -Landau equation / M. Gitterman. Transformation of the spectrum of scattered radiation in randomly inhomogeneous absorptive plasma layer / G. V. Jandieri, G. D. Aburjunia, V. G. Jandieri. Numerical analysis of microwave heating on saponification reaction / K. Huang, K. Jia -- IV. Scattering from complex targets. Analysis of electromagnetic scattering from layered crossed-gratings of circular cylinders using lattice sums technique / K. Yasumoto, H. T. Jia. Scattering by a body in a random medium / M. Tateiba, Z. Q. Meng, H. El-Ocla. A rigorous analysis of electromagnetic scattering from multilayered crossed-arrays of metallic cylinders / H. T. Jia, K. Yasumoto. Vector models of non-stable and spatially-distributed radar objects / A. Surkov ... [et al.]. Simulation of algorithm of orthogonal signals forming and processing used to estimate back scattering matrix of non-stable radar objects / D. Nosov ... [et al.]. New features of scattering from a dielectric film on a reflecting metal substrate / Z. H. Gu, I. M. Fuks, M. Ciftan. A higher order FDTD method for EM wave propagation in collision plasmas / S. B. Liu, J. J. Mo, N. C. Yuan -- V. Radiative transfer and remote sensing. Simulating microwave emission from Antarctica ice sheet with a coherent model / M. Tedesco, P. Pampaloni. Scattering and emission from inhomogeneous vegetation canopy and alien target by using three-dimensional Vector Radiative Transfer (3D-VRT) equation / Y. Q. Jin, Z. C. Liang. Analysis of land types using high-resolution satellite images and fractal approach / H. G. Zhang ... [et al.]. Data fusion of RADARSAT SAR and DMSP SSM/I for monitoring sea ice of China's Bohai Sea / Y. Q. Jin. Retrieving atmospheric temperature profiles from simulated microwave radiometer data with artificial neural networks / Z. G. Yao, H. B. Chen -- VI. Wave propagation and wireless communication. Wireless propagation in urban environments: modeling and experimental verification / D. Erricolo ... [et al.]. An overview of physics-based wave propagation in forested environment / K. Sarabandi, I. Koh. Angle-of-arrival fluctuations due to meteorological conditions in the diffraction zone of C-band radio waves, propagated over the ground surface / T. A. Tyufilina, A. A. Meschelyakov, M. V. Krutikov. Simulating radio channel statistics using ray based prediction codes / H. L. Bertoni. Measurement and simulation of ultra wideband antenna elements / W. Srgel, W. Wiesbeck. The experimental investigation of a ground-placed radio complex synchronization system / V. P. Denisov ... [et al.] -- VII. Computational electromagnetics. Analysis of 3-D electromagnetic wave scattering with the Krylov subspace FFT iterative methods / R. S. Chen ... [et al.]. Sparse approximate inverse preconditioned iterative algorithm with block toeplitz matrix for fast analysis of microstrip circuits / L. Mo, R. S. Chen, E. K. N. Yung. An Efficient modified interpolation technique for the translation operators in MLFMA / J. Hu, Z. P. Nie, G. X. Zou. Efficient solution of 3-D vector electromagnetic scattering by CG-MLFMA with partly approximate iteration / J. Hu, Z. P. Nie. The effective constitution at interface of different media / L. G. Zheng, W. X. Zhang. Novel basis functions for quadratic hexahedral edge element / P. Liu ... [et al.]. A higher order FDTD method for EM wave propagation in collision plasmas / S. B. Liu, J. J. Mo, N. C. Yuan. Attenuation of electric field eradiated by underground source / J. P. Dong, Y. G. Gao.

  12. Radio Frequency Interference: Radio Astronomy's Biggest Enemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, F.; Ghosh, Tapasi

    1997-12-01

    As technology progresses, the demand for the usage of the electromagnetic spectrum increases with it. The development is so fast and prolific that clean band space for passive users such as Radio Astronomy is becoming ever so scarce. Even though, several spectral bands have been protected for Radio Astronomy by Federal Communication Commission (in the USA) under the recommendations of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), pressure for making more spectral space commercially usable is extreme. Although these commercial usages make our modern living at all possible, often the extreme vulnerability of passive users are are not fully appreciated, resulting in unwanted emissions (RFI) in the Radio Astronomy Bands. Another source of RFI is the fact that many of the electronic devices used in the observatories themselves generate radio waves. If proper precautions are not taken, these can be received back through the Radio Telescope itself. This problem is referred to as internal RFI. The focus of this paper is the search and diminution of internal RFI in the Arecibo Observatory in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Using a simple setup of a log-periodic antenna and a Spectrum Analyzer, spectra spanning a frequency range of 100 - 1800 MHZ were recorded in some areas of the Observatory and the new Visitor Center (AOVEF). The measurements disclosed sources of radio emission among some of the digital electronic equipment in the Equipment room and a few displays in the AOVEF. Most prominent of these was a 2.5 MHz comb spanning the entire range of the measurements emitted from the SRENDIP and AOFTM machines. The respective groups were informed and corrective shielding & isolations were implemented immediately. In AOVEF, three displays, some audio-visual equipment, and video/digital cameras used by the visitors were found to be "leaky". In future, the use of such cameras will be prohibited and the exhibits will be screened appropriately.

  13. Solar radio astronomy at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, George A.

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of solar radio emissions at decametric to kilometric wavelengths are reviewed. Special attention is given to the radiation of the quiet sun at several metric and decametric wavelengths and to nonthermal radiation from the active sun, including radio bursts of type III (electron beams), type-III bursts from behind the sun, storms of type III bursts, the flare-associated radio bursts, type II bursts (shock waves), and shock-associated bursts. It is pointed out that almost no observations have been made so far of solar radiation between about 20 MHz and about 2 MHz. Below about 2 MHz, dynamic spectra of flux densities of solar burst have been recorded in space and observations were made of the directions of centroids and characteristic sizes of the emitting sources.

  14. On the radio spectral index of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Vlk, H. J.

    2000-02-01

    The radio emission of a galaxy consists of thermal bremsstrahlung, synchrotron emission from discrete supernova remnants, and diffuse synchrotron emission from cosmic ray electrons spread over the galactic disk and halo. Each of these components has a different spectral index so that the total radio spectral index of a galaxy depends sensitively on their relative contribution and on the processes shaping the diffuse synchrotron emission. In the present paper we calculate the contribution of supernova remnants to the total synchrotron emission and conclude that it is about 10%. This moderate contribution has a noticeable effect on the nonthermal spectral index, lowering it by =~ 0.1 for steep spectra. We then calculate the diffuse synchrotron emission in two simple models, a diffusion and a convection model. We find that the spatially integrated nonthermal spectral index is in general a poor diagnostic for the type of propagation or the importance of energy losses. Spatially resolved radio data for the halo of galaxies are necessary in order to draw firm conclusions. The steepening of the spectrum away from the disk is a clear indication that synchrotron and inverse Compton losses are taking place during the propagation of cosmic ray electrons in the halo. In those galaxies for which spatially resolved data for the halos exist such a steepening has been found. We conclude therefore that energy losses are generally important and that cosmic ray electrons cannot freely escape from galaxies.

  15. Modeling and Simulation for Realistic Propagation Environments of Communications Signals at SHF Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Christian

    2005-01-01

    In this article, most of widely accepted radio wave propagation models that have proven to be accurate in practice as well as numerically efficient at SHF band will be reviewed. Weather and terrain data along the signal's paths can be input in order to more accurately simulate the propagation environments under particular weather and terrain conditions. Radio signal degradation and communications impairment severity will be investigated through the realistic radio propagation channel simulator. Three types of simulation approaches in predicting signal's behaviors are classified as: deterministic, stochastic and attenuation map. The performance of the simulation can be evaluated under operating conditions for the test ranges of interest. Demonstration tests of a real-time propagation channel simulator will show the capabilities and limitations of the simulation tool and underlying models.

  16. Tracking by Identification Using Computer Vision and Radio

    PubMed Central

    Mandeljc, Rok; Kovačič, Stanislav; Kristan, Matej; Perš, Janez

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel system for detection, localization and tracking of multiple people, which fuses a multi-view computer vision approach with a radio-based localization system. The proposed fusion combines the best of both worlds, excellent computer-vision-based localization, and strong identity information provided by the radio system, and is therefore able to perform tracking by identification, which makes it impervious to propagated identity switches. We present comprehensive methodology for evaluation of systems that perform person localization in world coordinate system and use it to evaluate the proposed system as well as its components. Experimental results on a challenging indoor dataset, which involves multiple people walking around a realistically cluttered room, confirm that proposed fusion of both systems significantly outperforms its individual components. Compared to the radio-based system, it achieves better localization results, while at the same time it successfully prevents propagation of identity switches that occur in pure computer-vision-based tracking. PMID:23262485

  17. Vector wave propagation method.

    PubMed

    Fertig, M; Brenner, K-H

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we extend the scalar wave propagation method (WPM) to vector fields. The WPM [Appl. Opt.32, 4984 (1993)] was introduced in order to overcome the major limitations of the beam propagation method (BPM). With the WPM, the range of application can be extended from the simulation of waveguides to simulation of other optical elements like lenses, prisms and gratings. In that reference it was demonstrated that the wave propagation scheme provides valid results for propagation angles up to 85 degrees and that it is not limited to small index variations in the axis of propagation. Here, we extend the WPM to three-dimensional vectorial fields (VWPMs) by considering the polarization dependent Fresnel coefficients for transmission in each propagation step. The continuity of the electric field is maintained in all three dimensions by an enhanced propagation vector and the transfer matrix. We verify the validity of the method by transmission through a prism and by comparison with the focal distribution from vectorial Debye theory. Furthermore, a two-dimensional grating is simulated and compared with the results from three-dimensional RCWA. Especially for 3D problems, the runtime of the VWPM exhibits special advantage over the RCWA. PMID:20360813

  18. PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Takenori J.; De Pontieu, Bart

    2011-08-01

    Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagating waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.

  19. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  20. Film, Radio, and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This journal issue covers the history of film, radio, and television in Iowa. The first article, "When Pictures and Sound Came to Iowa," summarizes the origin of movies and radio and their early beginnings in Iowa. Using old photographs and measurement charts, the viewing, reading, and listening habits of young people in 1950 and 1958 are

  1. Broadcast Management: Radio; Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaal, Ward L.; Martin, Leo A.

    After outlining the qualities necessary in a good radio or television manager, the book describes his duties which fall in three major areas: programming, engineering, and sales. It discusses the relationship between the station and its audience in detail. Sections on radio and television programming describe the way most stations operate and…

  2. Optical and radio rangefinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostetskaia, Iaromira Mikhailovna

    This handbook expounds the theory of optical and radio rangefinders and radiogeodesic systems. Particular attention is given to instrument design, investigations using geodesic phase rangefinders, ranging errors, and the effect of meteorological factors in the atmospheric surface layer. Applications of optical and radio rangefinders are considered, including the establishment of geodetic networks and the assessment of the accuracy of triangulation networks.

  3. The Radio Jove Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

  4. Film, Radio, and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This journal issue covers the history of film, radio, and television in Iowa. The first article, "When Pictures and Sound Came to Iowa," summarizes the origin of movies and radio and their early beginnings in Iowa. Using old photographs and measurement charts, the viewing, reading, and listening habits of young people in 1950 and 1958 are…

  5. Radio Astronomy for Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, N.; Murdin, P.

    2003-04-01

    Karl Jansky is considered the father of RADIOASTRONOMY. During the 1930s, Jansky worked for the Bell Telephone Laboratories studying the origin of static noise from thunderstorms. During the course of this work he discovered that some signals had an extraterrestrial origin. However, it was Grote Reber, a professional radio engineer and radio amateur, who carried out further investigations. In 1937...

  6. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  7. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  8. Writing for Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tupper, Marianna S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a 24-hour commercial radio station simulation class project for eighth-grade language arts. Students wrote their own scripts, chose music and were disc jockeys on their own music and talk shows, and prepared news and traffic reports. Guest speakers from actual commercial radio came in to discuss issues such as advertising, censorship,

  9. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-05-01

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until `forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  10. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-05-23

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until 'forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  11. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  12. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  13. The earth as a radio source. [noting auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The primary characteristics of radio emission from the earth's magnetosphere are summarized, the origins of these missions are considered and similarities to other astronomical radio sources discussed. The auroral kilometric radiation has features very similar to Io-related decametric radiation from Jupiter and from Saturn. The radiation at fp and 2 fp upstream of the bow shock appears to be generated by the same mechanism as type III solar radio bursts. The beaming of the auroral kilometric radiation into a cone shaped region over the polar cap has some similarity to the angular distribution of radiation from Io and to the beaming of radio emission from pulsars.

  14. Ionospheric Sounding Using Real-Time Amateur Radio Reporting Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frissell, N. A.; Miller, E. S.; Kaeppler, S. R.; Ceglia, F.; Pascoe, D.; Sinanis, N.; Smith, P.; Williams, R.; Shovkoplyas, A.

    2014-12-01

    Amateur radio reporting networks, such as the Reverse Beacon Network (RBN), PSKReporter, and the Weak Signal Propagation Network, are powerful tools for remote sensing the ionosphere. These voluntarily constructed and operated networks provide real-time and archival data that could be used for space weather operations, forecasting, and research. The potential exists for the study of both global and localized effects. The capability of one such network to detect space weather disturbances is demonstrated by examining the impacts on RBN-observed HF propagation paths of an X2.9 class solar flare detected by the GOES 15 satellite. Prior to the solar flare, the RBN observed strong HF propagation conditions between multiple continents, primarily Europe, North America, and South America. Immediately following the GOES 15 detection of the solar flare, the number of reported global RBN propagation paths dropped to less than 35% that of prior observations. After the flare, the RBN showed the gradual recovery of HF propagation conditions.

  15. Proceedings of the Twenty-First NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX XXI) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications industry, academia and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at this meeting by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satellite communications industry.

  16. Line-of-sight multipath propagation measurements at 15 GHz over 500 MHz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touati, M.; Elzein, G.; Citerne, J.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental wideband grazing radio link at 15 GHz has been set up on a 17.6 Km line-of-sight between Laille and Rennes to measure the variations of the propagation medium characteristics (attenuation and group delay versus frequency) due to meteorological effects. For this, a meteorological system was set up at the receiver station in order to measure the variations of the meteorological parameters (temperatures, pressure, rain precipitation, speed and direction of the wind). Consequently, the atmosphere refractive index is obtained. A particular interest is given to the occurrence of multipath fading in clear air caused by low-level layering in the troposphere. The collecting and recording of the propagation data (attenuation and group delay), from the MLA (microwave Link Analyzer), and that which relates to the meteorological characteristics, from the meteorological station, are executed using a computer program in a sequential manner. The channel impulse response, corresponding to each measured data, is calculated to deduce the number of rays detected and their different delays respectively. Besides this and using the meteorological parameters data acquired, the refractivity gradient is calculated in order to correlate the multipath fading occurrence to the meteorological parameters.

  17. Radio efficiency of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ren-Xin E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-03-20

    We investigate radio emission efficiency, ξ, of pulsars and report a near-linear inverse correlation between ξ and the spin-down power, E-dot , as well as a near-linear correlation between ξ and pulsar age, τ. This is a consequence of very weak, if any, dependences of radio luminosity, L, on pulsar period, P, and the period derivative, P-dot , in contrast to X-ray or γ-ray emission luminosities. The analysis of radio fluxes suggests that these correlations are not due to a selection effect, but are intrinsic to the pulsar radio emission physics. We have found that, although with a large variance, the radio luminosity of pulsars is ≈10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1}, regardless of the position in the P-- P-dot diagram. Within such a picture, a model-independent statement can be made that the death line of radio pulsars corresponds to an upper limit in the efficiency of radio emission. If we introduce the maximum value for radio efficiency into the Monte Carlo-based population syntheses we can reproduce the observed sample using the random luminosity model. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on a synthetic flux distribution reveals a high probability of reproducing the observed distribution. Our results suggest that the plasma responsible for generating radio emission is produced under similar conditions regardless of pulsar age, dipolar magnetic field strength, and spin-down rate. The magnetic fields near the pulsar surface are likely dominated by crust-anchored, magnetic anomalies, which do not significantly differ among pulsars, leading to similar conditions for generating electron-positron pairs necessary to power radio emission.

  18. Populations and evolution of radio pulsars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Zhenru

    1996-05-01

    A new physical parameter Q = log(We/P˙2/3) is defined as a criterion for judging whether a radio pulsar is a normal pulsar or a recycled pulsar originating from accreting binary systems. Based on the definition, the observational characteristics and the evolution of the two groups of pulsars are discussed.

  19. Optical propagation and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, J. H.; Rediker, R. H.; Kumar, P.; Bogler, P. L.; Bondurant, R. S.; Hakimi, F.; Maeda, M. W.; Mark, M. B.; Mesite, P. L.; Nguyen, T. T.

    1984-01-01

    Ongoing research projects on the following topics are described: atmospheric optical communication systems for network environments, two photon coherent state light, atmospheric propagation effects on infrared radars, and semiconductor lasers.

  20. Propagation of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions for environmental noise pollution lie in systematic study of many basic processes such as reflection, scattering, and spreading. Noise propagation processes should be identified in different situations and assessed for their relative importance. (PS)

  1. Characterizing the Kinematics of Interactions between Radio Galaxies and their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koekemoer, A. M.

    1999-12-01

    I discuss results from detailed hydrodynamic modelling of radio galaxy propagation and interaction with the ambient medium, with specific emphasis on the evolution of the kinematic structure in the expanding radio cocoon. The gas dynamics provide a useful diagnostic of the properties of the ambient medium, allowing the models to be compared directly with observations of line-emitting gas associated with the lobes of radio sources. Specifically, combining observed excitation diagnostics with high-dispersion kinematic data allows investigation of the amount of kinetic energy that is transferred from the radio plasma to the surrounding gas, thereby yielding constraints on the properties of the jets and the overall evolution of the radio source. The implications are discussed in the context of the effects of the environment on the general evolution of radio galaxies, together with the reciprocal impact of radio sources upon their environments.

  2. Characterization of local wave energy propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifah, Arnida L.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the local wave energy propagation is essential, especially for tracing the propagation of large energy. This paper focuses on characterizing the local wave energy propagation of slowly varying surface water waves. The wave is assumed to be unidirectional above flat bottom. We investigated the local features of waves such as wave energy, wave number, wave frequency, and local group velocity through complexification signal. From the analysis the local group velocity plays an important role as the double characteristic lines of the wave energy and the wave number. Therefore the local wave energy was successfully traced as energy trajectory by these characteristic lines. The energy trajectory was then numerically computed by finite difference scheme. In the application, we investigated the slowly varying waves; Gaussian waves, Trichromatic waves, and Peregrine soliton, in which the converging and diverging energy of these cases have been observed well from the energy trajectories.

  3. Solar Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk,

    2012-01-01

    Radio bursts from the Sun are produced by electron accelerated to relativistic energies by physical processes on the Sun such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The radio bursts are thus good indicators of solar eruptions. Three types of nonthermal radio bursts are generally associated with CMEs. Type III bursts due to accelerated electrons propagating along open magnetic field lines. The electrons are thought to be accelerated at the reconnection region beneath the erupting CME, although there is another view that the electrons may be accelerated at the CME-driven shock. Type II bursts are due to electrons accelerated at the shock front. Type II bursts are also excellent indicators of solar energetic particle (SEP) events because the same shock is supposed accelerate electrons and ions. There is a hierarchical relationship between the wavelength range of type /I bursts and the CME kinetic energy. Finally, Type IV bursts are due to electrons trapped in moving or stationary structures. The low frequency stationary type IV bursts are observed occasionally in association with very fast CMEs. These bursts originate from flare loops behind the erupting CME and hence indicate tall loops. This paper presents a summary of radio bursts and their relation to CMEs and how they can be useful for space weather predictions.

  4. Correlation of Radio and Gamma Emissions in Lightning Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, A. V.; Antonova, V. P.; Chubenko, A. P.; Karashtin, A. N.; Mitko, G. G.; Ptitsyn, M. O.; Ryabov, V. A.; Shepetov, A. L.; Shlyugaev, Yu. V.; Thu, W. M.; Vildanova, L. I.; Zybin, K. P.

    2013-10-01

    The results of simultaneous radio and gamma emission measurements during thunderstorms are presented. A gamma detector situated at the height 3840 m and two radio detectors of Tien-Shan Mountain Scientific Station (altitude 3340 m) registered intensive gamma flashes and radio pulses during the time of lightning initiation. The radio-gamma correlation grows abruptly at the initial moment (a few hundred microseconds), and the correlation coefficient reaches 0.9-0.95. The gamma-energy spectrum measured during lightning initiation is close to the characteristic spectrum of runaway breakdown. Radio pulses observed at the same time have highest amplitudes. Combined observation of gamma and radio emissions confirm the conception of lightning initiation due to multiple simultaneous electric discharges at hydrometeors stimulated and synchronized by low-energy electrons generated in the runaway breakdown process.

  5. Calibration of Solar Radio Spectrometer of the Purple Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, L.; Liu, S. M.; Song, Q. W. Ning, Z. J.

    2015-03-01

    Calibration is a basic and important procedure in the radio astronomy. It deduces the solar radio flux which is an important physical quantity of solar observation. It also deducts the flat-field of the spectrometer, displaying the radio spectrogram clearly. In this paper, we first introduce the basic method of calibration based on the data of solar radio spectrometer of the Purple Mountain Observatory. We then analyze the variation of the calibration coefficients, and give the calibrated results for a few flares. These results are compared with those from the Nobeyama solar radio polarimeters and hard X-ray band of RHESSI (The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) satellite, which shows the consistency with the characteristics of the typical solar flare light curves. In particular, the correlation between the radio flux and hard X-ray flux variations can be used to study the relevant emission mechanism, the related energy release and particle acceleration process.

  6. Wave Propagation Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User’s Manual [1].

  7. Database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-01-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  8. Wave Propagation Program

    SciTech Connect

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User?s Manual [1].

  9. Radio emission of RRAT pulsars at 111 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losovsky, B. Ya.; Dumsky, D. V.

    2014-08-01

    Observations of the RRAT pulsars J0627+16, J0628+09, J1819-1458, J1826-1419, J1839-01, J1840-1419, J1846-0257, J1848-12, J1850+15, J1854+0306, J1919+06, J1913+1330, J1919+17, J1946+24, and J2033+00 observed earlier on the 64-m Parkes telescope (Australia) and the 300-m Arecibo radio telescope (Puerto Rico) at 1400 MHz were conducted at 111 MHz on the LSA radio telescope of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy observatory in 2010-2012. A characteristic feature of these pulsars is their sporadic radio emission during rare active epochs and the absence of radio emission during long time intervals. No appreciable flare activity of these pulsars was detected in the Pushchino observations. However, processing the observations using the Fast Folding Algorithm taking into account known information about the pulsar dispersion measures and periods shows that, even during quiescent intervals, the majority of the studied pulsars generate weak radio pulses with a period corresponding to that of the radio emission of the sporadic pulses observed at active epochs. The flux of this radio emission does not exceed 100 mJy at the pulse peak, even at the low frequency of 111 MHz. This considerably hinders detection of the radio emission of RRAT pulsars at high frequencies, since the radio fluxes of RRAT pulsars decreases with increasing frequency.

  10. HF Radio Wave Production of Artificial Ionospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert

    In 1993 it was predicted that artificial ionospheres would be produced by high power HF radio waves, once HF transmitters approached a GWatt ERP. When that threshold was very recently achieved, such production was indeed detected and published at two high latitude high power HF facilities. Here we review: the first-principles logic behind that prediction, which aspects of such production are critically dependent on magnetic latitude, and which aspects of such production depend only on physical parameters independent of latitude. These distinctions follow directly from decomposition of the problem of ionization production into its components of: radio-wave propagation, wave-particle interactions, electron transport, and quantitative elastic/inelastic cross-sections. We outline this analysis to show that, within the context of early observations, the production of ionization is inevitable, and only a question of competing instability thresholds, and scale of ionization production. This illustrates complimentary aeronomy and plasma physics to advance understanding of both.

  11. The Radio Transient Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, J.; Ray, P. S.; Ellingson, S.; Close, S.; Crane, P.; Hyman, S. D.; Jacoby, B. A.; Junor, W.; Kassim, N. E.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Pihlstrom, Y. M.; Taylor, G. B.; Werthimer, D.

    2006-08-01

    Transient radio sources are necessarily compact and usually are the locations of explosive or dynamic events, therefore offering unique opportunities for probing fundamental physics and astrophysics. In addition, short-duration transients are powerful probes of intervening media owing to dispersion, scattering, and Faraday rotation that modify the signals. While radio astronomy has an impressive record obtaining high time resolution, usually it is achieved in quite narrow fields of view. Consequently, the dynamic radio sky is poorly sampled, in contrast to the situation in the X-ray and ?-ray bands. Operating in the 20-80 MHz range, the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) is one of a suite of next-generation radio telescopes that will explore the radio transient sky. Composed of phased "stations" of dipoles, the LWA can probe the sky for transients on a range of angular and temporal scales, by using an individual station to scan much of the sky or correlating the signals from multiple stations to monitor possible transients. Numerous classes of radio transients, both known and hypothesized, are accessible to the LWA, ranging from cosmic ray air showers and Jovian emission, to bursts from extrasolar planets or other coherent emitters and prompt emission from ?-ray bursts, to possible electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave burst sources. We summarize the scientific potential of radio transient observations with the LWA as well as some of the technical challenges, the most notable of which is the robust excision or avoidance of radio frequency interference (RFI). Basic research in radio astronomy at the NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  12. Vertical laser beam propagation through the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.; Bufton, J. L.; Schaefer, W. H.; Grolemund, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the earth's atmosphere and its effects upon laser beams was investigated in a series of balloon borne, optical propagation experiments. These experiments were designed to simulate the space to ground laser link. An experiment to determine the amplitude fluctuation, commonly called scintillation, caused by the atmosphere was described.

  13. Low frequency radio observations of five rich clusters of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hanisch, R.J.; Erickson, W.C.

    1980-03-01

    Observations have been made at 43.0 and 73.8 MHz of five rich x-ray emitting clusters of galaxies: Abell 399/401, Abell 426 (the Perseus cluster), Abell 1367, Abell 1656 (the Coma cluster), and the Virgo cluster. A fan beam synthesis system has been used to search for extended radio emission, i.e., radio halos, in these clusters. Radio halos were detected in the Coma and Virgo clusters. No evidence was found for the existence of 3C84B, the halo source previously thought to exist in the Perseus cluster. If halo sources exist in Abell 399/401 or Abell 1367, they must be quite weak at frequencies less than 100 MHz. The observed sizes of the extended sources in Coma and Virgo imply that the rate of particle propagation away from strong radio galaxies greatly exceeds the Alfven velocity and is probably independent of particle energy.

  14. Radio variability of the blazar AO 0235 + 164

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, S. L.; Dennison, B.; Broderick, J. J.; Altschuler, D. R.; Condon, J. J.; Payne, H. E.; Mitchell, K. J.

    1988-01-01

    The high-redshift blazar A0 0235 + 164 exhibits flux-density variations which are primarily of the less common variety in which low-frequency flux-density variations track the high-frequency variations but are delayed and of smaller amplitude. Observational results based on five years of monitoring are presented which are correlated over at least a factor of 50 frequency range in the sense expected for an expanding synchrotron component: outbursts propagating toward lower frequencies with diminishing amplitudes. A simple, semiempirical jet model is developed which accounts reasonably well for the radio properties of the object. The predictions of the model are compared with observations, examining the radio flux-density histories, the radio spectral evolution, the radio structure, and evidence for relativistic bulk motion.

  15. Giant radio galaxies via inverse Compton weakened jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiita, Paul J.; Rosen, Alexander; Gopal-Krishna; Saripalli, L.

    Both analytical and numerical models for the propagation of relativistic jets through a hot interstellar medium (ISM) and into an even hotter intergalactic medium (IGM) have been considered. The models by Gopal-Krishna and Wiita (1987), and Wiita and Gopal-Krishna (1987, 1988) were extended to allow for intrinsically extremely powerful jets, which may start off advancing relativistically through the interstellar medium. Eventually the energy density in the lobes becomes comparable to that of the microwave background, and inverse Compton losses of the synchrotron emitting electrons against the background photons become important. It is argued that only powerful radio engines are responsible for giant radio galaxies (GRGs, those whose linear size exceeds 1.5 Mpc), most of the observed peculiarities of the GRGs, such as their rarity, moderate radio flux and relatively strong radio cores can be explained.

  16. Mesures Radio Spatiales : Goniopolarimtrie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.

    2011-04-01

    Space-based radioastronomy is an essential tool for remote studies of solar system plasmas. Indeed, any radio wave emitted below the Earth ionospheric cutoff (~10~MHz) will not reach the ground and thus requires observation from space. Space-based radio receivers, as well as their antennas, have to fulfill space instrumentation constraints. The antennas used with these receivers do not have any instantaneous angular resolution. Goniopolarimetric (also known as direction-finding) techniques, as well as goniopolarimetric capable receivers, have thus been developed to retrieve the wave parameters (not only the flux density and polarization state, but also the direction of arrival) of the observed radio emissions.

  17. Analysis of a Mathematical Model for Worm Virus Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaojie, Wang; Qiming, Liu

    Considering the characteristics of the propagation of worm, we can analyze it by epidemic model. In this paper, we build a SIQR model for Internet worm virus propagation depended on the two-factor model. By using the theory of differential equations, the dynamical properties of the model is analyzed, the regularity of Internet worm virus propagation is gained and numerical simulation is presented. The analysis techniques of the mathematical model provide theoretical foundation of control and forecast for Internet worm.

  18. Radio emission altitudes in the pulsar magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency timing measurements of four pulsars are used to search for propagation delays predicted by the 'radius-to-frequency mapping' (RFM) model of pulsar radio emission. The RFM model specifies that emissions at different frequencies are produced at different altitudes in the pulsar magnetosphere. An analysis including aberration, retardation, and magnetic sweepback effects showed that the 47 and 4800 MHz emission zones were separated by no more than 200 km. Assuming a dipolar form for the pulsar magnetic field, the data indicate that 4800 MHz emission was produced less than about 100 km above the surface of the neutron star.

  19. The Deep Space Network as an instrument for radio science research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, S. W.; Renzetti, N. A.

    1993-01-01

    Radio science experiments use radio links between spacecraft and sensor instrumentation that is implemented in the Deep Space Network. The deep space communication complexes along with the telecommunications subsystem on board the spacecraft constitute the major elements of the radio science instrumentation. Investigators examine small changes in the phase and/or amplitude of the radio signal propagating from a spacecraft to study the atmospheric and ionospheric structure of planets and satellites, planetary gravitational fields, shapes, masses, planetary rings, ephemerides of planets, solar corona, magnetic fields, cometary comae, and such aspects of the theory of general relativity as gravitational waves and gravitational redshift.

  20. Algonquin Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berube, Mario; Klatt, Calvin

    1999-08-01

    This report gives an overview of the activities at the Algonquin Radio Observatory. It also summarizes the technical parameters and upgrades done to improve the antenna performance. Finally, the Algonquin VLBI team is introduced.

  1. Eratosthenes via Ham Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koser, John F.

    1975-01-01

    A secondary geology class used Eratosthenes' method for measuring the circumference of the earth by comparing their measurements of the shadow of a vertical rod to the measurements made by another person contacted by ham radio. (MLH)

  2. Carp and Radio Transmitters

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Iowa Unit Graduate student Chris Penne listens for signals from carp with surgically implanted radio transmitters in Clear Lake. Chris studied carp aggregation to assist in planning for carp reduction by the DNR....

  3. Radio Sources and Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, Barney

    2001-10-01

    A review is given of the interplay between studies of compact radio sources and the scattering and scintillations that occur as the signals travel through the irregular refractive index of the interstellar and interplanetary plasmas.

  4. The Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi

    2011-08-01

    We present the status of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) project, a new general purpose, fully steerable 64 m diameter parabolic radio telescope under construction in Sardinia. The instrument is funded by Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR), by the Sardinia Regional Government (RAS), and by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and it is charge to three research structures of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF): the Institute of Radio Astronomy of Bologna, the Cagliari Astronomical Observatory (in Sardinia), and the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Florence. The radio telescope has a shaped Gregorian optical configuration with a 8 m diameter secondary mirror and additional Beam-Wave Guide (BWG) mirrors. One of the most challenging feature of SRT is the active surface of the primary reflector which provides good efficiency up to about 100 GHz. This paper reports on the most recent advances of the construction.

  5. Packet Radio for Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownrigg, Edwin B.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This tutorial on packet radio (communication system using radio and digital packet-switching technology) highlights radio transmission of data, brief history, special considerations in applying packet radio to library online catalogs, technology, defining protocol at physical and network levels, security, geographic coverage, and components. (A…

  6. Packet Radio for Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownrigg, Edwin B.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This tutorial on packet radio (communication system using radio and digital packet-switching technology) highlights radio transmission of data, brief history, special considerations in applying packet radio to library online catalogs, technology, defining protocol at physical and network levels, security, geographic coverage, and components. (A

  7. Two exact lattice propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellin, Joel

    1995-09-01

    Exact Schrdinger and heat propagators are given for a particle hopping on a one-dimensional rectangular lattice, assuming a uniform field Vnn=?n and a ?-function potential Vnn=??n0. In its quantum form, the uniform-field propagator is the general solution of the Wannier-Stark problem for a discrete lattice, describing a particle moving in the superposition of a homogeneous field and a discrete periodic potential created by the lattice. A disentangled form for the uniform-field propagator is obtained by using the transformation properties of the Hamiltonian under the Lie algebra iso(1,1). Using this result, it is shown that the expected position and spatial extension of a lattice wave packet oscillate in phase with equal amplitudes. The discrete ?-function heat propagator is related by a Lyapunov transformation to the solution of the lattice Smoluchowski equation for the cusp potential Vnn~||n||. It is shown that the implied discrete-time Smoluchowski evolution operator generates a Markov process in which a pair of nonsymmetric random walks on the right and left half-axes are coupled at cell 0 by a partly reflecting, partly transmitting, sticky barrier. The interaction term in the lattice ?-function heat propagator is a Poisson weighted superposition of nonsymmetric random walks.

  8. DROMO Propagator Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutxua, H.; Sanjurjo-Rivo, M.; Pelez, J.

    2013-12-01

    In year 2000 a house-made orbital propagator was developed by the SDGUPM (former Grupo de Dinmica de Tethers) based in a set of redundant variables including Euler parameters. This propagator was called DROMO. and it was mainly used in numerical simulations of electrodynamic tethers. It was presented for the first time in the international meeting V Jornadas de Trabajo en Mecnica Celeste, held in Albarracn, Spain, in 2002 (see reference 1). The special perturbation method associated with DROMO can be consulted in the paper.2 In year 1975, Andre Deprit in reference 3 proposes a propagation scheme very similar to the one in which DROMO is based, by using the ideal frame concept of Hansen. The different approaches used in references 3 and 2 gave rise to a small controversy. In this paper we carried out a different deduction of the DROMO propagator, underlining its close relation with the Hansen ideal frame concept, and also the similarities and the differences with the theory carried out by Deprit in 3. Simultaneously we introduce some improvements in the formulation that leads to a more synthetic propagator.

  9. The Radio JOVE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L.; Thieman, J.; Higgins, C.

    1999-09-01

    Radio JOVE is an interactive educational activity which brings the radio sounds of Jupiter and the Sun to students, teachers, and the general public. This is accomplished through the construction of a simple radio telescope kit and the use of a real-time radio observatory on the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/) will contain science information, instruction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for students and teachers. Our target audience is high school science classes, but subjects can be tailored to college undergraduate physics and astronomy courses or even to middle school science classes. The goals of the project are: 1) Educate people about planetary and solar radio astronomy, space physics, and the scientific method 2) Provide teachers and students with a hands-on radio astronomy exercise as a science curriculum support activity by building and using a simple radio telescope receiver/antenna kit 3) Create the first ever online radio observatory which provides real-time data for those with internet access 4) Allow interactions among participating schools by facilitating exchanges of ideas, data, and observing experiences. Our current funding will allow us to impact 100 schools by partially subsidizing their participation in the program. We expect to expand well beyond this number as publicity and general interest increase. Additional schools are welcome to fully participate, but we will not be able to subsidize their kit purchases. We hope to make a wide impact among the schools by advertising through appropriate newsletters, space grant consortia, the INSPIRE project (http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire/), electronic links, and science and education meetings. We would like to acknoledge support from the NASA/GSFC Director's Discretionary Fund, the STScI IDEAS grant program and the NASA/GSFC Space Science Data Operations Office.

  10. Conceptual Background to Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsonby, J. E. B.

    2004-06-01

    The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) conceives the radio spectrum as primarily a resource for telecommunications. Indeed most applications of radio are for communications and other radio services, particularly the Radio Astronomy Service, are deemed to be `pretend'communication serviceas for spectrum amnagement purposes. The language of Radio Spectrum Management is permeated by the terminology ofcommunications, some derived from the physics of radio and some from aspects of information theory. This contribution touches on all the essential concepts of radiocommunications which the author thinks should be the common mental equipment of the Spectrum Manager. The fundamental capacity of a communication channel is discussed in terms of the degrees of freedom and bandwidth of a signal, and the signal to noise ratio. It is emphasized that an information bearing signal is inherently unpredictable, and must, at some level, be discontinuous. This has important consequences for the form of its power spectrum. The effect of inserting filters is discussed particularly with regard to constant amplitude signals and, in the context of non-linear power amplifiers, the phenomenon of`sideband recovery'. All the common generic forms of modulation are discussed including the very different case of `no-modulation' which applies in all forms of passive remote sensing. Whilst all are agreed that the radio spectrum should be used `efficiently', there is no quantitative measure of spectral efficiency which embraces all relevant aspects of spectral usage. These various aspects are dicussed. Finally a brief outline of some aspects of antennae are reviewed. It is pointed out that the recent introduction of so-called `active antennnae', which have properties unlike traditional passive antennae, has confused the interpretation of those ITU Radio Regulations which refer to antennae.

  11. Effects on transionospheric HF propagation observed by ISIS at middle and auroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.

    2006-01-01

    In 1978, an experiment on transionospheric HF propagation was carried out using a transmitter at Ottawa and the sounder receivers of the ISIS-I and ISIS-II spacecraft. Over 100 ISIS-II passes were successfully recorded using a fixed frequency of 9.303 MHz. A survey of the data has allowed some reproducible characteristics of transionospheric propagation to be identified. A number of ISIS-II ionograms are published here to illustrate those characteristics. A systematic feature of the pulses is their partial splitting into ordinary (O) and extraordinary (X) parts, producing a tripartite compound pulse at the satellite. Equatorward pulses are comparatively sharp and occasionally exhibit periodic fades with beat frequencies between about 1 and 4 Hz. Features of the fades indicate that focussing of rays is a better explanation for the fades than diffraction. Rays near the limits of the reception zone can result in dispersed pulses, thought to indicate forward scattering. Swept-frequency ionograms interleaved with fixed-frequency measurements allowed two-dimensional density distributions to be modeled in altitude and latitude. Three-dimensional ray tracing plus a Newtons-iteration algorithm were used to find rays that connected the transmitter with the position of the satellite at any time along its path. The latitudinal extent of the zone irradiated at ISIS-II altitude thus computed is approximately as observed, albeit sensitively dependent upon north south density gradients. Within this iris of accessibility, the maximum intensity of waves recorded at the spacecraft is within 10 dB of what is computed with a link calculation based on ray optics, but there are many dropouts of 20 30 dB below this maximum envelope. Toward the equator, propagation directions come to within about 10 of the magnetic-field axis. This research supports planning for coordinated ground-space radio experiments in the upcoming e-POP satellite mission.

  12. Elevated temperature crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Orange, T.W.

    1994-02-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  13. Elevated Temperature Crack Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  14. Voice communications over packet radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seah, M. M.

    1985-03-01

    The use of packet virtual circuit technique for voice communications in military radio networks was investigated. The work was concerned with various aspects of networking which include network modeling, communications techniques, traffic analysis and network control. An attempt has been made to develop a simple yet efficient time slot assignment algorithm . This was analyzed under a variety of slot depths and networks topologies using computer simulation. The Erlang' B results were used to provide more insight into the channel characteristics of the packet radio networks. The capabilities of implementing TDMA/CDMA hybrid schemes in the system were scrutinized. A method to estimate the transmission capacity of the inter-node links was found. We demonstrate its effectiveness in controlling local congestion by computer simulation. Graphical results were presented to highlight the behavior of the proposed packet radio networks. We concluded that an appropriate link weight function would provide efficient and reliable network services.

  15. Astrometry of southern radio sources.

    PubMed

    White, G L; Jauncey, D L; Harvey, B R; Savage, A; Gulkis, S; Preston, R A; Peterson, B A; Reynolds, J E; Nicolson, G D; Malin, D F

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of a number of astrometry and astrophysics programs based on radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz catalogues. The programs cover the optical identification and spectroscopy of flat-spectrum Parkes sources and the determination of their milliarc-second radio structures and positions. Work is also in progress to tie together the radio and Hipparcos positional reference frames. A parallel program of radio and optical astrometry of southern radio stars is also under way. PMID:11538705

  16. RADIO SIGNATURES OF CORONAL-MASS-EJECTION-STREAMER INTERACTION AND SOURCE DIAGNOSTICS OF TYPE II RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Kong, X. L.; Li, G.; Song, H. Q.; Feng, X. S.; Liu Ying

    2012-07-01

    It has been suggested that type II radio bursts are due to energetic electrons accelerated at coronal shocks. Radio observations, however, have poor or no spatial resolutions to pinpoint the exact acceleration locations of these electrons. In this paper, we discuss a promising approach to infer the electron acceleration location by combining radio and white light observations. The key assumption is to relate specific morphological features (e.g., spectral bumps) of the dynamic spectra of type II radio bursts to imaging features (e.g., coronal mass ejection (CME) going into a streamer) along the CME (and its driven shock) propagation. In this study, we examine the CME-streamer interaction for the solar eruption dated on 2003 November 1. The presence of spectral bump in the relevant type II radio burst is identified, which is interpreted as a natural result of the shock-radio-emitting region entering the dense streamer structure. The study is useful for further determinations of the location of type II radio burst and the associated electron acceleration by CME-driven shock.

  17. Proceedings of the 19th NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 19) and the 7th Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW 7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX 19 was held on 14 Jun. 1995, in Fort Collins, Colorado. Participants included representatives from Canada, Japan, and the United States, including researchers from universities, government agencies, and private industry. The meeting focused on mobile personal satellite systems and the use of 20/30-GHz band for fixed and mobile satellite applications. In total, 18 technical papers were presented. Following NAPEX 19, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Workshop 7 (APSW 7) was held on 15-16 Jun. 1995, to review ACTS propagation activities with emphasis on the experimenters' status reports and dissemination of propagation data to industry.

  18. Turbofan Duct Propagation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, Justin H.; Posey, Joe W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The CDUCT code utilizes a parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation in order to efficiently model acoustic propagation in acoustically treated, complex shaped ducts. The parabolic approximation solves one-way wave propagation with a marching method which neglects backwards reflected waves. The derivation of the parabolic approximation is presented. Several code validation cases are given. An acoustic lining design process for an example aft fan duct is discussed. It is noted that the method can efficiently model realistic three-dimension effects, acoustic lining, and flow within the computational capabilities of a typical computer workstation.

  19. Noise Enhanced Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Chandramouli, Sridhar; Bulsara, Adi R.; Lcher, Markus; Ditto, William L.

    1998-12-01

    We use noise to extend signal propagation in one- and two-dimensional arrays of two-way coupled bistable oscillators. In a numerical model, we sinusoidally force one end of a chain of noisy oscillators. We record a signal-to-noise ratio at each oscillator. We demonstrate that moderate noise significantly extends the propagation of the sinusoidal input. Oscillators far from the input, where noise extends the signal, exhibit a classical stochastic resonance. We obtain similar results with two-dimensional arrays. The simplicity of the model suggests the generality of the phenomenon.

  20. Imaging interplanetary CMEs at radio frequency from solar polar orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Hao; Yan, Jingye; Wang, Chi; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Shui

    2011-09-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) represent a great concentration of mass and energy input into the lower corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions change in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, observations of CMEs are important for understanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. This paper discusses a proposed mission, the Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) mission, which will observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs to distances of near 0.35 AU from the Sun. The orbit of SPORT is an elliptical solar polar orbit. The inclination angle between the orbit and ecliptic plane should be about 90°. The main payload on board SPORT will be an imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band (radio telescope), which can follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs. The images that are obtained by the radio telescope embody the brightness temperature of the objectives. Due to the very large size required for the antenna aperture of the radio telescope, we adopt interferometric imaging technology to reduce it. Interferometric imaging technology is based on indirect spatial frequency domain measurements plus Fourier transformation. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind ion instrument, an energetic particle detector, a magnetometer, a wave detector and a solar radio burst spectrometer.

  1. Statistical Survey of Type III Radio Bursts at Long Wavelengths Observed by the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO)/ Waves Instruments: Goniopolarimetric Properties and Radio Source Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupar, V.; Maksimovic, M.; Santolik, O.; Cecconi, B.; Kruparova, O.

    2014-12-01

    We have performed a statistical analysis of a large number of Type III radio bursts observed by STEREO between May 2007 and February 2013. Only intense, simple, and isolated cases have been included in our data set. We focused on the goniopolarimetric (GP, also referred to as direction-finding) properties at frequencies between 125 kHz and 2 MHz. The apparent source size ? is very extended (? 60?) for the lowest analyzed frequencies. Observed apparent source sizes ? expand linearly with a radial distance from the Sun at frequencies below 1 MHz. We show that Type III radio bursts statistically propagate in the ecliptic plane. The calculated positions of radio sources indicate that scattering of the primary beam pattern plays an important role in the propagation of Type III radio bursts in the interplanetary medium.

  2. A Study of Malware Propagation via Online Social Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghani, Mohammad Reza; Nguyen, Uyen Trang

    The popularity of online social networks (OSNs) have attracted malware creators who would use OSNs as a platform to propagate automated worms from one user's computer to another's. On the other hand, the topic of malware propagation in OSNs has only been investigated recently. In this chapter, we discuss recent advances on the topic of malware propagation by way of online social networking. In particular, we present three malware propagation techniques in OSNs, namely cross site scripting (XSS), Trojan and clickjacking types, and their characteristics via analytical models and simulations.

  3. On 3D detection of lightning discharges and associated events with a small scale interferometric network of radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezentsev, A.; Fullekrug, M.

    2012-04-01

    Lightning discharges cause different phenomena in the atmosphere such as sprites, gigantic jets and runaway electron beams. Lightning discharges and their associated events exhibit characteristic electromagnetic signatures in a wide range of frequencies. These electromagnetic signatures are detected and recorded with radio receivers for a detailed investigation. This work uses a small scale network of wide band digital radio receivers, which record vertical electric field strengths in the frequency range from ~ 4 Hz to ~ 400 KHz, with a sampling frequency of 1 MHz, an amplitude resolution of ~ 35 μV/m and a timing accuracy of ~ 12 ns. The small scale interferometric network consists of eight radio receivers, which are separated by distances ranging from 1 km up to 30 km. The network was deployed in Southern France from July to September 2011. Three additional receivers served as remote reference measurements at distances from 300 km up to 1000 km. The small scale interferometric network enables the detection of lightning discharges and associated events in three dimensions for nearby thunderstorms which are less than 500 km away. The network operated successfully during several nearby sprite producing thunderstorms. The recorded waveforms are very consistent and exhibit small time delays which reflect the propagation of the electromagnetic waves across the network. These time delays are used to determine the bearing and elevation angle of the arriving electromagnetic energy. The first results obtained with the interferometric network are presented.

  4. Propagation of Rhizopus javanicus Biosorbent

    PubMed Central

    Treen-Sears, Margaret E.; Martin, Stanley M.; Volesky, Bohumil

    1984-01-01

    After propagation of Rhizopus javanicus in defined media containing glucose, urea, and mineral salts in deionized distilled water, the ability of the nonliving biomass to sequester cupric ion was assayed. Growth, uptake capacity (saturation uptake at >1 mM Cu2+ concentration in solution), and biosorptive yield (biomass concentration uptake capacity) were increased by augmentation of the growth medium with mineral salts once growth was under way. In the stationary phase, the uptake capacity of mycelia, which were normally a poor biosorbent, was improved within 4 h of trace metal addition to the growth medium. Growth of the culture was inhibited by excessive concentrations (0.04 to 40 ?M) of metals in the medium in the following order: Cu > Co ? Ni > Mn > Mo; zinc was not inhibitory at 40 ?M, and chromium was stimulatory at 0.53 ?M but slightly inhibitory at higher levels. Iron and potassium phosphate stimulated growth at levels of 0.53 and 40 mM, respectively. When R. javanicus was propagated in a medium with a high salt concentration, exponential growth (0.23 h?1) to a biomass concentration of >3 g/liter and a biosorptive yield of >500 ?mol/liter was achieved. It is evident that the powerful biosorbent characteristics of Rhizopus biomass led to depletion of available trace minerals in suspension culture, which in turn limited growth. PMID:16346580

  5. Satellite augmentation of cellular type mobile radio telephone systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Roy E.

    NASA's ATS-6 satellite relayed voice bandwidth communications between five trucks and the trucking company dispatchers as the trucks traveled throughout the north-eastern quarter of the contiguous United States. The experiment, conducted over a seven month period, demonstrated that propagation characteristics are much different for the satellite-mobile links than for terrestrial-mobile links. A properly designed satellite system can provide high quality, reliable voice and data communications except where the vehicle-satellite path is shadowed by a structure or terrain feature. Mobile equipment in the experiment was adapted from commercial mobile radios. The vehicle antennas were 75 cm tall, 2 cm diam. Another experiment proved the feasibility of vehicle position surveillance using active two-way tone-code ranging through ATS-6 to provide one line of position and passive one-way ranging by measuring the time-of-arrival of a signal from an independent satellite. A position fix was printed out at an earth station 1 sec after it sent the interrogation signal to the distant vehicle, a towboat on the Mississippi River. The line of position from ATS-6 was accurate to 0.1 nautical mile using a voice bandwidth ranging signal. The line of position from the NOAA GOES satellite was accurate to 2 miles, using 100 Hz signal bandwidth. If the signal from the independent satellite had the same bandwidth and signal-to-noise ratio as ATS-6, the fixes would have been accurate to about 0.1 nautical mile. A concept study concluded that satellites might be a cost effective augmentation of terrestrial cellular type mobile radio telephone systems. The satellites would serve thinly populated areas where terrestrial systems are not cost effective. In the United States, the satellites would serve about 90% of the land area where 20% of the population resides. A multibeam satellite with many channels in each beam would be compatible with the urban terrestrial systems and together they would provide a nearly ubiquitous mobile radio telephone service.

  6. Propagation along azimuthally magnetized ferrite-loaded circular waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. S.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the modal dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic waves traveling along the azimuthally magnetized ferrite-loaded coaxial transmission line and the ferrite-loaded wire. The modal dispersion curves are used to determine the pass and stop bands of normal propagation. Boundary-value problems were solved with Bolle-Heller functions. The dispersion characteristics of transverse electric modes are presented as plots of the normalized propagation constant vs the normalized frequency.

  7. COBE nonspinning attitude propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft will exhibit complex attitude motion consisting of a spin rate of approximately -0.8 revolution per minute (rpm) about the x-axis and simultaneous precession of the spin axis at a rate of one revolution per orbit (rpo) about the nearly perpendicular spacecraft-to-Sun vector. The effect of the combined spinning and precession is to make accurate attitude propagation difficult and the 1-degree (3 sigma) solution accuracy goal problematic. To improve this situation, an intermediate reference frame is introduced, and the angular velocity divided into two parts. The nonspinning part is that which would be observed if there were no rotation about the X-axis. The spinning part is simply the X-axis component of the angular velocity. The two are propagated independently and combined whenever the complete attitude is needed. This approach is better than the usual one-step method because each of the two angular velocities look nearly constant in their respective reference frames. Since the angular velocities are almost constant, the approximations made in discrete time propagation are more nearly true. To demonstrate the advantages of this nonspinning method, attitude is propagated as outlined above and is then compared with the results of the one-step method. Over the 100-minute COBE orbit, the one-step error grows to several degrees while the nonspinning error remains negligible.

  8. DROMO propagator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutxua, Hodei; Sanjurjo-Rivo, Manuel; Peláez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000 an in-house orbital propagator called DROMO (Peláez et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 97:131-150, 2007. doi: 10.1007/s10569-006-9056-3) was developed by the Space Dynamics Group of the Technical University of Madrid, based in a set of redundant variables including Euler-Rodrigues parameters. An original deduction of the DROMO propagator is carried out, underlining its close relation with the ideal frame concept introduced by Hansen (Abh der Math-Phys Cl der Kon Sachs Ges der Wissensch 5:41-218, 1857). Based on the very same concept, Deprit (J Res Natl Bur Stand Sect B Math Sci 79B(1-2):1-15, 1975) proposed a formulation for orbit propagation. In this paper, similarities and differences with the theory carried out by Deprit are analyzed. Simultaneously, some improvements are introduced in the formulation, that lead to a more synthetic and better performing propagator. Also, the long-term effect of the oblateness of the primary is studied in terms of DROMO variables, and new numerical results are presented to evaluate the performance of the method.

  9. Orogenic propagating precipitation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncrieff, Mitchell; Pritchard, Mike

    2010-05-01

    Organized propagating systems in the lee of mountains make an important contribution to convective precipitation in midlatitudes (e.g., US during the warm season) and in the tropics throughout the year. These systems display a high degree of variability in regard to the thermodynamic state (i.e., temperature and moisture distribution) and kinetic state (i.e., vertical shear) of the atmosphere. However, propagating precipitation systems are absent from climate models and are inadequately represented in global numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, if they are present at all. The reason is simple. Firstly, traditional cumulus parameterizations do not represent interactions between latent heating, rain evaporation and wind-shear which are fundamental to the mesoscale convective dynamics. Secondly, the spatial resolution of climate models is too coarse to permit explicit mesoscale convective organization. This has practical implications for quantitative precipitation prediction and fundamental implications for the Earth's water cycle and its variability. This talk will describe issues regarding the parameterization of organized convection for climate models, its explicit representation by cloud-system resolving models (CRMs, and hybrid representation for high-resolution NWP models. Also described will be new methodologies for representing propagating precipitation systems in climate models: i)superparameterization whereby traditional convective parameterization is replaced by CRMs; ii) hybrid parametric representation of stratiform heating, mesoscale downdrafts, and organized momentum transport associated with propagating systems.

  10. DROMO propagator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutxua, Hodei; Sanjurjo-Rivo, Manuel; Pelez, Jess

    2015-09-01

    In the year 2000 an in-house orbital propagator called DROMO (Pelez et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 97:131-150, 2007. doi: 10.1007/s10569-006-9056-3) was developed by the Space Dynamics Group of the Technical University of Madrid, based in a set of redundant variables including Euler-Rodrigues parameters. An original deduction of the DROMO propagator is carried out, underlining its close relation with the ideal frame concept introduced by Hansen (Abh der Math-Phys Cl der Kon Sachs Ges der Wissensch 5:41-218, 1857). Based on the very same concept, Deprit (J Res Natl Bur Stand Sect B Math Sci 79B(1-2):1-15, 1975) proposed a formulation for orbit propagation. In this paper, similarities and differences with the theory carried out by Deprit are analyzed. Simultaneously, some improvements are introduced in the formulation, that lead to a more synthetic and better performing propagator. Also, the long-term effect of the oblateness of the primary is studied in terms of DROMO variables, and new numerical results are presented to evaluate the performance of the method.

  11. GRC RF Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been involved in the characterization of atmospheric effects on space communications links operating at Ka-band and above for the past 20 years. This presentation reports out on the most recent activities of propagation characterization that NASA is currently involved in.

  12. Wave Normal and Poynting Vector Calculations using the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Dougherty, M.; Inan, Umran; Wood, Troy

    2001-01-01

    Wave normal and Poynting vector measurements from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument (RPWS) are used to examine the propagation characteristics of various plasma waves during the Earth flyby on August 18, 1999. Using the five-channel waveform receiver (WFR), the wave normal vector is determined using the Means method for a lightning-induced whistler, equatorial chorus, and a series of low-frequency emissions observed while Cassini was in the magnetosheath. The Poynting vector for these emissions is also calculated from the five components measured by the WFR. The propagation characteristics of the lightning-induced whistler were found to be consistent with the whistler wave mode of propagation, with propagation antiparallel to the magnetic field (southward) at Cassini. The sferic associated with this whistler was observed by both Cassini and the Stanford VLF group at the Palmer Station in Antarctica. Analysis of the arrival direction of the sferic at the Palmer Station suggests that the lightning stroke is in the same sector as Cassini. Chorus was observed very close (within a few degrees) to the magnetic equator during the flyby. The chorus was found to propagate primarily away from the magnetic equator and was observed to change direction as Cassini crossed the magnetic equator. This suggests that the source region of the chorus is very near the magnetic equator. The low-frequency emission in the magnetosheath has many of the characteristics of lion roars. The average value of the angle between the wave normal vector and the local magnetic field was found to be 16 degrees, and the emissions ranged in frequency from 0. 19 to 0.75 f(sub ce), where f(sub ce) is the electron cyclotron frequency. The wave normal vectors of these waves were primarily in one direction for each individual burst (either parallel or antiparallel to the local field) but varied in direction throughout the magnetosheath. This suggests that the sources of the emissions are far from the spacecraft and that there are multiple source regions.

  13. Fine spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emission observed by ground-based radio telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radio emission in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of a complicated interaction between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying the free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from few MHz up to 40 MHz. This emission is generated via cyclotron maser mechanism in sources located along Jovian magnetic field lines. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAMexhibits different complex spectral structures. We present the observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN- 2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. This telescope is one of the largest low frequency telescopes in Europe equipped with high performance digital radio spectrometers. The antenna array of URAN-2 consists of 512 crossed dipoles with an effective area of 28 000m2 and beam pattern size of 3.5 x 7 deg. (at 25 MHz). The instrument enables continuous observations of the Jovian radio during long period of times. Jovian DAM was observed continuously since Sep. 2012 (depending on Jupiter visibility) with relatively high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100ms) in the broad frequency range (8-32MHz). We have detected a big amount of the fine spectral structures in the dynamic spectra of DAM such as trains of S-bursts, quasi-continuous narrowband emission, narrow-band splitting events and zebra stripe-like patterns. We analyzed mainly the fine structures associated with non-Io controlled DAM. We discuss how the observed narrowband structures which most probably are related to the propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jupiter's ionosphere can be used to study the plasma parameters in the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  14. Wave propagation into the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirota, I.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observations of various types of waves propagating into the middle atmosphere are reviewed. Emphasis is made on the excitation processes in the lower atmosphere and their vertical propagation through the background flow as a function of the latitude, height and season. The following subjects are discussed: (1) Vertical propagation of quasi-stationary forced Rossby waves into the winter stratosphere in connection with the sudden warming; (2) Spectral distribution and seasonal characteristics of normal mode (free) Rossby waves and the asymmetry of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres; and (3) Seasonal variation of internal gravity waves in the middle atmosphere. Further discussions are presented for future studies based on accumulated observational data during the MAP period.

  15. Propagation of shock waves through petroleum suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuk, K. V.; Makhkamov, S. M.; Azizov, K. K.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous shock wave propagation through petroleum with a high paraffin content was studied in an attempt to confirm the theoretically predicted breakdown of a forward shock wave into oscillating waves and wave packets as well as individual solitons. Tests were performed in a shock tube at 10, 20, and 50 to 60 C, with pure kerosene as reference and with kerosene + 5, 10, 15, and 20% paraffin. The addition of paraffin was found to radically alter the rheodynamic characteristics of the medium and, along with it, the pattern of shock wave propagation. The integro-differential equation describing a one dimensional hydraulic shock process in viscoelastic fluids is reduced to the Burgers-Korteweg-deVries equation, which is solved numerically for given values of the system parameters. The results indicate that the theory of shock wave propagation through such an anomalous suspension must be modified.

  16. Stern-Gerlach dynamics with quantum propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Bailey C.; Berrondo, Manuel; van Huele, Jean-Franois S.

    2011-01-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of a nonrelativistic neutral particle with spin in inhomogeneous external magnetic fields. We first consider fields with one-dimensional inhomogeneities, both unphysical and physical, and construct the corresponding analytic propagators. We then consider fields with two-dimensional inhomogeneities and develop an appropriate numerical propagation method. We propagate initial states exhibiting different degrees of space localization and various initial spin configurations, including both pure and mixed spin states. We study the evolution of their spin densities and identify characteristic features of spin density dynamics, such as the spatial separation of spin components, and spin localization or accumulation. We compare our approach and our results with the coverage of the Stern-Gerlach effect in the literature, and we focus on nonstandard Stern-Gerlach outcomes, such as radial separation, spin focusing, spin oscillation, and spin flipping.

  17. Stern-Gerlach dynamics with quantum propagators

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Bailey C.; Berrondo, Manuel; Van Huele, Jean-Francois S.

    2011-01-15

    We study the quantum dynamics of a nonrelativistic neutral particle with spin in inhomogeneous external magnetic fields. We first consider fields with one-dimensional inhomogeneities, both unphysical and physical, and construct the corresponding analytic propagators. We then consider fields with two-dimensional inhomogeneities and develop an appropriate numerical propagation method. We propagate initial states exhibiting different degrees of space localization and various initial spin configurations, including both pure and mixed spin states. We study the evolution of their spin densities and identify characteristic features of spin density dynamics, such as the spatial separation of spin components, and spin localization or accumulation. We compare our approach and our results with the coverage of the Stern-Gerlach effect in the literature, and we focus on nonstandard Stern-Gerlach outcomes, such as radial separation, spin focusing, spin oscillation, and spin flipping.

  18. Modeling the Slow-Tail of Atmospheric Waves to Approximate the Distance of Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cocq, C.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    A lightning strike emits an electromagnetic wave known as an atmospheric or sferic, which propagates through the earth-ionosphere waveguide. Sferics can be recorded by extremely low and very low frequency, ELF and VLF, receiver systems. The recorded signal is composed of two segments, a pulse containing VLF frequencies, followed by a slow-tail, containing the ELF components. The slow-tail is essentially a single cycle wave, which is delayed with respect to the rest of the sferic due to the dispersive nature of the ionosphere. The recorded time- domain slow-tail varies with the lightning strike's current moment, and the waveguide's media characteristics. It is possible to approximate the location of the lightning source with measurements of the sferic. Many methods require measurements from multiple stations, however the goal of this work is to approximate the distance a sferic propagated with a single station. J.R. Wait developed a mode theory where propagating ELF radio are characterized by the first mode. The research reported here uses the first mode equations to model a slow-tail that propagated a certain distance. We include a comparison to measurements on slow-tails observed at widely variable distances from their causative lightning, and analyze the accuracy of our model. Using the inverse of this method along with sferics from known locations, we approximate the form of the current moment at the source and use an average of this waveform to improve our slow-tail model. With an accurate computed slow-tail we can approximate the distance of propagation by fitting the computed waveform to the observed slow-tail. An analysis is given of the effectiveness of this method. As expected, since this method uses data from only one station, the estimation error from this method are larger than those of the traditional multiple station estimation method. However, in most instances our method was accurate to within hundreds of kilometers. With such accuracy, this method can be used to predict abnormalities in the conditions of the ionosphere along the path of propagation. In addition, it is a powerful tool that can be used to validate multiple station estimates and determine any errors due to single station faults.

  19. Anomalous propagation conditions of electromagnetic wave observed over Bosten Lake, China in July and August, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sun; Hui, Ning; Jing, Tang; Yong-Jie, Xie; Peng-Fei, Shi; Jian-Hua, Wang; Ke, Wang

    2016-02-01

    Atmospheric duct is a common phenomenon over large bodies of water, and it can significantly affect the performance of many radio systems. In this paper, a two-month (in July and August, 2014) sounding experiment in ducting conditions over Bosten Lake was carried out at a littoral station (41.89° N, 87.22° E) with high resolution GPS radiosondes, and atmospheric ducts were observed for the first time in this area. During the two months, surface and surface-based ducts occurred frequently over the Lake. Strong diurnal variations in ducting characteristics were noticed in clear days. Ducting occurrence was found at its lowest in the early morning and at its highest (nearly 100%) in the afternoon. Duct strength was found increasing from early morning to forenoon, and reaching its maximum in the afternoon. But contrarily, duct altitude experienced a decrease in a clear day. Then the meteorological reasons for the variations were discussed in detail, turbulent bursting was a possible reason for the duct formation in the early morning and the prevailing lake-breeze front was the main reason in the afternoon. The propagation of electromagnetic wave in a ducting environment was also investigated. A ray-tracing framework based on Runge–Kutta method was proposed to assess the performance of radio systems, and the precise critical angle and grazing angle derived from the ray-tracing equations were provided. Finally, numerical investigations on the radar performance in the observed ducting environments have been carried out with high accuracy, which demonstrated that atmospheric ducts had made great impacts on the performance of radio systems. The range/height errors for radar measurement induced by refraction have also been presented, too, which shows that the height errors were very large for trapped rays when the total range was long enough.

  20. Star formation in quasar hosts and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakamska, Nadia L.; Lampayan, Kelly; Petric, Andreea; Dicken, Daniel; Greene, Jenny E.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Ho, Luis C.; Krolik, Julian H.; Nesvadba, Nicole P. H.; Strauss, Michael A.; Geach, James E.; Oguri, Masamune; Strateva, Iskra V.

    2016-02-01

    Radio emission from radio-quiet quasars may be due to star formation in the quasar host galaxy, to a jet launched by the supermassive black hole, or to relativistic particles accelerated in a wide-angle radiatively driven outflow. In this paper, we examine whether radio emission from radio-quiet quasars is a byproduct of star formation in their hosts. To this end, we use infrared spectroscopy and photometry from Spitzer and Herschel to estimate or place upper limits on star formation rates in hosts of ˜300 obscured and unobscured quasars at z < 1. We find that low-ionization forbidden emission lines such as [Ne II] and [Ne III] are likely dominated by quasar ionization and do not provide reliable star formation diagnostics in quasar hosts, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features may be suppressed due to the destruction of PAH molecules by the quasar radiation field. While the bolometric luminosities of our sources are dominated by the quasars, the 160 μm fluxes are likely dominated by star formation, but they too should be used with caution. We estimate median star formation rates to be 6-29 M⊙ yr-1, with obscured quasars at the high end of this range. This star formation rate is insufficient to explain the observed radio emission from quasars by an order of magnitude, with log (Lradio, obs/Lradio, SF) = 0.6-1.3 depending on quasar type and star formation estimator. Although radio-quiet quasars in our sample lie close to the 8-1000 μm infrared/radio correlation characteristic of the star-forming galaxies, both their infrared emission and their radio emission are dominated by the quasar activity, not by the host galaxy.

  1. High redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    High redshift galaxies that host powerful radio sources are examined. An overview is presented of the content of radio surveys: 3CR and 3CRR, 4C and 4C/USS, B2/1 Jy, MG, MRC/1Jy, Parkes/PSR, B3, and ESO Key-Project. Narrow-line radio galaxies in the visible and UV, the source of ionization and excitation of the emission lines, emission-line luminosities, morphology of the line-emitting gas, physical properties and energetics, kinematics of the line-emitting gas, and implications from the emission lines are discussed. The morphologies and environments of the host galaxies, the alignment effect, and spectral energy distributions and ages are also examined.

  2. Radio emissions from Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.; Evans, D. R.; Romig, J. H.; Sawyer, C. B.

    1987-01-01

    The hardware of the Planetary Radio Astronomy Experiment aboard Voyager 2 and the results of the measurements of radio emissions from Uranus are described. Strong 40-kHz to 850-kHz radio emissions were detected after closest approach on the day-side of Uranus. The time variations of these emissions were periodic, with a period of 17.24 h closely matching that of Uranus's rotation and evidently being controlled by the strength and shape of its magnetic field. The instrument also recorded possible Uranian electrostatic discharges, vertex early arcs occurring in sequences of more than a dozen events with approximately 10-min period, and very intense isolated bursts lasting tens of minutes.

  3. Radio Emissions from the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    1996-01-01

    For nearly fifteen years the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft have been detecting an unusual radio emission in the outer heliosphere in the frequency range from about 2 to 3 kHz. Two major events have been observed, the first in 1983-84 and the second in 1992-93. In both cases the onset of the radio emission occurred about 400 days after a period of intense solar activity, the first in mid-July 1982, and the second in May-June 1991. These two periods of solar activity produced the two deepest cosmic ray Forbush decreases ever observed. Forbush decreases are indicative of a system of strong shocks and associated disturbances propagating outward through the heliosphere. The radio emission is believed to have been produced when this system of shocks and disturbances interacted with one of the outer boundaries of the heliosphere, most likely in the vicinity of the the heliopause. The emission is believed to be generated by the shock-driven Langmuir-wave mode conversion mechanism, which produces radiation at the plasma frequency (f(sub p)) and at twice the plasma frequency (2f(sub p)). From the 400-day travel time and the known speed of the shocks, the distance to the interaction region can be computed, and is estimated to be in the range from about 110 to 160 AU.

  4. Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have important connections to various types of radio emissions from the Sun. The persistent noise storm radiation (type I storm at metric wavelengths, type III storms at longer wavelengths) can be clearly interrupted by the occurrence of a CME in the active region that produces the storm. Sometimes the noise storm completely disappears and other times, it reappears in the active region. Long-lasting type III bursts are associated with CME eruption, thought to be due to the reconnection process taking place beneath the erupting CME. Type II bursts are indicative of electron acceleration in the CME-driven shocks and hence considered to be the direct response of the CME propagation in the corona and interplanetary medium. Finally type IV bursts indicate large-scale post-eruption arcades containing trapped electrons that produce radio emission. This paper summarizes some key results that connect CMEs to various types of radio emission and what we can learn about particle acceleration in the corona) and interplanetary medium. Particular emphasis will be placed on type If bursts because of their connection to interplanetary shocks detected in situ.

  5. PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2014-04-20

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 10{sup 3} pc cm{sup –3}. Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ∼5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period.

  6. Energy distributions of radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Impey, Chris; Gregorini, Loretta

    1993-01-01

    Far-infrared observations of 140 radio galaxies which span a range of over four orders of magnitude in radio power, (from weak nuclear sources in nearby galaxies, to powerful FR II doubled lobed sources at moderate redshift) are presented. The strength of the far-infrared emission is more closely correlated with core than total radio emission. Far-infrared emission in radio galaxies represents star formation that is more closely tied to the active nucleus than to the global properties of the galaxy. The far-infrared luminosity function shows good continuity between radio galaxies and radio loud quasars.

  7. Advances in Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Jacob W. M.; D'Addario, Larry R.; Thompson, A. Richard

    2009-08-01

    The editors of the third Special Issue on Radio Telescopes, which appeared in the Proceedings of the IEEE in May 1994, surmised in their introduction that "perhaps yet a future issue is merited, one devoted to those new telescopes that are still on the drawing boards." Now, 15 years later, such an issue lies in front of you, featuring 16 papers describing both the realization of new instruments and the status of several giant radio telescopes, most of which are moving from the drawing board to different stages of construction. The development of astronomy over this period has led radio astronomers to concentrate on both the highest and the lowest ranges of the radio spectrum. The technological advance in the millimeter wavelength domain has enabled an enormous improvement in observing capabilities. In the low frequency range, roughly 10 - 2000 MHz, new telescopes are being planned that combine a large instantaneous field of view with a large number of high- resolution antenna beams. In addition to these developments, this issue features papers on several new single aperture telescopes. We also have three papers covering advances in technologies that are applicable to multiple projects, namely, antenna metrology, imaging techniques, and the use of phased array techniques. The issue begins with a short paper by the guest editors on "Radio Astronomy in the Early Twenty-First Century." There we attempt to put the topics of the following papers in historical perspective and to provide background information for readers whose expertise lies outside astronomy. The remaining papers are organized into three broad categories: single antenna telescopes, synthesis array telescopes, and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Although the last is also a synthesis array, the intensity of SKA-related work now under way around the world justifies a separate set of papers devoted to it. This issue features new single-aperture and synthesis array radio telescopes and covers advances in antenna metrology, imaging techniques, and the use of phased array technology.

  8. Fluid-Mud Gravity Current Propagation through Aquatic Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testik, F. Y.; Yilmaz, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to elucidate the effects of aquatic vegetation on the propagation of constant-flux non-Newtonian gravity currents. The motivation of this study is related to the formation of fluid-mud gravity currents, which exhibit non-Newtonian rheology, in the vegetated coastal zones during shallow-water dredge disposal operations. Although the propagation dynamics and phase transitions of non-Newtonian gravity currents over horizontal bottoms have been previously studied both experimentally and theoretically, the effects of stiff aquatic vegetation on the propagation characteristics have not been studied yet. During its propagation, a gravity current is under the influence of three main forces: inertia, buoyancy and viscous forces. Based upon the balance among these forces, the gravity currents may propagate in three distinct phases: slumping (for constant-volume gravity currents) or jet (for constant-flux gravity currents), inertia-buoyancy and viscous-buoyancy phase. Propagation characteristics of gravity currents differ for each of these phases. Presence of aquatic vegetation, which is typical in shallow coastal waters, disturbs the form and propagation characteristics of the gravity currents. In this present study, the effects of emerged stiff aquatic vegetation (such as the Spartina Alterniflora, also known as smooth cordgrass that exist in salt marshes) on the propagation characteristics of fluid-mud gravity currents are studied experimentally. A laboratory tank (4.3m x 0.25m x 0.5m) is used to generate constant-flux gravity currents that propagate over a 2.0m long perforated plate with stiff plastic rods that simulate emerged stiff aquatic vegetation. Experiments have been conducted with different concentrations of fluid-mud mixtures that are prepared by mixing Kaolinite clay and tap water. In the experiments, different vegetation densities have been considered. For each of the experimental runs with the vegetation, an experimental run without vegetation (i.e. gravity currents propagating over a smooth horizontal bottom) was also conducted for the same experimental conditions. In the experiments, gravity current front positions with time were obtained using video camera recordings. Experimental propagation curves with and without vegetation were compared to identify the effects of vegetation on propagation characteristics. Our preliminary experiments showed that the aquatic vegetation has different effects for different propagation phases. The effects were most clearly observed during the viscous-buoyancy propagation phase. Moreover, our experiments indicated increasingly distinct effects of vegetation as the density of the vegetation (the ratio of the total cross-sectional area of the vegetation over the total cross-sectional area of the vegetated part of the experimental setup) increase.

  9. A Database for Propagation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Rucker, James

    1997-01-01

    The Propagation Models Database is designed to allow the scientists and experimenters in the propagation field to process their data through many known and accepted propagation models. The database is an Excel 5.0 based software that houses user-callable propagation models of propagation phenomena. It does not contain a database of propagation data generated out of the experiments. The database not only provides a powerful software tool to process the data generated by the experiments, but is also a time- and energy-saving tool for plotting results, generating tables and producing impressive and crisp hard copy for presentation and filing.

  10. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  11. Algonquin Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berube, Mario; Klatt, Calvin

    2001-04-01

    The Algonquin Radio Observatory (ARO) is situated in Algonquin provincial park, about 250 km north of Ottawa and is operated by the Geodetic Survey Division of Natural Resources Canada in partnership with the Space Geodynamics Laboratory, CRESTech. The antenna is involved in a large number of international geodetic Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) experiments each year and is a key site in the ongoing Canadian S2 developments. The ARO is the most sensitive IVS Network Station. This report summarizes recent activities at the Algonquin Radio Observatory.

  12. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-05-03

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  13. Radio astronomy with microspacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D.

    2001-01-01

    A dynamic constellation of microspacecraft in lunar orbit can carry out valuable radio astronomy investigations in the frequency range of 30kHz--30MHz, a range that is difficult to explore from Earth. In contrast to the radio astronomy ivestigations that have flown on individual spacecraft, the four microspacecraft together with a carrier spacecraft, which transported them to lunar orbit, form an interferometer with far superior angular resolution. Use of microspacecraft allows the entire constellation to be launched with a Taurus-class vehicle. Also distinguishing this approach is that the Moon is used as needed to shield the constellation from RF interference from the Earth and Sun.

  14. Theories of radio emissions and plasma waves. [in Jupiter magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Goertz, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    The complex region of Jupiter's radio emissions at decameter wavelengths, the so-called DAM, is considered, taking into account the basic theoretical ideas which underly both the older and newer theories and models. Linear theories are examined, giving attention to direct emission mechanisms, parallel propagation, perpendicular propagation, and indirect emission mechanisms. An investigation of nonlinear theories is also conducted. Three-wave interactions are discussed along with decay instabilities, and three-wave up-conversio. Aspects of the Io and plasma torus interaction are studied, and a mechanism by which Io can accelerate electrons is reviewed.

  15. A theory of solar type III radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Papadopoulos, K.; Smith, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A theory of type III bursts is reviewed. Energetic electrons propagating through the interplanetary medium are shown to excite the one dimensional oscillating two stream instability (OTSI). The OTSI is in turn stabilized by anomalous resistivity which completes the transfer of long wavelength Langmuir waves to short wavelengths, out of resonance with the electrons. The theory explains the small energy losses suffered by the electrons in propagating to 1 AU, the predominance of second harmonic radiation, and the observed correlation between radio and electron fluxes.

  16. On the speed and acceleration of electron beams triggering interplanetary type III radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupar, V.; Kontar, E. P.; Soucek, J.; Santolik, O.; Maksimovic, M.; Kruparova, O.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: Type III radio bursts are intense radio emissions triggered by beams of energetic electrons often associated with solar flares. These exciter beams propagate outwards from the Sun along an open magnetic field line in the corona and in the interplanetary (IP) medium. Methods: We performed a statistical survey of 29 simple and isolated IP type III bursts observed by STEREO/Waves instruments between January 2013 and September 2014. We investigated their time-frequency profiles in order to derive the speed and acceleration of exciter electron beams. Results: We show these beams noticeably decelerate in the IP medium. Obtained speeds range from ~0.02c up to ~0.35c depending on initial assumptions. It corresponds to electron energies between tens of eV and hundreds of keV, and in order to explain the characteristic energies or speeds of type III electrons (~0.1c) observed simultaneously with Langmuir waves at 1 au, the emission of type III bursts near the peak should be predominately at double plasma frequency. Derived properties of electron beams can be used as input parameters for computer simulations of interactions between the beam and the plasma in the IP medium. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Preventing Unofficial Information Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Zhengyi; Ouyang, Yi; Xu, Yurong; Ford, James; Makedon, Fillia

    Digital copies are susceptible to theft and vulnerable to leakage, copying, or manipulation. When someone (or some group), who has stolen, leaked, copied, or manipulated digital documents propagates the documents over the Internet and/or distributes those through physical distribution channels many challenges arise which document holders must overcome in order to mitigate the impact to their privacy or business. This paper focuses on the propagation problem of digital credentials, which may contain sensitive information about a credential holder. Existing work such as access control policies and the Platform for Privacy Preferences (P3P) assumes that qualified or certified credential viewers are honest and reliable. The proposed approach in this paper uses short-lived credentials based on reverse forward secure signatures to remove this assumption and mitigate the damage caused by a dishonest or honest but compromised viewer.

  18. Transionospheric Propagation Code (TIPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Kelley, T.A.

    1990-10-01

    The Transionospheric Propagation Code is a computer program developed at Los Alamos National Lab to perform certain tasks related to the detection of vhf signals following propagation through the ionosphere. The code is written in Fortran 77, runs interactively and was designed to be as machine independent as possible. A menu format in which the user is prompted to supply appropriate parameters for a given task has been adopted for the input while the output is primarily in the form of graphics. The user has the option of selecting from five basic tasks, namely transionospheric propagation, signal filtering, signal processing, DTOA study, and DTOA uncertainty study. For the first task a specified signal is convolved against the impulse response function of the ionosphere to obtain the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of four analytic forms for the input pulse or of supplying a tabular form. The option of adding Gaussian-distributed white noise of spectral noise to the input signal is also provided. The deterministic ionosphere is characterized to first order in terms of a total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path. In addition, a scattering model parameterized in terms of a frequency coherence bandwidth is also available. In the second task, detection is simulated by convolving a given filter response against the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of a wideband filter or a narrowband Gaussian filter. It is also possible to input a filter response. The third task provides for quadrature detection, envelope detection, and three different techniques for time-tagging the arrival of the transionospheric signal at specified receivers. The latter algorithms can be used to determine a TEC and thus take out the effects of the ionosphere to first order. Task four allows the user to construct a table of delta-times-of-arrival (DTOAs) vs TECs for a specified pair of receivers.

  19. ACTS propagation terminal update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, Warren L.; Pratt, Tim

    1992-01-01

    The activities at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in preparation for the February 1993 launch of ACTS are summarized. ACTS propagation terminals (APT) are being constructed to receive the 20 and 27.5 GHz ACTS beacon signals. Total power radiometers operating at the same frequencies are integrated into the terminal for use in level setting. Recent progress and plans for APT's are reported.

  20. Passive turbulent flamelet propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashurst, William T.; Ruetsch, G. R.; Lund, T. S.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze results of a premixed constant density flame propagating in three-dimensional turbulence, where a flame model developed by Kerstein, et al. (1988) has been used. Simulations with constant and evolving velocity fields are used, where peculiar results were obtained from the constant velocity field runs. Data from the evolving flow runs with various flame speeds are used to determine two-point correlations of the fluctuating scalar field and implications for flamelet modeling are discussed.