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Sample records for radio pulsar binary

  1. Understanding the Evolution of Close Binary Systems with Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the evolution of close binary systems (CBSs) formed by a neutron star (behaving as a radio pulsar) and a normal donor star, which evolve either to a helium white dwarf (HeWD) or to ultra-short orbital period systems. We consider X-ray irradiation feedback and evaporation due to radio pulsar irradiation. We show that irradiation feedback leads to cyclic mass transfer episodes, allowing CBSs to be observed in between episodes as binary radio pulsars under conditions in which standard, non-irradiated models predict the occurrence of a low-mass X-ray binary. This behavior accounts for the existence of a family of eclipsing binary systems known as redbacks. We predict that redback companions should almost fill their Roche lobe, as observed in PSR J1723-2837. This state is also possible for systems evolving with larger orbital periods. Therefore, binary radio pulsars with companion star masses usually interpreted as larger than expected to produce HeWDs may also result in such quasi-Roche lobe overflow states, rather than hosting a carbon-oxygen WD. We found that CBSs with initial orbital periods of Pi < 1 day evolve into redbacks. Some of them produce low-mass HeWDs, and a subgroup with shorter Pi becomes black widows (BWs). Thus, BWs descend from redbacks, although not all redbacks evolve into BWs. There is mounting observational evidence favoring BW pulsars to be very massive (gsim 2 M ⊙). As they should be redback descendants, redback pulsars should also be very massive, since most of the mass is transferred before this stage.

  2. UNDERSTANDING THE EVOLUTION OF CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS WITH RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the evolution of close binary systems (CBSs) formed by a neutron star (behaving as a radio pulsar) and a normal donor star, which evolve either to a helium white dwarf (HeWD) or to ultra-short orbital period systems. We consider X-ray irradiation feedback and evaporation due to radio pulsar irradiation. We show that irradiation feedback leads to cyclic mass transfer episodes, allowing CBSs to be observed in between episodes as binary radio pulsars under conditions in which standard, non-irradiated models predict the occurrence of a low-mass X-ray binary. This behavior accounts for the existence of a family of eclipsing binary systems known as redbacks. We predict that redback companions should almost fill their Roche lobe, as observed in PSR J1723-2837. This state is also possible for systems evolving with larger orbital periods. Therefore, binary radio pulsars with companion star masses usually interpreted as larger than expected to produce HeWDs may also result in such quasi-Roche lobe overflow states, rather than hosting a carbon-oxygen WD. We found that CBSs with initial orbital periods of P{sub i} < 1 day evolve into redbacks. Some of them produce low-mass HeWDs, and a subgroup with shorter P{sub i} becomes black widows (BWs). Thus, BWs descend from redbacks, although not all redbacks evolve into BWs. There is mounting observational evidence favoring BW pulsars to be very massive (≳ 2 M {sub ☉}). As they should be redback descendants, redback pulsars should also be very massive, since most of the mass is transferred before this stage.

  3. Modelling of the radio spectrum evolution in the binary pulsar B1259-63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewska, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Our model of the radio waves absorption in the binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 supports the hypothesis that the external factors have a significant impact on the observed radio emission of a pulsar. The model can also contribute to our understanding of the origin of some non-typical spectral shapes.

  4. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  5. On the nature of the binary radio pulsar PSR B0042-73 in the small magellanic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Postnov, K. A.; Prokhorov, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    The modern scenario of evolution of massive binary systems predicts the existence of a subclass of binary radio pulsars (PSRs) with black holes (BHs). Their Galactic number was evaluated as approximately 1 per 1000 single pulsars (Lipunov et al. 1994b). Distinctive properties of such binaries would be (1) mass of the unseen companion M(sub c) greater than 3-4 solar mass and (2) absence of eclipses of the pulsar radiation with no distinctive variance of the dispersion measure along the pulsar orbit. The pulsars themselves must be similar to standard isolated ones. The recently discovered binary 1 s pulsar PSR B0042-73 = PSR J0045-7319 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with a massive companion in a highly elongated (eccentricity e =0.8) 51 day orbit (Kaspi et al. 1994) may be the first such pulsar with a BH. The paradoxical fact that the first pulsar discovered in the SMC proved to be in a binary system can be naturally understood if its companion actually is a 10-30 solar mass black hole. We illustrate this fact by the numerical calculation of evolution of radio pulsars after a star formation burst.

  6. PSR J1723–2837: AN ECLIPSING BINARY RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Fronefield; Lyne, Andrew G.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Kaplan, David L.; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Kramer, Michael; Burgay, Marta; D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Camilo, Fernando; Faulkner, Andrew; Manchester, Richard N.; Steeghs, Danny

    2013-10-10

    We present a study of PSR J1723–2837, an eclipsing, 1.86 ms millisecond binary radio pulsar discovered in the Parkes Multibeam survey. Radio timing indicates that the pulsar has a circular orbit with a 15 hr orbital period, a low-mass companion, and a measurable orbital period derivative. The eclipse fraction of ∼15% during the pulsar's orbit is twice the Roche lobe size inferred for the companion. The timing behavior is significantly affected by unmodeled systematics of astrophysical origin, and higher-order orbital period derivatives are needed in the timing solution to account for these variations. We have identified the pulsar's (non-degenerate) companion using archival ultraviolet, optical, and infrared survey data and new optical photometry. Doppler shifts from optical spectroscopy confirm the star's association with the pulsar and indicate a pulsar-to-companion mass ratio of 3.3 ± 0.5, corresponding to a companion mass range of 0.4 to 0.7 M{sub ☉} and an orbital inclination angle range of between 30° and 41°, assuming a pulsar mass range of 1.4-2.0 M{sub ☉}. Spectroscopy indicates a spectral type of G for the companion and an inferred Roche-lobe-filling distance that is consistent with the distance estimated from radio dispersion. The features of PSR J1723–2837 indicate that it is likely a 'redback' system. Unlike the five other Galactic redbacks discovered to date, PSR J1723–2837 has not been detected as a γ-ray source with Fermi. This may be due to an intrinsic spin-down luminosity that is much smaller than the measured value if the unmeasured contribution from proper motion is large.

  7. The Unusual Binary Pulsar PSR J1744-3922: Radio Flux Variability, Near-Infrared Observation, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, R. P.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Ransom, S. M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Durant, M.; Bergeron, P.; Faulkner, A. J.

    2007-06-01

    PSR J1744-3922 is a binary pulsar exhibiting highly variable pulsed radio emission. We report on a statistical multifrequency study of the pulsed radio flux variability which suggests that this phenomenon is extrinsic to the pulsar and possibly tied to the companion, although not strongly correlated with orbital phase. The pulsar has an unusual combination of characteristics compared to typical recycled pulsars: a long spin period (172 ms); a relatively high magnetic field strength (1.7×1010 G); a very circular, compact orbit of 4.6 hr; and a low-mass companion (0.08 Msolar). These spin and orbital properties are likely inconsistent with standard evolutionary models. We find similarities between the properties of the PSR J1744-3922 system and those of several other known binary pulsar systems, motivating the identification of a new class of binary pulsars. We suggest that this new class could result from: a standard accretion scenario of a magnetar or a high magnetic field pulsar; common envelope evolution with a low-mass star and a neutron star, similar to what is expected for ultracompact X-ray binaries; or accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf. We also report the detection of a possible K'=19.30(15) infrared counterpart at the position of the pulsar, which is relatively bright if the companion is a helium white dwarf at the nominal distance, and discuss its implications for the pulsar's companion and evolutionary history.

  8. Radio pulsar style timing of eclipsing binary stars from the All Sky Automated Survey catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, S. K.; Konacki, M.; Sybilski, P.

    2011-09-01

    The light-time effect (LTE) is observed whenever the distance between the observer and any kind of periodic event changes in time. The usual cause of this change in the distance is the reflex motion about the system's barycentre due to the gravitational influence of one or more additional bodies. We analyse 5032 eclipsing contact (EC) and eclipsing detached (ED) binaries from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue to detect variations in the times of eclipses which possibly can be due to the LTE effect. To this end we use an approach known from the radio pulsar timing where a template radio pulse of a pulsar is used as a reference to measure the times of arrivals of the collected pulses. In our analysis, as a template for a photometric time series from the ASAS, we use a best-fitting trigonometric series representing the light curve of a given EC or ED. Subsequently, an observed minus calculated (O-C) diagram is built by comparing the template light curve with light curves obtained from subsets of a given time series. Most of the variations we detect in O-C diagrams correspond to a linear period change. Three of the O-C diagrams show evidence of more than one complete LTE orbit. For these objects we obtain preliminary orbital solutions. Our results demonstrate that the timing analysis employed in radio pulsar timing can be effectively used to study large data sets from photometric surveys.

  9. Millisecond radio pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Van Paradijs, Jan

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the number of millisecond radio pulsars, in globular clusters, should be larger than 100, applying the standard scenario that all the pulsars descend from low-mass X-ray binaries. Moreover, most of the pulsars are located in a small number of clusters. The prediction that Teran 5 and Liller 1 contain at least about a dozen millisecond radio pulsars each is made. The observations of millisecond radio pulsars in globular clusters to date, in particular the discovery of two millisecond radio pulsars in 47 Tuc, are in agreement with the standard scenario, in which the neutron star is spun up during the mass transfer phase.

  10. X-ray and γ-ray studies of the millisecond pulsar and possible X-ray binary/radio pulsar transition object PSR J1723-2837

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Esposito, Paolo; Crawford III, Fronefield; Possenti, Andrea; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Freire, Paulo

    2014-01-20

    We present X-ray observations of the 'redback' eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ∼2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar MSP binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and γ-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a γ-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at its position a definitive association cannot be established. No statistically significant pulsations or modulation at the orbital period are detected. For a presumed detection, the implied γ-ray luminosity is ≲5% of its spin-down power. This indicates that PSR J1723-2837 is either one of the least efficient γ-ray producing MSPs or, if the detection is spurious, the γ-ray emission pattern is not directed toward us.

  11. LMXB AND IMXB EVOLUTION: I. THE BINARY RADIO PULSAR PSR J1614-2230

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Jinrong; Rappaport, S.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Nelson, L.; Paxton, B.; Todorov, P. E-mail: podsi@astro.ox.ac.uk E-mail: paxton@kitp.ucsb.edu

    2011-05-10

    We have computed an extensive grid of binary evolution tracks to represent low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs and IMXBs). The grid includes 42,000 models which cover 60 initial donor masses over the range of 1-4 M{sub sun} and, for each of these, 700 initial orbital periods over the range of 10-250 hr. These results can be applied to understanding LMXBs and IMXBs: those that evolve analogously to cataclysmic variables, that form ultracompact binaries with P{sub orb} in the range of 6-50 minutes, and that lead to wide orbits with giant donors. We also investigate the relic binary recycled radio pulsars into which these systems evolve. To evolve the donor stars in this study, we utilized a newly developed stellar evolution code called 'MESA' that was designed, among other things, to be able to handle very low mass and degenerate donors. This first application of the results is aimed at an understanding of the newly discovered pulsar PSR J1614-2230 which has a 1.97 M{sub sun} neutron star, P{sub orb} = 8.7 days, and a companion star of 0.5 M{sub sun}. We show that (1) this system is a cousin to the LMXB Cyg X-2; (2) for neutron stars of canonical birth mass 1.4 M{sub sun}, the initial donor stars which produce the closest relatives to PSR J1614-2230 have a mass between 3.4 and 3.8 M{sub sun}; (3) neutron stars as massive as 1.97 M{sub sun} are not easy to produce in spite of the initially high mass of the donor star, unless they were already born as relatively massive neutron stars; (4) to successfully produce a system like PSR J1614-2230 requires a minimum initial neutron-star mass of at least 1.6 {+-} 0.1 M{sub sun}, as well as initial donor masses and P{sub orb} of {approx}4.25 {+-} 0.10 M{sub sun} and {approx}49 {+-} 2 hr, respectively; and (5) the current companion star is largely composed of CO, but should have a surface H abundance of {approx}10%-15%.

  12. The Quasi-Roche Lobe Overflow State in the Evolution of Close Binary Systems Containing a Radio Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of close binary systems formed by a normal (solar composition), intermediate-mass-donor star together with a neutron star. We consider models including irradiation feedback and evaporation. These nonstandard ingredients deeply modify the mass-transfer stages of these binaries. While models that neglect irradiation feedback undergo continuous, long-standing mass-transfer episodes, models including these effects suffer a number of cycles of mass transfer and detachment. During mass transfer, the systems should reveal themselves as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whereas when they are detached they behave as binary radio pulsars. We show that at these stages irradiated models are in a Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) state or in a quasi-RLOF state. Quasi-RLOF stars have radii slightly smaller than their Roche lobes. Remarkably, these conditions are attained for an orbital period as well as donor mass values in the range corresponding to a family of binary radio pulsars known as "redbacks." Thus, redback companions should be quasi-RLOF stars. We show that the characteristics of the redback system PSR J1723-2837 are accounted for by these models. In each mass-transfer cycle these systems should switch from LMXB to binary radio pulsar states with a timescale of approximately one million years. However, there is recent and fast growing evidence of systems switching on far shorter, human timescales. This should be related to instabilities in the accretion disk surrounding the neutron star and/or radio ejection, still to be included in the model having the quasi-RLOF state as a general condition.

  13. THE QUASI-ROCHE LOBE OVERFLOW STATE IN THE EVOLUTION OF CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS CONTAINING A RADIO PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of close binary systems formed by a normal (solar composition), intermediate-mass-donor star together with a neutron star. We consider models including irradiation feedback and evaporation. These nonstandard ingredients deeply modify the mass-transfer stages of these binaries. While models that neglect irradiation feedback undergo continuous, long-standing mass-transfer episodes, models including these effects suffer a number of cycles of mass transfer and detachment. During mass transfer, the systems should reveal themselves as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whereas when they are detached they behave as binary radio pulsars. We show that at these stages irradiated models are in a Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) state or in a quasi-RLOF state. Quasi-RLOF stars have radii slightly smaller than their Roche lobes. Remarkably, these conditions are attained for an orbital period as well as donor mass values in the range corresponding to a family of binary radio pulsars known as ''redbacks''. Thus, redback companions should be quasi-RLOF stars. We show that the characteristics of the redback system PSR J1723-2837 are accounted for by these models. In each mass-transfer cycle these systems should switch from LMXB to binary radio pulsar states with a timescale of approximately one million years. However, there is recent and fast growing evidence of systems switching on far shorter, human timescales. This should be related to instabilities in the accretion disk surrounding the neutron star and/or radio ejection, still to be included in the model having the quasi-RLOF state as a general condition.

  14. Radio efficiency of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ren-Xin E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-03-20

    We investigate radio emission efficiency, ξ, of pulsars and report a near-linear inverse correlation between ξ and the spin-down power, E-dot , as well as a near-linear correlation between ξ and pulsar age, τ. This is a consequence of very weak, if any, dependences of radio luminosity, L, on pulsar period, P, and the period derivative, P-dot , in contrast to X-ray or γ-ray emission luminosities. The analysis of radio fluxes suggests that these correlations are not due to a selection effect, but are intrinsic to the pulsar radio emission physics. We have found that, although with a large variance, the radio luminosity of pulsars is ≈10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1}, regardless of the position in the P-- P-dot diagram. Within such a picture, a model-independent statement can be made that the death line of radio pulsars corresponds to an upper limit in the efficiency of radio emission. If we introduce the maximum value for radio efficiency into the Monte Carlo-based population syntheses we can reproduce the observed sample using the random luminosity model. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on a synthetic flux distribution reveals a high probability of reproducing the observed distribution. Our results suggest that the plasma responsible for generating radio emission is produced under similar conditions regardless of pulsar age, dipolar magnetic field strength, and spin-down rate. The magnetic fields near the pulsar surface are likely dominated by crust-anchored, magnetic anomalies, which do not significantly differ among pulsars, leading to similar conditions for generating electron-positron pairs necessary to power radio emission.

  15. A RADIO PULSAR SEARCH OF THE {gamma}-RAY BINARIES LS I +61 303 AND LS 5039

    SciTech Connect

    Virginia McSwain, M.; Ray, Paul S.; Ransom, Scott M.; Roberts, Mallory S. E.; Dougherty, Sean M.; Pooley, Guy G. E-mail: paul.ray@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: malloryr@gmail.com E-mail: guy@mrao.cam.ac.uk

    2011-09-01

    LS I +61 303 and LS 5039 are exceptionally rare examples of high-mass X-ray binaries with MeV-TeV emission, making them two of only five known '{gamma}-ray binaries'. There has been disagreement within the literature over whether these systems are microquasars, with stellar winds accreting onto a compact object to produce high energy emission and relativistic jets, or whether their emission properties might be better explained by a relativistic pulsar wind colliding with the stellar wind. Here we present an attempt to detect radio pulsars in both systems with the Green Bank Telescope. The upper limits of flux density are between 4.1 and 14.5 {mu}Jy, and we discuss the null results of the search. Our spherically symmetric model of the wind of LS 5039 demonstrates that any pulsar emission will be strongly absorbed by the dense wind unless there is an evacuated region formed by a relativistic colliding wind shock. LS I +61 303 contains a rapidly rotating Be star whose wind is concentrated near the stellar equator. As long as the pulsar is not eclipsed by the circumstellar disk or viewed through the densest wind regions, detecting pulsed emission may be possible during part of the orbit.

  16. SDSS J102347.6+003841: A MILLISECOND RADIO PULSAR BINARY THAT HAD A HOT DISK DURING 2000-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhongxiang; Archibald, Anne M.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Thorstensen, John R.; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Stairs, Ingrid; Ransom, Scott M.

    2009-10-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) source J102347.6+003841 was recently revealed to be a binary 1.69 ms radio pulsar with a 4.75 hr orbital period and a approx0.2 M {sub sun} companion. Here, we analyze the SDSS spectrum of the source in detail. The spectrum was taken on 2001 February 1, when the source was in a bright state and showed broad, double-peaked hydrogen and helium lines-dramatically different from the G-type absorption spectrum seen from 2002 May onward. The lines are consistent with emission from a disk around the compact primary. We derive properties of the disk by fitting the SDSS continuum with a simple disk model, and find a temperature range of 2000-34,000 K from the outer to inner edge of the disk. The disk inner and outer radii were approximately 10{sup 9} and 5.7x10{sup 10} cm, respectively. These results further emphasize the unique feature of the source: it is a system likely at the end of its transition from an X-ray binary to a recycled radio pulsar. The disk mass is estimated to have been approx10{sup 23} g, most of which would have been lost due to pulsar wind ablation (or due to the propeller effect if the disk had extended inside the light cylinder of the pulsar) before the final disk disruption event. The system could undergo repeated episodes of disk formation. Close monitoring of the source is needed to catch the system in its bright state again, so that this unusual example of a pulsar-disk interaction can be studied in much finer detail.

  17. Acceleration by pulsar winds in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Gaisser, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    In the absence of accretion torques, a pulsar in a binary system will spin down due to electromagnetic dipole radiation and the spin-down power will drive a wind of relativistic electron-positron pairs. Winds from pulsars with short periods will prevent any subsequent accretion but may be confined by the companion star atmosphere, wind, or magnetosphere to form a standing shock. The authors investigate the possibility of particle acceleration at such a pulsar wind shock and the production of very high energy (VHE) and ultra high energy (UHE) gamma rays from interactions of accelerated protons in the companion star's wind or atmosphere. They find that in close binaries containing active pulsars, protons will be shock accelerated to a maximum energy dependent on the pulsar spin-down luminosity. If a significant fraction of the spin-down power goes into particle acceleration, these systems should be sources of VHE and possibly UHE gamma rays. The authors discuss the application of the pulsar wind model to binary sources such as Cygnus X-3, as well as the possibility of observing VHE gamma-rays from known binary radio pulsar systems.

  18. Acceleration by pulsar winds in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Gaisser, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    In the absence of accretion torques, a pulsar in a binary system will spin down due to electromagnetic dipole radiation, and the spin-down power will drive a wind of relativistic electron-position pairs. Winds from pulsars with short periods will prevent any subsequent accretion but may be confined by the companion star atmosphere, wind, or magnetosphere to form a standing shock. This paper investigates the possibility of particle acceleration at such a pulsar wind shock and the production of VHE and UHE gamma-rays from interactions of accelerated protons in the companion star's wind or atmosphere. It is found that, in close binaries containing active pulsars, protons will be shock accelerated to a maximum energy dependent on the pulsar spin-down luminosity. If a significant fraction of the spin-down power goes into particle acceleration, these systems should be sources of VHE and possibly UHE gamma-rays. The application of the pulsar wind model to binary sources such as Cygnus X-3 is discussed, as well as the possibility of observing VHE gamma-rays from known binary radio pulsar systems.

  19. A Search for Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, Ronald Winston

    1996-01-01

    We have built a data acquisition backend for radio pulsar search observations carried out at the NRAO 140 -foot telescope in Green Bank, West Virginia. Our system sampled 512 spectral channels over 40 MHz every 256 mus, reduced samples to one-bit precision, and wrote the resulting data stream onto magnetic tape for later, off-line processing. We have completed three surveys with this backend. In the first survey, we searched most of the Northern Hemisphere for millisecond radio pulsars. Previous surveys directed towards most of the region covered had not been as sensitive to pulsars with millisecond periods. We obtained high quality data for 15,876 deg^2 of sky. Eight new pulsars were discovered and 76 previously known pulsars were detected. Two of the eight new pulsars (PSR J1022+1001 and PSR J1518+4904) are millisecond pulsars in binary systems. PSR J1518+4904 is a 41 ms radio pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.25) 8.6 day orbit with another stellar object, probably another neutron star. It is only the fifth double neutron star system known. The system's relativistic advance of periastron has been measured to be ˙omega = 0.0112 +/- 0.0002 ^circ yr^{-1}, implying that the total mass of the pair of stars is 2.65 +/-0.07Modot. We have searched for radio pulsar companions to 40 nearby OB runaway stars. No pulsar companions to OB runaways were discovered. One previously unknown pulsar, PSR J2044+4614, was discovered while observing towards target O star BD+45,3260. However, follow-up timing observations reveal that the pulsar is not associated with the target O star. Assuming standard models for the pulsar beaming fraction and luminosity function, we conclude that most OB runaways do not have pulsar companions. We have completed a survey for pulsed radio signals towards 27 gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. No new pulsars were discovered.

  20. A radio pulsar spinning at 716 Hz.

    PubMed

    Hessels, Jason W T; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Freire, Paulo C C; Kaspi, Victoria M; Camilo, Fernando

    2006-03-31

    We have discovered a 716-hertz eclipsing binary radio pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5 using the Green Bank Telescope. It is the fastest spinning neutron star found to date, breaking the 24-year record held by the 642-hertz pulsar B1937+21. The difficulty in detecting this pulsar, because of its very low flux density and high eclipse fraction (approximately 40% of the orbit), suggests that even faster spinning neutron stars exist. If the pulsar has a mass less than twice the mass of the Sun, then its radius must be constrained by the spin rate to be <16 kilometers. The short period of this pulsar also constrains models that suggest that gravitational radiation, through an r-mode (Rossby wave) instability, limits the maximum spin frequency of neutron stars. PMID:16410486

  1. Gravitational Radiation from Compact Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, John

    An outstanding question in modern Physics is whether general relativity (GR) is a complete description of gravity among bodies at macroscopic scales. Currently, the best experiments supporting this hypothesis are based on high-precision timing of radio pulsars. This chapter reviews recent advances in the field with a focus on compact binary millisecond pulsars with white-dwarf (WD) companions. These systems—if modeled properly—provide an unparalleled test ground for physically motivated alternatives to GR that deviate significantly in the strong-field regime. Recent improvements in observational techniques and advances in our understanding of WD interiors have allowed for a series of precise mass measurements is such systems. These masses, combined with high-precision radio timing of the pulsars, result to stringent constraints on the radiative properties of gravity, qualitatively very different from what was available in the past.

  2. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  3. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Chernoff, D. F.; Cordes, J. M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars based on large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys. We do so by modelling evolution of the locations, velocities, spins, and radio luminosities of pulsars; calculating pulsed flux according to a beaming model and random orientation angles of spin and beam; applying selection effects of pulsar surveys; and comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. The surveys analyzed have well-defined characteristics and cover approx. 95% of the sky. We maximize the likelihood in a 6-dimensional space of observables P, dot-P, DM, absolute value of b, mu, F (period, period derivative, dispersion measure, Galactic latitude, proper motion, and flux density). The models we test are described by 12 parameters that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as E(exp 1/2) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/ s and 500 km/ s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution; this preference is largely immune to variations in other population parameters, such as the luminosity or distance scale, or the assumed spin-down law. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (1) roughly 50% of pulsars in the solar neighborhood will escape the Galaxy, while approx. 15% have velocities greater than 1000 km/ s (2) observational bias against high velocity pulsars is relatively unimportant for surveys that reach high Galactic absolute value of z distances, but is severe for

  4. Pulsars in binary systems: probing binary stellar evolution and general relativity.

    PubMed

    Stairs, Ingrid H

    2004-04-23

    Radio pulsars in binary orbits often have short millisecond spin periods as a result of mass transfer from their companion stars. They therefore act as very precise, stable, moving clocks that allow us to investigate a large set of otherwise inaccessible astrophysical problems. The orbital parameters derived from high-precision binary pulsar timing provide constraints on binary evolution, characteristics of the binary pulsar population, and the masses of neutron stars with different mass-transfer histories. These binary systems also test gravitational theories, setting strong limits on deviations from general relativity. Surveys for new pulsars yield new binary systems that increase our understanding of all these fields and may open up whole new areas of physics, as most spectacularly evidenced by the recent discovery of an extremely relativistic double-pulsar system. PMID:15105492

  5. Discovery of a 1.69 ms radio pulsar associated with the X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Roy, Jayanta; Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Deneva, Julia S.; Camilo, Fernando M.

    2014-08-01

    XSS J12270-4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9-4852 (Hill et al. 2011). In 2012 December, the source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped suddenly and spectral signatures of an accretion disk disappeared (Bassa et al. 2014). We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar associated with this source using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 607 MHz, confirming that this system now contains an active radio millisecond pulsar. We report on radio timing observations of the source with the GMRT and the Parkes Telescope that allow determination of the orbital parameters and eclipse behavior as a function of frequency. We also describe searches for gamma-ray pulsations from the newly-visible pulsar.We thank the staff of the GMRT who have made these observations possible. GMRT is run by the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research. The Fermi LAT Collaboration acknowledges support from a number of agencies and institutes for both development and the operation of the LAT as well as scientific data analysis. These include NASA and DOE in the United States, CEA/Irfu and IN2P3/CNRS in France, ASI and INFN in Italy, MEXT, KEK, and JAXA in Japan, and the K. A. Wallenberg Foundation, the Swedish Research Council and the National Space Board in Sweden. Additional support from INAF in Italy and CNES in France for science analysis during the operations phase is also gratefully acknowledged.

  6. An eccentric binary millisecond pulsar in the galactic plane.

    PubMed

    Champion, David J; Ransom, Scott M; Lazarus, Patrick; Camilo, Fernando; Bassa, Cees; Kaspi, Victoria M; Nice, David J; Freire, Paulo C C; Stairs, Ingrid H; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Stappers, Ben W; Cordes, James M; Hessels, Jason W T; Lorimer, Duncan R; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Backer, Don C; Bhat, N D Ramesh; Chatterjee, Shami; Cognard, Ismaël; Deneva, Julia S; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Gaensler, Bryan M; Han, Jinlin; Jenet, Fredrick A; Kasian, Laura; Kondratiev, Vlad I; Kramer, Michael; Lazio, Joseph; McLaughlin, Maura A; Venkataraman, Arun; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2008-06-01

    Binary pulsar systems are superb probes of stellar and binary evolution and the physics of extreme environments. In a survey with the Arecibo telescope, we have found PSR J1903+0327, a radio pulsar with a rotational period of 2.15 milliseconds in a highly eccentric (e = 0.44) 95-day orbit around a solar mass (M(middle dot in circle)) companion. Infrared observations identify a possible main-sequence companion star. Conventional binary stellar evolution models predict neither large orbital eccentricities nor main-sequence companions around millisecond pulsars. Alternative formation scenarios involve recycling a neutron star in a globular cluster, then ejecting it into the Galactic disk, or membership in a hierarchical triple system. A relativistic analysis of timing observations of the pulsar finds its mass to be 1.74 +/- 0.04 M solar symbol, an unusually high value. PMID:18483399

  7. An Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in the Galactic Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champion, David J.; Ransom, Scott M.; Lazarus, Patrick; Camilo, Fernando; Bassa, Cess; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Nice, David J.; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; vanLeeuwen, Joeri; Stappers, Ben W.; Cordes, James M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Backer, Don C.; Bhat, N. D. Ramesh; Chatterjee, Shami; Cognard, Ismael; Deneva, Julia S.; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Han, JinLin; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Kasian, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Binary pulsar systems are superb probes of stellar and binary evolution and the physics of extreme environments. In a survey with the Arecibo telescope, we have found PSR J1903+0327, a radio pulsar with a rotational period of 2.15 milliseconds in a highly eccentric (e = 0.44) 95-day orbit around a solar mass (M.) companion. Infrared observations identify a possible main-sequence companion star. Conventional binary stellar evolution models predict neither large orbital eccentricities nor main-sequence companions around millisecond pulsars. Alternative formation scenarios involve recycling a neutron star in a globular cluster, then ejecting it into the Galactic disk, or membership in a hierarchical triple system. A relativistic analysis of timing observations of the pulsar finds its mass to be 1.74 +/- 0.04 Solar Mass, an unusually high value.

  8. Wideband Observations of Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.

    2015-08-01

    Pulsars are exotic objects which have yielded a bounty of important astrophysical results. As rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars, pulsars' stable rotation and beamed radio emission enables their use as interstellar laboratory clocks. The extraordinary timing regularity of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) population permits some of the most precise measurements in astronomy. The discovery of MSPs raised the probability of directly detecting gravitational waves for the first time. Ongoing efforts by several pulsar timing array (PTA) collaborations compliment the ground- and space-based efforts of laser interferometers. One such PTA is the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav). NANOGrav has recently employed a new set of wideband instruments to increase the sensitivity of their PTA, and the future of pulsar astronomy is moving towards progressively larger bandwidths. In this dissertation, we address the benefits and issues from adopting the new instrumentation, particularly for the scientific motivations of NANOGrav. We first develop a measurement technique for simultaneously obtaining pulse times-of-arrival (TOAs) and dispersion measures (DMs) using 2D models of evolving Gaussian components. We then apply the methodology broadly to a variety of pulsars, including a bright, test MSP in a globular cluster, the Galactic Center magnetar, and the entire suite of 37 MSPs from the NANOGrav 9-year data set. For a subset of these MSPs, we make targeted observations at specific orbital phases aimed at improving the timing models and constraining the Shapiro delay. With a few exceptions, we find positive or consistent timing results from the implementation of our first generation wideband timing protocol. Some highlights include: improved measurement uncertainties, mitigation of chromatic ISM effects, a reduction in the number of timing parameters and TOAs, signs of chromatic DMs, and at least one new pulsar mass.

  9. Pulsar searches: From radio to gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Adam M.

    2003-08-01

    We report the results of four different pulsar searches, covering radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths. These searches targeted pulsars in virtually all of their guises: young and old, long-period and short-period, accretion-powered and rotation-powered. Ten new pulsars were discovered. There are very few known gamma-ray pulsars, all of which were found by folding gamma-ray data with a pulse period known from other wavelengths. Some emission models indicate that there may be a large number of gamma-ray pulsars that are undetectable at lower energies. We searched several of the brightest unidentified gamma-ray sources for pulsations. This was the first attempt to identify gamma-ray pulsars by directly searching gamma- ray data. No new identifications resulted; we report upper limits. Even more rare than gamma-ray pulsars are accreting millisecond pulsars. We searched for coherent pulsations from Aql X-1, a low-mass X-ray binary suspected of harboring such an object. No pulsations were detected, and we argue that the quiescent emission of this system has a thermal origin. The two radio searches included here were both designed to detect millisecond pulsars. First, we report the results of a large area survey from Arecibo. Five new slow pulsars were discovered, including an apparent orthogonal rotator and an extremely unusual bursting radio pulsar. No short-period pulsars were discovered and we place some of the first useful observational constraints on the limiting spin period of a neutron star. We also performed pointed searches of several globular clusters using the new Green Bank Telescope. Three new binary millisecond pulsars were found in M62. These were the first new objects found with the GBT, and they bring the total pulsar population in M62 to six. We also discovered two isolated pulsars, one each in NGC 6544 and NGC 6624. Many of the methods we developed will be relevant to future searches. Perhaps the most significant contribution is a dynamic power

  10. The Role of Binary Pulsars in Testing Gravity Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possenti, Andrea; Burgay, Marta

    Radio pulsars are neutron stars (NSs) which emit collimated beams of radio waves, observed as pulses, once per rotation of the NS. A subgroup of the radio pulsars behave as highly stable clocks and monitoring the times of arrival of their radio pulses can provide an accurate determination of their positional, rotational, and orbital parameters, as well as indications on the properties of their space-time environment. In this chapter, we focus on the so-called relativistic binary pulsars, recycled NSs orbiting around a compact companion star. Some of them can be used as unique tools to test general relativity and other gravitational theories. The methodology for exploiting these sources as laboratories for gravity theories is first explained and then some of the most relevant recent results are reviewed.

  11. Binary millisecond pulsar discovery via gamma-ray pulsations.

    PubMed

    Pletsch, H J; Guillemot, L; Fehrmann, H; Allen, B; Kramer, M; Aulbert, C; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; de Angelis, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Çelik, Ö; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; den Hartog, P R; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hill, A B; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Johnson, A S; Johnson, W N; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Massaro, F; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; de Palma, F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Romoli, C; Sanchez, D A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; do Couto e Silva, E; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2012-12-01

    Millisecond pulsars, old neutron stars spun up by accreting matter from a companion star, can reach high rotation rates of hundreds of revolutions per second. Until now, all such "recycled" rotation-powered pulsars have been detected by their spin-modulated radio emission. In a computing-intensive blind search of gamma-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (with partial constraints from optical data), we detected a 2.5-millisecond pulsar, PSR J1311-3430. This unambiguously explains a formerly unidentified gamma-ray source that had been a decade-long enigma, confirming previous conjectures. The pulsar is in a circular orbit with an orbital period of only 93 minutes, the shortest of any spin-powered pulsar binary ever found. PMID:23112297

  12. Pulsar Observations with Radio Telescope FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Wang, Qi-Ming; Zhu, Li-Chun; Zhu, Wen-Bai; Jin, Cheng-Jin; Gan, Heng-Qian

    2006-12-01

    FAST, Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, is the Chinese effort for the international project SKA, Square Kilometer Array. An innovative engineering concept and design pave a new road to realizing huge single dish in the most effective way. Three outstanding features of the telescope are the unique karst depressions as the sites, the active main reflector which corrects spherical aberration on the ground to achieve full polarization and wide band without involving complex feed system, and the light focus cabin driven by cables and servomechanism plus a parallel robot as secondary adjustable system to carry the most precise parts of the receivers. Besides a general coverage of those critical technologies involved in FAST concept, the progresses in demonstrating model being constructed at the Miyun Radio Observatory of the NAOC is introduced. Being the most sensitive radio telescope, FAST will enable astronomers to jumpstart many of science goals, for example, the natural hydrogen line surveying in distant galaxies, looking for the first generation of shining objects, hearing the possible signal from other civilizations, etc. Among these subjects, the most striking one could be pulsar study. Large scale survey by FAST will not only improve the statistics of the pulsar population, but also may offer us a good fortune to pick up more of the most exotic, even unknown types like a sub-millisecond pulsar or a neutron star -- black hole binary as the telescope is put into operation.

  13. The Binary Pulsar: Gravity Waves Exist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the history of pulsars generally and the 1974 discovery of the binary pulsar by Joe Taylor and Russell Hulse specifically. Details the data collection and analysis used by Taylor and Hulse. Uses this discussion as support for Albert Einstein's theory of gravitational waves. (CW)

  14. Spin-down of radio millisecond pulsars at genesis.

    PubMed

    Tauris, Thomas M

    2012-02-01

    Millisecond pulsars are old neutron stars that have been spun up to high rotational frequencies via accretion of mass from a binary companion star. An important issue for understanding the physics of the early spin evolution of millisecond pulsars is the impact of the expanding magnetosphere during the terminal stages of the mass-transfer process. Here, I report binary stellar evolution calculations that show that the braking torque acting on a neutron star, when the companion star decouples from its Roche lobe, is able to dissipate >50% of the rotational energy of the pulsar. This effect may explain the apparent difference in observed spin distributions between x-ray and radio millisecond pulsars and help account for the noticeable age discrepancy with their young white dwarf companions. PMID:22301314

  15. Pulsar-black hole binaries in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Loeb, Abraham

    2011-08-01

    Binaries consisting of a pulsar and a black hole (BH) are a holy grail of astrophysics, both for their significance for stellar evolution and for their potential application as probes of strong gravity. In spite of extensive surveys of our Galaxy and its system of globular clusters, no pulsar-black hole (PSR-BH) binary has been found to date. Clues as to where such systems might exist are therefore important. We show that if the central parsec around Sgr A★ harbours a cluster of ˜25 000 stellar BHs (as predicted by mass-segregation arguments) and if it is also rich in recycled pulsar binaries (by analogy with globular clusters), then three-body exchange interactions should produce PSR-BHs in the Galactic Centre. Simple estimates of the formation rate and survival time of these binaries suggest that a few PSR-BHs should be present in the central parsec today. The proposed formation mechanism makes unique predictions for the PSR-BH properties: (1) the binary would reside within ˜1 pc of Sgr A★; (2) the pulsar would be recycled, with a period of ˜1 to a few tens of milliseconds, and a low magnetic field B≲ 1010 G; (3) the binary would have high eccentricity, e˜ 0.8, but with a large scatter and (4) the binary would be relatively wide, with semimajor axis ab˜ 0.1 -≳3 au. The potential discovery of a PSR-BH binary therefore provides a strong motivation for deep, high-frequency radio searches for recycled pulsars towards the Galactic Centre.

  16. Formation of Short-Period Binary Pulsars in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Rasio; Pfahl; Rappaport

    2000-03-20

    We present a new dynamical scenario for the formation of short-period binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters. Our work is motivated by the recent observations of 20 radio pulsars in 47 Tuc. In a dense cluster such as 47 Tuc, most neutron stars acquire binary companions through exchange interactions with primordial binaries. The resulting systems have semimajor axes in the range approximately 0.1-1 AU and neutron star companion masses approximately 1-3 M middle dot in circle. For many of these systems, we find that when the companion evolves off the main sequence and fills its Roche lobe, the subsequent mass transfer is dynamically unstable. This leads to a common envelope phase and the formation of short-period neutron star-white dwarf binaries. For a significant fraction of these binaries, the decay of the orbit due to gravitational radiation will be followed by a period of stable mass transfer driven by a combination of gravitational radiation and tidal heating of the companion. The properties of the resulting short-period binaries match well those of observed binary pulsars in 47 Tuc. PMID:10702129

  17. A millisecond pulsar in an extremely wide binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Tauris, T. M.; Wevers, T.; Jonker, P. G.; Lentati, L.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Desvignes, G.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Cognard, I.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K. J.; Liu, K.; Lyne, A. G.; McKee, J.; Osłowski, S.; Perrodin, D.; Sanidas, S.; Shaifullah, G.; Smits, R.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on 22 yrs of radio timing observations of the millisecond pulsar J1024$-$0719 by the telescopes participating in the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). These observations reveal a significant second derivative of the pulsar spin frequency and confirm the discrepancy between the parallax and Shklovskii distances that has been reported earlier. We also present optical astrometry, photometry and spectroscopy of 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190. We find that it is a low-metallicity main-sequence star (K7V spectral type, $\\mathrm{[M/H]}=-1.0$, $T_\\mathrm{eff}=4050\\pm50$ K) and that its position, proper motion and distance are consistent with those of PSR J1024$-$0719. We conclude that PSR J1024$-$0719 and 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190 form a common proper motion pair and are gravitationally bound. The gravitational interaction between the main-sequence star and the pulsar accounts for the spin frequency derivatives, which in turn resolves the distance discrepancy. Our observations suggest that the pulsar and main-sequence star are in an extremely wide ($P_\\mathrm{b}>200$ yr) orbit. Combining the radial velocity of the companion and proper motion of the pulsar, we find that the binary system has a high spatial velocity of $384\\pm45$ km s$^{-1}$ with respect to the local standard of rest and has a Galactic orbit consistent with halo objects. Since the observed main-sequence companion star cannot have recycled the pulsar to millisecond spin periods, an exotic formation scenario is required. We demonstrate that this extremely wide-orbit binary could have evolved from a triple system that underwent an asymmetric supernova explosion, though find that significant fine-tuning during the explosion is required. Finally, we discuss the implications of the long period orbit on the timing stability of PSR J1024$-$0719 in light of its inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.

  18. A millisecond pulsar in an extremely wide binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Tauris, T. M.; Wevers, T.; Jonker, P. G.; Lentati, L.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Desvignes, G.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Cognard, I.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K. J.; Liu, K.; Lyne, A. G.; McKee, J.; Osłowski, S.; Perrodin, D.; Sanidas, S.; Shaifullah, G.; Smits, R.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on 22 yr of radio timing observations of the millisecond pulsar J1024-0719 by the telescopes participating in the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). These observations reveal a significant second derivative of the pulsar spin frequency and confirm the discrepancy between the parallax and Shklovskii distances that has been reported earlier. We also present optical astrometry, photometry and spectroscopy of 2MASS J10243869-0719190. We find that it is a low-metallicity main-sequence star (K7V spectral type, [M/H] = -1.0, Teff = 4050 ± 50 K) and that its position, proper motion and distance are consistent with those of PSR J1024-0719. We conclude that PSR J1024-0719 and 2MASS J10243869-0719190 form a common proper motion pair and are gravitationally bound. The gravitational interaction between the main-sequence star and the pulsar accounts for the spin frequency derivatives, which in turn resolves the distance discrepancy. Our observations suggest that the pulsar and main-sequence star are in an extremely wide (Pb > 200 yr) orbit. Combining the radial velocity of the companion and proper motion of the pulsar, we find that the binary system has a high spatial velocity of 384 ± 45 km s-1 with respect to the local standard of rest and has a Galactic orbit consistent with halo objects. Since the observed main-sequence companion star cannot have recycled the pulsar to millisecond spin periods, an exotic formation scenario is required. We demonstrate that this extremely wide-orbit binary could have evolved from a triple system that underwent an asymmetric supernova explosion, though find that significant fine-tuning during the explosion is required. Finally, we discuss the implications of the long period orbit on the timing stability of PSR J1024-0719 in light of its inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.

  19. Radio polarimetry of Galactic Centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre (GC), we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 and 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  20. Radio polarimetry of Galactic centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic centre (GC) we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 - 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜ 12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳ 100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  1. Microarcsecond VLBI Pulsar Astrometry with PSRπ. I. Two Binary Millisecond Pulsars with White Dwarf Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A. T.; Vigeland, S. J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Goss, W. M.; Brisken, W. F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Janssen, G. H.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Petrov, L.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A.

    2016-09-01

    Model-independent distance constraints to binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are of great value to both the timing observations of the radio pulsars and multiwavelength observations of their companion stars. Astrometry using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) can be employed to provide these model-independent distances with very high precision via the detection of annual geometric parallax. Using the Very Long Baseline Array, we have observed two binary MSPs, PSR J1022+1001 and J2145–0750, over a two-year period and measured their distances to be {700}-10+14 pc and {613}-14+16 pc respectively. We use the well-calibrated distance in conjunction with revised analysis of optical photometry to tightly constrain the nature of their massive (M˜ 0.85 {M}ȯ ) white dwarf companions. Finally, we show that several measurements of the parallax and proper motion of PSR J1022+1001 and PSR J2145–0750 obtained by pulsar timing array projects are incorrect, differing from the more precise VLBI values by up to 5σ. We investigate possible causes for the discrepancy, and find that imperfect modeling of the solar wind is a likely candidate for the errors in the timing model given the low ecliptic latitude of these two pulsars.

  2. Microarcsecond VLBI Pulsar Astrometry with PSRπ. I. Two Binary Millisecond Pulsars with White Dwarf Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A. T.; Vigeland, S. J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Goss, W. M.; Brisken, W. F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Janssen, G. H.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Petrov, L.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A.

    2016-09-01

    Model-independent distance constraints to binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are of great value to both the timing observations of the radio pulsars and multiwavelength observations of their companion stars. Astrometry using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) can be employed to provide these model-independent distances with very high precision via the detection of annual geometric parallax. Using the Very Long Baseline Array, we have observed two binary MSPs, PSR J1022+1001 and J2145–0750, over a two-year period and measured their distances to be {700}-10+14 pc and {613}-14+16 pc respectively. We use the well-calibrated distance in conjunction with revised analysis of optical photometry to tightly constrain the nature of their massive (M∼ 0.85 {M}ȯ ) white dwarf companions. Finally, we show that several measurements of the parallax and proper motion of PSR J1022+1001 and PSR J2145–0750 obtained by pulsar timing array projects are incorrect, differing from the more precise VLBI values by up to 5σ. We investigate possible causes for the discrepancy, and find that imperfect modeling of the solar wind is a likely candidate for the errors in the timing model given the low ecliptic latitude of these two pulsars.

  3. Constraining Binary Stellar Evolution With Pulsar Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdman, Robert D.; Stairs, I. H.; Backer, D. C.; Burgay, M.; Camilo, F.; D'Amico, N.; Demorest, P.; Faulkner, A.; Hobbs, G.; Kramer, M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Nice, D. J.; Possenti, A.

    2006-06-01

    The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has yielded a significant number of very interesting binary and millisecond pulsars. Two of these objects are part of an ongoing timing study at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). PSR J1756-2251 is a double-neutron star (DNS) binary system. It is similar to the original Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar system PSR B1913+16 in its orbital properties, thus providing another important opportunity to test the validity of General Relativity, as well as the evolutionary history of DNS systems through mass measurements. PSR J1802-2124 is part of the relatively new and unstudied "intermediate-mass" class of binary system, which typically have spin periods in the tens of milliseconds, and/or relatively massive (> 0.7 solar masses) white dwarf companions. With our GBT observations, we have detected the Shapiro delay in this system, allowing us to constrain the individual masses of the neutron star and white dwarf companion, and thus the mass-transfer history, in this unusual system.

  4. A fan beam model for radio pulsars. I. Observational evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. G.; Pi, F. P.; Deng, C. L.; Wen, S. Q.; Ye, F.; Guan, K.Y.; Liu, Y.; Xu, L. Q.; Zheng, X. P.

    2014-07-01

    We propose a novel beam model for radio pulsars based on the scenario that the broadband and coherent emission from secondary relativistic particles, as they move along a flux tube in a dipolar magnetic field, form a radially extended sub-beam with unique properties. The whole radio beam may consist of several sub-beams, forming a fan-shaped pattern. When only one or a few flux tubes are active, the fan beam becomes very patchy. This model differs essentially from the conal beam models with respect to the beam structure and predictions on the relationship between pulse width and impact angle β (the angle between the line of sight and the magnetic pole) and the relationship between emission intensity and beam angular radius. The evidence for this model comes from the observed patchy beams of precessional binary pulsars and three statistical relationships found for a sample of 64 pulsars, of which β were mostly constrained by fitting polarization position angle data with the rotation vector model. With appropriate assumptions, the fan beam model can reproduce the relationship between 10% peak pulse width and |β|, the anticorrelation between the emission intensity and |β|, and the upper boundary line in the scatter plot of |β| versus pulsar distance. An extremely patchy beam model with the assumption of narrowband emission from one or a few flux tubes is studied and found unlikely to be a general model. The implications of the fan beam model for the studies on radio and gamma-ray pulsar populations and radio polarization are discussed.

  5. High-Energy Emission at Shocks in Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kust Harding, Alice; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    A large number of new Black Widow (BW) and Redback (RB) energetic millisecond pulsars have been discovered through radio searches of unidentified Fermi sources, increasing the known number of these systems from 4 to 28. We model the high-energy emission components from particles accelerated to several TeV in intrabinary shocks in BW and RB systems, and their predicted modulation at the binary orbital period. Synchrotron emission is expected at X-ray energies and such modulated emission has already been detected by Chandra and XMM. Inverse Compton emission from accelerated particles scattering the UV emission from the radiated companion star is expected in the Fermi and TeV bands. Detections or constraints on this emission will probe the unknown physics of pulsar winds.

  6. PULSAR BINARY BIRTHRATES WITH SPIN-OPENING ANGLE CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Kim, Chunglee E-mail: ckim@astro.lu.s

    2010-05-20

    One ingredient in an empirical birthrate estimate for pulsar binaries is the fraction of sky subtended by the pulsar beam: the pulsar beaming fraction. This fraction depends on both the pulsar's opening angle and the misalignment angle between its spin and magnetic axes. The current estimates for pulsar binary birthrates are based on an average value of beaming fractions for only two pulsars, i.e., PSRs B1913+16 and B1534+12. In this paper, we revisit the observed pulsar binaries to examine the sensitivity of birthrate predictions to different assumptions regarding opening angle and alignment. Based on empirical estimates for the relative likelihood of different beam half-opening angles and misalignment angles between the pulsar rotation and magnetic axes, we calculate an effective beaming correction factor, f{sub b,eff}, whose reciprocal is equivalent to the average fraction of all randomly selected pulsars that point toward us. For those pulsars without any direct beam geometry constraints, we find that f{sub b,eff} is likely to be smaller than 6, a canonically adopted value when calculating birthrates of Galactic pulsar binaries. We calculate f{sub b,eff} for PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545, applying the currently available constraints for their beam geometry. As in previous estimates of the posterior probability density function P(R) for pulsar binary birthrates R, PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545 still significantly contribute to, if not dominate, the Galactic birthrate of tight pulsar-neutron star (NS) and pulsar-white dwarf (WD) binaries, respectively. Our median posterior present-day birthrate predictions for tight PSR-NS binaries, wide PSR-NS binaries, and tight PSR-WD binaries given a preferred pulsar population model and beaming geometry are 89 Myr{sup -1}, 0.5 Myr{sup -1}, and 34 Myr{sup -1}, respectively. For long-lived PSR-NS binaries, these estimates include a weak (x1.6) correction for slowly decaying star formation in the galactic disk. For pulsars

  7. High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sachindra

    2016-07-01

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) are interesting objects that provide a wide range of observational probes to the nature of the two stellar components, accretion process, stellar wind and orbital parameters of the systems. Most of the transient HMXBs are found to Be/X-ray binaries (~67%), consisting of a compact object (neutron star) in orbit around the companion Be star. The orbit of the compact object around the Be star is wide and highly eccentric. Be/X-ray binaries are generally quiescent in X-ray emission. The transient X-ray outbursts seen in these objects are known to be due to interaction between the compact object and the circumstellar disk surrounding the Be star. In the recent years, another class of transient HMXBs have been found which have supergiant companions and show shorter X-ray outbursts. X-ray, infrared and optical observations of these HMXBs provide vital information regarding these systems. The timing and broad-band X-ray spectral properties of a few HMXB pulsars, mainly Be/X-ray binary pulsars during regular X-ray outbursts will be discussed.

  8. A state change in the missing link binary pulsar system PSR J1023+0038

    SciTech Connect

    Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G.; Archibald, A. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Bogdanov, S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Patruno, A.; Tendulkar, S.; Hill, A. B.; Glanzman, T.

    2014-07-20

    We present radio and γ-ray observations, which, along with concurrent X-ray observations, reveal that the binary millisecond pulsar (MSP)/low-mass X-ray binary transition system PSR J1023+0038 has undergone a transformation in state. Whereas until recently the system harbored a bright millisecond radio pulsar, the radio pulsations at frequencies between 300 to 5000 MHz have now become undetectable. Concurrent with this radio disappearance, the γ-ray flux of the system has quintupled. We conclude that, though the radio pulsar is currently not detectable, the pulsar mechanism is still active and the pulsar wind, as well as a newly formed accretion disk, are together providing the necessary conditions to create the γ-ray increase. This system is the first example of a compact, low-mass binary which has shown significant state changes accompanied by large changes in γ-ray flux; it will continue to provide an exceptional test bed for better understanding the formation of MSPs as well as accretion onto neutron stars in general.

  9. What is causing the eclipse in the millisecond binary pulsar

    SciTech Connect

    Rasio, F.A.; Shapiro, S.L.; Teukolsky, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Possible physical mechanisms for explaining the radio eclipses in the millisecond binary pulsar PSR 1957 + 20 are discussed. If, as recent observations suggest, the duration of the eclipses depends on the observing frequency, a plausible mechanism is free-free absorption of the radio pulses by a low-density ionized wind surrounding the companion. Detailed numerical calculations are performed for this case, and it is found that all of the observations made at 430 MHz can be reliably reproduced, including the asymmetry in the excess time delay of the pulses. The model leads to definite predictions for the duration of the eclipse at other observing frequencies, as well as the radio intensity and excess time delay of the pulses as a function of orbital phase. If the duration of the eclipses were found to be independent of frequency, then the likely mechanism would be reflection of the radio signal at a contact discontinuity between a high-density wind and the pulsar radiation. In this case, however, it is difficult to explain the observed symmetry of the eclipse. 12 refs.

  10. Radio wave propagation in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. A.; Lyubarskii, Yu. E.

    Pulsar magnetospheres are known to contain an ultrarelativistic highly magnetized plasma which streams along the open magnetic lines. The radio emission observed from pulsars is believed to originate sufficiently deep in the open field line tube, so that the characteristics of outgoing waves can be influenced by propagation in the magnetospheric plasma. Refraction of radio waves in pulsar magnetospheres appears to be efficient. The effect not only influences the observed pulse width and its frequency dependency. It can alter the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region which can be derived from the observations of pulsar interstellar scintillations. Transverse ray separation versus pulse longitude calculated allowing for magnetospheric refraction appears to be in qualitative agreement with that observed. In particular, the nonmonotonic character of the curve can be attributed to nonmonotonic distribution of the plasma number density across the open field line tube which makes the rays emitted at different spatial locations deviate in the opposite directions. Proceeding from the frequency dependence of refraction some predictions are made about the frequency evolution of the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region. Magnetospheric refraction can also determine the profile shape giving rise to ray grouping into separate components. It will be demonstrated that the salient features of profile morphology can be explained within the frame of a primordial hollow-cone emission model taking into account refraction of rays in pulsar plasma. Then the frequency evolution of profile structure is naturally interpreted as a consequence of frequency dependence of refraction. As the waves propagate in the magnetospheric plasma their polarization also evolves essentially. In the vicinity of the emission region normal waves are linearly polarized and propagate independently, with the polarization plane following the orientation of the local magnetic field. As

  11. On the detectability of eccentric binary pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Manjari; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Wolfe, Spencer

    2013-06-01

    By generalizing earlier work of Johnston and Kulkarni, we present a detailed description of the reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio for observations of binary pulsars. We present analytical expressions, and provide software, to calculate the sensitivity reduction for orbits of arbitrary eccentricity. We find that this reduction can be quite significant, especially in the case of a massive companion like another neutron star or a black hole. On the other hand, the reduction is less for highly eccentric orbits. We also demonstrate that this loss of sensitivity can be recovered by employing `acceleration search' or `acceleration-jerk search' algorithms.

  12. Neutron star binaries, pulsars and burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.

    1981-01-01

    Unresolved issues involving neutron star binaries, pulsars, and burst sources are described. Attention is drawn to the types of observations most likely to resolve them. Many of these observations are likely to be carried out during the next decade by one or more missions that have been approved or proposed. Flux measurements with an imaging detector and broad-band spectroscopic studies in the energy range 30-150 keV are discussed. The need for soft X-ray and X-ray observations with an instrument which has arcminute angular resolution and an effective area substantially greater than of ROSAT or EXOSAT is also discussed.

  13. Transformation of a star into a planet in a millisecond pulsar binary.

    PubMed

    Bailes, M; Bates, S D; Bhalerao, V; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; D'Amico, N; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Kulkarni, S R; Levin, L; Lyne, A G; Milia, S; Possenti, A; Spitler, L; Stappers, B; van Straten, W

    2011-09-23

    Millisecond pulsars are thought to be neutron stars that have been spun-up by accretion of matter from a binary companion. Although most are in binary systems, some 30% are solitary, and their origin is therefore mysterious. PSR J1719-1438, a 5.7-millisecond pulsar, was detected in a recent survey with the Parkes 64-meter radio telescope. We show that this pulsar is in a binary system with an orbital period of 2.2 hours. The mass of its companion is near that of Jupiter, but its minimum density of 23 grams per cubic centimeter suggests that it may be an ultralow-mass carbon white dwarf. This system may thus have once been an ultracompact low-mass x-ray binary, where the companion narrowly avoided complete destruction. PMID:21868629

  14. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Belczynski, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkey, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Chin, D.; Chin, E.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jackrel, D.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lee, B.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McNabb, J. W. C.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswariah, C.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Regimbau, T.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; de La Jordana, L. Sancho; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Sazonov, A.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Sidles, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarallo, M.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; van Putten, M.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Webber, D.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitbeck, D. M.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiley, S.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.

    2007-08-01

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO 600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximize sensitivity. For the first time, pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 2.6×10-25 for PSR J1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSR J2124 3358 is less than 10-6. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only 2.2 times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  15. Binary pulsar evolution: unveiled links and new species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possenti, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    In the last years a series of blind and/or targeted pulsar searches led to almost triple the number of known binary pulsars in the galactic field with respect to a decade ago. The focus will be on few outliers, which are emerging from the average properties of the enlarged binary pulsar population. Some of them may represent the long sought missing links between two kinds of neutron star binaries, while others could represent the stereotype of new groups of binaries, resulting from an evolutionary path which is more exotic than those considered until recently. In particular, a new class of binaries, which can be dubbed Ultra Low Mass Binary Pulsars (ULMBPs), is emerging from recent data.

  16. Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stappers, Benjamin W.

    2012-04-01

    themselves can be used as the arms of a Galactic-scale gravitational-wave detector. Measuring correlated deviations in the arrival times of pulses from a number of pulsars distributed throughout the Galaxy could give rise to a direct detection of the stochastic gravitational-wave background, which is associated with the astrophysics of the early Universe-most likely from supermassive black-hole binary systems, but potentially also from cosmic strings. While they are famed for their clock-like rotational stability, some pulsars-in particular the more youthful ones-exhibit modulation in pulse arrival times, often called timing noise. It was recently demonstrated that in at least some cases this variability is deterministic and is associated with modulations in the pulsar emission properties and the spin-down rate. This breakthrough may lead to further improvements in the precision which can be achieved with pulsar timing, and enhance still further the ability to test theories of gravity directly and to make a direct detection of gravitational waves. I presented some of the history of what is known about the variations in pulsars on all these time-scales and reviewed some of the recent achievements in our understanding of the phenomena. I also highlighted how new transients associated with radio-emitting neutron stars are being discovered, and how other transient sources are being identified by the same techniques. These continued improvements have come about without new telescopes, but the next generation of very sensitive wide-field instruments will permit observational cadences which will reveal many new manifestations and will further revolutionise our understanding of this class of objects which have such high astrophysical potential.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray and radio sources in binaries (Malkov+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O. Y.; Tessema, S. B.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2016-05-01

    We have also compiled a general list of 239 radio pulsars in binary systems. The list is supplied with indication of photometric, spectroscopic or X-ray binarity, and with cross-identification data. (4 data files).

  18. Swings between rotation and accretion power in a binary millisecond pulsar.

    PubMed

    Papitto, A; Ferrigno, C; Bozzo, E; Rea, N; Pavan, L; Burderi, L; Burgay, M; Campana, S; Di Salvo, T; Falanga, M; Filipović, M D; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Possenti, A; Ransom, S M; Riggio, A; Romano, P; Sarkissian, J M; Stairs, I H; Stella, L; Torres, D F; Wieringa, M H; Wong, G F

    2013-09-26

    It is thought that neutron stars in low-mass binary systems can accrete matter and angular momentum from the companion star and be spun-up to millisecond rotational periods. During the accretion stage, the system is called a low-mass X-ray binary, and bright X-ray emission is observed. When the rate of mass transfer decreases in the later evolutionary stages, these binaries host a radio millisecond pulsar whose emission is powered by the neutron star's rotating magnetic field. This evolutionary model is supported by the detection of millisecond X-ray pulsations from several accreting neutron stars and also by the evidence for a past accretion disc in a rotation-powered millisecond pulsar. It has been proposed that a rotation-powered pulsar may temporarily switch on during periods of low mass inflow in some such systems. Only indirect evidence for this transition has hitherto been observed. Here we report observations of accretion-powered, millisecond X-ray pulsations from a neutron star previously seen as a rotation-powered radio pulsar. Within a few days after a month-long X-ray outburst, radio pulses were again detected. This not only shows the evolutionary link between accretion and rotation-powered millisecond pulsars, but also that some systems can swing between the two states on very short timescales. PMID:24067710

  19. A New Parameterization of the Shapiro delay and improved tests of general relativity in binary pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Paulo; Wex, Norbert

    In this talk, we present a re-parameterization of the Shapiro delay as observed in the timing of radio pulses of binary pulsars. We express the Shapiro delay as a sum of harmonics of the orbital period of the system, and use the harmonic coefficients as the main parameters of a much improved description of the effect. This includes a superior description of the constraints on the masses and orbital inclination introduced by a measurement of the Shapiro delay. In some cases (which we discuss) this leads to dramatically improved parametric tests of general relativity with binary pulsars.

  20. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  1. Six millisecond pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and the radio/gamma-ray connection of millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, C. M.; Guillemot, L.; Çelik, Ö.; Weltevrede, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Smith, D. A.; Kerr, M.; Zavlin, V. E.; Cognard, I.; Eatough, R. P.; Freire, P. C. C.; Janssen, G. H.; Camilo, F.; Desvignes, G.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hou, X.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A.; Manchester, R. N.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Shannon, R.; Theureau, G.; Webb, N.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing ephemerides provided by various radio observatories. We also present confirmation of the gamma-ray pulsations from a sixth source, PSR J2051-0827. Five of these six MSPs are in binary systems: PSRs J1713+0747, J1741+1351, J1600-3053 and the two black widow binary pulsars PSRs J0610-2100 and J2051-0827. The only isolated MSP is the nearby PSR J1024-0719, which is also known to emit X-rays. We present X-ray observations in the direction of PSRs J1600-3053 and J2051-0827. While PSR J2051-0827 is firmly detected, we can only give upper limits for the X-ray flux of PSR J1600-3053. There are no dedicated X-ray observations available for the other three objects. The MSPs mentioned above, together with most of the MSPs detected by Fermi, are used to put together a sample of 30 gamma-ray MSPs. This sample is used to study the morphology and phase connection of radio and gamma-ray pulse profiles. We show that MSPs with pulsed gamma-ray emission which is phase-aligned with the radio emission present the steepest radio spectra and the largest magnetic fields at the light cylinder among all MSPs. Also, we observe a trend towards very low, or undetectable, radio linear polarization levels. These properties could be attributed to caustic radio emission produced at a range of different altitudes in the magnetosphere. We note that most of these characteristics are also observed in the Crab pulsar, the only other radio pulsar known to exhibit phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray emission.

  2. Possible radio emission mechanism for pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalev, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented and discussed as a possible mechanism to describe radio emission from pulsars. The model determines that the magnetic field in the neutron proton electron (npe) layer of a neutron star results from a quasistationary eddy current of superconducting and normal protons relative to normal electrons, which generates radio emission by the Josephson effect. The radiation propagates in the magnetically active medium, from the optically thick npe layer to the magnetosphere through breaks in the crust. As a result, hot radio spots form on the surface of the star, and a radiation pattern forms near the magnetic poles, the cross section of which gives the observed pulse structure. Due to the specific properties of the mechanism, variations of the quasistationary current are converted to amplitude frequency variations of the radiation spectrum. Variations of the fine structure of the spectrum pulse amplitude and spectral index, as well as their correlation are discussed.

  3. Radio Observations of Elongated Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Stephen C.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    The majority of pulsars' rotational energy is carried away by relativistic winds, which are energetic particles accelerated in the magnetosphere. The confinement of the winds by the ambient medium result in synchrotron bubbles with broad-band emission, which are commonly referred to as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). Due to long synchrotron cooling time, a radio PWN reflects the integrated history of the system, complementing information obtained from the X-ray and higher energy bands. In addition, radio polarization measurements can offer a powerful probe of the PWN magnetic field structure. Altogether these can reveal the physical conditions and evolutionary history of a system.I report on preliminary results from high-resolution radio observations of PWNe associated with G327.1-1.1, PSRs J1015-5719, B1509-58, and J1549-4848 taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Their magnetic field structure and multiwavelength comparison with other observations are discussed.This work is supported by a ECS grant of the Hong Kong Government under HKU 709713P. The Australia Telescope is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility managed by CSIRO.

  4. Gravitational waves from binary supermassive black holes missing in pulsar observations.

    PubMed

    Shannon, R M; Ravi, V; Lentati, L T; Lasky, P D; Hobbs, G; Kerr, M; Manchester, R N; Coles, W A; Levin, Y; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Osłowski, S; Reardon, D J; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J-B; Wen, L; Wyithe, J S B; Zhu, X-J

    2015-09-25

    Gravitational waves are expected to be radiated by supermassive black hole binaries formed during galaxy mergers. A stochastic superposition of gravitational waves from all such binary systems would modulate the arrival times of pulses from radio pulsars. Using observations of millisecond pulsars obtained with the Parkes radio telescope, we constrained the characteristic amplitude of this background, A(c,yr), to be <1.0 × 10(-15) with 95% confidence. This limit excludes predicted ranges for A(c,yr) from current models with 91 to 99.7% probability. We conclude that binary evolution is either stalled or dramatically accelerated by galactic-center environments and that higher-cadence and shorter-wavelength observations would be more sensitive to gravitational waves. PMID:26404832

  5. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  6. Physics of radio emission in gamma-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    > Propagation of radio emission in a pulsar magnetosphere is reviewed. The effects of polarization transfer, induced scattering and reprocessing to high energies are analysed with a special emphasis on the implications for the gamma-ray pulsars. The possibilities of the pulsar plasma diagnostics based on the observed radio pulse characteristics are also outlined. As an example, the plasma number density profiles obtained from the polarization data for the Vela and the gamma-ray millisecond pulsars J1446-4701, J1939+2134 and J1744-1134 are presented. The number densities derived tend to be the highest/lowest when the radio pulse leads/lags the gamma-ray peak. In the PSR J1939+2134, the plasma density profiles for the main pulse and interpulse appear to fit exactly the same curve, testifying to the origin of both radio components above the same magnetic pole and their propagation through the same plasma flow in opposite directions. The millisecond radio pulse components exhibiting flat position angle curves are suggested to result from the induced scattering of the main pulse by the same particles that generate gamma rays. This is believed to underlie the wide-sense radio/gamma-ray correlation in the millisecond pulsars. The radio quietness of young gamma-ray pulsars is attributed to resonant absorption, whereas the radio loudness to the radio beam escape through the periphery of the open field line tube.

  7. Radio Timing and Analysis of Black Widow Pulsar J2256-1024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowter, Kathryn; Stairs, Ingrid H.; McPhee, Christie A.; Archibald, Anne M.; Boyles, Jason; Hessels, Jason; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Kondratiev, Vlad I.; Lorimer, Duncan; Lynch, Ryan S.; McLaughlin, Maura; Pennucci, Timothy; Ransom, Scott M.; Roberts, Mallory; Stovall, Kevin; van Leeuwen, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    Pulsar J2256-1024, discovered in a 350MHz GBT drift-scan survey and subsequently detected by Fermi-LAT, is a black widow millisecond pulsar in an eclipsing binary system. Black widow pulsars have a rather interesting history. They started life in a binary system, were then spun up by their companions into millisecond pulsars but at some point started ablating those companions, slowly destroying them - thus the moniker "black widow". They are characterized by relatively short orbital periods, in this case 5.1 hours, a low companion mass and, if the inclination angle is right, eclipses. For J2256-1024 we see very clear radio eclipses. Black widow systems used to be few and far between but are now more common with at least 18 currently known. Black widows are interesting for a variety of reasons. They provide potential insight into the formation of isolated millisecond pulsars which must have formed in a binary but are now seen alone, and in eclipsing systems pulses travel through the magnetosphere of the companion providing a probe of that region. Here we present timing and polarization results for J2256-1024 based on radio observations with the GBT.

  8. Strong binary pulsar constraints on Lorentz violation in gravity.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kent; Blas, Diego; Yunes, Nicolás; Barausse, Enrico

    2014-04-25

    Binary pulsars are excellent laboratories to test the building blocks of Einstein's theory of general relativity. One of these is Lorentz symmetry, which states that physical phenomena appear the same for all inertially moving observers. We study the effect of violations of Lorentz symmetry in the orbital evolution of binary pulsars and find that it induces a much more rapid decay of the binary's orbital period due to the emission of dipolar radiation. The absence of such behavior in recent observations allows us to place the most stringent constraints on Lorentz violation in gravity, thus verifying one of the cornerstones of Einstein's theory much more accurately than any previous gravitational observation. PMID:24815632

  9. The Annular Gap: Gamma-Ray & Radio Emission of Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, G. J.; Du, Y. J.; Han, J. L.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-01-01

    Pulsars have been found more than 40 years. Observations from radio to gamma-rays present abundant information. However, the radiation mechanism is still an open question. It is found that the annular gap could be formed in the magnetosphere of pulsars (neutron stars or quark stars), which combines the advantages of the polar cap, slot gap and outer gap models. It is emphasized that observations of some radio pulsars, normal and millisecond gamma-ray pulsars (MSGPs) show that the annular gap would play a very important role. Here we show some observational and theoretical evidences about the annular gap. For example, bi-drifting sub-pulses; radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars and so on.

  10. A test of general relativity from the three-dimensional orbital geometry of a binary pulsar.

    PubMed

    van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Britton, M; Kulkarni, S R; Anderson, S B; Manchester, R N; Sarkissian, J

    2001-07-12

    Binary pulsars provide an excellent system for testing general relativity because of their intrinsic rotational stability and the precision with which radio observations can be used to determine their orbital dynamics. Measurements of the rate of orbital decay of two pulsars have been shown to be consistent with the emission of gravitational waves as predicted by general relativity, but independent verification was not possible. Such verification can in principle be obtained by determining the orbital inclination in a binary pulsar system using only classical geometrical constraints. This would permit a measurement of the expected retardation of the pulse signal arising from the general relativistic curvature of space-time in the vicinity of the companion object (the 'Shapiro delay'). Here we report high-precision radio observations of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715, which establish the three-dimensional structure of its orbit. We see the Shapiro delay predicted by general relativity, and we determine the mass of the neutron star and its white dwarf companion. The determination of such masses is necessary in order to understand the origin and evolution of neutron stars. PMID:11449265

  11. Radio emission physics in the Crab pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilek, Jean A.; Hankins, Timothy H.

    2016-06-01

    We review our high-time-resolution radio observations of the Crab pulsar and compare our data to a variety of models for the emission physics. The Main Pulse and the Low Frequency Interpulse come from regions somewhere in the high-altitude emission zones (caustics) that also produce pulsed X-ray and -ray emission. Although no emission model can fully explain these two components, the most likely models suggest they arise from a combination of beam-driven instabilities, coherent charge bunching and strong electromagnetic turbulence. Because the radio power fluctuates on a wide range of time scales, we know the emission zones are patchy and dynamic. It is tempting to invoke unsteady pair creation in high-altitude gaps as the source of the variability, but current pair cascade models cannot explain the densities required by any of the likely models. It is harder to account for the mysterious High Frequency Interpulse. We understand neither its origin within the magnetosphere nor the striking emission bands in its dynamic spectrum. The most promising models are based on analogies with solar zebra bands, but they require unusual plasma structures which are not part of our standard picture of the magnetosphere. We argue that radio observations can reveal much about the upper magnetosphere, but work is required before the models can address all of the data.

  12. Radio emission physics in the Crab pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilek, Jean A.; Hankins, Timothy H.

    2016-06-01

    > We review our high-time-resolution radio observations of the Crab pulsar and compare our data to a variety of models for the emission physics. The Main Pulse and the Low Frequency Interpulse come from regions somewhere in the high-altitude emission zones (caustics) that also produce pulsed X-ray and -ray emission. Although no emission model can fully explain these two components, the most likely models suggest they arise from a combination of beam-driven instabilities, coherent charge bunching and strong electromagnetic turbulence. Because the radio power fluctuates on a wide range of time scales, we know the emission zones are patchy and dynamic. It is tempting to invoke unsteady pair creation in high-altitude gaps as the source of the variability, but current pair cascade models cannot explain the densities required by any of the likely models. It is harder to account for the mysterious High Frequency Interpulse. We understand neither its origin within the magnetosphere nor the striking emission bands in its dynamic spectrum. The most promising models are based on analogies with solar zebra bands, but they require unusual plasma structures which are not part of our standard picture of the magnetosphere. We argue that radio observations can reveal much about the upper magnetosphere, but work is required before the models can address all of the data.

  13. WIDE RADIO BEAMS FROM {gamma}-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, V.; Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G.

    2010-06-10

    We investigate the radio and {gamma}-ray beaming properties of normal and millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by selecting two samples from the known populations. The first, Sample G, contains pulsars which are detectable in blind searches of {gamma}-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The second, Sample R, contains pulsars detectable in blind radio searches which have spin-down luminosities E>10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1}. We analyze the fraction of the {gamma}-ray-selected Sample G which have detectable radio pulses and the fraction of the radio-selected Sample R which have detectable {gamma}-ray pulses. Twenty of our 35 Sample G pulsars have already observed radio pulses. This rules out low-altitude polar-cap beaming models if, as is currently believed, {gamma}-ray beams are generated in the outer magnetosphere and are very wide. We further find that, for the highest-E pulsars, the radio and {gamma}-ray beams have comparable beaming factors, i.e., the beams cover similar regions of the sky as the star rotates. For lower-E {gamma}-ray emitting pulsars, the radio beams have about half of the {gamma}-ray sky coverage. These results suggest that, for high-E young and MSPs, the radio emission originates in wide beams from regions high in the pulsar magnetosphere, probably close to the null-charge surface and to the {gamma}-ray emitting regions. Furthermore, it suggests that for these high-E pulsars, as in the {gamma}-ray case, features in the radio profile represent caustics in the emission beam pattern.

  14. The radio luminosity distribution of pulsars in 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, D.; Deshpande, A. A.; Connors, T.; Ables, J. G.

    2004-03-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array to seek the integrated radio flux from all the pulsars in the core of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. We have detected an extended region of radio emission and have calibrated its flux against the flux distribution of the known pulsars in the cluster. We find the total 20-cm radio flux from the pulsars in the cluster to be S= 2.0 +/- 0.3 mJy. This implies the lower limit to the radio luminosity distribution to be minL1400= 0.4 mJy kpc2 and the size of the observable pulsar population to be N<~ 30.

  15. New Energetic Radio Pulsars: An Archival X-Ray Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This ADP grant was to analyze archival X-ray data obtained in the direction of radio pulsars that were recently discovered as part of the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Search, which was done using the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The survey discovered nearly 700 pulsars, of which roughly three dozen were possible candidates for the detection of X-ray emission. Our team looked at 30 of the most interesting candidates. In most cases, there was insufficient data in the archive to conclude anything. However in several cases, there were interesting archival observations. In three cases, a detailed analysis proved scientifically interesting, and two publications have resulted.

  16. From radio pulsars to rotating radio transients via magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Sushan

    2012-07-01

    Recent observations suggest a possible evolutionary link between the rotation-powered pulsars (RPP) and the magnetars through glitch-induced increase in the surface magnetic fields of RPPs. PSR J1846-0258, observed to exhibit transient magnetar-like activity accompanied by a giant glitch~(Livingstone et al. 2011) is likely undergoing a transition from the RPP phase. On the other hand, it is possible that magnetars show up as rotating radio transients (RRAT) through a rapid field decay like in the case of RRAT J1819-1459 ~(Lyne et al. 2009). In the present work, we investigate a possible evolutionary route from RPPs to RRATs via magnetars. The magnetic field of a neutron star is generally understood to thread the superfluid core in the form of Abrikosov flux tubes. We postulate that a super-strong magnetic field residing in the core of a radio pulsar is completely/partially screened by some form of screening currents at the core-crust boundary. Glitches of large magnitudes (mostly seen in young, high magnetic field pulsars) are capable of crust-cracking and thereby inducing a decay of this screening current which would result in an increase in the observable field at the surface. On the other hand rapid spin-down (also glitches) would give rise to an expulsion of magnetic flux from the superconducting core to the metallic crust. We model this expelled flux. It is also understood that the crust of a young, high-magnetic field pulsar undergoing frequent glitches would have very high impurity/defect content. We find that the magnetic flux expelled to this 'impure' crust undergoes rapid dissipation resulting in the transition of a magnetar into an RRAT. Livingstone, Margaret A.; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Gavriil, Fotis P.; Gotthelf, E. V., 2011, ApJ, 730, 66 Lyne, A. G.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M.; Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W.; Palliyaguru, N. T.; Miller, J., 2009, MNRAS, 400, 1439

  17. The Einstein@Home Search for Radio Pulsars and PSR J2007+2722 Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, B.; Knispel, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Demorest, P. B.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Hammer, D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Pletsch, H. J.; Ransom, S. M.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Crawford, F.; Desvignes, G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Heald, G.; Jenet, F. A.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Papa, M. A.; Prix, R.; Rosen, R.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W.

    2013-08-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 193 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using Pulsar ALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 minutes. We also describe the first Einstein@Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However, there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but cannot prove that PSR J2007+2722 is at least ~100 kyr old. In the future, we expect that the massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many additional radio pulsar discoveries.

  18. THE EINSTEIN-HOME SEARCH FOR RADIO PULSARS AND PSR J2007+2722 DISCOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Knispel, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Deneva, J. S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Anderson, D.; Demorest, P. B.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Hammer, D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; McLaughlin, M. A.; and others

    2013-08-20

    Einstein-Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 193 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using Pulsar ALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 minutes. We also describe the first Einstein-Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However, there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but cannot prove that PSR J2007+2722 is at least {approx}100 kyr old. In the future, we expect that the massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many additional radio pulsar discoveries.

  19. Parkes Radio Searches of Fermi Gamma-Ray Sources and Millisecond Pulsar Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Sarkissian, J.; Cromartie, H. T.; Johnston, S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Wolff, M. T.; Freire, P. C. C.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Ferrara, E. C.; Keith, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Wood, K. S.

    2015-09-01

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported by Kerr et al. We did not detect radio pulsations from six other pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets conducted to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in \\gt 1 day circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 {M}⊙ presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 day orbit with a ≈ 0.25 {M}⊙ companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recently identified class of eccentric MSPs. PSR J1036-8317 is in an 8 hr binary with a \\gt 0.14 {M}⊙ companion that is probably a white dwarf. PSR J1946-5403 is in a 3 hr orbit with a \\gt 0.02 {M}⊙ companion with no evidence of radio eclipses.

  20. THE BINARY COMPANION OF YOUNG, RELATIVISTIC PULSAR J1906+0746

    SciTech Connect

    Van Leeuwen, J.; Janssen, G. H.; Kasian, L.; Stairs, I. H.; Lorimer, D. R.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Nice, D. J.; Ransom, S. M.; Weisberg, J. M.

    2015-01-10

    PSR J1906+0746 is a young pulsar in the relativistic binary with the second-shortest known orbital period, of 3.98 hr. We here present a timing study based on five years of observations, conducted with the five largest radio telescopes in the world, aimed at determining the companion nature. Through the measurement of three post-Keplerian orbital parameters, we find the pulsar mass to be 1.291(11) M {sub ☉}, and the companion mass 1.322(11) M {sub ☉}, respectively. These masses fit well in the observed collection of double neutron stars (DNSs), but are also compatible with other systems where a young pulsar such as J1906+0746 is orbited by a white dwarf (WD). Neither radio pulsations nor dispersion-inducing outflows that could have further established the companion nature were detected. We derive an H I-absorption distance, which indicates that an optical confirmation of a WD companion is very challenging. The pulsar is fading fast due to geodetic precession, limiting future timing improvements. We conclude that the young pulsar J1906+0746 is likely part of a DNS, or is otherwise orbited by an older WD, in an exotic system formed through two stages of mass transfer.

  1. A SEARCH FOR RAPIDLY SPINNING PULSARS AND FAST TRANSIENTS IN UNIDENTIFIED RADIO SOURCES WITH THE NRAO 43 METER TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Deborah; Crawford, Fronefield; Gilpin, Claire; Langston, Glen

    2013-04-15

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g., sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a different epoch with a new 800 MHz backend on the NRAO 43 m Telescope at a center frequency of 1200 MHz. Our search was sensitive to sub-millisecond pulsars in highly accelerated binary systems and to short transient pulses. No periodic or transient signals were detected from any of the target sources. We conclude that diffractive scintillation, dispersive smearing, and binary acceleration are unlikely to have prevented detection of the large majority of the sources if they are pulsars, though we cannot rule out eclipsing, nulling or intermittent emission, or radio interference as possible factors for some non-detections. Other (speculative) possibilities for what these sources might include radio-emitting magnetic cataclysmic variables or older pulsars with aligned magnetic and spin axes.

  2. Be/X-Ray Pulsar Binary Science with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Accretion disks are ubiquitous in astronomical sources. Accretion powered pulsars are a good test bed for accretion disk physics, because unlike for other objects, the spin of the neutron star is directly observable allowing us to see the effects of angular momentum transfer onto the pulsar. The combination of a sensitive wide-field monitor and the large area detector on LOFT will enable new detailed studies of accretion powered pulsars which I will review. RXTE observations have shown an unusually high number of Be/X-ray pulsar binaries in the SMC. Unlike binaries in the Milky Way, these systems are all at the same distance, allowing detailed population studies using the sensitive LOFT WFM, potentially providing connections to star formation episodes. For Galactic accreting pulsar systems, LOFT will allow measurement of spectral variations within individual pulses, mapping the accretion column in detail for the first time. LOFT will also provide better constraints on magnetic fields in accreting pulsars, allowing measurements of cyclotron features, observations of transitions into the centrifugal inhibition regime, and monitoring of spin-up rate vs flux correlations. Coordinated multi-wavelength observations are crucial to extracting the best science from LOFT from these and numerous other objects.

  3. FORMATION OF BLACK WIDOWS AND REDBACKS—TWO DISTINCT POPULATIONS OF ECLIPSING BINARY MILLISECOND PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Chen, Xuefei; Han, Zhanwen; Tauris, Thomas M.

    2013-09-20

    Eclipsing binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs; the so-called black widows and redbacks) can provide important information about accretion history, pulsar irradiation of their companion stars, and the evolutionary link between accreting X-ray pulsars and isolated MSPs. However, the formation of such systems is not well understood, nor the difference in progenitor evolution between the two populations of black widows and redbacks. Whereas both populations have orbital periods between 0.1 and 1.0 days, their companion masses differ by an order of magnitude. In this paper, we investigate the formation of these systems via the evolution of converging low-mass X-ray binaries by employing the MESA stellar evolution code. Our results confirm that one can explain the formation of most of these eclipsing binary MSPs using this scenario. More notably, we find that the determining factor for producing either black widows or redbacks is the efficiency of the irradiation process, such that the redbacks absorb a larger fraction of the emitted spin-down energy of the radio pulsar (resulting in more efficient mass loss via evaporation) compared to that of the black widow systems. We argue that geometric effects (beaming) are responsible for the strong bimodality of these two populations. Finally, we conclude that redback systems do not evolve into black widow systems with time.

  4. Confirmation of Pulsed Radio Emission from the Pulsar J1907+0919 (Shitov Radio Pulsar, SGR 1900+14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushak, A. P.; Losovsky, B. Ya.; Dumsky, D. V.

    2015-10-01

    Observations at a frequency of 111 MHz with the Large Phased Array at the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the Astro Space Center of the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute confirm the pulsed radio emission of the X-ray pulsar J1907+0919 that is a counterpart of the magnetar SGR 1900+14. Its pulsed radio emission was discovered earlier by Shitov (1999). A flux density periodogram is built. A new spin period P = 5.22756(42) s and flux density 50± 5~mJy are measured at the Epoch 56834.6 MJD. A value of the pulsar radio emission spectral index is estimated as < -4.3. This radio spectrum is one of the steepest among the spectra of known pulsars.

  5. Discovery of a Millisecond Pulsar in the 5.4 day Binary 3FGL J1417.5-4402: Observing the Late Phase of Pulsar Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo, F.; Reynolds, J. E.; Ransom, S. M.; Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Cordes, J. M.; Sarkissian, J.; Barr, E. D.; Ferrara, E. C.

    2016-03-01

    In a search of the unidentified Fermi gamma-ray source 3FGL J1417.5-4402 with the Parkes radio telescope, we discovered PSR J1417-4402, a 2.66 ms pulsar having the same 5.4 day orbital period as the optical and X-ray binary identified by Strader et al. The existence of radio pulsations implies that the neutron star is currently not accreting. Substantial outflows from the companion render the radio pulsar undetectable for more than half of the orbit, and may contribute to the observed Hα emission. Our initial pulsar observations, together with the optically inferred orbit and inclination, imply a mass ratio of 0.171 ± 0.002, a companion mass of {M}2=0.33+/- 0.03 M⊙, and a neutron star mass in the range 1.77≤slant {M}1≤slant 2.13 M⊙. However, there remains a discrepancy between the distance of 4.4 kpc inferred from the optical properties of the companion and the smaller radio dispersion measure distance of 1.6 kpc. The smaller distance would reduce the inferred Roche-lobe filling factor, increase the inferred inclination angle, and decrease the masses. As a wide binary, PSR J1417-4402 differs from the radio-eclipsing black widow and redback pulsars being discovered in large numbers by Fermi. It is probably a system that began mass transfer onto the neutron star after the companion star left the main sequence. The companion should end its evolution as a He white dwarf in a 6-20 day orbit, i.e., as a typical binary millisecond pulsar companion.

  6. Binary pulsar with a very small mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, R. J.; Maguire, C. M.; Rawley, L. A.; Stokes, G. H.; Taylor, J. H.

    1986-08-01

    Radiotelescope pulse-arrival-time (PAT) data of PSR1831-00, primarily at 390 MHz, were collected to characterize the evolution of the binary pulsars. The data were used to calculate, the right ascension and declination, pulsar and orbital periods, dispersion measure, semi-major axis, eccentricity, and time of periastron. The orbital period and semi-major axis are used to calculate the mass function. Comparisons are made with other binary and millisecond pulsars, noting the high degree of similarity with the other objects. The limitations imposed on the evolution of the objects by the observed physical characteristics lead to two possible evolutionary models: mass transfer after or during the formation of the neutron star, or no mass transfer. The first model would have required a contact phase during evolution of the primary. The second model posits a three solar mass primary which was also in contact during its evolution and which went to supernova.

  7. Disks Surviving the Radiation Pressure of Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekşİ, K. Yavuz; Alpar, M. Alİ

    2005-02-01

    The radiation pressure of a radio pulsar does not necessarily disrupt a surrounding disk. The position of the inner radius of a thin disk around a neutron star, determined by the balance of stresses, can be estimated by comparing the electromagnetic energy density generated by the neutron star as a rotating magnetic dipole in vacuum with the kinetic energy density of the disk. Inside the light cylinder, the near zone electromagnetic field is essentially the dipole magnetic field, and the inner radius is the conventional Alfvén radius. Far outside the light cylinder, in the radiation zone, E=B, and the electromagnetic energy density is /c~1/r2, where S is the Poynting vector. Shvartsman argued that a stable equilibrium cannot be found in the radiative zone because the electromagnetic energy density dominates over the kinetic energy density, with the relative strength of the electromagnetic stresses increasing with radius. In order to check whether this is also true near the light cylinder, we employ the Deutsch global electromagnetic field solutions for rotating oblique magnetic dipoles. Near the light cylinder the electromagnetic energy density increases steeply enough with decreasing r to balance the kinetic energy density at a stable equilibrium. The transition from the near zone to the radiation zone is broad. The radiation pressure of the pulsar cannot disrupt the disk for values of the inner radius up to about twice the light cylinder radius if the rotation axis and the magnetic axis are orthogonal. This allowed range beyond the light cylinder extends much farther for small inclination angles. The mass flow rate in quiescent phases of accretion-driven millisecond pulsars can occasionally drop to values low enough that the inner radius of the disk goes beyond the light cylinder. The possibilities considered here may be relevant for the evolution of spun-up X-ray binaries into millisecond pulsars, for some transients, and for the evolution of young neutron

  8. Probing Binary Evolution Using the Pulsar Fossil Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdman, Robert D.; Stairs, I. H.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Faulkner, A.; Backer, D. C.; Demorest, P.; Nice, D. J.; Burgay, M.; Camilo, F.; D'Amico, N.; Hobbs, G.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R.; Possenti, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has yielded a significant number of very interesting binary and millisecond pulsars. Two of these objects are part of an ongoing timing study at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). PSR J1756-2251 is a double-neutron star (DNS) binary system. Its orbital properties show it to be a similar system to PSR B1913+16, the original binary pulsar system discovered by Hulse and Taylor. Mass measurements of this system thus provide another important opportunity to test the validity of General Relativity, and to study the evolutionary history of DNS systems. PSR J1802-2124 is part of the relatively new and unstudied "intermediate-mass" class of binary pulsars. These typically spin with periods in the tens of milliseconds, and often have relatively massive (> 0.7 solar masses) white dwarf companions. GBT observations over the past two years have enabled us to detect the Shapiro delay in this system. This has led to the determination of the individual masses of the neutron star and white dwarf companion, providing constraints on the mass-transfer history in this unusual system.

  9. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  10. Classical Spin-Orbit Coupling and Periastron Advance in a Binary Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspi, V. M.; Bailes, M.; Manchester, R. N.; Stappers, B. W.; Bell, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    We report on radio timing observations of PSR J0045-7319, and eccentric pulsar/B star 51-day binary in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Significant deviations from a simple Keplerian orbit, observed as precessions of the periastron longitude and orbital plane, are identified with classical spin-orbit coupling and apsidal advance, for the fist time in a binary pulsar. Both precessions result from the B star's rotationally-induced gravitational quadropole moment, however, the orbital plane precession requires the B star's spin axis to be inclined with respect to the orbital angular momentum. We constrain this inclination angle (theta) to be 25(deg) <(theta)<41(deg). Under the conventional assumption that the pre-supernova angular momenta were aligned, our observations provide the most direct evidence yet for an asymmetric supernova.

  11. The binary pulsar PSR J1811-1736: evidence of a low amplitude supernova kick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corongiu, A.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G.; Jessner, A.; Possenti, A.; D'Amico, N.; Löhmer, O.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:The binary pulsar PSR J1811-1736 has been identified, since its discovery, as a member of a double neutron star system. Observations of such binary pulsars allow the measurement of general relativistic effects, which in turn lead to information about the orbiting objects, to their binary evolution and, in a few cases, to tests of theories of gravity. Methods: Regular timing observations have since January 1999 been carried out with three of the largest European radio telescopes involved in pulsar research. Pulse times of arrival were determined by convolving the observed profiles with standard templates, and were fitted to a model that takes into account general relativistic effects in binary systems. The prospects of continued observations were studied with simulated timing data. Pulse scattering times were measured using dedicated observations at 1.4 GHz and at 3.1 GHz, and the corresponding spectral index has also been determined. The possibility of detecting the yet unseen companion as a radio pulsar was investigated as a function of pulse period, observing frequency and flux density of the source. A study of the natal kick received by the younger neutron star at birth was performed considering the total energy and total angular momentum for a two body system. Results: We present an up to date and improved timing solution for the binary pulsar PSR J1811-1736. One post-Keplerian parameter, the relativistic periastron advance, is measured and leads to the determination of the total mass of this binary system. Measured and derived parameters strongly support the double neutron star scenario for this system. The pulse profile at 1.4 GHz is heavily broadened by interstellar scattering, limiting the timing precision achievable at this frequency. We show that a better precision can be obtained with observations at higher frequencies. This would allow one to measure a second post-Keplerian parameter within a few years. We find that interstellar scattering is

  12. Escaping radio emission from pulsars: Possible role of velocity shear

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M. |; Machabeli, G.Z.; Rogava, A.D. |

    1997-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the velocity shear, intrinsic to the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} plasma present in the pulsar magnetosphere, can efficiently convert the nonescaping longitudinal Langmuir waves (produced by some kind of a beam or stream instability) into propagating (escaping) electromagnetic waves. It is suggested that this shear induced transformation may be the basic mechanism needed for the eventual generation of the observed pulsar radio emission.

  13. A RADIO SEARCH FOR PULSAR COMPANIONS TO SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY LOW-MASS WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Agueeros, Marcel A.; Camilo, Fernando; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Anderson, Scott F.; Kleinman, S. J.; Liebert, James W.

    2009-05-20

    We have conducted a search for pulsar companions to 15 low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs; M <0.4 M {sub sun}) at 820 MHz with the NRAO Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These LMWDs were spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and do not show the photometric excess or spectroscopic signature associated with a companion in their discovery data. However, LMWDs are believed to evolve in binary systems and to have either a more massive white dwarf (WD) or a neutron star (NS) as a companion. Indeed, evolutionary models of low-mass X-ray binaries, the precursors of millisecond pulsars (MSPs), produce significant numbers of LMWDs, suggesting that the SDSS LMWDs may have NS companions. No convincing pulsar signal is detected in our data. This is consistent with the findings of van Leeuwen et al., who conducted a GBT search for radio pulsations at 340 MHz from unseen companions to eight SDSS WDs (five are still considered LMWDs; the three others are now classified as 'ordinary' WDs). We discuss the constraints our nondetections place on the probability P {sub MSP} that the companion to a given LMWD is a radio pulsar in the context of the luminosity and acceleration limits of our search; we find that P {sub MSP} < 10{sup +4} {sub -2}%.

  14. The LOFAR pilot surveys for pulsars and fast radio transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, Thijs; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Stappers, Ben W.; Kondratiev, Vladislav I.; Alexov, A.; Breton, R. P.; Bilous, A.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Gajjar, V.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Karastergiou, A.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Serylak, M.; Schrijvers, C.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; Verbiest, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Wijnholds, S.; Zagkouris, K.; van Amesfoort, A. S.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; Corstanje, A.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; van der Horst, A.; Juette, E.; Kuper, G.; Law, C.; Mann, G.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Munk, H.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Renting, A.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schwarz, D.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.

    2014-10-01

    We have conducted two pilot surveys for radio pulsars and fast transients with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) around 140 MHz and here report on the first low-frequency fast-radio burst limit and the discovery of two new pulsars. The first survey, the LOFAR Pilot Pulsar Survey (LPPS), observed a large fraction of the northern sky, ~ 1.4 × 104 deg2, with 1 h dwell times. Each observation covered ~75 deg2 using 7 independent fields formed by incoherently summing the high-band antenna fields. The second pilot survey, the LOFAR Tied-Array Survey (LOTAS), spanned ~600 deg2, with roughly a 5-fold increase in sensitivity compared with LPPS. Using a coherent sum of the 6 LOFAR "Superterp" stations, we formed 19 tied-array beams, together covering 4 deg2 per pointing. From LPPS we derive a limit on the occurrence, at 142 MHz, of dispersed radio bursts of < 150 day-1 sky-1, for bursts brighter than S> 107 Jy for the narrowest searched burst duration of 0.66 ms. In LPPS, we re-detected 65 previously known pulsars. LOTAS discovered two pulsars, the first with LOFAR or any digital aperture array. LOTAS also re-detected 27 previously known pulsars. These pilot studies show that LOFAR can efficiently carry out all-sky surveys for pulsars and fast transients, and they set the stage for further surveying efforts using LOFAR and the planned low-frequency component of the Square Kilometer Array. http://www.astron.nl/pulsars/lofar/surveys/lotas/

  15. Impact of the orbital uncertainties on the timing of pulsars in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliandro, G. A.; Torres, D. F.; Rea, N.

    2012-12-01

    The detection of pulsations from an X-ray binary is an unambiguous signature of the presence of a neutron star in the system. When the pulsations are missed in the radio band, their detection at other wavelengths, such as X-ray or gamma-rays, requires orbital demodulation, since the length of the observations is often comparable to, or longer than, the system orbital period. A detailed knowledge of the orbital parameters of binary systems plays a crucial role in the detection of the spin period of pulsars since any uncertainty in their determination translates into a loss in the coherence of a signal during the demodulation process. In this paper, we present an analytical study aimed at unveiling how the uncertainties in the orbital parameters might impact on periodicity searches. We find a correlation between the power of the signal in the demodulated arrival time series and the uncertainty in each of the orbital parameters. This correlation is also a function of the pulsar frequency. We test our analytical results with numerical simulations, finding good agreement between them. Finally, we apply our study to the cases of LS 5039 and LS I +61 303 and consider the current level of uncertainties in the orbital parameters of these systems and their impact on a possible detection of a hosted pulsar. We also discuss the possible appearance of a sideband ambiguity in real data. The latter can occur when, due to the use of uncertain orbital parameters, the power of a putative pulsar is distributed in frequencies lying near the pulsar period. Even if the appearance of a sideband is already a signature of a pulsar component, it may introduce an ambiguity in the determination of its period. We present here a method to solve the sideband issue.

  16. Hybrid Imaging-Periodicity Search for Radio Pulsars: A Pilot VLA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Molly; Wharton, Robert; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James M.; Kaplan, David L. A.; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Crawford, Fronefield; Deller, Adam; Lazio, Joseph; Ransom, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all of the ~2300 known pulsars have been discovered using the standard period-dispersion measure (P-DM) search. In a P-DM search, time series intensity data are collected, de-dispersed for a set of trial DMs, and searched for periodic signals usually with frequency-domain algorithms but with fast-folding algorithms for long-period objects. Here we describe a hybrid imaging-periodicity search, an alternate method that uses an imaging survey to select radio point sources as pulsar candidates, followed by a deep P-DM search of these candidates using new or archival data. Since the hybrid search is largely conducted in the imaging domain of time-averaged intensities, it does not suffer reduced sensitivity (as the P-DM method does) when a pulsar signal is heavily modulated by orbital motion, pulse-broadened by scattering, or intermittently emitting (due to large-scale magnetospheric changes, eclipses, etc). As such, the hybrid method is sensitive to systems that are highly selected against in P-DM searches such as compact neutron star binaries, highly scattered millisecond pulsars, and pulsars with spin periods less than a millisecond (should they exist). Interferometric imaging also requires a lower significance threshold for detection than a periodicity search and is more robust against radio-frequency interference. We present preliminary results of a wide-field high dynamic range imaging survey conducted with the Jansky VLA at 1-2 GHz in a pilot program to test the efficacy of a hybrid imaging-periodicity search for radio pulsars in the Galactic plane. The survey region covers four square degrees (Galactic longitudes 32.5-36.5 degrees) using 38 pointings and overlaps with the Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey, which will be used as the periodicity component of our hybrid search. We analyze the observed properties of the 23 known radio pulsars in the survey region and discuss the implications for the selection process needed to narrow the thousands of detected

  17. RADIO AND GAMMA-RAY PULSED EMISSION FROM MILLISECOND PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. J.; Chen, D.; Qiao, G. J.

    2013-01-20

    Pulsed {gamma}-ray emission from millisecond pulsars (MSPs) has been detected by the sensitive Fermi space telescope, which sheds light on studies of the emission region and its mechanism. In particular, the specific patterns of radio and {gamma}-ray emission from PSR J0101-6422 challenge the popular pulsar models, e.g., outer gap and two-pole caustic models. Using the three-dimensional annular gap model, we have jointly simulated radio and {gamma}-ray light curves for three representative MSPs (PSR J0034-0534, PSR J0101-6422, and PSR J0437-4715) with distinct radio phase lags, and present the best simulated results for these MSPs, particularly for PSR J0101-6422 with complex radio and {gamma}-ray pulse profiles, and for PSR J0437-4715 with a radio interpulse. We have found that both the {gamma}-ray and radio emission originate from the annular gap region located in only one magnetic pole, and the radio emission region is not primarily lower than the {gamma}-ray region in most cases. In addition, the annular gap model with a small magnetic inclination angle instead of an 'orthogonal rotator' can account for the MSPs' radio interpulse with a large phase separation from the main pulse. The annular gap model is a self-consistent model not only for young pulsars but also MSPs, and multi-wavelength light curves can be fundamentally explained using this model.

  18. MILLISECOND PULSAR AGES: IMPLICATIONS OF BINARY EVOLUTION AND A MAXIMUM SPIN LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Kiziltan, Buelent; Thorsett, Stephen E.

    2010-05-20

    In the absence of constraints from the binary companion or supernova remnant, the standard method for estimating pulsar ages is to infer an age from the rate of spin-down. While the generic spin-down age may give realistic estimates for normal pulsars, it can fail for pulsars with very short periods. Details of the spin-up process during the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) phase pose additional constraints on the period (P) and spin-down rates ( P-dot ) that may consequently affect the age estimate. Here, we propose a new recipe to estimate millisecond pulsar (MSP) ages that parametrically incorporates constraints arising from binary evolution and limiting physics. We show that the standard method can be improved by this approach to achieve age estimates closer to the true age while the standard spin-down age may overestimate or underestimate the age of the pulsar by more than a factor of {approx}10 in the millisecond regime. We use this approach to analyze the population on a broader scale. For instance, in order to understand the dominant energy loss mechanism after the onset of radio emission, we test for a range of plausible braking indices. We find that a braking index of n = 3 is consistent with the observed MSP population. We demonstrate the existence and quantify the potential contributions of two main sources of age corruption: the previously known 'age bias' due to secular acceleration and 'age contamination' driven by sub-Eddington progenitor accretion rates. We explicitly show that descendants of LMXBs that have accreted at very low rates ( m-dot << M-dot{sub Edd}) will exhibit ages that appear older than the age of the Galaxy. We further elaborate on this technique, the implications and potential solutions it offers regarding MSP evolution, the underlying age distribution, and the post-accretion energy loss mechanism.

  19. A massive pulsar in a compact relativistic binary.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, John; Freire, Paulo C C; Wex, Norbert; Tauris, Thomas M; Lynch, Ryan S; van Kerkwijk, Marten H; Kramer, Michael; Bassa, Cees; Dhillon, Vik S; Driebe, Thomas; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Langer, Norbert; Marsh, Thomas R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Pennucci, Timothy T; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Verbiest, Joris P W; Whelan, David G

    2013-04-26

    Many physically motivated extensions to general relativity (GR) predict substantial deviations in the properties of spacetime surrounding massive neutron stars. We report the measurement of a 2.01 ± 0.04 solar mass (M⊙) pulsar in a 2.46-hour orbit with a 0.172 ± 0.003 M⊙ white dwarf. The high pulsar mass and the compact orbit make this system a sensitive laboratory of a previously untested strong-field gravity regime. Thus far, the observed orbital decay agrees with GR, supporting its validity even for the extreme conditions present in the system. The resulting constraints on deviations support the use of GR-based templates for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Additionally, the system strengthens recent constraints on the properties of dense matter and provides insight to binary stellar astrophysics and pulsar recycling. PMID:23620056

  20. Fast pulsars, strange stars: An opportunity in radio astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1990-07-15

    The world's data on radio pulsars is not expected to represent the underlying pulsar population because of a search bias against detection of short periods, especially below 1 ms. Yet pulsars in increasing numbers with periods right down to this limit have been discovered suggesting that there may be even shorter ones. If pulsars with periods below 1/2 ms were found, the conclusion that the confined hadronic phase of nucleons and nuclei is only metastable would be almost inescapable. The plausible ground state in that event is the deconfined phase of (3-flavor) strange-quark-matter. From the QCD energy scale this is as likely a ground state as the confined phase. We show that strange matter as the ground state is not ruled out by any known fact, and most especially not by the fact that the universe is in the confined phase. 136 refs.

  1. Conducting the deepest all-sky radio pulsar survey ever: The All-Sky High Time Resolution Universe Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Cherry

    The extreme conditions found in and around pulsars make them fantastic natural laboratories, providing insights to a rich variety of aspects of fundamental physics and astronomy. To discover more pulsars we have begun the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey; a blind survey of the northern sky with the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope in Germany and a twin survey of the southern sky with the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The HTRU survey uses multi-beam receivers and backends constructed with new advancements in technology, providing unprecedentedly high time and frequency resolution to probe deeper into the Galaxy than ever before. Observations from Parkes have recently been completed and it is thus a suitable moment to review the success of the survey. In my talk I will discuss the discovery highlights such as the magnetar, two “planet-pulsar” binaries and the Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) from cosmological distances. The HTRU low-latitude data promises to provide the deepest large-scale search ever for the Galactic plane region. I will present an innovative segmented search technique which aims to increase our chances of discoveries of highly accelerated relativistic binary systems, including the potential pulsar-black-hole binaries. I will also provide an update on the survey status for the Northern survey with Effelsberg, which has led to the recent discovery of a highly eccentric binary millisecond pulsar.

  2. Sampling the Radio Transient Universe: Studies of Pulsars and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth

    The transient radio universe is a relatively unexplored area of astronomy, offering a variety of phenomena, from solar and Jovian bursts, to flare stars, pulsars, and bursts of Galactic and potentially even cosmological origin. Among these, perhaps the most widely studied radio transients, pulsars are fast-spinning neutron stars that emit radio beams from their magnetic poles. In spite of over 40 years of research on pulsars, we have more questions than answers on these exotic compact objects, chief among them the nature of their emission mechanism. Nevertheless, the wealth of phenomena exhibited by pulsars make them one of the most useful astrophysical tools. With their high densities, pulsars are probes of the nature of ultra-dense matter. Characterized by their high timing stability, pulsars can be used to verify the predictions of general relativity, discover planets around them, study bodies in the solar system, and even serve as an interplanetary (and possibly some day, interstellar) navigation aid. Pulsars are also used to study the nature of the interstellar medium, much like a flashlight illuminating airborne dust in a dark room. Studies of pulsars in the Galactic center can help answer questions about the massive black hole in the region and the star formation history in its vicinity. Millisecond pulsars in globular clusters are long-lived tracers of their progenitors, low-mass X-ray binaries, and can be used to study the dynamical history of those clusters. Another source of interest in radio transient astronomy is the hitherto undetected engineered signal from extraterrestrial intelligence. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is an ongoing attempt at discovering the presence of technological life elsewhere in the Galaxy. In this work, I present my forays into two aspects of the study of the radio transient universe---pulsars and SETI. Firstly, I describe my work on the luminosity function and population size of pulsars in the globular

  3. Youngest Radio Pulsar Revealed with Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-04-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's (NSF) newly commissioned Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have detected remarkably faint radio signals from an 820 year-old pulsar, making it the youngest radio-emitting pulsar known. This discovery pushes the boundaries of radio telescope sensitivity for discovering pulsars, and will enable scientists to conduct observations that could lead to a better understanding of how these stars evolve. The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope "Important questions about pulsars may be answered by long-term monitoring of objects such as the one we just detected," said Fernando Camilo of Columbia University in New York City. "Young pulsars are particularly rare, and being able to study such a young one at radio wavelengths provides an outstanding opportunity to learn critical facts about their evolution and workings." The results of this research, based on observations conducted on February 22-23, 2002, were accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Scientists have long suspected that a pulsar - a rapidly spinning, superdense neutron star - was born when a giant star ended its life in a cataclysmic supernova explosion observed in late summer of 1181, as suggested by Japanese and Chinese historical records. For the past 20 years, astronomers have searched this supernova remnant (3C58), located 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, for the telltale pulsations of a newly born pulsar. Late in 2001, data from NASA's Chandra X-ray satellite confirmed its existence, but it remained an elusive quarry for radio telescopes. "We believed from historical records and certainly knew from recent X-ray observations that this star was there," Camilo remarked, "but despite many attempts, no one had been able to find any radio pulsations from it because the signals are, it turns out, incredibly weak." For comparison, this pulsar's radio emission is some 250

  4. Keck Spectroscopy of Millisecond Pulsar J2215+5135: A Moderate-MNS, High-inclination Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Graham, Melissa L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kerr, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    We present Keck spectroscopic measurements of the millisecond pulsar binary J2215+5135. These data indicate a neutron-star (NS) mass {M}{NS}=1.6 {M}⊙ , much less than previously estimated. The pulsar heats the companion face to {T}D≈ 9000 K; the large heating efficiency may be mediated by the intrabinary shock dominating the X-ray light curve. At the best-fit inclination i = 88.°8, the pulsar should be eclipsed. We find weak evidence for such eclipses in the pulsed gamma-rays; an improved radio ephemeris allows use of up to five times more Fermi-Large Area Telescope gamma-ray photons for a definitive test of this picture. If confirmed, the gamma-ray eclipse provides a novel probe of the dense companion wind and the pulsar magnetosphere.

  5. The space velocities of radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, A. A.; Nikitina, E. B.; Malov, I. F.

    2016-02-01

    Known models proposed to explain the high space velocities of pulsars based on asymmetry of the transport coefficients of different sorts of neutrinos or electromagnetic radiation can be efficient only in the presence of high magnetic fields (to 1016 G) or short rotation periods for the neutron stars (of the order of 1 ms). This current study shows that the observed velocities are not correlated with either the pulsar periods or their surface magnetic fields. The initial rotation periods are estimated in a model for the magnetedipolar deceleration of their spin, aßsuming that the pulsar ages are equal to their kinematic ages. The initial period distribution is bimodal, with peaks at 5 ms and 0.5 s, and similar to the current distribution of periods. It is shown that asymmetry of the pulsar electromagnetic radiation is insufficient to give rise to additional acceleration of pulsars during their evolution after the supernova explosion that gave birth to them. The observations testify to deceleration of the motion, most likely due to the influence of the interstellar medium and interactions with nearby objects. The time scale for the exponential decrease in the magnetic field τ D and in the angle between the rotation axis and magnetic moment τ ß are estimated, yielding τ β = 1.4 million years. The derived dependence of the transverse velocity of a pulsar on the angle between the line of sight and the rotation axis of the neutron star corresponds to the expected dependence for acceleration mechanisms associated with asymmetry of the radiation emitted by the two poles of the star.

  6. Pulsar Radiation Models - Radio to High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice

    Rotation-powered pulsars emit over nearly 19 decades of energy. Although an all-encompassing answer as to the origin of this broad-band emission remains elusive nearly 50 years after their discovery, the theorist does have a few tools in his / her toolkit to aid investigation. Phase-averaged spectra give clues as to the emitting particles, their acceleration, environment, and the radiation mechanism. Moreover, the phase-evolution of spectra constrains the radiation energetics and environment as different parts of the magnetosphere are exposed to the observer during the pulsar's rotation. A detailed model furthermore critically depends on the specification of the emission geometry. Modeling the light curves probes this fundamental geometric assumption, which is closely tied to the posited magnetospheric structure. Studying many versions of the same system helps to constrain critical population-averaged quantities, discover population trends, and probe model performance for different regions of phase space. When coupled with population synthesis, such modeling can provide powerful discrimination between competing emission models. Polarization properties may provide complementary constraints on the magnetic field orientation and pulsar geometry. Lastly, comparison of parameters inferred from independent models for the different wavebands yields necessary crosschecks. It is indeed fortunate that the past few years have witnessed an incredible increase in number and improved characterization of rotation-powered pulsars. We will review how the enhanced quality and quantity of data are providing impetus for further model refinement.

  7. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Coelho, J. G.; Malheiro, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ˜ 107 - 1010 G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ˜ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission "o2" is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  8. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, M.; Coelho, J. G.

    2015-12-17

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ∼ 10{sup 7} − 10{sup 10} G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ∼ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission “o2” is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  9. 1FGL J0523.5–2529: A NEW PROBABLE GAMMA-RAY PULSAR BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Sonbas, Eda; Sokolovsky, Kirill; Sand, David J.; Moskvitin, Alexander S.; Cheung, C. C.

    2014-06-20

    We report optical photometric and Southern Astrophysical Research spectroscopic observations of an X-ray source found within the localization error of the Fermi Large Area Telescope unidentified γ-ray source 1FGL J0523.5–2529. The optical data show periodic flux modulation and radial velocity variations indicative of a binary with a 16.5 hr period. The data suggest a massive non-degenerate secondary (≳ 0.8 M {sub ☉}), and we argue the source is likely a pulsar binary. The radial velocities have good phase coverage and show evidence for a measurable eccentricity (e = 0.04). There is no clear sign of irradiation of the secondary in either photometry or spectroscopy. The spatial location out of the Galactic plane and γ-ray luminosity of the source are more consistent with classification as a recycled millisecond pulsar than as a young pulsar. Future radio timing observations can confirm the identity of the primary and further characterize this interesting system.

  10. Challenging the presence of scalar charge and dipolar radiation in binary pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo C.; Yunes, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    accurate black hole observations, for example through gravitational waves from inspiraling binaries or the timing of pulsar-black hole binaries with radio telescopes. We estimate these constraints to be a factor of 10 better than the current estimated bound, and also include estimated constraints on generic quadratic gravity theories from pulsar timing.

  11. Rotating Radio Transients and Their Place Among Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke-Spolaor, S.

    2012-01-01

    Six years ago, the discovery of Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs) marked what appeared to be a new type of sparsely-emitting pulsar. Since 2006, more than 70 of these objects have been discovered in single-pulse searches of archival and new surveys. With a continual inflow of new information about the RRAT population in the form of new discoveries, multi-frequency follow ups, coherent timing solutions, and pulse rate statistics, a view is beginning to form of the place in the pulsar population RRATs hold. Here we review the properties of neutron stars discovered through single pulse searches. We first seek to clarify the definition of the term RRAT, emphasising that "the RRAT population" encompasses several phenomenologies. A large subset of RRATs appears to represent the tail of an extended distribution of pulsar nulling fractions and activity cycles; these objects present several key open questions remaining in this field.

  12. The orbital eccentricities of binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.; Heggie, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    Low-mass binary millisecond pulsars (LMBPs) are born with very small orbital eccentricities, typically of order e(sub i) approximately 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3). In globular clusters, however, higher eccentricities e(sub f) much greater than e(sub i) can be induced by dynamical interactions with passing stars. Here we show that the cross section for this process is much larger than previously estimated. This is becuse, even for initially circular binaries, the induced eccentricity e(sub f) for an encounter with pericenter separation r(sub p) beyond a few times the binary semimajor axis a declines only as a power law (e(sub f) varies as (r(sub p)/a)(exp -5/2), and not as an exponential. We find that all currently known LMBPs in clusters were probably affected by interactions, with their current eccentricities typically greater than at birth by an order of magnitude or more.

  13. Crab pulsar giant pulses: Simultaneous radio and GRO observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Scott C.; Cordes, James M.; Foster, Roger; Hankins, Tim; Ulmer, Mel; Garasi, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Observations are reported of the Crab pulsar made at radio frequencies concurrent with Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) observations from 15 to 27 May 1991. Using the 43 m telescope at Green Bank at 0.8 and 1.4 GHz, samples were made continuously for 10 hrs/day at intervals of 100 to 300 microsecs. The analysis of the radio data includes calculation of histograms of pulse intensities, absolute timing to about 20 microsec precision, and characterization of intensity variations on time scales from the 33 ms spin period to days. The most detailed analysis is presented made of giant pulses. The ultimate goal is to bin the radio data into giant and nongiant pulses and to form average waveforms of OSSE data for the corresponding pulse periods. A test is done to see whether the violet radio fluctuations (which are not seen in other radio pulsars to the same degree) are correlated with low energy gamma rays, yielding constraints on the radio coherence mechanism and the steadiness of the electron-positron outflow in the magnetosphere. Timing analysis of the radio data provides a well defined ephemeris over the specified range of epochs. The gamma ray pulse phase was predicted with an error of less than 70 microsecs.

  14. Timing the Relativistic Binary Pulsar PSR B1913+16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuping; Weisberg, Joel M.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of three decades of timing data from the relativistic binary pulsar PSR B1913+16. With kinematic corrections, the measured rate of orbital decay due to gravitational wave radiation exhibits 99.69+/-0.17% agreement with the prediction of general relativity. For the first time in this system, the Shapiro delay parameters have been determined, therefore constituting two additional tests of gravity theories. We have also measured the relativistic deformation parameter of the orbit, and marginally the derivative of the semimajor axis, both of which are biased by the presence of aberration delay. We will discuss the possibility of constraining the moment of inertia of the pulsar in this system through improved measurement of the orbital semimajor axis derivative, and the determination of the aberration delay parameters from future geodetic precession modelling.

  15. A Shapiro Delay Detection in the Binary System Hosting the Millisecond Pulsar PSR J1910-5959A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corongiu, A.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Camilo, F.; D'Amico, N.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Bailes, M.; Johnston, S.; Kramer, M.; van Straten, W.

    2012-12-01

    PSR J1910-5959A is a binary pulsar with a helium white dwarf (HeWD) companion located about 6 arcmin from the center of the globular cluster NGC 6752. Based on 12 years of observations at the Parkes radio telescope, the relativistic Shapiro delay has been detected in this system. We obtain a companion mass MC = 0.180 ± 0.018 M ⊙ (1σ) implying that the pulsar mass lies in the range 1.1 M ⊙ <= MP <= 1.5 M ⊙. We compare our results with previous optical determinations of the companion mass and examine prospects for using this new measurement for calibrating the mass-radius relation for HeWDs and for investigating their evolution in a pulsar binary system. Finally, we examine the set of binary systems hosting a millisecond pulsar and a low-mass HeWD for which the mass of both stars has been measured. We confirm that the correlation between the companion mass and the orbital period predicted by Tauris & Savonije reproduces the observed values but find that the predicted MP -PB correlation overestimates the neutron star mass by about 0.5 M ⊙ in the orbital period range covered by the observations. Moreover, a few systems do not obey the observed MP -PB correlation. We discuss these results in the framework of the mechanisms that inhibit the accretion of matter by a neutron star during its evolution in a low-mass X-ray binary.

  16. The spin down of the radio pulsars: Braking index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Gurevich, A. V.; Istomin, Ya. N.

    1991-01-01

    Presently, the value of the retardation dP/dt is well known for most radio pulsars. It is negative for all cases except one and is of the order of 10(exp -15). That single case is when the pulsar, which is located in the star globular system, can have a considerable acceleration leading to the opposite sign of P'= dP/dt due to the Doppler effect. Careful measurements of the period, P, also allow one to determine the variation of this retardation with the course of time- P'' = d(exp 2)P/dt(exp 2). The results of these measurements are usually represented in the form of the dimensionless retardation index n = omega'' omega/omega(exp 2)= 2 - P''P/P(exp 2) (omega is the angular velocity). The data for 21 pulsars are given. The parameter, n, is strongly undetermined both in value and sign in all cases except for four pulsars. Changes of the rotation period, P, and the inclination angle, chi, the angle between the axes of rotation and the magnetic moment are caused by two processes: the regular retardation and nutation due to deviation from the strict spherical shape of the neutron star. Losses which are caused by the currents flowing in the magnetosphere of the neutron star and by being closed on the star surface are considered. Such losses are critical for the neutron star magnetosphere which is full of dense plasma. Since the radio emission is generated in the dense plasma of the polar magnetosphere, then practically all radio pulsars are retarded by the current mechanism. The formula for the braking index is presented along with other aspects of the investigation.

  17. SUPERB - A SUrvey for Pulsars & Extragalactic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Evan; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Burgay, Marta; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Eatough, Ralph; van Straten, Willem; Stappers, Benjamin; Bates, Samuel; Levin, Lina; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Ng, Cherry; Tiburzi, Caterina; Petroff, Emily; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris; Jankowski, Fabian; Caleb, Manisha; Lyon, Robert; Morello, Vincent; Bhandari, Shivani

    2014-10-01

    SUPERB is a large-scale survey for pulsars and extragalactic radio bursts. It will uses optimised GPU codes to search for pulsars and fast radio bursts (FRBs), making discoveries in real time. Handling our data as it comes in is essential for the SKA Phase I era so this work applies directly to the high-data rates of next generation telescopes. The pulsars discovered will enable studies of the interstellar medium, allow us to more accurately constrain the MSP luminosity function (which informs estimates of the SKA yield of MSPs), tests of theories of gravity and several will contribute to the precision timing projects of the PPTA. The FRBs discovered will have much more associated information than all previous detections. Firstly the discovery lag will be ~1 second, rather than months/years. The Parkes observations will be shadowed by the Molonglo telescope to allow, for the first time, localisation of FRBs, and a host of optical and high-energy telescopes will then be triggered as appropriate. This is key for identifying FRB host galaxies, so as to solve the mystery of their progenitors. The survey will discover ~20 MSPs, ~100 slower pulsars and ~10 FRBs.

  18. SUPERB - A SUrvey for Pulsars & Extragalactic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Evan; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Burgay, Marta; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Eatough, Ralph; van Straten, Willem; Stappers, Benjamin; Bates, Samuel; Levin, Lina; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Ng, Cherry; Tiburzi, Caterina; Petroff, Emily; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris; Jankowski, Fabian; Caleb, Manisha; Lyon, Robert; Morello, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    SUPERB is a large-scale survey for pulsars and extragalactic radio bursts. It will use highly optimised GPU codes to search for pulsars and fast radio bursts (FRBs), making discoveries in real time. Handling our data as it comes in is essential for the SKA Phase I era so this work applies directly to the high-data rates of next generation telescopes. The pulsars discovered will enable studies of the interstellar medium, allow us to more accurately constrain the MSP luminosity function (which informs estimates of the SKA yield of MSPs), tests of theories of gravity and several will contribute to the precision timing projects of the PPTA. The FRBs discovered will have much more associated information than all previous detections. Firstly the discovery lag will be ~1 second, rather than months/years. The Parkes observations will be shadowed by the Molonglo telescope to allow, for the first time, localisation of FRBs, and a host of optical and high-energy telescopes will then be triggered as appropriate. This is key for identifying FRB host galaxies, so as to solve the mystery of their progenitors. The survey will discover ~20 MSPs, ~100 slower pulsars and ~10 FRBs.

  19. Elementary Wideband Timing of Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M.

    2014-08-01

    We present an algorithm for the simultaneous measurement of a pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM) from folded wideband pulsar data. We extend the prescription from Taylor's 1992 work to accommodate a general two-dimensional template "portrait," the alignment of which can be used to measure a pulse phase and DM. We show that there is a dedispersion reference frequency that removes the covariance between these two quantities and note that the recovered pulse profile scaling amplitudes can provide useful information. We experiment with pulse modeling by using a Gaussian-component scheme that allows for independent component evolution with frequency, a "fiducial component," and the inclusion of scattering. We showcase the algorithm using our publicly available code on three years of wideband data from the bright millisecond pulsar J1824-2452A (M28A) from the Green Bank Telescope, and a suite of Monte Carlo analyses validates the algorithm. By using a simple model portrait of M28A, we obtain DM trends comparable to those measured by more standard methods, with improved TOA and DM precisions by factors of a few. Measurements from our algorithm will yield precisions at least as good as those from traditional techniques, but is prone to fewer systematic effects and is without ad hoc parameters. A broad application of this new method for dispersion measure tracking with modern large-bandwidth observing systems should improve the timing residuals for pulsar timing array experiments, such as the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves.

  20. Elementary wideband timing of radio pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M. E-mail: pdemores@nrao.edu

    2014-08-01

    We present an algorithm for the simultaneous measurement of a pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM) from folded wideband pulsar data. We extend the prescription from Taylor's 1992 work to accommodate a general two-dimensional template 'portrait', the alignment of which can be used to measure a pulse phase and DM. We show that there is a dedispersion reference frequency that removes the covariance between these two quantities and note that the recovered pulse profile scaling amplitudes can provide useful information. We experiment with pulse modeling by using a Gaussian-component scheme that allows for independent component evolution with frequency, a 'fiducial component', and the inclusion of scattering. We showcase the algorithm using our publicly available code on three years of wideband data from the bright millisecond pulsar J1824–2452A (M28A) from the Green Bank Telescope, and a suite of Monte Carlo analyses validates the algorithm. By using a simple model portrait of M28A, we obtain DM trends comparable to those measured by more standard methods, with improved TOA and DM precisions by factors of a few. Measurements from our algorithm will yield precisions at least as good as those from traditional techniques, but is prone to fewer systematic effects and is without ad hoc parameters. A broad application of this new method for dispersion measure tracking with modern large-bandwidth observing systems should improve the timing residuals for pulsar timing array experiments, such as the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves.

  1. SHORT-LIVED RADIO BURSTS FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, J. H.; Eilek, J. A.; Hankins, T. H.; Kern, J. S.

    2010-10-20

    Our high-time-resolution observations reveal that individual main pulses from the Crab pulsar contain one or more short-lived microbursts. Both the energy and duration of bursts measured above 1 GHz can vary dramatically in less than a millisecond. These fluctuations are too rapid to be caused by propagation through turbulence in the Crab Nebula or in the interstellar medium; they must be intrinsic to the radio emission process in the pulsar. The mean duration of a burst varies with frequency as {nu}{sup -2}, significantly different from the broadening caused by interstellar scattering. We compare the properties of the bursts to some simple models of microstructure in the radio emission region.

  2. Exploring Dual and Binary AGN via Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke Spolaor, Sarah; Lazio, J.

    2012-05-01

    Dual and binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are thought to form as a direct result of a major galaxy merger. The discovery of late-stage SMBH pairs could critically inform upcoming gravitational wave science and cosmological formation models, and could provide fascinating studies of post-merger dynamics and merger-induced SMBH growth. However, it has been notoriously difficult to identify clear electromagnetic markers for dual and binary SMBHs in late-stage merger systems. Accordingly, few definitive discoveries of paired SMBHs have yet been made, with only a handful of known systems at projected separations below 1kpc. We will review the unique contributions that radio imaging observations can make to this field: particularly in the search for new systems, the confirmation of candidate small-orbit binary systems, and the potential for multi-messenger gravitational wave science when combined with pulsar timing methods. We will also provide an update on recent radio searches for binary AGN. We acknowledge that a portion of research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. CURVATURE-DRIFT INSTABILITY FAILS TO GENERATE PULSAR RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Alexander; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2010-10-01

    The curvature-drift instability has long been considered as a viable mechanism for pulsar radio emission. We reconsidered this mechanism by finding an explicit solution describing the propagation of short electromagnetic waves in a plasma flow along curved magnetic field lines. We show that even though the waves could be amplified, the amplification factor remains very close to unity; therefore, this mechanism is unable to generate high brightness temperature emission from initial weak fluctuations.

  4. Searches for gamma ray emission from radio pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    Searches were made for pulsed high energy (E 35 MeV) gamma radiation from 43 pulsars using the SAS-2 data base and radio parameters. No positive results were found, and the upper limits are consistent with the concept that gamma ray production efficiency increases with increasing apparent age. Two limits suggest that efficiency cannot be a simple function of apparent age beyond 10,000,000 years.

  5. Tests of gravitational symmetries with radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, LiJing; Wex, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    Symmetries play important roles in modern theories of physical laws. In this paper, we review several experimental tests of important symmetries associated with the gravitational interaction, including the universality of free fall for self-gravitating bodies, time-shift symmetry in the gravitational constant, local position invariance and local Lorentz invariance of gravity, and spacetime translational symmetries. Recent experimental explorations for post-Newtonian gravity are discussed, of which, those from pulsar astronomy are highlighted. All of these tests, of very different aspects of gravity theories, at very different length scales, favor to very high precision the predictions of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) and, in particular, general relativity which embodies SEP completely. As the founding principles of gravity, these symmetries are motivated to be promoted to even stricter tests in future.

  6. A study of microglitches in Hartebeesthoek radio pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuchukwu, C. C.; Chukwude, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    We carried out a statistical analysis of microglitch events on a sample of radio pulsars. The distributions of microglitch events in frequency (ν) and first frequency derivative ({ν'}) indicate that the size of a microglitch and sign combinations of events in ν and {ν'} are purely randomized. Assuming that the probability of a given size of a microglitch event occurring scales inversely as the absolute size of the event in both ν and {ν'}, we constructed a cumulative distribution function (CDF) for the absolute sizes of microglitches. In most of the pulsars, the theoretical CDF matched the observed values. This is an indication that microglitches in pulsar may be interpreted as an avalanche process in which angular momentum is transferred erratically from the flywheel-like superfluid interior to the slowly decelerating solid crust. Analysis of the waiting time indicates that it is purely Poisson distributed with mean microglitch rate <γrangle˜0.94 ±0.25 year^{-1} for all the pulsars in our sample and <Δ T rangle˜1.26 ±0.21 year giving <γrangle/ <Δ T rangle˜ 1.19 ±0.27. Correlation analysis showed that the relative absolute size of microglitch event correlates with the rotation period of the pulsar with correlation coefficient r˜0.7 and r˜0.5 respectively for events in ν and {ν'}. The mean glitch rate and number of microglitches (Ng) showed some dependence on spin down rate (r˜-0.6) and the characteristic age of the pulsar (τ) with (r˜-0.4/{-}0.5).

  7. Do pulsar radio fluxes violate the inverse-square law?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shantanu

    2016-04-01

    Singleton et al. (arXiv:0912.0350, 2009) have argued that the flux of pulsars measured at 1400 MHz shows an apparent violation of the inverse-square law with distance (r), and instead the flux scales as 1/r. They deduced this from the fact that the convergence error obtained in reconstructing the luminosity function of pulsars using an iterative maximum likelihood procedure is about 105 times larger for a distance exponent of two (corresponding to the inverse-square law) compared to an exponent of one. When we applied the same technique to this pulsar dataset with two different values for the trial luminosity function in the zeroth iteration, we find that neither of them can reproduce a value of 105 for the ratio of the convergence error between these distance exponents. We then reconstruct the differential pulsar luminosity function using Lynden-Bell's C- method after positing both inverse-linear and inverse-square scalings with distance. We show that this method cannot help in discerning between the two exponents. Finally, when we tried to estimate the power-law exponent with a Bayesian regression procedure, we do not get a best-fit value of one for the distance exponent. The model residuals obtained from our fitting procedure are larger for the inverse-linear law compared to the inverse-square law. Moreover, the observed pulsar flux cannot be parameterized only by power-law functions of distance, period, and period derivative. Therefore, we conclude from our analysis using multiple methods that there is no evidence that the pulsar radio flux at 1400 MHz violates the inverse-square law or that the flux scales inversely with distance.

  8. Binary pulsars studies with multiwavelength sky surveys - I. Companion star identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, R. P.; Corongiu, A.; Pallanca, C.; Oates, S. R.; Yershov, V. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Page, M. J.; Ferraro, F. R.; Possenti, A.; Jackson, A. C.

    2014-09-01

    The identification of the stellar companions to binary pulsars is key to studying the evolution of the binary system and how this is influenced by the interactions between the two stars. For only a fraction of the known binary pulsars, the stellar companions have been identified. Here, we used 11 source catalogues available from multiwavelength (ultraviolet, optical, infrared) imaging sky surveys to search for the stellar companions of a sample of 144 field binary pulsars (i.e. not in globular clusters) selected from the Australia Telescope National Facility data base (version 1.48) and from the public list of γ-ray pulsars detected by Fermi. We found positional associations in at least one source catalogue for 22 pulsars, of which 10 are detected in γ-rays by Fermi, including 15 millisecond pulsars. For six pulsars in our compilation, we confirm their identifications. For another seven pulsars that had yet not been identified, we examine potential identifications. In particular, we identified a likely companion star candidate to PSR J2317+1439, whereas for both PSR B1953+29 and PSR J1935+1726 the companion star identification is more uncertain. Follow-up observations of these three pulsars are needed to settle the proposed identifications. For the remaining nine pulsars that had been already identified, we provide additional spectral information in at least one of the surveys' spectral bands, which we will use to better constrain the stars' spectral energy distributions.

  9. Radio Detection of Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Brandon; Cardena, Brett; Dispoto, Dana; Papadopoulos, Joanna; Kavic, Michael; Simonetti, John

    2011-10-01

    Neutron star binary systems lose energy through gravitational radiation, and eventually merge. The gravitational radiation from the merger can be detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). It is expected that a transient radio pulse will also be produced during the merger event. Detection of such radio transients would allow for LIGO to search for signals within constrained time periods. We calculate the LWA-1 detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers. We calculate the detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers for the Long Wavelength Array and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array.

  10. Identification of the nebula G70.7 + 1.2 as a bow shock powered by a pulsar/Be-star binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Vogel, S. N.; Wang, Z.; Wood, D. O. S.

    1992-01-01

    New data are presented here that firmly establish the nonthermal nature of the radio emission from the enigmatic radio and optical nebula G70.7 + 1.2. H-alpha and forbidden O I Fabry-Perot observations are used to argue that the extended optical emission from the nebula arises from a bow shock powered by a mass-losing luminous star moving supersonically through dense gas. The strong nonthermal radio emission from the object is then explained as the shocked relativistic wind from a pulsar, which is proposed here as a companion to the Be star. The coincidence of the optical and radio emission requires the pulsar and stellar winds to be mixed together. The system has a large overall velocity of about 60 km/s which is inexplicable in all other models but which is typical of binary pulsars.

  11. A Possible X-Ray Detection of the Binary Millisecond Pulsar J1012+5307

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A possible X-ray detection of the newly discovered binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1012+5307 was obtained from an archival ROSAT observation. The 80 +/- 24 photons detected correspond to a 0.1 - 2.4 keV luminosity of approx. = 2.5 x 10(exp 30) erg/s at the nominal dispersion-measure distance of 520 pc. This luminosity is a factor of 2 less than that of PSR J0437-4715, a near twin of PSR J1012+5307 in its spin parameters and energetics, and the only millisecond pulsar from which pulsed X-rays have definitely been detected. PSR J1012+5307 is also within 6 deg of the "HI hole" in Ursa Major, providing a new estimate of the electron column density through this region which confirms that the ionized column density is also low. The small neutral column density to PSR J1012+5307, N(sub H) less than 7.5 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, will facilitate future soft X-ray study, which will help to discriminate between thermal and nonthermal origins of the X-ray emission in millisecond pulsars.

  12. RELATIVISTIC MODEL ON PULSAR RADIO EMISSION AND POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, D.; Gangadhara, R. T. E-mail: ganga@iiap.res.in

    2012-02-20

    We have developed a relativistic model for pulsar radio emission and polarization by taking into account a detailed geometry of emission region, rotation, and modulation. The sparks activity on the polar cap leads to plasma columns in the emission region and modulated emission. By considering relativistic plasma bunches streaming out along the rotating dipolar field lines as a source of curvature radiation, we have deduced the polarization state of the radiation field in terms of the Stokes parameters. We have simulated a set of typical pulse profiles and analyzed the role of viewing geometry, rotation, and modulation in the pulsar polarization profiles. Our simulations explain most of the diverse behaviors of polarization generally found in pulsar radio profiles. We show that both the 'antisymmetric' and 'symmetric' types of circular polarization are possible within the framework of curvature radiation. We also show that the 'kinky' nature in the polarization position angle traverses might be due to the rotation and modulation effects. The phase lag of the polarization position angle inflection point relative to the phase of core peak depends upon the rotationally induced asymmetry in the curvature of source trajectory and modulation.

  13. ARECIBO PULSAR SURVEY USING ALFA: PROBING RADIO PULSAR INTERMITTENCY AND TRANSIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Deneva, J. S.; Cordes, J. M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Edel, S.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Nice, D. J.; Crawford, F.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Stairs, I. H.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.

    2009-10-01

    We present radio transient search algorithms, results, and statistics from the ongoing Arecibo Pulsar ALFA (PALFA) survey of the Galactic plane. We have discovered seven objects through a search for isolated dispersed pulses. All of these objects are Galactic and have measured periods between 0.4 and 4.7 s. One of the new discoveries has a duty cycle of 0.01%, smaller than that of any other radio pulsar. We discuss the impact of selection effects on the detectability and classification of intermittent sources, and compare the efficiencies of periodicity and single-pulse (SP) searches for various pulsar classes. For some cases we find that the apparent intermittency is likely to be caused by off-axis detection or a short time window that selects only a few bright pulses and favors detection with our SP algorithm. In other cases, the intermittency appears to be intrinsic to the source. No transients were found with DMs large enough to require that they originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Accounting for the on-axis gain of the ALFA system, as well as the low gain but large solid-angle coverage of far-out sidelobes, we use the results of the survey so far to place limits on the amplitudes and event rates of transients of arbitrary origin.

  14. On the decay of the magnetic fields of single radio pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Hartman, Jan W.; Verbunt, Frank

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the statistical evidence for the decay of the magnetic field of single radio pulsars. We perform population syntheses for different assumed values for the time scale of field decay using a Monte Carlo method. We allow for the selection effects in pulsar surveys and compare the synthesized populations with the observed pulsars. We take account of the finite scale height of the distribution in the Galaxy of free electrons, which determine the dispersion measure and hence the apparent distance of radio pulsars. Our simulations give much better agreement with the observations if the time scale for the field decay is assumed to be longer than the typical active life time of a radio pulsar. This indicates that no significant field decay occurs in single radio pulsars.

  15. Correlation of pulsar radio emission spectrum with peculiarities of particle acceleration in a polar gap

    SciTech Connect

    Kontorovich, V. M. Flanchik, A. B.

    2013-01-15

    The analytical expression for the frequency of radio emission intensity maximum in pulsars with free electron emission from the stellar surface has been found. Peculiarities of the electron acceleration in a polar gap are considered. The correlation between the high-frequency cutoff and low-frequency turnover in the radio emission spectrum of pulsars known from observations has been explained.

  16. Multi-wavelength emissions from the millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038 during an accretion active state

    SciTech Connect

    Takata, J.; Leung, Gene C. K.; Wu, E. M. H.; Cheng, K. S.; Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T.; Hui, C. Y.; Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Cao, Yi; Tang, Sumin E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2014-04-20

    Recent observations strongly suggest that the millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038 has developed an accretion disk since 2013 June. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of PSR J1023+0038, which reveals that (1) its gamma-rays suddenly brightened within a few days in 2013 June/July and has remained at a high gamma-ray state for several months; (2) both UV and X-ray fluxes have increased by roughly an order of magnitude; and (3) the spectral energy distribution has changed significantly after the gamma-ray sudden flux change. Time variabilities associated with UV and X-rays are on the order of 100-500 s and 50-100 s, respectively. Our model suggests that a newly formed accretion disk, due to the sudden increase of the stellar wind, could explain the changes of all these observed features. The increase of UV is emitted from the disk, and a new component in gamma-rays is produced by inverse Compton scattering between the new UV component and pulsar wind. The increase of X-rays results from the enhancement of injection pulsar wind energy into the intra-binary shock due to the increase of the stellar wind. We also predict that the radio pulses may be blocked by the evaporated winds from the disk, and the pulsar is still powered by rotation.

  17. Searching for debris disks around seven radio pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Wang, Xuebing; Ng, C.-Y.; Li, Aigen; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-10-01

    We report on our searches for debris disks around seven relatively nearby radio pulsars, which are isolated sources that were carefully selected as targets on the basis of our deep K{sub s} -band imaging survey. The K{sub s} images obtained with the 6.5 m Baade Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory are analyzed together with the Spitzer/IRAC images at 4.5 and 8.0 μm and the WISE images at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm. No infrared counterparts of these pulsars are found, with flux upper limits of ∼μJy at near-infrared (λ < 10 μm) and ∼10-1000 μJy at mid-infrared wavelengths (λ > 10 μm). The results of this search are discussed in terms of the efficiency of converting the pulsar spin-down energy to thermal energy and X-ray heating of debris disks, with a comparison made of the two magnetars 4U 0142+61 and 1E 2259+586, which are suggested to harbor a debris disk.

  18. SCATTERING OF PULSAR RADIO EMISSION BY THE INTERSTELLAR PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.; Gao, J. J.; Hobbs, G.; Verbiest, J. P. W.

    2010-07-10

    We present simulations of scattering phenomena which are important in pulsar observations, but which are analytically intractable. The simulation code, which has also been used for solar wind and atmospheric scattering problems, is available from the authors. These simulations reveal an unexpectedly important role of dispersion in combination with refraction. We demonstrate the effect of analyzing observations which are shorter than the refractive scale. We examine time-of-arrival fluctuations in detail: showing their correlation with intensity and dispersion measure, providing a heuristic model from which one can estimate their contribution to pulsar timing observations, and showing that much of the effect can be corrected making use of measured intensity and dispersion. Finally, we analyze observations of the millisecond pulsar J0437-4715, made with the Parkes radio telescope, that show timing fluctuations which are correlated with intensity. We demonstrate that these timing fluctuations can be corrected, but we find that they are much larger than would be expected from scattering in a homogeneous turbulent plasma with isotropic density fluctuations. We do not have an explanation for these timing fluctuations.

  19. A search of the SAS-2 data for pulsed gamma-ray emission from radio pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogelman, H. B.; Fichtel, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    Data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment were examined for pulsed emission from each of 75 radio pulsars which were viewed by the instrument and which have sufficiently well defined period and period derivative information from radio observations to allow for gamma ray periodicity searches. When gamma ray arrival times were converted to pulsar phase using the radio reference timing information, two pulsars, PSR 1747-46 and PSR 1818-04, showed positive effects, each with a probability less than 0.0001 of being a random fluctuation in the data for that pulsar. These are in addition to PSR 0531+21 and PSR 0833-45, previously reported. The results of this study suggest that gamma-ray astronomy has reached the detection threshold for gamma ray pulsars and that work in the near future should give important information on the nature of pulsars.

  20. A search for binary pulsar companions using multi-wavelength OBSERVATIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Roberto; Yershov, Vladimir; Oates, Samantha; Breeveld, Alice; Pallanca, Cristina; Corongiu, Alessandro; Ferraro, Francesco

    The identification of the stellar companions to binary pulsars is key to study the evolution of the binary system and how this is influenced by the interactions between the two stars. For only a fraction of the known binary pulsars, the stellar companion has been identified. Here, we used 11 source catalogues available from multi-wavelength (optical, infrared, ultraviolet) imaging sky surveys, including the recently released Swift/UVOT and XMM-Newton/OM, to search for the stellar companions of a sample of 144 field binary pulsars (i.e. not in Globular Clusters) selected from the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) data base (version 1.48) and from the public list of gamma-ray pulsars detected by Fermi.

  1. Radio-Quiet Pulsars and Point Sources in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David

    2002-04-01

    Since Baade and Zwicky made their prescient remark identifying the central blue star in the Crab Nebula as a neutron star, this pulsar's period has increased by 0.9 msec, turning 10^48 ergs of rotational kinetic energy into a relativistic wind that has been deposited in its surroundings. This makes the compact remnant of the supernova of 1054 AD highly conspicuous. It also makes this remnant highly anomalous. Nowhere else in the Galaxy does such a luminous young pulsar exists, despite the fact that at least half a dozen core-collapse supernovae have occurred since the Crab's birth. Indeed, the newly discovered central object in Cas A is four orders of magnitude less luminous in the X-ray band. While the Chandra and XMM-Newton Observatories are discovering an increasing number of Crab-like synchrotron nebulae (albeit, far less luminous than the prototype), they are also revealing X-ray point sources inside supernova remnants that lack detectable radio pulses and show no evidence of a relativistic outflow to power a surrounding nebula. I will provide an inventory of these objects, discuss whether or not truly radio-silent young neutron stars exist, and speculate on the emission mechanisms and power sources which make such objects shine. I will conclude with a commentary on the implications of this population for the distributions of pulsar birth parameters such as spin period, magnetic field strength, and space velocity, as well as offer a glimpse of what future observations might reveal about the demographics of core-collapse remnants.

  2. Space velocities of radio pulsars from interstellar scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    Scintillation observations are used to determine the space velocities of 71 radio pulsars, including most of the 26 objects with proper motions derived from interferometry. The scintillation velocity is dominated by the peculiar transverse velocity of the neutron star and is insensitive to differential galactic rotation. Velocities have a broad distribution function ranging up to about 150 km/s with a tail extending to about 300 km/s. There is no definitive appearance of a bimodal distribution, however. A correlation of velocity with PP(dot) is confirmed to be a general property of the radio pulsar population. It cannot be explained by any observational selection effect and most plausibly is due to a relationship between a neutron star's magnetic moment and the momentum impulse given to it at or near the time of its formation. A small fraction of the objects are discrepant with respect to the velocity-PP(dot) relation. For some objects, this discrepancy may be evidence for a peculiar evolutionary history. 41 references.

  3. Constraining the Vela Pulsar's Radio Emission Region Using Nyquist-limited Scintillation Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. D.; Gwinn, C. R.; Demorest, P.

    2012-10-01

    Using a novel technique, we achieve ~100 picoarcsec resolution and set an upper bound of less than 4 km for the characteristic size of the Vela pulsar's emission region. Specifically, we analyze flux-density statistics of the Vela pulsar at 760 MHz. Because the pulsar exhibits strong diffractive scintillation, these statistics convey information about the spatial extent of the radio emission region. We measure both a characteristic size of the emission region and the emission sizes for individual pulses. Our results imply that the radio emission altitude for the Vela pulsar at this frequency is less than 340 km.

  4. CONSTRAINING THE VELA PULSAR'S RADIO EMISSION REGION USING NYQUIST-LIMITED SCINTILLATION STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M. D.; Gwinn, C. R.; Demorest, P. E-mail: cgwinn@physics.ucsb.edu

    2012-10-10

    Using a novel technique, we achieve {approx}100 picoarcsec resolution and set an upper bound of less than 4 km for the characteristic size of the Vela pulsar's emission region. Specifically, we analyze flux-density statistics of the Vela pulsar at 760 MHz. Because the pulsar exhibits strong diffractive scintillation, these statistics convey information about the spatial extent of the radio emission region. We measure both a characteristic size of the emission region and the emission sizes for individual pulses. Our results imply that the radio emission altitude for the Vela pulsar at this frequency is less than 340 km.

  5. A SHAPIRO DELAY DETECTION IN THE BINARY SYSTEM HOSTING THE MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J1910-5959A

    SciTech Connect

    Corongiu, A.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; D'Amico, N.; Camilo, F.; Lyne, A. G.; Kramer, M.; Manchester, R. N.; Johnston, S.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Bailes, M.; Van Straten, W.

    2012-12-01

    PSR J1910-5959A is a binary pulsar with a helium white dwarf (HeWD) companion located about 6 arcmin from the center of the globular cluster NGC 6752. Based on 12 years of observations at the Parkes radio telescope, the relativistic Shapiro delay has been detected in this system. We obtain a companion mass M{sub C} = 0.180 {+-} 0.018 M {sub Sun} (1{sigma}) implying that the pulsar mass lies in the range 1.1 M {sub Sun} {<=} M{sub P} {<=} 1.5 M {sub Sun }. We compare our results with previous optical determinations of the companion mass and examine prospects for using this new measurement for calibrating the mass-radius relation for HeWDs and for investigating their evolution in a pulsar binary system. Finally, we examine the set of binary systems hosting a millisecond pulsar and a low-mass HeWD for which the mass of both stars has been measured. We confirm that the correlation between the companion mass and the orbital period predicted by Tauris and Savonije reproduces the observed values but find that the predicted M{sub P} -P{sub B} correlation overestimates the neutron star mass by about 0.5 M {sub Sun} in the orbital period range covered by the observations. Moreover, a few systems do not obey the observed M{sub P} -P{sub B} correlation. We discuss these results in the framework of the mechanisms that inhibit the accretion of matter by a neutron star during its evolution in a low-mass X-ray binary.

  6. Fast Radio Burst Discovered in the Arecibo Pulsar ALFA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Cordes, J. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Wharton, R. S.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Freire, P. C. C.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Knispel, B.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J. K.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W. W.; Aulbert, C.; Fehrmann, H.

    2014-08-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4 GHz Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 ± 2.0 pc cm-3, pulse width of 3.0 ± 0.5 ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude (b = -0.°2), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line of sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.

  7. Fast radio burst discovered in the Arecibo pulsar ALFA survey

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, L. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Wharton, R. S.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; and others

    2014-08-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4 GHz Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 ± 2.0 pc cm{sup –3}, pulse width of 3.0 ± 0.5 ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude (b = –0.°2), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line of sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.

  8. GAMMA-RAY SIGNAL FROM THE PULSAR WIND IN THE BINARY PULSAR SYSTEM PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    SciTech Connect

    Khangulyan, Dmitry; Bogovalov, Sergey V.; Ribo, Marc E-mail: felix.aharonian@dias.ie E-mail: mribo@am.ub.es

    2011-12-01

    Binary pulsar systems emit potentially detectable components of gamma-ray emission due to Comptonization of the optical radiation of the companion star by relativistic electrons of the pulsar wind, both before and after termination of the wind. The recent optical observations of binary pulsar system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 revealed radiation properties of the companion star which differ significantly from previous measurements. In this paper, we study the implications of these observations for the interaction rate of the unshocked pulsar wind with the stellar photons and the related consequences for fluxes of high energy and very high energy (VHE) gamma rays. We show that the signal should be strong enough to be detected with Fermi close to the periastron passage, unless the pulsar wind is strongly anisotropic or the Lorentz factor of the wind is smaller than 10{sup 3} or larger than 10{sup 5}. The higher luminosity of the optical star also has two important implications: (1) attenuation of gamma rays due to photon-photon pair production and (2) Compton drag of the unshocked wind. While the first effect has an impact on the light curve of VHE gamma rays, the second effect may significantly decrease the energy available for particle acceleration after termination of the wind.

  9. Gamma rays from hidden millisecond pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1992-01-01

    The properties were studied of a new class of gamma ray sources consisting of millisecond pulsars totally or partially surrounded by evaporating material from irradiated companion stars. Hidden millisecond pulsars offer a unique possibility to study gamma ray, optical and radio emission from vaporizing binaries. The relevance of this class of binaries for GRO observations and interpretation of COS-B data is emphasized.

  10. Blind searches for radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars with Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormody, Michael Harry

    Blind searches for radio-quiet pulsars have been extremely fruitful, with over two dozen detected in searches of LAT point sources. While there is a general idea that the blind search sensitivity to radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars is worse compared with the sensitivity to radio-loud pulsars, it has not been well established quantitatively. To achieve this, we simulate pulsars across a wide variety of rotational and spectral parameters, and search for pulsations in their corresponding LAT optimized positions. Using these results, we can estimate the detection threshold given a location on the sky and a spectral model. We also explore the benefit of using counterpart source locations from multiwavelength observations (e.g. X-rays). The sensitivity to blind searches can be used to estimate the gamma-ray pulsar birth distribution, an open question in pulsar astronomy. We use a model for galactic gamma-ray pulsars and evolve them to the present-day via the gravitational potential of the Galaxy. By comparing the resulting distribution with the known pulsar distribution, we can effectively rule out certain birth models at high confidence and place an estimate on the number of galactic gamma-ray pulsars.

  11. Linear-drifting subpulse sources in radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. B.

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of plasma acceleration in pulsars with positive corotational charge density has shown that any element of area on the polar cap is bi-stable: it can be in phases either of pure proton emission or of mixed ions and protons (the ion phase). Ion-phase zones are concentrated near the edge of the polar cap, and are physical bases for the coherent radio emission observed as components within the mean pulse profile. The state of the polar cap is generally chaotic, but organized linear motion of ion zones in a peripheral band is possible and is the likely source of subpulse drift. It is shown that several patterns of limited movement are possible and can account for the varied phenomena observed including mirror and bi-directional drifting.

  12. Low-radio-frequency eclipses of the redback pulsar J2215+5135 observed in the image plane with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Breton, R. P.; Stewart, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Bell, M. E.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Jonker, P.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Law, C. J.; Markoff, S.; Molenaar, G. J.; Pietka, M.; Scheers, L. H. A.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B. W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M. W.; Zarka, P.

    2016-04-01

    The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. `black widows' and `redbacks') are often studied using high-time-resolution, `beamformed' radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of 2 weeks - 6 months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent (∝ν-0.4), such that the pulsar is eclipsed for longer at lower frequencies, in broad agreement with beamformed studies of other similar sources. Furthermore, the detection of the eclipses in imaging data suggests an eclipsing medium that absorbs the pulsed emission, rather than scattering it. Our study is also a demonstration of the prospects of finding pulsars in wide-field imaging surveys with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes.

  13. Low-radio-frequency eclipses of the redback pulsar J2215+5135 observed in the image plane with LOFAR

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Breton, R. P.; Stewart, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Bell, M. E.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Jonker, P.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Law, C. J.; Markoff, S.; Molenaar, G. J.; Pietka, M.; Scheers, L. H. A.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B. W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M. W.; Zarka, P.

    2016-01-01

    The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. ‘black widows’ and ‘redbacks’) are often studied using high-time-resolution, ‘beamformed’ radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of two weeks – six months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent (∝ν−0.4), such that the pulsar is eclipsed for longer at lower frequencies, in broad agreement with beamformed studies of other similar sources. Furthermore, the detection of the eclipses in imaging data suggests an eclipsing medium that absorbs the pulsed emission, rather than scattering it. Our study is also a demonstration of the prospects of finding pulsars in wide-field imaging surveys with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes. PMID:27279782

  14. Low-radio-frequency eclipses of the redback pulsar J2215+5135 observed in the image plane with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Breton, R. P.; Stewart, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Bell, M. E.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Jonker, P.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Law, C. J.; Markoff, S.; Molenaar, G. J.; Pietka, M.; Scheers, L. H. A.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B. W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M. W.; Zarka, P.

    2016-07-01

    The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. `black widows' and `redbacks') are often studied using high-time-resolution, `beamformed' radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of two weeks - six months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent (∝ν-0.4), such that the pulsar is eclipsed for longer at lower frequencies, in broad agreement with beamformed studies of other similar sources. Furthermore, the detection of the eclipses in imaging data suggests an eclipsing medium that absorbs the pulsed emission, rather than scattering it. Our study is also a demonstration of the prospects of finding pulsars in wide-field imaging surveys with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes.

  15. Synchronous x-ray and radio mode switches: a rapid global transformation of the pulsar magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, W; Hessels, J W T; Kuiper, L; van Leeuwen, J; Mitra, D; de Plaa, J; Rankin, J M; Stappers, B W; Wright, G A E; Basu, R; Alexov, A; Coenen, T; Grießmeier, J-M; Hassall, T E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Noutsos, A; Serylak, M; Pilia, M; Sobey, C; Weltevrede, P; Zagkouris, K; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Batejat, F; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Macario, G; Markoff, S; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Miller-Jones, J C A; Morganti, R; Munk, H; Orrú, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Rawlings, S; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schoenmakers, A; Shulevski, A; Sluman, J; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Vermeulen, R; van de Brink, R H; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2013-01-25

    Pulsars emit from low-frequency radio waves up to high-energy gamma-rays, generated anywhere from the stellar surface out to the edge of the magnetosphere. Detecting correlated mode changes across the electromagnetic spectrum is therefore key to understanding the physical relationship among the emission sites. Through simultaneous observations, we detected synchronous switching in the radio and x-ray emission properties of PSR B0943+10. When the pulsar is in a sustained radio-"bright" mode, the x-rays show only an unpulsed, nonthermal component. Conversely, when the pulsar is in a radio-"quiet" mode, the x-ray luminosity more than doubles and a 100% pulsed thermal component is observed along with the nonthermal component. This indicates rapid, global changes to the conditions in the magnetosphere, which challenge all proposed pulsar emission theories. PMID:23349288

  16. Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsars from the Galactic Plane and the Gould Belt

    SciTech Connect

    Gonthier, P. L.

    2005-03-17

    We present recent results of a pulsar population synthesis study in the polar cap model that includes the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey, realistic beam geometries for radio and {gamma}-ray emission from neutron stars born in the Galactic disc as well as the local Gould Belt. We include nine radio surveys to normalize the simulated results from the Galactic disc to the number of radio pulsars observed by the group of selected surveys. In normalizing the contribution of the Gould Belt, we use results from a recent study that indicates a supernova rate in the Gould Belt of 3 to 5 times that of the local region of the Galactic plane leading to {approx}100 neutron stars born in the Gould Belt during the last 5 Myr. Our simulations include the dynamical evolution of the Gould Belt where neutron stars are produced in the plane of the Gould Belt during the past 5 Myr. We discuss the simulated numbers of radio-quiet (those below flux threshold of radio surveys) and radio-loud, {gamma}-ray pulsars from the Galactic disc and the Gould belt observed by {gamma}-ray telescopes EGRET, AGILE and GLAST. They suggest that about 35 of the unidentified EGRET sources could be (mostly radio-loud) {gamma}-ray pulsars with 2/3 of them born in the Galactic disc and 1/3 in the Gould Belt.

  17. Magnetospheric Interactions of Binary Pulsars as a Model for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vietri, Mario

    1996-11-01

    I consider a model of gamma -ray bursts in which they arise right before the merging of binary pulsars. A binary pulsar moving through its companion's magnetic field experiences a large, motional electric field E = v X B/c, which leads to the release in the pulsar's magnetosphere of a pair cascade and the acceleration of a wind of pure pairs. The energy and energy deposition rate of the wind are those of gamma -ray bursts, provided the pulsars have a field of ~1015 G. Baryon contamination is small and dominated by tidal heating, leading to Mbaryon ~ 10-6 Msolar, as required by the dirty-fireball model of Meszaros, Laguna, & Rees.

  18. Radio emission of RRAT-pulsars at a frequency of 111 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losovsky, Boris; Dmitry Dumsky, Mr/.

    We will report about our resalts concerning the observations of a number of Rotating Radio Transient (RRAT) pulsars .These observations have been carried out at Large Phased Array of P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute at 111 MHz during 2010-2013 years. RRAT- pulsars were first discovered in archive Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey [1,2]and Arecibo Pulsar Survey[3] at higher frequency 1400 MHz and some pulsars were discovered at frequency of 350 MHz with Green Bank Telescope[4]. A characteristic feature of these pulsars is sporadic radio emission in rare active phase and no radio emission for a long time making it difficult to find periodicity .Fast Folding Algorithm processing of observations at 111 MHz shows that even in passive phase RRAT-pulsars generate weak radio emission with the period corresponding to the period of sporadic radio pulses observed in the active phase. The flux density of the radio emission of these pulsars in passive phase is rather small even at low frequency 111 MHz, that greatly complicates its registration at high frequencies since flux density of the RRAT- pulsars decreases with increasing frequency.\\ ȩnterline{References}\\ 1.McLaughlin M.A., Lyne A.G., Lorimer D.R. et al., 2006, Nature,439,817. 2.Keane E.F., Ludovici D.A., Eatough E.P. et al., 2010, MNRAS,401,1057. 3.Deneva J.S., Cordes J.M., McLaughlin M.A. et al., 2009,ApJ,703,2259. 4.Keane E.F.,McLaughlin M.A., Bull.Astr.Soc.India, 2011,39,1.

  19. CONSTRAINING THE EVOLUTIONARY FATE OF CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS: ''OLD'' RADIO PULSARS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-09-10

    Central compact objects (CCOs) constitute a population of radio-quiet, slowly spinning (≥100 ms) young neutron stars with anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities. Their spin-down properties imply weak dipole magnetic fields (∼10{sup 10-11} G) and characteristic ages much greater than the ages of their host supernova remnants (SNRs). However, CCOs may posses strong ''hidden'' internal magnetic fields that may re-emerge on timescales of ≳10 kyr, with the neutron star possibly activating as a radio pulsar in the process. This suggests that the immediate descendants of CCOs may be masquerading as slowly spinning ''old'' radio pulsars. We present an X-ray survey of all ordinary radio pulsars within 6 kpc that are positionally coincident with Galactic SNRs in order to test the possible connection between the supposedly old but possibly very young pulsars and the SNRs. None of the targets exhibit anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities, suggesting that they are genuine old ordinary pulsars unrelated to the superposed SNRs. This implies that CCOs are either latent radio pulsars that activate long after their SNRs dissipate or they remain permanently radio-quiet. The true descendants of CCOs remain at large.

  20. HIGH-PRECISION TIMING OF FIVE MILLISECOND PULSARS: SPACE VELOCITIES, BINARY EVOLUTION, AND EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M. E.; Stairs, I. H.; Ferdman, R. D.; Lyne, A. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M.; Nice, D. J.; Demorest, P. B.; Ransom, S. M.; Camilo, F.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2011-12-20

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km s{sup -1}, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems, we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M{sub Sun }. The implications of the results presented here to our understanding of binary pulsar evolution are discussed. The updated parameters for the binary systems studied here, together with recently discovered similar systems, allowed us to update previous limits on the violation of the strong equivalence principle through the parameter |{Delta}| to 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} (95% confidence) and the violation of Lorentz invariance/momentum conservation through the parameter |{alpha}-hat3| to 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} (95% confidence).

  1. Neutrinos from binary pulsars. [generated by high energy particles striking companion star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that binary systems containing moderately young pulsars may emit high-energy neutrinos (between 1 and 100 TeV) at detectable levels. The pulsars are assumed to have total luminosities of the order of 10 to the 38th erg/sec. The neutrinos are produced by high energy particles (e.g. protons) from the pulsar striking the companion. Cyg X3 may be detectable in high-energy neutrinos if it emits greater than about 10 to the 35th erg/sec in high-energy protons. There may be a whole class of objects like Cyg X3, but obscured by thick accretion clouds.

  2. Deep searches for decametre-wavelength pulsed emission from radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Yogesh; Aswathappa, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of extensive follow-up observations of the gamma-ray pulsar J1732-3131, which has recently been detected at decametre wavelengths, and the results of deep searches for the counterparts of nine other radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars at 34 MHz, using the Gauribidanur radio telescope. No periodic signal from J1732-3131 could be detected above a detection threshold of 8σ, even with an effective integration time of more than 40 h. However, the average profile obtained by combining data from several epochs, at a dispersion measure of 15.44 pc cm-3, is found to be consistent with that from the earlier detection of this pulsar at a confidence level of 99.2 per cent. We present this consistency between the two profiles as evidence that J1732-3131 is a faint radio pulsar with an average flux density of 200-400 mJy at 34 MHz. Despite the extremely bright sky background at such low frequencies, the detection sensitivity of our deep searches is generally comparable to that of higher frequency searches for these pulsars, when scaled using reasonable assumptions about the underlying pulsar spectrum. We provide details of our deep searches, and put stringent upper limits on the decametre-wavelength flux densities of several radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars.

  3. New Discoveries from the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey Radio Transient Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneva, J. S.; Stovall, K.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Bagchi, M.; Bates, S. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Martinez, J. G.; Jenet, F.; Garver-Daniels, N.

    2016-04-01

    We present Clusterrank, a new algorithm for identifying dispersed astrophysical pulses. Such pulses are commonly detected from Galactic pulsars and rotating radio transients (RRATs), which are neutron stars with sporadic radio emission. More recently, isolated, highly dispersed pulses dubbed fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been identified as the potential signature of an extragalactic cataclysmic radio source distinct from pulsars and RRATs. Clusterrank helped us discover 14 pulsars and 8 RRATs in data from the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey (AO327). The new RRATs have DMs in the range 23.5–86.6 pc cm‑3 and periods in the range 0.172–3.901 s. The new pulsars have DMs in the range 23.6–133.3 pc cm‑3 and periods in the range 1.249–5.012 s, and include two nullers and a mode-switching object. We estimate an upper limit on the all-sky FRB rate of 105 day‑1 for bursts with a width of 10 ms and flux density ≳83 mJy. The DMs of all new discoveries are consistent with a Galactic origin. In comparing statistics of the new RRATs with sources from the RRATalog, we find that both sets are drawn from the same period distribution. In contrast, we find that the period distribution of the new pulsars is different from the period distributions of canonical pulsars in the ATNF catalog or pulsars found in AO327 data by a periodicity search. This indicates that Clusterrank is a powerful complement to periodicity searches and uncovers a subset of the pulsar population that has so far been underrepresented in survey results and therefore in Galactic pulsar population models.

  4. Searching for GW signals from eccentric supermassive black-hole binaries with pulsar-timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stephen; Gair, Jonathan; Huerta, Eliu; McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The mergers of massive galaxies leads to the formation of supermassive black-hole binaries in the common merger remnants. Various mechanisms have been proposed to harden these binaries into the adiabatic GW inspiral regime, from interactions with circumbinary disks to stellar scattering. It may be the case that these mechanisms leave the binary with a residual eccentricity, such that the deviation to the time-of-arrival of pulsar signals induced by the emitted GW passing between the Earth and a pulsar will contain a signature of this eccentricity. Current pulsar-timing search pipelines only probe circular binary systems, but much effort is now being devoted to considering the influence of the binary environment on GW signals. We will detail our efforts in constructing a generalised GW search pipeline to constrain the eccentricity of single systems with arrays of precisely-timed pulsars, which may shed light on the influence of various supermassive black-hole binary hardening mechanisms and illuminate the importance of environmental couplings.

  5. Observations and modeling of the companions of short period binary millisecond pulsars: evidence for high-mass neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Joshua; Halpern, Jules

    2014-10-01

    We present observations of fields containing eight recently discovered binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, we present the fully phase-resolved B, V, and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135 for which we employ model fitting using the eclipsing light curve (ELC) model of Orosz and Hauschildt to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744, we find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio observations to be M {sub NS} > 1.75 M {sub ☉} at the 3σ level. We also find a discrepancy between the model temperature and the measured colors of this object, which we interpret as possible evidence for an additional high-temperature source such as a quiescent disk. Given this and the fact that PSR J2215+5135 contains a relatively high mass companion (M {sub c} > 0.1 M {sub ☉}), we propose that similar to the binary pulsar systems PSR J1023+0038 and IGR J18245–2452, the pulsar may transition between accretion- and rotation-powered modes.

  6. A Coincident Search for Radio and Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardena, Brett

    2011-05-01

    The merger of neutron star-neutron star binary pairs may be accompanied by the prompt emission of a coherent low-frequency radio pulse. This radio transient is produced as synchrotron radiation caused by the spin and rotation of the surface charge density of a pulsar through the magnetosphere of a larger neutron star, usually referred to as a Magnetar . This type of merger event would also result in the release of a gravitational coalescence wave-form. We will discuss a coincident radio transient and gravitational wave search. This search is being conducted by two radio telescope arrays: The Long Wave Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) in coordination with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We will outline this ongoing coincident search and discuss some preliminary results.

  7. Radio crickets: chirping jets from black hole binaries entering their gravitational wave inspiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    We study a novel electromagnetic signature of supermassive black hole (BH) binaries whose inspiral starts being dominated by gravitational wave (GW) emission. Recent simulations suggest that the binary's member BHs can continue to accrete gas from the circumbinary accretion disc in this phase of the binary's evolution, all the way until coalescence. If one of the binary members produces a radio jet as a result of accretion, the jet precesses along a biconical surface due to the binary's orbital motion. When the binary enters the GW phase of its evolution, the opening angle widens, the jet exhibits milliarcsecond-scale wiggles, and the conical surface of jet precession is twisted due to apparent superluminal motion. The rapidly increasing orbital velocity of the binary gives the jet an appearance of a `chirp'. This helical chirping morphology of the jet can be used to infer the binary parameters. For binaries with mass 107-1010 M⊙ at redshifts z < 0.5, monitoring these features in current and archival data will place a lower limit on sources that could be detected by Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and Pulsar Timing Arrays. In the future, microarcsecond interferometry with the Square Kilometre Array will increase the potential usefulness of this technique.

  8. A PRECISE MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BINARY PULSAR PSR J1802 - 2124

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdman, R. D.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Theureau, G.; Stairs, I. H.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Nice, D. J.; Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G.; Lyne, A. G.; Faulkner, A.; Camilo, F.; Possenti, A.; Demorest, P. B.; Backer, D. C.

    2010-03-10

    PSR J1802 - 2124 is a 12.6 ms pulsar in a 16.8 hr binary orbit with a relatively massive white dwarf (WD) companion. These properties make it a member of the intermediate-mass class of binary pulsar (IMBP) systems. We have been timing this pulsar since its discovery in 2002. Concentrated observations at the Green Bank Telescope, augmented with data from the Parkes and Nancay observatories, have allowed us to determine the general relativistic Shapiro delay. This has yielded pulsar and WD mass measurements of 1.24 +- 0.11 M{sub sun} and 0.78 +- 0.04 M{sub sun} (68% confidence), respectively. The low mass of the pulsar, the high mass of the WD companion, the short orbital period, and the pulsar spin period may be explained by the system having gone through a common-envelope phase in its evolution. We argue that selection effects may contribute to the relatively small number of known IMBPs.

  9. Observational properties of pulsars.

    PubMed

    Manchester, R N

    2004-04-23

    Pulsars are remarkable clocklike celestial sources that are believed to be rotating neutron stars formed in supernova explosions. They are valuable tools for investigations into topics such as neutron star interiors, globular cluster dynamics, the structure of the interstellar medium, and gravitational physics. Searches at radio and x-ray wavelengths over the past 5 years have resulted in a large increase in the number of known pulsars and the discovery of new populations of pulsars, posing challenges to theories of binary and stellar evolution. Recent images at radio, optical, and x-ray wavelengths have revealed structures resulting from the interaction of pulsar winds with the surrounding interstellar medium, giving new insights into the physics of pulsars. PMID:15105491

  10. Pulsar-irradiated stars in dense globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the properties of stars irradiated by millisecond pulsars in 'hard' binaries of dense globular clusters. Irradiation by a relativistic pulsar wind as in the case of the eclipsing millisecond pulsar PSR 1957+20 alter both the magnitude and color of the companion star. Some of the blue stragglers (BSs) recently discovered in dense globular clusters can be irradiated stars in binaries containing powerful millisecond pulsars. The discovery of pulsar-driven orbital modulations of BS brightness and color with periods of a few hours together with evidence for radio and/or gamma-ray emission from BS binaries would valuably contribute to the understanding of the evolution of collapsed stars in globular clusters. Pulsar-driven optical modulation of cluster stars might be the only observable effect of a new class of binary pulsars, i.e., hidden millisecond pulsars enshrouded in the evaporated material lifted off from the irradiated companion star.

  11. ARECIBO PALFA SURVEY AND EINSTEIN-HOME: BINARY PULSAR DISCOVERY BY VOLUNTEER COMPUTING

    SciTech Connect

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Fehrmann, H.; Lazarus, P.; Bogdanov, S.; Anderson, D.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Camilo, F.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Desvignes, G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.

    2011-05-01

    We report the discovery of the 20.7 ms binary pulsar J1952+2630, made using the distributed computing project Einstein-Home in Pulsar ALFA survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Follow-up observations with the Arecibo telescope confirm the binary nature of the system. We obtain a circular orbital solution with an orbital period of 9.4 hr, a projected orbital radius of 2.8 lt-s, and a mass function of f = 0.15 M{sub sun} by analysis of spin period measurements. No evidence of orbital eccentricity is apparent; we set a 2{sigma} upper limit e {approx}< 1.7 x 10{sup -3}. The orbital parameters suggest a massive white dwarf companion with a minimum mass of 0.95 M{sub sun}, assuming a pulsar mass of 1.4 M{sub sun}. Most likely, this pulsar belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Future timing observations will aim to determine the parameters of this system further, measure relativistic effects, and elucidate the nature of the companion star.

  12. Role of Beam Geometry in Population Statistics and Pulse Profiles of Radio and Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Van Guilder, Robert; Harding, Alice K.

    2004-04-01

    We present results of a pulsar population synthesis study that incorporates a number of recent developments and some significant improvements over our previous study. We have included the results of the Parkes multibeam pulsar survey in our select group of nine radio surveys, doubling our sample of radio pulsars. More realistic geometries for the radio and γ-ray beams are included in our Monte Carlo computer code, which simulates the characteristics of the Galactic population of radio and γ-ray pulsars. We adopted with some modifications the radio-beam geometry of Arzoumanian, Chernoff, and Cordes. For the γ-ray beam, we have assumed the slot gap geometry described in the work of Muslimov and Harding. To account for the shape of the distribution of radio pulsars in the P-P diagram, we continue to find that decay of the magnetic field on a timescale of 2.8 Myr is needed. With all nine surveys, our model predicts that EGRET should have seen seven radio-quiet (below the sensitivity of these radio surveys) and 19 radio-loud γ-ray pulsars. AGILE (nominal sensitivity map) is expected to detect 13 radio-quiet and 37 radio-loud γ-ray pulsars, while GLAST, with greater sensitivity, is expected to detect 276 radio-quiet and 344 radio-loud γ-ray pulsars. When the Parkes multibeam pulsar survey is excluded, the ratio of radio-loud to radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars decreases, especially for GLAST. The decrease for EGRET is 45%, implying that some fraction of EGRET unidentified sources are radio-loud γ-ray pulsars. In the radio geometry adopted, short-period pulsars are core dominated. Unlike the EGRET γ-ray pulsars, our model predicts that when two γ-ray peaks appear in the pulse profile, a dominant radio core peak appears in between the γ-ray peaks. Our findings suggest that further improvements are required in describing both the radio and γ-ray geometries.

  13. The Role of Beam Geometry in Population Statistics and Pulse Profiles of Radio and Gamma-ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; VanGuilder, Robert; Harding, Alice K.

    2004-01-01

    We present results of a pulsar population synthesis study that incorporates a number of recent developments and some significant improvements over our previous study. We have included the results of the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey in our select group of nine radio surveys, doubling our sample of radio pulsars. More realistic geometries for the radio and gamma-ray beams are included in our Monte Carlo computer code that simulates the characteristics of the Galactic population of radio and gamma-ray pulsars. We adopted with some modifications the radio beam geometry of Arzoumanian, Chernoff & Cordes (2002). For the gamma-ray beam, we have assumed the slot gap geometry described in the work of Muslimov & Harding (2003). To account for the shape of the distribution of radio pulsars in the P(dot) - P diagram, we continue to find that decay of the magnetic field on a timescale of 2.8 Myr is needed. With all nine surveys, our model predicts that EGRET should have seen 7 radio-quiet (below the sensitivity of these radio surveys) and 19 radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. AGILE (nominal sensitivity map) is expected to detect 13 radio-quiet and 37 radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars, while GLAST, with greater sensitivity is expected to detect 276 radio-quiet and 344 radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. When the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey is excluded, the ratio of radio-loud to radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars decreases, especially for GLAST. The decrease for EGRET is 45%, implying that some fraction of EGRET unidentified sources are radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. In the radio geometry adopted, short period pulsars are core dominated. Unlike the EGRET gamma-ray pulsars, our model predicts that when two gamma-ray peaks appear in the pulse profile, a dominant radio core peak appears in between the gamma-ray peaks. Our findings suggest that further improvements are required in describing both the radio and gamma-ray geometries.

  14. X-RAY PULSATIONS FROM THE RADIO-QUIET GAMMA-RAY PULSAR IN CTA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Caraveo, P. A.; De Luca, A.; Marelli, M.; Bignami, G. F.; Ray, P. S.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Kanbach, G.

    2010-12-10

    Prompted by the Fermi-LAT discovery of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar inside the CTA 1 supernova remnant, we obtained a 130 ks XMM-Newton observation to assess the timing behavior of this pulsar. Exploiting both the unprecedented photon harvest and the contemporary Fermi-LAT timing measurements, a 4.7{sigma} single-peak pulsation is detected, making PSR J0007+7303 the second example, after Geminga, of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar also seen to pulsate in X-rays. Phase-resolved spectroscopy shows that the off-pulse portion of the light curve is dominated by a power-law, non-thermal spectrum, while the X-ray peak emission appears to be mainly of thermal origin, probably from a polar cap heated by magnetospheric return currents, pointing to a hot spot varying throughout the pulsar rotation.

  15. Pulsar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Pulsars are thought to emit relatively narrow radio beams, shown as green in this animation. If these beams don't sweep toward Earth, astronomers cannot detect the radio signals. Pulsar gamma-ray e...

  16. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRACOMPACT GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY CANDIDATE

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Albert K. H.; Jin, Ruolan; Yen, T.-C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Lin, L. C. C.; Hu, C.-P.; Hui, C. Y.; Park, S. M.; Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S.; Kim, C. L.

    2014-10-20

    We report multi-wavelength observations of the unidentified Fermi object 2FGL J1653.6-0159. With the help of high-resolution X-ray observations, we have identified an X-ray and optical counterpart to 2FGL J1653.6-0159. The source exhibits a periodic modulation of 75 minutes in the optical and possibly also in the X-ray. We suggest that 2FGL J1653.6-0159 is a compact binary system with an orbital period of 75 minutes. Combining the gamma-ray and X-ray properties, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 is potentially a black-widow-/redback-type gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP). The optical and X-ray light curve profiles show that the companion is mildly heated by the high-energy emission and that the X-rays are from intrabinary shock. Although no radio pulsation has yet been detected, we estimated that the spin period of the MSP is ∼ 2 ms based on a theoretical model. If pulsation can be confirmed in the future, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 will become the first ultracompact rotation-powered MSP.

  17. DIVERSITY OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS FROM COMPACT BINARY MERGERS HOSTING PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Cole; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Montes, Gabriela

    2014-07-20

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) are widely believed to result from the mergers of compact binaries. This model predicts an afterglow that bears the characteristic signatures of a constant, low-density medium, including a smooth prompt-afterglow transition, and a simple temporal evolution. However, these expectations are in conflict with observations for a non-negligible fraction of sGRB afterglows. In particular, the onset of the afterglow phase for some of these events appears to be delayed and, in addition, a few of them exhibit late-time rapid fading in their light curves. We show that these peculiar observations can be explained independently of ongoing central engine activity if some sGRB progenitors are compact binaries hosting at least one pulsar. The Poynting flux emanating from the pulsar companion can excavate a bow-shock cavity surrounding the binary. If this cavity is larger than the shock deceleration length scale in the undisturbed interstellar medium, then the onset of the afterglow will be delayed. Should the deceleration occur entirely within the swept-up thin shell, a rapid fade in the light curve will ensue. We identify two types of pulsar that can achieve the conditions necessary for altering the afterglow: low-field, long-lived pulsars, and high-field pulsars. We find that a sizable fraction (≈20%-50%) of low-field pulsars are likely to reside in neutron star binaries based on observations, while their high-field counterparts are not. Hydrodynamical calculations motivated by this model are shown to be in good agreement with observations of sGRB afterglow light curves.

  18. The complex polarization angles of radio pulsars: orthogonal jumps and interstellar scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karastergiou, A.

    2009-01-01

    Despite some success in explaining the observed polarization angle swing of radio pulsars within the geometric rotating vector model, many deviations from the expected S-like swing are observed. In this Letter, we provide a simple and credible explanation of these variations based on a combination of the rotating vector model, intrinsic orthogonally polarized propagation modes within the pulsar magnetosphere and the effects of interstellar scattering. We use simulations to explore the range of phenomena that may arise from this combination, and briefly discuss the possibilities of determining the parameters of scattering in an effort to understand the intrinsic pulsar polarization.

  19. A search of the SAS-2 data for pulsed gamma-ray emission from radio pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogelman, H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Data from the SAS-2 high-energy (above 35 MeV) gamma-ray experiment have been examined for pulsed emission from each of 75 radio pulsars which were viewed by the instrument and which have sufficiently well-defined period and period-derivative information from radio observations to allow for gamma-ray periodicity searches. When gamma-ray arrival times were converted to pulsar phase using the radio reference timing information, two pulsars, PSR 1747-46 and PSR 1818-04, showed positive effects, each with a probability of less than 1 part in 10,000 of being a random fluctuation in the data for that pulsar. These are in addition to PSR 0531+21 and PSR 0833-45, previously reported. The results of this study suggest that gamma-ray astronomy has reached the detection threshold for gamma-ray pulsars and that work in the near future should give important new information on the nature of pulsars.

  20. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. L.; Wang, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = Aν{sup μ} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, η = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have η < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ≤η ≤ 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have η > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  1. SAS-2 gamma-ray observations of PSR 1747-46. [radio pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence is reported for the observation of gamma-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 1747-46 by the gamma-ray telescope aboard SAS 2. The evidence is based on the presence of both an approximately 3-sigma enhancement of gamma rays at the pulsar's location and an approximately 4-sigma peak in the phase plot of 79 gamma-ray events whose phase was calculated from the pulsar's known period. The gamma-ray pulsation is found to appear at a phase lag of about 0.16 from that predicted by the radio observations. The pulsed gamma-ray fluxes above 35 MeV and 100 MeV are estimated, and it is shown that the gamma-ray pulse width is similar to the radio pulse width. It is concluded that PSR 1747-46 is a most likely candidate for pulsed gamma-ray emission.

  2. A Likely Millisecond Pulsar Binary Counterpart for Fermi Source 2FGL J2039.6-5620

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2015-10-01

    We have identified an optical/X-ray binary with an orbital period of Pb = 5.47 hr as the likely counterpart of the Fermi source 2FGL J2039.6-5620. GROND, SOAR, and DES observations provide an accurate orbital period and allow us to compare to the light curve of an archival XMM exposure. Like many short-period optical/X-ray binaries associated with Large Area Telescope sources, this may be an interacting (black widow/redback) millisecond pulsar binary. The X-ray light curve is consistent with the emission associated with an intrabinary shock. The optical light curve shows evidence of companion heating, but has a peculiar asymmetric double peak. The nature of this optical structure is not yet clear; additional optical studies and, in particular, detection of an orbital modulation in a γ-ray pulsar are needed to elucidate the nature of this peculiar source.

  3. Properties and Evolution of the Redback Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J2129-0429

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Kaplan, David L.; Breton, Rene P.; Phinney, E. Sterl; Bhalerao, Varun B.; Camilo, Fernando; Dahal, Sumit; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, Andrew J.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Laher, Russ R.; Levitan, David B.; Lewis, Fraser; Mahabal, Ashish A.; Ofek, Eran O.; Prince, Thomas A.; Ransom, Scott M.; Roberts, Mallory S. E.; Russell, David M.; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason A.; Tang, Sumin

    2016-01-01

    PSR J2129-0429 is a “redback” eclipsing millisecond pulsar binary with an unusually long 15.2 hr orbit. It was discovered by the Green Bank Telescope in a targeted search of unidentified Fermi gamma-ray sources. The pulsar companion is optically bright (mean mR = 16.6 mag), allowing us to construct the longest baseline photometric data set available for such a system. We present 10 years of archival and new photometry of the companion from the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research Survey, the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey, the Palomar Transient Factory, the Palomar 60 inch, and the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope. Radial velocity spectroscopy using the Double-Beam Spectrograph on the Palomar 200 inch indicates that the pulsar is massive: 1.74 ± 0.18 {M}⊙ . The G-type pulsar companion has mass 0.44 ± 0.04 {M}⊙ , one of the heaviest known redback companions. It is currently 95 ± 1% Roche-lobe filling and only mildly irradiated by the pulsar. We identify a clear 13.1 mmag yr-1 secular decline in the mean magnitude of the companion as well as smaller-scale variations in the optical light curve shape. This behavior may indicate that the companion is cooling. Binary evolution calculations indicate that PSR J2129-0429 has an orbital period almost exactly at the bifurcation period between systems that converge into tighter orbits as black widows and redbacks and those that diverge into wider pulsar-white dwarf binaries. Its eventual fate may depend on whether it undergoes future episodes of mass transfer and increased irradiation.

  4. Wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles of 100 radio pulsars with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Zagkouris, K.; Hassall, T. E.; Bilous, A. V.; Breton, R. P.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Keane, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Serylak, M.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Bîrzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; de Geus, E.; de Jong, A.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Heald, G.; Horneffer, A.; Jonker, P.; Juette, E.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Nelles, A.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2016-02-01

    Context. LOFAR offers the unique capability of observing pulsars across the 10-240 MHz frequency range with a fractional bandwidth of roughly 50%. This spectral range is well suited for studying the frequency evolution of pulse profile morphology caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic effects such as changing emission altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere or scatter broadening by the interstellar medium, respectively. Aims: The magnitude of most of these effects increases rapidly towards low frequencies. LOFAR can thus address a number of open questions about the nature of radio pulsar emission and its propagation through the interstellar medium. Methods: We present the average pulse profiles of 100 pulsars observed in the two LOFAR frequency bands: high band (120-167 MHz, 100 profiles) and low band (15-62 MHz, 26 profiles). We compare them with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and Lovell Telescope observations at higher frequencies (350 and 1400 MHz) to study the profile evolution. The profiles were aligned in absolute phase by folding with a new set of timing solutions from the Lovell Telescope, which we present along with precise dispersion measures obtained with LOFAR. Results: We find that the profile evolution with decreasing radio frequency does not follow a specific trend; depending on the geometry of the pulsar, new components can enter into or be hidden from view. Nonetheless, in general our observations confirm the widening of pulsar profiles at low frequencies, as expected from radius-to-frequency mapping or birefringence theories. We offer this catalogue of low-frequency pulsar profiles in a user friendly way via the EPN Database of Pulsar Profiles, http://www.epta.eu.org/epndb/

  5. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    PubMed

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations. PMID:23002736

  6. Discovery of millisecond pulsars in radio searches of southern Fermi Large Area Telescope sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, M. J.; Johnston, S.; Ray, P. S.; Ferrara, E. C.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Çelik, Ö.; Belfiore, A.; Donato, D.; Cheung, C. C.; Abdo, A. A.; Camilo, F.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Kramer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Ransom, S. M.; Romani, R. W.; Smith, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Weltevrede, P.; Wood, K. S.

    2011-06-01

    Using the Parkes Radio Telescope, we have carried out deep observations of 11 unassociated gamma-ray sources. Periodicity searches of these data have discovered two millisecond pulsars, PSR J1103-5403 (1FGL J1103.9-5355) and PSR J2241-5236 (1FGL J2241.9-5236), and a long-period pulsar, PSR J1604-44 (1FGL J1604.7-4443). In addition, we searched for but did not detect any radio pulsations from six gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi satellite to a level of ˜0.04 mJy (for pulsars with a 10 per cent duty cycle). The timing of the millisecond pulsar PSR J1103-5403 has shown that its position is 9 arcmin from the centroid of the gamma-ray source. Since these observations were carried out, independent evidence has shown that 1FGL J1103.9-5355 is associated with the flat spectrum radio source PKS 1101-536. It appears certain that the pulsar is not associated with the gamma-ray source, despite the seemingly low probability of a chance detection of a radio millisecond pulsar. We consider that PSR J1604-44 is a chance discovery of a weak, long-period pulsar and is unlikely to be associated with 1FGL J1604.7-4443. PSR J2241-5236 has a spin period of 2.2 ms and orbits a very low mass companion with a 3.5-h orbital period. The relatively high flux density and low dispersion measure of PSR J2241-5236 make it an excellent candidate for high precision timing experiments. The gamma rays of 1FGL J2241.9-5236 have a spectrum that is well modelled by a power law with an exponential cut-off, and phase binning with the radio ephemeris results in a multipeaked gamma-ray pulse profile. Observations with Chandra have identified a coincident X-ray source within 0.1 arcsec of the position of the pulsar obtained by radio timing.

  7. Basic physics and cosmology from pulsar timing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Radio pulsars provide unparalleled opportunities for making measurements of astrophysically interesting phenomena. The author concentrates on two particular applications of high precision timing observations of pulsars: tests of relativistic gravitation theory using the binary pulsar 1913+16, and tests of cosmological models using timing data from millisecond pulsars. New upper limits are presented for the energy density of a cosmic background of low frequency gravitational radiation.

  8. The PALFA Survey: Going to great depths to find radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, P.

    2013-03-01

    The on-going PALFA survey is searching the Galactic plane (|b| < 5°, 32° < l < 77° and 168° < l < 214°) for radio pulsars at 1.4 GHz using ALFA, the 7-beam receiver installed at the Arecibo Observatory. By the end of August 2012, the PALFA survey has discovered 100 pulsars, including 17 millisecond pulsars (P < 30 ms). Many of these discoveries are among the pulsars with the largest DM/P ratios, proving that the PALFA survey is capable of probing the Galactic plane for millisecond pulsars to a much greater depth than any previous survey. This is due to the survey's high sensitivity, relatively high observing frequency, and its high time and frequency resolution. Recently the rate of discoveries has increased, due to a new more sensitive spectrometer, two updated complementary search pipelines, the development of online collaborative tools, and access to new computing resources. Looking forward, focus has shifted to the application of artificial intelligence systems to identify pulsar-like candidates, and the development of an improved full-resolution pipeline incorporating more sophisticated radio interference rejection. The new pipeline will be used in a complete second analysis of data already taken, and will be applied to future survey observations. An overview of recent developments, and highlights of exciting discoveries will be presented.

  9. Discovery of Low DM Fast Radio Transients: Geminga Pulsar Caught in the Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Yogesh

    2015-12-01

    We report the discovery of several energetic radio bursts at 34 MHz, using the Gauribidanur radio telescope. The radio bursts exhibit two important properties associated with the propagation of astronomical signals through the interstellar medium: (i) frequency dependent dispersive delays across the observing bandwidth and (ii) Faraday rotation of the plane of linear polarization. These bursts sample a range of dispersion measures (DM; 1.4-3.6 pc cm-3) and show DM-variation at timescales of the order of a minute. Using groups of bursts having a consistent DM, we show that the bursts have originated from the radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar Geminga. Detection of these bursts supports the existence of occasional radio emission from Geminga. The rare occurrence of these bursts, and the short timescale variation in their DM (if really caused by the intervening medium or the pulsar magnetosphere), might provide clues as to why the pulsar has not been detected in earlier sensitive searches. We present details of the observations and search procedure used to discover these bursts, a detailed analysis of their properties, and evidences of these bursts being associated with Geminga pulsar, and briefly discuss the possible emission mechanism of these bursts.

  10. PSR J0737-3039B: A PROBE OF RADIO PULSAR EMISSION HEIGHTS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, B. B. P.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lomiashvili, D.; Gourgouliatos, K. N.; Lyutikov, M.

    2012-05-10

    In the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B, the strong wind produced by pulsar A distorts the magnetosphere of pulsar B. The influence of these distortions on the orbital-dependent emission properties of pulsar B can be used to determine the location of the coherent radio emission generation region in the pulsar magnetosphere. Using a model of the wind-distorted magnetosphere of pulsar B and the well-defined geometrical parameters of the system, we determine the minimum emission height to be {approx}20R{sub NS} in the two bright orbital longitude regions. We can determine the maximum emission height by accounting for the amount of deflection of the polar field line with respect to the magnetic axis using the analytical magnetic reconnection model of Dungey and the semi-empirical numerical model of Tsyganenko. Both of these models estimate the maximum emission height to be {approx}2500R{sub NS}. The minimum and maximum emission heights we calculate are consistent with those estimated for normal isolated pulsars.

  11. Multi-epoch Multi-frequency Observations of Double Pulsar using GMRT at lower radio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    The double pulsar system, J0737-3039, (Burgay et al. 2003; Lyne et al. 2004) with two radio pulsars in a tight edge-on mildly eccentric orbit with a significant advance of angle of periastron (orbital period Pb = 2.4 hr, orbital inclination angle i = 87.7 deg, eccentricity 0.09, ω = ˙ 17 deg) continues to display interesting and changing phenomenology. The timing observations and this phenomenology has been very useful to test theories of gravity (Kramer and Stairs 2009). We report on last seven years of monitoring of these pulsars at 325 and 235 MHz using GMRT and compare the variation in the phenomenology of the pulsars as a function of observation epoch with that at higher frequencies.

  12. The superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars in high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-01

    There exists a special class of X-ray pulsars that exhibit very slow pulsation of P spin > 1000 s in the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). We have studied the temporal and spectral properties of these superslow pulsation neutron star binaries in hard X-ray bands with INTEGRAL observations. Long-term monitoring observations find spin period evolution of two sources: spin-down trend for 4U 2206+54 (P spin ~ 5560 s with Ṗ spin ~ 4.9 × 10-7 s s-1) and long-term spin-up trend for 2S 0114+65 (P spin ~ 9600 s with Ṗ spin ~ -1 × 10-6 s s-1) in the last 20 years. A Be X-ray transient, SXP 1062 (P spin ~ 1062 s), also showed a fast spin-down rate of Ṗ spin ~ 3 × 10-6 s s-1 during an outburst. These superslow pulsation neutron stars cannot be produced in the standard X-ray binary evolution model unless the neutron star has a much stronger surface magnetic field (B > 1014 G). The physical origin of the superslow spin period is still unclear. The possible origin and evolution channels of the superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars are discussed. Superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars could be younger X-ray binary systems, still in the fast evolution phase preceding the final equilibrium state. Alternatively, they could be a new class of neutron star system - accreting magnetars.

  13. Simultaneous X-Ray and Radio Observations of the Unusual Binary LSI + 61 deg 303

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Leahy, Denis A.; Waltman, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    We present simultaneous 0.5 - 10 keV X-ray and two-frequency radio observations at 2.25 and 8.3 GHz of the unusual binary system LSI + 61 deg. 303. This system was observed twice in a single binary orbit by the ASCA satellite, and monitored daily at two radio frequencies during the same orbital cycle with the Greenbank Interferometer. During the first ASCA observation the source was detected with a 1 - 10 keV luminosity 3.6 x 10(exp 33) (d/2.0 kpc)(exp 2) erg 1/s and during the second at a similar level with evidence for a decrease in average flux of 30%. During the first pointing the radio source was at a quiescent 8 GHz flux level of 30 mJy while during the second the radio flux was rising dramatically with an average value of 100 mJy. No variability is seen in the X-ray flux during the first pointing, but during the second the flux is variable by approx. 50% on timescales of approx. 30 minutes. No pulsations are seen in either X-ray observation with an upper limit on pulsed flux of 20%. The low X-ray luminosity and lack of observed pulsations indicate that accretion onto a neutron star surface is not the origin for the high-energy emission. Rather, the X-rays must result either from accreted matter which is stopped at the magnetosphere because the magnetospheric boundry is rotating at super-Keplerian rates or due to a shock formed in the interaction of the dense wind of the Be star companion and a moderately young pulsar. We derive a required pulsar spin down luminosity of approx. 10(exp 37) erg 1/s, and argue that the shock model more easily explains the observed X-ray radio observations.

  14. Einstein@Home Discovery of 24 Pulsars in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knispel, B.; Eatough, R. P.; Kim, H.; Keane, E. F.; Allen, B.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Crawford, F.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Hammer, D.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; Miller, R. B.; Papa, M. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Sarkissian, J.; Siemens, X.; Stappers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of ≈17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s-1. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (≈420 pc cm-3). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  15. EINSTEIN-HOME DISCOVERY OF 24 PULSARS IN THE PARKES MULTI-BEAM PULSAR SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Knispel, B.; Kim, H.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Eatough, R. P.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M.; Anderson, D.; Crawford, F.; Rastawicki, D.; Hammer, D.; Papa, M. A.; Siemens, X.; Lyne, A. G.; Miller, R. B.; Sarkissian, J.; and others

    2013-09-10

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of Almost-Equal-To 17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein-Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s{sup -1}. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM ( Almost-Equal-To 420 pc cm{sup -3}). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  16. Absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary radio pulsar.

    PubMed

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Durant, Martin; Misanovic, Zdenka; Pavlov, George G

    2012-08-24

    The vast majority of known nonaccreting neutron stars (NSs) are rotation-powered radio and/or γ-ray pulsars. So far, their multiwavelength spectra have all been described satisfactorily by thermal and nonthermal continuum models, with no spectral lines. Spectral features have, however, been found in a handful of exotic NSs and were thought to be a manifestation of their unique traits. Here, we report the detection of absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary rotation-powered radio pulsar, J1740+1000. Our findings bridge the gap between the spectra of pulsars and other, more exotic, NSs, suggesting that the features are more common in the NS spectra than they have been thought so far. PMID:22923576

  17. Enhanced pulsar and single pulse detection via automated radio frequency interference detection in multipixel feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocz, J.; Bailes, M.; Barnes, D.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Levin, L.

    2012-02-01

    Single pixel feeds on large aperture radio telescopes have the ability to detect weak (˜10 mJy) impulsive bursts of radio emission and sub-mJy radio pulsars. Unfortunately, in large-scale blind surveys, radio frequency interference (RFI) mimics both radio bursts and radio pulsars, greatly reducing the sensitivity to new discoveries as real signals of astronomical origin get lost among the millions of false candidates. In this paper a technique that takes advantage of multipixel feeds to use eigenvector decomposition of common signals is used to greatly facilitate radio burst and pulsar discovery. Since the majority of RFI occurs with zero dispersion, the method was tested on the total power present in the 13 beams of the Parkes multibeam receiver using data from archival intermediate-latitude surveys. The implementation of this method greatly reduced the number of false candidates and led to the discovery of one new rotating radio transient or RRAT, six new pulsars and five new pulses that shared the swept-frequency characteristics similar in nature to the `Lorimer burst'. These five new signals occurred within minutes of 11 previous detections of a similar type. When viewed together, they display temporal characteristics related to integer seconds, with non-random distributions and characteristic 'gaps' between them, suggesting they are not from a naturally occurring source. Despite the success in removing RFI, false candidates present in the data that are only visible after integrating in time or at non-zero dispersion remained. It is demonstrated that with some computational penalty, the method can be applied iteratively at all trial dispersions and time resolutions to remove the vast majority of spurious candidates.

  18. Strong-field tests of f(R)-gravity in binary pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyadina, Polina I.; Alexeyev, Stanislav O.; Capozziello, Salvatore; de Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Rannu, Kristina A.

    2016-03-01

    We develop the parameterized post-Keplerian approach for class of analytic f(R)-gravity models. Using the double binary pulsar system PSR J0737-3039 data we obtain restrictions on the parameters of this class of f(R)-models and show that f(R)-gravity is not ruled out by the observations in strong field regime. The additional and more strong corresponding restriction is extracted from solar system data.

  19. Preliminary limits of a logarithmic correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential in binary pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang; Li, Zi-Wei; Yuan, Sheng-Feng; Wan, Zhen; Qin, Song-He; Zhu, Kai; Xie, Yi

    2014-10-01

    We obtain preliminary limits on a logarithmic correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential by using five binary pulsars: PSR J0737-3039, PSR B1534+12, PSR J1756-2251, PSR B1913+16 and PSR B2127+11C. This kind of correction may originate from fundamental frameworks, like string theories, effective models of gravity due to quantum effects and the non-local gravity scheme. We estimate the upper limit of the Tohline-Kuhn-Kruglyak parameter λ and the lower limit of the Fabris-Campos parameter α, which parameterize the correction and are connected to each other by αλ = -1. By analyzing the advances of periastron of these binary pulsars, we find that the preliminary upper limit of α is 0.19 ± 0.14 kpc-1 and the preliminary lower limit of λ is -5.2 ± 3.8 kpc. They are compatible with the bounds based on dynamics of spiral galaxies but quite different from those given by solar system dynamics. These results indicate that this logarithmic correction might be more observable in current timings of binary pulsars than in motions of the solar system.

  20. 2FGL J1653.6–0159: A NEW LOW IN EVAPORATING PULSAR BINARY PERIODS

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, Roger W.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2014-09-20

    We have identified an optical binary with orbital period P{sub b} = 4488 s as the probable counterpart of the Fermi source 2FGL J1653.6–0159. Although pulsations have not yet been detected, the source properties are consistent with an evaporating millisecond pulsar binary; this P{sub b} = 75 minutes is the record low for a spin-powered system. The heated side of the companion shows coherent radial-velocity variations, with amplitude K = 666.9 ± 7.5 km s{sup –1} for a large mass function of f(M) = 1.60 ± 0.05 M {sub ☉}. This heating suggests a pulsar luminosity ∼3 × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1}. The colors and spectra show an additional blue component dominating at binary minimum. Its origin is, at present, unclear. This system is similar to PSR J1311–3430, with a low-mass H-depleted companion, a dense shrouding wind and, likely, a large pulsar mass.

  1. X-rays from radio pulsars - The detection of PSR 1055-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Helfand, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The short-period pulsar PSR 1055-52 has been detected as a soft X-ray source in the course of an Einstein Observatory survey of radio pulsars. Its X-ray to radio luminosity ratio is about 10,000, although the X-rays are not modulated at the neutron star's rotation frequency. High spatial resolution observations suggest that a significant fraction of the emission comes from an extended region surrounding the pulsar. Several possible scenarios for the origin of both point and extended X-ray emission from isolated neutron stars are investigated: radiation from the hot stellar surface, from hot polar caps, and from an optically thick atmosphere, as well as from a circumstellar nebula emitting thermal bremsstrahlung or synchrotron radiation. It is concluded that the spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics of this source are most consistent with a model in which relativistic particles generated by the pulsar are radiating synchrotron X-rays in the surrounding magnetic field; i.e., that PSR 1055 is embedded in a mini-Crab nebula. Observational tests of this hypothesis are suggested, and the implications of this result for pulsar evolution are briefly discussed.

  2. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, Arun; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.; Krishnakumar, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a bandwidth of about four times larger (16 MHz) than that of the legacy system as well as its fluctuation spectrum with high temporal and frequency resolutions. The key point is that all the above modes operate in real time. This paper presents the design aspects of PONDER and outlines the design methodology for future similar backends. It also explains the principal operations of PONDER, illustrates its capabilities for a variety of pulsar and IPS observations and demonstrates its usefulness for a variety of astrophysical studies using the high sensitivity of the ORT.

  3. Magnetospheric Geometry in Pulsar B1929+10 from Radio/X-ray Phase Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somer, A. L.; Backer, D. C.; Halpern, J. P.; Wang, F. Y.-H.

    1998-05-01

    We have conducted a study of two rotation-powered pulsars that emit at both radio and x-ray wavelengths, PSR B0531+21 and PSR B1929+10. Using absolute phase information, we have phase-aligned x-ray and radio profiles from these pulsars. Observations were done using the Green Bank 140ft telescope, and ASCA. The 0531+21 x-ray profile is sharp and lines up well with the radio profile confirming that the x-ray emission from this pulsar is magnetospheric in origin. The 1929+10 profile is approximately sinusoidal (Wang & Halpern, ApJ 4 82, L159) with the peak of the emission arriving 67+/- 23 degrees after the maximum in the radio emission. The controversy to which the PSR B1929+10 result adds fuel, is whether this ``inter"-pulsar, is an ``aligned" or ``orthogonal" rotator - describing the alignment of the magnetic axis to the rotation axis. Do the two peaks in the radio profile (the pulse and interpulse) come from a double crossing of a thin hollow cone nearly aligned with rotation axis (as in Lyne & Manchester, 1988, MNRAS, 234, 477; Phillips, 1990, ApJL, 361, L57; Blaskiewicz et al, 1991, ApJ 370, 643), or alternatively (as in Rankin and Rathnasree, 1998 preprint) do they come from from opposite poles of an ``orthogonal" rotator where the spin axis is perpendicular to the magnetic axis? The radio to x-ray alignment we find favors the former explanation: if the x-ray hot spot is the result of return currents to the surface from the outward current that generates radio emission, then in the ``double-crossing" model, the hot spot phase is expected to lie between the main pulse and interpulse as observed.

  4. On the pulse-width statistics in radio pulsars - I. Importance of the interpulse emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciesiak, Krzysztof; Gil, Janusz; Ribeiro, Valério A. R. M.

    2011-06-01

    We performed Monte Carlo simulations of different properties of pulsar radio emission, such as pulsar periods, pulse widths, inclination angles and rates of occurrence of interpulse (IP) emission. We used recently available large data sets of the pulsar periods P, the pulse profile widths W and the magnetic inclination angle α. We also compiled the largest ever data base of pulsars with IP, divided into the double pole (DP-IP) and the single pole (SP-IP) cases. We identified 31 (about 2 per cent) and 13 (about 1 per cent) of the former and the latter, respectively, in the population of 1520 normal pulsars. Their distribution on the ? diagram strongly suggests a secular alignment of the magnetic axis from the originally random orientation. We derived possible parent distribution functions of important pulsar parameters by means of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov significance test using the available data sets (P, W, α and IP), different models of pulsar radio beam ρ=ρ(P) as well as different trial distribution functions of pulsar period P and the inclination angles α. The best suited parent period distribution function is the lognormal distribution, although the gamma function distribution cannot be excluded. The strongest constraint on derived model distribution functions was the requirement that the numbers of IPs generated by means of Monte Carlo simulations (both DP-IP and SP-IP cases) were exactly (within 1σ errors) at the observed level of occurrences. We found that a suitable model distribution function for the inclination angle is the complicated trigonometric function which has two local maxima, one near 0° and the other near 90°. The former and the latter imply the right rates of IP, occurrence, single pole (almost aligned rotator) and double pole (almost orthogonal rotator), respectively. It is very unlikely that the pulsar beam deviates significantly from the circular cross-section. We found that the upper limit for the average beaming factor fb

  5. RADIO DETECTION OF THE FERMI-LAT BLIND SEARCH MILLISECOND PULSAR J1311-3430

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Cheung, C. C.; Giroletti, M.; Cognard, I.; Camilo, F.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Roy, J.; Romani, R. W.; Kerr, M.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2013-01-20

    We report the detection of radio emission from PSR J1311-3430, the first millisecond pulsar (MSP) discovered in a blind search of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray data. We detected radio pulsations at 2 GHz, visible for <10% of {approx}4.5 hr of observations using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Observations at 5 GHz with the GBT and at several lower frequencies with Parkes, Nancay, and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope resulted in non-detections. We also report the faint detection of a steep spectrum continuum radio source (0.1 mJy at 5 GHz) in interferometric imaging observations with the Jansky Very Large Array. These detections demonstrate that PSR J1311-3430 is not radio quiet and provide additional evidence that radio-quiet MSPs are rare. The radio dispersion measure of 37.8 pc cm{sup -3} provides a distance estimate of 1.4 kpc for the system, yielding a gamma-ray efficiency of 30%, typical of LAT-detected MSPs. We see apparent excess delay in the radio pulses as the pulsar appears from eclipse and we speculate on possible mechanisms for the non-detections of the pulse at other orbital phases and observing frequencies.

  6. Radio Detection of the Fermi-LAT Blind Search Millisecond Pulsar J1311-3430

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Cheung, C. C.; Giroletti, M.; Cognard, I.; Camilo, F.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Roy, J.; Romani, R. W.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Kramer, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of radio emission from PSR J1311.3430, the first millisecond pulsar (MSP) discovered in a blind search of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray data. We detected radio pulsations at 2 GHz, visible for less than 10% of approximately 4.5 hr of observations using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Observations at 5 GHz with the GBT and at several lower frequencies with Parkes, Nan cay, and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope resulted in non-detections. We also report the faint detection of a steep spectrum continuum radio source (0.1 mJy at 5 GHz) in interferometric imaging observations with the Jansky Very Large Array. These detections demonstrate that PSR J1311.3430 is not radio quiet and provide additional evidence that radio-quiet MSPs are rare. The radio dispersion measure of 37.8 pc cm(exp -3) provides a distance estimate of 1.4 kpc for the system, yielding a gamma-ray efficiency of 30%, typical of LAT-detected MSPs. We see apparent excess delay in the radio pulses as the pulsar appears from eclipse and we speculate on possible mechanisms for the non-detections of the pulse at other orbital phases and observing frequencies.

  7. A CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATION OF THE BINARY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J1023+0038

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Archibald, Anne M.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Lorimer, Duncan; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Ransom, Scott M.; Stairs, Ingrid H.

    2011-12-01

    We present a Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S variability, spectroscopy, and imaging study of the peculiar binary containing the millisecond pulsar J1023+0038. The X-ray emission from the system exhibits highly significant (12.5{sigma}) large-amplitude (factor of two to three) orbital variability over the five consecutive orbits covered by the observation, with a pronounced decline in the flux at all energies at superior conjunction. This can be naturally explained by a partial geometric occultation by the secondary star of an X-ray-emitting intrabinary shock, produced by the interaction of outflows from the two stars. The depth and duration of the eclipse imply that the intrabinary shock is localized near or at the surface of the companion star and close to the inner Lagrangian point. The energetics of the shock favor a magnetically dominated pulsar wind that is focused into the orbital plane, requiring close alignment of the pulsar spin and orbital angular momentum axes. The X-ray spectrum consists of a dominant non-thermal component and at least one thermal component, likely originating from the heated pulsar polar caps, although a portion of this emission may be from an optically thin 'corona'. We find no evidence for extended emission due to a pulsar wind nebula or bow shock down to a limiting luminosity of L{sub X} {approx}< 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg s{sup -1} (0.3-8 keV), {approx}< 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} of the pulsar spin-down luminosity, for a distance of 1.3 kpc and an assumed power-law spectrum with photon index {Gamma} = 1.5.

  8. X-ray observations of XSS J12270-4859 in a new low state: A transformation to a disk-free rotation-powered pulsar binary

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Patruno, Alessandro; Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H.; Stappers, Ben W.

    2014-07-01

    We present XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859, which experienced a dramatic decline in optical/X-ray brightness at the end of 2012, indicative of the disappearance of its accretion disk. In this new state, the system exhibits previously absent orbital-phase-dependent, large-amplitude X-ray modulations with a decline in flux at superior conjunction. The X-ray emission remains predominantly non-thermal but with an order of magnitude lower mean luminosity and significantly harder spectrum relative to the previous high flux state. This phenomenology is identical to the behavior of the radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary PSR J1023+0038 in the absence of an accretion disk, where the X-ray emission is produced in an intra-binary shock driven by the pulsar wind. This further demonstrates that XSS J12270-4859 no longer has an accretion disk and has transformed to a full-fledged eclipsing 'redback' system that hosts an active rotation-powered MSP. There is no evidence for diffuse X-ray emission associated with the binary that may arise due to outflows or a wind nebula. An extended source situated 1.'5 from XSS J12270-4859 is unlikely to be associated, and is probably a previously uncataloged galaxy cluster.

  9. European Pulsar Timing Array limits on continuous gravitational waves from individual supermassive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babak, S.; Petiteau, A.; Sesana, A.; Brem, P.; Rosado, P. A.; Taylor, S. R.; Lassus, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bassa, C. G.; Burgay, M.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Gair, J. R.; Guillemot, L.; Janssen, G. H.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; Lentati, L.; Liu, K.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Osłowski, S.; Perrodin, D.; Possenti, A.; Purver, M. B.; Sanidas, S.; Smits, R.; Stappers, B.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; van Haasteren, R.; Vecchio, A.; Verbiest, J. P. W.

    2016-01-01

    We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) data set, which consists of ultraprecise timing data on 41-ms pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95 per cent upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range 6 × 10-15 < A < 1.5 × 10-14 at 5 nHz < f < 7 nHz. This limit varies by a factor of five, depending on the assumed source position and the most constraining limit is achieved towards the positions of the most sensitive pulsars in the timing array. The most robust upper limit - obtained via a full Bayesian analysis searching simultaneously over the signal and pulsar noise on the subset of ours six best pulsars - is A ≈ 10-14. These limits, the most stringent to date at f < 10 nHz, exclude the presence of sub-centiparsec binaries with chirp mass M_c>10^9 M_{⊙} out to a distance of about 25 Mpc, and with M_c>10^{10} M_{⊙} out to a distance of about 1Gpc (z ≈ 0.2). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict <1 per cent probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA data set, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA limits on individual CGW have improved by almost an order of magnitude in the last five years. The continuing advances in pulsar timing data acquisition and analysis techniques will allow for strong astrophysical constraints on the population of nearby SMBHBs in the coming years.

  10. TIMING MEASUREMENTS OF THE RELATIVISTIC BINARY PULSAR PSR B1913+16

    SciTech Connect

    Weisberg, J. M.; Nice, D. J.; Taylor, J. H. E-mail: niced@lafayette.ed

    2010-10-20

    We present results of more than three decades of timing measurements of the first known binary pulsar, PSR B1913+16. Like most other pulsars, its rotational behavior over such long timescales is significantly affected by small-scale irregularities not explicitly accounted for in a deterministic model. Nevertheless, the physically important astrometric, spin, and orbital parameters are well determined and well decoupled from the timing noise. We have determined a significant result for proper motion, {mu}{sub {alpha}} = -1.43 {+-} 0.13, {mu}{sub {delta}} = -0.70 {+-} 0.13 mas yr{sup -1}. The pulsar exhibited a small timing glitch in 2003 May, with {Delta}f/f = 3.7 x 10{sup -11}, and a smaller timing peculiarity in mid-1992. A relativistic solution for orbital parameters yields improved mass estimates for the pulsar and its companion, m{sub 1} = 1.4398 {+-} 0.0002 M{sub sun} and m{sub 2} = 1.3886 {+-} 0.0002 M{sub sun}. The system's orbital period has been decreasing at a rate 0.997 {+-} 0.002 times that predicted as a result of gravitational radiation damping in general relativity. As we have shown before, this result provides conclusive evidence for the existence of gravitational radiation as predicted by Einstein's theory.

  11. Discovery of a Highly Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in a Gamma-Ray-Detected Globular Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Kaplan, D. L.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We report on the Green Bank Telescope discovery of a highly eccentric binary millisecond pulsar (MSP) in NGC 6652, the first MSP to be detected in this globular cluster. The pulsar search was guided by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, which detected NGC 6652 at GeV energies, identifying the cluster as a likely host of a population of gamma-ray-emitting MSPs. Initial timing of the MSP yielded an eccentricity of ~0.95 and a minimum companion mass of 0.73 solar masses, assuming a neutron star mass of 1.4 solar masses. These results strongly indicate that the pulsar has undergone one or more companion exchanges in the dense stellar environment of the cluster, and that the current companion is a compact object, likely a massive white dwarf or a neutron star. Further timing of this system will result in a measurement of the post-Keplerian rate of periastron advance and therefore a direct measurement of the total system mass, allowing additional constraints to be placed on both the pulsar and companion masses. The timing solution will also be used to search for gamma-ray pulsations from the MSP.

  12. Hot Collionsal Plasma Emissions in the Ultra-compact Binary Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Marshall, Herman

    2016-07-01

    4U 1626-67 is an ultra-compact binary pulsar with a pulse period of 7.7 sec and an orbital period of 40 min. Its X-ray spectrum varies distinctively before and after torque reversal episodes. 4U 1626-67 is a peculiar ultra-compact binary in that it not only truncates its accretion disk at the magnetospheric radius, but also emits Ne and O Doppler X-ray lines, The nature of these lines have remained quite mysterious but we can now show that these lines originate from a coronal type plasma with temperatures up to 10 Million degrees located at the magnetospheric radius. The disk line fits constrain the source distance to about 5 kpc. We also observe consistent variations in the disk lines before and after torque reversal. The observed disk lines constrain the angle of inclination to 38 degrees, which is is significantly larger than previously assumed. We discuss these findings in the context of accreting X-ray binaries and binary pulsar properties.

  13. Timing and Fermi LAT Analysis of Four Millisecond Pulsars Discovered in Parkes Radio Searches of Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Ransom, Scott M.; Camilo, Fernando M.; Kerr, Matthew; Reynolds, John; Sarkissian, John; Freire, Paulo; Thankful Cromartie, H.; Barr, Ewan D.

    2016-01-01

    We present phase-connected timing solutions for four binary millisecond pulsars discovered in searches of Fermi LAT gamma-ray sources using the Parkes radio telescope. Follow-up timing observations of PSRs J0955-6150, J1012-4235, J1036-8317, and J1946-5403 have yielded timing models with precise orbital and astrometric parameters. For each pulsar, we also did a gamma-ray spectral analysis using LAT Pass 8 data and generated photon probabilities for use in a weighted H-test pulsation test. In all 4 cases, we detect significant gamma-ray pulsations, confirming the identification with the gamma-ray source originally targeted in the discovery observations. We describe the results of the pulse timing and gamma-ray spectral and timing analysis and the characteristics of each of the systems. The Fermi-LAT Collaboration acknowledges support for LAT development, operation and data analysis from NASA and DOE (United States), CEA/Irfu and IN2P3/CNRS (France), ASI and INFN (Italy), MEXT, KEK, and JAXA (Japan), and the K.A. Wallenberg Foundation, the Swedish Research Council and the National Space Board (Sweden). Science analysis support in the operations phase from INAF (Italy) and CNES (France) is also gratefully acknowledged. NRL participation was funded by NASA.

  14. Einstein@Home Discovery of a PALFA Millisecond Pulsar in an Eccentric Binary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knispel, B.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferdman, R.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lynch, R.; Machenschalk, B.; Madsen, E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J. K.; Venkataraman, A.; Wharton, R. S.; Zhu, W. W.

    2015-06-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1950+2414 (P = 4.3 ms) in a binary system with an eccentric (e = 0.08) 22 day orbit in Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Its companion star has a median mass of 0.3 M⊙ and is most likely a white dwarf (WD). Fully recycled MSPs like this one are thought to be old neutron stars spun-up by mass transfer from a companion star. This process should circularize the orbit, as is observed for the vast majority of binary MSPs, which predominantly have orbital eccentricities e < 0.001. However, four recently discovered binary MSPs have orbits with 0. 027 < e < 0.44; PSR J1950+2414 is the fifth such system to be discovered. The upper limits for its intrinsic spin period derivative and inferred surface magnetic field strength are comparable to those of the general MSP population. The large eccentricities are incompatible with the predictions of the standard recycling scenario: something unusual happened during their evolution. Proposed scenarios are (a) initial evolution of the pulsar in a triple system which became dynamically unstable, (b) origin in an exchange encounter in an environment with high stellar density, (c) rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a super-Chandrasekhar WD, and (d) dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. We compare the properties of all five known eccentric MSPs with the predictions of these formation channels. Future measurements of the masses and proper motion might allow us to firmly exclude some of the proposed formation scenarios.

  15. NANOGrav Millisecond Pulsar Observing Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nice, David J.; Nanograv

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves from sources such as supermassive black hole binary systems are expected to perturb times-of-flight of signals traveling from pulsars to the Earth. The NANOGrav consortium aims to measure these perturbations in high precision millisecond pulsar timing measurements and thus to directly detect gravitational waves and characterize gravitational wave sources. By observing pulsars over time spans of many years, we are most sensitive to gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies.In this presentation we describe the NANOGrav observing program. We presently observe an array of 45 millisecond pulsars, evenly divided between the Arecibo Observatory (for pulsars with declinations between -1 and 39 degrees) and the Green Bank Telescope (for other pulsars, with two pulsars overlapping with Arecibo). Observation of a large number of pulsars allows for searches of correlated perturbations between multiple pulsar signals, which will be crucial for achieving high-significance detection of gravitational waves in the face of uncorrelated noise (from gravitational waves and rotation noise) in the individual pulsars. As new high-quality pulsars are discovered, they are added to the program.Observations of each pulsar are made with cadence of 20 to 30 days, with observations of each pulsar in two separate radio bands. Arrival times for nearly all pulsars are measured with precision better than 1 microsecond (averaged over a typical observation of 20 minutes), and in the best cases the precision is better than 100 nanoseconds.We describe the NANOGrav nine-year data release, which contains time-of-arrival measurements and high quality timing solutions from 37 pulsars observed over spans ranging between 0.7 to 9.3 years.

  16. The influence of PWNs and SNRs on the pulsar and magnetar radio spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Wojciech

    The recent studies of pulsar spectra (Kijak et al. 2007, 2011, 2013) revealed a new sub-class of objects, namely the gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. These can be characterized by high frequency turnover in their spectra appearing at the frequencies of 1 GHz and above. So far we know eight such pulsars, and three magnetars showing this phenomenon. Most of these sources adjoin peculiar environments, such as pulsar wind nebulae, supernova remnants or dense HII regions. This, along with a special case of PSR B1259-63 (Kijak, Dembska et al. 2011), led us to believe that the source of this phenomenon may be interaction of the pulsar radiation with the matter in their surroundings, mainly by the means of thermal absorption. Based on the lastest research in the field of PWN and SNR studies we are reviewing such possibility using simple models. The preliminary results show that thermal absorption can explain the observed GPS-type spectra at least for some PWN/SNR geometries. Further research of GPS objects, both in radio as well as in the high-energy (X-ray) regime can help us understand these objects better.

  17. A Study of the X-Ray Emission from Three Radio Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The subject grant is for work on a study of x-ray emission from isolated pulsars. The purpose of the study was to: determine whether the pulsars were x-ray sources; and, if so, search for evidence of pulsations at the known radio period; and study the nature of the x-ray emission. Observation of the pulsar PSR 0355+54 were obtained, and the analysis of these data is complete. These results were reported at the 183rd AAS Meeting, and in a paper entitled 'X-Ray Emission from PSR 0355+54' which as published in the The Astrophysical Journal. Also obtained an approx. 3 ks PSPC observations of PSR 1642-03. A summary of the results from these data were reported in a Conference Proceedings for the 'New Horizon of X-ray Astronomy' symposium. In addition, as part of a study with a student from the SAO Summer Intern Program, I incorporated ROSAT archival data in an extended study of pulsar emission. These results were reported at the 185th AAS Meeting, and in a paper entitled 'Soft X-ray Emission from Selected Isolated Pulsars' which was published in The Astrophysical Journal (Letters).

  18. Known radio pulsars do not contribute to the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Tim

    2016-03-01

    Observations using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) have found a significant γ -ray excess surrounding the center of the Milky Way (GC). One possible interpretation of this excess invokes γ -ray emission from an undiscovered population of either young or recycled pulsars densely clustered throughout the inner kiloparsec of the Milky Way. While these systems, by construction, have individual fluxes that lie below the point-source sensitivity of the Fermi-LAT, they may already be observed in multiwavelength observations. Notably the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) catalog of radio pulsars includes 270 sources observed in the inner 10° around the GC. We calculate the γ -ray emission observed from these 270 sources and obtain three key results: (1) point-source searches in the GC region produce a plethora of highly significant γ -ray "hot spots" compared to searches far from the Galactic Plane, (2) there is no statistical correlation between the positions of these γ -ray hot spots and the locations of ATNF pulsars, and (3) the spectrum of the most statistically significant γ -ray hot spots is substantially softer than the spectrum of the GC γ -ray excess. These results place strong constraints on models where young pulsars produce the majority of the γ -ray excess, and disfavor some models where millisecond pulsars produce the γ -ray excess.

  19. On the detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Eliu; McWilliams, Sean; Gair, Jonathan; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    It is believed that supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with masses between a million up to a few billion solar masses are ubiquitous in nearby galactic nuclei. Hence, the merger of a pair of galaxies hosting these compact objects may result in the formation of a compact binary that decays to small orbital separations via interactions with its stellar and gaseous environments. Recent studies suggest that these formation channels imply that SMBH binaries may have large orbital eccentricities when they become dominated by gravitational wave emission. In light of these considerations, we present a novel and comprehensive framework that we put at work to carry out an end-to-end analysis of the effect of eccentricity on the amplitude and spectrum of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational wave background from SMBH binaries and single resolvable sources that may be detected with Pulsar Timing Arrays.

  20. PSR J1841-0500: A RADIO PULSAR THAT MOSTLY IS NOT THERE

    SciTech Connect

    Camilo, F.; Ransom, S. M.; Demorest, P.; Chatterjee, S.; Johnston, S.

    2012-02-10

    In a search for radio pulsations from the magnetar 1E 1841-045, we have discovered the unrelated pulsar J1841-0500, with rotation period P = 0.9 s and characteristic age 0.4 Myr. One year after discovery with the Parkes telescope at 3 GHz, radio emission ceased from this bright pulsar. After 580 days, emission resumed as before. The P-dot during both on states is 250% of the average in the off state. PSR J1841-0500 is a second example of an extremely intermittent pulsar, although with a much longer off period and larger ratio of spin-down rates than PSR B1931+24. The new pulsar is hugely scattered by the interstellar medium, with a fitted timescale referenced to 1 GHz of {tau}{sub 1} = 2 s. Based on polarimetric observations at 5 GHz with the Green Bank Telescope, the intrinsic pulse profile has not obviously changed between the two on states observed so far, although relatively small variations cannot be excluded. The magnitude of its rotation measure is the largest known, RM = -3000 rad m{sup -2}, and with a dispersion measure DM = 532 pc cm{sup -3} implies a large electron-weighted average magnetic field strength along the line of sight, 7 {mu}G.

  1. The study of multi-frequency scattering of 10 radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Wojciech; Rożko, Karolina; Kijak, Jarosław; Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Roy, Jayanta

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of the multi-frequency scatter time measurements for 10 radio pulsars that were relatively less studied in this regard. The observations were performed using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at the observing frequencies of 150, 235, 325, 610 and 1060 MHz. The data we collected, in conjunction with the results from other frequencies published earlier, allowed us to estimate the scatter time frequency scaling indices for eight of these sources. For PSR J1852-0635, it became evident that its profile undergoes a strong evolution with frequency, which makes the scatter time measurements difficult to perform, and for PSR J1835-1020 we were able to obtain reliable pulse broadening estimates at only two frequencies. We used the eight frequency scaling indices to estimate both: the electron density fluctuation strengths along the respective lines of sight and the standardized amount of scattering at the frequency of 1 GHz. Combining the new data with the results published earlier by Lewandowski et al., we revisited the scaling index versus the dispersion measure (DM) relation, and similarly to some of the earlier studies, we show that the average value of the scaling index deviates from the theoretical predictions for large-DM pulsars; however, it reaches the magnitude claimed by Löhmer et al. only for pulsars with very large DMs (>650 pc cm-3). We also investigated the dependence of the scattering strength indicators on the pulsar distance, DM and the position of the source in the Milky Way Galaxy.

  2. Gravitomagnetism: a novel explanation of the precession of planets and binary pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab, Arbab I.

    2010-11-01

    We have studied the consequences of applying gravitomagnetism to gravitating objects. Gravitomagnetism was the missing part of the Newton’s law of gravitation. This phenomenon is manifest in the generalized Newton’s law of gravitation that is published in A.I. Arbab, Astrophys. Space Sci. 325:37, 2010a. Owing to gravitomagnetism, we have shown, the precession of planetary and pulsars orbits is due to the interaction of these objects with the gravitomagnetic field. We have calculated the gravitomagnetic fields arising from the orbital motion of the planets and binary pulsars and we have shown that they are double the Larmor-like frequency. This effect coincides with the prediction of general relativity and places the general theory of relativity on new affirmative grounds. Consequently, a modified Newton law of gravitation of Lorentz-type is proposed, which explains this precession.

  3. Very Long Baseline Interferometry Experiment on Giant Radio Pulses of Crab Pulsar toward Fast Radio Burst Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takefuji, K.; Terasawa, T.; Kondo, T.; Mikami, R.; Takeuchi, H.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kita, H.; Sekido, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment on giant radio pulses (GPs) from the Crab pulsar in the radio 1.4–1.7 GHz range to demonstrate a VLBI technique for searching for fast radio bursts (FRBs). We carried out the experiment on 2014 July 26 using the Kashima 34 m and Usuda 64 m radio telescopes of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN) with a baseline of about 200 km. During the approximately 1 hr observation, we could detect 35 GPs by high-time-resolution VLBI. Moreover, we determined the dispersion measure (DM) to be 56.7585 ± 0.0025 on the basis of the mean DM of the 35 GPs detected by VLBI. We confirmed that the sensitivity of a detection of GPs using our technique is superior to that of a single-dish mode detection using the same telescope.

  4. Recent Radio Results on X-ray Binaries and Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupen, M. P.; Dhawan, V.; Mioduszewski, A. J.

    2003-03-01

    We present recent results from observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) on a number of recent X-ray transients, and a few old friends. In addition to any new X-ray transients discovered between now and the HEAD meeting, we discuss the radio counterpart to XTE J1720-318; the recent resurgence of XTE J1908+094 and GRS 1758-258; the connection between the radio and X-ray emission in the millisecond X-ray pulsars XTE J0929-314 and SAX J1808.4-3658; and VLBA imaging of the 1999 outburst of the microquasar V4641 Sgr, confirming the rapid expansion seen with the VLA. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  5. Constraints on individual supermassive black hole binaries from pulsar timing array limits on continuous gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, Katelin; Ma, Chung-Pei

    2016-06-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are placing increasingly stringent constraints on the strain amplitude of continuous gravitational waves emitted by supermassive black hole binaries on subparsec scales. In this paper, we incorporate independent information about the dynamical masses Mbh of supermassive black holes in specific galaxies at known distances and use this additional information to further constrain whether or not those galaxies could host a detectable supermassive black hole binary. We estimate the strain amplitudes from individual binaries as a function of binary mass ratio for two samples of nearby galaxies: (1) those with direct dynamical measurements of Mbh in the literature, and (2) the 116 most massive early-type galaxies (and thus likely hosts of the most massive black holes) within 108 Mpc from the MASSIVE Survey. Our exploratory analysis shows that the current PTA upper limits on continuous waves (as a function of angular position in the sky) can already constrain the mass ratios of hypothetical black hole binaries in many galaxies in our samples. The constraints are stronger for galaxies with larger Mbh and at smaller distances. For the black holes with Mbh ≳ 5 × 109 M⊙ at the centres of NGC 1600, NGC 4889, NGC 4486 (M87), and NGC 4649 (M60), any binary companion in orbit within the PTA frequency bands would have to have a mass ratio of a few per cent or less.

  6. Detecting Eccentric Supermassive Black Hole Binaries with Pulsar Timing Arrays: Resolvable Source Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Huerta, E. A.; Gair, J. R.; McWilliams, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    The couplings between supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) and their environments within galactic nuclei have been well studied as part of the search for solutions to the final parsec problem. The scattering of stars by the binary or the interaction with a circumbinary disk may efficiently drive the system to sub-parsec separations, allowing the binary to enter a regime where the emission of gravitational waves can drive it to merger within a Hubble time. However, these interactions can also affect the orbital parameters of the binary. In particular, they may drive an increase in binary eccentricity which survives until the system’s gravitational-wave (GW) signal enters the pulsar-timing array (PTA) band. Therefore, if we can measure the eccentricity from observed signals, we can potentially deduce some of the properties of the binary environment. To this end, we build on previous techniques to present a general Bayesian pipeline with which we can detect and estimate the parameters of an eccentric SMBHB system with PTAs. Additionally, we generalize the PTA {{ F }}{{e}}-statistic to eccentric systems, and show that both this statistic and the Bayesian pipeline are robust when studying circular or arbitrarily eccentric systems. We explore how eccentricity influences the detection prospects of single GW sources, as well as the detection penalty incurred by employing a circular waveform template to search for eccentric signals, and conclude by identifying important avenues for future study.

  7. Population synthesis of radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Koh, Yew-Meng; Kust Harding, Alice

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of a new population synthesis of millisecond pulsars (MSP) from the Galactic disk using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to better understand the model parameter space. We include empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent on the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. The magnitudes of the model luminosities are adjusted to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of thirteen radio surveys as well as the MSP birth rate in the Galaxy and the number of MSPs detected by Fermi. We explore various high-energy emission geometries like the slot gap, outer gap, two pole caustic and pair starved polar cap models. The parameters associated with the birth distributions for the mass accretion rate, magnetic field, and period distributions are well constrained. With the set of four free parameters, we employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to explore the model parameter space. We present preliminary comparisons of the simulated and detected distributions of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics. We estimate the contribution of MSPs to the diffuse gamma-ray background with a special focus on the Galactic Center.We express our gratitude for the generous support of the National Science Foundation (RUI: AST-1009731), Fermi Guest Investigator Program and the NASA Astrophysics Theory and Fundamental Program (NNX09AQ71G).

  8. A search for rotating radio transients and fast radio bursts in the Parkes high-latitude pulsar survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Bates, S. D.; McMann, N.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Rajwade, K.

    2016-01-01

    Discoveries of rotating radio transients and fast radio bursts (FRBs) in pulsar surveys suggest that more of such transient sources await discovery in archival data sets. Here we report on a single-pulse search for dispersed radio bursts over a wide range of Galactic latitudes (|b| < 60°) in data previously searched for periodic sources by Burgay et al. We re-detected 20 of the 42 pulsars reported by Burgay et al. and one rotating radio transient reported by Burke-Spolaor. No FRBs were discovered in this survey. Taking into account this result, and other recent surveys at Parkes, we corrected for detection sensitivities based on the search software used in the analyses and the different back-ends used in these surveys and find that the all-sky FRB event rate for sources with a fluence above 4.0 Jy ms at 1.4 GHz to be R = 4.4^{+5.2}_{-3.1} × 10^3 FRBs d-1 sky-1, where the uncertainties represent a 99 per cent confidence interval. While this rate is lower than inferred from previous studies, as we demonstrate, this combined event rate is consistent with the results of all systematic FRB searches at Parkes to date and does not require the need to postulate a dearth of FRBs at intermediate latitudes.

  9. Detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Signal-to-noise ratio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, E. A.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Gair, Jonathan R.; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the expected signal-to-noise ratios of supermassive black hole binaries on eccentric orbits observed by pulsar timing arrays. We derive several analytical relations that extend the results of Peters and Mathews [Phys. Rev. D 131, 435 (1963)] to quantify the impact of eccentricity in the detection of single resolvable binaries in the pulsar timing array band. We present ready-to-use expressions to compute the increase/loss in signal-to-noise ratio of eccentric single resolvable sources whose dominant harmonic is located in the low/high frequency sensitivity regime of pulsar timing arrays. Building upon the work of Phinney (arXiv:astro-ph/0108028) and Enoki and Nagashima [Prog. Theor. Phys. 117, 241 (2007)], we present an analytical framework that enables the construction of rapid spectra for a stochastic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric sources. We confirm previous findings which indicate that, relative to a population of quasicircular binaries, the strain of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric binaries will be suppressed in the frequency band of pulsar timing arrays. We quantify this effect in terms of signal-to-noise ratios in a pulsar timing array.

  10. Using Pulsar Timing observations to understand the formation and evolution of supermassive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil; Sampson, Laura; McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The astrophysical processes that form and harden supermassive black hole binaries impart distinct features that may be observed in the gravitational-wave spectrum within the sensitive frequency range of Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTA). We investigate how well the various formation and hardening mechanisms can be constrained by applying Bayesian inference to simulated PTA data sets. We find that even without strong priors on the merger rate, any detection of the signal will place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models. Folding in priors on the merger rate allows us to place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models even before a detection is made.

  11. Cosmological Fast Radio Bursts from Binary White Dwarf Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiyama, Kazumi

    2014-10-01

    So far, ~10 fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been reported by the Parks radio telescope and the Arecibo observatory. The dispersion measures indicate that the sources are at cosmological distance, and the full sky event rate can be quite large ~10,000/day. If this is really the case, the FRBs are a promising target of multi-messenger astronomy in the coming years. I will present our cosmological binary white dwarf merger model, and also discuss future prospects of FRB astrophysics

  12. Pulsars in a Box: A Radio Astronomy Exercise for Windows from PROJECT CLEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, L. A.; Snyder, G. A.; Good, R. F.; Hayden, M. B.; Cooper, P. R.

    1996-12-01

    The latest astronomy laboratory exercise from PROJECT CLEA, "Radio Astronomy of Pulsars", is designed for use in introductory astronomy classes, but contains options and features that make it usable by upperclass astronomy students as well. The heart of the exercise is a simulated radio telescope, whose aperture, location, and beamwidth can be set by the instructor. It is steered by pushing buttons, but instead of seeing a star field on the field monitor,students see a projection of the sky showing, with a colored dot,where the beam is pointing. Large LED-like readouts display time and telescope coordinates. The telescope can be operated in either a tracking or transit mode. Using the telescope, students point to several pulsars suggested by the write-up (from an on-line catalog of over 500). Students can then use a multi-channel tunable receiver, with multiple oscilloscope displays, to view the incoming signal vs. time. The signal received is a combination of random receiver and background noise plus the pulsar signal (if it is in the beam) Receivers are tunable from 400 to 1400 MHz, and both the time and frequency behavior of signals can be studied. By measuring the dispersion delay at a number of different frequencies, students can determine the pulsar's distance. Data can be stored, displayed, and printed using a versatile measuring window. Though we provide a manual for a 2-3 hour lab exercise involving dispersion measures, the database and receivers can be used for a wide variety of other exercises, for instance the measurement of pulsar spin-down rates. We welcome suggestions for improvements and applications.

  13. The role of rotation and polar-cap currents on pulsar radio emission and polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, D.; Gangadhara, R. T. E-mail: ganga@iiap.res.in

    2013-06-01

    Perturbations such as rotation and polar-cap current (PC-current) have been believed to greatly affect the pulsar radio emission and polarization. The two effects have not been considered simultaneously in the literature; each one of these has been considered separately, and a picture has been deduced by simply superposing them, but such an approach can lead to spurious results. Hence, by considering pulsar rotation and PC-current perturbations together instead of one at a time, we have developed a single particle curvature radiation model, which is expected to be much more realistic. By simulating a set of typical pulse profiles, we have made an attempt to explain most of the observational results of pulsar radio emission and polarization. The model predicts that due to the perturbations the leading side component can become either stronger or weaker than the corresponding trailing one in any given cone, depending on the passage of the sight line and modulation (nonuniform source distribution). Further, we find that the phase delay of the polarization angle inflection point with respect to the core component greatly depends on the viewing geometry. The correlation between the sign reversal of circular polarization and the polarization angle swing in the case of core-dominated pulsars becomes obscure once the perturbations and modulation become significant. However, the correlation between the negative circular polarization and the increasing polarization angle and vice versa is very clear in the case of conal-double pulsars. The 'kinky'-type distortions in polarization angle swing could be due to the incoherent superposition of modulated emission in the presence of strong perturbations.

  14. On the nature of a "typical" pulsar radio emission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazbegi, A. Z.; Machabeli, G. Z.; Melikidze, G. I.; Usov, V. V.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of the excitation of electromagnetic (t) as well as of longitudinal-transverse (lt) waves in the magnetosphere of a "typical" pulsar is discussed. Two mechanisms of the t-waves excitation exist. The first mechanism is connected with the cyclotron resonance between t-waves and high-energy particles of both: the "tail" of the distribution function and the primary beam. The second mechanism is conditioned by the particles drift motion and needs to satisfy a Cherenkov resonance condition. Due to the second mechanism the lt-waves excitation is also possible. The waves excited due to the cyclotron instability cause the diffusion of particles across the magnetic field. For the sufficiently large pitch angles the additional possibility of t-waves excitation appears.

  15. On the nature of a typical pulsars radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazbegi, A. Z.; Machabeli, G. Z.; Melikidze, G. I.; Usov, V. V.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of the excitation of electromagnetic (t) as well as of longitudinal-transverse (lt) waves in the magnetosphere of a typical pulsar is discussed. Two mechanisms of the t-wave excitation exist. The first is connected with the cyclotron resonance between t-waves and high-energy particles of both the tail of the distribution function and the primary beam. The second mechanism is conditioned by particle drift motion and needs to satisfy a Cherenkov resonance condition. Due to the second mechanism lt-wave excitation is also possible. The waves excited due to the cyclotron instability cause the diffusion of particles across the magnetic field. For sufficiently large pitch angles, t-wave excitation is also possible.

  16. Simultaneous absolute timing of the Crab pulsar at radio and optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterbroek, T.; Cognard, I.; Golden, A.; Verhoeve, P.; Martin, D. D. E.; Erd, C.; Schulz, R.; Stüwe, J. A.; Stankov, A.; Ho, T.

    2008-09-01

    Context: The Crab pulsar emits across a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Determining the time delay between the emission at different wavelengths will allow to better constrain the site and mechanism of the emission. We have simultaneously observed the Crab Pulsar in the optical with S-Cam, an instrument based on Superconducting Tunneling Junctions (STJs) with μs time resolution and at 2 GHz using the Nançay radio telescope with an instrument doing coherent dedispersion and able to record giant pulses data. Aims: We have studied the delay between the radio and optical pulse using simultaneously obtained data therefore reducing possible uncertainties present in previous observations. Methods: We determined the arrival times of the (mean) optical and radio pulse and compared them using the tempo2 software package. Results: We present the most accurate value for the optical-radio lag of 255 ± 21 μs and suggest the likelihood of a spectral dependence to the excess optical emission asociated with giant radio pulses.

  17. Detection of the new rotating radio transient pulsar PSR J2225+35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitov, Yu. P.; Kuzmin, A. D.; Dumskii, D. V.; Losovsky, B. Ya.

    2009-06-01

    We have detected the new pulsar PSR J2225+35, which displays the properties of the new class of radio sources “Rotating Radio Transients” (RRATs). RRATs are distinguished by isolated bursts of radio emission and long quiet periods. Throughout 45 observations with a total duration of about 3 hr, only two bursts of radio emission lasting a total of about 10 min were detected in two observations. The temporal and frequency delay of the pulses corresponds to the dispersion measure DM = 51.8 pc/cm3 and the distance d = 3.05 kpc. The period of the pulses is P = 0.94 s. The emission is polarized, with the rotation measure being RM = 49.8 rad/m2.

  18. Optical Observations of the Binary Pulsar System PSR B1718-19: Implications for Tidal Circularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kerkwijk, M. H.; Kaspi, V. M.; Klemola, A. R.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Van Buren, D.

    2000-01-01

    We report on Keck and Hubble Space Telescope optical observations of the eclipsing binary pulsar system PSR B1718-19, in the direction of the globular cluster NGC 6342. These reveal a faint star (mF702W=25.21+/-0.07 Vega system) within the pulsar's 0.5" radius positional error circle. This may be the companion. If it is a main-sequence star in the cluster, it has radius RC~=0.3 Rsolar, temperature Teff~=3600 K, and mass MC~=0.3 Msolar. In many formation models, however, the pulsar (spun-up by accretion or newly formed) and its companion are initially in an eccentric orbit. If so, for tidal circularization to have produced the present-day highly circular orbit, a large stellar radius is required, i.e., the star must be bloated. Using constraints on the radius and temperature from the Roche and Hayashi limits, we infer from our observations that RC<~0.44 Rsolar and Teff>~3300 K. Even for the largest radii, the required efficiency of tidal dissipation is larger than expected for some prescriptions.

  19. Gamma-ray and Radio Properties of Six Pulsars Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltevrede, P.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hobbs, G.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Makeev, A.; Manchester, R. N.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wang, N.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed γ-rays for PSRs J0631+1036, J0659+1414, J0742-2822, J1420-6048, J1509-5850, and J1718-3825 using the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly known as GLAST). Although these six pulsars are diverse in terms of their spin parameters, they share an important feature: their γ-ray light curves are (at least given the current count statistics) single peaked. For two pulsars, there are hints for a double-peaked structure in the light curves. The shapes of the observed light curves of this group of pulsars are discussed in the light of models for which the emission originates from high up in the magnetosphere. The observed phases of the γ-ray light curves are, in general, consistent with those predicted by high-altitude models, although we speculate that the γ-ray emission of PSR J0659+1414, possibly featuring the softest spectrum of all Fermi pulsars coupled with a very low efficiency, arises from relatively low down in the magnetosphere. High-quality radio polarization data are available showing that all but one have a high degree of linear polarization. This allows us to place some constraints on the viewing geometry and aids the comparison of the γ-ray light curves with high-energy beam models.

  20. Timing analysis of binary X ray pulsars observed by HEAO 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soong, Y.; Swank, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    Timing analysis of the pointed observations of 5 selected binary X ray pulsars, in two categories of disk-fed and wind-fed sources, by HEAO 1 A-2 is reported. The power spectral analysis was performed on the data in the frequency range from approx. 1 MHz to 6.25 Hz. The coherent signal of the pulsation, the continuum of the power spectrum, varies in time and differs among sources. Quasi-Periodic Oscillation (QPO) is probably related to a fast spinning but weakly magnetized neutron star in the low mass X ray binaries. QPO was searched for in this frequency range to see if scaling laws exist among these two systems which may have possessed different order of magnitude of magnetic field strengths and the inner disk radii. One possible QPO is found centering at 0.062 Hz in 4U0115+63 during a flare.

  1. RADIO DETECTION OF LAT PSRs J1741-2054 AND J2032+4127: NO LONGER JUST GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Camilo, F.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Ray, P. S.; Abdo, A. A.; Ransom, S. M.; Demorest, P.; Burgay, M.; Johnson, T. J.; Thompson, D. J.; Harding, A. K.; Kerr, M.; Reynolds, J.; Johnston, S.; Romani, R. W.; Van Straten, W.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Ziegler, M.; Dormody, M.; Smith, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    Sixteen pulsars have been discovered so far in blind searches of photons collected with the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We here report the discovery of radio pulsations from two of them. PSR J1741-2054, with period P = 413 ms, was detected in archival Parkes telescope data and subsequently has been detected at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Its received flux varies greatly due to interstellar scintillation and it has a very small dispersion measure of DM = 4.7 pc cm{sup -3}, implying a distance of approx0.4 kpc and possibly the smallest luminosity of any known radio pulsar. At this distance, for isotropic emission, its gamma-ray luminosity above 0.1 GeV corresponds to 28% of the spin-down luminosity of E-dot=9.4x10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The gamma-ray profile occupies 1/3 of pulse phase and has three closely spaced peaks with the first peak lagging the radio pulse by delta = 0.29 P. We have also identified a soft Swift source that is the likely X-ray counterpart. In many respects PSR J1741-2054 resembles the Geminga pulsar. The second source, PSR J2032+4127, was detected at the GBT. It has P = 143 ms, and its DM = 115 pc cm{sup -3} suggests a distance of approx3.6 kpc, but we consider it likely that it is located within the Cyg OB2 stellar association at half that distance. The radio emission is nearly 100% linearly polarized, and the main radio peak precedes by delta = 0.15 P the first of two narrow gamma-ray peaks that are separated by DELTA = 0.50 P. The second peak has a harder spectrum than the first one, following a trend observed in young gamma-ray pulsars. Faint, diffuse X-ray emission in a Chandra image is possibly its pulsar wind nebula. The wind of PSR J2032+4127 is responsible for the formerly unidentified HEGRA source TeV J2032+4130. PSR J2032+4127 is coincident in projection with MT91 213, a Be star in Cyg OB2, although apparently not a binary companion of it.

  2. Five New Millisecond Pulsars from a Radio Survey of 14 Unidentified Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Hessels, J.; Johnson, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sarkissian, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Ferm;'LAT sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR JOl01-6422 (P=2.57ms, DH=12pc/cubic cm ), we have detected gamma-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its gamma-ray spectrum (a power law of Gamma = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and gamma-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey -- enabled by selecting gamma-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics -- and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  3. FIVE NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM A RADIO SURVEY OF 14 UNIDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Hessels, J.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Reynolds, J. E.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Sarkissian, J. E-mail: fernando@astro.columbia.edu

    2012-03-20

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR J0101-6422 (P = 2.57 ms, DM = 12 pc cm{sup -3}), we have detected {gamma}-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its {gamma}-ray spectrum (a power law of {Gamma} = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and {gamma}-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey-enabled by selecting {gamma}-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics-and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  4. Fermi variability study of the candidate pulsar binary 2FGL J0523.3–2530

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Ng, C.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    The Fermi source 2FGL J0523.3–2530 has recently been identified as a candidate millisecond pulsar binary with an orbital period of 16.5 hr. We have carried out detailed studies of the source's emission properties by analyzing data taken with the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the 0.2-300 GeV energy range. Long-term, yearly variability from the source has been found, with a factor of four flux variations in 1-300 GeV. From spectral analysis, we find an extra spectral component at 2-3 GeV that causes the source brightening. While no orbital modulations have been found from the Fermi data over the whole period of 2008-2014, orbital modulation in the source's >2 GeV emission is detected during the last 1.5 yr of the Fermi observation. Our results support the millisecond pulsar binary nature of 2FGL J0523.3–2530. Multi-wavelength observations of the source are warranted in order to find any correlated flux variations and thus help determine the origin of the long-term variability, which currently is not understood.

  5. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-ray-emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4–112820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    I present a 40 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4‑112820, which is associated with the high-energy γ-ray source 3FGL J1544.6‑1125. The system is detected up to ˜30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270‑4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosity. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves covering approximately the past decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that it has not experienced prolonged episodes of a non-accreting radio pulsar state but may spontaneously undergo such events in the future.

  6. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-ray-emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4–112820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    I present a 40 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4‑112820, which is associated with the high-energy γ-ray source 3FGL J1544.6‑1125. The system is detected up to ∼30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270‑4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosity. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves covering approximately the past decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that it has not experienced prolonged episodes of a non-accreting radio pulsar state but may spontaneously undergo such events in the future.

  7. The proper motion of the nearby radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar PSR J0357+3205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Andrea

    2011-09-01

    PSR J0357+32 is a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar detected by the Fermi-LAT. The relatively high gamma-ray flux with respect to the modest rotational energy loss rate suggests that PSR J0357+32 is relatively close-by, probably at ≈ 500 pc. An observation of PSR J0357+32 with Chandra in AO11 allowed us to detect the X-ray counterpart of the pulsar. Most interesting, Chandra data unveiled the existence of a huge (9 arcmin long) extended feature apparently protruding from the pulsar. The most natural interpretation of the feature - a bow-shock pulsar wind nebula - is challenged by its very unusual phenomenology and by energetic arguments.A measure of the pulsar proper motion with Chandra could easily clarify the nature of its puzzling X-ray tail.

  8. Detection of cyclotron resonance scattering feature in high-mass X-ray binary pulsar SMC X-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra

    2016-09-01

    We report broad-band spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary pulsar SMC X-2 by using three simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopy Telescope Array and Swift/XRT observations during its 2015 outburst. The pulsar was significantly bright, reaching a luminosity up to as high as ˜5.5 × 1038 erg s-1 in 1-70 keV range. Spin period of the pulsar was estimated to be 2.37 s. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly luminosity dependent. The 1-70 keV energy spectrum of the pulsar was well described with three different continuum models such as (i) negative and positive power law with exponential cutoff, (ii) Fermi-Dirac cutoff power law and (iii) cutoff power-law models. Apart from the presence of an iron line at ˜6.4 keV, a model independent absorption like feature at ˜27 keV was detected in the pulsar spectrum. This feature was identified as a cyclotron absorption line and detected for the first time in this pulsar. Corresponding magnetic field of the neutron star was estimated to be ˜2.3 × 1012 G. The cyclotron line energy showed a marginal negative dependence on the luminosity. The cyclotron line parameters were found to be variable with pulse phase and interpreted as due to the effect of emission geometry or complicated structure of the pulsar magnetic field.

  9. Formation of millisecond pulsars with low-mass helium white dwarf companions in very compact binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Kun; Li, X.-D.

    2014-08-20

    Binary millisecond pulsars (BMSPs) are thought to have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). If the mass transfer in LMXBs is driven by nuclear evolution of the donor star, the final orbital period is predicted to be well correlated with the mass of the white dwarf (WD), which is the degenerate He core of the donor. Here we show that this relation can be extended to very small WD mass (∼0.14-0.17 M {sub ☉}) and narrow orbital period (about a few hours), depending mainly on the metallicities of the donor stars. There is also discontinuity in the relation, which is due to the temporary contraction of the donor when the H-burning shell crosses the hydrogen discontinuity. BMSPs with low-mass He WD companions in very compact binaries can be accounted for if the progenitor binary experienced very late Case A mass transfer. The WD companion of PSR J1738+0333 is likely to evolve from a Pop II star. For PSR J0348+0432, to explain its extreme compact orbit in the Roche-lobe-decoupling phase, even lower metallicity (Z = 0.0001) is required.

  10. The binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038 during its accretion state - I. Optical variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbaz, T.; Linares, M.; Nevado, S. P.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Casares, J.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Littlefair, S.; Leckngam, A.; Poshyachinda, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present time-resolved optical photometry of the binary millisecond `redback' pulsar PSR J1023+0038 (=AY Sex) during its low-mass X-ray binary phase. The light curves taken between 2014 January and April show an underlying sinusoidal modulation due to the irradiated secondary star and accretion disc. We also observe superimposed rapid flaring on time-scales as short as ˜20 s with amplitudes of ˜0.1-0.5 mag and additional large flare events on time-scales of ˜5-60 min with amplitudes of ˜0.5-1.0 mag. The power density spectrum of the optical flare light curves is dominated by a red-noise component, typical of aperiodic activity in X-ray binaries. Simultaneous X-ray and UV observations by the Swift satellite reveal strong correlations that are consistent with X-ray reprocessing of the UV light, most likely in the outer regions of the accretion disc. On some nights we also observe sharp-edged, rectangular, flat-bottomed dips randomly distributed in orbital phase, with a median duration of ˜250 s and a median ingress/egress time of ˜20 s. These rectangular dips are similar to the mode-switching behaviour between disc `active' and `passive' luminosity states, observed in the X-ray light curves of other redback millisecond pulsars. This is the first time that the optical analogue of the X-ray mode-switching has been observed. The properties of the passive- and active-state light curves can be explained in terms of clumpy accretion from a trapped inner accretion disc near the corotation radius, resulting in rectangular, flat-bottomed optical and X-ray light curves.